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Sample records for freezing point depression

  1. Reproducing Black's experiments: freezing point depression and supercooling of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmez, J.; Fiolhais, C.; Fiolhais, M.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out two historical experiments referred to by Joseph Black, one on freezing mixtures of salted water with ice and another on freezing supercooled pure water by a small disturbance. The results confirm thermodynamical predictions for the depression of the freezing point of salted water and for the latent heat of freezing of supercooled water respectively, which came after Black. The depression of the freezing point can hardly be fitted in the framework of the caloric theory of heat, which was taken for granted by Black, and the instantaneous freezing of supercooled water also poses some difficulties for that theory.

  2. Study of freezing-point depression of selected food extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Murata, Satoshi; Habara, Kazuhiro; Amaratunga, K.S.P.

    1996-12-31

    The phenomenon of freezing-point depression that accompanies the solute concentration of selected food extracts was investigated to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The freezing curves of various food extracts did not exhibit ideal solution behavior in the higher concentration range. The experimental data were fitted to new freezing-point depression equations by the method of nonlinear least squares, and the results clearly indicated that the calculated freezing points at various concentrations were in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, by using the determined parameters, the freezing ratio and the activation coefficient were derived.

  3. The Freezing Point Depression Law in Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzen, Hugo F.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests a change in physical chemistry courses to use a slightly more complicated but significantly more useful generalization of the simple freezing point depression law. Lists reasons for the change and presents the treatment of solid-liquid equilibria where solid-solution is allowed. Provides a mathematical treatment. (MVL)

  4. Depression of soil moisture freezing point

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, V.I.

    1996-12-01

    Certain criteria for freezing temperature of clay soil have been found which are a relative moisture content at the soil liquid limit (W/W{sub L}) and maximum hydroscopic moisture (W/W{sub h}). On the strength of test data it has been established that the relative moisture content at the soil liquid limit (W/W{sub L}) may also serve as a criterion on compression pressure and resistance against shearing for soil paste with no structural binding. Linear correlation between the moisture content of natural soil and its paste -- the equation of moisture balance -- has been found which specifies a thermodynamic balance condition. The equation of moisture balance represents a whole set of properties for a certain type of soil, such as strength and compressibility. In this respect, it may be considered as a ``Soil equation`` which allows for further prognosis of its properties.

  5. Measurement of Freezing Point Depression of Selected Food Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Satoshi; Tanaka, Fumihiko; Matsuoka, Takahisa

    Freezing point depression of selected food solutions were measured at various concentrations in order to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The measurement were carried out on a hand made apparatus that was calibrated before the measurement by some of selected reagents (acid and sugar) with known thermal properties. The results revealed that the freezing point depression of selected food solutions deviated from the behavior of the ideal solution with increasing solute concentration, so the water activity for non-ideal solution were introduced to the freezing point depression equation. Further, assuming that the heat of fusion was a equation of temperature, thus the following new equation was led, ln {(1-Xs)/(l-Xs+?Xs + ?Xs2)} = A(1/To - 1/Tf) - Bln(To/Tf) The goodness of fit of the equation showed the best results. Futhermore, by using the parameters a formula of freezing ratio and the relative water activities, which showed deviation from the ideal solution, were derived.

  6. Correction for solute/solvent interaction extends accurate freezing point depression theory to high concentration range.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, G D; Keener, C R; Cameron, I L

    1994-12-01

    The authors describe empirical corrections to ideally dilute expressions for freezing point depression of aqueous solutions to arrive at new expressions accurate up to three molal concentration. The method assumes non-ideality is due primarily to solute/solvent interactions such that the correct free water mass Mwc is the mass of water in solution Mw minus I.M(s) where M(s) is the mass of solute and I an empirical solute/solvent interaction coefficient. The interaction coefficient is easily derived from the constant in the linear regression fit to the experimental plot of Mw/M(s) as a function of 1/delta T (inverse freezing point depression). The I-value, when substituted into the new thermodynamic expressions derived from the assumption of equivalent activity of water in solution and ice, provides accurate predictions of freezing point depression (+/- 0.05 degrees C) up to 2.5 molal concentration for all the test molecules evaluated; glucose, sucrose, glycerol and ethylene glycol. The concentration limit is the approximate monolayer water coverage limit for the solutes which suggests that direct solute/solute interactions are negligible below this limit. This is contrary to the view of many authors due to the common practice of including hydration forces (a soft potential added to the hard core atomic potential) in the interaction potential between solute particles. When this is recognized the two viewpoints are in fundamental agreement. PMID:7699200

  7. Oxygen demand of aircraft and airfield pavement deicers and alternative freezing point depressants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, Steven R.; Mericas, Dean; Bowman, George

    2012-01-01

    Aircraft and pavement deicing formulations and other potential freezing point depressants were tested for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Propylene glycol-based aircraft deicers exhibited greater BOD5 than ethylene glycol-based aircraft deicers, and ethylene glycol-based products had lower degradation rates than propylene glycol-based products. Sodium formate pavement deicers had lower COD than acetate-based pavement deicers. The BOD and COD results for acetate-based pavement deicers (PDMs) were consistently lower than those for aircraft deicers, but degradation rates were greater in the acetate-based PDM than in aircraft deicers. In a 40-day testing of aircraft and pavement deicers, BOD results at 20°C (standard) were consistently greater than the results from 5°C (low) tests. The degree of difference between standard and low temperature BOD results varied among tested products. Freshwater BOD test results were not substantially different from marine water tests at 20°C, but glycols degraded slower in marine water than in fresh water for low temperature tests. Acetate-based products had greater percentage degradation than glycols at both temperatures. An additive component of the sodium formate pavement deicer exhibited toxicity to the microorganisms, so BOD testing did not work properly for this formulation. BOD testing of alternative freezing point depressants worked well for some, there was little response for some, and for others there was a lag in response while microorganisms acclimated to the freezing point depressant as a food source. Where the traditional BOD5 test performed adequately, values ranged from 251 to 1,580 g/kg. Where the modified test performed adequately, values of BOD28 ranged from 242 to 1,540 g/kg.

  8. Freezing Point Depression of Water in Phospholipid Membranes — A Solid-State NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Kwon, ByungSoo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2009-01-01

    Lipid-water interaction plays an important role in the properties of lipid bilayers, cryoprotectants, and membrane-associated peptides and proteins. The temperature at which water bound to lipid bilayers freezes is lower than that of free water. Here, we report a solid-state NMR investigation on the freezing point depression of water in phospholipid bilayers in the presence and absence of cholesterol. Deuterium NMR spectra at different temperatures ranging from -75 to +10°C were obtained from fully 2H2O-hydrated POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine) multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), prepared with and without cholesterol, to determine the freezing temperature of water and the effect of cholesterol on the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. Our 2H NMR experiments reveal the motional behavior of unfrozen water molecules in POPC bilayers even at temperatures significantly below 0°C and show that the presence of cholesterol further lowered the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. These results suggest that in the presence of cholesterol the fluidity and dynamics of lipid bilayers can be retained even at very low temperatures as exist in the liquid crystalline phase of the lipid. Therefore, bilayer samples prepared with a cryoprotectant like cholesterol should enable the performance of multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments to investigate the structure, dynamics, and topology of membrane proteins at a very low temperature with enhanced sample stability and possibly a better sensitivity. Phosphorus-31 NMR data suggest that lipid bilayers can be aligned at low temperatures, while 15N NMR experiments demonstrate that such aligned samples can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of 15N chemical shift spectra of a 37-residue human antimicrobial peptide, LL-37. PMID:18991419

  9. New expressions to describe solution nonideal osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, G D; Zimmerman, R J; Cantu, C; Cameron, I L

    1992-12-01

    New empirical expressions for osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure are proposed based on the concepts of volume occupancy and (or) hydration force. These expressions are in general inverse relationships in comparison to the standard ideal expressions for the same properties. The slopes of the new equations are determined by the molecular weight of the solute and known constants. The accuracy and precision of the molecular weights calculated from the slope are identical and approximately 1% for the experiments reported here. The nonideality of all three colligative expressions is described by a dimensionless constant called the solute-solvent interaction parameter I. The results on sucrose have the same I = 0.26 for all three solution properties. The nonideality parameter I increased from 0.26 on sucrose to 1.7 on hemoglobin to successfully describe the well-known nonideal response of macromolecules. PMID:1299270

  10. Relationship of amino acid composition and molecular weight of antifreeze glycopeptides to non-colligative freezing point depression.

    PubMed

    Schrag, J D; O'Grady, S M; DeVries, A L

    1982-08-01

    Many polar fishes synthesize a group of eight glycopeptides that exhibit a non-colligative lowering of the freezing point of water. These glycopeptides range in molecular weight between 2600 and 33 700. The largest glycopeptides [1-5] lower the freezing point more than the small ones on a weight basis and contain only two amino acids, alanine and threonine, with the disaccharide galactose-N-acetyl-galactosamine attached to threonine. The small glycopeptides, 6, 7, and 8, also lower the freezing point and contain proline, which periodically substitutes for alanine. Glycopeptides with similar antifreeze properties isolated from the saffron cod and the Atlantic tomcod contain an additional amino acid, arginine, which substitutes for threonine in glycopeptide 6. In this study we address the question of whether differences in amino acid composition or molecular weight between large and small glycopeptides are responsible for the reduced freezing point depressing capability of the low molecular weight glycopeptides. The results indicate that the degree of amino acid substitutions that occur in glycopeptides 6-8 do not have a significant effect on the unusual freezing point lowering and that the observed decrease in freezing point depression with smaller glycopeptides can be accounted for on the basis of molecular weight. PMID:7115772

  11. Ice slurry cooling research: Microscale study of ice particles characteristics, role of freezing point depressant, and influence on slurry fluidity

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, K.; Kasza, K.

    2000-05-03

    The influences of freezing-point-depressants on ice slurry characteristics in the form of ice slurry fluidity and on the microscale ice particle features are studied. The results identify microscale features of ice particles such as surface roughness that greatly influence slurry fluidity that are altered favorably by the use of a freezing point depressant. The engineering of a workable and efficient ice slurry cooling system depends very strongly on the characteristics of the individual ice particles in the slurry and, in turn, on the method of ice production. Findings from this study provide guidance on the fluidity and handleability of slurry produced by several methods currently under development and already many achieved.

  12. Accuracy of two osmometers on standard samples: electrical impedance technique and freezing point depression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garca-Resa, Carlos; Pena-Verdeal, Hugo; Miones, Mercedes; Gilino, Jorge; Giraldez, Maria J.; Yebra-Pimentel, Eva

    2013-11-01

    High tear fluid osmolarity is a feature common to all types of dry eye. This study was designed to establish the accuracy of two osmometers, a freezing point depression osmometer (Fiske 110) and an electrical impedance osmometer (TearLab) by using standard samples. To assess the accuracy of the measurements provided by the two instruments we used 5 solutions of known osmolarity/osmolality; 50, 290 and 850 mOsm/kg and 292 and 338 mOsm/L. Fiske 110 is designed to be used in samples of 20 ?l, so measurements were made on 1:9, 1:4, 1:1 and 1:0 dilutions of the standards. Tear Lab is addressed to be used in tear film and only a sample of 0.05 ?l is required, so no dilutions were employed. Due to the smaller measurement range of the TearLab, the 50 and 850 mOsm/kg standards were not included. 20 measurements per standard sample were used and differences with the reference value was analysed by one sample t-test. Fiske 110 showed that osmolarity measurements differed statistically from standard values except those recorded for 290 mOsm/kg standard diluted 1:1 (p = 0.309), the 292 mOsm/L H2O sample (1:1) and 338 mOsm/L H2O standard (1:4). The more diluted the sample, the higher the error rate. For the TearLab measurements, one-sample t-test indicated that all determinations differed from the theoretical values (p = 0.001), though differences were always small. For undiluted solutions, Fiske 110 shows similar performance than TearLab. However, for the diluted standards, Fiske 110 worsens.

  13. Theoretical and experimental studies on freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit as methods to measure osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol and bovine serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, Keitaro

    2003-05-01

    For survival in adverse environments where there is drought, high salt concentration or low temperature, some plants seem to be able to synthesize biochemical compounds, including proteins, in response to changes in water activity or osmotic pressure. Measurement of the water activity or osmotic pressure of simple aqueous solutions has been based on freezing point depression or vapor pressure deficit. Measurement of the osmotic pressure of plants under water stress has been mainly based on vapor pressure deficit. However, differences have been noted for osmotic pressure values of aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit. For this paper, the physicochemical basis of freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit were first examined theoretically and then, the osmotic pressure of aqueous ethylene glycol and of PEG solutions were measured by both freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit in comparison with other aqueous solutions such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions. The results showed that: (1) freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit share theoretically the same physicochemical basis; (2) theoretically, they are proportional to the molal concentration of the aqueous solutions to be measured; (3) in practice, the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, and raffinose solutions increase in proportion to their molal concentrations and there is little inconsistency between those measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit; (4) the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous ethylene glycol and PEG solutions measured by freezing point depression differed from the values measured by vapor pressure deficit; (5) the osmotic pressure of aqueous BSA solution measured by freezing point depression differed slightly from that measured by vapor pressure deficit. PMID:12834836

  14. Revised equation and table for determining the freezing point depression of H[sub 2]O-NaCl solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnar, R.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Salinities of H[sub 2]O-salt inclusions are most often determined by measuring the melting temperature of ice in the inclusion and then referring this value to an equation or table describing the relationship between salinity and freezing-point depression. Generally, data for the system H[sub 2]O-NaCl are used to determine an NaCl-equivalent salinity, owing to lack of information concerning the salts (or other electrolytes) actually contributing to the freezing-point depression. The equation most often used to determine the salinity of H[sub 2]O-salt inclusions from freezing measurements is that of Potter et al (1978), which is based on a regression of data available in the literature at that time. More recently, Hall et al (1988) experimentally redetermined the ice-melting temperatures of H[sub 2]O-NaCl-KCl solutions having compositions ranging from pure water to the ternary eutectic and to each of the two binary (H[sub 2]O-NaCl and H[sub 2]O-KCl) eutectics.

  15. An evaluation of osmolality measurement by freezing point depression using micro-amounts of sample

    PubMed Central

    Koumantakis, G.; Wyndham, L. E.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation of the Advanced micro-osmometer is presented. This instrument has been shown to have an excellent analytical precision (within-run CV = 0.59%, between-day CV = 0.58%). It is accurate over an analytical range of 0-2000 mmol/kg of osmolality shown by linearity studies and split sample correlations against vapour pressure osmometry, freezing point osmometry and an external quality assurance programme. Analytical errors due to operator technique are almost eliminated because of good instrument design. Preliminary results on whole-blood osmolality are included. The required sample size of 20 ?l permits osmolality measurements on most clinical samples. It is concluded that the Advanced micro-osmometer satisfies laboratory requirements. PMID:18925239

  16. The nature of aqueous solutions: insights into multiple facets of chemistry and biochemistry from freezing-point depressions.

    PubMed

    Zavitsas, Andreas A

    2010-05-25

    Contrary to current widely held beliefs, many concentrated aqueous solutions of electrolytes and nonelectrolytes behave ideally. For both, the same simple equation yields mole fractions of water that are equal to the theoretical activities of water. No empirical activity coefficients or ad hoc parameters are needed. Thermodynamic hydration numbers and the number of particles produced per mole of solute are found by searching freezing-point depression measurements, as if asking the water, "How much available water solvent is left and how many solute particles are there?" The results answer questions currently under debate: Do solutes alter the nature of water outside their immediate surroundings? What is the number of ion pairs formed by various electrolytes and what affects extents of their formation? What are some factors that cause precipitation of proteins, latexes, and so forth from aqueous solutions upon addition of other solutes (Hofmeister series)? Which nonelectrolytes form aggregates in water and what are the implications? Why do different solutes affect viscosity differently? How do ion-selective channels in cell membranes function at the molecular level? PMID:20397243

  17. Preliminary report on fluid inclusions from halites in the Castile and lower Salado formations of the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico. [Freezing-point depression

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.L.

    1985-09-01

    A suite of samples composed primarily of halite from the upper Castile and lower Salado Formations of the Permian Basin was selected from Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) core for a reconnaissance study of fluid inclusions. Volume percent of these trapped fluids averaged 0.7% to 1%. Freezing-point depressions varied widely and appeared to be unrelated to fluid-inclusion type, to sedimentary facies, or to stratigraphic depth. However, because very low freezing points were usually associated with anhydrite, a relation may exist between freezing-point data and lithology. Dissolved sulfate values were constant through the Castile, then decreased markedly with lesser depth in the lower Salado. This trend correlates very well with observed mineralogy and is consistent with an interpretation of the occurrence of secondary polyhalite as a result of gypsum or anhydrite alteration with simultaneous consumption of dissolved sulfate from the coexisting fluids. Together with the abundance and distribution of fluid inclusions in primary or ''hopper'' crystal structures, this evidence suggests that inclusions seen in these halites did not migrate any significant geographical distance since their formation. 28 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Cold Heat Storage Characteristics of O/W-type Latent Heat Emulsion Including Continuum Phase of Water Treated with a Freezing Point Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    This paper deals with flow and cold heat storage characteristics of the oil (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K, Latent heat 229 kJ/kg)/water emulsion as a latent heat storage material having a low melting point. The test emulsion includes a water-urea solution as a continuum phase. The freezing point depression of the continuum phase permits enhancement of the heat transfer rate of the emulison, due to the large temperature difference between the latent heat storage material and water-urea solution. The velocity of emulsion flow and the inlet temperature of coolant in a coiled double tube heat exchanger are chosen as the experimental parameters. The pressure drop, the heat transfer coefficient of the emulsion in the coiled tube are measured in the temperture region over solid and liquid phase of the latent heat storage material. The finishing time of the cold heat storage is defined experimentally in the range of sensible and latent heat storage. It is clarified that the flow behavior of the emulsion as a non-Newtonian fluid has an important role in cold heat storage. The useful nondimentional correlation equations for the additional pressure loss coefficient, the heat transfer coefficient and the finishing time of the cold heat storage are derived in terms of Dean number and heat capacity ratio.

  19. Device and method for determining freezing points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, Balakrishnan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A freezing point method and device (10) are disclosed. The method and device pertain to an inflection point technique for determining the freezing points of mixtures. In both the method and device (10), the mixture is cooled to a point below its anticipated freezing point and then warmed at a substantially linear rate. During the warming process, the rate of increase of temperature of the mixture is monitored by, for example, thermocouple (28) with the thermocouple output signal being amplified and differentiated by a differentiator (42). The rate of increase of temperature data are analyzed and a peak rate of increase of temperature is identified. In the preferred device (10) a computer (22) is utilized to analyze the rate of increase of temperature data following the warming process. Once the maximum rate of increase of temperature is identified, the corresponding temperature of the mixture is located and earmarked as being substantially equal to the freezing point of the mixture. In a preferred device (10), the computer (22), in addition to collecting the temperature and rate of change of temperature data, controls a programmable power supply (14) to provide a predetermined amount of cooling and warming current to thermoelectric modules (56).

  20. Freezing Point of Milk: A Natural Way to Understand Colligative Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novo, Mercedes; Reija, Belen; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented in which the freezing point depression is analyzed using milk as solution. The nature of milk as a mixture of different solutes makes it a suitable probe to learn about colligative properties. The first part of the experiment illustrates the analytical use of freezing point measurements to control milk quality,…

  1. Freezing Point of Milk: A Natural Way to Understand Colligative Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novo, Mercedes; Reija, Belen; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented in which the freezing point depression is analyzed using milk as solution. The nature of milk as a mixture of different solutes makes it a suitable probe to learn about colligative properties. The first part of the experiment illustrates the analytical use of freezing point measurements to control milk quality,

  2. High-freezing-point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. The higher-freezing-point fuels can be substituted in the majority of present commercial flights, since temperature data indicate that in-flight fuel temperatures are relatively mild. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple system design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating. Both systems offer advantages that outweigh the obvious penalties.

  3. High freezing point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating.

  4. Effect of composition on freezing points of model hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Affens, W.A.; Hall, J.M.; Holt, S.; Hazlett, R.N.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the effect of composition on the freezing points of model hydrocarbon jet fuel type mixtures was performed. Solutions of higher n-alkanes (C/sub 12/ to C/sub 17/) in several solvents were emphasized. Freezing points (T/sub m/) of solutions of single alkanes were found to conform with the Van't Hoff ideal solubility equation. From the slopes and intercepts of plots of concentration (Ln X) vs 1/T/sub m/, heats (..delta..H/sub m/) and entropies (..delta..S/sub m/) of fusion, and extrapolated freezing points of pure alkanes (T/sub m,o/) were derived T/sub m,o/ values were in good agreement with the literature values for the pure alkanes. For ..delta..H/sub m/ and ..delta..S/sub m/, only the even carbon numbered alkanes exhibited values similar to literature data for the pure compounds. This alternating behavior for the n-alkanes series has been observed for melting point and other properties of the pure compounds. For alkanes in other solvents, considerable solubility effect was noticed. For C/sub 14/ and C/sub 16/, decalin and Isopar-M were found to be relatively good solvents but aromatic compounds, such as butyl benzenes, were relatively poor. For naphthalene, butyl benzene was a better solvent than isopar-M. For mixtures of C/sub 13/ and C/sub 16/ in Isopar-M, significant changes or reversals of slope were observed for 1/T plotted against Ln X (C/sub 13/ concentration) at various C/sub 16/ concentrations, and this suggested interaction between the two alkane solutes. C/sub 16/ had the predominant effect in C/sub 13/ + C/sub 16/ solutions in Isopar-M. Above about 4% C/sub 16/, changes in C/sub 13/ concentration had no observable effect.

  5. Practical limitations of ITS-90 from the mercury triple point to the silver freeze point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavener, J. P.; Tavener, S. J.; Tavener, I. F.; Davies, N.

    2013-09-01

    The NPL published a forward to the ITS-90 text as follows:- "The purpose of the ITS is to define procedures by which certain specified practical thermometers of the required quality can be calibrated in such a way that the values of temperature obtained from them can be precise and reproducible, while at the same time closely approximating the corresponding thermodynamic values." [1]. The paper investigates the properties of thirty four lots of 6N pure metal used to make cells conforming to ITS-90 from mercury through silver over a period of twenty years. Three hundred individual cells are analysed by the impurities listed and supplied with each lot, melt and freeze curve slopes are also summarised for each lot and depressions calculated. These are then compared to the slopes and depressions suggested in the Supplementary Information for the ITS-90 and in CCT/2000-13 "Optimal Realizations". Results are summarised, tabulated and discussed. Three lots of the thirty four were found to produce cells outside 6N expectations; however the remaining thirty one lots no matter how well or badly the accompanying certification was presented produced cells that conformed to 6N expectations as suggested in Supplementary Information to ITS-90 and CCT/2000-13.

  6. Practical limitations of ITS-90 from the mercury triple point to the silver freeze point

    SciTech Connect

    Tavener, J. P.; Tavener, S. J.; Tavener, I. F.; Davies, N.

    2013-09-11

    The NPL published a forward to the ITS-90 text as follows:- 'The purpose of the ITS is to define procedures by which certain specified practical thermometers of the required quality can be calibrated in such a way that the values of temperature obtained from them can be precise and reproducible, while at the same time closely approximating the corresponding thermodynamic values.' [1]. The paper investigates the properties of thirty four lots of 6N pure metal used to make cells conforming to ITS-90 from mercury through silver over a period of twenty years. Three hundred individual cells are analysed by the impurities listed and supplied with each lot, melt and freeze curve slopes are also summarised for each lot and depressions calculated. These are then compared to the slopes and depressions suggested in the Supplementary Information for the ITS-90 and in CCT/2000-13 'Optimal Realizations'. Results are summarised, tabulated and discussed. Three lots of the thirty four were found to produce cells outside 6N expectations; however the remaining thirty one lots no matter how well or badly the accompanying certification was presented produced cells that conformed to 6N expectations as suggested in Supplementary Information to ITS-90 and CCT/2000-13.

  7. Design and evaluation of aircraft heat source systems for use with high-freezing point fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasion, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives were the design, performance and economic analyses of practical aircraft fuel heating systems that would permit the use of high freezing-point fuels on long-range aircraft. Two hypothetical hydrocarbon fuels with freezing points of -29 C and -18 C were used to represent the variation from current day jet fuels. A Boeing 747-200 with JT9D-7/7A engines was used as the baseline aircraft. A 9300 Km mission was used as the mission length from which the heat requirements to maintain the fuel above its freezing point was based.

  8. An Equipment to Measure the Freezing Point of Soils under Higher Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayan; Guan, Hui; Wen, Zhi; Ma, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Soil freezing point is the highest temperature at which ice can be presented in the system and soil can be referred to as frozen. The freezing temperature of soil is an important parameter for solving many practical problems in civil engineering, such as evaluation of soil freezing depth, prediction of soil heaving, force of soil suction, etc. However, as the freezing temperature is always affected by many factors like soil particle size, mineral composition, water content and the external pressure endured by soils, to measure soil freezing point is a rather difficult task until now, not to mention the soil suffering higher pressure. But recently, with the artificial freezing technology widely used in the excavation of deep underground space, the frozen wall thickness is a key factor to impact the security and stability of deep frozen wall. To determine the freeze wall thickness, the location of the freezing front must be determined firstly, which will deal with the determination of the soil freezing temperature. So how to measure the freezing temperature of soil suffering higher pressure is an important problem to be solved. This paper will introduce an equipment which was developed lately by State Key Laboratory of Frozen Soil Engineering to measure the freezing-point of soils under higher pressure. The equipment is consisted of cooling and keeping temperature system, temperature sensor and data collection system. By cooling and keeping temperature system, not only can we make the higher pressure soil sample's temperature drop to a discretionary minus temperature, but also keep it and reduce the heat exchange of soil sample with the outside. The temperature sensor is the key part to our measurement, which is featured by high precision and high sensitivity, what is more important is that the temperature sensor can work in a higher pressure condition. Moreover, the major benefit of this equipment is that the soil specimen's loads can be loaded by any microcomputer control electron universal testing machines. All of above mentioned advantages of this equipment ensures one to catch up the moment soil turns from the thawed state into ice and enable one to determine the freezing point experimentally by recording the temperature-time history (cooling curve) at particular points within the sample used for analysis. Therefore, this equipment has excellent characteristics such as compact construction, convenient operation, high reliability and the measuring accuracy. The authors would like to thank the following agents for their financial supports: the National Natural Science Foundation (No.41071048),Hundred Talent Young Scientists program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences granted to Dr. Zhi Wen.

  9. Evaluation of methods for rapid determination of freezing point of aviation fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, B.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for identification of the more promising concepts for the development of a portable instrument to rapidly determine the freezing point of aviation fuels are described. The evaluation process consisted of: (1) collection of information on techniques previously used for the determination of the freezing point, (2) screening and selection of these techniques for further evaluation of their suitability in a portable unit for rapid measurement, and (3) an extensive experimental evaluation of the selected techniques and a final selection of the most promising technique. Test apparatuses employing differential thermal analysis and the change in optical transparency during phase change were evaluated and tested. A technique similar to differential thermal analysis using no reference fuel was investigated. In this method, the freezing point was obtained by digitizing the data and locating the point of inflection. Results obtained using this technique compare well with those obtained elsewhere using different techniques. A conceptual design of a portable instrument incorporating this technique is presented.

  10. Realization of the Temperature Scale in the Range from 234.3 K (Hg Triple Point) to 1084.62C (Cu Freezing Point) in Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvizdic, Davor; Veliki, Tomislav; Grgec Bermanec, Lovorka

    2008-06-01

    This article describes the realization of the International Temperature Scale in the range from 234.3 K (mercury triple point) to 1084.62C (copper freezing point) at the Laboratory for Process Measurement (LPM), Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FSB), University of Zagreb. The system for the realization of the ITS-90 consists of the sealed fixed-point cells (mercury triple point, water triple point and gallium melting point) and the apparatus designed for the optimal realization of open fixed-point cells which include the gallium melting point, tin freezing point, zinc freezing point, aluminum freezing point, and copper freezing point. The maintenance of the open fixed-point cells is described, including the system for filling the cells with pure argon and for maintaining the pressure during the realization.

  11. Note: equation of state and the freezing point in the hard-sphere model.

    PubMed

    Robles, Miguel; López de Haro, Mariano; Santos, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    The merits of different analytical equations of state for the hard-sphere system with respect to the recently computed high-accuracy value of the freezing-point packing fraction are assessed. It is found that the Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa and the branch-point approximant equations of state yield the best performance. PMID:24712819

  12. Nano materials for efficiently lowering the freezing point of heat transfer nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Haiping; Roy, Walter

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the effect of the lowered freezing point in a 50% water / 50% antifreeze coolant (PAC) or 50% water / 50% ethylene glycol (EG) solution by the addition of carbon nanotubes and other particles. The experimental results indicated that the nano materials are much more efficient (hundreds fold) in lowering the freezing point than the regular ionic materials (e.g. NaCl). The possible explanation for this interesting phenomenon is the colligative property of fluid and relative small size of nano material. It is quite certain that the carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nano particles could be a wonderful candidate for the nano coolant application because they could not only increase the thermal conductivity, but also efficiently lower the freezing point of traditional coolants.

  13. Measurement of the in freezing-point temperature: Effect of the liquid-solid interface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. G.; Abasov, M. Yu.; Gerasimov, S. F.; Pokhodun, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    The results of the experimental study of the inner interface formation process under different conditions of its initiation for the indium freezing point showed that, depending on the initiation intensity, both the planar structure of the interface on the thermometer well and a noticeable intergrowth of dendrites could be obtained. However, under some specific initiation conditions dendrites disappeared partly or completely in the process of crystallization. The value of the indium freezing point temperature was measured under realization conditions corresponding to different inner interface structure.

  14. Experimental results for the rapid determination of the freezing point of fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, B.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods for the rapid determination of the freezing point of fuels were investigated: an optical method, which detected the change in light transmission from the disappearance of solid particles in the melted fuel; and a differential thermal analysis (DTA) method, which sensed the latent heat of fusion. A laboratory apparatus was fabricated to test the two methods. Cooling was done by thermoelectric modules using an ice-water bath as a heat sink. The DTA method was later modified to eliminate the reference fuel. The data from the sample were digitized and a point of inflection, which corresponds to the ASTM D-2386 freezing point (final melting point), was identified from the derivative. The apparatus was modifified to cool the fuel to -60 C and controls were added for maintaining constant cooling rate, rewarming rate, and hold time at minimum temperature. A parametric series of tests were run for twelve fuels with freezing points from -10 C to -50 C, varying cooling rate, rewarming rate, and hold time. Based on the results, an optimum test procedure was established. The results showed good agreement with ASTM D-2386 freezing point and differential scanning calorimetry results.

  15. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ?0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point. PMID:26203042

  16. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-01

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by 0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  17. Dissemination of thermodynamic temperature above the freezing point of silver.

    PubMed

    Sadli, M; Machin, G; Anhalt, K; Bourson, F; Briaudeau, S; Del Campo, D; Diril, A; Kozlova, O; Lowe, D H; Mantilla Amor, J M; Martin, M J; McEvoy, H C; Ojanen-Saloranta, M; Pehlivan, Ö; Rougié, B; Salim, S G R

    2016-03-28

    The mise-en-pratique for the definition of the kelvin at high temperatures will formally allow dissemination of thermodynamic temperature either directly or mediated through high-temperature fixed points (HTFPs). In this paper, these two distinct dissemination methods are evaluated, namely source-based and detector-based. This was achieved by performing two distinct dissemination trials: one based on HTFPs, the other based on absolutely calibrated radiation thermometers or filter radiometers. These trials involved six national metrology institutes in Europe in the frame of the European Metrology Research Programme joint project 'Implementing the new kelvin' (InK). The results have shown that both dissemination routes are possible, with similar standard uncertainties of 1-2 K, over the range 1273-2773 K, showing that, depending on the facilities available in the laboratory, it will soon be possible to disseminate thermodynamic temperatures above 1273 K to users by either of the two methods with uncertainties comparable to the current temperature scale. PMID:26903097

  18. Measurement of Al Freezing-Point Temperature: Effect of Initiation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abasov, M. Y.; Gerasimov, S. F.; Ivanova, A. G.; Pokhodun, A. I.; Shulgat, O. S.

    2010-09-01

    In CCT documents it is stated that "...for the freezing curves of the metallic fixed points, the maximum observed temperature on the plateau should be taken as the best approximation of the liquidus temperature. The fixed points should be realized with the inner and outer liquid-solid interfaces and extend past the maximum by 10 % to 20 % of the fraction frozen, to clearly establish the value of the maximum and the resolution of its determination." Also, it is accepted that "...the inner interface is essentially static. It is the temperature of the inner liquid/solid interface that is measured by the thermometer." The analysis of freezing curves obtained by the standard method of fixed-point realization shows that the parameters of the initial part of the freezing curve, the mean temperature value of which is usually taken as the liquidus temperature, depend on how the inner interface is initiated. Variations in the duration and intensity of initiation cause changes in the initial part of the freezing curve and in the resulting SPRT measurement. Moreover, the relation between the duration of the initial section of the plateau with a minor temperature change and the duration of its final section with a significant slope also depend on the initiation method used and on the furnace temperature. The effect of freezing initiation conditions on the measurement result is individual for each fixed point because of the differences in thermophysical properties of metals and in conditions of the heat transfer from the liquid-solid interface to the thermometer. Aluminum has a maximum value of the melting specific heat in comparison with other metals used in ITS-90 fixed points; in the present study, the effect of the intensity and duration of the inner liquid-solid interface initiation was investigated both experimentally and through calculation.

  19. Point-prevalence of depression and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Richards, Derek; Sanabria, Alicia Salamanca

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to assess levels of depressive symptoms and associated risk factors in a sample of students in Bogot, Colombia. A convenient sample (N = 254) of students at the University Antonio Nario, Bogot was invited to complete an online survey that contained questions associated with common risk factors for depression and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Chi-square was used to analyze comparisons between demographic and risk factors and severity of depression, and comparisons between those depressed and not depressed. Odds Ratios and their 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were computed through logistic regression model developed for each independent variable. The point-prevalence of current depressive symptoms was 36.2%; women 47.3% and men 21.3%. Risk factors associated with depression included being a woman, having a previous diagnosis, suicidal ideation and (or) intent, sleep problems, a recent loss, and a history of family depression and alcoholism. The study confirms the high incidence of depression and associated risk factors in students. The results demonstrate a need for prevention measures, early detection and early intervention. PMID:24839729

  20. Multiple Freezing Points as a Test for Viability of Plant Stems in the Determination of Frost Hardiness 1

    PubMed Central

    McLeester, R. C.; Weiser, C. J.; Hall, T. C.

    1969-01-01

    A technique is presented for a simple, rapid, and reliable means of determining the viability of plant tissue subjected to freezing temperatures. Freezing curves of excised stems of Cornus stolonifera Michx., and several other genera were studied. Tissue temperature was recorded during freezing of plant stem sections. The heat of crystallization deflected the resultant freezing curves at points where tissue froze. Living stem sections of all genera studied revealed 2 freezing points, while dead tissue exhibited only 1. The influence of variables such as moisture content, sample size, thermocouple placement, and cooling rate on freezing curves was analyzed. Stem samples wrapped in moisture-proof film with a thermocouple inserted into the pith were frozen to a predetermined test temperature, thawed, and subjected to a second freezing cycle. The presence or absence of 2 freezing points in the second freezing cycle was used as a criterion for establishing viability. The results were immediately available and identical to results from regrowth tests which took about 20 days. PMID:16657031

  1. Realization of tin freezing point using a loop heat pipe-based hydraulic temperature control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Wukchul; Gam, Kee Sool; Kim, Yong-Gyoo

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the freezing point of tin (Sn FP) was realized by inside nucleation where the supercooling of tin and the reheating of the sample after the nucleation were achieved without extracting the cell from an isothermal apparatus. To this end, a novel hydraulic temperature control technique, which was based on the thermo-hydraulic characteristics of a pressure-controlled loop heat pipe (LHP), was employed to provide a slow cooling of the sample for deep supercooling and fast reheating after nucleation to minimize the amount of initial freeze of the sample. The required temperature controls were achieved by the active pressure control of a control gas inside the compensation chamber of the pressure-controlled LHP, and slow cooling at??-0.05 K min-1 for the deep supercooling of tin and fast heating at 2 K min-1 for reheating the sample after nucleation was attained. Based on this hydraulic temperature control technique, the nucleation of tin was realized at supercooling of around 19 K, and a satisfactorily fast reheating of the sample to the plateau-producing temperature (i.e. 0.5 K below the Sn FP) was achieved without any temperature overshoots of the isothermal region. The inside-nucleated Sn FP showed many desirable features compared to the Sn FP realized by the conventional outside nucleation method. The longer freezing plateaus and the better immersion characteristics of the Sn FP were obtained by inside nucleation, and the measured freezing temperature of the inside-nucleated Sn FP was as much as 0.37 mK higher than the outside-nucleated Sn FP with an expanded uncertainty of 0.19 mK. Details on the experiment are provided and explanations for the observed differences are discussed.

  2. Development of modulated optical transmission system to determinate the cloud and freezing points in biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo-Ochoa, Liliana; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Cristian F.; Sánchez-Moguel, Alonso; Acosta-Osorio, Andrés; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused in the development of a modulated optical transmission system with temperature control to determine the thermal properties of biodiesels such as the cloud and freezing points. This system is able to determine these properties in real time without relying on the operator skills as indicated in the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) norms. Thanks to the modulation of the incident laser, the noise of the signal is reduced and two information channels are generated: amplitude and phase. Lasers with different wavelengths can be used in this system but the sample under study must have optical absorption at the wavelength of the laser.

  3. Development of modulated optical transmission system to determinate the cloud and freezing points in biofuels.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Ochoa, Liliana; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Cristian F; Sánchez-Moguel, Alonso; Acosta-Osorio, Andrés; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario E

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused in the development of a modulated optical transmission system with temperature control to determine the thermal properties of biodiesels such as the cloud and freezing points. This system is able to determine these properties in real time without relying on the operator skills as indicated in the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) norms. Thanks to the modulation of the incident laser, the noise of the signal is reduced and two information channels are generated: amplitude and phase. Lasers with different wavelengths can be used in this system but the sample under study must have optical absorption at the wavelength of the laser. PMID:25638112

  4. Ultra-high temperature isothermal furnace liners (IFLS) for copper freeze point cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussinger, P. M.; Tavener, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    Primary Laboratories use large fixed-point cells in deep calibration furnaces utilizing heat pipes to achieve temperature uniformity. This combination of furnace, heat pipe, and cell gives the smallest of uncertainties. The heat pipe, also known as an isothermal furnace liner (IFL), has typically been manufactured with Alloy 600/601 as the envelope material since the introduction of high temperature IFLs over 40 years ago. Alloy 600/601 is a widely available high temperature material, which is compatible with Cesium, Potassium, and Sodium and has adequate oxidation resistance and reasonable high temperature strength. Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) Alloy 600/Sodium IFLs are rated to 1100C for approximately 1000 hours of operation (based on creep strength). Laboratories interested in performing calibrations and studies around the copper freezing point (1084.62C) were frustrated by the 1000 hours at 1100C limitation and the fact that expensive freeze-point cells were getting stuck and/or crushed inside the IFL. Because of this growing frustration/need, ACT developed an Ultra High Temperature IFL to take advantage of the exceptional high temperature strength properties of Haynes 230.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of jet fuel flow near the freeze point temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assudani, Rajee

    2006-12-01

    Under low-temperature environmental conditions, the cooling of aircraft fuel results in reduced fluidity with the potential for freezing. Therefore, it is important to study the flow and heat transfer phenomena that occur in an aircraft fuel tank near the freeze point temperature of jet fuels. The purpose of this dissertation is to study the effects of low temperatures on the flow, heat transfer and freezing of commercial and military jet fuels. The research is accomplished with the help of computational models of a thermal simulator tank and a quartz duct. Experimental results with the thermal simulator tank show that fuel flowability and pumpability decrease substantially as temperature is reduced. Time-dependent temperature and velocity distributions were numerically simulated for static cooling. Measured properties were used in all the computational fluid dynamics simulations. The calculations show that stringers, ribs, and other structures strongly promote fuel cooling. Also, the cooler, denser fuel resides near the bottom surface of the fuel tank simulator. The presence of an ullage space within the tank was found to strongly influence the fuel temperature profile by sometimes reducing cooling from the upper surface. Moreover, since the presence of ullage space is an explosion risk, some military aircraft fuel tanks are fitted with explosion suppressant polyurethane foam. To study the effect of foam on the flowability and heat transfer inside the simulator tank, the wing tank thermal simulator was filled with military specified polyurethane foam. The tank was simultaneously drained and cooled and the mass flow rate results showed that flowability of the fuel is not affected by the presence of foam. However, the presence of foam certainly affected the heat transfer phenomenon inside the fuel tank when the simulator tank was cooled and drained simultaneously. To study the freezing behavior of jet fuel under forced flow conditions, a quartz duct was fabricated. The duct walls were cooled below the solidification temperatures of JP-8 and JPTS fuel samples. Freezing was also simulated using computational fluid dynamics, and the validity of the calculations was established by comparing them with experimental measurements. This work demonstrates that computational fluid dynamics techniques can potentially be used to predict fuel hold-up in aircraft fuel tanks. The effect of flow rate on solidification was also simulated, and it was found that lower flow rates result in relatively more solidification of the fuel than do higher flow rates. The simulations of the freezing behaviors of JP-8 and JPTS samples were found to have essentially the same value of morphology constant. However, the crystal structures of these two fuels were studied in experiments and were found to be very different. This shows the inability of the model to capture small-scale details like the crystal microstructure. However, this limitation is not fatal here because the focus is on the overall flow and freezing behavior of jet fuels. The model was successful in predicting the freezing behavior by comparing the calculated frozen area obtained by the model with the measured area.

  6. Improvements in the realization of the ITS-90 over the temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Zhang, J. T.; Ping, Q.

    2013-09-01

    The temperature primary standard over the range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver in National institute of Metrology (NIM), China, was established in the early 1990s. The performance of all of fixed-point furnaces degraded and needs to be updated due to many years of use. Nowadays, the satisfactory fixed point materials can be available with the development of the modern purification techniques. NIM plans to use a group of three cells for each defining fixed point temperature. In this way the eventual drift of individual cells can be evidenced by periodic intercomparison and this will increase the reliability in disseminating the ITS-90 in China. This article describes the recent improvements in realization of ITS-90 over temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM. Taking advantages of the technological advances in the design and manufacture of furnaces, the new three-zone furnaces and the open-type fixed points were developed from the freezing point of indium to the freezing point of silver, and a furnace with the three-zone semiconductor cooling was designed to automatically realize the melting point of gallium. The reproducibility of the new melting point of gallium and the new open-type freezing points of In, Sn, Zn. Al and Ag is improved, especially the freezing points of Al and Ag with the reproducibility of 0.2mK and 0.5mK respectively. The expanded uncertainty in the realization of these defining fixed point temperatures is 0.34mK, 0.44mK, 0.54mK, 0.60mK, 1.30mK and 1.88mK respectively.

  7. Improvements in the realization of the ITS-90 over the temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Zhang, J. T.; Ping, Q.

    2013-09-11

    The temperature primary standard over the range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver in National institute of Metrology (NIM), China, was established in the early 1990s. The performance of all of fixed-point furnaces degraded and needs to be updated due to many years of use. Nowadays, the satisfactory fixed point materials can be available with the development of the modern purification techniques. NIM plans to use a group of three cells for each defining fixed point temperature. In this way the eventual drift of individual cells can be evidenced by periodic intercomparison and this will increase the reliability in disseminating the ITS-90 in China. This article describes the recent improvements in realization of ITS-90 over temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM. Taking advantages of the technological advances in the design and manufacture of furnaces, the new three-zone furnaces and the open-type fixed points were developed from the freezing point of indium to the freezing point of silver, and a furnace with the three-zone semiconductor cooling was designed to automatically realize the melting point of gallium. The reproducibility of the new melting point of gallium and the new open-type freezing points of In, Sn, Zn. Al and Ag is improved, especially the freezing points of Al and Ag with the reproducibility of 0.2mK and 0.5mK respectively. The expanded uncertainty in the realization of these defining fixed point temperatures is 0.34mK, 0.44mK, 0.54mK, 0.60mK, 1.30mK and 1.88mK respectively.

  8. Optimization of thermophysical properties of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) previously treated with freezing-point regulators using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Zunying; Zhao, Yuanhui; Dong, Shiyuan; Zeng, Mingyong; Yang, Huicheng

    2015-08-01

    Three freezing-point regulators (glycine, sodium chloride and D-sorbitol) were employed to optimize thermophysical properties of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) using response surface methodology (RSM). The independent variables were glycine content (0.250-1.250 %), sodium chloride content (0.500-2.500 %) and D-sorbitol content (0.125-0.625 %) and analysis of variance showed that the effects of glycine, sodium chloride and D-sorbitol on the thermophysical properties were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The coefficient of determination, R (2) values for initial freezing point (T i ), unfreezable water mass fraction (W u ), apparent specific heat (C app ) and Enthalpy (H) were 0.896 ~ 0.999. The combined effects of these independent variables on T i , W u , C app and H were investigated. The results indicated that T i , C app and H varied curvilinearly with increasing of glycine, sodium chloride and D-sorbitol content whereas W u increased nearly linearly. Based on response plots and desirability functions, the optimum combination of process variables for Pacific white shrimp previously treated with freezing-point regulators were 0.876 % for glycine content, 2.298 % for sodium chloride content and 0.589 % for D-sorbitol content, correspondently the optimized thermophysical properties were T i , - 5.086 °C; W u , 17.222 %; C app , 41.038 J/g °C and H, 155.942 J/g, respectively. Briefly, the application of freezing-point regulators depressed T i and obtained the optimum W u , C app and H, which would be obviously beneficial for the exploitation of various thermal processing and food storage. PMID:26243904

  9. Relationship Between Ice Nucleation Temperature Depression and Equilibrium Melting Points Depression of Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimizuka, Norihito; Suzuki, Toru

    We measured the ice nucleation temperature depression , ?Tf , and equilibrium melting points depression, ?Tm, of Medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos with different cryoprotectant (ethylene glycol, 1.3-propanediol, 1.4-butanediol, glycerol aqueous solutions) treatments. Our obtained results showed the good relationship between the ?Tf ,and ?Tm all samples. In addition the value of ? , which can be obtained from the linear relationship, ?Tf =? ?Tm, were confirmed to show correlation with the value of ? , as obtained by the W/O emulsion method.

  10. Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Misconceptions about Colligative Properties: Boiling Point Elevation and Freezing Point Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Sozbilir, Mustafa; Canpolat, Nurtac

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying prospective chemistry teachers' misconceptions of colligative properties. In order to fulfill this aim, a diagnostic test composed of four open-ended questions was used. The test was administered to seventy-eight prospective chemistry teachers just before qualifying to teaching in secondary schools. Nine different…

  11. Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Misconceptions about Colligative Properties: Boiling Point Elevation and Freezing Point Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Sozbilir, Mustafa; Canpolat, Nurtac

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying prospective chemistry teachers' misconceptions of colligative properties. In order to fulfill this aim, a diagnostic test composed of four open-ended questions was used. The test was administered to seventy-eight prospective chemistry teachers just before qualifying to teaching in secondary schools. Nine different

  12. Freeze-dried plasma at the point of injury: from concept to doctrine.

    PubMed

    Glassberg, Elon; Nadler, Roy; Gendler, Sami; Abramovich, Amir; Spinella, Philip C; Gerhardt, Robert T; Holcomb, John B; Kreiss, Yitshak

    2013-12-01

    While early plasma transfusion for the treatment of patients with ongoing major hemorrhage is widely accepted as part of the standard of care in the hospital setting, logistic constraints have limited its use in the out-of-hospital setting. Freeze-dried plasma (FDP), which can be stored at ambient temperatures, enables early treatment in the out-of-hospital setting. Point-of-injury plasma transfusion entails several significant advantages over currently used resuscitation fluids, including the avoidance of dilutional coagulopathy, by minimizing the need for crystalloid infusion, beneficial effects on endothelial function, physiological pH level, and better maintenance of intravascular volume compared with crystalloid-based solutions. The Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps policy is that plasma is the resuscitation fluid of choice for selected, severely wounded patients and has thus included FDP as part of its armamentarium for use at the point of injury by advanced life savers, across the entire military. We describe the clinical rationale behind the use of FDP at the point-of-injury, the drafting of the administration protocol now being used by Israel Defense Forces advanced life support providers, the process of procurement and distribution, and preliminary data describing the first casualties treated with FDP at the point of injury. It is our hope that others will be able to learn from our experience, thus improving trauma casualty care around the world. PMID:24089000

  13. Freezing and quantization of current passing through a doubly connected superconductor with a point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koverya, V. P.; Bondarenko, S. I.; Krevsun, A. V.; Levchenko, N. M.; Bondarenko, I. S.

    2010-07-01

    The particulars of dc current passage through a structure consisting of a doubly connected superconductor (DCS) with branches that are asymmetric with respect to length and critical current have been investigated experimentally. The short branch, which has the lowest critical current, was a clamping niobium-niobium point contact with length comparable to the coherence length of the superconductor. In contrast to a previously studied DCS with a short branch much longer than the coherence length, it was found that when the short-branch current reaches the critical value the currents in the branches of the DCS do not undergo self-excited oscillations; a current exceeding the critical value enters the long branch when this current is increased in portions (is quantized), and when it is subsequently decreased it freezes partially or completely in the DCS circuit.

  14. Serum protein and casein concentration: effect on pH and freezing point of milk with added CO2.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Barbano, D M

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of protein concentration and protein type [i.e., casein (CN) and serum protein (SP)] on pH (0 degree C) and freezing point (FP) of skim milk upon CO2 injection at 0 degree C. CN-free skim milks with increasing SP content (0, 3, and 6%) and skim milks with the same SP content (0.6%) but increasing CN content (2.4, 4.8, and 7.2%) were prepared using a combination of microfiltration and ultrafiltration processes. CO2 was injected into milks at 0 degree C using a continuous flow carbonation unit (230 ml/min). Increasing SP or CN increased milk buffering capacity and protein-bound mineral content. At the same CO2 concentration at 0 degree C, a milk with a higher SP or a higher CN concentration had more resistance to pH change and a greater extent of FP decrease. The buffering capacity provided by an increase of CN was contributed by both the CN itself and the colloidal salts solublized into the serum phase from CN upon carbonation. Skim milks with the same true protein content (3%), one with 2.4% CN plus 0.6% SP and one with 3% SP, were compared. At the same true protein content (3%), increasing the proportion of CN increased milk buffering capacity and protein-bound mineral content. Milk with a higher proportion of CN had more resistance to pH change and a greater extent of FP decrease at the same carbonation level at 0 degree C. Once CO2 was dissolved in the skim portion of a milk, the extent of pH reduction and FP depression depended on protein concentration and protein type (i.e., CN and SP). PMID:12778569

  15. Depression of melting point for protective aluminum oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreizin, E. L.; Allen, D. J.; Glumac, N. G.

    2015-01-01

    The protective aluminum oxide film naturally formed on a surface of aluminum has a thickness in the range of 3-5 nm. Its melting causes loss of its continuity, which may significantly affect the ignition and combustion processes and their relative time scales. Melting of the alumina film also plays an important role when aluminum powders are used to prepare composites and/or being sintered. This letter quantifies depression of the melting point of an alumina film based on its nano-meter thickness. A theoretical estimate is supported by experiments relying on a detected change in the optical properties of naturally oxidized aluminum particles heated in an inert environment.

  16. A psychometric cut-point to separate emergently suicidal depressed patients from stable depressed outpatients

    PubMed Central

    McCall, W. Vaughn; Batson, Nicolas; Webster, Megan; Joshi, Indu; Derreberry, Todd; McDonough, Adam; Farris, Suzan

    2013-01-01

    Context: The design of safe clinical trials targeting suicidal ideation requires operational definitions of what degree of suicidal ideation is too excessive to allow safe participation. Aims: We examined the Scale for Suicide Ideation (SSI) to develop a psychometric cut-point that would identify patients having a suicidal emergency. Settings and Design: The Emergency Department (ED) and the out-patient clinic of a university hospital. Materials and Methods: We used the SSI to contrast 23 stable, depressed adult out-patients versus 11 depressed adult ED patients awaiting psychiatric admission for a suicidal emergency. Statistical Analysis: The performance of the SSI was examined with nominal logistic regression. Results: ED patients were older than out-patients (P<0.001), with proportionally more men (P<0.05), and were more ethnically diverse than the outpatients (P<0.005). Compared to out-patients, ED patients were more depressed (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score 23.13.8 vs. 11.77.3, P<0.005) and reported a greater degree of suicidal ideation (SSI scores 25.77.3 vs. 4.28.4, P<0.0001). Nominal logistic regression for the univariate model of SSI score and group yielded a score of 16 (P<0.0001) as the best cut-point in separating groups, with a corresponding Receiver Operating Characteristic Area Under the Curve = 0.94. Of 34 patients in the total sample, only two were misclassified by SSI score = 16, with both of these being false positive for ED status. Thus, the sensitivity of the cut-point was 100% with specificity of 91%. When the model was expanded to include SSI along with age, gender, ethnicity, sedative-hypnotic use, and over-the-counter use, only SSI score remained significant as a predictor. Conclusions: A SSI score ?16 may be useful as an exclusion criterion for out-patients in depression clinical trials. PMID:24082251

  17. 'Love Hormone' Levels in Pregnancy May Point to Risk for Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Pregnancy May Point to Risk for Postpartum Depression Goal is to identify and treat this mental ... may be associated with increased risk of postpartum depression in some women, researchers say. The findings suggest ...

  18. Supercooling Point Plasticity During Cold Storage in the Freeze-tolerant Sugarbeet Root Maggot Tetanops myopaeformis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugarbeet root maggot, Tetanops myopaeformis (Röder), overwinters as a freeze-tolerant 3rd instar larva. While most larvae are thought to overwinter for only one year, some may exhibit prolonged diapause in the field. In the laboratory, they can live for over five years using a combination of ...

  19. Molecular Dynamics Study of Freezing Point and Solid-Liquid Interfacial Free Energy of Stockmayer Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Apte, Pankaj; Morris, James R; Zeng, X.C.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing temperatures of Stockmayer fluids with different dipolar strength at zero pressure are estimated and computed using three independent molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation methods, namely, the superheating-undercooling method, the constant-pressure and constant-temperature (NPT) two phase coexistence method, and the constant-pressure and constant-enthalpy (NPH) coexistence method. The best estimate of the freezing temperature (in reduced unit) for the Stockmayer (SM) fluid with a reduced dipole moment is 0.656 0.001, 0.726 0.002 and 0.835 0.005, respectively. The freezing temperature increases with the dipolar strength. The solid-liquid interfacial free energies of the (111), (110) and (100) interface are calculated for the first time using two independent methods, namely, the cleaving-wall method and the interfacial fluctuation method. Both methods predict that the interfacial free energy increases with the dipole moment. Although the interfacial fluctuation method suggests a weaker interfacial anisotropy, particularly for strongly dipolar SM fluids, both methods predicted the same trend of interfacial anisotropy, that is, .

  20. Working and Non-Working University Students: Anxiety, Depression, and Grade Point Average

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mounsey, Rebecca; Vandehey, Michael A.; Diekhoff, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the differences between 110 working and non-working students in terms of mental health, academic achievement, and perceptions about student employment. Anxiety and depression were measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Academic achievement was measured by grade point average. Perceptions of

  1. Working and Non-Working University Students: Anxiety, Depression, and Grade Point Average

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mounsey, Rebecca; Vandehey, Michael A.; Diekhoff, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the differences between 110 working and non-working students in terms of mental health, academic achievement, and perceptions about student employment. Anxiety and depression were measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Academic achievement was measured by grade point average. Perceptions of…

  2. Effect of Thawing Time, Cooling Rate and Boron Nutrition on Freezing Point of the Primordial Shoot in Norway Spruce Buds

    PubMed Central

    RISNEN, MIKKO; REPO, TAPANI; LEHTO, TARJA

    2006-01-01

    Background Effects of cooling rates on bud frost hardiness have been studied but there is little information on bud responses to thawing. Since the cell wall pore size has been found to increase with boron (B) deficiency, B deficiency may affect the supercooling ability of buds in winter. Methods The effects of duration of thawing time and rate of cooling on bud frost hardiness of Norway spruce (Picea abies) were studied in a B fertilization trial in February 2003 and March 2005. Frost hardiness of apical buds was determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and visual scoring of damage. Key Results In 2003, the freezing point of primordial shoots of buds (Tf), i.e. the low-temperature exotherm (LTE), was, on average, ?39?C when buds were thawed for less than 3?h and the Tf increased to ?21?C after 18?h of thawing. During the first 4?h of thawing, the rate of dehardening was 6?C h?1. In 2005, buds dehardened linearly from ?39?C to ?35?C at a rate of 07?C h?1. In 2003, different cooling rates of 15?C h?1 had a minor effect on Tf but in 2005 with slow cooling rates Tf decreased. In both samplings, at cooling rates of 2 and 1?C h?1, Tf was slightly higher in B-fertilized than in non-fertilized trees. By contrast, at very short thawing times in 2003, Tf was somewhat lower in B-fertilized trees. Conclusions There was little evidence of reduced frost hardiness in trees with low B status. This study showed that buds deharden rapidly when exposed to above-freezing temperatures in winter, but if cooled again they reharden more slowly. According to this study, rapid dehardening of buds has to be taken into account in assessments of frost hardiness. PMID:16464880

  3. Freezing Models For Heterogeneous Drop Freezing In Immersion and Contact Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, K.; Wurzler, S.

    Field measurements showed that supercooled liquid water drops and frozen drops can coexist in tropospheric clouds at temperatures down to -40 C with an incidence of ice particles already at -4 C. The freezing behaviour of water drops depends on their sizes, on their content of soluble particles (freezing point depression) and of insoluble particles (potential immersion ice nuclei) as well as on the collision with dry particles (potential contact ice nuclei). In the present model studies, the influence of soluble and insoluble particles on drop freezing in immersion and contact modes are considered. Using a two dimensional field of drop and aerosol particle sizes the numerical simula- tion of the coexistence of similar sized drops with different compositions is possible, also the combination of different collision partners. The freezing point depression of salt solution drops was calculated according to physical chemistry equations. The median freezing temperatures of particles in the immersion and contact modes were derived from laboratory results for typical atmospheric ice nuclei. The collision effi- ciency was calculated based on experimental results and numerical estimations. The results obtained with the freezing models are consistent with experimental results. They show that in the whole temperature range relevant for the troposphere the com- position of the drops has an important influence on their freezing in the immersion mode. The smaller the drop sizes, the more effecting are the soluble particles. A sig- nificant influence of insoluble immersion ice nuclei on atmospheric drop f reezing can be expected at temperatures of -20 C and lower, in the contact freezing mode already at temperatures around -10 C, with the different insoluble particles not showing large deviations. However, the freezing efficiency of contact ice nuclei is restricted by the collision efficiency which is dependant on both, the drop and aerosol particle size.

  4. High-speed Imaging of Freezing Drops: Investigating the Role of Point-like Contact in Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J.; Shaw, R. A.; Kostinski, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Formation of ice by contact nucleation remains enigmatic and the possible role of the three-phase boundary (i.e., liquid water-ice-aerosol contact line) is still undetermined. Because aerosol size, surface area, composition and exact region of contact remain difficult to measure, we examine a simpler geometry with a spherical cap droplet resting on a substrate. In this configuration, the droplet simultaneously experiences a two-phase immersion region and a three phase contact region around the perimeter of the droplet. Utilizing high speed imaging of the droplet-substrate plane, we are able to identify nucleation sites in individual droplets. This technique allows for a spatial distribution of freezing sites in addition to a freezing temperature distribution. Our initial study indicated no preference for nucleation originating at the three phase boundary for an atomically smooth homogenous substrate [1]. The nucleation site distribution agreed well with the stochastic view in that the germ sites are distributed uniformly over the surface area. In that study we minimized the thermal variation (?T) across a droplet during cooling to prevent biased observations. We also compared ?T for several experiments in literature using a simple formulation of droplet size (r) and cooling rate (?). Large variations in some experiments could possibly explain observed 'contact nucleation' events in the laboratory as artifacts of radial thermal variations during droplet cooling. As a continuation of this study, we redesigned our system to enable much greater substrate cooling rates, but these experiments too revealed no preference for nucleation in the contact mode. Thermal modeling of the new system confirmed that while a vertical thermal gradient does develop within the droplet, no horizontal gradient is induced in the drop near the substrate. This result argues against a thermodynamic bias toward contact nucleation in substrate cooled geometries. Another possible explanation for this contact phenomenon comes in a lowering of the energy barrier for nucleation due to the existence of a line tension at the point of contact. A scale analysis of the line and surface energy values available in the literature suggests that line tension may become dominant below length scales of ~10 nm [1]. From this simple result we postulate that 'point-like' surface features might play an important role at the three phase boundary. To mimic these features on substrates we introduce chemical and mechanical processes to enhance substrate surface roughness. Using these new substrates we repeat our experimental procedure to compare effectiveness of the immersion (two phase) and contact (three phase) regions for a variety of surface topologies. Here we report the initial findings from this work. 1. Gurganus, C.; Kostinski, A. B.; Shaw, R. A., Fast Imaging of Freezing Drops: No Preference for Nucleation at the Contact Line. J Phys Chem Lett 2011, 2 (12) Identifying nucleation sites with two high speed cameras.

  5. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stay Connected Home » Depression Heath and Aging Depression What Causes Depression? What to Look For Getting ... feel better with the right treatment. What Causes Depression? There is no one cause of depression. For ...

  6. Activity coefficients and free energies of nonionic mixed surfactant solutions from vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Jennifer A; Ray, Gargi Basu; Leaist, Derek G

    2011-05-19

    The thermodynamic properties of mixed surfactant solutions are widely investigated, prompted by numerous practical applications of these systems and by interest in molecular association and self-organization. General techniques for measuring thermodynamic activities, such as isopiestic equilibration, are well-established for multicomponent solutions. Surprisingly, these techniques have not yet been applied to mixed surfactant solutions, despite the importance of the free energy for micelle stability. In this study, equations are developed for the osmotic coefficients of solutions of nonionic surfactant A + nonionic surfactant B. A mass-action model is used, with virial equations for the activity coefficients of the micelles and free surfactant monomer species. The equations are fitted to osmotic coefficients of aqueous decylsulfobetaine + dodecylsulfobetaine solutions measured by vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry. Equilibrium constants for mixed-micelle formation are calculated from the free monomer concentrations at the critical micelle concentrations. The derived activity coefficients of the micelles and free monomers indicate large departures from ideal solution behavior, even for dilute solutions of the surfactants. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of the total surfactant components are evaluated by Gibbs-Duhem integration of the osmotic coefficients. Relatively simple colligative property measurements hold considerable promise for free energy studies of multicomponent surfactant solutions. PMID:21504169

  7. Depression Treatment for Impoverished Mothers by Point-of-Care Providers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Segre, Lisa S.; Brock, Rebecca L.; O’Hara, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depression in low-income, ethnic-minority women of childbearing age is prevalent and compromises infant and child development. Yet numerous barriers prevent treatment delivery. Listening Visits (LV), an empirically supported intervention developed for delivery by British home-visiting nurses, could address this unmet mental health need. This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of LV delivered at a woman’s usual point-of-care, including home-visits or an ob-gyn office. Method Listening Visits were delivered to depressed pregnant women or mothers of young children by their point-of-care provider (e.g., home visitor or physician’s assistant), all of whom had low levels of prior counseling experience. Three quarters of the study’s participants were low-income. Of those who reported ethnicity, all identified themselves as minorities. Participants from four study sites (N = 66) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio, to LV or a wait-list control group (WLC). Assessments, conducted at baseline and 8 weeks, evaluated depression, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Results Depressive severity, depressive symptoms, and quality of life significantly improved among LV recipients as compared to women receiving standard social/health services. Women valued LV as evidenced by their high attendance rates and treatment satisfaction ratings. Conclusions In a stepped model of depression care, LV can provide an accessible, acceptable, and effective first-line treatment option for at-risk women who otherwise are unlikely to receive treatment. PMID:25486371

  8. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Depression About Depression Click for more information Everyone feels blue or ... disorder," or "clinical depression." Click for more information Depression in Older Adults Important life changes that happen ...

  9. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Depression KidsHealth > For Teens > Depression Print A A A ... yet, but she is depressed. Regular Sadness vs. Depression Feeling sad, down, or discouraged are natural human ...

  10. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stress and your health fact sheet What is depression? What are the different types of depression? What causes depression? What are the signs of ... away. Return to top What are the different types of depression? Different kinds of depression include: Major depressive disorder. ...

  11. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  12. Periodic ice banding in freezing colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Anthony M; Worster, M Grae

    2012-12-01

    Concentrated colloidal alumina dispersions were frozen in a directional solidification apparatus that provides independent control of the freezing rate and temperature gradient. Two distinct steady-state modes of periodic ice banding were observed in the range of freezing rates examined. For each mode, the wavelength between successive bands of segregated ice decreases with increasing freezing rate. At low freezing rates (0.25-3 ?m s(-1)), the ice segregates from the suspension into ice lenses, which are cracklike in appearance, and there is visible structure in the layer of rejected particles in the unfrozen region ahead of the ice lenses. In this regime, we argue that compressive cryosuction forces lead to the irreversible aggregation of the rejected particles into a close-packed cohesive layer. The temperature in the aggregated layer is depressed below the bulk freezing point by more than 2 C before the ice lenses are encountered; moreover, this undercooled region appears as a light-colored layer. The magnitude of the undercooling and the color change in this region both suggest the presence of pore ice and the formation of a frozen fringe. The possibility of a frozen fringe is supported by a quantitative model of the freezing behavior. At intermediate freezing rates, around 4 ?m s(-1), the pattern of ice segregation is disordered, coinciding with the disappearance of the dark- and light-colored layers. Finally, at high freezing rates (5-10 ?m s(-1)), there is a new mode of periodic ice banding that is no longer cracklike and is absent of any visible structure in the suspension ahead of the ice bands. We discuss the implications of our experimental findings for theories of ice lensing. PMID:23110707

  13. Effect of temperature of CO2 injection on the pH and freezing point of milks and creams.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Barbano, D M

    2003-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to measure the impact of CO2 injection temperature (0 degree C and 40 degrees C) on the pH and freezing point (FP) of (a) milks with different fat contents (i.e., 0, 15, 30%) and (b) creams with 15% fat but different fat characteristics. Skim milk and unhomogenized creams containing 15 and 30% fat were prepared from the same batch of whole milk and were carbonated at 0 and 40 degrees C in a continuous flow CO2 injection unit (230 ml/min). At 0 degree C, milk fat was mostly solid; at 40 degrees C, milk fat was liquid. At the same total CO2 concentration with CO2 injection at 0 degree C, milk with a higher fat content had a lower pH and FP, while with CO2 injection at 40 degrees C, milks with 0%, 15%, and 30% fat had the same pH. This indicated that less CO2 was dissolved in the fat portion of the milk when the CO2 was injected at 0 degree C than when it was injected at 40 degrees C. Three creams, 15% unhomogenized cream, 15% butter oil emulsion in skim milk, and 15% vegetable oil emulsion in skim milk were also carbonated and analyzed as described above. Vegetable oil was liquid at both 0 and 40 degrees C. At a CO2 injection temperature of 0 degree C, the 15% vegetable oil emulsion had a slightly higher pH than the 15% butter oil emulsion and the 15% unhomogenized cream, indicating that the liquid vegetable oil dissolved more CO2 than the mostly solid milk fat and butter oil. No difference in the pH or FP of the 15% unhomogenized cream and 15% butter oil emulsion was observed when CO2 was injected at 0 degree C, suggesting that homogenization or physical dispersion of milk fat globules did not influence the amount of CO2 dissolved in milk fat at a CO2 injection temperature of 0 degree C. At a CO2 injection temperature of 40 degrees C and at the same total CO2 concentration, the 15% unhomogenized cream, 15% vegetable oil emulsion, and 15% butter oil emulsion had similar pH. At the same total concentration of CO2 in cream, injection of CO2 at low temperature (i.e., < 4 degrees C) may produce a better antimicrobial effect during refrigerated shelf life due to the higher concentration of CO2 in the skim portion of the cream. PMID:12778568

  14. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or someone I know is in crisis? Share Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels sad sometimes, but these feelings usually ...

  15. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and negative thinking worse. previous continue Depression Can Go Unrecognized People with depression may not realize they ... themselves or who have eating disorders or who go through extreme mood changes may have unrecognized depression. ...

  16. Liposome fluidization and melting point depression by pressurized CO2 determined by fluorescence anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Bothun, Geoffrey D; Knutson, Barbara L; Strobel, Herbert J; Nokes, Sue E

    2005-01-18

    The influence of CO2 on the bilayer fluidity of liposomes, which are representative of model cellular membranes, was examined for the first time at the elevated pressures (up to 13.9 MPa) associated with CO2-based processing of liposomes and microbial sterilization. Fluidization and melting point depression of aqueous dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes by pressurized CO2 (present as an excess phase) were studied by steady-state fluorescence anisotropy using the membrane probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Isothermal experiments revealed reversible, pressure-dependent fluidization of DPPC bilayers at temperatures corresponding to near-gel (295 K) and fluid (333 K) phases at atmospheric pressure, where the gel-to-fluid phase transition (Tm) occurs at approximately 315 K. Isobaric measurements (PCO2 =1.8, 7.0, and 13.9 MPa) of DPH anisotropy demonstrate substantial melting point depression (DeltaTm = -4.8 to -18.5 K) and a large broadening of the gel-fluid phase transition region, which were interpreted using conventional theories of melting point depression. Liposome fluidity is influenced by CO2 accumulation in the hydrocarbon core and polar headgroup region, as well as the formation of carbonic acid and/or the presence of buffering species under elevated CO2 pressure. PMID:15641820

  17. Negative pressures and melting point depression in oxide-coated liquid metal droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.; Turnbull, D.

    1979-01-01

    Negative pressures and melting point depression in oxide-coated liquid metal droplets are studied. The calculation presented show the existence of large negative pressures when the oxide coating is thick enough. The change in the melting point caused by these negative pressures should be considered in studies of homogeneous crystal nucleation. Furthermore, since the negative pressure raises the entropy of the melt, it increases the entropy loss at the crystal-melt interface; the resulting increase of the surface tension could have a large effect on the homogeneous nucleation frequency.

  18. A molecular simulation study of freezing/melting phenomena for Lennard-Jones methane in cylindrical nanoscale pores

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, M.W.; Gubbins, K.E.

    1997-12-01

    A combination of grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation techniques are used to study the freezing and melting of Lennard-Jones methane in several different cylindrical pores. Two different types of pore wall are considered; a strongly attractive wall, and a weakly attractive wall, each with pore diameters in the range 1.5{endash}3.5 nm. Freezing point depression is observed in the case of the weakly attractive pores, in agreement with several experimental studies. Freezing point elevation is observed at the walls of the strongly attractive pore, but freezing point depression occurs at the center of such pores, due to geometrical constraints. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Depressants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... use of depressants without a prescription is a crime punishable by hefty fines and jail time. How Can Someone Quit? Quitting depressants can be very difficult. A person who tries to stop taking the drugs can ...

  20. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of ... million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist ...

  1. Magneto-caloric effect of a Gd50Co50 amorphous alloy near the freezing point of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Wu, C.; Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, we report the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) of a binary Gd50Co50 amorphous alloy near the freezing temperature of water. The Curie temperature of Gd50Co50 amorphous ribbons is about 267.5 K, which is very close to room temperature. The peak value of the magnetic entropy change (-ΔSmpeak) and the resulting adiabatic temperature rise (ΔTad.) of the Gd50Co50 amorphous ribbons is much higher than that of any other amorphous alloys previously reported with a Tc near room temperature. On the other hand, although the -ΔSmpeak of Gd50Co50 amorphous ribbons is not as high as those of crystalline alloys near room temperature, its refrigeration capacity (RC) is still much larger than the RC values of these crystalline alloys. The binary Gd50Co50 amorphous alloy provides a basic alloy for developing high performance multi-component amorphous alloys near room temperature.

  2. Experimental and analytical investigation of a freezing point depressant fluid ice protection system. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    A glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system was tested in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel. Stainless steel mesh, laser drilled titanium, and composite panels were tested on two general aviation wing sections. Two different glycol-water solutions were evaluated. Minimum glycol flow rates required for anti-icing were obtained as a function of angle of attack, liquid water content, volume median drop diameter, temperature, and velocity. Ice accretions formed after five minutes of icing were shed in three minutes or less using a glycol fluid flow equal to the anti-ice flow rate. Two methods of predicting anti-ice flow rates are presented and compared with a large experimental data base of anti-ice flow rates over a wide range of icing conditions. The first method presented in the ADS-4 document typically predicts flow rates lower than the experimental flow rates. The second method, originally published in 1983, typically predicts flow rates up to 25 percent higher than the experimental flow rates. This method proved to be more consistent between wing-panel configurations. Significant correlation coefficients between the predicted flow rates and the experimental flow rates ranged from .867 to .947.

  3. Final report on COOMET.T-S1. Comparison of type S thermocouples at the freezing points of zinc, aluminium and copper 2014—2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhodun, A. I.; Ivanova, A. G.; Duysebayeva, K. K.; Ivanova, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Regional comparison of type S thermocouples at the freezing points of zinc, aluminium and copper was initiated by COOMET TC1.1-10 (the technical committee of COOMET `Thermometry and thermal physics'). Three NMI take part in COOMET regional comparison: D I Mendeleev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM) (Russian Federation), National Scientific Centre (Institute of Metrology) (NSC IM, Ukraine), Republic State Enterprise (Kazakhstan Institute of Metrology) (KazInMetr, Republic of Kazakhstan). VNIIM (Russia) was chosen as the coordinator-pilot of the regional comparison. A star type comparison was used. The participants: KazInMetr and NSC IM constructed the type S thermocouples and calibrated them in three fixed points: zinc, aluminum and copper points, using methods of ITS-90 fixed point realizations. The thermocouples have been sent to VNIIM together with the results of the calibration at three fixed points, with the values of the inhomogeneity at temperature 200 °C and the uncertainty evaluations of the results. For calibration of thermocouples the same VNIIM fixed points cells were used. Participating laboratories repeated the calibration of thermocouples after its returning in zinc, aluminum and copper points to determine the stability of its results. In result of the comparison was to evaluate the equivalence of the type S thermocouples calibration in fixed points by NMIs to confirm corresponding lines of international website for NMI's Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMC). This paper is the final report of the comparison including analysis of the uncertainty of measurement results. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT WG-KC, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. Depressants

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    ... Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Depressants KidsHealth > Teens > Drugs & Alcohol > Drugs > Depressants Print A A A Text Size ... Date reviewed: February 2014 Back 1 ? 2 For ... Drugs: What to Know Dealing With Addiction I Think I May Have a Drinking/Drug Problem. What Should I Do? Prescription Drug ...

  5. Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  6. Method and apparatus for determining the presence or absence of a pour point depressant additive in hydrocarbon liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Rummel, J.D.

    1986-07-29

    A method is described of determining the presence or absence of a pour point depressant additive in a hydrocarbon liquid derived from petroleum, the liquid containing paraffin wax, comprising the steps of: (a) cooling a sample of the liquid at a predetermined cooling rate from a temperature substantially above the cloud point temperature to a temperature substantially below the cloud point temperature; (b) monitoring the slope of the cooling rate curve and noting the points at which a deflection in the curve begins and ends; (c) determining the time interval between the beginning and ending points of the deflection of the curve, and (d) comparing the determined time interval to a reference time interval, associated with the predetermined cooling rate, so as to establish whether the determined time interval is less than or greater than the reference time interval thereby establishing the presence or absence, respectively, of a pour point depressant additive.

  7. Depression.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Myrna

    2009-04-01

    This is an invited article on how my career as an epidemiologist studying depression unfolded. The role of the Civil Rights movement in opening the PhD doors to women at Yale began my career. The unfolding of depression studies are described. These studies included a clinical trial of medication and what later was known as interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), the first community survey of psychiatric disorder, family genetic and brain imaging studies or depression and anxiety disorders. I hope the new generation will have the wonderful opportunities I have had. PMID:19344866

  8. Ground freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Kinosita, S.; Fukuda, M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors' discuss how artificial freezing of the ground has been used in increasingly in the last few decades to stabilize earth materials and control groundwater seepage in geotechnical construction. Emphasis is on the relation between theory, design and application of ground freezing in construction: Thermal properties and processes in earth materials; Frost action; Mechanical properties and processes in earth materials; Engineering design and case histories (tunnels, pipelines, foundations, slopes, LNG tanks, shafts).

  9. Depression

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    ... less likely to have depression come back. In psychotherapy, you talk with a trained therapist or counselor ... affecting you, and what you can do differently. Psychotherapy usually lasts for a limited time, such as ...

  10. Wetting and freezing of hexadecane on an aqueous surfactant solution: triple point in a 2-D film.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, H; Ohtomi, E; Aratono, M; Bain, Colin D

    2008-09-18

    Wetting of water by hexadecane has been investigated by ellipsometry as a function of the concentration of the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) in the aqueous phase and temperature. Three phases are identified: a 2-D gas of hexadecane molecules and DTAB molecules, a 2-D liquid comprising a mixed monolayer of hexadecane and DTAB, and a 2-D 'solid' phase. Evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that the liquid-solid phase transition is actually a wetting transition in which a surface-frozen layer of pure hexadecane wets the liquid-like mixed monolayer of hexadecane and DTAB. The triple point, at which the three phases coexist, is located at a temperature of 17.3 degrees C and DTAB concentration of 0.75 mmol kg (-1). The slopes of the three phase boundaries are analyzed thermodynamically. PMID:18729394

  11. On laboratory simulation and the effect of small temperature oscillations about the freezing point and ice formation on the evaporation rate of water on Mars.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shauntae R; Sears, Derek W G

    2006-08-01

    We report measurements of the evaporation rate of water under Mars-like conditions (CO2 atmosphere at 7 mbar and approximately 0 degrees C) in which small temperature oscillations about the freezing point repeatedly formed and removed a thin layer of ice. We found that the average evaporation at 2.7 +/- 0.5 degrees C without an ice layer (corrected for the difference in gravity on Earth and on Mars) was 1.24 +/- 0.12 mm/h, while at -2.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C with an ice layer the average evaporation rate was 0.84 +/- 0.08 mm/h. These values are in good agreement with those calculated for the evaporation of liquid water and ice when it is assumed that evaporation only depends on diffusion and buoyancy. Our findings suggest that such differences in evaporation rates are entirely due to the temperature difference and that the ice layer has little effect on evaporation rate. We infer that the formation of thin layers of ice on pools of water on Mars does not significantly increase the stability of water on the surface of Mars. PMID:16916288

  12. Exposure to early adversity: Points of cross-species translation that can lead to improved understanding of depression.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Susan L

    2015-05-01

    The relationship between developmental exposure to adversity and affective disorders is reviewed. Adversity discussed herein includes physical and sexual abuse, neglect, or loss of a caregiver in humans. While these stressors can occur at any point during development, the unique temporal relationship to specific depressive symptoms was the focus of discussion. Further influences of stress exposure during sensitive periods can vary by gender and duration of abuse as well. Data from animal studies are presented to provide greater translational and causal understanding of how sensitive periods, different types of psychosocial stressors, and sex interact to produce depressive-like behaviors. Findings from maternal separation, isolation rearing, chronic variable stress, and peer-peer rearing paradigms clarify interpretation about how various depressive behaviors are influenced by age of exposure. Depressive behaviors are broken down into the following categories: mood and affect, anhedonia, energy, working memory, sleep-wake, appetite changes, suicide, and general malaise. Cross-species evidence from humans, nonhuman primates, rats, and mice within each of these categories is discussed. In conclusion, sensitive periods for affective-related behaviors (anxiety, mood, and controllability) occur earlier in life, while other aspects of depression are associated with adversity later during adolescence. PMID:25997766

  13. MedLink: A Mobile Intervention to Address Failure Points in the Treatment of Depression in General Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, David C.; Stiles-Shields, Colleen; Brenner, Christopher; Palac, Hannah; Montague, Enid; Kaiser, Susan M.; Carty-Fickes, Eric; Duffecy, Jenna

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is common, and imposes a high burden in terms of cost, morbidity, and suffering. Most people with depression are treated in general medicine using antidepressant medication. Outcomes are poor due to failure points across the care system, including patient non-adherence, failure of physicians to optimize the treatment regimens, and lack of patient-physician communication. This study reports on the 4-week pilot deployment of MedLink, a mobile intervention aimed at systemically addressing each of these failure points. A mobile app provides the patient with information and collects data on symptoms and side-effects. A cellularly enabled pill bottle monitors medication adherence. Data from these are provided to the physician and patient to foster communication and medication adjustments. Usability evaluation was generally favorable. Medication adherence rates in this first deployment were high with no patients discontinuing, and 84% of doses taken. Depressive symptom severity was significantly reduced. This study supports the use of a comprehensive, systemic approach to mHealth solutions to enhance processes of care for depression by general medicine physicians.

  14. Depression in vascular pathologies: the neurologists point of view

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Rita; Bernobich, Elena; Esposito, Francesca; Torre, Paola; Antonello, Rodolfo M; De Angelis, Luisa; Bellini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The coexistence of depression and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is regularly discussed, and much debated. There is strong evidence that there are pathophysiological mechanisms, particularly endothelial dysfunction, altered platelet aggregation, and hyperactivation of the thrombosis cascade, which coexist with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis dysfunction, and link depression to CVD. Therefore, depression should not be automatically considered to be a consequence of life impairment due to myocardial infarction or major stroke. Probably, it should be considered as one of the many other stressful events, or genetic reactions to life, which are risk factors for CVD development. This review will examine the significance of depression in clinical daily practice, its pathophysiology as a determinant in vascular events, and its real importance in, before, and after many CVD events. PMID:21796258

  15. Pore structure of hydrating cement paste by magnetic resonance relaxation analysis and freezing.

    PubMed

    Jehng, J Y; Sprague, D T; Halperin, W P

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis has been applied to interpret the evolution of microstructure in a cement paste during hydration. A basic understanding of the wet-dry and freeze-thaw processes of cement pastes has been developed. The pore structure evolution has been studied by the suppression of the freezing temperature of water and compared with spin-spin relaxation analysis performed at room temperature. Both methods consistently show that hydrating cement pastes have two principal components in their size distribution. The NMR relaxation times provide a measure of the characteristic pore sizes. Their interpretation is made in the context of a fast exchange model. Supercooling and thawing point depression of confined water has been studied systematically. The depression of the freezing point of liquid water confined within a pore was found to be dependent on the pore size, with capillary pore water freezing at 240 K and the remaining gel pore water freezing over a temperature range extending to as low as 160 K.A modified Gibbs-Thompson analysis was used to determine pore volume distributions from the distribution of thawing temperatures. PMID:8970082

  16. Synergistic impacts of land-use change and soil property variation on non-point source nitrogen pollution in a freeze-thaw area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Huang, Haobo; Hao, Fanghua; Guo, Bobo

    2013-07-01

    Quantifying the non-point source (NPS) nitrogen pollution response to the varied land-use and soil properties in highly agricultural regions is critical for the proper management of NPS pollution. This study simulated the NPS nitrogen loading responses to variations of land-use and soil from 1979 to 2009. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to model the NPS organic nitrogen and nitrate loading in a freeze-thaw area in northeast China. The temporal-spatial simulations of land-use in four periods indicated that the NPS nitrogen loading responded to the disappearance of wetlands and the conversion of uplands to paddy rice. After updating the soil data, the watershed NPS nitrogen loading decreased, and the spatial distribution of the loading indicated that the NPS organic nitrogen was more sensitive than was the nitrate to soil variation. F-tests were employed to assess the significance of each of the predictor variables in five types of scenarios. Overall, the results indicate that the watershed NPS nitrogen loading is sensitive to changes of soil and land-use, but soil changes have a more significant impact. The results of this study also suggest that temperature has significant effects on NPS nitrogen yield and that it caused the twin peaks in the temporal scale. Increasing the temperature above zero in April caused a temporal shift in soil water movement and transported nitrogen pollution earlier in the year, causing an increased loading in water before the summer irrigation, which is advantageous for NPS nitrogen pollution control.

  17. Satellite freeze forecast system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Provisions for back-up operations for the satellite freeze forecast system are discussed including software and hardware maintenance and DS/1000-1V linkage; troubleshooting; and digitized radar usage. The documentation developed; dissemination of data products via television and the IFAS computer network; data base management; predictive models; the installation of and progress towards the operational status of key stations; and digital data acquisition are also considered. The d addition of dew point temperature into the P-model is outlined.

  18. Autobiographical Memory and Depression in the Later Age: The Bump Is a Turning Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidron, Yori; Alon, Shirly

    2007-01-01

    This preliminary study integrated previous findings of the distribution of autobiographical memories in the later age according to their age of occurrence, with the overgeneral memory bias predictive of depression. Twenty-five non-demented, Israeli participants between 65-89 years of age provided autobiographical memories to 4 groups of word cues…

  19. Vapor Pressure Plus: An Experiment for Studying Phase Equilibria in Water, with Observation of Supercooling, Spontaneous Freezing, and the Triple Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-vapor, solid-vapor, and solid-liquid-vapor equilibria are studied for the pure substance water, using modern equipment that includes specially fabricated glass cells. Samples are evaporatively frozen initially, during which they typically supercool to -5 to -10 [degrees]C before spontaneously freezing. Vacuum pumping lowers the temperature

  20. Vapor Pressure Plus: An Experiment for Studying Phase Equilibria in Water, with Observation of Supercooling, Spontaneous Freezing, and the Triple Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-vapor, solid-vapor, and solid-liquid-vapor equilibria are studied for the pure substance water, using modern equipment that includes specially fabricated glass cells. Samples are evaporatively frozen initially, during which they typically supercool to -5 to -10 [degrees]C before spontaneously freezing. Vacuum pumping lowers the temperature…

  1. Cloud Point Depression in Dilute Solutions of HEMA/DMAEMA Copolymers with Prescribed Composition Profiles and Gradient Strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallow, Keith; Jhon, Young; Genzer, Jan; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2011-03-01

    We have synthesized a random copolymer and gradient copolymers of hydroxyethyl methacrylate and dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate whose instantaneous compositions vary linearly and according to hyperbolic tangent (Tanh) functions along the backbones, all having similar molecular weights and overall compositions. The cloud point of the dilute solution of the random copolymer is 20.0circ; C; the transparent-to-turbid transition occurs over 1.0circ; C. Dilute solutions of linear gradient copolymers exhibit cloud point depressions of up to 3.5circ; C and transition breadths of 1-3circ; C compared to that of the random copolymer. The cloud points of dilute solutions of gradient copolymers with Tanh composition profiles are further suppressed by as much as 9.0circ; C compared to that of the random copolymer. Our observations demonstrate the importance of monomer sequence distribution in altering the macroscopic solution properties of copolymers.

  2. New freeze pipe systems for nitrogen freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rephan, D.

    A number of field and laboratory experiments have been carried out using new kinds of freezing pipe systems. These systems particularly enable freezing to be performed in stages. They further enable liquid gas consumption to be minimized. One system is particularly suitable for shaft freezing while another lends itself to tunnelling.

  3. Liquidus Temperature Depression in Cryolitic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, Asbjørn

    2012-08-01

    The electrolyte in Hall-Héroult cells for the manufacture of primary aluminum nominally contains only cryolite (Na3AlF6) with additions of AlF3, CaF2, and Al2O3. However, impurities are present, entering the process with the feedstock. The effect on the liquidus temperature by the impurities cannot be calculated correctly by the well-known equation for freezing-point depression in binary systems simply because the electrolyte cannot be regarded as a binary system. By extending the equation for freezing-point depression to the ternary system NaF-AlF3-B, it appeared that the acidity of the impurity B plays a major role. Some calculations were made using an ideal Temkin model, and for most types of impurities, the effect on the liquidus temperature will be larger in an industrial electrolyte than what can be estimated from the equation for freezing-point depression in cryolite. Experimental data on the liquidus temperature in the system Na3AlF6-AlF3-Al2O3-CaF2-MgF2 show that the effect of MgF2 on the liquidus temperature increases strongly with decreasing NaF/AlF3 molar ratio, and it is suggested that MgF2 forms an anion complex, probably MgF{4/2-}.

  4. Preservation of flavor in freeze dried green beans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Davis, D.

    1973-01-01

    Before freeze drying, green beans are heated to point at which their cell structure is altered. Beans freeze dried with altered cell structure have improved rehydration properties and retain color, flavor, and texture.

  5. Stability against freezing of aqueous solutions on early Mars.

    PubMed

    Fairn, Alberto G; Davila, Alfonso F; Gago-Duport, Luis; Amils, Ricardo; McKay, Christopher P

    2009-05-21

    Many features of the Martian landscape are thought to have been formed by liquid water flow and water-related mineralogies on the surface of Mars are widespread and abundant. Several lines of evidence, however, suggest that Mars has been cold with mean global temperatures well below the freezing point of pure water. Martian climate modellers considering a combination of greenhouse gases at a range of partial pressures find it challenging to simulate global mean Martian surface temperatures above 273 K, and local thermal sources cannot account for the widespread distribution of hydrated and evaporitic minerals throughout the Martian landscape. Solutes could depress the melting point of water in a frozen Martian environment, providing a plausible solution to the early Mars climate paradox. Here we model the freezing and evaporation processes of Martian fluids with a composition resulting from the weathering of basalts, as reflected in the chemical compositions at Mars landing sites. Our results show that a significant fraction of weathering fluids loaded with Si, Fe, S, Mg, Ca, Cl, Na, K and Al remain in the liquid state at temperatures well below 273 K. We tested our model by analysing the mineralogies yielded by the evolution of the solutions: the resulting mineral assemblages are analogous to those actually identified on the Martian surface. This stability against freezing of Martian fluids can explain saline liquid water activity on the surface of Mars at mean global temperatures well below 273 K. PMID:19458717

  6. Freeze Prediction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, C. T. (principal investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of wind speed, net irradiation, and of air, soil, and dew point temperatures in an orchard at the Rock Springs Agricultural Research Center, as well as topographical and climatological data and a description of the major apple growing regions of Pennsylvania were supplied to the University of Florida for use in running the P-model, freeze prediction program. Results show that the P-model appears to have considerable applicability to conditions in Pennsylvania. Even though modifications may have to be made for use in the fruit growing regions, there are advantages for fruit growers with the model in its present form.

  7. Molecular biology of freezing tolerance.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B; Storey, Janet M

    2013-07-01

    Winter survival for many kinds of animals involves freeze tolerance, the ability to endure the conversion of about 65% of total body water into extracellular ice and the consequences that freezing imposes including interruption of vital processes (e.g., heartbeat and breathing), cell shrinkage, elevated osmolality, anoxia/ischemia, and potential physical damage from ice. Freeze-tolerant animals include various terrestrially hibernating amphibians and reptiles, many species of insects, and numerous other invertebrates inhabiting both terrestrial and intertidal environments. Well-known strategies of freezing survival include accumulation of low molecular mass carbohydrate cryoprotectants (e.g., glycerol), use of ice nucleating agents/proteins for controlled triggering of ice growth and of antifreeze proteins that inhibit ice recrystallization, and good tolerance of anoxia and dehydration. The present article focuses on more recent advances in our knowledge of the genes and proteins that support freeze tolerance and the metabolic regulatory mechanisms involved. Important roles have been identified for aquaporins and transmembrane channels that move cryoprotectants, heat shock proteins and other chaperones, antioxidant defenses, and metabolic rate depression. Genome and proteome screening has revealed many new potential targets that respond to freezing, in particular implicating cytoskeleton remodeling as a necessary facet of low temperature and/or cell volume adaptation. Key regulatory mechanisms include reversible phosphorylation control of metabolic enzymes and microRNA control of gene transcript expression. These help to remodel metabolism to preserve core functions while suppressing energy expensive metabolic activities such as the cell cycle. All of these advances are providing a much more complete picture of life in the frozen state. PMID:23897687

  8. Equation of state for fluid hydrogen-isotopes H2, D2, and T2 up to their freezing points at 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Kumazawa, Takao

    1983-04-01

    The calculations of the P-V isotherms of fluid hydrogen isotopes H2, D2, and T2 up to their freezing pressures around 55 kbar at 300 K have been performed by using the modified hard-sphere variational perturbation theory with a quantum correction for four kinds of intermolecular potentials. The results by the use of the potentials of Silvera-Goldman and Nellis et al. agreed well with the experimental equation of state. The quantum pressures (?P) were estimated as a function of volume for H2, D2, and T2 at 300 and 200 K, and the dependences of ?P on volume, molecular mass, and temperature were discussed.

  9. Size-dependent freezing of n-alcohols in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwanger, R.; Schumacher, Ch.; Huber, P.; Pelster, R.

    2010-10-01

    We present a study on the phase behavior of several linear n-alcohols (heptanol, nonanol and undecanol) in their bulk state as well as confined in mesoporous silicon. We were able to vary the mean pore radii of the nanochannels from r = 3.5 nm to 7 nm and to determine the respective temperatures of the freezing and melting transitions using infrared and dielectric spectroscopy. The smaller the chain length the lower the freezing point, both in the bulk and in the confined state. Under confinement the freezing temperature decreases by up to 28 K compared to the bulk value. In accordance with the Gibbs-Thompson model the lowering is proportional to the inverse pore radius, ?Tfr ? 1/r. Moreover, the ratio of freezing temperature depression to melting temperature depression is close to the theoretical value of ?Tfr/?Tmelt = 3/2. The spectra also indicate a structural change: while the solid bulk alcohols are a polycrystalline mixture of the orthorhombic ?- and monoclinic ?-form, geometrical confinement forces the alcohol-chains into the more simple orthorhombic structure. In addition, a part of the material does not crystallize. Such an additional amorphous phase seems to be a logical consequence of the size mismatch between molecular crystals and irregular shaped pores.

  10. Freezing cold injury.

    PubMed

    Granberg, P O

    1991-01-01

    The pathogenesis of freezing cold injuries (FCI) is not yet entirely understood. Two possible hypothesis emerge: 1) Injury is a direct result of cryogenic insult to the cells. 2) Injury is secondary to vascular stasis which leads to anoxia. In clinical congelatio ice crystallization takes place in the EC-space. When water is transformed into ice, the osmolality in this compartment will increase leading to a passive diffusion of water from the IC-space. Cell dehydration modifies protein structure, alters membrane lipids and cellular pH leading to destructions incompatible with cell survival. Cold induces vasoconstriction of both arterioles and venules, which enhances peripheral filtration and raises plasma viscosity. The stability of red corpuscle aggregates increases and showers of emboli course microvessels. Finally progressive thrombosis will end up in anoxia. The indirect vascular effect has earlier been interpreted similar to that found in non-freezing injuries. Recent studies have, however, shown, that endothelial cells are very sensitive to freezing. The rheologic part of the pathogenesis therefore also seems to depend on a direct injury to cells. The development of FCI does not always depend on ambient temperature and duration of exposure but more to the heat loss subjected to exposed skin. Wind chill, humidity and wetness are all of significance in this matter. From a clinical point of view FCI are best subdivided into superficial and deep injuries. The superficial frostbite is limited to the skin and nearest subcutaneous tissue. A stringing, pinching pain is often the first symptom. The affected area becomes pale or waxy-white and numb.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1811585

  11. Poromechanics of freezing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussy, Olivier

    2005-08-01

    When subjected to a uniform cooling below the freezing point a water-infiltrated porous material undergoes a cryo-deformation resulting from various combined actions: (i) the difference of density between the liquid water and the ice crystal, which results in the initial build-up of an in-pore pressure at the onset of crystallization; (ii) the interfacial effects arising between the different constituents, which eventually govern the crystallization process in connection with the pore access radius distribution; (iii) the drainage of the liquid water expelled from the freezing sites towards the air voids; (iv) the cryo-suction process, which drives liquid water towards the already frozen pores as the temperature further decreases; (v) the thermomechanical coupling between the solid matrix, the liquid water and the ice crystal. We work out a comprehensive theory able to encompass this whole set of actions. A macroscopic approach first provides the constitutive equations of freezing poroelastic materials, including the interfacial energy effects. This approach reveals the existence of a thermodynamic state function—namely the liquid saturation degree as a function of the temperature only. The macroscopic ice-dependent poroelastic properties are then upscaled from the knowledge of the elastic properties of the solid matrix, of the pore access radius distribution, and of the capillary curve. The theory is finally illustrated by analysing quantitatively the effects of the cooling rate and of the pore radius distribution upon the cryo-deformation of water-infiltrated porous materials. The theory succeeds in accounting for the experimentally observed shrinkage of embedded air voids, while predicting the partial melting of the ice already formed when the cooling suddenly stops.

  12. Fish antifreeze protein and the freezing and recrystallization of ice.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; DeVries, A L; Oolman, L D

    Antifreeze glycopeptide and peptides from the blood of polar fishes prevent the growth of ice crystals in water at temperatures down to approximately 1 degree C below freezing point, but do not appreciably influence the equilibrium freezing point. This freezing point hysteresis must be a disequilibrium effect, or it would violate Gibbs' phase rule, but the separate freezing and melting points are experimentally very definite: ice neither melts nor freezes perceptibly within the 'hysteresis gap', for periods of hours or days. We report here unusual crystal faces on ice crystals grown from solutions of very low concentrations of the anti-freeze glycopeptides and peptides. This is a clue to the mechanism of freezing inhibition, and it may be the basis of a simple, very sensitive test for antifreeze material. Very low concentrations of the antifreeze protein are also remarkably effective in preventing the recrystallization of ice. PMID:6700733

  13. Depression, anxiety and their comorbidity in the Swedish general population: point prevalence and the effect on health-related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Carlbring, Per; Heedman, ?sa; Paxling, Bjrn; Andersson, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Background. Depression and anxiety disorders are major world-wide problems. There are no or few epidemiological studies investigating the prevalence of depression, generalized anxiety disorder and anxiety disorders in general in the Swedish population. Methods. Data were obtained by means of a postal survey administered to 3001 randomly selected adults. After two reminders response rate was 44.3%. Measures of depression and general anxiety were the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Scale (PHQ-9) and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7). The PHQ-9 identified participants who had experienced clinically significant depression (PHQ-9 ? 10), and who had a diagnosis of major depression (defined by using a PHQ-9 scoring algorithm). Clinically significant anxiety was defined as having a GAD-7 score ? 8. To specifically measure generalized anxiety disorder, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-IV (GAD-Q-IV) was used with an established cut-off. Health-related quality of life was measured using the EuroQol (EQ-5D). Experiences of treatments for psychiatric disorders were also assessed. Results. Around 17.2% (95% CI: 15.119.4) of the participants were experiencing clinically significant depression (10.8%; 95% CI: 9.112.5) and clinically significant anxiety (14.7%; 95% CI: 12.716.6). Among participants with either clinically significant depression or anxiety, nearly 50% had comorbid disorders. The point prevalence of major depression was 5.2% (95% CI: 4.06.5), and 8.8% (95% CI: 7.310.4) had GAD. Among those with either of these disorders, 28.2% had comorbid depression and GAD. There were, generally, significant gender differences, with more women having a disorder compared to men. Among those with depression or anxiety, only between half and two thirds had any treatment experience. Comorbidity was associated with higher symptom severity and lower health-related quality of life. Conclusions. Epidemiological data from the Swedish community collected in this study provide point prevalence rates of depression, anxiety disorders and their comorbidity. These conditions were shown in this study to be undertreated and associated with lower quality of life, that need further efforts regarding preventive and treatment interventions. PMID:23862109

  14. Avoid freeze-up of steam traps and their piping

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, W.

    1993-12-01

    This article addresses the problem of keeping steam traps free of ice in cold weather. The topics of the article include piping configurations and trap types that contribute to freezing, freeze damage, obstructions in piping, insulation of lines to retard freezing, common manifolds for heating of condensate, draining of low points, temperature-actuated devices, and water hammer damage.

  15. Drought increases freezing tolerance of both leaves and xylem of Larrea tridentata.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Juliana S; Pockman, William T

    2011-01-01

    Drought and freezing are both known to limit desert plant distributions, but the interaction of these stressors is poorly understood. Drought may increase freezing tolerance in leaves while decreasing it in the xylem, potentially creating a mismatch between water supply and demand. To test this hypothesis, we subjected Larrea tridentata juveniles grown in a greenhouse under well-watered or drought conditions to minimum temperatures ranging from -8 to -24 C. We measured survival, leaf retention, gas exchange, cell death, freezing point depression and leaf-specific xylem hydraulic conductance (k?). Drought-exposed plants exhibited smaller decreases in gas exchange after exposure to -8 C compared to well-watered plants. Drought also conferred a significant positive effect on leaf, xylem and whole-plant function following exposure to -15 C; drought-exposed plants exhibited less cell death, greater leaf retention, higher k? and higher rates of gas exchange than well-watered plants. Both drought-exposed and well-watered plants experienced 100% mortality following exposure to -24 C. By documenting the combined effects of drought and freezing stress, our data provide insight into the mechanisms determining plant survival and performance following freezing and the potential for shifts in L. tridentata abundance and range in the face of changing temperature and precipitation regimes. PMID:20825578

  16. Characterisation of the nanoporous structure of collagen-glycosaminoglycan hydrogels by freezing-out of bulk and bound water.

    PubMed

    Mikhalovska, Lyuba I; Gun'ko, Vlad M; Turov, Vlad V; Zarko, Vlad I; James, Stuart L; Vadgama, Pankaj; Tomlins, Paul E; Mikhalovsky, Sergey Victorovich

    2006-07-01

    The nanoporous structure of collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) hydrogels was studied using 1H NMR spectroscopy and thermally stimulated depolarisation (TSD) current with layer-by-layer freezing-out of bulk and interfacial water. The depression of the freezing point of water is related to the size of the nanopore, to which it is confined. Changes in the Gibbs free energy of the unfrozen interfacial water are related to the amount of bound water in the hydrogel matrix and to the re-arrangement of the 3D network structure of the biopolymer. Analysis of the thermodynamic properties of bulk and interfacial water using the layer-by-layer freezing-out technique combined with NMR and TSDC provides valuable information about the structural features of CG hydrogels that can be used for characterisation of different types of hydrogels and soft tissue scaffolds, artificial skin substitutes and other biomaterials. PMID:16519934

  17. A Low-Cost Point-of-Care Testing System for Psychomotor Symptoms of Depression Affecting Standing Balance: A Preliminary Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arindam; Kumar, Robins; Malhotra, Suruchi; Chugh, Sanjay; Banerjee, Alakananda; Dutta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that major depression is the fourth most significant cause of disability worldwide for people aged 65 and older, where depressed older adults reported decreased independence, poor health, poor quality of life, functional decline, disability, and increased chronic medical problems. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1) to develop a low-cost point-of-care testing system for psychomotor symptoms of depression and (2) to evaluate the system in community dwelling elderly in India. The preliminary results from the cross-sectional study showed a significant negative linear correlation between balance and depression. Here, monitoring quantitative electroencephalography along with the center of pressure for cued response time during functional reach tasks may provide insights into the psychomotor symptoms of depression where average slope of the Theta-Alpha power ratio versus average slope of baseline-normalized response time may be a candidate biomarker, which remains to be evaluated in our future clinical studies. Once validated, the biomarker can be used for monitoring the outcome of a comprehensive therapy program in conjunction with pharmacological interventions. Furthermore, the frequency of falls can be monitored with a mobile phone-based application where the propensity of falls during the periods of psychomotor symptoms of depression can be investigated further. PMID:24205436

  18. The nuclear freeze controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, K.B.; Gray, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear arms control. Topics considered include the background and rationale behind the nuclear freeze proposal, nuclear deterrence, national defense, arms races, arms buildup, warfare, the moral aspects of nuclear deterrence, treaty verification, the federal budget, the economy, a historical perspective on Soviet policy toward the freeze, the other side of the Soviet peace offensive, and making sense of the nuclear freeze debate.

  19. Validity of a portable urine refractometer: the effects of sample freezing.

    PubMed

    Sparks, S Andy; Close, Graeme L

    2013-01-01

    The use of portable urine osmometers is widespread, but no studies have assessed the validity of this measurement technique. Furthermore, it is unclear what effect freezing has on osmolality. One-hundred participants of mean (SD) age 25.1 7.6 years, height 1.77 0.1 m and weight 77.1 10.8 kg provided single urine samples that were analysed using freeze point depression (FPD) and refractometry (RI). Samples were then frozen at -80C (n = 81) and thawed prior to re-analysis. Differences between methods and freezing were determined using Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Relationships between measurements were assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and typical error of estimate (TE). Osmolality was lower (P = 0.001) using RI (634.2 339.8 mOsm kgH2O(-1)) compared with FPD (656.7 334.1 mOsm kgH2O(-1)) but the TE was trivial (0.17). Freezing significantly reduced mean osmolality using FPD (656.7 341.1 to 606.5 333.4 mOsm kgH2O(-1); P < 0.001), but samples were still highly related following freezing (ICC, r = 0.979, P < 0.001, CI = 0.993-0.997; TE = 0.15; and r=0.995, P < 0.001, CI = 0.967-0.986; TE = 0.07 for RI and FPD respectively). Despite mean differences between methods and as a result of freezing, such differences are physiologically trivial. Therefore, the use of RI appears to be a valid measurement tool to determine urine osmolality. PMID:23205563

  20. Major depression

    MedlinePLUS

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Ferri FF. Major depression. In: Ferri FF. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015.

  1. The Freezing Bomb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron "bomb" and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation

  2. 3 CFR - Pay Freeze

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay Freeze Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 21, 2009 Pay Freeze Memorandum for the Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff The United States is in a period of severe economic stress. Too many Americans have...

  3. The Freezing Bomb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron "bomb" and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation…

  4. Freeze drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  5. Freeze drying method

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  6. Study on the Realization of Indium Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiatmo, Januarius V.; Yamazawa, Kazuaki; Satou, Kouichi; Tamba, Jun; Arai, Masaru

    Indium point cells are fabricated using ingots of various forms from a variety of sources (manufacturers). Using these cells, newly built indium point furnaces are evaluated and their reliability is confirmed. The indium point realizations based on the single solid-liquid method (SSL method) and multi solid-liquid method (MSL method) are evaluated. The effect of impurities in the ingots is evaluated from the dependency of the slope of the freezing curve on the change in furnace temperature, the indium point depression based on the impurity analysis, and the cell comparison. The results show equality among the cells. Based on the results obtained, the uncertainty in realizing the indium point using the described indium point cells and indium point furnaces is estimated. The new uncertainty budget introduces uncertainties coming from plateau repeatability and chemical impurity derived by the present work, the values of which are significantly lower than those adopted in the current calibration service.

  7. Surface freezing of n-octane nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Viraj; Pathak, Harshad; Thayer, Mitchell; Singer, Sherwin; Wyslouzil, Barbara

    2013-05-01

    Surface freezing, at temperatures up to a few degrees above the equilibrium melting point, has been observed for intermediate chain length (16? i? 50) n-alkanes [B. M. Ocko, X. Z. Wu, E. B. Sirota, S. K. Sinha, O. Gang and M. Deutsch, Phys. Rev. E, 1997, 55, 3164-3182]. Our recent experimental results suggest that surface freezing is also the first step when highly supercooled nanodroplets of n-octane crystallize. Our data yield surface and bulk nucleation rates on the order of 1015/cm2.s and 1022/cm3.s, respectively. Complementary molecular dynamics simulations also show that the surface of the droplet freezes almost immediately, and freezing of the remainder of the droplet progresses in a layer-by-layer manner.

  8. Freezing and Food Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Frozen Food Safe? Does Freezing Destroy Bacteria & Parasites? Freshness & ... freezer — are they safe? Every year, thousands of callers to the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline aren't sure about the ...

  9. High-freezing-point fuel studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolle, F. F.

    1980-01-01

    Considerable progress in developing the experimental and analytical techniques needed to design airplanes to accommodate fuels with less stringent low temperature specifications is reported. A computer technique for calculating fuel temperature profiles in full tanks was developed. The computer program is being extended to include the case of partially empty tanks. Ultimately, the completed package is to be incorporated into an aircraft fuel tank thermal analyser code to permit the designer to fly various thermal exposure patterns, study fuel temperatures versus time, and determine holdup.

  10. Future freeze forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholic, J. F.; Sutherland, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Real time GOES thermal data acquisition, an energy balance minimum temperature prediction model and a statistical model are incorporated into a minicomputer system. These components make up the operational "Satellite Freeze Forecast System" being used to aid NOAA, NWS forecasters in developing their freeze forecasts. The general concept of the system is presented in this paper. Specific detailed aspects of the system can be found in the reference cited.

  11. Hydrocarbon exclusion from ground water during freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeo, M.A.; Davidson, B. )

    1993-08-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted using a constant-head ground-water flow chamber and natural soil. Initial experiments with chlorides and dye were conducted to test the hydraulic and adsorptive characteristics of the chamber. A constant flow of phenol was then introduced into the chamber and contaminant movement with time was monitored under freezing and nonfreezing conditions. The chamber was located in a controlled-temperature room, and freezing fronts were induced from the soil surface downward using cooled Freon circulated through freezer pads placed on the surface of the soil. The results conclusively demonstrate that phenol is excluded from the freezing front and pushed downward through the system. Extensive exclusion of the chemical occurs even though the freezing point of phenol (43 C) is significantly higher than water. The information gained through this research is applicable in cold regions outside Alaska and the Arctic where ground water systems may undergo periodic freezing, and may also be of extreme importance in artificial-freezing scenarios such as those currently being investigated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a method of contaminant containment.

  12. Two-dimensional freezing criteria for crystallizing colloidal monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ziren; Han Yilong; Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    2010-04-21

    Video microscopy was employed to explore crystallization of colloidal monolayers composed of diameter-tunable microgel spheres. Two-dimensional (2D) colloidal liquids were frozen homogenously into polycrystalline solids, and four 2D criteria for freezing were experimentally tested in thermal systems for the first time: the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, the Loewen-Palberg-Simon dynamical freezing criterion, and two other rules based, respectively, on the split shoulder of the radial distribution function and on the distribution of the shape factor of Voronoi polygons. Importantly, these freezing criteria, usually applied in the context of single crystals, were demonstrated to apply to the formation of polycrystalline solids. At the freezing point, we also observed a peak in the fluctuations of the orientational order parameter and a percolation transition associated with caged particles. Speculation about these percolated clusters of caged particles casts light on solidification mechanisms and dynamic heterogeneity in freezing.

  13. [Depression...but which depression?].

    PubMed

    Marion-Veyron, Rgis; Saraga, Michal; Stiefel, Friedrich

    2015-10-21

    Despite intensive efforts in neurobiology and epidemiology, depression remains a diagnosis with blurred b. We illustrate this point by examining the controversial issue of systematic screening by GPs, which highlights tensions between psychiatry and general medicine. We suggest a broader perspective on depression, taking into account the patient's individuality, as well as potentially pathogenic social determinants. In the era of operational diagnostic criteria, clinical intuition and the wider sociological context of the doctor-patient relationship are relevant. PMID:26672261

  14. Freezing and melting water in lamellar structures.

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, J T; Erramilli, S; Gruner, S M

    1994-01-01

    The manner in which ice forms in lamellar suspensions of dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine, dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine, and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine in water depends strongly on the water fraction. For weight fractions between 15 and 9%, the freezing and melting temperatures are significantly depressed below 0 degree C. The ice exhibits a continuous melting transition spanning as much as 20 degrees C. When the water weight fraction is below 9%, ice never forms at temperatures as low as -40 degrees C. We show that when water contained in a lamellar lipid suspension freezes, the ice is not found between the bilayers; it exists as pools of crystalline ice in equilibrium with the bound water associated with the polar lipid headgroups. We have used this effect, together with the known chemical potential of ice, to measure hydration forces between lipid bilayers. We find exponentially decaying hydration repulsion when the bilayers are less than about 7 A apart. For larger separations, we find significant deviations from single exponential decay. PMID:7948683

  15. Oxime Catalysis by Freezing.

    PubMed

    Agten, Stijn M; Suylen, Dennis P L; Hackeng, Tilman M

    2016-01-20

    Chemical reaction rates are generally decreased at lower temperatures. Here, we report that an oxime ligation reaction in water at neutral pH is accelerated by freezing. The freezing method and its rate effect on oxime ligation are systematically studied on a peptide model system, and applied to a larger chemokine protein, containing a single acetyl butyrate group, which is conjugated to an aminooxy-labeled ligand. Our improved ligation protocol now makes it possible to efficiently introduce oxime-bond coupled ligands into proteins under aqueous conditions at low concentrations and neutral pH. PMID:26649643

  16. Freezing of Lennard-Jones-type fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Chaudhuri, Manis; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2011-02-01

    We put forward an approximate method to locate the fluid-solid (freezing) phase transition in systems of classical particles interacting via a wide range of Lennard-Jones-type potentials. This method is based on the constancy of the properly normalized second derivative of the interaction potential (freezing indicator) along the freezing curve. As demonstrated recently it yields remarkably good agreement with previous numerical simulation studies of the conventional 12-6 Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid [S. A. Khrapak, M. Chaudhuri, G. E. Morfill, Phys. Rev. B 134, 052101 (2010)]. In this paper, we test this approach using a wide range of the LJ-type potentials, including LJ n-6 and exp-6 models, and find that it remains sufficiently accurate and reliable in reproducing the corresponding freezing curves, down to the triple-point temperatures. One of the possible application of the methodestimation of the freezing conditions in complex (dusty) plasmas with "tunable" interactionsis briefly discussed.

  17. Freezing of Lennard-Jones-type fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Chaudhuri, Manis; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2011-02-07

    We put forward an approximate method to locate the fluid-solid (freezing) phase transition in systems of classical particles interacting via a wide range of Lennard-Jones-type potentials. This method is based on the constancy of the properly normalized second derivative of the interaction potential (freezing indicator) along the freezing curve. As demonstrated recently it yields remarkably good agreement with previous numerical simulation studies of the conventional 12-6 Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid [S.A.Khrapak, M.Chaudhuri, G.E.Morfill, Phys. Rev. B 134, 052101 (2010)]. In this paper, we test this approach using a wide range of the LJ-type potentials, including LJ n-6 and exp-6 models, and find that it remains sufficiently accurate and reliable in reproducing the corresponding freezing curves, down to the triple-point temperatures. One of the possible application of the method--estimation of the freezing conditions in complex (dusty) plasmas with ''tunable'' interactions--is briefly discussed.

  18. Freezing and thawing processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonally frozen soil strongly influences runoff and erosion on large areas of land around the world. In many areas, rain or snowmelt on seasonally frozen soil is the single leading cause of severe runoff and erosion events. As soils freeze, ice blocks the soil pores, greatly diminishing the permea...

  19. Modeling soil freezing dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonally frozen soil strongly influences runoff and erosion on large areas of land around the world. In many areas, rain or snowmelt on seasonally frozen soil is the single leading cause of severe runoff and erosion events. As soils freeze, ice blocks the soil pores, greatly diminishing the permea...

  20. The freezing bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Allan

    2010-03-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron 'bomb' and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation suggests a maximum of about 55 MPa (8000 psi) might have been achieved, with some 2.3% of the water frozen into a hollow shell around the interior of the vessel. In a sufficiently strong alloy steel container the pressure might rise to a maximum of 210 MPa (30 460 psi), this limiting figure being due to the collapse of ordinary ice (ice I) to the denser forms ice II or ice III.

  1. Freezing increment in keratophakia.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A; Wisnicki, H J

    In homoplastic keratomileusis, keratophakia, and epikeratophakia, the corneal tissue that provides the final refractive lenticule undergoes a conformational change when frozen. Because corneal tissue is composed primarily of water, an assumed value of 9.08% (approximate volumic percentage expansion of water when frozen) is frequently used for the increase in thickness, or freezing increment, rather than measuring it directly. We evaluated 32 cases of clinical keratophakia and found the increase in thickness to average 37 +/- 21%. In this series of 32 cases, the percentage of patients with a greater than 4 D residual refractive error was 16%. If an assumed freezing increment of 9.08% had been used, the percentage would have been 28%, with two-thirds of these 28% manifesting a marked undercorrection. Because of a lack of studies documenting the behavior of corneal tissue following cryoprotection and freezing, it is suggested that measurements be taken during homoplastic surgery to minimize the potential for significant inaccuracy in obtaining the desired optic result. PMID:3915238

  2. Freezing Behavior of Water in Small Pores and the Possible Role in the Freezing of Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Edward N.; Abeles, Fred B.

    1984-01-01

    Two model systems were used to study the freezing of water in small diameter pores. Water in pores having a diameter of less than 100 nanometers froze at lower temperatures than bulk water. Data obtained with a range of pore sizes were consistent with predicted values based on equations developed by Mazur (1965 Ann NY Acad Sci 125: 658-676), and Homshaw (1980 J Soil Sci 31: 399-414). The addition of solutes lowered the freezing point of water in small pores. We propose that the freezing behavior of water in small pores may account for some of the freezing patterns observed in plant tissues. In tissues where cells are tightly packed, share common walls, and lack intercellular spaces, the presence of water in cell wall microcapillaries would alter the freezing temperature of tissue water, impede the spread of ice, and facilitate supercooling. PMID:16663798

  3. Study on the Realization of Zinc Point and the Zinc-Point Cell Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiatmo, J. V.; Sakai, M.; Satou, K.; Yamazawa, K.; Tamba, J.; Arai, M.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing our study on aluminum, tin, and silver points, a study on the realization of the zinc point was conducted. Zinc-point cells were newly fabricated using 6N-nominal grade zinc samples, impurity elements of which were analyzed extensively based on glow-discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS). The present paper reports the temperature measurements done using the newly fabricated cells during the zinc freezing process, under which the zinc fixed point is defined, and the analysis of the freezing curve obtained. Comparisons of zinc-point temperatures realized by the newly fabricated cells (cell-to-cell comparisons) were also conducted. Zinc-point depression due to impurity elements was calculated based on the sum of individual estimates and the impurity element analysis. One of the cells evaluated was drawn out from its crucible and analyzed by GDMS at four points, namely, at around the center of the top, of the middle, of the bottom, and around the outer part of the middle area. The purpose of this cell disassembly is to see whether or not there has been some difference before and after cell fabrication, as well as difference in impurity element distribution within the ingot. From the aforementioned studies, some findings were obtained. First finding is that the homogeneity of the zinc ingot was within 30%, except for Pb, which was more concentrated in the center part. Second finding is that the cell-to-cell temperature difference changes along with the progressing solidification process. As a consequence, for an accurate cell-to-cell comparison, the locus in the freezing plateau where the comparison is done should be determined. Third finding is that the slope analysis estimates accurately the cell-to-cell comparison, and is consistent with the impurity analysis. This shows that the slope analysis gives extensive information about the effect of impurity to the zinc-point realization, especially after the cell fabrication.

  4. Inactivation of Kudoa septempunctata in olive flounder meat by liquid freezing.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takahiro; Akuzawa, Sayuri; Furusawa, Hiroko; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Kamata, Yoichi; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko

    2014-01-01

    Kudoa septempunctata in olive flounder meat was inactivated using 3 distinct freezing methods:liquid freezing for 5 min, air blast freezing at -30℃ for 5 h, and -80℃ for 1 h. The fracture curve of olive flounder meat subjected to liquid freezing resembled that of meat stored at 4℃, indicating that the structure of olive flounder muscle was well preserved. In contrast, air blast freezing induced the disappearance of the fracture point in the fracture curve, indicating that there was deterioration in the meat quality. Liquid freezing preserved the transparency of olive flounder meat to the same degree as that of meat stored at 4°C. However, air blast freezing induced meat cloudiness. These results indicate that liquid freezing can be used for K. septempunctata inactivation without affecting the meat quality. PMID:25252645

  5. Experimental investigation of molten metal freezing on to a structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mizanur Rahman, M.; Hino, Tomohiko; Morita, Koji; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Kiyoshi; Fukuda, Kenji; Maschek, Werner

    2007-10-15

    During core disruptive accidents (CDAs) of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs), it is important to understand the freezing phenomena of molten metal, which may prevent fuel dispersal and subsequent shutdown. The present paper describes the freezing behavior of molten metal during interaction with a structure with a view to the safety of LMRs. In this study, Wood's metal (melting point 78.8 C) was used as a simulant melt, while stainless steel and copper were used as freezing structures. A series of simulation experiments was conducted to study the freezing behavior of Wood's metal during pouring on to the freezing structures immersed in a coolant. In the experiments, simulant melt was poured into a stainless steel tube and finally ejected into a coolant through a nozzle so as to observe the freezing behavior of the molten metal. The penetration length and width were measured in the air cooled experiments, whereas penetration length and the proportion of adhering frozen metal were measured in water coolant experiment. The melt flow and distribution were observed in both types of experiment using a high-speed video camera. Distinct freezing modes were observed in the water coolant experiments, whereas only one freezing mode with a longer melt penetration was found in air coolant experiments. The present result will be utilized to create a relevant database for the verification of reactor safety analysis codes. (author)

  6. Depression - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  7. Freeze-Tolerant Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Christopher J.; Elkouhk, Nabil

    2004-01-01

    Two condensers designed for use in dissipating heat carried by working fluids feature two-phase, self-adjusting configurations such that their working lengths automatically vary to suit their input power levels and/or heat-sink temperatures. A key advantage of these condensers is that they can function even if the temperatures of their heat sinks fall below the freezing temperatures of their working fluids and the fluids freeze. The condensers can even be restarted from the frozen condition. The top part of the figure depicts the layout of the first condenser. A two-phase (liquid and vapor) condenser/vapor tube is thermally connected to a heat sink typically, a radiatively or convectively cooled metal panel. A single-phase (liquid) condensate-return tube (return artery) is also thermally connected to the heat sink. At intervals along their lengths, the condenser/vapor tube and the return artery are interconnected through porous plugs. This condenser configuration affords tolerance of freezing, variable effective thermal conductance (such that the return temperature remains nearly constant, independently of the ultimate sink temperature), and overall pressure drop smaller than it would be without the porous interconnections. An additional benefit of this configuration is that the condenser can be made to recover from the completely frozen condition either without using heaters, or else with the help of heaters much smaller than would otherwise be needed. The second condenser affords the same advantages and is based on a similar principle, but it has a different configuration that affords improved flow of working fluid, simplified construction, reduced weight, and faster recovery from a frozen condition.

  8. Seasonal accumulation of acetylated triacylglycerols by a freeze-tolerant insect.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katie E; Thomas, Raymond H; Roxin, Aron; Chen, Eric K Y; Brown, Jason C L; Gillies, Elizabeth R; Sinclair, Brent J

    2014-05-01

    Most animals store energy as long-chain triacylglycerols (lcTAGs). Trace amounts of acetylated triacylglycerols (acTAGs) have been reported in animals, but are not accumulated, likely because they have lower energy density than lcTAGs. Here we report that acTAGs comprise 36% of the neutral lipid pool of overwintering prepupae of the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, while only 17% of the neutral lipid pool is made up of typical lcTAGs. These high concentrations of acTAGs, present only during winter, appear to be synthesized by E. solidaginis and are not found in other freeze-tolerant insects, nor in the plant host. The mixture of acTAGs found in E. solidaginis has a significantly lower melting point than equivalent lcTAGs, and thus remains liquid at temperatures at which E. solidaginis is frozen in the field, and depresses the melting point of aqueous solutions in a manner unusual for neutral lipids. We note that accumulation of acTAGs coincides with preparation for overwintering and the seasonal acquisition of freeze tolerance. This is the first observation of accumulation of acTAGs by an animal, and the first evidence of dynamic interconversion between acTAGs and lcTAGs during development and in response to stress. PMID:24790101

  9. H, not O or pressure, causes eutectic T depression in the Fe-FeS System to 8 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buono, Antonio S.; Walker, David

    2015-04-01

    The Fe-FeS system maintains a eutectic temperature of 990 10 C to at least 8 GPa if starting materials and pressure media are rigorously dehydrated. Literature reports of pressure-induced freezing point depression of the eutectic for the Fe-FeS system are not confirmed. Modest addition of oxygen alone is confirmed to cause negligible freezing point depression at 6 GPa. Addition of H alone causes a progressive decrease in the eutectic temperature with P in the Fe-FeS-H system to below 965 C at 6 GPa to below 950 C at 8 GPa. It is our hypothesis that moisture contamination in unrigorously dried experiments may be an H source for freezing point depression. O released from H2O disproportionation reacts with Fe and is sequestered as ferropericlase along the sample capsules walls, leaving the H to escape the system and/or enter the Fe-FeS mixture. The observed occurrence of ferropericlase on undried MgO capsule margins is otherwise difficult to explain, because an alternate source for the oxygen in the ferropericlase layer is difficult to identify. This study questions the use of pressure-depressed Fe-S eutectic temperatures and suggests that the lower eutectic temperatures sometimes reported are achieved by moving into the ternary Fe-S-H system. These results adjust slightly the constraints on eutectic temperatures allowed for partly solidified cores on small planets. H substantially diminishes the temperature extent of the melting interval in Fe-S by reducing the melting points of the crystalline phases more than it depresses the eutectic.

  10. Freezing of Nonwoody Plant Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. S.; Pereira, E. Sa B.; Finkle, Bernard J.

    1974-01-01

    Temperature recordings of the freezing of plant tissues include two plateaus or regions of reduced slope. During the second of these, small positive spikes were observed. When a completely frozen tissue was thawed and refrozen, neither the second plateau nor the spikes were recorded. Both were present, however, if the initial freezing had been terminated before the second plateau had been reached. The spikes appear to represent the release of heat of crystallization during the freezing of individual cells. Such a freezing and thawing cycle destroys the ability of the cells to remain supercooled in the presence of the ice that is formed as the first plateau is recorded. PMID:16658774

  11. [Pathophysiology of depression].

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Akira; Nomura, Soichiro

    2007-09-01

    Neurobiological findings of depression are reviewed in this paper. Modern neurobiological methods have revealed pathophysiological mechanism associated with depression. Monoamine hypothesis, which was advocated in the 1950's, emphasizes that the deficiency of monoamine neurotransmitters bring about depressive symptoms. This theory played an important role in promoting the development of new antidepressants, but some inconsistent findings were pointed out concerning this theory. Neuroendocrine studies have revealed the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunctions in depressive patients, and increased activity of HPA axis are considered as state marker of depression. Morphological changes of hippocampus, polymorphism of serotonin transporter gene, and down regulation of neurotrophin are also discussed in this review. PMID:17876979

  12. Performance Characteristics of an Isothermal Freeze Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, A.E.

    2001-08-22

    This document discusses performance characteristics of an isothermal freeze valve. A freeze valve has been specified for draining the DWPF melter at the end of its lifetime. Two freeze valve designs have been evaluated on the Small Cylindrical Melter-2 (SCM-2). In order to size the DWPF freeze valve, the basic principles governing freeze valve behavior need to be identified and understood.

  13. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises, shall be capable of freezing all liquid egg products in accordance with the freezing...

  14. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises, shall be capable of freezing all liquid egg products in accordance with the freezing...

  15. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises, shall be capable of freezing all liquid egg products in accordance with the freezing...

  16. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises, shall be capable of freezing all liquid egg products in accordance with the freezing...

  17. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises, shall be capable of freezing all liquid egg products in accordance with the freezing...

  18. Effects of Pressure-shift Freezing on the Structural and Physical Properties of Gelatin Hydrogel Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeongsoo; Gil, Hyung Bae; Min, Sang-Gi; Lee, Si-Kyung; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the gelatin concentration (10-40%, w/v), freezing temperatures (from -20? to -50?) and freezing methods on the structural and physical properties of gelatin matrices. To freeze gelatin, the pressure-shift freezing (PSF) is being applied at 0.1 (under atmospheric control), 50 and 100 MPa, respectively. The freezing point of gelatin solutions decrease with increasing gelatin concentrations, from -0.2? (10% gelatin) to -6.7? (40% gelatin), while the extent of supercooling did not show any specific trends. The rheological properties of the gelatin indicate that both the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli were steady in the strain amplitude range of 0.1-10%. To characterize gelatin matrices formed by the various freezing methods, the ice crystal sizes which were being determined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are affected by the gelatin concentrations. The ice crystal sizes are affected by gelatin concentrations and freezing temperature, while the size distributions of ice crystals depend on the freezing methods. Smaller ice crystals are being formed with PSF rather than under the atmospheric control where the freezing temperature is above -40?. Thus, the results of this study indicate that the PSF processing at a very low freezing temperature (-50?) offers a potential advantage over commercial atmospheric freezing points for the formation of small ice crystals. PMID:26760743

  19. Freezing of living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    It can be calculated that a living cell will survive more than 5000 years at -196/sup 0/C. This ability to essentially stop biological time has important implications in medicine and agriculture, and in biological research. In medicine the chief implications are in the banking of transplantable tissues and organs and in in vitro fertilization. In agriculture the applications stem in part from the role of frozen embryos in amplifying the number of calves produced by high quanlity cows. The problem is how can cells survive both the cooling to such very low temperatures and the return to normal temperatures. The answers involve fundamental characteristics of cells such as the permeability of their surface membranes to water and solutes. These characteristics determine whether or not cells undergo lethal internal ice formation and other response during freezing and thawing. 27 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Understanding Slag Freeze Linings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2014-09-01

    Slag freeze linings, the formation of protective deposit layers on the inner walls of furnaces and reactors, are increasingly used in industrial pyrometallurgical processes to ensure that furnace integrity is maintained in these aggressive, high-temperature environments. Most previous studies of freeze-linings have analyzed the formation of slag deposits based solely on heat transfer considerations. These thermal models have assumed that the interface between the stationary frozen layer and the agitated molten bath at steady-state deposit thickness consists of the primary phase, which stays in contact with the bulk liquid at the liquidus temperature. Recent experimental studies, however, have clearly demonstrated that the temperature of the deposit/liquid bath interface can be lower than the liquidus temperature of the bulk liquid. A conceptual framework has been proposed to explain the observations and the factors influencing the microstructure and the temperature of the interface at steady-state conditions. The observations are consistent with a dynamic steady state that is a balance between (I) the rate of nucleation and growth of solids on detached crystals in a subliquidus layer as this fluid material moves toward the stagnant deposit interface and (II) the dissolution of these detached crystals as they are transported away from the interface by turbulent eddies. It is argued that the assumption that the interface temperature is the liquidus of the bulk material represents only a limiting condition, and that the interface temperature can be between T liquidus and T solidus depending on the process conditions and bath chemistry. These findings have implications for the modeling approach and boundary conditions required to accurately describe these systems. They also indicate the opportunity to integrate considerations of heat and mass flows with the selection of melt chemistries in the design of future high temperature industrial reactors.

  1. How low-permeability rocks freeze: A laboratory study on resistivity pathways of thawed, supercooled and frozen permafrost rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, M.; Zisser, N.

    2009-04-01

    Resistivity - temperature paths are among the most important proxies in permafrost research. Testing 8 sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous rocks from European permafrost summits, we found evidence that the theoretical background developed in the 70s does not describe the physics of low-permability rocks correctly, which dominate these environments. Saturated rocks with permeabilities below 10 D have an equilibrium freezing point depression of -0.5C to -1.55C and indicate metastable supercooling effects between -0.5 and -1.4 C. Instantaneous freezing from metastable stages occurs with sudden warming of the rock sample with up to 0.9C temperature difference. This is due to the spontaneous dissipation of freezing energy subsequent to supercooling. Warming occurs over tens of seconds to a few minutes and coincides with a jump in resistivity. Unfrozen and frozen temperature-resistivity paths match bilinear functions with an R of 0.88 to 1.00. The frozen temperature-resistivity gradient is 12-34 times steeper that the unfrozen resistivity gradient. Low permeability may decide the ratio of frozen and unfrozen gradients while porosity influences the 0C resistivity value and the unfrozen gradient. Here we show that separate linear approximation of unfrozen, supercooled and frozen temperature-resistivity behaviour provides a better explanation of involved physics than exponential fits.

  2. The Theory of Ice Nucleation by Heterogeneous Freezing of Deliquescent Mixed CCN. Part I: Critical Radius, Energy, and Nucleation Rate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Vitaly I.; Curry, Judith A.

    2004-11-01

    This paper extends previous work on the theory of heterogenous ice nucleation. The goals of this analysis are to explain empirical observations of ice nucleation and to provide a suitable framework for modeling and parameterizing the ice nucleation process in cloud-scale and large-scale atmospheric models. Considered are the processes of heterogeneous freezing of deliquescent mixed cloud condensation nuclei that may serve as ice nuclei, and the properties of an ice germ critical radius, energy, and nucleation rate of ice crystals are examined as functions of temperature and supersaturation. Expressions for nucleation in a polydisperse aerosol for the deliquescence-freezing mode are developed. Equations are derived for the threshold and critical saturation ratios as functions of temperature and nucleation rate, and for the threshold and critical temperatures as functions of saturation ratio. Equivalence of the new formulation for the freezing point depression with traditional expressions is shown and the concepts of the effective temperature and supercooling are introduced. These new formulations are used in a companion paper for simulations of ice nucleation using a cloud parcel model.


  3. Coil freezing: What a relief!

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes why a coil freezes, what happens during the freezing, and what is required to alleviate the damage. Water and steam have been used to cool and heat air in finned-tube heat exchanger coils almost since the inception of heating and air conditioning. Freezing of the fluid and the resultant coil damage have also been around for the same length of time. It is a systematic problem that many times is preventable, but one knows that this is not a perfect world. Nor are the HVAC and process systems that have been in service for decades. It is fairly simple to understand the basics of a liquid phase freeze. The ambient conditions must be at or below 32 F, and that can, in turn cause the water inside the coil to fall below 32 F as well. If kept below the freezing temperature of fluid long enough, the coil may be damaged by this condition.

  4. Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Postpartum Depression Home For Patients Search FAQs Postpartum Depression Page ... Postpartum Depression FAQ091, December 2013 PDF Format Postpartum Depression Labor, Delivery, and Postpartum Care What are the ...

  5. Combined impacts of freeze-thaw processes on paddy land and dry land in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyang; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Zhao, Xuchen

    2013-07-01

    The quantity of spring snowmelt infiltration and runoff, which affects the hydrology of the freeze zone, depends on the antecedent soil water content (SWC) conditions at the time of the soil's freezing. An understanding of the characteristics of frozen soil is essential for spring sowing in the agricultural freeze zones. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the differences in the freeze-thaw process and the freeze-thaw-induced water redistribution between the paddy and dry lands in a freeze zone. For this purpose, a field study was conducted in the winter of 2011-2012 for two types of farmlands in Northeast China. To illustrate the soil's frost dynamics over time, the measured SWCs at different depths (15, 30, 60, and 90 cm) were transformed into different expressions including the SWC dynamic, the frozen soil's profile, and the freezing and thawing front trace. The freezing characteristics in the paddy land, in contrast to that in the dry land, had a higher freezing point temperature, a larger amount of water movement to the upper layer, and a 2.76 mm larger accumulation of water in the upper layer. However, the increase of SWC (which is equivalent to thawing) was evidently faster than the decrease of SWC (which is equivalent to freezing). The water in the frozen soil's profile was most likely redistributed towards the freezing front before soil temperature (ST) falls below the freezing point. The findings may partially explain the soil's freeze-thaw characteristics for the different stages as well as the combined impact of these characteristics with farmland use types on soil hydrology; the findings may also provide a foundation for forecasting the hydrologic response of the freeze-thaw process and provide guidance for management strategies dealing with seasonally frozen agricultural soils. PMID:23584030

  6. Summer Freezing Resistance: A Critical Filter for Plant Community Assemblies in Mediterranean High Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Pescador, David S.; Sierra-Almeida, Ángela; Torres, Pablo J.; Escudero, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Assessing freezing community response and whether freezing resistance is related to other functional traits is essential for understanding alpine community assemblages, particularly in Mediterranean environments where plants are exposed to freezing temperatures and summer droughts. Thus, we characterized the leaf freezing resistance of 42 plant species in 38 plots at Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain) by measuring their ice nucleation temperature, freezing point (FP), and low-temperature damage (LT50), as well as determining their freezing resistance mechanisms (i.e., tolerance or avoidance). The community response to freezing was estimated for each plot as community weighted means (CWMs) and functional diversity (FD), and we assessed their relative importance with altitude. We established the relationships between freezing resistance, growth forms, and four key plant functional traits (i.e., plant height, specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content (LDMC), and seed mass). There was a wide range of freezing resistance responses and more than in other alpine habitats. At the community level, the CWMs of FP and LT50 responded negatively to altitude, whereas the FD of both traits increased with altitude. The proportion of freezing-tolerant species also increased with altitude. The ranges of FP and LT50 varied among growth forms, and only leaf dry matter content was negatively correlated with freezing-resistance traits. Summer freezing events represent important abiotic filters for assemblies of Mediterranean high mountain communities, as suggested by the CWMs. However, a concomitant summer drought constraint may also explain the high freezing resistance of species that thrive in these areas and the lower FD of freezing resistance traits at lower altitudes. Leaves with high dry matter contents may maintain turgor at lower water potential and enhance drought tolerance in parallel to freezing resistance. This adaptation to drought seems to be a general prerequisite for plants found in xeric mountains. PMID:26941761

  7. Summer Freezing Resistance: A Critical Filter for Plant Community Assemblies in Mediterranean High Mountains.

    PubMed

    Pescador, David S; Sierra-Almeida, Ángela; Torres, Pablo J; Escudero, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Assessing freezing community response and whether freezing resistance is related to other functional traits is essential for understanding alpine community assemblages, particularly in Mediterranean environments where plants are exposed to freezing temperatures and summer droughts. Thus, we characterized the leaf freezing resistance of 42 plant species in 38 plots at Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain) by measuring their ice nucleation temperature, freezing point (FP), and low-temperature damage (LT50), as well as determining their freezing resistance mechanisms (i.e., tolerance or avoidance). The community response to freezing was estimated for each plot as community weighted means (CWMs) and functional diversity (FD), and we assessed their relative importance with altitude. We established the relationships between freezing resistance, growth forms, and four key plant functional traits (i.e., plant height, specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content (LDMC), and seed mass). There was a wide range of freezing resistance responses and more than in other alpine habitats. At the community level, the CWMs of FP and LT50 responded negatively to altitude, whereas the FD of both traits increased with altitude. The proportion of freezing-tolerant species also increased with altitude. The ranges of FP and LT50 varied among growth forms, and only leaf dry matter content was negatively correlated with freezing-resistance traits. Summer freezing events represent important abiotic filters for assemblies of Mediterranean high mountain communities, as suggested by the CWMs. However, a concomitant summer drought constraint may also explain the high freezing resistance of species that thrive in these areas and the lower FD of freezing resistance traits at lower altitudes. Leaves with high dry matter contents may maintain turgor at lower water potential and enhance drought tolerance in parallel to freezing resistance. This adaptation to drought seems to be a general prerequisite for plants found in xeric mountains. PMID:26941761

  8. Biomimetic Materials by Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael M.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2013-06-01

    Natural materials, such as bone and abalone nacre, exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, a product of their intricate microstructural organization. Freeze casting is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and adaptable materials processing method to form porous ceramic scaffolds with controllable microstructural features. After infiltration of a second polymeric phase, hybrid ceramic-polymer composites can be fabricated that closely resemble the architecture and mechanical performance of natural bone and nacre. Inspired by the narwhal tusk, magnetic fields applied during freeze casting can be used to further control architectural alignment, resulting in freeze-cast materials with enhanced mechanical properties.

  9. Benchmarking numerical freeze/thaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhaak, Wolfram; Anbergen, Hauke; Molson, John; Grenier, Christophe; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The modeling of freezing and thawing of water in porous media is of increasing interest, and for which very different application areas exist. For instance, the modeling of permafrost regression with respect to climate change issues is one area, while others include geotechnical applications in tunneling and for borehole heat exchangers which operate at temperatures below the freezing point. The modeling of these processes requires the solution of a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations for flow and heat transport in space and time. Different code implementations have been developed in the past. Analytical solutions exist only for simple cases. Consequently, an interest has arisen in benchmarking different codes with analytical solutions, experiments and purely numerical results, similar to the long-standing DECOVALEX and the more recent "Geothermal Code Comparison" activities. The name for this freezing/ thawing benchmark consortium is INTERFROST. In addition to the well-known so-called Lunardini solution for a 1D case (case T1), two different 2D problems will be presented, one which represents melting of a frozen inclusion (case TH2) and another which represents the growth or thaw of permafrost around a talik (case TH3). These talik regions are important for controlling groundwater movement within a mainly frozen ground. First results of the different benchmark results will be shown and discussed.

  10. Nuclear freeze: myths and realities

    SciTech Connect

    Weinrod, W.B.

    1983-03-03

    A nuclear freeze would create serious problems for US strategic and political interests, and would not achieve the professed goal of a lower probability of nuclear war. It could increase strategic instability and reinforce the morally questionable Mutual Assured Destruction (MAD) approach of using civilian populations as hostages. Compliance would not be verifiable, and Soviet compliance would be doubtful. A review of the strategic and political implications and the basic assumptions of freeze advocates suggests that the movement has proved useful in forcing advocates of other positions to sharpen and refine their arguments. The challenge for freeze opponents is to make it clear to the public that the proposed freeze would benefit the Soviets and to offer viable alternatives for nuclear policy. 15 references.

  11. Role of Heart and its Diseases in the Etiology of Depression According to Avicenna's Point of View and its Comparison with Views of Classic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yousofpour, Mohammad; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Esfahani, Mohammad Mahdi; Shams, Jamal; Tehrani, Hassan Hoshdar; Bahrami, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression is one of the most important medical problems in today's world; despite its high prevalence, its causes unfortunately remain not fully known. Among important issues regarding this is its relation with heart diseases. Based on studies this comorbidity increase morbidity and mortality and leads to worst prognosis. However the cause of such high rate of comorbidity is unclear and instead of efforts to understand this correlation has prompted the medical world to consult other medicinal disciplines, not only to find the answer but also to increase the effectiveness of treatment and decrease its cost. Methods: We first reviewed the most important ancient causes for depression mentioned by Avicenna and considered those as the key words for our next step. Then, we made a literature search (PubMed and Scopus) with those key words to find out new scientific findings in modern medicine about the Avicenna's suggestions. Results: Avicenna does not regard depression as only a mental ailment, but as a disorder resulted by the involvement of brain, heart and blood. He believed that the main causes of depressive events are rooted in heart diseases; in most cases brain is only affected secondary to the heart. Thus he declared that for the treatment of depressive disorders, the underlying cardiovascular diseases should be considered. Conclusions: It is worthwhile to consider the Avicenna's recommended causes of depression and to design future scientific studies based on his suggestions. PMID:26124946

  12. Freeze concentration of fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, S S; Cheryan, M; Sathe, S K; Salunkhe, D K

    1984-01-01

    Concentration of aqueous foods such as fruit juices, milk, beer, wine, coffee, and tea, is a major unit operation in the food industry. Technically feasible processes that are commercially available for the concentration of liquid foods include evaporation, freeze concentration, reverse osmosis, and ultrafiltration. Evaporation is considered to be the most economical and most widely used method of concentration. However, it is not suited for food products with very delicate flavors. Commercial processes for the concentration of such products by membrane separation techniques are not yet available. As compared to the conventional evaporation processes, concentration by freezing is potentially a superior and economic process for aroma-rich liquid foods. In the past, the process, however, was seldom used because of the investment cost and the considerable loss of concentrate in the withdrawn ice, and hence, the quality. Recent technological developments have minimized these two drawbacks associated with the earlier freeze concentration processes. In the coming decade, freeze concentration is seen as a potentially attractive method for the concentration of aroma-rich liquid foods, including fruit juices, coffee, tea, and selected alcoholic beverages. In this article, several aspects of the theoretical considerations behind freeze concentration of fruit juices, the development of new and cheaper designs, and commercially available freeze concentration processes are reviewed. The economics of the process and its application to several other areas of the food industry are also discussed. PMID:6383717

  13. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  14. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  15. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and... products shall be examined by organoleptic examination after freezing to determine their fitness for...

  16. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  17. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  18. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  19. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and... products shall be examined by organoleptic examination after freezing to determine their fitness for...

  20. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and... products shall be examined by organoleptic examination after freezing to determine their fitness for...

  1. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and... products shall be examined by organoleptic examination after freezing to determine their fitness for...

  2. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and... products shall be examined by organoleptic examination after freezing to determine their fitness for...

  3. Sub-ice Stream Till Properties: Changes Induced By Basal Freeze-on and The Influence of Subglacial Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, P.; Tulaczyk, S.

    The physical properties of weak and porous sub-ice stream till are changed character- istically when the thermal regimen changes from melting to freezing. These property changes influence the dynamics of ice streams and may control the location of shear margins and inter-stream ridges. Basal freeze-on can be a trigger of ice stream stop- page or it can occur due to the decrease in basal shear heating that accompanies the stoppage. In a high resolution (ca. 0.01 m) numerical model, we investigate the re- sponse of subglacial sediments to basal freeze-on. In-situ freezing of pore water is prevented in fine-grained sub-ice stream till due to the surface tension (ca. 100 kPa) that are associated with a small characteristic particles size (ca. 10^-6 m). The till be- comes super-cooled, and the response to freezing is a characteristic flow of pore water towards the ice base where clean ice accretes. The basal temperature is depressed by several tens of a degree below the pressure-melting point and discrete lenses of segregation ice develop within the till. Till with a low surface tension (ca. 25 kPa) is associated with development of thin ice lenses (ca. 0.02 m) that are closely spaced (ca. 0.30 m). A higher value of surface tension (ca. 100 kPa) is associated with thicker ice lenses (ca. 0.25 m) with a wider spacing (ca. 0.85 m). Complete freeze-up will eventu- ally create a uniquely layered basal zone consisting of uniform bands of debris-filled ice and clean segregation ice. Basal freeze-on beneath West Antarctic ice streams may increase the shear strength of initially weak and porous till (ca. 2 kPa), not only to a level that prevents fast ice streaming (ca. 13 kPa), but also to level that produces a high degree of consolidation (>100 kPa). Significant property changes take place mainly after ice stream shutdown due to the continuous extraction of pore water. The grain size distribution of the till and the hydrogeological setting control the property changes that succeed shut-down. Despite freezing bed conditions, the bed may remain unfrozen and highly porous (> 30 %) if the sub-till sediment can supply water to the freeze-on process. However, if the till is fine-grained and if the sub-till sediment is im- permeable, pore water may be extracted to a degree that causes significant reduction of porosity (<20 %) and high basal shear strengths (>100 kPa). Our model predictions compare favourably with the thermal setting of the now stagnant Ice Stream C where the freeze-on rate is 4 mm/y.

  4. Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Your Child All About Food Allergies Postpartum Depression KidsHealth > For Parents > Postpartum Depression Print A A ... the cause of your emotional lows. continue Postpartum Depression For some women, the feelings of sadness or ...

  5. Caregiver Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  6. Postpartum depression

    MedlinePLUS

    Depression - postpartum; Postnatal depression; Postpartum psychological reactions ... The exact causes of postpartum depression are unknown. Changes in hormone levels during and after pregnancy may affect a woman’s mood. Many non-hormonal factors may also ...

  7. Hepatitis B vaccine freezing in the Indonesian cold chain: evidence and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Carib M.; Wibisono, Hariadi; Purwanto, Hary; Mansyur, Isa; Moniaga, Vanda; Widjaya, Anton

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To document and characterize freezing temperatures in the Indonesian vaccine cold chain and to evaluate the feasibility of changes designed to reduce the occurrence of freezing. METHODS: Data loggers were used to measure temperatures of shipments of hepatitis B vaccine from manufacturer to point of use. Baseline conditions and three intervention phases were monitored. During each of the intervention phases, vaccines were removed progressively from the standard 2-8 degrees C cold chain. FINDINGS: Freezing temperatures were recorded in 75% of baseline shipments. The highest rates of freezing occurred during transport from province to district, storage in district-level ice-lined refrigerators, and storage in refrigerators in health centres. Interventions reduced freezing, without excessive heat exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Inadvertent freezing of freeze-sensitive vaccines is widespread in Indonesia. Simple strategies exist to reduce freezing - for example, selective transport and storage of vaccines at ambient temperatures. The use of vaccine vial monitors reduces the risk associated with heat-damaged vaccines in these scenarios. Policy changes that allow limited storage of freeze-sensitive vaccines at temperatures >2-8 degrees C would enable flexible vaccine distribution strategies that could reduce vaccine freezing, reduce costs, and increase capacity. PMID:15042231

  8. Novel Real-Time Diagnosis of the Freezing Process Using an Ultrasonic Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yen-Hsiang; Cheng, Chin-Chi; Cheng, Hong-Ping; Lee, Dasheng

    2015-01-01

    The freezing stage governs several critical parameters of the freeze drying process and the quality of the resulting lyophilized products. This paper presents an integrated ultrasonic transducer (UT) in a stainless steel bottle and its application to real-time diagnostics of the water freezing process. The sensor was directly deposited onto the stainless steel bottle using a sol-gel spray technique. It could operate at temperature range from −100 to 400 °C and uses an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The progression of the freezing process, including water-in, freezing point and final phase change of water, were all clearly observed using ultrasound. The ultrasonic signals could indicate the three stages of the freezing process and evaluate the cooling and freezing periods under various processing conditions. The temperature was also adopted for evaluating the cooling and freezing periods. These periods increased with water volume and decreased with shelf temperature (i.e., speed of freezing). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the ultrasonic sensor and technology for diagnosing and optimizing the process of water freezing to save energy. PMID:25946629

  9. Novel real-time diagnosis of the freezing process using an ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yen-Hsiang; Cheng, Chin-Chi; Cheng, Hong-Ping; Lee, Dasheng

    2015-01-01

    The freezing stage governs several critical parameters of the freeze drying process and the quality of the resulting lyophilized products. This paper presents an integrated ultrasonic transducer (UT) in a stainless steel bottle and its application to real-time diagnostics of the water freezing process. The sensor was directly deposited onto the stainless steel bottle using a sol-gel spray technique. It could operate at temperature range from -100 to 400 °C and uses an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The progression of the freezing process, including water-in, freezing point and final phase change of water, were all clearly observed using ultrasound. The ultrasonic signals could indicate the three stages of the freezing process and evaluate the cooling and freezing periods under various processing conditions. The temperature was also adopted for evaluating the cooling and freezing periods. These periods increased with water volume and decreased with shelf temperature (i.e., speed of freezing). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the ultrasonic sensor and technology for diagnosing and optimizing the process of water freezing to save energy. PMID:25946629

  10. Deposition nucleation viewed as homogeneous or immersion freezing in pores and cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important mechanism for the glaciation of mixed phase clouds and may also be relevant for cloud formation and dehydration at the cirrus cloud level. It is thought to proceed through different mechanisms, namely contact, condensation, immersion and deposition nucleation. Supposedly, deposition nucleation is the only pathway which does not involve liquid water but occurs by direct water vapor deposition on a surface. This study challenges this classical view by putting forward the hypothesis that what is called deposition nucleation is in fact homogeneous or immersion nucleation occurring in pores and cavities that may form between aggregated primary particles and fill with water at relative humidity RHw < 100% because of the inverse Kelvin effect. Evidence for this hypothesis of pore condensation and freezing (PCF) originates from a number of only loosely connected scientific areas. The prime example for PCF is ice nucleation in clay minerals and mineral dusts, for which the data base is best. Studies on freezing in confinement carried out on mesoporous silica materials such as SBA-15, SBA-16, MCM-41, zeolites and KIT have shown that homogeneous ice nucleation occurs abruptly at T=230-235 K in pores with diameters (D) of 3.5-4 nm or larger but only gradually at T=210-230 K in pores with D=2.5-3.5 nm. Melting temperatures in pores are depressed by an amount that can be described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation. Water adsorption isotherms of MCM-41 show that pores with D=3.5-4 nm fill with water at RHw = 56-60% in accordance with an inverse Kelvin effect. Water in such pores should freeze homogeneously for T < 235 K even before relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) reaches ice saturation. Ice crystal growth by water vapor deposition from the gas phase is therefore expected to set in as soon as RHw > 100%. Pores with D > 7.5 nm fill with water at RHi > 100% for T < 235 K and are likely to freeze homogeneously as soon as they are filled with water. Water in pores can freeze in immersion mode at T > 235 K if the pore walls contain an active site. Pore analysis of clay minerals shows that kaolinites exhibit pore structures with pore diameters of 20-50 nm. The mesoporosity of illites and montmorillonites is characterized by pores with T = 2-5 nm. The number and size of pores is distinctly increased in acid treated montmorillonites like K10. Many clay minerals and mineral dusts show a strong increase in ice nucleation efficiency when temperature is decreased below 235 K. Such an increase is difficult to explain when ice nucleation is supposed to occur by a deposition mechanism, but evident when assuming freezing in pores, because for homogeneous ice nucleation only small pore volumes are needed, while heterogeneous ice nucleation requires larger pore structures to contain at least one active site for immersion nucleation. Together, these pieces of evidence strongly suggest that ice nucleation within pores should be the prevailing freezing mechanism of clay minerals for RHw below water saturation. Extending the analysis to other types of ice nuclei shows that freezing in pores and cracks is probably the prevailing ice nucleation mechanism for glassy and volcanic ash aerosols at RHw below water saturation. Freezing of water in carbon nanotubes might be of significance for ice nucleation by soot aerosols. No case could be identified that gives clear evidence of ice nucleation by water vapor deposition on a solid surface. Inspection of ice nuclei with a close lattice match to ice, such as silver iodide or SnomaxTM, show that for high ice nucleation efficiency below water saturation the presence of impurities or cracks on the surface may be essential. Soluble impurities promote the formation of a liquid phase below water saturation in patches on the surface or as a complete surface layer that offers an environment for immersion freezing. If porous aerosol particles come in contact with semivolatile vapors, these will condense preferentially in pores before a coating on the surface of the particles is formed. A pore partially filled with condensed species attracts water at lower RHw than an empty pore, but the aqueous solution that forms in the pore will freeze at a higher RHi than pure water. The ice nucleation ability of pores completely filled with condensed organic species might be totally impeded. Pores might also be important for preactivation, the capability of a particle to nucleate ice at lower RHi in subsequent experiments when compared to the first initial ice nucleation event. Preactivation has often been explained by persistence of ice embryos at specific sites like dislocations, steps, kinks or pores. However, it is not clear how such features can preserve an ice embryo at RHi < 100%. Rather, ice embryos could be preserved when embedded in water. To keep liquid water at RHw well below 100%, narrow pores are needed but to avoid a strong melting point depression large pores are favorable. A narrow pore opening and a large inner volume are combined in "ink bottle" pores. Such "ink bottle" pores would be suited to preserve ice at RHi < 100% and can arise e.g. in spaces between aggregated particles.

  11. ANNAGNPS: ACCOUNTING FOR SNOWPACK, SNOWMELT, FREEZING AND THAWING OF SOIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The watershed model, AnnAGNPS (Annualized AGricultural Non-Point Source Pollution model) has been enhanced by incorporating winter climate algorithms that account for frozen soil conditions. The model includes snowpack accumulation and melt, and the freeze/thaw process in the soil. Three major imp...

  12. Membrane Fusion through Point Defects in Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, S. W.; Stewart, T. P.; Boni, L. T.; Yeagle, P. L.

    1981-05-01

    Fusion between bilayers of mixed egg phosphatidylcholine and soybean phosphatidylethanolamine was induced by freezing and thawing. Contact points between bilayers were observed by freeze fracture electron microscopy, and isotropic molecular motional averaging was detected by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance under fusion conditions. A molecular model of point defect structure is proposed as an intermediate stage of fusion.

  13. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Ma?olepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ? liquid and cubic ice ? liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  14. Basic concepts in freezing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    Freezing involves the lowering of temperature and the formation of ice. Most cells have not been found to be sensitive to the former; rather injury is a consequence of the removal of water from the system in the form of ice. Some cells such as boar sperm and those of many tropical crops are susceptible to even short-term lowering of temperature to near O/sup 0/C. This susceptiblity, which is independent of the rate of temperature drop, is defined as chilling injury. Other cells are injured by chilling only if the rate of cooling is high, a phenomenon referred to as thermal shock. This paper discusses the physical-chemical events during freezing and on freezing injury will assume that lowered temperature per se is not injurious.

  15. Freeze-in through portals

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Fernandez-Martínez, Enrique; Zaldívar, Bryan E-mail: enrique.fernandez-martinez@uam.es

    2014-01-01

    The popular freeze-out paradigm for Dark Matter (DM) production, relies on DM-baryon couplings of the order of the weak interactions. However, different search strategies for DM have failed to provide a conclusive evidence of such (non-gravitational) interactions, while greatly reducing the parameter space of many representative models. This motivates the study of alternative mechanisms for DM genesis. In the freeze-in framework, the DM is slowly populated from the thermal bath while never reaching equilibrium. In this work, we analyse in detail the possibility of producing a frozen-in DM via a mediator particle which acts as a portal. We give analytical estimates of different freeze-in regimes and support them with full numerical analyses, taking into account the proper distribution functions of bath particles. Finally, we constrain the parameter space of generic models by requiring agreement with DM relic abundance observations.

  16. A Model for Prediction of Shrinkage Defects in Long and Short Freezing Range Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, A.; Duarte, J. F.; Santos, A. D.; Magalhaes, A. B.; Houbaert, Y.

    2007-05-17

    The aim of the model presented in this paper is to capture the difference in solidification behaviour of long and short freezing materials. The shrinkage defects in short freezing materials tends to be internal, as porosity, while in long freezing materials these defects tend to be external in the form of surface depressions. To achieve this, a pressure drop based 3-D feeding flow model has been developed to evaluate shrinkage defects for casting alloys. A continuum formulation is used to describe the transport of mass, energy and momentum. It is assumed that during solidification the driving force for flow is shrinkage. A Darcy type source term has been included in the momentum equation to account for flow resistance in the mushy zone. A VOF free surface model has been used to describe shrinkage defects, i.e., external surface depressions and internal shrinkage porosities, while ensuring mass conservation. The model is used to calculate the shrinkage in a simple casting. The results shows internal and outside shrinkage defects depending on the freezing range of the metal. Short freezing range results mainly in internal shrinkage whereas the long freezing range results in external shrinkage. The expected shrinkage features are well described by the present model.

  17. Synchrotron X-Ray Visualisation of Ice Formation in Insects during Lethal and Non-Lethal Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Brent J.; Gibbs, Allen G.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Rajamohan, Arun; Roberts, Stephen P.; Socha, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Although the biochemical correlates of freeze tolerance in insects are becoming well-known, the process of ice formation in vivo is subject to speculation. We used synchrotron x-rays to directly visualise real-time ice formation at 3.3 Hz in intact insects. We observed freezing in diapausing 3rd instar larvae of Chymomyza amoena (Diptera: Drosophilidae), which survive freezing if it occurs above −14°C, and non-diapausing 3rd instar larvae of C. amoena and Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae), neither of which survive freezing. Freezing was readily observed in all larvae, and on one occasion the gut was seen to freeze separately from the haemocoel. There were no apparent qualitative differences in ice formation between freeze tolerant and non-freeze tolerant larvae. The time to complete freezing was positively related to temperature of nucleation (supercooling point, SCP), and SCP declined with decreasing body size, although this relationship was less strong in diapausing C. amoena. Nucleation generally occurred at a contact point with the thermocouple or chamber wall in non-diapausing larvae, but at random in diapausing larvae, suggesting that the latter have some control over ice nucleation. There were no apparent differences between freeze tolerant and non-freeze tolerant larvae in tracheal displacement or distension of the body during freezing, although there was markedly more distension in D. melanogaster than in C. amoena regardless of diapause state. We conclude that although control of ice nucleation appears to be important in freeze tolerant individuals, the physical ice formation process itself does not differ among larvae that can and cannot survive freezing. This suggests that a focus on cellular and biochemical mechanisms is appropriate and may reveal the primary adaptations allowing freeze tolerance in insects. PMID:20011523

  18. Ultrasonic Measurements of Unconsolidated Saline Sediments During Freeze/Thaw Cycles: The Seismic Properties of Cryopeg Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Saline permafrost and cryopegs (hypersaline unfrozen layers/zones within permafrost) are widespread in the Arctic coastal area as a result of marine transgression and regression in recent geological history. Owing to the freezing-point depression effect of soluble salts, they contain more unfrozen water than non-saline frozen sediments when subjected to the same permafrost temperatures (e.g., from 0 to -15 °C). Mapping subsurface cryopeg structure remains a challenging geophysical task due to the poor penetration of GPR in highly conductive fluids and related limitations for lower frequency EM techniques. Seismic profiling, particularly surface wave characterization, provides one possible approach to delineate the extent of cryopeg bodies. However, interpretation of such surveys is currently limited by the sparse database of measurements examining the seismic properties of unconsolidated materials saturated with saline fluids at sub-zero temperatures. We present the results of experiments examining seismic velocity in the ultrasonic range for both synthetic and natural permafrost sediments during freeze/thaw cycles; in these experiments, use of a range of brine salinities allows us to evaluate the properties of cryopeg sediments at in-situ conditions, a prerequisite for quantitative interpretation of seismic imaging results. Because of the abundant unfrozen water and less developed inter-granular ice structure, the seismic properties of saline permafrost typically falls between frozen and unfrozen soils. We conducted ultrasonic measurements of a freeze-thaw cycle on 20-30 Ottawa sand (grain size 590-840 μm) as well as natural mineral soils from the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) saturated with brines of different salinities (0-2.5 M NaCl). For each salinity, seismic properties were measured using the ultrasonic (~1 MHz) pulse-transmission method in the temperature range from 20 to -30 °C. Similar to sediments saturated with low salinity fluids, seismic velocities increase significantly upon freezing in brine-saturated samples due to the formation of ice. However, substantial differences were observed: First, the onset of the velocity increase occurred at temperatures significantly below 0 °C (e.g., as low as -11.8 °C for 2.5 M pore-water salinity); Second, instead of having a stepwise velocity increase (temperature derivative of velocity on the order of 1000 m/s/°C) in the immediate neighborhood of the freezing-point as in non-saline samples, velocities in saline samples exhibit a gradual increase (dv/dT as low as ~70 m/s/°C) in temperatures between the freezing-point and the eutectic-point (~-25 °C) of NaCl solutions. Unusual increases in attenuation were also observed in the vicinity of freezing. Our results indicate that saline permafrost and cryopegs have distinct seismic properties when compared with their non-saline counterparts under the same thermal conditions. Moreover, the very low seismic velocities observed in this laboratory study are consistent with the low-velocity zones at Barrow, Alaska that were previously found through field-scale geophysical investigations.

  19. Peripheral tissue freezing in cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Song, W J; Jiji, L M

    1988-04-01

    The recently formulated bioheat equation of Weinbaum and Jiji which accounts for the vascular ultrastructure and blood perfusion was applied to the freezing of peripheral tissue. Using quasi-steady approximation the temperature distribution in the two-phase tissue and the motion of the frozen front were determined. Results are in good agreement with Pennes' bioheat equation. PMID:3371060

  20. Non-freezing cold injury.

    PubMed

    Glennie, J S; Milner, R

    2014-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury can be a diagnostic challenge for clinicians in the United Kingdom Armed Forces. It is associated with operations in adverse climatic conditions, and may result in significant long-term morbidity. In this article we discuss the operational importance of this condition and the current best practice in its management and prevention. PMID:25895405

  1. Waste freezing, remote retrieval technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) scientists have successfully demonstrated a process of freezing soil and buried waste and retrieving it using remotely operated tools. Early results indicate that this cryogenic retrieval process may reduce risk to workers and protect the environment from airborne and liquid contaminants during actual waste cleanup projects.

  2. [Severe depression : psychoanalysis].

    PubMed

    Bouvet de la Maisonneuve, O

    2009-12-01

    The indication for psychoanalysis in severe depression is not clear. And yet, demands for this type of intervention are increasing, despite the absence of any form of consensus on the subject. Freud considered depression as a failure of analytical efforts and, based on this observation, revised his theory, in particular to include the notions of narcissism and the death drive. Many analysts have been reluctant to follow his teachings on this last point and provide depressed patients with analytical-type therapies aimed at restoring narcissism. Melanie Klein pushed Freud's ideas about depression even further and brought such therapies back to the heart of analytical practice. Jacques Lacan took the debate to another level by proposing an overhaul of the principles on which analysis has been based. Today, while following certain precautionary rules, true psychoanalyses can be proposed to patients with severe depression, whether of the bipolar, recurring or even neurotic type that can reach this level of severity. PMID:20141799

  3. Entropy Budgets in Oscillating and Freezing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    An interesting spontaneously oscillating system was demonstrated some decades ago by Welander : an open-topped water tank supplied with a continuous supply of heat is exposed to chilled air. A layer of ice forms, as one might expect. However, the ice retards the loss of heat to the air, and the water temperature rises until eventually the ice melts. The enhanced heat loss allows the system to cool again to the point where ice can form, and the cycle repeats. The oscillating behaviour is counterintuitive (like another freezing phenomenon, the Mpemba effect, wherein a warm liquid will begin freezing before a cool one), but is in full accord with the laws of thermodynamics and can be demonstrated in the laboratory and with numerical models. Oscillations occur in specific regions of parameter space (heating rate, heat transfer coefficients etc) - smooth variation, e.g. of the ice:air heat transfer coefficient yields a smooth variation of entropy production, except for a jump to increased entropy production when oscillations begin. A geophysical system where similar oscillations may occur is the icy Jovian satellite Europa, which appears to have a young crust. More generally, where a system is subject to a varying excitation (such as diurnal or seasonal forcing of the climate of Earth or Mars) the presence of phase changes such as melting of water or the condensation of carbon dioxide as frost have an important impact on the entropy budget of the system.

  4. Freeze-drying today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Leary, J H; Stanford, E A

    1976-10-01

    The freeze-drying process and equipment have been improved over the years; the cycle times have shortened and the dried products have improved as a result. This talk will deal with these improvements and how we have progressed from the early systems to where we are today. Such areas of discussion will include: vacuum pumping systems, how they are sized and designed to meet the needs for general and special applications; heat transfer systems, and their use in maintaining the drying profile; condensing surface design, and what is best for certain types of dryers; controls and instrumentation, and how these have played a big part in the drying process and have made it possible to get repeatability; refrigeration systems, and the part they play in the performance of freeze-drying; and lastly the effect of internal stoppering, bottomless trays, and other items such as these have had on the present state of the art. It goes without saying that there have been many changes and there will continue to be changes and we shall endeavor to look into the future--as to what might well bo some of these changes. Included in the talk will be a number of slides and illustrations to point out the various items as they are discussed. PMID:1030422

  5. Non-Toxic, Low-Freezing, Drop-In Replacement Heat Transfer Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutbirth, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    A non-toxic, non-flammable, low-freezing heat transfer fluid is being developed for drop-in replacement within current and future heat transfer loops currently using water or alcohol-based coolants. Numerous water-soluble compounds were down-selected and screened for toxicological, physical, chemical, compatibility, thermodynamic, and heat transfer properties. Two fluids were developed, one with a freezing point near 0 C, and one with a suppressed freezing point. Both fluids contain an additive package to improve material compatibility and microbial resistance. The optimized sub-zero solution had a freezing point of 30 C, and a freezing volume expansion of 10-percent of water. The toxicity of the solutions was experimentally determined as LD(50) greater than 5g/kg. The solutions were found to produce minimal corrosion with materials identified by NASA as potentially existing in secondary cooling loops. Thermal/hydrodynamic performance exceeded that of glycol-based fluids with comparable freezing points for temperatures Tf greater than 20 C. The additive package was demonstrated as a buffering agent to compensate for CO2 absorption, and to prevent microbial growth. The optimized solutions were determined to have physically/chemically stable shelf lives for freeze/thaw cycles and longterm test loop tests.

  6. Temperature and flow measurements on near-freezing aviation fuels in a wing-tank model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.; Stockemer, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Freezing behavior, pumpability, and temperature profiles for aviation turbine fuels were measured in a 190-liter tank, to simulate internal temperature gradients encountered in commercial airplane wing tanks. Two low-temperature situations were observed. Where the bulk of the fuel is above the specification freezing point, pumpout of the fuel removes all fuel except a layer adhering to the bottom chilled surfaces, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the fuel temperature near these surfaces. Where the bulk of the fuel is at or below the freezing point, pumpout ceases when solids block the pump inlet, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the overall average temperature.

  7. Temperature and flow measurements on near-freezing aviation fuels in a wing-tank model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.; Stockemer, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Freezing behavior, pumpability, and temperature profiles for aviation turbine fuels were measured in a 190-liter tank chilled to simulate internal temperature gradients encountered in commercial airplane wing tanks. When the bulk of the fuel was above the specification freezing point, pumpout of the fuel removed all fuel except a layer adhering to the bottom chilled surfaces, and the unpumpable fraction depended on the fuel temperature near these surfaces. When the bulk of the fuel was at or below the freezing point, pumpout ceased when solids blocked the pump inlet, and the unpumpable fraction depended on the overall average temperature.

  8. Measuring freezing tolerance: Survival and regrowth assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening plants for freezing tolerance under tightly-controlled conditions is an invaluable technique for studying freezing tolerance and selecting for improved winterhardiness. Artificial freezing tests of cereal plants historically have used isolated crown and stem tissue prepared by removing a...

  9. Combined infrared and freeze-drying.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drying of the combined infrared (IR) and freeze-drying of food materials has been shown to be very rapid compared to regular freeze drying (FD). The resulting tissue structure of products processed with sequential infrared and freeze drying (SIRFD) tends to have higher crispness than those proce...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1562 - Freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing. 51.1562 Section 51.1562 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1562 Freezing. Freezing means that the potato is frozen or shows evidence of having been frozen....

  11. 7 CFR 51.1562 - Freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing. 51.1562 Section 51.1562 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1562 Freezing. Freezing means that the potato is...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1562 - Freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing. 51.1562 Section 51.1562 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1562 Freezing. Freezing means that the potato is frozen or shows evidence of having been frozen....

  13. 7 CFR 51.1562 - Freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing. 51.1562 Section 51.1562 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1562 Freezing. Freezing means that the potato is...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1562 - Freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing. 51.1562 Section 51.1562 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1562 Freezing. Freezing means that the potato is...

  15. Thermal analysis on the realization of the tin fixed point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, S. F.

    2013-09-01

    A study on the thermal analysis of a new tin fixed-point open cell within a new three-zone furnace was carried out. The stability at the setting temperatures of liquid-solid coexisting together with some degree Celsius lower and higher than the tin fixed point; and the axial uniformity of furnace while tin is still in solid phase were investigated and analyzed. The impurities effect on the depression in temperature was investigated in terms of ?T (Tobserved-T1/F=0) and the inverse of the melted fraction (1/F) relationship during the melting and the following freezing realizations at various temperature settings of furnace. These thermal analysis results were also compared with those estimated by the CCT-WG1 recommended SIE (sum of individual estimates) method, which leads to a temperature correction along with a corresponding uncertainty through the individual impurity content detected by GDMS (glow discharge mass spectrometry).

  16. Heat pump with freeze-up prevention

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

    1981-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid prevents freeze up of the second heat exchanger by keeping the temperature above the dew point; and, optionally, provides heat for efficient operation.

  17. Crystal structures and freezing of dipolar fluids.

    PubMed

    Groh, B; Dietrich, S

    2001-02-01

    We investigate the crystal structure of classical systems of spherical particles with an embedded point dipole at T=0. The ferroelectric ground state energy is calculated using generalizations of the Ewald summation technique. Due to the reduced symmetry compared to the nonpolar case the crystals are never strictly cubic. For the Stockmayer (i.e., Lennard-Jones plus dipolar) interaction three phases are found upon increasing the dipole moment: hexagonal, body-centered orthorhombic, and body-centered tetragonal. An even richer phase diagram arises for dipolar soft spheres with a purely repulsive inverse power law potential approximately r(-n). A crossover between qualitatively different sequences of phases occurs near the exponent n=12. The results are applicable to electro- and magnetorheological fluids. In addition to the exact ground state analysis we study freezing of the Stockmayer fluid by density-functional theory. PMID:11308482

  18. Freeze chromatography method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.

    1987-04-16

    A freeze chromatography method and apparatus are provided which enable separation of the solutes contained in a sample. The apparatus includes an annular column construction comprising cylindrical inner and outer surfaces defining an annular passage therebetween. One of the surfaces is heated and the other cooled while passing an eluent through the annular passageway so that the eluent in contact with the cooled surface freezes and forms a frozen eluent layer thereon. A mixture of solutes dissolved in eluent is passed through the annular passageway in contact with the frozen layer so that the sample solutes in the mixture will tend to migrate either toward or away the frozen layer. The rate at which the mixture flows through the annular passageway is controlled so that the distribution of the sample solutes approaches that at equilibrium and thus a separation between the sample solutes occurs. 3 figs.

  19. The structure of the cytoplasmic matrix preserved by freeze-drying and freeze-substitution.

    PubMed

    Porter, K R; Anderson, K L

    1982-11-01

    This paper reports a study of the cytoplasmic matrix in whole cultured cells examined by high voltage electron microscopy. In order to acquaint ourselves with the influence of preparation procedures on the morphology depicted, PtK2 cells were prepared for examination by first freezing in propane at -185 degrees C and then drying while maintained at -95 degrees C. Other cells of the same type were first fixed with glutaraldehyde and OsO4 and then frozen dried. Others were prepared by freeze-substitution and eventually dried by the critical-point method from CO2. And finally, some were preserved by conventional techniques of glutaraldehyde and OsO4 followed by dehydration in alcohol and critical-point drying. The observations are presented in stereo images. The morphologies after these various procedures are quite similar. All show the characteristic three-dimensional lattice or meshwork of slender filaments called microtrabeculae. In cells rapidly frozen and then dried from the frozen state, there is less evidence of shrinkage and probable change in the trabecular structure than in cells first fixed with glutaraldehyde and then frozen dried. The differences we relate to the demonstrable failure of glutaraldehyde to penetrate the cell quickly and fix instantly any component that is in active motion. Other differences that can be observed between all four types of preparation are not recognizably striking and are thought to reflect as much as anything morphological diversity in the original cells. In some instances, the amorphous ice of the initial freezing at -185 degrees C was allowed to crystallize at -80 degrees C. The small crystals that form push aside the microtrabeculae and leave obvious imprints on the structure. The essential message from these experiments is that the cytomatrix is structured. PMID:6818029

  20. Freeze Technology for Nuclear Applications - 13590

    SciTech Connect

    Rostmark, Susanne C.; Knutsson, Sven; Lindberg, Maria

    2013-07-01

    Freezing of soil materials is a complicated process of a number of physical processes: - freezing of pore water in a thermal gradient, - cryogenic suction causing water migration and - ice formation expanding pores inducing frost heave. Structural changes due to increase of effective stress during freezing also take place. The over consolidation gives a powerful dewatering/drying effect and the freeze process causes separation of contaminates. Artificial ground freezing (AGF is a well established technique first practiced in south Wales, as early as 1862. AGF is mostly used to stabilize tunnels and excavations. During the last ten years underwater applications of freeze technologies based on the AGF have been explored in Sweden. The technology can, and has been, used in many different steps in a remediation action. Freeze Sampling where undisturbed samples are removed in both soft and hard sediment/sludge, Freeze Dredging; retrieval of sediment with good precision and minimal redistribution, and Freeze Drying; volume reduction of contaminated sludge/sediment. The application of these technologies in a nuclear or radioactive environment provides several advantages. Sampling by freezing gives for example an advantage of an undisturbed sample taken at a specified depth, salvaging objects by freezing or removal of sludges is other applications of this, for the nuclear industry, novel technology. (authors)

  1. Depression - overview

    MedlinePLUS

    Depression may be described as feeling sad, blue, unhappy, miserable, or down in the dumps. Most of ... one time or another for short periods. Clinical depression is a mood disorder in which feelings of ...

  2. Teen Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... something you did wrong Learn more Share Teen Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... get back to being yourself. Regular sadness and depression are not the same Regular sadness Feeling moody, ...

  3. Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may ... treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after ...

  4. Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Postpartum Depression Overview Are mood changes common after childbirth? Yes. After having a baby, many women have mood swings. ... away within 10 days after delivery. What is postpartum depression? Some womens have more severe symptoms of the ...

  5. Improvement of Freezing Quality of Food by Pre-dehydration with Microwave-Vacuum Drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Nurkholis; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    Partial dehydration by microwave vacuum drying has been applied to tuna, oyster and mackerel prior to freezing in order to reduce quality damages due to freezing and thawing. Samples were dehydrated at pressure of 4kPa and temperature lower than 25C. Two cooling conditions were tested in the experiment by using the freezing chamber of temperatures -20C and -80C. The experimental results showed that decreasing the water content in tuna could lower the freezing point temperature and made the freezing time shorter. It was also found that removing some water was effective to reduce the size of ice crystal and the drip loss in mackerel. After thawing, the pre-dehydrated mackerel showed better microstructure than that frozen without pre-treatment. Furthermore, the sensory tests have been done by a group of panelist for the evaluation on aroma, flavor, and general acceptability of mackerels.

  6. Adolescent Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dina M.

    Affective disorder is characterized by maladaptive changes in mood, attitudes, energy level, and physical status. These changes constitute the basic dimensions of depression. Depression results from a combination of genetic and experiential factors. There are sex differences and age differences with regard to depression, and there is a high

  7. Adolescent Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dina M.

    Affective disorder is characterized by maladaptive changes in mood, attitudes, energy level, and physical status. These changes constitute the basic dimensions of depression. Depression results from a combination of genetic and experiential factors. There are sex differences and age differences with regard to depression, and there is a high…

  8. Study on the Impurity Effect in the Realization of Silver Fixed Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, S. F.

    2016-03-01

    The application of a thermal analysis model to estimate the temperature depression from the ideal fixed-point temperature is important, especially when the chemical analysis of the sample in a cell is insufficient or the cell might have been contaminated during fabrication. This study extends previous work, on thermal analysis with the tin point, to an investigation of the impurity dependence of the silver-point temperature. Close agreement was found between the temperature depression (-0.36 mK) inferred from the thermal analysis of the measured fixed-point plateau and the temperature depression (-0.32 mK) inferred using the sum of individual estimates (SIE) method with an impurity analysis based on glow discharge mass spectrometry. Additionally, the results of the thermal analysis manifest no significant dependence on the rate of solidification, and the scatter of observed gradients was within 0.36 mK among five plateaux with different temperature settings of the furnace. Although the results support the application of both the SIE method and thermal analysis for the silver point, further experiments with cell-to-cell comparisons linked to thermal analysis, a study of the thermometer-furnace systematic effects, the oxygen effect, and the locus of the freezing plateau should be investigated to reach a firm conclusion.

  9. Freezing Rate Due to Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, Gabor

    1994-07-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled water is influenced by the nature of the foreign nuclei that serve as the sites for ice embryo formation, and by the stochastic nature of the process of embryo growth to critical size. The relative roles of these two factors have been the subject of some debate, especially as they influence the way nucleation of ice is modeled in clouds. `Freezing rate' is defined as the time-dependent rate at which a population of macroscopically identical samples (e.g., drops in a volume of air) freeze due to the nuclei contained in them. Freezing rate is the combined result of nucleus content and of time dependence. The time-dependent freezing rate model (TDFR) is consistent with available empirical evidence. For droplets cooled at rates of the order of 1C per min, the nucleus content, or nucleus spectrum, predicts the freezing rate with reasonable accuracy. For samples exposed to a fixed temperature, the time dependence of the freezing rate becomes important, but the probability of freezing is not the same for each individual of the sample population. Stochastic models are not supported by the results. Application of the TDFR model and use of measured freezing nucleus data for precipitation provide a basis for the description of ice formation via immersion-freezing nucleation in cloud models. Limitations to full development of these models arise from inadequate knowledge about the freezing nucleus content of cloud water as a function of cloud evolution.

  10. Metabolic activity of permafrost bacteria below the freezing point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkina, E. M.; Friedmann, E. I.; McKay, C. P.; Gilichinsky, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic activity was measured in the laboratory at temperatures between 5 and -20 degrees C on the basis of incorporation of (14)C-labeled acetate into lipids by samples of a natural population of bacteria from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil). Incorporation followed a sigmoidal pattern similar to growth curves. At all temperatures, the log phase was followed, within 200 to 350 days, by a stationary phase, which was monitored until the 550th day of activity. The minimum doubling times ranged from 1 day (5 degrees C) to 20 days (-10 degrees C) to ca. 160 days (-20 degrees C). The curves reached the stationary phase at different levels, depending on the incubation temperature. We suggest that the stationary phase, which is generally considered to be reached when the availability of nutrients becomes limiting, was brought on under our conditions by the formation of diffusion barriers in the thin layers of unfrozen water known to be present in permafrost soils, the thickness of which depends on temperature.

  11. Metabolic activity of permafrost bacteria below the freezing point.

    PubMed

    Rivkina, E M; Friedmann, E I; McKay, C P; Gilichinsky, D A

    2000-08-01

    Metabolic activity was measured in the laboratory at temperatures between 5 and -20 degrees C on the basis of incorporation of (14)C-labeled acetate into lipids by samples of a natural population of bacteria from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil). Incorporation followed a sigmoidal pattern similar to growth curves. At all temperatures, the log phase was followed, within 200 to 350 days, by a stationary phase, which was monitored until the 550th day of activity. The minimum doubling times ranged from 1 day (5 degrees C) to 20 days (-10 degrees C) to ca. 160 days (-20 degrees C). The curves reached the stationary phase at different levels, depending on the incubation temperature. We suggest that the stationary phase, which is generally considered to be reached when the availability of nutrients becomes limiting, was brought on under our conditions by the formation of diffusion barriers in the thin layers of unfrozen water known to be present in permafrost soils, the thickness of which depends on temperature. PMID:10919774

  12. Cavitation in water under tension near the freezing point

    SciTech Connect

    Sosikov, V. A. Utkin, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-05-15

    Experiments are reported on cavitation in water at an initial temperature of 0.7 deg. C under the dynamic tension created when a compression wave interacts with a free liquid surface. It is found that the tensile strength of water increases from 20 to 50 MPa as the strain rate is varied from 1.8 x 10{sup 4} to 5.2 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. It is shown that the phase state of water obtained in experiments is in a double metastable region.

  13. Metabolic Activity of Permafrost Bacteria below the Freezing Point

    PubMed Central

    Rivkina, E. M.; Friedmann, E. I.; McKay, C. P.; Gilichinsky, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic activity was measured in the laboratory at temperatures between 5 and −20°C on the basis of incorporation of 14C-labeled acetate into lipids by samples of a natural population of bacteria from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil). Incorporation followed a sigmoidal pattern similar to growth curves. At all temperatures, the log phase was followed, within 200 to 350 days, by a stationary phase, which was monitored until the 550th day of activity. The minimum doubling times ranged from 1 day (5°C) to 20 days (−10°C) to ca. 160 days (−20°C). The curves reached the stationary phase at different levels, depending on the incubation temperature. We suggest that the stationary phase, which is generally considered to be reached when the availability of nutrients becomes limiting, was brought on under our conditions by the formation of diffusion barriers in the thin layers of unfrozen water known to be present in permafrost soils, the thickness of which depends on temperature. PMID:10919774

  14. Freeze-fracture of biological specimens prior to conductive staining.

    PubMed

    Iida, N

    1984-03-01

    Liver, kidney, spleen and other organs of the rat were fixed with glutaraldehyde, substituted with absolute ethanol or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), freeze-fractured in liquid nitrogen, stained by the rapid tannin-osmium thiocarbohydrazide-osmium (TaOTO) method (staining with each agent for 10 min), critical-point-dried with liquid carbon dioxide, and observed with the scanning electron microscope. The absolute ethanol or DMSO freeze-fracture method provided flat fracture surfaces (without regard to cell boundaries) of the samples and allowed a good visualization of their inner structures. The fracture surfaces were suitably stained by the rapid TaOTO method, and could be scanned with no charging. Neither maked damage nor undesired dislocation of tissue elements was noted on the freeze-fractured and TaOTO-stained surfaces. This procedure, freeze-fracture prior to conductive staining, has an advantage of eliminating the bulk charging effects that tend to occur in specimens fractured after staining. When substituted with 75% DMSO aqueous solution, the samples spontaneously fractured without any need for razor blades. Fracture planes in this spontaneous fracture sometimes ran along the cell boundaries and allowed a clear visualization in the SEM of the enfaced surfaces of closely associated cells such as hepatocytes. PMID:6204620

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of the OCP freezing transition

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, H.E.; Slattery, W.L.; Yang, Juxing

    1992-09-01

    The One Component Plasma (OCP) in three dimensions is a system of classical point charges moving in a fixed uniform neutralizing background. In nature the OCP is a rough approximation of the conditions in a white dwarf star in which one has fully ionized nuclei such as carbon, oxygen, and smaller amounts of heavier elements up to iron all moving in a nearly uniform background provided by relativistically degenerate electrons. The OCP is also a mathematical limiting model for a non-neutral plasma of ions in a Penning trap and cooled to strongly coupled conditions. Similarly, a collection of charge colloidal suspensions in water can exhibit the Coulomb freezing behavior of the OCP. A single dimensionless parameter, {Gamma} is sufficient to describe the system. For very weak coupling, {Gamma} {much_lt} 1, the thermodynamic properties of the OCP are given rigorously by the Debye-Huckel theory. This paper reports on Monte Carlo simulation of the freezing of the OCP from a random start for particle numbers ranging from 500 to 2000. In one case the authors obtained a perfect bcc lattice, but in most cases the final state would be an imperfect crystal or two different microcrystals, fcc and bcc, growing into each other. With a cluster analysis program the authors looked at the formation of nucleating clusters, and followed the actual freezing process. Roughly 80 particles are needed in a cluster before it starts to grow rapidly and freeze.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of the OCP freezing transition

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, H.E. ); Slattery, W.L. ); Yang, J. . Dept. of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology)

    1992-09-01

    The One Component Plasma (OCP) in three dimensions is a system of classical point charges moving in a fixed uniform neutralizing background. In nature the OCP is a rough approximation of the conditions in a white dwarf star in which one has fully ionized nuclei such as carbon, oxygen, and smaller amounts of heavier elements up to iron all moving in a nearly uniform background provided by relativistically degenerate electrons. The OCP is also a mathematical limiting model for a non-neutral plasma of ions in a Penning trap and cooled to strongly coupled conditions. Similarly, a collection of charge colloidal suspensions in water can exhibit the Coulomb freezing behaviour of the OCP. A single dimensionless parameter, [Gamma] is sufficient to describe the system. For very weak coupling, [Gamma][much lt]1, the thermodynamic properties of the OCP are given rigorously by the Debye-Huckel theory. This paper reports on Monte Carlo simulation of the freezing of the OCP from a random start for particle numbers ranging from 500 to 2000. In one case the authors obtained a perfect bcc lattice, but in most cases the final state would be an imperfect crystal or two different microcrystals, fcc and bcc, growing into each other. With a cluster analysis program the authors looked at the formation of nucleating clusters, and followed the actual freezing process. Roughly 80 particles are needed in a cluster before it starts to grow rapidly and freeze.

  17. Transverse freezing of thin liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beerman, Michael

    A pair of coupled non-linear partial differential equations is derived using lubrication theory that govern the morphology of a thin, liquid film of a pure and a binary metal alloy, bounded by the liquid's solid phase and a passive gas phase. The analysis is motivated by the directional freezing of metallic foams, and is a first attempt to model transverse freezing in thin films that form in foam networks, but also applies to thin film layers in general. Both the no-slip crystal-melt and the free melt-gas interfaces are deformable. The governing pair of non-linear differential equations for the most general case incorporate crystal-melt and melt-gas surface tension, latent heat, heat transfer, volume change, molecular interactions, thermocapillary and dilute phase concentration effects. Linear analysis of a uniform film reveals a variety of instabilities. A unique wavenumber is selected at the onset of instability in the case of an applied temperature gradient with vanishing crystal-melt surface tension. This system reproduces the isothermal result for a rigid solid-liquid interface in which a band of wavenumbers is unstable. A new long-wave instability has been identified, for the case with CM surface tension, that is due to the coupling of the interfaces. Numerical solutions of the fully non-linear system provide film evolution and rupture times, and show that, near the critical conditions, rupture can occur by the growth of standing or traveling waves. The numerics also reveals complex non-linear interactions between unstable modes. It is found that for most unstable initial conditions, the crystal-melt interface retreats by melting away from the tip region of the encroaching melt-gas interface due to a rise in heat flux as the film thins near the rupture point.

  18. Predicting Freezing for Some Repulsive Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-18

    We propose a simple method to approximately predict the freezing (fluid-solid) phase transition in systems of particles interacting via purely repulsive potentials. The method is based on the striking universality of the freezing curve for the model Yukawa and inverse-power-law interactions. This method is applied to draw an exemplary phase diagram of complex plasmas. We suggest that it can also be used to locate freezing transition in other substances with similar properties of interaction.

  19. Freezing techniques defeat ground water problems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    The sinking of a new shaft at Walsum Colliery, West Germany, is described. The 640 m of strata above the coal seams were known to be unstable and include the Bunter Sandstone. The shaft is also within 1 km of the River Rhine. Freezing techniques were therefore adopted. Details of the freezing operation are given, including the drilling of the freezing holes and the determination of the size and strength of the ice wall.

  20. Mechanism of freeze-drying drug nanosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Chung, Nae-Oh; Lee, Min Kyung; Lee, Jonghwi

    2012-11-01

    Drug nanoparticles prepared in a liquid medium are commonly freeze-dried for the preparation of an oral dosage in solid dosage form. The freezing rate is known to be a critical parameter for redispersible nanoformulations. However, there has been controversy as to whether a fast or slow freezing rate prevents irreversible aggregation. A systematic investigation is presented herein regarding the effect of both the molecular weight of the cryoprotectant and the freezing rate in order to elucidate the mechanism underlying irreversible aggregation. It was found that irreversible aggregation occurred during drying rather than freezing, although a proper freezing rate is critical. A more homogeneous distribution of the cryoprotectant and drug nanoparticles led to more redispersible powders. Thus, keeping the local concentration distribution of the nanoparticles and cryoprotectant fixed during the freezing step plays a critical role in how the freezing rate affects the redispersibility. The kinetic approach of excluding the tendency of ice crystal growth permitted an explanation of the controversial results. This study will facilitate an in-depth understanding of the aggregation process of nanoparticles or proteins during freeze-drying. PMID:22877696

  1. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  2. Additional weight load increases freezing of gait episodes in Parkinson's disease; an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Mensink, Senja H G; Nonnekes, Jorik; van Bon, Geert; Snijders, Anke H; Duysens, Jacques; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Oude Nijhuis, Lars B

    2014-05-01

    Freezing of gait is an episodic gait disorder,characterized by the inability to generate effective forward stepping movements. The pathophysiology underlying freezing of gait remains insufficiently understood, and this hampers the development of better treatment strategies.Preliminary evidence suggests that impaired force control during walking may contribute to freezing episodes, with difficulty to unload the swing leg and initiate the swing phase. Here, we used external loading to manipulate force control and to investigate its influence on freezing of gait.Twelve Parkinson's disease patients with freezing of gait performed three contrasting tasks: (1) loaded gait while wearing a belt fortified with lead weights; (2) weight supported gait using a parachute harness connected to a rigid metal cable running above the gait trajectory; and (3)normal gait. Gait tasks were used to provoke freezing episodes, including rapid 360 turns. Freezing episodes were quantified using blinded, videotaped clinical assessment. Furthermore, ground reaction forces and body kinematics were recorded. Loading significantly increased the mean number of freezing episodes per trial compared to the normal gait condition (P<0.05), but the effect of weight support was not consistent. Loading particularly increased the number of freezing episodes during rapid short steps. Step length was significantly smaller during loaded gait compared to normal gait (P<0.05), but changes in anticipatory postural adjustments were not different.Our results may point to impaired force control playing a key role in freezing of gait. Future studies should further investigate the mechanism, i.e., the contribution of deficient load feedback, and evaluate which forms of weight support might offer treatment opportunities. PMID:24658705

  3. Urban Modification of Freezing-Rain Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changnon, Stanley A.

    2003-06-01

    A new national database for freezing-rain occurrences during the 1945-2000 period provided an opportunity for a study of the potential urban effects on freezing-rain events. Numerous past studies of snowfall events in urban areas have defined decreases of 10%-35% related to the urban heat island. The heat island, which acts to elevate near-surface temperatures, could also keep some freezing-rain situations from occurring in the city. The study involved four cities in the Midwest and Northeast for which the average annual number of days with freezing rain are three or more, for which data from in-city stations existed, and for which data for several surrounding rural stations existed. The two largest qualifying cities, New York City, New York, and Chicago, Illinois, had sizable reductions in average and maximum annual freezing-rain-day frequencies, ranging from 16% to 43% less than values of surrounding rural stations, and their freezing-rain `seasons' were 1-2 months shorter than those in surrounding rural areas. The ocean/lake influences at both cities, along with the heat island, also helped to reduce the local incidence of freezing-rain events. Two qualifying smaller urban areas, Washington, District of Columbia, and St. Louis, Missouri, had reductions in freezing-rain-day occurrences but had no shifts in the length of their freezing-rain seasons. Results suggest that freezing-rain occurrences in large cities are decreased between 10% and 30% by the heat island, which acts to keep rain from freezing to urban surfaces.

  4. 47 CFR 64.1190 - Preferred carrier freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preferred carrier freezes. 64.1190 Section 64....1190 Preferred carrier freezes. (a) A preferred carrier freeze (or freeze) prevents a change in a subscriber's preferred carrier selection unless the subscriber gives the carrier from whom the freeze...

  5. 47 CFR 64.1190 - Preferred carrier freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Preferred carrier freezes. 64.1190 Section 64....1190 Preferred carrier freezes. (a) A preferred carrier freeze (or freeze) prevents a change in a subscriber's preferred carrier selection unless the subscriber gives the carrier from whom the freeze...

  6. Mechanisms of deterioration of nutrients. [of freeze dried foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Flink, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Methods which produce freeze dried foods of improved quality were examined with emphasis on storage stability. Specific topics discussed include: microstructure of freeze dried systems, investigation of structural changes in freeze dried systems, artificial food matrices, osmotic preconcentration to yield improved quality freeze dried fruits, and storage stability of osmotically preconcentrated freeze dried fruits.

  7. Geriatric Depression in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mijung; Untzer, Jrgen

    2011-01-01

    Primary care settings present important opportunities for the detection and management of depression in older adults. As many as 10 % of older adults presenting in primary care have clinically significant depression, but only about half are recognized and only one in five depressed older adults receive effective treatment in primary care. We review common barriers to effective treatment such as atypical clinical presentations and comorbid medical conditions that are common in older adults. We identify treatment strategies such as measurement-based stepped care and collaborative care that can substantially improve the effectiveness of treatment in this setting and we highlight opportunities for addressing health disparities in geriatric depression care. We also point out the importance of engaging and supporting family caregivers of depressed older adults. We conclude by identifying three strategic areas to improve the treatment of geriatric depression in primary care: activation and engagement of patients and family members, health care provider training, and broader system changes. PMID:21536169

  8. Depression among Asian Americans: Review and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kalibatseva, Zornitsa; Leong, Frederick T. L.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a review of the prevalence and manifestation of depression among Asian Americans and discusses some of the existing issues in the assessment and diagnosis of depression among Asian Americans. The authors point out the diversity and increasing numbers of Asian Americans and the need to provide better mental health services for this population. While the prevalence of depression among Asian Americans is lower than that among other ethnic/racial groups, Asian Americans receive treatment for depression less often and its quality is less adequate. In addition, the previous belief that Asians somatize depression may become obsolete as more evidence appears to support that Westerners may “psychologize” depression. The cultural validity of the current DSM-IV conceptualization of depression is questioned. In the course of the review, the theme of complexity emerges: the heterogeneity of ethnic Asian American groups, the multidimensionality of depression, and the intersectionality of multiple factors among depressed Asian Americans. PMID:21961060

  9. HOST CADAVERS PROTECT ENTOMOPATHOGENIC NEMATODES DURING FREEZING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four species of insect-killing nematodes were exposed to freezing temperatures while inside their hosts. Survival was assessed by observing live and dead nematodes inside cadavers and by counting the infective juveniles (IJs) tht emerged after freezing. We 1) measured the effects of 24 hours of fr...

  10. A Simple Method for Quick-Freezing

    PubMed Central

    BEARER, ELAINE L.; ORCI, LELIO

    2015-01-01

    In conventional freeze-fracture replicas produced from tissue cryoprotected with glycerol, the hydrophobic inner surfaces of membranes are revealed, but hydrophillic structures are obscured in the surrounding ice. Quick-freezing of tissue obviates the need for glycerol, which prevents the removal of this ice by etching or freeze-drying, but the major problem in freezing without glycerol cryoprotection is ice crystal formation. We describe here a simple method for quick-freezing tissue, in the absence of glycerol, on a nitrogen-cooled copper block with a hand-held specimen holder. This method freezes samples well enough to preserve molecular detail that can be revealed by subsequent etching. We show some examples of the quality of this freezing with respect to the visualization of molecular detail in isolated protein molecules such as ferritin and catalase. Furthermore, we show examples of in situ cellular structures that are revealed by this method, and we compare the structure seen in these replicas with structures preserved by quick-freezing at liquid helium temperatures. PMID:26549928

  11. Inherent freeze protection for solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Jeter, S.M.; Leonaitis, L.L.; Leonaitis, L.L.

    1981-05-01

    Research and development of a method for protection of a solar collector from freezing is described. The method is shown to be technically and economically feasible. A prototype water heating system using the inherent freeze protection method was successfully operated during the winter of 1980 to 1981.

  12. Improving Forecasts of Freezing Rain at ECMWF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsonevsky, Ivan; Forbes, Richard; Hewson, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Freezing rain events, though relatively rare, can be extremely debilitating and dangerous for society, with recovery times of order months or even years. Analysis of forecasts of past events by the operational ECMWF Integrated Forecast System (IFS) showed a strong tendency to incorrectly represent freezing rain as snow. Investigations highlighted that this was primarily because the re-freezing process in IFS, following hydrometeors as they descend, was parametrised with the same time-scale as the melting process. In reality the time-scale for re-freezing should, in general, be much longer. The model physics were changed accordingly, and the results in terms of forecast quality were positive and very striking. Coupled with these physics changes new IFS output was developed for users which shows precipitation type at the surface (rain, snow, wet snow, sleet, freezing rain, ice pellets). The changes to the physics will be described in detail, and their impact will be illustrated by comparing forecast output for past events in new and old model versions, in terms of precipitation type and intensity. Illustrations will include short-range deterministic forecasts from 'HRES' (the high resolution ECMWF model), and longer range probabilistic forecasts of freezing rain occurrence from the ensemble. There will also be reference to issues requiring further work/investigation, such as high level convection in potential freezing rain cases, freezing drizzle generated in supercooled shallow clouds, and IFS retention of the 'warm nose' in which melting occurs.

  13. Bioinspired Design: Magnetic Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael Martin

    Nature is the ultimate experimental scientist, having billions of years of evolution to design, test, and adapt a variety of multifunctional systems for a plethora of diverse applications. Next-generation materials that draw inspiration from the structure-property-function relationships of natural biological materials have led to many high-performance structural materials with hybrid, hierarchical architectures that fit form to function. In this dissertation, a novel materials processing method, magnetic freeze casting, is introduced to develop porous scaffolds and hybrid composites with micro-architectures that emulate bone, abalone nacre, and other hard biological materials. This method uses ice as a template to form ceramic-based materials with continuously, interconnected microstructures and magnetic fields to control the alignment of these structures in multiple directions. The resulting materials have anisotropic properties with enhanced mechanical performance that have potential applications as bone implants or lightweight structural composites, among others.

  14. Freezing out early dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielefeld, Jannis; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Caldwell, Robert R.; Dor, Olivier

    2013-11-01

    A phenomenological model of dark energy that tracks the baryonic and cold dark matter at early times but resembles a cosmological constant at late times is explored. In the transition between these two regimes, the dark energy density drops rapidly as if it were a relic species that freezes out, during which time the equation of state peaks at +1. Such an adjustment in the dark energy density, as it shifts from scaling to potential domination, could be the signature of a trigger mechanism that helps explain the late-time cosmic acceleration. We show that the non-negligible dark energy density at early times, and the subsequent peak in the equation of state at the transition, leave an imprint on the cosmic microwave background anisotropy pattern and the rate of growth of large scale structure. The model introduces two new parameters, consisting of the present-day equation of state and the redshift of the freeze-out transition. A Monte Carlo Markov chain analysis of a ten-dimensional parameter space is performed to compare the model with pre-Planck cosmic microwave background, large scale structure and supernova data and measurements of the Hubble constant. We find that the transition described by this model could have taken place as late as a redshift z250. We explore the capability of future cosmic microwave background and weak lensing experiments to put tighter constraints on this model. The viability of this model may suggest new directions in dark-energy model building that address the coincidence problem.

  15. Analysis of freezing in an eccentric annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Faghri, A.

    1996-12-31

    Thermal energy storage systems are very important in the harnessing of periodical energy sources, such as solar energy. The phase change thermal energy storage system is the most promising since it can store and release a large amount of heat energy during the melting and freezing process. Freezing in an eccentric annulus is investigated numerically by using a temperature transforming model. Since the effect of the heat conduction along the circular direction on the growth of the freezing layer is very small, an analytical solution by employing integral approximate method is proposed. The freezing rate obtained by the analytical solution agreed very well with that of the numerical solution, although the analytical solution is much simpler than the numerical solution. The effects of the eccentric annulus geometric structure on the freezing process is also investigated.

  16. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  17. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Miquel; Martn, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimers disease and related conditions like Parkinsons disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  18. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Miquel; Martn, Nuria

    2015-08-16

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer's disease and related conditions like Parkinson's disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  19. Influence of formulation pH and suspension state on freezing-induced agglomeration of aluminum adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Salnikova, Maya S; Davis, Harrison; Mensch, Christopher; Celano, Lauren; Thiriot, David S

    2012-03-01

    Freezing and thawing of vaccines containing aluminum adjuvants can lead to formation of aggregates and loss in vaccine potency. We sought to understand whether and to what extent the freeze-thaw damage to aluminum adjuvants would differ based on suspension state (flocculation and settlement) at the time of freezing. As flocculation and settlement characteristics of aluminum adjuvants are driven largely by the electrostatic charges on the adjuvant particles, which, in turn, are strongly influenced by the pH of the suspension, we conducted freeze-thaw studies on both Adjuphos and Alhydrogel samples at three pH levels (4, 6.5, and 7.2) in buffer solutions with 9% sucrose. Significantly less aggregation occurred in the buffered sucrose solutions at the pH furthest from the aluminum adjuvant point of zero charge during slow freezing at -20C. The freezing-induced aggregation for the samples with 9% sucrose at each pH was minimal during fast freezing at -70C and -115C. Suspensions that were flocculated and settled to a greater extent experienced the most freeze-thaw aggregation, whereas suspensions that were frozen before significant flocculation and settlement occurred showed little or no aggregation. Because pH of formulation can affect flocculation and settling time, it indirectly affects the extent of freeze-thaw aggregation. PMID:22113733

  20. Freeze-drying for morphological control of high performance semi-interpenetrating polymer networks. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiung, H. J.; Hansen, M. G.; Pater, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using a freeze-drying (solvent removal by sublimation) approach for controlling the morphology of a high-performance semi-IPN is assessed. A high-performance thermoplastic polyimide and commercially available 4,4'-bismaleimide diphenylenemethane were dissolved in a solvent, 1,3,5-trioxane. The solvent was removed from the constituents by freeze-drying. For purposes of comparison, the constituents were dissolved in a high-boiling-point solvent, N,N-dimethylformamide. The solvent was removed from the solution by evaporation. The physical and mechanical properties and phase morphology of the neat resins and composites prepared by freeze-drying and traditional solution methods are presented and compared. It is concluded that the TG is higher and that the magnitude of minor constituent separation is less in the freeze-dry processed materials than for the processed solution.

  1. Microphysical Modelling of the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter. 3; Impact of Homogeneous Freezing on PSCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.

    2003-01-01

    Simulations of the 1999-2000 winter have tested the effect on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) of the homogeneous freezing of liquid ternary solutions into nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD). Proposed laboratory-derived volume-based and surface-based homogeneous freezing rates have both been examined, including different assumptions about the extrapolation of laboratory measurements to atmospheric conditions. Widespread PSC formation and denitrification are possible in several of the scenarios examined. However, the simulations are all unable to explain the solid-phase PSCs observed early in the 1999-2000 winter, and are unable to reproduce the measured extent of vortex denitrification. These problems can both be attributed to the relatively cold temperatures, more than 5 K below the NAT condensation point, necessary for effective homogeneous freezing. Therefore synoptic-scale homogeneous freezing appears unlikely to be the primary mechanism responsible for solid-phase PSC formation.

  2. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of metals by freeze-thaw cycles.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2014-01-21

    The potential of freeze-thaw cycles to release colloids and colloid-associated contaminants into water is unknown. We examined the effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the mobilization of cesium and strontium in association with colloids in intact cores of a fractured soil, where preferential flow paths are prevalent. Two intact cores were contaminated with cesium and strontium. To mobilize colloids and metal cations sequestered in the soil cores, each core was subjected to 10 intermittent wetting events separated by 66 h pauses. During the first five pauses, the cores were dried at room temperature, and during last five pauses, the cores were subjected to 42 h of freezing followed by 24 h of thawing. In comparison to drying, freeze-thaw cycles created additional preferential flow paths through which colloids, cesium, and strontium were mobilized. The wetting events following freeze-thaw intervals mobilized about twice as many colloids as wetting events following drying at room temperature. Successive wetting events following 66 h of drying mobilized similar amounts of colloids; in contrast, successive wetting events after 66 h of freeze-thaw intervals mobilized greater amounts of colloids than the previous one. Drying and freeze-thaw treatments, respectively, increased and decreased the dissolved cesium and strontium, but both treatments increased the colloidal cesium and strontium. Overall, the freeze-thaw cycles increased the mobilization of metal contaminants primarily in association with colloids through preferential flow paths. These findings suggest that the mobilization of colloid and colloid-associated contaminants could increase when temperature variations occur around the freezing point of water. Thus, climate extremes have the potential to mobilize contaminants that have been sequestered in the vadose zone for decades. PMID:24377325

  3. Understanding Depression (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Your Child All About Food Allergies Understanding Depression KidsHealth > For Parents > Understanding Depression Print A A ... or a child you know, seems depressed. About Depression Depression isn't just bad moods and occasional ...

  4. Depression in the Workplace

    MedlinePLUS

    ... You are here Home » Depression In The Workplace Depression In The Workplace Clinical depression has become one ... will die by suicide vi . Employees' Attitudes Towards Depression Often times a depressed employee will not seek ...

  5. Exploring the Nature of Contact Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A. A.; Hoffmann, N.; Duft, D.; Leisner, T.

    2012-12-01

    The freezing of supercooled water droplets upon contact with aerosol particles (contact nucleation of ice) is the least understood mechanism of ice formation in atmospheric clouds. Although experimental evidences suggest that some aerosols can be better IN in the contact than in the immersion mode (that is, triggering ice nucleation at higher temperature), no final explanation of this phenomena currently exists. On the other hand, the contact freezing is believed to be responsible for the enhanced rate of secondary ice formation occasionally observed in LIDAR measurements in the cold mixed phase clouds. Recently we have been able to show that the freezing of supercooled droplets electrodynamically levitated in the laminar flow containing mineral dust particles (kaolinite) is a process solely governed by a rate of collisions between the supercooled droplet and the aerosol particles. We have shown that the probability of droplet freezing on a single contact with aerosol particle may differ over an order of magnitude for kaolinite particles having different genesis and morphology. In this presentation we extend the study of contact nucleation of ice and compare the IN efficiency measured for DMA-selected kaolinite, illite and hematite particles. We show that the freezing probability increases towards unity as the temperature decreases and discuss the functional form of this temperature dependence. We explore the size dependence of the contact freezing probability and show that it scales with the surface area of the particles, thus resembling the immersion freezing behavior. However, for all minerals investigated so far, the contact freezing has been shown to dominate over immersion freezing on the short experimental time scales. Finally, based on the combined ESEM and electron microprobe analysis, we discuss the significance of particle morphology and variability of chemical composition on its IN efficiency in contact mode.

  6. Kinetics of osmotic water flow across cell membranes in non-ideal solutions during freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lindong; Li, Weizhong; Zuo, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Cryopreservation requires quantitatively analytical models to simulate the biophysical responses of biomaterials during cryopreservation. The Mazur model and other improved ones, such as Karlsson model concerning solutions containing cryoprotectants (CPA), are somehow precluded by some minor points, particularly, the assumption of ideal solutions. To avoid the ideal solution assumption, in this study a new method is developed to simulate water transport across cell membranes in non-ideal solutions during cooling and thawing. The comparison between osmolalities calculated by the linear freezing-point depression used in this new method and other non-ideal ones is conducted and a good agreement is achieved. In addition, in an ideal case, besides a theoretical agreement, this new approach has been validated by its numerical simulation results. Comparisons between this new approach and the traditional ones with an ideal solution assumption have been conducted based on a spherical hypothetical cell. The main results are (1) the predicted non-ideal intracellular water content is larger than the ideal results; (2) the concentration of CPA solutions is directly proportional to the deviation between the non-ideal and ideal curves. In the end, this study presents a direct description of the degree of subcooling of the protoplasm during dynamic cooling. This study demonstrates that our experimental data-based method is a valid one with clear physical interpretations, convenient expressions and a more extensive application room than traditional ones. PMID:20654609

  7. A Phase-Field Solidification Model of Almost Pure ITS-90 Fixed Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Large, M. J.; Pearce, J. V.

    2014-07-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric phase-field model of thermo-solutal solidification in freezing-point cells used for calibrating standard platinum resistance thermometers for realization and dissemination of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 is presented. The cell is essentially a graphite crucible containing an ingot of very pure metal (of order 99.9999 %). A graphite tube is inserted along the axis of the ingot to enable immersion of the thermometer in the metal. In this study, the metal is tin (freezing temperature of ). During the freezing of these cells, a steady, reproducible temperature is realized, with a defined temperature that can be used to calibrate thermometers with uncertainties mK. The model is applied to understand the effect of experimental parameters, such as initiation technique and furnace homogeneity, on the measured freezing curve. Results show that freezing curves whose behavior is consistent with the Scheil theory of solidification can be obtained with a specific furnace temperature profile, and provided that the freeze is of a long duration, the results are consistent with previous one-dimensional models and experiments. Morphological instability is observed with the inner interface initiation technique, causing the interface to adopt a cellular structure. This elevates the measured temperature, in accordance with the Gibbs-Thomson effect. In addition, the influence of initiation techniques on the solidification behavior is examined. The model indicates that an initially smooth inner mantle can `de-wet' from the thermometer well-forming agglomerated solid droplets, following recalescence, under certain conditions. This manifests as a measured temperature depression due to the Gibbs-Thomson effect, with a magnitude of to in simulations. The temperature rises to that of the stable outer mantle as freezing progresses and the droplets re-melt. It is demonstrated that the effect occurs below a critical mantle thickness. A physical explanation for the origin of the effect is offered showing that it is consistent with solid-state de-wetting phenomena. Consideration is also given to the limitations of the current model configuration.

  8. Immersion freezing of different kinds of combustion ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Grawe, Sarah; Hellner, Lisa; Wex, Heike; Pettersson, Jan B. C.; Stratmann, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Ice particles in the atmosphere influence both, weather and climate. Therefore it is important to know which kind of particles can act as ice nucleating particles (INP) under atmospheric conditions. In the last years, a lot of effort has been made to investigate the freezing abilities of natural INPs such as dusts and biological particles (Murray et al., 2012, Hoose and Möhler, 2012). However, there are only a few investigations concerning the ice nucleation ability of combustion ashes, which are the remains of fossil fuel and wood combustion and thus a possible source for anthropogenic INPs. Ash particles have similar compositions as mineral dust particles. However, the actual contribution of combustion ash particles to the atmospheric ice nucleation is rather unclear. A recent study by Umo et al. (2014) showed that combustion ashes could have a significant impact on the ice nucleation in clouds and thus should be the focus of further research. Ash particles can be lifted to the atmosphere by wind (bottom ashes) or directly during the combustion process (fly ashes). In the present study we investigated the freezing behavior of bottom ash particles which originated from wood as well as from coal. Additionally we investigated particles from fly ash from a coal-fired power plant. Particles were generated by dry dispersion and afterwards size selected with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA). The immersion freezing ability of the different ash particles was quantified utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS, Hartmann et al., 2011), where exactly one size segregated ash particle is immersed in a droplet. We found significant differences between the freezing abilities of the different ash types. Particles from wood bottom ashes initiate freezing at rather low temperatures near the homogenous freezing point (around -36°C). Particles from coal bottom ashes show significant higher ice nucleation abilities than the wood bottom ash, with observed freezing temperatures similar to those of clay minerals (around -30°C). The particles from the fly ash showed the best freezing ability, which was significantly higher than the freezing ability of the clay minerals but still not as good as that of K-feldspar. Hartmann, S., Niedermeier, D., Voigtländer, J., Clauss, T., Shaw, R. A., Wex, H., Kiselev, A., and Stratmann, F.: Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 1753-1767, doi:10.5194/acp-11-1753-2011, 2011. Hoose, C. and O. Möhler, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 9817-9854, 2012. Murray, B. J., O'Sullivan, D., Atkinson, J. D. and Webb, M. E., Chem. Soc. Rev., 41, 6519-6554, 2012. Umo N. S., Murray B. J., Baeza-Romero M. T., Jones J. M., Lea-Langton A. R., Malkin T. L., O'Sullivan D., Plane J. M. C. and Williams A., Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 14, 28845-28883, 2014

  9. New particle dependant parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Karoline; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    For detailed investigations of cloud microphysical processes an adiabatic air parcel model with entrainment is used. It represents a spectral bin model which explicitly solves the microphysical equations. The initiation of the ice phase is parameterized and describes the effects of different types of ice nuclei (mineral dust, soot, biological particles) in immersion, contact, and deposition modes. As part of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT), existing parameterizations have been modified for the present studies and new parameterizations have been developed mainly on the basis of the outcome of INUIT experiments. Deposition freezing in the model is dependant on the presence of dry particles and on ice supersaturation. The description of contact freezing combines the collision kernel of dry particles with the fraction of frozen drops as function of temperature and particle size. A new parameterization of immersion freezing has been coupled to the mass of insoluble particles contained in the drops using measured numbers of ice active sites per unit mass. Sensitivity studies have been performed with a convective temperature and dew point profile and with two dry aerosol particle number size distributions. Single and coupled freezing processes are studied with different types of ice nuclei (e.g., bacteria, illite, kaolinite, feldspar). The strength of convection is varied so that the simulated cloud reaches different levels of temperature. As a parameter to evaluate the results the ice water fraction is selected which is defined as the relation of the ice water content to the total water content. Ice water fractions between 0.1 and 0.9 represent mixed-phase clouds, larger than 0.9 ice clouds. The results indicate the sensitive parameters for the formation of mixed-phase and ice clouds are: 1. broad particle number size distribution with high number of small particles, 2. temperatures below -25C, 3. specific mineral dust particles as ice nuclei such as illite or montmorillonite. Coupled cases of deposition and contact freezing show that they are hardly in competition because of differences in the preferred particle sizes. In the contact mode, small particles are less efficient for collisions as well as less efficient as ice nuclei so that these are available for deposition freezing. On the other hand, immersion freezing is the dominant process when it is coupled with deposition freezing. As it is initiated earlier the formed ice particles consume water vapor for growing. The competition of combined contact and immersion freezing leads to lower ice water contents because more ice particles are formed via the immersion mode. In general, ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds with high ice water fractions are not directly the result of primary ice formation but of secondary ice formation and growth of ice particles at the expense of liquid drops.

  10. Freeze Denaturation of Fish Muscle Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Takahide

    Studies on the freeze denaturation of fish muscle proteins were reviewed with emphasis given to changes in their physicochemical and biochemical properties during frozen storage. Denaturation of actomyosin commonly occurs during frozen storage and side-to-side aggregation of myosin molecules apppears to major role in this reaction. The author's group performed freezing studies with isolated preparations of proteins from carp muscle, namely actomyosin, myosin, H-meromyosin, L-meromyosin, and actin. Freeze denaturation occurred with indvidual proteins as well as with their subunits. Not only aggregation but also some conformational changes were observed. Denaturation was inhibited in the presence of added glutamate.

  11. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-09-01

    We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze - a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple crossover model without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space-time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe.

  12. Neuroimaging of Freezing of Gait.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herman, Talia; Tessitore, Alessandro; Strafella, Antonio P; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2015-01-01

    Functional brain imaging techniques appear ideally suited to explore the pathophysiology of freezing of gait (FOG). In the last two decades, techniques based on magnetic resonance or nuclear medicine imaging have found a number of structural changes and functional disconnections between subcortical and cortical regions of the locomotor network in patients with FOG. FOG seems to be related in part to disruptions in the "executive-attention" network along with regional tissue loss including the premotor area, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the parietal and occipital areas involved in visuospatial functions of the right hemisphere. Several subcortical structures have been also involved in the etiology of FOG, principally the caudate nucleus and the locomotor centers in the brainstem. Maladaptive neural compensation may present transiently in the presence of acute conflicting motor, cognitive or emotional stimulus processing, thus causing acute network overload and resulting in episodic impairment of stepping.In this review we will summarize the state of the art of neuroimaging research for FOG. We will also discuss the limitations of current approaches and delineate the next steps of neuroimaging research to unravel the pathophysiology of this mysterious motor phenomenon. PMID:25757831

  13. Freeze concentration beats the heat

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on freeze concentration (FC) which saves energy and money in packaging, shipping, and storing food products. FC---in contrast to existing heat-evaporation processes---retains volatile flavor and aroma compounds in food products so that no additives are required to restore the taste and smell of the original product. In recent tests on orange, grapefruit, and pineapple juices, reconstituted FC juices were found to be superior in taste to juices produced by evaporation and similar to the original pasteurized juices. The dairy industry, which is the largest user of energy for concentration in the food sector, is looking to FC for new products such as frozen concentrated milk as well as better use of the milk by-products of cheese production. The biggest potential for new FC applications is in those industries that consume large amounts of energy for separation processing, according to a 1987 report prepared for EPRI. In the food industry, this includes milk, vinegar, and beer producers. Potential applications also abound in the pulp and paper, pharmaceutical, chemical, and petroleum industries. FC separates substances via crystallization at substantial energy savings.

  14. Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mary N.; Peterson, John; Sheldon, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Depression in adolescence and adulthood is common, afflicting up to 20 percent of these populations. It represents a significant public health concern and is associated with considerable suffering and functional impairment. Adolescent-onset depression tends to be a particularly malignant and recalcitrant condition, increasing the likelihood of recurrence and chronicity in adulthood. Clinical presentations for various medical and psychiatric conditions, as well as reactions to psychosocial stressors, can mimic or confound the picture of depression in adolescents. Therefore, careful assessment and differential diagnosis is essential. Effective treatments, both pharmacological and psychosocial in nature, exist, and so early detection and intervention is paramount. This article presents an overview of optimal prevention, assessment, and clinical decision-making strategies for managing depression in adolescents. PMID:19855857

  15. Freezing Characteristics of Droplet on a Cooled Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horibe, Akihiko; Fukusako, Shouichiro; Yamada, Masahiko

    An experimental study has been performed to investigate the freezing characteristics of an aqueous binary solution droplet on a cooled wall. Pure water, ethylene-glycol aqueous solutions of 1to 10 mass%, and NaCl aqueous solutions of 1 to 15 mass% in concentration were adopted as the testing solutions. The droplet was frozen under a variety of cooling conditions such as wall temperature, air temperature, air velocity, and solute concentration in both the static atmosphere and the cold air flow. The observations on both the freezing characteristics and the morphologies of the droplet were extensively carried out. In addition, the inside flow of the droplets were observed. It was found that the morphology of the droplet on the cooled wall varied markedly depending on the solution, which appears to be mainly caused by the difference in the surface tension of the solution. On the other hand, under the conditions with a cold air flow, initial freezing point of the droplet was found to be mainly owing to the cooling rate between the cooled wall and the cold air.

  16. Sensitivity of liquid clouds to homogenous freezing parameterizations

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Ross J; Murray, Benjamin J; Dobbie, Steven J; Koop, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Water droplets in some clouds can supercool to temperatures where homogeneous ice nucleation becomes the dominant freezing mechanism. In many cloud resolving and mesoscale models, it is assumed that homogeneous ice nucleation in water droplets only occurs below some threshold temperature typically set at ?40C. However, laboratory measurements show that there is a finite rate of nucleation at warmer temperatures. In this study we use a parcel model with detailed microphysics to show that cloud properties can be sensitive to homogeneous ice nucleation as warm as ?30C. Thus, homogeneous ice nucleation may be more important for cloud development, precipitation rates, and key cloud radiative parameters than is often assumed. Furthermore, we show that cloud development is particularly sensitive to the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate. In order to better constrain the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation laboratory measurements are needed at both high (>?35C) and low (Points Homogeneous freezing may be significant as warm as ?30C Homogeneous freezing should not be represented by a threshold approximation There is a need for an improved parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation PMID:26074652

  17. Monitoring the freeze-thaw process of soil with different moisture contents using piezoceramic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruolin; Zhu, Daopei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Sima, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Water content plays an active and important role in the performance of the soil freeze-thaw cycle to form frozen soil mechanical properties. Monitoring the freeze-thaw cycle of soil with various types of soil with varied moisture content will provide a direct observation of the properties of soil in cold regions. This paper presents new findings from monitoring the freeze-thaw process of soil using a piezoceramic-based smart aggregate (SA). For comparison, clay soil and medium sand with different moisture contents were used to study the behavior of the soil under the freeze-thaw process. Two SAs were embedded in the soil specimens with a pre-determined distance between them, one as an actuator to generate a stress wave and the other as a sensor to detect the propagated wave. As the propagation of the emitted wave is sensitive to soil status and properties, it is possible to monitor the soil freeze-thaw process by interpreting the SA sensor signal. Based on the attenuation of the energy, a freeze-thaw status indicator was established to describe the freezing-thawing condition. Indicator values of soil specimens with different types and different levels of moisture in freeze-thaw cycles were studied. The test results indicate that the freezing duration in the freezing-thawing process varied for different types of soil and different initial moisture content of the soil. Soil with different particle sizes and moisture content will determine the frozen soil microstructure and its corresponding mechanical properties. Our results illustrate that if soil particle size is bigger, then the signal indicator is stronger; if the moisture content is higher for the same soil, then the signal indicator is stronger. The research presents an innovative method to investigate the freezing-thawing performance of soil and potentially points to a new method to study the variation of soil mechanical properties during the freezing-thawing process, which is a critical problem for infrastructure in cold regions.

  18. Evaluation of spin freezing versus conventional freezing as part of a continuous pharmaceutical freeze-drying concept for unit doses.

    PubMed

    De Meyer, L; Van Bockstal, P-J; Corver, J; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P; De Beer, T

    2015-12-30

    Spin-freezing as alternative freezing approach was evaluated as part of an innovative continuous pharmaceutical freeze-drying concept for unit doses. The aim of this paper was to compare the sublimation rate of spin-frozen vials versus traditionally frozen vials in a batch freeze-dryer, and its impact on total drying time. Five different formulations, each having a different dry cake resistance, were tested. After freezing, the traditionally frozen vials were placed on the shelves while the spin-frozen vials were placed in aluminum vial holders providing radial energy supply during drying. Different primary drying conditions and chamber pressures were evaluated. After 2h of primary drying, the amount of sublimed ice was determined in each vial. Each formulation was monitored in-line using NIR spectroscopy during drying to determine the sublimation endpoint and the influence of drying conditions upon total drying time. For all tested formulations and applied freeze-drying conditions, there was a significant higher sublimation rate in the spin-frozen vials. This can be explained by the larger product surface and the lower importance of product resistance because of the much thinner product layers in the spin frozen vials. The in-line NIR measurements allowed evaluating the influence of applied drying conditions on the drying trajectories. PMID:25981618

  19. Automated assessment of pavlovian conditioned freezing and shock reactivity in mice using the video freeze system.

    PubMed

    Anagnostaras, Stephan G; Wood, Suzanne C; Shuman, Tristan; Cai, Denise J; Leduc, Arthur D; Zurn, Karl R; Zurn, J Brooks; Sage, Jennifer R; Herrera, Gerald M

    2010-01-01

    The Pavlovian conditioned freezing paradigm has become a prominent mouse and rat model of learning and memory, as well as of pathological fear. Due to its efficiency, reproducibility and well-defined neurobiology, the paradigm has become widely adopted in large-scale genetic and pharmacological screens. However, one major shortcoming of the use of freezing behavior has been that it has required the use of tedious hand scoring, or a variety of proprietary automated methods that are often poorly validated or difficult to obtain and implement. Here we report an extensive validation of the Video Freeze system in mice, a "turn-key" all-inclusive system for fear conditioning in small animals. Using digital video and near-infrared lighting, the system achieved outstanding performance in scoring both freezing and movement. Given the large-scale adoption of the conditioned freezing paradigm, we encourage similar validation of other automated systems for scoring freezing, or other behaviors. PMID:20953248

  20. Automated Assessment of Pavlovian Conditioned Freezing and Shock Reactivity in Mice Using the Video Freeze System

    PubMed Central

    Anagnostaras, Stephan G.; Wood, Suzanne C.; Shuman, Tristan; Cai, Denise J.; LeDuc, Arthur D.; Zurn, Karl R.; Zurn, J. Brooks; Sage, Jennifer R.; Herrera, Gerald M.

    2009-01-01

    The Pavlovian conditioned freezing paradigm has become a prominent mouse and rat model of learning and memory, as well as of pathological fear. Due to its efficiency, reproducibility and well-defined neurobiology, the paradigm has become widely adopted in large-scale genetic and pharmacological screens. However, one major shortcoming of the use of freezing behavior has been that it has required the use of tedious hand scoring, or a variety of proprietary automated methods that are often poorly validated or difficult to obtain and implement. Here we report an extensive validation of the Video Freeze system in mice, a “turn-key” all-inclusive system for fear conditioning in small animals. Using digital video and near-infrared lighting, the system achieved outstanding performance in scoring both freezing and movement. Given the large-scale adoption of the conditioned freezing paradigm, we encourage similar validation of other automated systems for scoring freezing, or other behaviors. PMID:20953248

  1. Microbial analysis and survey test of gamma-irradiated freeze-dried fruits for patient's food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Nam; Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Hong; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Kyung-A.; Son, Eun-Joo; Lyu, Eun-Soon

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the microbiological and organoleptic qualities of gamma-irradiated freeze-dried apples, pears, strawberries, pineapples, and grapes, and evaluated the organoleptic acceptability of the sterilized freeze-dried fruits for hospitalized patients. The freeze-dried fruits were gamma-irradiated at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 12, and 15 kGy, and their quality was evaluated. Microorganisms were not detected in apples after 1 kGy, in strawberries and pears after 4 kGy, in pineapples after 5 kGy, and in grapes after 12 kGy of gamma irradiation. The overall acceptance score, of the irradiated freeze-dried fruits on a 7-point scale at the sterilization doses was 5.5, 4.2, 4.0, 4.1, and 5.1 points for apples, strawberries, pears, pineapples, and grapes, respectively. The sensory survey of the hospitalized cancer patients (N=102) resulted in scores of 3.8, 3.7, 3.9, 3.9, and 3.7 on a 5-point scale for the gamma-irradiated freeze-dried apples, strawberries, pears, pineapples, and grapes, respectively. The results suggest that freeze-dried fruits can be sterilized with a dose of 5 kGy, except for grapes, which require a dose of 12 kGy, and that the organoleptic quality of the fruits is acceptable to immuno-compromised patients. However, to clarify the microbiological quality and safety of freeze-dried fruits should be verified by plating for both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms.

  2. Cell-encapsulating droplet formation and freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryoun Youn, Jae; Seok Song, Young

    2012-09-01

    Cell-encapsulating droplets are vitrified for biopreservation applications. The dynamics of micro-droplet formation and its freezing mechanism are analyzed numerically and experimentally. In addition, the microdroplet encapsulation technique is applied to cryopreserve cells.

  3. [Freezing and gait disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Giovanna; Pereira, João

    2013-06-01

    More than one third of patients with Parkinson disease experience freezing. It is characterized by the feeling that one's feet are "glued to the floor", and it is more common in the later stages of the disease. The causes of this gait disorder are not yet fully established, but it may lead patients to suffer falls and lose their independence. As a consequence, the development of therapeutic measures which can overcome freezing is of fundamental important for the autonomy of such individuals. There is no consensus in the literature on the most recommended therapeutic measures for the prevention or attenuation of freezing in gait. What seems to be defined are the phenomenological aspects of the disorder and good therapy, represented by the association between drug therapy and sensorial stimuli or motor coordination training geared towards the specificities to avoid motor difficulties of freezing, when triggering factors are present. PMID:24121579

  4. Notes on the freezing of simple substances

    SciTech Connect

    Stishov, S. M.

    2006-08-15

    Experimental data on the freezing of argon and the helium isotopes at high pressures are analyzed. It is found that attractive forces in argon can be adequately described by the van der Waals mean field theory. An analogous approximation may also be applicable to helium, but this cannot be established conclusively because of quantum effects. However, an analysis of experimental results on the freezing of helium intuitively suggests that the solid-phase stability region is enlarged by quantum effects.

  5. Threshold temperatures mediate the impact of reduced snow cover on overwintering freeze-tolerant caterpillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Katie E.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2012-01-01

    Decreases in snow cover due to climate change could alter the energetics and physiology of ectothermic animals that overwinter beneath snow, yet how snow cover interacts with physiological thresholds is unknown. We applied numerical simulation of overwintering metabolic rates coupled with field validation to determine the importance of snow cover and freezing to the overwintering lipid consumption of the freeze-tolerant Arctiid caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella. Caterpillars that overwintered above the snow experienced mean temperatures 1.3C lower than those below snow and consumed 18.36 mg less lipid of a total 68.97-mg reserve. Simulations showed that linear temperature effects on metabolic rate accounted for only 30% of the difference in lipid consumption. When metabolic suppression by freezing was included, 93% of the difference between animals that overwintered above and below snow was explained. Our results were robust to differences in temperature sensitivity of metabolic rate, changes in freezing point, and the magnitude of metabolic suppression by freezing. The majority of the energy savings was caused by the non-continuous reduction in metabolic rate due to freezing, the first example of the importance of temperature thresholds in the lipid use of overwintering insects.

  6. Simulations of Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Denitrification Using Laboratory Freezing Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, Katja; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During the 1999-2000 Arctic winter, the SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) provided evidence of widespread solid-phase polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) accompanied by severe nitrification. Previous simulations have shown that a freezing process occurring at temperatures above the ice frost point is necessary to explain these observations. In this work, the nitric acid freezing rates measured by Salcedo et al. and discussed by Tabazadeh et al. have been examined. These freezing rates have been tested in winter-long microphysical simulations of the 1999-2000 Arctic vortex evolution in order to determine whether they can explain the observations. A range of cases have been explored, including whether the PSC particles are composed of nitric acid dihydrate or trihydrate, whether the freezing process is a bulk process or occurs only on the particle surfaces, and uncertainties in the derived freezing rates. Finally, the possibility that meteoritic debris enhances the freezing rate has also been examined. The results of these simulations have been compared with key PSC and denitrification measurements made by the SOLVE campaign. The cases that best reproduce the measurements will he highlighted, with a discussion of the implications for our understanding of PSCs.

  7. Real-time measurement of metabolic rate during freezing and thawing of the wood frog, Rana sylvatica: implications for overwinter energy use.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Bremxnt J; Stinziano, Joseph R; Williams, Caroline M; Macmillan, Heath A; Marshall, Katie E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-01-15

    Ectotherms overwintering in temperate ecosystems must survive low temperatures while conserving energy to fuel post-winter reproduction. Freeze-tolerant wood frogs, Rana sylvatica, have an active response to the initiation of ice formation that includes mobilising glucose from glycogen and circulating it around the body to act as a cryoprotectant. We used flow-through respirometry to measure CO(2) production ( ) in real time during cooling, freezing and thawing. CO(2) production increases sharply at three points during freeze-thaw: at +1°C during cooling prior to ice formation (total of 104±17 μl CO(2) frog(-1) event(-1)), at the initiation of freezing (565±85 μl CO(2) frog(-1) freezing event(-1)) and after the frog has thawed (564±75 μ l CO(2) frog(-1) freezing event(-1)). We interpret these increases in metabolic rate to represent the energetic costs of preparation for freezing, the response to freezing and the re-establishment of homeostasis and repair of damage after thawing, respectively. We assumed that frogs metabolise lipid when unfrozen and that carbohydrate fuels metabolism during cooling, freezing and thawing, and when frozen. We then used microclimate temperature data to predict overwinter energetics of wood frogs. Based on the freezing and melting points we measured, frogs in the field were predicted to experience as many as 23 freeze-thaw cycles in the winter of our microclimate recordings. Overwinter carbohydrate consumption appears to be driven by the frequency of freeze-thaw events, and changes in overwinter climate that affect the frequency of freeze-thaw will influence carbohydrate consumption, but changes that affect mean temperatures and the frequency of winter warm spells will modify lipid consumption. PMID:23255194

  8. Care during freeze-drying of bovine pericardium tissue to be used as a biomaterial: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Polak, Roberta; Pitombo, Ronaldo N M

    2011-10-01

    Bovine pericardium (BP) tissue is widely used in the manufacture of bioprosthetics. The effects of freeze-drying on the BP tissue have been studied by some researchers in order to decrease their cytotoxicity due to preservation in formaldehyde solution, and to increase the lifetime of the product in storage. This study was undertaken in order to study the effect of freeze-drying in the structure of BP. To perform this study BP samples were freeze-dried in two different types of freeze-dryers available in our laboratory: a laboratory freeze-dryer, in which it was not possible to control parameters and a pilot freeze-dryer, wherein all parameters during freezing and drying were controlled. After freeze-drying processes, samples were analyzed by SEM, Raman spectroscopy, tensile strength, water uptake tests and TEM. In summary, it has been demonstrated that damages occur in collagen fibers by the loss of bulk water of collagen structure implicating in a drastic decreasing of BP mechanical properties due to its structural alterations. Moreover, it was proven that the collagen fibrils suffered breakage at some points, which can be attributed to the uncontrolled parameters during drying. PMID:21619875

  9. Time perception, depression and sadness.

    PubMed

    Gil, Sandrine; Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    2009-02-01

    This study examined changes in time perception as a function of depressive symptoms, assessed for each participant with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The participants performed a temporal bisection task in which they had to categorize a signal duration of between 400 and 1600 ms as either as short or long. The data showed that the bisection function was shifted toward the right, and that the point of subjective equality was higher in the depressive than in the non-depressive participants. Furthermore, the higher the depression score was, the shorter the signal duration was judged to be. In contrast, the sensitivity to time was similar in these two groups of participants. These results thus indicate that the probe durations were underestimated by the depressive participants. The sadness scores assessed by the Brief Mood Inventory Scale (BMIS) also suggest that the emotional state of sadness in the depressive participants goes some way to explaining their temporal performance. Statistical analyses and modeling of data support the idea according to which these results may be explained by a slowing down of the internal clock in the depressive participants. PMID:19073237

  10. Accurate freezing and melting equations for the Lennard-Jones system.

    PubMed

    Khrapak, Sergey A; Morfill, Gregor E

    2011-03-01

    Analyzing three approximate methods to locate liquid-solid coexistence in simple systems, an observation is made that all of them predict the same functional dependence of the temperature on density at freezing and melting of the conventional Lennard-Jones (LJ) system. The emerging equations can be written as T=A?(4)+B?(2) in normalized units. We suggest to determine the values of the coefficients A at freezing and melting from the high-temperature limit, governed by the inverse 12th power repulsive potential. The coefficients B can be determined from the triple point parameters of the LJ fluid. This produces freezing and melting equations which are exact in the high-temperature limit and at the triple point and show remarkably good agreement with numerical simulation data in the intermediate region. PMID:21384951

  11. Composition and freezing of aqueous H2SO4/HNO3 solutions under polar stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, K. D.; Seago, S. W.; Chang, H. Y.; Molina, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    The results of laboratory investigations of the freezing behavior of aqueous acid solutions indicate that in the stratosphere H2SO/H2O aerosol droplets would not freeze at temperatures above the ice frost point in the absence of HNO3; however, in the presence of typical levels of HNO3 liquid sulfuric acid aerosols take up significant amounts of HNO3 and H2O vapors and freeze much more readily. This is a consequence of the very rapid change in composition of the liquid droplets as the temperature drops to within two to three degrees of the equilibrium temperature at which HNO3 and H2O vapors would co-condense to form a liquid solution. In the high latitude stratosphere this HNO3/H2O 'dew point' is typically around 192-194 K at 100 mbar.

  12. A new freeze casting technique for ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kiyoshi

    A new freeze casting technique for ceramics capable of manufacturing near room temperature with a sublimable vehicle has been developed in order to eliminate expensive processes under extremely cold temperatures in the conventional freeze casting. Fluid concentrated slurries of Al2O 3 powder in molten camphene (C10H16) were successfully prepared at 55°C with a small amount of a dispersant. These slurries were quickly solidified (frozen) at room temperature to yield a rigid solid green body, where the frozen camphene was easily removed by sublimation (freeze-drying) with negligible shrinkage. Sintering was successfully conducted without any special binder burnout process to yield dense sintered bodies (over 98% T.D). An organic alloy with a eutectic composition in the naphthalene (C 10H8)-camphor (C10H16O) binary system with a eutectic temperature of 31°C was also found to be a successful vehicle for the new ceramic freeze casting. The fabrication processes are almost the same as those with camphene. It was found that vehicles with off-eutectic compositions resulted in large voids in the sintered body due to the ceramic particle rejection by pro-eutectic crystals during freezing. At the eutectic composition, fine lamellar microstructure in the solidified vehicle inhibits the particle rejection. The proposed advantages of the new freeze casting technique with a sublimable vehicle include; (1) elimination of extremely cold temperatures used in conventional freeze casting; (2) elimination of troublesome binder burnout process; and (3) fast manufacturing cycle due to quick solidification. Porous ceramic bodies with unique interconnected pore channels were fabricated by the new freeze casting with lower solid content. The unique channels surrounded by fully dense walls have nearly circular cross-sections unlike conventional aqueous freeze casting. The porosity and the channel diameters are controllable by the solid content in the slurry. The unique channels are replicas of entangled dendrites of frozen camphene, which sublimes during freeze-drying process. The unique porous structure with interconnected pore channels, which is completely new, is considered potentially useful in many applications such as filters and implantable bone scaffolds.

  13. Spacecraft Radiator Freeze Protection Using a Regenerative Heat Exchanger with Bypass Setpoint Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.

    2008-01-01

    Spacecraft radiators are sized for their maximum heat load in their warmest thermal environment, but must operate at reduced heat loads and in colder environments. For systems where the radiator environment can be colder than the working fluid freezing temperature, radiator freezing becomes an issue. Radiator freezing has not been a major issue for the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS) active thermal control systems (ATCSs) because they operate in environments that are warm relative to the freezing point of their external coolants (Freon-21 and ammonia, respectively). For a vehicle that lands at the Lunar South Pole, the design thermal environment is 215K, but the radiator working fluid must also be kept from freezing during the 0 K sink of transit. A radiator bypass flow control design such as those used on the Space Shuttle and ISS requires more than 30% of the design heat load to avoid radiator freezing during transit - even with a very low freezing point working fluid. By changing the traditional ATCS architecture to include a regenerating heat exchanger inboard of the radiator and by using a regenerator bypass flow control valve to maintain system setpoint, the required minimum heat load can be reduced by more than half. This gives the spacecraft much more flexibility in design and operation. The present work describes the regenerator bypass ATCS setpoint control methodology. It includes analytical results comparing the performance of this system to the traditional radiator bypass system. Finally, a summary of the advantages of the regenerator bypass system are presented.

  14. The equilibrated state of freezing as a basis for distinguishing lethal stresses of freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model for coordination of stresses that limit winterhardiness in plants based on the thermodynamic equilibrated state of freezing and melting provides a rational basis for distinction of freeze-induced energies which can stress and injure living organisms in various ways. The departure from equili...

  15. Freeze Tolerance of Nine Zoysiagrass Cultivars Using Natural Cold Acclimation and Freeze Chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter hardiness of zoysiagrass (Zoysia spp.) cultivars is an important attribute throughout the biogeographical transition zone, thus the inability to withstand freezing temperatures may limit the use of these cultivars. The objective of this research was to determine the freeze tolerance (LT50) of...

  16. Freezing and thawing or freezing, thawing, and aging effects on beef tenderness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of freezing and thawing or freezing and thawing with an additional aging period after frozen storage on the tenderness of longissimus lumborum (LL) and semitendinosus (ST) steaks relative to aged, fresh steaks. Left-side LL and ST (n=35 each) ...

  17. Predicting Arabidopsis Freezing Tolerance and Heterosis in Freezing Tolerance from Metabolite Composition

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Marina; Grtner, Tanja; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Selbig, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Heterosis, or hybrid vigor, is one of the most important tools in plant breeding and has previously been demonstrated for plant freezing tolerance. Freezing tolerance is an important trait because it can limit the geographical distribution of plants and their agricultural yield. Plants from temperate climates increase in freezing tolerance during exposure to low, non-freezing temperatures in a process termed cold acclimation. Metabolite profiling has indicated a major reprogramming of plant metabolism in the cold, but it has remained unclear in previous studies which of these changes are related to freezing tolerance. In the present study, we have used metabolic profiling to discover combinations of metabolites that predict freezing tolerance and its heterosis in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified compatible solutes and, in particular, the pathway leading to raffinose as crucial statistical predictors for freezing tolerance and its heterosis, while some TCA cycle intermediates contribute only to predicting the heterotic phenotype. This indicates coordinate links between heterosis and metabolic pathways, suggesting that a limited number of regulatory genes may determine the extent of heterosis in this complex trait. In addition, several unidentified metabolites strongly contributed to the prediction of both freezing tolerance and its heterosis and we present an exemplary analysis of one of these, identifying it as a hexose conjugate. PMID:20026477

  18. Older Adults and Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Older Adults and Depression Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Download Mobi Order a ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels down or sad sometimes, but these ...

  19. Caregiving and Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... FCA - A A + A You are here Home Depression and Caregiving Order this publication Printer-friendly version ... a more serious depression over time. Symptoms of Depression People experience depression in different ways. Some may ...

  20. Depression and African Americans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... You are here Home » Depression And African Americans Depression And African Americans Not “Just the Blues” Clinical ... or spiritual communities. Commonly Asked Questions about Clinical Depression How do I get help for clinical depression? ...

  1. Depression in Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... here Home » Depression In Older Adults: More Facts Depression In Older Adults: More Facts Depression affects more ... combination of both. [8] Older Adult Attitudes Toward Depression: According to a Mental Health America survey [9] ...

  2. Can Lupus Cause Depression?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lupus Living well with lupus Can lupus cause depression? Life with lupus can be challenging. With symptoms ... treatable illness called clinical depression. Symptoms of Clinical Depression People are considered clinically depressed when they have ...

  3. Men and Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... information on Men and Depression Share Men and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels sad or irritable sometimes, or has ...

  4. Depression in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Abrams, R C; Teresi, J A; Butin, D N

    1992-05-01

    Although their extent remains unclear, major and minor depressions are widespread in the nursing home population. This statement appears intuitively to be correct when consideration is given to the inactivity, decline in functional competence, loss of personal autonomy, and unavoidable confrontation with the process of death and dying that are associated with nursing home placement. In addition, some nursing home residents have had previous episodes of depression or are admitted to the facility already dysthymic or with other chronic forms of the illness. Such circumstances provide a favorable culture for the development and persistence of depressive illness. When the high frequency of other psychiatric disorders among nursing home residents is factored in, it is not surprising that long-term health care facilities have come to be regarded as de facto psychiatric hospitals. Nursing homes largely lack the treatment resources of psychiatric hospitals, however. Nursing home physicians are often unprepared to make psychiatric diagnoses, and a perfunctory annual psychiatric evaluation is insufficient to manage the complex depression syndromes of nursing home residents. Because nursing home psychiatrists typically work on a consultation basis, recommendations are not necessarily acted upon by the primary physicians. The consequences of undiagnosed and untreated depression are substantial. From the psychiatric perspective, the possibility that depression increases the risk for eventual development of permanent dementia highlights the importance of early identification for cases of reversible dementia. From the rehabilitation point of view, persistent depression among individuals with physical dependency following a catastrophic illness is associated with failure to improve in physical functioning. Depression can probably be linked to increased medical morbidity in nursing home residents, a relationship that also has been suggested for elderly medical inpatients. If so, the use of nursing time and other health-care facility services would be greater for depressed than nondepressed residents, and financial costs would be higher as well. Finally, recent data point to increased mortality in nursing home residents with major depressive disorder. It is apparent that depression in long-term care facilities is a condition with doubtful prognosis and negative medical, social, and financial consequences. The highest costs of all may be paid by nursing home residents who experience the unrelieved suffering of depressive illness. Only epidemiologic research using standard diagnostic criteria and direct resident assessment will adequately establish the magnitude of the need for intervention among depressed residents in long-term care.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1600481

  5. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stphanie; Passot, Stphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery. PMID:25428024

  6. Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting autumn freezing resistance and phenology in Salix.

    PubMed

    Tsarouhas, V; Gullberg, U; Lagercrantz, U

    2004-05-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed at different time points during cold-acclimation of a tetraploid F(2 ) Salix pedigree. The pedigree ( n=92) was derived from a cross between a frost-susceptible diploid female clone 'Jorunn' ( Salix viminalis) and a frost resistant hexaploid male clone 'SW901290' ( Salix dasyclados). Freezing resistance, height growth increment and number of new leaves were assessed at days 0, 12, 20, 24, 31 and 42 of a short day-low temperature (SD-LT) hardening regime, while the initiation of shoot tip abscission and shoot tip abscission were measured daily. Height increment, dry-to-fresh weight ratio and number of new leaves were also measured in a replicated field trial. Freezing resistance was determined from electrolyte leakage of leaf tissues and from visual injuries on stem segments, after exposure to a predetermined freeze-thaw stress. Using a genetic map of the F(2) composed of 432 single-dose AFLP markers, a total of 19 genomic regions controlling freezing resistance (10) and phenological traits (9) before and during cold-acclimation (SD-LT) were identified. The magnitude of the phenotypic variation explained by each freezing resistance locus varied over acclimation time (0-45%), and there was no time point at which all the QTLs could be detected. The single QTL detected for non-acclimated freezing resistance did not reach significance at any time point during cold-acclimation, suggesting an independent genetic relationship between non-acclimated and acclimated resistance to freezing in Salix. Five of the loci associated with freezing resistance shared common intervals with loci controlling phenological traits. Of the 14 QTLs controlling autumn freezing resistance and/or phenological traits in the indoors experiment, six (43%) were associated with autumn phenology-related traits, i.e. height increment, dry-to-fresh weight ratio and number of new leaves, measured in the field. A major locus with multi-trait association in both indoor and outdoor experiments was detected. PMID:14747916

  7. Field Response of Sugarcane Genotypes to Freeze Stress with Genotype x Environment Effects on Quality Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freeze stress is a constraint to sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) with negative effect on sucrose yield, particularly during the harvest season. To understand its impact on the performance of genotypes developed by the Canal Point (CP) breeding program, the genotype by environment (GxE) interaction was app...

  8. Towards a scientific taxonomy of depression

    PubMed Central

    K. Ranga, Rama Krishnan

    Many concepts have been introduced into the classification of depression, including manic-depressive/bipolar disorder depression, etc. Kraepelin's original concept of manic-depressive disorder has evolved into the concept of polarity, and bipolar and unipolar disorders. Psychiatric classification is characterized by an inflation of the diagnostic categories, including subtypes of depression. This rapid multiplier effect is primarily descriptive, and there is a need to rethink, in a pragmatic fashion, the classification system, in order to develop one that is likely to be of utility and which has a scientific basis. Is the time now right to ask whether there are essential conditions relevant to depression? I think that it is, and here I will introduce the notion with two such conditions. The first is early life stress disorder, and the second vascular depression. These conditions have reached a point where the data supports them as distinct entities. In this paper, the rationale for this is discussed. PMID:18979943

  9. Droplet coalescence and freezing on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and biphilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyke, Alexander S.; Collard, Diane; Derby, Melanie M.; Betz, Amy Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Frost and ice formation can have severe negative consequences, such as aircraft safety and reliability. At atmospheric pressure, water heterogeneously condenses and then freezes at low temperatures. To alter this freezing process, this research examines the effects of biphilic surfaces (surfaces which combine hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) on heterogeneous water nucleation, growth, and freezing. Silicon wafers were coated with a self-assembled monolayer and patterned to create biphilic surfaces. Samples were placed on a freezing stage in an environmental chamber at atmospheric pressure, at a temperature of 295 K, and relative humidities of 30%, 60%, and 75%. Biphilic surfaces had a significant effect on droplet dynamics and freezing behavior. The addition of biphilic patterns decreased the temperature required for freezing by 6 K. Biphilic surfaces also changed the size and number of droplets on a surface at freezing and delayed the time required for a surface to freeze. The main mechanism affecting freezing characteristics was the coalescence behavior.

  10. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    PubMed

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)K) and 10000 W/(m (2)K). PMID:23812315

  11. Study on Freezing of a Single Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumoto, Koji; Yamagishi, Hideaki; Ikegawa, Masahiro

    The freezing characteristics of a single water droplet placed on the column edge were visually investigated using a video camera. The temperatures of the edge face and the environment air were independently controlled. The solidification process of the water droplet was discussed based on the many pictures obtained. The experimental results indicated that the freezing time of droplet was strongly affected by the edge temperature. Furthermore, we found that the water dispersion thermosensitivity slurry was effective for the observation of the temperature of the droplet. Consequently, it was indicated that the heat transfer characteristics of the droplet under freezing condition were mainly affected by both temperature of the air and surface of the flat plate.

  12. UltraViolet freeze-in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Fatemeh; Kolda, Christopher; Unwin, James

    2015-03-01

    If dark matter is thermally decoupled from the visible sector, the observed relic density can potentially be obtained via freeze-in production of dark matter. Typically in such models it is assumed that the dark matter is connected to the thermal bath through feeble renormalisable interactions. Here, rather, we consider the case in which the hidden and visible sectors are coupled only via non-renormalisable operators. This is arguably a more generic realisation of the dark matter freeze-in scenario, as it does not require the introduction of diminutive renormalisable couplings. We examine general aspects of freeze-in via non-renormalisable operators in a number of toy models and present several motivated implementations in the context of Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics. Specifically, we study models related to the Peccei-Quinn mechanism and Z ' portals.

  13. Cell cycle regulation in the freeze tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Storey, Kenneth B

    2012-05-01

    The wood frog (Rana sylvatica) is one of only a few vertebrate species that can survive extensive freezing of its body fluids during the winter. The mechanisms of natural freeze tolerance include metabolic rate depression to conserve energy and the implementation of cryoprotective strategies, especially the synthesis of huge amounts of glucose as a cryoprotectant. Liver is the main source of glucose production/export (and other cryoprotective actions) and plays a central role in freezing survival of the whole animal. Freezing is a multi-component stress that includes anoxia/ischemia due to the cessation of blood flow and dehydration of cells caused by ice accumulation in extracellular spaces. To help endure these stresses, cells need to suppress and reprioritize ATP-expensive cell functions. One of these is cell growth and proliferation, and we hypothesized that cell cycle arrest would be key to freezing survival. The present study examines the responses by key cell cycle components to freezing, anoxia and dehydration stresses in wood frog liver. Immunoblotting was used to investigate protein expression of Cdc 2, Cdks (2, 4, 6), and cyclins (A, B1, D1, E) as well as the phosphorylation states of Cdks (Thr14/Tyr15), the phosphatases Cdc25a (Ser76) and Cdc25c (Ser216) and the CIP/KIP Cdk inhibitors p21 (Thr145) and p27 (Thr187). Responses to 24 h freezing, 24 h anoxia and 40% dehydration as well as recovery from these stresses were analyzed. The results showed very similar responses by cell cycle components to anoxia or dehydration and were consistent with cell cycle suppression under stress and reversal during recovery. Freezing showed elements of cell cycle suppression, including reduced protein levels of Cdks and cyclins A and B1, but also showed unique responses by cyclin D1, Cdc25 phosphatases and p21/p27. These may be linked with alternative actions by these proteins that contribute to cryoprotection; e.g., an alternative action of cyclin D1 as a transcription factor may contribute to the upregulation of glucose-6-phosphatase, a key enzyme needed for the export of glucose cryoprotectant. PMID:22510573

  14. Executive functioning moderates the relationship between motivation and adolescent depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Lopez, Chrystal; Lopez-Vergara, Hector I; Colder, Craig R

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the association between adolescent depressive symptoms and components of executive functioning (EF), including planning (Tower of London), set-shifting (Wisconsin Card Sorting Task), and inhibition (Stop Signal Task) in a community sample of 12-14 year olds. Further, EF was tested as a moderator of motivation (as operationalized by revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory) effects on depressive symptoms. Results suggested that planning ability was associated with depressive symptoms. Furthermore, planning ability moderated the relationship between motivation (fight-flight- freeze system; FFFS) and depressive symptoms, such that among adolescents with poor planning ability the FFFS positively predicted depressive symptoms, but among adolescents with strong planning ability the FFFS negatively predicts depressive symptoms. Neither set-shifting nor inhibition was associated with depressive symptoms. Findings highlight the need to consider multiple components of EF and to integrate motivational and executive dysfunction models to the study of depression. PMID:23105161

  15. Stratospheric Polar Freezing Belt Causes Denitrification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Jensen, E. J.; Toon, O. B.; Drdla, K.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Trajectory cloud model calculations are presented to show that homogeneous freezing of nitric acid hydrates can produce a polar freezing belt in both hemispheres that can cause denitrification. While hydrate cloud microphysical properties are similar over both poles, the shorter persistence of clouds in the Arctic prevents the depth of the denitrified layers from growing beyond a few kilometers. The 1999-2000 Arctic winter is unique in showing a distinct denitrification profile with a depth of approx. 4.5 km that is nearly half as deep as that computed for a typical Antarctic winter.

  16. Freeze drying for morphological control of inter-penetrating polymer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Marion G.; Pater, Ruth H.

    1990-01-01

    The intrinsic brittleness of BMI resins can be reduced through the creation of an interpenetrating network (IPN) of BMI with a reactive-encapped thermoplastic, such as the presently considered polyimidesulfone, PISO2. The PISO2 and BMI were dissolved in a common solvent, which was then removed from the constituents by freeze drying; in an alternative method, an IPN was formed through dissolution of the constituent in a common solvent with either high or low melting point, followed by evaporative removal of the solvent. The effectiveness of the freeze-drying approach for morphological control is evaluated.

  17. Effect of process conditions on recovery of protein activity after freezing and freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Nail, S L

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this research was to gain a better understanding of the degree to which recovery of activity of model proteins after freeze-drying can be maximized by manipulation of freeze-dry process conditions in the absence of protective solutes. Catalase, beta-galactosidase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were used as model proteins. All of the three proteins exhibited a concentration-dependent loss of activity after freezing, with significantly higher recovery at higher concentration. The freezing method and the type of buffer were also important, with sodium phosphate buffer and freezing by immersion of vials in liquid nitrogen associated with the lowest recovery of activity. Differential scanning calorimetry was predictive of the onset of collapse during freeze-drying only for beta-galactosidase. For the other proteins, either no Tg' transition was observed, or the apparent glass transition did not correlate with the microscopically-observed collapse temperature. The time course of activity loss for beta-galactosidase and LDH was compared during freeze-drying under conditions which produced collapse of the dried matrix and conditions which produced retention of microstructure in the dried solid. Recovery of activity decreased continuously during primary drying, with no sharp drop in recovery of activity associated with the onset of collapse. The most important drying process variable affecting recovery of activity was residual moisture level, with a dramatic drop in activity recovery associated with residual moisture levels less than about 10%. PMID:9653629

  18. Freezing-thawing action in the deterioration of the stones of Chambord Castle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Asaad; Brunetaud, Xavier; Beck, Kevin; Al-Mukhtar, Muzahim

    2013-04-01

    Limestone is very common in architecture (monuments and cultural heritage buildings) and used in the sculptures. The soft and porous limestone soaks up water and show weathering patterns and forms: alveolar weathering, granular disintegration, efflorescences. Freezing-thawing actions can be considered as one of the processes that contribute in the deterioration of stones located in the "cold regions" characterized with air temperatures below freezing point temperature. The amount of water within the pore space of the stones is a crucial factor of the decay. The experimental work presented in this paper is a part of a research program that aims to study the mechanisms that lead to the degradation of stone building materials due to the variation of climatic conditions. The analysis of the meteorological data of the field around the castle of Chambord shows the magnitude of temperature variations and the frequency of freezing-thawing cycles. The critical degrees of saturation at which the stone start to deteriorate after treatment with freezing-thawing cycles were examined in the tests conducted. The study concerns two porous limestone used in the construction and conservation of Chambord castle; highly porous Tuffeau stone having a total porosity of about 48 %, and medium porous Richemont stone with a total porosity of 27 %. Richemont stone has been used as a substitute stone of the degraded Tuffeau stone on the castle. The main physical properties, total porosity, apparent dry density and skeleton density and sound velocity for mechanical properties were measured for the stone samples before and during freezing-thawing cycles. ASTM (D5312-04) procedure was applied in the freezing-thawing tests. Tuffeau and Richmond samples were prepared at nine different degrees of saturations; 0, 20, 40, 70, 80, 85, 90, 95 and 100%, and properties were measured after different freezing-thawing cycles conditions; 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 30 and 50 cycles. The results of these tests show that when the degree of saturation exceeds 80-85%, freeze-thaw damage is inevitable even for a very few freeze-thaw cycles. Moreover, results indicate that the two studied stones have similar critical degree of saturation of about 85 %. This can be attributed to the similar percentage of macro-pores in the two tested stones. Finally, the critical degree of saturation was not changed after increasing the number of freezing-thawing cycles, thus the critical degree of saturation can be considered as a stone property.

  19. Determination of ethanol in whey-sugar solutions by freezing. [Kluyveromyces fragilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Demott, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    The composition of solutions undergoing yeast fermentation was stimulated by using direct-acid-set cottage cheese whey containing increasing amounts of EtOH (0 to 5.4%) with decreasing amounts of sucrose (10 to 0%). Each decrease of 0.54 g EtOH decreased specific gravity by 0.0046 unit and lowered the freezing point by 0.159 H (the Hortvet unit). Whey containing 10% added sucrose was treated as follows: (a) inoculated with Kluyveromyces fragilis, (b) carbohydrate splitting enzymes added and inoculated with Kluyveromyces fragilis and (c) carbohydrate splitting enzymes added and inoculated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All mixtures were incubated 48 h at 32 degrees during which 6 samples from each treatment were analyzed for total solids, specific gravity and freezing point. No difference was noted between samples treated with enzymes or those treated with the 2 yeasts cultured as related to decrease in total solids concentration or specific gravity. Each 0.001 H decrease in freezing point was accompanied by a total solids decrease of 0.006 g/100 g whey in the nonenzyme treated sample, and 0.008 g and 0.010 g/100 g whey in the enzyme-treated samples inoculated with Kluyveromyces fragilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. Each 0.001 H change in freezing point was equivalent to a change of 0.00003 specific gravity unit in the nonenzyme-treated sample and 0.000043 and 0.000048 specific gravity unit in the enzyme-treated samples inoculated with Kluyveromyces fragilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. The precision with which freezing point can be determined suggests its use in evaluating the amount of EtOH produced during fermentation.

  20. Roles of carbohydrate reserves for local adaptation to low temperatures in the freeze tolerant oligochaete Enchytraeus albidus.

    PubMed

    Fisker, Karina Vincents; Overgaard, Johannes; Srensen, Jesper Givskov; Slotsbo, Stine; Holmstrup, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Geographic variation in cold tolerance and associated physiological adaptations were investigated in the freeze tolerant enchytraeid Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta). Specimens from Svalbard, Greenland (Nuuk), Iceland (Hlar and Mossfellsbr) and continental Europe [Norway (Bergen), Sweden (Kullen) and Germany] were reared in the laboratory in a common-garden experiment. The aim was to test for variations in minimum lethal temperature, freeze duration tolerance, carbohydrate reserves and metabolic rate among the populations. Cold tolerance was related to environmental temperature of the respective location. Populations from the coldest climatic regions were able to tolerate freezing down to at least -15 C and endured being frozen at -5 C for 27-48 days, respectively. Populations from milder climates had a lower freeze duration tolerance (about -9 C) and endured -5 C for a shorter period (between 9 and 16 days). Glucose accumulation and glycogen reserves varied significantly between populations, but was not related directly to cold tolerance. Metabolic rate varied significantly between populations, but was not significantly related to cold tolerance. The metabolic rates at -2 C of frozen and unfrozen worms from Germany and Svalbard were tested. The metabolic depression due to freezing of these populations was relatively small (<50 %), suggesting that the large carbohydrate accumulations may also be important as fuel during long-term freezing at moderately low temperatures. Differences in metabolic depression may partly explain the difference in cold tolerance of these two populations, however, the mechanisms behind local adaptation to low winter temperatures in these enchytraeid populations seem more complex than earlier studies have indicated. PMID:24154838

  1. Dual roles of glucose in the freeze-tolerant earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra: cryoprotection and fuel for metabolism.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Sofia; Holmstrup, Martin; Westh, Peter; Overgaard, Johannes

    2009-03-01

    Ectothermic animals inhabiting the subarctic and temperate regions have evolved strategies to deal with periods of continuous frost during winter. The earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra is freeze tolerant and accumulates large concentrations of glucose upon freezing. The present study investigates the roles of glucose accumulation for long-term freeze tolerance in worms kept frozen at -2 degrees C for 47 days. During this period, worms were sampled periodically for determination of survival and for measurements of glucose, glycogen, lactate, alanine and succinate. In addition we performed calorimetric measurements to assess metabolic rate of frozen and unfrozen worms. Long-term freezing was associated with a gradual depletion of glucose and worms that succumbed during this period were always characterised by low glucose and glycogen levels. The anaerobic waste products lactate and alanine increased slightly whereas succinate levels remained constant. However, it is argued that other waste products (particularly propionate) could be the primary end product of a continued anaerobic metabolism. Calorimetric measures of the metabolic rate of frozen worms were in accord with values calculated from the reduction in glucose assuming that most ( approximately 90%) glucose was metabolised anaerobically. Both estimates of metabolic rate demonstrated a 10-fold metabolic depression associated with freezing. Thus, in addition to the suspected role of glucose as cryoprotectant, the present study demonstrates that glucose accumulation is vital to ensure substrate for long-term anaerobic metabolism in frozen worms. On the basis of the estimated metabolite levels, we calculate that the combined effect of metabolic depression and large glucose stores enables a projected 3 months survival of freezing at -2 degrees C of the ;average' D. octaedra. Such conditions are very likely to occur in the northern distribution ranges of this stress-tolerant earthworm. PMID:19252003

  2. Physiological responses to freezing in hatchlings of freeze-tolerant and -intolerant turtles.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Jon P; Baker, Patrick J; Lee, Richard E

    2006-09-01

    Freeze tolerance is a complex cold-hardiness adaptation that has independently evolved in a diverse group of organisms, including several ectothermic vertebrates. Because little is known about the mechanistic basis for freeze tolerance in reptiles, we compared responses to experimental freezing in winter-acclimatized hatchlings representing nine taxa of temperate North American turtles, including ones that tolerated freezing and others that did not. Viability rates of hatchlings frozen to -3 degrees C for 72 h ranged from 0 to 100%. Tolerance to freezing was poor in Sternotherus odoratus, Graptemys geographica and Trachemys scripta, intermediate in Chelydra serpentina, and high in Emydoidea blandingii, Chrysemys picta bellii, C. p. marginata, Malaclemys terrapin, and Terrapene ornata, and generally reflected the winter thermal ecology of each taxon. Plasma activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a novel in vivo index of freeze/thaw damage, corroborated viability assessments and demonstrated that cryoinjury occurred even in surviving turtles. Irrespective of taxon, cryoinjury tended to be higher in smaller individuals and in those having relatively low water contents; however, bases for these associations were not apparent. Screening for certain organic osmolytes that might promote freezing survival by colligatively reducing ice content and limiting cell dehydration showed that the plasma of unfrozen (control) turtles contained small quantities of glucose (1.3-5.8 mmol l(-1)) and lactate (0.6-3.2 mmol l(-1)) and modest amounts of urea (range of mean values for all taxa 8.2-52.3 mmol l(-1)). Frozen/thawed turtles of all taxa accumulated modest amounts of glucose and lactate that jointly raised the plasma solute concentration by 30-100 mmol l(-1). We conclude that organic osmolytes accumulated both before and during freezing may promote survival in species that have evolved a tolerance to freezing, but are not necessarily accumulated for that purpose. PMID:16758216

  3. Soil salinity increases survival of freezing in the enchytraeid Enchytraeus albidus.

    PubMed

    Silva, A L Patrcio; Holmstrup, M; Kostal, V; Amorim, M J B

    2013-07-15

    Enchytraeus albidus is a freeze-tolerant enchytraeid found in diverse habitats, ranging from supralittoral to terrestrial and spanning temperate to arctic regions. Its freeze tolerance is well known but the effect of salinity in this strategy is still poorly understood. We therefore studied the combined effect of salinity (0, 15, 35, 50 NaCl) and sub-zero temperatures (-5, -14, -20C) on the freeze tolerance of E. albidus collected from two distinct geographical regions (Greenland and Germany). A full factorial design was used to study survival, and physiological and biochemical end points. The effect of salinity on the reproduction of German E. albidus was also assessed. Exposure for 48 h to saline soils prior to cold exposure triggered an increase in osmolality and decrease in water content. Worms exposed to saline soils had an improved survival of freezing compared to worms frozen in non-saline soils, particularly at -20C (survival more than doubled). Differential scanning calorimetry measurements showed that the fraction of water frozen at -5 and -14C was lower in worms exposed to 35 NaCl than in control worms. The lowering of ice content by exposure to saline soils was probably the main explanation for the better freeze survival in saline-exposed worms. Glucose increased with decreasing temperature, but was lower in saline than in non-saline soils. Thus, glucose accumulation patterns did not explain differences in freeze survival. Overall, the physiological responses to freezing of E. albidus from Greenland and Germany were similar after exposure to saline soils. Soil salinity up to 30 improved reproduction by a factor of ca. 10. PMID:23531829

  4. Infrared Thermography for Monitoring of Freeze-Drying Processes: Instrumental Developments and Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Emteborg, Håkan; Zeleny, Reinhard; Charoud-Got, Jean; Martos, Gustavo; Lüddeke, Jörg; Schellin, Holger; Teipel, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Coupling an infrared (IR) camera to a freeze dryer for on-line monitoring of freeze-drying cycles is described for the first time. Normally, product temperature is measured using a few invasive Pt-100 probes, resulting in poor spatial resolution. To overcome this, an IR camera was placed on a process-scale freeze dryer. Imaging took place every 120 s through a Germanium window comprising 30,000 measurement points obtained contact-free from −40°C to 25°C. Results are presented for an empty system, bulk drying of cheese slurry, and drying of 1 mL human serum in 150 vials. During freezing of the empty system, differences of more than 5°C were measured on the shelf. Adding a tray to the empty system, a difference of more than 8°C was observed. These temperature differences probably cause different ice structures affecting the drying speed during sublimation. A temperature difference of maximum 13°C was observed in bulk mode during sublimation. When drying in vials, differences of more than 10°C were observed. Gradually, the large temperature differences disappeared during secondary drying and products were transformed into uniformly dry cakes. The experimental data show that the IR camera is a highly versatile on-line monitoring tool for different kinds of freeze-drying processes. © 2014 European Union 103:2088–2097, 2014 PMID:24902839

  5. Infrared thermography for monitoring of freeze-drying processes: instrumental developments and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Emteborg, Håkan; Zeleny, Reinhard; Charoud-Got, Jean; Martos, Gustavo; Lüddeke, Jörg; Schellin, Holger; Teipel, Katharina

    2014-07-01

    Coupling an infrared (IR) camera to a freeze dryer for on-line monitoring of freeze-drying cycles is described for the first time. Normally, product temperature is measured using a few invasive Pt-100 probes, resulting in poor spatial resolution. To overcome this, an IR camera was placed on a process-scale freeze dryer. Imaging took place every 120 s through a Germanium window comprising 30,000 measurement points obtained contact-free from -40 °C to 25 °C. Results are presented for an empty system, bulk drying of cheese slurry, and drying of 1 mL human serum in 150 vials. During freezing of the empty system, differences of more than 5 °C were measured on the shelf. Adding a tray to the empty system, a difference of more than 8 °C was observed. These temperature differences probably cause different ice structures affecting the drying speed during sublimation. A temperature difference of maximum 13 °C was observed in bulk mode during sublimation. When drying in vials, differences of more than 10 °C were observed. Gradually, the large temperature differences disappeared during secondary drying and products were transformed into uniformly dry cakes. The experimental data show that the IR camera is a highly versatile on-line monitoring tool for different kinds of freeze-drying processes. PMID:24902839

  6. Effect of chlorine, blanching, freezing, and microwave heating on Cryptosporidium parvum viability inoculated on green peppers.

    PubMed

    Duhain, G L M C; Minnaar, A; Buys, E M

    2012-05-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts have been found on the surface of vegetables in both developed and developing countries. C. parvum can contaminate vegetables via various routes, including irrigation water. This study investigated the effect of individual treatments of chlorine, blanching, blast freezing, and microwave heating, as well as combined treatments of chlorine and freezing, and chlorine and microwave heating on the viability of C. parvum oocysts inoculated on green peppers. The viability of the oocysts after the treatments was assessed using propidium iodide and a flow cytometer. Based on the propidium iodide staining, the chlorine treatments did not affect the viability of the oocysts. Blast freezing significantly inactivated 20% of the oocysts. Microwave heating and blanching significantly inactivated 93% of oocysts. Treatment with chlorine followed by blast freezing did not affect the viability of the oocysts significantly. Treatment with chlorine and microwave heating was significantly more effective than microwave heating alone and inactivated 98% of the oocysts. The study indicates that C. parvum oocysts are sensitive to heat and, to some extent, to blast freezing, but are resistant to chlorine. Therefore, the use of chlorine during vegetable processing is not a critical control point for C. parvum oocysts, and the consumption of raw or minimally processed vegetables may constitute a health risk as C. parvum oocysts can still be found viable on ready-to-eat, minimally processed vegetables. PMID:22564944

  7. FREEZE-FRAME: Fast Action Stress Relief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childre, Doc Lew

    Recent scientific research has proven that we can, not only manage our stress, we can even prevent it. Ways to achieve stress management are presented in this book. It details a method called FREEZE-FRAME, a process in which individuals mentally stop the chaos that surrounds them and then calmly contemplate their situation. The text opens with an

  8. Polybutylene pipe freeze/thaw reliability testing

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.

    1987-04-01

    This paper discusses the ability of polybutylene pipe to withstand repeated freezing and thawing. The test apparatus, test procedure, list of chronological events, and results are discussed. Polybutylene piping has potential use in active solar heating systems and integral-collector-storage systems.

  9. Managing damaging freeze events in Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of sugarcane to damaging frosts occurs in approximately 25% of the sugarcane producing countries of the world, but is most frequent on the mainland of the United States, especially in the state of Louisiana. The frequent winter freezes that occur in the sugarcane areas of Louisiana have fo...

  10. Unitarity Constraints on Asymmetric Freeze-In

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; /SLAC

    2011-08-15

    This paper considers unitarity and CPT constraints on asymmetric freeze-in, the use of freeze-in to store baryon number in a dark sector. In this scenario, Sakharov's out of equilibrium condition is satisfied by placing the visible and hidden sectors at different temperatures while a net visible baryon number is produced by storing negative baryon number in a dark sector. It is shown that unitarity and CPT lead to unexpected cancellations. In particular, the transfer of baryon number cancels completely at leading order. This note has shown that if two sectors are in thermal equilibrium with themselves, but not with each other, then the leading effect transferring conserved quantities between the two sectors is of order the the weak coupling connecting them to the third power. When freeze-in is used to produce a net baryon number density, the leading order effect comes from {Omicron}({lambda}{sup 3}) diagrams where the intermediate state that goes on-shell has a different visible baryon number than the final state visible baryon number. Models in which the correct baryon number is generated with freeze-in as the dominant source of abundance, typically require {lambda} {approx}> 10{sup -6} and m{sub bath} {approx}> TeV. m{sub bath} is the mass of the visible particle which communicates with the hidden sector. The lower window is potentially observable at the LHC.

  11. Canalization of freeze tolerance in an alpine grasshopper.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Timothy C

    2015-10-01

    In the Rock and Pillar Range, New Zealand, the alpine grasshopper, Sigaus australis Hutton, survives equilibrium freezing (EF) all-year round. A comparison of freeze tolerance (FT) in grasshoppers over four austral seasons for a 1 year period finds that: (a) the majority (>70%) of the sample population of grasshoppers survive single freeze-stress throughout the year; (b) exposure to increased freeze stress (multiple freeze-stress events) does not lead to a loss of freeze tolerance; and (c) responses to increased freeze stress reveal seasonal tuning of the FT adaptation to environmental temperatures. The Rock and Pillar sample population provides a clear example of the canalization of the FT adaptation. Seasonal variability in the extent of tolerance of multiple freezing events indicates that physiology is modulated to environmental temperatures by phenotypic plasticity - i.e. the FT adaptation is permanent and adjustable. PMID:26210007

  12. Nucleation Pathways For Freezing Of Two Grades Of Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Rulison, Aaron; Bayuzick, Robert; Hofmeister, William; Morton, Craig

    1996-01-01

    Report discusses classical nucleation theory of freezing and describes experimental study of nucleation mechanisms that predominate during freezing of spherical specimens of initially molten zirconium levitated electrostatically in vacuum.

  13. The influence of freezing and freeze-drying of tissue specimens on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Meijer, A E; Benson, D; Scholte, H R

    1977-04-01

    In the presented study the influence of freezing and freeze-drying on enzyme activity is described. Attention is paid to 16 enzymes which can be used for quantitative enzyme histochemical techniques. With the exception of succinate dehydrogenase only, no significant inactivation during freezing and freeze-drying procedures could be demonstrated with lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase (NAD+), malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) (NADP+), isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, NADH-oxydoreductase, mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase, phosphoglucomutase, glucosephosphate isomerase, glucose-6-phosphatase, acid phosphatase, beta-glucuronidase and non specific aryl esterase. Therefore, the results supply a sound foundation for those quantitative enzyme histochemical techniques in which tissue specimens are frozen or frozen-dried before enzyme estimations are performed. PMID:870461

  14. Deliquesence and freezing of stratospheric aerosol observed by balloonborne backscattersondes

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, N.; Knudsen, B.; Rosen, J.M.

    1995-05-15

    Stratospheric sulfate aerosols, originating from the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic eruption, have been observed during three winters in the Arctic by balloonborne backscattersondes. A measured color index, defined as the quotient between the aerosol backscatter ratios at wavelengths 940 and 480 nm, provides information of the size of the observed particles. The effects of liquid particle growth, by water vapor uptake, clearly show up as changes in the color index, whereas measurements on other days indicate the particles to be frozen. Air parcel trajectories have been calculated, providing the temperature history of the observed particles. Evidences appear of a temperature hysteresis in the freezing and melting cycle of the aerosol, indicating melting temperatures around 215-220 K in good agreement with laboratory measurements, and freezing of the particles within less than 5 K above the ice frost point. The changes in color index of the liquid particles are in good agreement with predictions from theoretical model calculations of growth by water vapor uptake. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Objective video quality assessment method for freeze distortion based on freeze aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Keishiro; Okamoto, Jun; Kurita, Takaaki

    2006-01-01

    With the development of the broadband network, video communications such as videophone, video distribution, and IPTV services are beginning to become common. In order to provide these services appropriately, we must manage them based on subjective video quality, in addition to designing a network system based on it. Currently, subjective quality assessment is the main method used to quantify video quality. However, it is time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, we need an objective quality assessment technology that can estimate video quality from video characteristics effectively. Video degradation can be categorized into two types: spatial and temporal. Objective quality assessment methods for spatial degradation have been studied extensively, but methods for temporal degradation have hardly been examined even though it occurs frequently due to network degradation and has a large impact on subjective quality. In this paper, we propose an objective quality assessment method for temporal degradation. Our approach is to aggregate multiple freeze distortions into an equivalent freeze distortion and then derive the objective video quality from the equivalent freeze distortion. Specifically, our method considers the total length of all freeze distortions in a video sequence as the length of the equivalent single freeze distortion. In addition, we propose a method using the perceptual characteristics of short freeze distortions. We verified that our method can estimate the objective video quality well within the deviation of subjective video quality.

  16. Depression: What We Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobel, Brana; Hirschfeld, Robert M. A.

    This booklet is concerned with the area of clinical depression. Questions about clinical depression are briefly answered in an overview section and are examined in greater detail in the five chapters that follow. In chapter 1, depression is defined and various types of depression are identified. The origins of depression are explored in the second…

  17. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS 305.7 Quick freeze treatment requirements. Quick freeze treatment for fruits and vegetables imported into the United States or...

  18. 47 CFR 64.636 - Prohibition of default provider freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibition of default provider freezes. 64.636... Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities 64.636 Prohibition of default provider freezes. (a) A default provider freeze prevents a change in an iTRS user's default provider selection...

  19. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS 305.7 Quick freeze treatment requirements. Quick freeze treatment for fruits and vegetables imported into the United States or...

  20. 47 CFR 64.636 - Prohibition of default provider freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prohibition of default provider freezes. 64.636... Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities 64.636 Prohibition of default provider freezes. (a) A default provider freeze prevents a change in an iTRS user's default provider selection...

  1. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  2. VISUALIZATION OF FREEZING PROGRESSION IN TURFGRASSES USING INFRARED VIDEO THERMOGRAPHY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freezing injury can be a significant problem in turfgrasses. Understanding how freezing develops and ramifies throughout the plant could assist in the development of improved management or screening processes for cultivar improvemen. The development of freezing injury is not well understand due pa...

  3. Genetics of winter wheat response to two freezing treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inheritance of the ability of winter wheat plants to survive two kinds of freezing stress was investigated in a five-parent diallel cross. Plants were acclimated at +4°C for 5 wks and frozen with or without a –3°C, 16-hour pre-freezing (PF) period prior to freezing to damaging temperatures. The ...

  4. FREEZING-STRESS-RESPONSIVE GENES AND THEIR EXPRESSION IN BARLEY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Injury of barley plants by spring freezing is a major cause of crop loss, but most cold tolerance research has focused on cold acclimation, which confers freezing tolerance upon exposure to low nonfreezing temperatures. In order to address freezing tolerance per se, we have chosen a cold sensitive ...

  5. Modification of physical properties of freeze-dried rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.

    1971-01-01

    Freeze cycling process consists of alternately freezing and thawing precooked rice for two cycles, rice is then frozen and freeze-dehydrated in vacuum sufficient to remove water from rice by sublimitation. Process modifies rice grain structure and porosity, enabling complete rehydration in one minute in hot water.

  6. 7 CFR 58.638 - Freezing the mix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing the mix. 58.638 Section 58.638 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.638 Freezing the mix. After the mix enters the freezer, it shall be frozen as rapidly as... and further freezing....

  7. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  8. 7 CFR 58.638 - Freezing the mix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing the mix. 58.638 Section 58.638 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.638 Freezing the mix. After the mix enters the freezer, it shall be frozen as rapidly as... and further freezing....

  9. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  10. 7 CFR 58.638 - Freezing the mix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing the mix. 58.638 Section 58.638 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.638 Freezing the mix. After the mix enters the freezer, it shall be frozen as rapidly as... and further freezing....

  11. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  12. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  13. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  14. Interspecific analysis of xylem freezing responses in Acer and Betula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperate woody plants have evolved two methods for coping with seasonal exposure to sub-zero temperatures. Supercooling is a freeze-avoidance strategy where cells are able to resist the freezing of intracellular water below sub-zero temperatures. Non-supercooling is a freeze-tolerance strategy wh...

  15. Learning and memory impairments in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression

    PubMed Central

    Darcet, Flavie; Mendez-David, Indira; Tritschler, Laurent; Gardier, Alain M.; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; David, Denis J.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive disturbances are often reported as serious incapacitating symptoms by patients suffering from major depressive disorders (MDDs). Such deficits have been observed in various animal models based on environmental stress. Here, we performed a complete characterization of cognitive functions in a neuroendocrine mouse model of depression based on a chronic (4 weeks) corticosterone administration (CORT). Cognitive performances were assessed using behavioral tests measuring episodic (novel object recognition test, NORT), associative (one-trial contextual fear conditioning, CFC), and visuo-spatial (Morris water maze, MWM; Barnes maze, BM) learning/memory. Altered emotional phenotype after chronic corticosterone treatment was confirmed in mice using tests predictive of anxiety or depression-related behaviors. In the NORT, CORT-treated mice showed a decrease in time exploring the novel object during the test session and a lower discrimination index compared to control mice, characteristic of recognition memory impairment. Associative memory was also impaired, as observed with a decrease in freezing duration in CORT-treated mice in the CFC, thus pointing out the cognitive alterations in this model. In the MWM and in the BM, spatial learning performance but also short-term spatial memory were altered in CORT-treated mice. In the MWM, unlike control animals, CORT-treated animals failed to learn a new location during the reversal phase, suggesting a loss of cognitive flexibility. Finally, in the BM, the lack of preference for the target quadrant during the recall probe trial in animals receiving corticosterone regimen demonstrates that long-term retention was also affected in this paradigm. Taken together, our results highlight that CORT-induced anxio-depressive-like phenotype is associated with a cognitive deficit affecting all aspects of memory tested. PMID:24822041

  16. Understanding Depression (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disorder with depressed mood, seasonal affective disorder , and bipolar disorder (or manic depression). All of these can affect ... dysthymic disorder go on to develop major depression.) Bipolar disorder , another type of mood disturbance, is marked by ...

  17. Depression - older adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... life for weeks or longer. Depression in older adults is a widespread problem, but it is not ... In older adults, life changes can increase the risk for depression or make existing depression worse. Some of these changes are: ...

  18. Depression and Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePLUS

    Depression - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society ... Twitter Email Home Symptoms & Diagnosis MS Symptoms Depression Depression Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print In this ...

  19. Postpartum Depression Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Where can I find more information? Share Postpartum Depression Facts Download PDF Download ePub Download Mobi Order ... for herself or her family. What is postpartum depression? Postpartum depression is a mood disorder that can ...

  20. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    PDD; Chronic depression; Depression - chronic ... The exact cause of persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is unknown. It tends to run in families. PDD occurs more often in women. Most people with PDD will also ...

  1. Depression in Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or someone I know is in crisis? Share Depression in Women Download PDF Download ePub Order a ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone sometimes feels sad, but these feelings usually ...

  2. Depression and College Students

    MedlinePLUS

    ... depression and other mental health issues? Reference Share Depression and College Students Download PDF Download ePub Order ... Answers to college students’ frequently asked questions about depression Feeling moody, sad, or grouchy? Who doesn’t ...

  3. Depression after Stroke

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Library CARING FOR SOMEONE WITH EMOTIONAL & BEHAVIORAL NEEDS Depression After Stroke After a stroke, your loved one ... available! Almost half of all stroke survivors have depression. Depression is a normal response to the losses ...

  4. Depression and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More Information on Diabetes Citations Reprints Depression and Diabetes Order a free hardcopy En Espaol Introduction Depression ... see the NIMH booklet on Depression . What is diabetes? Diabetes is an illness that affects the way ...

  5. Numerical study of two-dimensional freezing in an annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Sablani, S.S.; Venkateshan, S.P.; Sastri, V.M.K. )

    1990-07-01

    An evaluation is made of the results of a numerical study on two-dimensional freezing in an annulus made up of an initially superheated phase-change medium. Numerical results are used to deduce a relation between the nondimensional discharge time and the other parameters. The velocity of the freeze front decreases with time because of the increase of interface area as the freezing proceeds radially outward, followed by a marginal decrease in the freezing rate due to the presence of the adiabatic surface; sensible cooling then occurs only where the freeze front has already reached the adiabatic surface. 6 refs.

  6. Hibernation physiology, freezing adaptation and extreme freeze tolerance in a northern population of the wood frog.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Jon P; do Amaral, M Clara F; Rosendale, Andrew J; Lee, Richard E

    2013-09-15

    We investigated hibernation physiology and freeze tolerance in a population of the wood frog, Rana sylvatica, indigenous to Interior Alaska, USA, near the northernmost limit of the species' range. Winter acclimatization responses included a 233% increase in the hepatic glycogen depot that was subsidized by fat body and skeletal muscle catabolism, and a rise in plasma osmolality that reflected accrual of urea (to 106±10 μmol ml(-1)) and an unidentified solute (to ~73 μmol ml(-1)). In contrast, frogs from a cool-temperate population (southern Ohio, USA) amassed much less glycogen, had a lower uremia (28±5 μmol ml(-1)) and apparently lacked the unidentified solute. Alaskan frogs survived freezing at temperatures as low as -16°C, some 10-13°C below those tolerated by southern conspecifics, and endured a 2-month bout of freezing at -4°C. The profound freeze tolerance is presumably due to their high levels of organic osmolytes and bound water, which limits ice formation. Adaptive responses to freezing (-2.5°C for 48 h) and subsequent thawing (4°C) included synthesis of the cryoprotectants urea and glucose, and dehydration of certain tissues. Alaskan frogs differed from Ohioan frogs in retaining a substantial reserve capacity for glucose synthesis, accumulating high levels of cryoprotectants in brain tissue, and remaining hyperglycemic long after thawing. The northern phenotype also incurred less stress during freezing/thawing, as indicated by limited cryohemolysis and lactate accumulation. Post-glacial colonization of high latitudes by R. sylvatica required a substantial increase in freeze tolerance that was at least partly achieved by enhancing their cryoprotectant system. PMID:23966588

  7. Spacecraft Radiator Freeze Protection Using a Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Schunk, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    An active thermal control system architecture has been modified to include a regenerative heat exchanger (regenerator) inboard of the radiator. Rather than using a radiator bypass valve a regenerative heat exchanger is placed inboard of the radiators. A regenerator cold side bypass valve is used to set the return temperature. During operation, the regenerator bypass flow is varied, mixing cold radiator return fluid and warm regenerator outlet fluid to maintain the system setpoint. At the lowest heat load for stable operation, the bypass flow is closed off, sending all of the flow through the regenerator. This lowers the radiator inlet temperature well below the system set-point while maintaining full flow through the radiators. By using a regenerator bypass flow control to maintain system setpoint, the required minimum heat load to avoid radiator freezing can be reduced by more than half compared to a radiator bypass system.

  8. Studies on Freezing Injury of Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shizuo

    1984-01-01

    The thermotropic transition of plasma membrane of Dactylis glomerata was studied by using fluorescence polarization of embedded fluorophore, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Under the presence of 35% ethylene glycol, reversible thermotropic transitions were observed in isolated plasma membrane vesicles in nearly the same temperature range as the temperature of freezing injury to cells. In liposomes prepared from isolated plasma membranes, however, the thermotropic transitions occurred at much lower temperatures in comparison with those of intact membrane vesicles. Following treatment with pronase, the thermotropic transition also shifted downward. Thus, the thermotropic properties of plasma membranes appeared to be dependent on the membrane proteins. In vitro freezing of the isolated plasma membrane vesicles without addition of any cryoprotectant, such as sorbitol, resulted in an irreversible alteration both in the fluorescence anisotropy values and the temperatures for the thermotropic transition, suggesting an irreversible alteration in the membrane structure, presumably changes in lipid-protein interactions and protein conformation. PMID:16663597

  9. Biotechnological applications of plant freezing associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Breton, G; Danyluk, J; Ouellet, F; Sarhan, F

    2000-01-01

    Plants use a wide array of proteins to protect themselves against low temperature and freezing conditions. The identification of these freezing tolerance associated proteins and the elucidation of their cryoprotective functions will have important applications in several fields. Genes encoding structural proteins, osmolyte producing enzymes, oxidative stress scavenging enzymes, lipid desaturases and gene regulators have been used to produce transgenic plants. These studies have revealed the potential capacity of different genes to protect against temperature related stresses. In some cases, transgenic plants with significant cold tolerance have been produced. Furthermore, the biochemical characterization of the cold induced antifreeze proteins and dehydrins reveals many applications in the food and the medical industries. These proteins are being considered as food additives to improve the quality and shelf-life of frozen foods, as cryoprotective agents for organ and cell cryopreservation, and as chemical adjuvant in cancer cryosurgery. PMID:11193297

  10. [Non-freezing cold injury in soldiers].

    PubMed

    Melamed, E; Glassberg, E

    2002-12-01

    Non-freezing cold injury (NFCI) is an injury of the hands or feet resulting from exposure to wet conditions and temperatures just above freezing, typically found in soldiers. NFCI is due to microvascular endothelial damage, stasis and vascular occlusion. At first, the tissue is cold and anesthetic, progressing to hyperemia in 24-48 hours. Hyperemia is accompanied by an intense painful burning sensation as well as blisters, redness, and possibly, ulcerations. NFCI management raises frustration in both medical officers and commanders. Most authorities are not aware of or remain unimpressed with the severity of NFCI, nor do they realize that it produces lifelong symptomatology. The following review of the available literature attempts to clear up some issues regarding the definition, pathogenesis, symptoms and preventative measures available in NFCI, including our own experience. PMID:12534203

  11. Freeze-out, Hadronization and Statistical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The comparison of the statistical hadronization model with experimental data and lattice QCD results is not always straightforward. Indeed, the interpretation of the ϕ meson production, of the proton to pion multiplicity ratio at LHC and the agreement of the freeze-out curve with the lattice critical line in the T — µB plane, require further analyses. Moreover the dynamics of the hadronization has to be compatible with: 1) the statitical behavior also observed in elementary high energy collisions; 2) a universal hadronization temperature for all high energy collisions; 3) the freeze-out criteria. In these lecture notes the SHM is recalled and some explanations of the puzzling aspects of its comparison with data are discussed.

  12. Freeze-out parameters: lattice meets experiment.

    PubMed

    Borsnyi, S; Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Krieg, S; Ratti, C; Szab, K K

    2013-08-01

    We present our results for ratios of higher order fluctuations of electric charge as functions of the temperature. These results are obtained in a system of 2+1 quark flavors at physical quark masses and continuum extrapolated. We compare them to preliminary data on higher order moments of the net electric charge distribution from the STAR collaboration. This allows us to determine the freeze-out temperature and chemical potential from first principles. We also show continuum-extrapolated results for ratios of higher order fluctuations of baryon number. These will allow us to test the consistency of the approach, by comparing them to the corresponding experimental data (once they become available) and thus, extracting the freeze-out parameters in an independent way. PMID:23971565

  13. Ground freezing for containment of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    Sayles, F.N.; Iskandar, I.K.

    1998-07-01

    The freezing of ground for the containment of subsurface hazardous waste is a promising method that is environmentally friendly and offers a safe alternative to other methods of waste retention in many cases. The frozen soil method offers two concepts for retaining waste. One concept is to freeze the entire waste area into a solid block of frozen soil thus locking the waste in situ. For small areas where the contaminated soil does not include vessels that would rupture from frost action, this concept may be simpler to install. A second concept, of course, is to create a frozen soil barrier to confine the waste within prescribed unfrozen soil boundaries; initial research in this area was funded by EPA, Cincinnati, OH, and the Army Corps of Engineers. The paper discusses advantages and limitations, a case study from Oak Ridge, TN, and a mesh generation program that simulates the cryogenic technology.

  14. Fast Melting and Freezing for Microgravity Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial tube welders adapted to metallurgical research. Proposed furnace melts and resolidifies small metal samples during brief periods. In furnace, sample surrounded by large heat sinks and rapidly heated near midlength by intense source of heat. Furnace intended for use in experiments in microgravity: entire melting-and-freezing process requires less than 20 s of near weightlessness experienced in parabolic climb and dive of KC-135 airplane.

  15. Anhedonia, Depressed Mood, and Smoking Cessation Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Piper, Megan E.; Japuntich, Sandra J.; Baker, Timothy B.; Cook, Jessica W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although the relation between lifetime depression and smoking cessation outcome has been well-studied, the proposition that different symptomatic expressions of depression exert disparate predictive effects on risk of smoking cessation failure has largely gone uninvestigated. This study analyzed the individual contributions of depression's two hallmark affective symptoms, anhedonia (i.e., diminished interest in normally enjoyable activities) and depressed mood (i.e., elevated sadness), to the prediction of smoking cessation outcome. Method Participants were adult daily smokers (N=1469; Mean age = 45 years, 58% Female, 84% White) enrolled in a smoking cessation treatment study. Lifetime history of anhedonia and depressed mood were classified via structured interview prior to quit day. Seven-day point prevalence smoking abstinence was assessed at 8-weeks and 6-months post-quit. Results When examined separately, both lifetime anhedonia, OR(95% CI)=1.42(1.16-1.73), p=.004, and depressed mood, OR(95% CI)=1.35(1.11-1.63), p=.002, predicted increased odds of relapse. These relations remained after adjusting for covariates, including lifetime depressive disorder, which did not predict outcome. After controlling for the covariation between lifetime anhedonia and depressed mood, anhedonia predicted cessation outcome, OR(95% CI)=1.31(1.05-1.62), p=.02, while depressed mood did not, p=.19. Symptom duration (>2 weeks), treatment, and substance use disorder did not modify relations of lifetime anhedonia and depressed mood with cessation outcome. Conclusions Results suggest that: (1) symptoms of affective disturbance capture depression-relevant risk of cessation failure, which is not adequately demarcated by the lifetime depressive disorder diagnosis; and (2) anhedonia is a more sensitive index of this affective disturbance than depressed mood per se. Clinical attention to anhedonia may facilitate smoking cessation. PMID:24219183

  16. Atmospheric freeze drying assisted by power ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santacatalina, J. V.; Crcel, J. A.; Simal, S.; Garcia-Perez, J. V.; Mulet, A.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric freeze drying (AFD) is considered an alternative to vacuum freeze drying to keep the quality of fresh product. AFD allows continuous drying reducing fix and operating costs, but presents, as main disadvantage, a long drying time required. The application of power ultrasound (US) can accelerate AFD process. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the application of power ultrasound to improve atmospheric freeze drying of carrot. For that purpose, AFD experiments were carried out with carrot cubes (10 mm side) at constant air velocity (2 ms-1), temperature (-10C) and relative humidity (10%) with (20.5 kWm-3,USAFD) and without (AFD) ultrasonic application. A diffusion model was used in order to quantify the influence of US in drying kinetics. To evaluate the quality of dry products, rehydration capacity and textural properties were determined. The US application during AFD of carrot involved the increase of drying rate. The effective moisture diffusivity identified in USAFD was 73% higher than in AFD experiments. On the other hand, the rehydration capacity was higher in USAFD than in AFD and the hardness of dried samples did not show significant (p<0.05) differences. Therefore, US application during AFD significantly (p<0.05) sped-up the drying process preserving the quality properties of the dry product.

  17. Freeze substitution in 3 hours or less.

    PubMed

    McDonald, K L; Webb, R I

    2011-09-01

    Freeze substitution is a process for low temperature dehydration and fixation of rapidly frozen cells that usually takes days to complete. New methods for freeze substitution have been developed that require only basic laboratory tools: a platform shaker, liquid nitrogen, a metal block with holes for cryotubes and an insulated container such as an ice bucket. With this equipment, excellent freeze substitution results can be obtained in as little as 90 min for cells of small volume such as bacteria and tissue culture cells. For cells of greater volume or that have significant diffusion barriers such as cuticles or thick cell walls, one can extend the time to 3 h or more with dry ice. The 3-h method works well for all manner of specimens, including plants and Caenorhabditis elegans as well as smaller samples. Here, we present the basics of the techniques and some results from Nicotiana leaves, C. elegans adult worms, Escherichia coli and baby hamster kidney tissue culture cells. PMID:21827481

  18. Disaggregating meteorites by automated freeze thaw.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher R J

    2011-06-01

    An automated freeze-thaw (AFT) instrument for disaggregating meteorites is described. Meteorite samples are immersed in 18.2 M? water and hermetically sealed in a clean 30 ml Teflon vial. This vial and its contents are dipped between baths of liquid nitrogen and hot water over a number of cycles by a dual-stepper motor system controlled by LabView. Uniform and periodic intervals of freezing and thawing induce multiple expansions and contractions, such that cracks propagate along natural flaws in the meteorite for a sufficient number of AFT cycles. For the CR2 chondrite NWA801, the boundaries between different phases (i.e., silicates, metal, matrix) became progressively weaker and allowed for an efficient recovery of 500 individual chondrules and chondrule fragments spanning 0.2-4.7 mm diameters after 243 AFT cycles over 103.3 h. Further FT experiments on a basalt analog showed that the time required for freezing and thawing the same number of cycles can be reduced by a factor of ?4. PMID:21721725

  19. Steam consumption reduction by eutectic freeze crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Bichsel, S.E.; Cleary, M.; Barron, T.S.; Heist, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Steam production in American beet sugar factories can be reduced by 600 pounds per ton of beets by using hydrate freeze crystallization in place of pan evaporators for sugar crystallization. This is a relatively constant number, regardless of current factory energy use. Further reduction is limited by the juice heating needs in the purification operations. Steam for juice heating is 20 to 30% on beets, or 400 to 600 pounds of steam per ton. In efficient factories this is about the steam flow to the evaporators when the pan crystallizers are replaced by freeze crystallization. An approach is described here for a rapid evaluation of effects on the steam balance of basic process changes. It provides a visual guide to restructuring the steam balance that simplifies optimization when such changes are made. The graphic approach is useful in illustrating methods of reducing energy use in a sugar factory, in addition to the current analysis of integration of the hydrate freeze process. For example, membrane and vapor recompression evaporators for juice concentration must be accompanied by major factory modifications to produce any net savings of steam. The reason is the needs for specific steam quantity and quality for the pan evaporators and juice heaters, supplied through the current evaporator trains. Reduction of the steam rate below 25 to 35% on beets will require changes to the conventional juice purification process.

  20. Radiobrightness of diurnally heated, freezing soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Anthony W.

    1990-01-01

    Freezing and thawing soils exhibit unique radiometric characteristics. To examine these characteristics, diurnal insolation is modeled as one-dimensional heating of a moist soil half-space during a typical fall at a northern Great Plains site. The one-dimensional heat flow equation is nonlinear because both the enthalpy (the change in internal energy with temperature at constant pressure) and the thermal conductivity of freezing soils are nonlinear functions of temperature. The problem is particularly difficult because phase boundaries propagate in time, and because soils, particularly clay-rich soils, freeze over a range of temperatures rather than at 0 C. Diurnal radiobrightness curves at 10.7, 18.0, and 37.0-GHz were computed for each month. The 37.0-GHz radiobrightness best tracks soil surface temperature; the 10.7-37.0-GHz spectral gradient of thawed soils is strongly positive; the spectral gradient of frozen soils is slightly negative; and the midnight-to-noon spectral gradient is shifted by approximately +0.1 K/GHz by diurnal changes in the surface temperature and the thermal gradient. These observations support the use of the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer 37.0-GHz radiobrightness and its 10.7-37.0-GHz spectral gradient as discriminants in a frozen soil classifier for high-latitude prairie.

  1. Seasonal freeze resistance of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is generated by differential expression of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and antifreeze protein genes.

    PubMed

    Liebscher, Ryan S; Richards, Robert C; Lewis, Johanne M; Short, Connie E; Muise, Denise M; Driedzic, William R; Ewart, K Vanya

    2006-01-01

    In winter, rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) accumulate glycerol and produce an antifreeze protein (AFP), which both contribute to freeze resistance. The role of differential gene expression in the seasonal pattern of these adaptations was investigated. First, cDNAs encoding smelt and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and smelt glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were cloned so that all sequences required for expression analysis would be available. Using quantitative PCR, expression of beta actin in rainbow smelt liver was compared with that of GAPDH in order to determine its validity as a reference gene. Then, levels of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), PEPCK, and AFP relative to beta actin were measured in smelt liver over a fall-winter-spring interval. Levels of GPDH mRNA increased in the fall just before plasma glycerol accumulation, implying a driving role in glycerol synthesis. GPDH mRNA levels then declined during winter, well in advance of serum glycerol, suggesting the possibility of GPDH enzyme or glycerol conservation in smelt during the winter months. PEPCK mRNA levels rose in parallel with serum glycerol in the fall, consistent with an increasing requirement for amino acids as metabolic precursors, remained elevated for much of the winter, and then declined in advance of the decline in plasma glycerol. AFP mRNA was elevated at the onset of fall sampling in October and remained elevated until April, implying separate regulation from GPDH and PEPCK. Thus, winter freezing point depression in smelt appears to result from a seasonal cycle of GPDH gene expression, with an ensuing increase in the expression of PEPCK, and a similar but independent cycle of AFP gene expression. PMID:16555199

  2. Anomalous stress reactions in patients suffering from depression and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Harry; Jamieson, Robin

    1974-01-01

    An experiment is reported in which the forearm muscle blood flow of a group of patients with mixed depressions is compared with that of a group of patients with anxiety states. The blood flow was measured under relaxed conditions and during the presentation of a noise `stress'. The measurements obtained under stressed conditions show that, while the blood flow of those with anxiety states fell with repetition of the stress noise, that of the depressive patients increased. A similar pattern was shown by the relaxed measurements but here the difference was not statistically significant. There was also suggestion that stress produced a fall in blood flow in depressive subjects and an increase in patients with anxiety states. These results tend to support the hypothesis that depressive patients show something akin to a freeze response to stress, while patients with anxiety states show an arousal response. PMID:4838916

  3. Response of New zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum to freezing and near freezing fluctuating water temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.; James, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the resilience of the invasive New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to fluctuating winter freezing and near-freezing temperature cycles in laboratory tests. Our goal was to provide data to confirm field observations of mortality and presumed mortality in stream habitats with fluctuating freezing to near-freezing temperatures. We tested individuals from 2 locations with distinctly different thermal regimes and population densities. One location had low snail densities and water temperatures with strong diel and seasonal water variation. The other location had high snail densities and nearly constant water temperatures. Groups of individuals from both locations were tested in each of 3 laboratory-created diel thermal cycles around nominal temperatures of 0, 2, or 4°C. Mortality occurred in cycles around 0°C in both populations, and little to no mortality occurred at temperatures >0°C. Individuals from both sources held in diel 0°C cycles for 72 h showed 100% mortality. Our findings support observations from published field studies that survival was limited in infested habitats subject to freezing temperatures.

  4. Gullied Depression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    26 February 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies formed in the wall of a depression located on the floor of Rabe Crater west of the giant impact basin, Hellas Planitia. Gullies such as these are common features on Mars, but the process by which they are formed is not fully understood. The debate centers on the role and source of fluids in the genesis of these features.

    Location near: 44.1oS, 325.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  5. [Depression and personality].

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    In the current research concerning the relation between depression and personality a phenomenological, anthropological method and an empirical, statistical method coexist. Each of these methods has its own limitations. The latter is abandoning the classical endogenous-neurotic dichotomy without full considerations. It also tries to treat the personality as an objectively defined entity and it lacks insight into the fact that the "pre"-morbid personality is sometimes revealed "after" onset of the illness. Although the former has succeeded in establishing the concept of "Typus melancholicus," which is still of a clinical significance today, it is not sufficiently well developed to deal with patients having endogenous symptoms who show other types of personality. It also lacks the profound description on the domain of neurotic depression or depression with personality disorder. Typus melancholicus personality includes two components, not only as found in its original phenomenological arguments but also as suggested by the recent empirical research. The first component consists of the tendency to seek for a symbiotic relation with others and the intolerance of ambiguity. The excessive narcissistic cathexis to the "private self," rather than the "official self" (Matussek), can also be included here. The second component consists of the "orderliness" and the "hypernomic" identification with role identities. Typus melancholicus is brought about only when these two components are integrated into one personal structure and the contradiction between them remains not overt. In contrast, it can be considered that in such marginal types as the dependent anaclytic type, avoidant type and soft bipolar type, this contradiction is already overt. Although these marginal types show neurotic or personality disorder-like manifestations, it can be considered that the authentic domain of neurotic depression and the depression of personality disorder spreads outside of these marginal types. In this domain the depression in which the problems of object relations play a dominant role is important. It is worth taking into consideration the contrast between endogenous depression and depression associated with the problems of object relations when we decide therapeutic strategies. This contrast can be pointed out from the following three perspectives; the relation between subject and society, ambivalence, and the status of somatic symptoms. In the former, social elements play a limited role, constituting only the background conditions of patients, while in the latter patients' personal conflicts are closely intermingled with social elements. In the former the patients are almost unable to maintain ambivalent feelings so as to deal with reality and they rather adjust themselves to reality utilizing their syntonic personalities. The latter patients, on the other hand, have intense ambivalent feelings and are impacted when the negative side of the ambivalence predominates. In the former, pathological phenomena are located where somatic and psychological spheres are not yet divided, while in the latter metaphorical interpretations of somatic symptoms from the psychological contents are sometimes possible to a certain degree. PMID:16509425

  6. Understanding the freezing of biopharmaceuticals: first-principle modeling of the process and evaluation of its effect on product quality.

    PubMed

    Radmanovic, Nikola; Serno, Tim; Joerg, Susanne; Germershaus, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    Freezing and thawing are important process steps in the manufacture of numerous biopharmaceuticals. It is well established that these process steps can significantly influence product quality attributes (PQA). Herein, we describe a physico-mathematical model to predict product temperature profiles based on the freezing program as input parameter in a commercial freeze-thaw module. Applying this model, the time from first nucleation until the last point to freeze (LPF) reaching -5C and the time from -5C at LPF to -30C at LPF was varied to study the effect on PQA in a full factorial design. Effects of process parameter settings on a typical fully formulated, highly concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) solution as well as highly concentrated mAb solution formulated with buffer only were investigated. We found that both process phases affected PQA, such as aggregates by size-exclusion chromatography, polydispersity index by dynamic light scattering, and number of subvisible particles and turbidity in a complex way. In general, intermediate cooling and freezing times resulted in overall optimized PQA. Fully formulated mAb solution containing cryoprotectant and nonionic surfactant was significantly less affected by freezing-thawing than mAb solution formulated in buffer only. PMID:23775776

  7. Freeze-Thaw Injury to Isolated Spinach Protoplasts and Its Simulation at Above Freezing Temperatures 1

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Steven C.; Steponkus, Peter L.

    1978-01-01

    Possibilities to account for the mechanism of freeze-thaw injury to isolated protoplasts of Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Winter Bloomsdale were investigated. A freeze-thaw cycle to ?3.9 C resulted in 80% lysis of the protoplasts. At ?3.9 C, protoplasts are exposed to the equivalent of a 2.1 osmolal solution. Isolated protoplasts behave as ideal osmometers in the range of concentrations tested (0.35 to 2.75 osmolal), arguing against a minimum critical volume as a mechanism of injury. Average protoplast volume after a freeze-thaw cycle was not greatly different than the volume before freezing, arguing against an irreversible influx of solutes while frozen. A wide variety of sugars and sugar alcohols, none of which was freely permeant, were capable of protecting against injury which occurred when protoplasts were frozen in salt solutions. The extent of injury was also dependent upon the type of monovalent ions present, with Li = Na > K = Rb = Cs and Cl ? Br > I, in order of decreasing protoplast survival. Osmotic conditions encountered during a freeze-thaw cycle were established at room temperature by exposing protoplasts to high salt concentrations and then diluting the osmoticum. Injury occurred only after dilution of the osmoticum and was correlated with the expansion of the plasma membrane. Injury observed in frozen-thawed protoplasts was correlated with the increase in surface area the plasma membrane should have undergone during thawing, supporting the contention that contraction of the plasma membrane during freezing and its expansion during thawing are two interacting lesions which cause protoplast lysis during a freezethaw cycle. PMID:16660588

  8. Observations on the Freezing of Supercooled Pollen Washing Water by a New Electrodynamic Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Haijie; Pope, Francis D.; Kalberer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Primary biological particles can act as efficient ice nuclei (IN) by initiating freezing events at temperatures warmer than the homogenous freezing temperature [1, 2]. For example, pollen grain particles can trigger freezing events at temperatures as warm as -5 C in the contact freezing mode [3]. More recently pollen residues, which are released by washing pollen grains in water, were also observed to act as efficient IN in the immersion mode [4, 5]. In this study we developed a new cold electrodynamic balance (CEDB) system and investigated the freezing properties of single particles of supercooled pollen washing water (SPWW). The EDB technique allows for a contact free measurement of freezing events. The phase of the particle (liquid or frozen solid) can be distinguished via measuring the Mie scattering signal from the particle. Furthermore the size of liquid (spherical) particles can be determined. The freezing events are characterized through the loss of the regular Mie scattering signal from the levitated droplet as it changes state from liquid to a frozen solid. The statistical freezing probabilities of SPWW were obtained in the temperature range: -15 to -40 C. Each temperature measurement point consists of the analysis of 30-100 droplets. Preliminary conclusions are that SPWW is IN active in the immersion mode. Further discussion will focus on the temperature range of the IN activity, the important variables (other than temperature) for IN activity, other likely modes of IN activity, and the implications of these results in terms of the atmospheric relevance of SPWW. This study was supported by the NERC. We acknowledge Professor Jonathan Reid and James Davis from the University of Bristol for providing information of the design of the warm EDB system. References: [1] Mhler, O., et al. (2007) Biogeosciences, 4, 1059-1071. [2] Prenni, A. J., et al. (2009) Nat. Geosci., 2, 401-404. [3] Diehl, K., et al. (2002) Atmos. Res., 61, 125-133. [4] Pummer, B. G., et al. (2012) Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 2541-2550. [5] Augustin, S., et al. (2013) Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 10989-11003.

  9. The WAG/Rij strain: a genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depression [corrected].

    PubMed

    Sarkisova, Karine; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    A great number of clinical observations show a relationship between epilepsy and depression. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy, including absence epilepsy, has a genetic basis. The review provides evidence that WAG/Rij rats can be regarded as a valid genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depression. WAG/Rij rats, originally developed as an animal model of human absence epilepsy, share many EEG and behavioral characteristics resembling absence epilepsy in humans, including the similarity of action of various antiepileptic drugs. Behavioral studies indicate that WAG/Rij rats exhibit depression-like symptoms: decreased investigative activity in the open field test, increased immobility in the forced swimming test, and decreased sucrose consumption and preference (anhedonia). In addition, WAG/Rij rats adopt passive strategies in stressful situations, express some cognitive disturbances (reduced long-term memory), helplessness, and submissiveness, inability to make choice and overcome obstacles, which are typical for depressed patients. Elevated anxiety is not a characteristic (specific) feature of WAG/Rij rats; it is a characteristic for only a sub-strain of WAG/Rij rats susceptible to audiogenic seizures. Interestingly, WAG/Rij rats display a hyper-response to amphetamine similar to anhedonic depressed patients. WAG/Rij rats are sensitive only to chronic, but not acute, antidepressant treatments, suggesting that WAG/Rij rats fulfill a criterion of predictive validity for a putative animal model of depression. However, more and different antidepressant drugs still await evaluation. Depression-like behavioral symptoms in WAG/Rij rats are evident at baseline conditions, not exclusively after stress. Experiments with foot-shock stress do not point towards higher stress sensitivity at both behavioral and hormonal levels. However, freezing behavior (coping deficits) and blunted response of 5HT in the frontal cortex to uncontrollable sound stress, increased c-fos expression in the terminal regions of the meso-cortico-limbic brain systems and greater DA response of the mesolimbic system to forced swim stress suggest that WAG/Rij rats are vulnerable to some, but not to all types of stressors. We propose that genetic absence epileptic WAG/Rij rats have behavioral depression-like symptoms, are vulnerable to stress and might represent a model of chronic low-grade depression (dysthymia). Both 5HT and DAergic abnormalities detected in the brain of WAG/Rij rats are involved in modulation of vulnerability to stress and provocation of behavioral depression-like symptoms. The same neurotransmitter systems modulate SWDs as well. Recent studies suggest that the occurrence and repetition of absence seizures are a precipitant of depression-like behavior. Whether the neurochemical changes are primary to depression-like behavioral alterations remains to be determined. In conclusion, the WAG/Rij rats can be considered as a genetic animal model for absence epilepsy with comorbidity of dysthymia. This model can be used to investigate etiology, pathogenic mechanisms and treatment of a psychiatric comorbidity, such as depression in absence epilepsy, to reveal putative genes contributing to comorbid depressive disorder, and to screen novel psychotropic drugs with a selective and/or complex (dual) action on both pathologies. PMID:21093520

  10. Assessment of depression in medical patients: A systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Pang; Gorenstein, Clarice

    2013-01-01

    To perform a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory for detecting depression in medical settings, this article focuses on the revised version of the scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II), which was reformulated according to the DSM-IV criteria for major depression. We examined relevant investigations with the Beck Depression Inventory-II for measuring depression in medical settings to provide guidelines for practicing clinicians. Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria seventy articles were retained. Validation studies of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, in both primary care and hospital settings, were found for clinics of cardiology, neurology, obstetrics, brain injury, nephrology, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, oncology, and infectious disease. The Beck Depression Inventory-II showed high reliability and good correlation with measures of depression and anxiety. Its threshold for detecting depression varied according to the type of patients, suggesting the need for adjusted cut-off points. The somatic and cognitive-affective dimension described the latent structure of the instrument. The Beck Depression Inventory-II can be easily adapted in most clinical conditions for detecting major depression and recommending an appropriate intervention. Although this scale represents a sound path for detecting depression in patients with medical conditions, the clinician should seek evidence for how to interpret the score before using the Beck Depression Inventory-II to make clinical decisions. PMID:24141845

  11. Variation of the average 'freezing-in' temperature of oxygen ions with solar wind speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Vogt, C.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the average oxygen ionization equilibrium as a function of speed of the solar wind are presented. At low solar wind speeds they indicate a coronal temperature at the freezing-in point of (1.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the 6th K. At speeds above 450 km/sec the apparent temperature starts to rise rapidly. This rise is tentatively interpreted in terms of a lack of thermodynamic equilibrium in the source region.

  12. Depression and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Elizabeth H B

    2008-11-01

    Depression is significant among patients with arthritis and musculoskeletal illnesses. However, the impact of depression on osteoarthritis has not been extensively studied. This article highlights the close links between these 2 prevalent chronic conditions, and the associated individual and societal burden. Results from a large clinical trial of depressed older patients with arthritis showed that a focused, collaborative depression care intervention not only decreased depression but also improved arthritis-associated outcomes, such as pain severity and arthritis-related limitations in daily activities. Relative to patients given usual care, patients receiving intervention also reported better health status and higher quality of life. Analyses of the depression interventions uncovered a reciprocal interrelation between depression and pain. Higher severity of either depression or pain decreased the benefits of systematic depression treatment and was associated with worse pain and depression outcomes. Current approaches to management of depression and arthritis do not reflect readily-available evidence-based treatment. A pilot study using a combined approach to address both depression and pain problems among elderly patients with depression and osteoarthritis suggested that benefits for depression, pain, and functional outcomes are strengthened by providing both pain and depression care management. An integrated depression and pain program using evidenced-based pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments is needed to achieve optimal depression and pain outcomes. Currently, a randomized trial is under way to evaluate effectiveness of a combined pain and depression intervention using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies. Key intervention components in these 2 innovative and integrated depression and pain programs can guide clinicians to treat both depression and pain with more focus and intensity. PMID:18954588

  13. Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, Stefanie; Hartmann, Susan; Pummer, Bernhard; Grothe, Hinrich; Niedermeier, Dennis; Clauss, Tina; Voigtlnder, Jens; Tomsche, Laura; Wex, Heike; Stratmann, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Up to now, the importance of pollen for atmospheric ice nucleation was considered to be minor, as they are too large to stay in the atmosphere for a long time. But as recent investigations have shown, not the pollen grains themselves are responsible for freezing, but easily suspendable macromolecules on their surfaces (Pummer et al., 2012). Due to the bursting of pollen grains these ice nucleating active (INA) macromolecules could be numerous in the atmosphere. In the present study, the immersion freezing behavior of birch pollen, i.e. its ice nucleating active (INA) macromolecules, was investigated at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS, Hartmann et al., 2011). For this, washing water of two different birch pollen samples with different origin (Northern birch and Southern birch) were used. Immersion freezing of droplets generated from the pollen washing water was observed at temperatures higher than -20 C for both samples. The main difference between the Northern and the Southern birch pollen was the temperature dependence of the immersion freezing process. Our results suggest that the ice nucleating potential of the Southern birch is controlled by a single type of INA macromolecule, while the Northern birch pollen seem to feature two distinctively different types of INA macromolecules. We determined the heterogeneous nucleation rates for both INA macromolecule types and thereby consistently describe the ice nucleation behavior of both, the Southern and the Northern birch pollen washing water. Furthermore we will suggest a theoretical framework for describing e.g. single INA macromolecule related ice nucleation in atmospheric models. References: Pummer, B. G., Bauer, H., Bernardi, J., Bleicher, S. and Grothe, H.: Suspendable macromolecules are responsible for ice nucleation activity of birch and conifer pollen. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 2541-2550, doi:10.5194/acp-12-2541-2012, 2012. Hartmann, S., Niedermeier, D., Voigtlnder, J., Clauss, T., Shaw, R. A., Wex, H., Kiselev, A., and Stratmann, F.: Homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation at LACIS: operating principle and theoretical studies, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 1753-1767, doi:10.5194/acp-11-1753-2011, 2011.

  14. Freezing distributed entanglement in spin chains

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Irene; Lovett, Brendon W.; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2007-09-15

    We show how to freeze distributed entanglement that has been created from the natural dynamics of spin chain systems. The technique that we propose simply requires single-qubit operations and isolates the entanglement in specific qubits at the ends of branches. Such frozen entanglement provides a useful resource, for example for teleportation or distributed quantum processing. The scheme can be applied to a wide range of systems--including actual spin systems and alternative qubit embodiments in strings of quantum dots, molecules, or atoms.

  15. Freeze Tolerant Radiator for an Advanced EMU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Robert J.; Elliott, Jeannine; Weislogel, Mark

    2004-01-01

    During an Extravehicular Activity (EVA), the astronaut s metabolic heat and the heat produced by the Portable Life Support Unit (PLSS) must be rejected. This heat load is currently rejected by a sublimator, which vents up to eight pounds of water each EVA. However, for advanced space missions of the future, water venting to space needs to be minimized because resupply impacts from earth will be prohibitive. If this heat load could be radiated to space from the PLSS, which has enough surface area to radiate most of the heat, the amount of water now vented could be greatly reduced. Unfortunately, a radiator rejects heat at a relatively constant rate, but the astronauts generate a variable heat load depending on how hard they are working. Without a way to vary the heat removal rate, the astronaut would experience cold discomfort or even frostbite. A proven method allowing a radiator to be turned-down is to sequentially allow tubes that carry the heat transfer fluid to the radiator to freeze. A drawback of current freezable radiators using this method is that they are far to heavy for use on a PLSS, because they use heavy construction to prevent the tubes from bursting as they freeze and thaw. This creates the need for a large radiator to reject most of the heat but with a lightweight tube that doesn t burst as it freezes and thaws. The new freezable radiator for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) has features to accommodate the expansion of the radiator fluid when it freezes, and still have the high tube to fin conductance needed to minimize the number and weight of the tubes. Radiator fluid candidates are water and a propylene glycol-water mixture. This design maintains all materials within their elastic limits so that large volume changes can be achieved without breaking the tube. This concept couples this elastic expansion with an extremely lightweight, extremely high conductivity carbon fiber fin that can carry the heat needed to thaw a frozen tube. By using most of the exposed surface area of the PLSS as a radiator, the system can reject about 75% of the highest heat load, and reduce the loss of water through sublimation by a factor of four. The proposed radiator and a small water tank can be no heavier than the current system.

  16. Cellularized Cellular Solids via Freeze-Casting.

    PubMed

    Christoph, Sarah; Kwiatoszynski, Julien; Coradin, Thibaud; Fernandes, Francisco M

    2016-02-01

    The elaboration of metabolically active cell-containing materials is a decisive step toward the successful application of cell based technologies. The present work unveils a new process allowing to simultaneously encapsulate living cells and shaping cell-containing materials into solid-state macroporous foams with precisely controlled morphology. Our strategy is based on freeze casting, an ice templating materials processing technique that has recently emerged for the structuration of colloids into macroporous materials. Our results indicate that it is possible to combine the precise structuration of the materials with cellular metabolic activity for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:26536388

  17. Hierarchical freezing in a lattice model.

    PubMed

    Byington, Travis W; Socolar, Joshua E S

    2012-01-27

    A certain two-dimensional lattice model with nearest and next-nearest neighbor interactions is known to have a limit-periodic ground state. We show that during a slow quench from the high temperature, disordered phase, the ground state emerges through an infinite sequence of phase transitions. We define appropriate order parameters and show that the transitions are related by renormalizations of the temperature scale. As the temperature is decreased, sublattices with increasingly large lattice constants become ordered. A rapid quench results in a glasslike state due to kinetic barriers created by simultaneous freezing on sublattices with different lattice constants. PMID:22400863

  18. Thermal properties of freezing bound water restrained by polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tatsuko; Tanaka, Masaru; Hatakeyama, Hyoe

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the thermal properties of bound water restrained by various kinds of polysaccharides and several synthetic polymers. The characteristic features of freezing bound water which is closely related with biocompatibility of polymers are summarized based on results obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition, cold crystallization and melting of water-polysaccharide systems were observed. Three kinds of water, non-freezing, freezing bound and free water, were quantified from the enthalpy of melting of water in the system. Freezing bound water restrained by polysaccharides is in a metastable state. The equilibrium melting temperature of freezing bound water is lower than 0C and the temperature decreases with decreasing water content. Nucleation and growth rate of freezing bound water were calculated from isothermal crystallization and the values were compared with those of free water. PMID:20557717

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies on sequential freezing solar water heater

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Xinian; Tao Zhen; Lu Junsheng; Ge Hongchuan )

    1994-08-01

    This article presents the principle of using sequential freezing for the purpose of freeze protection in a solar water heater. Sequential freezing is accomplished by maintaining a temperature gradient across the collector so that water is squeezed out of the collector rather than being trapped by ice at the ends of the tubes. The authors give the mathematical models of tubular sequential freezing, compare the predicted results of models with the measured data, and investigate the influences of various factors on the tubular sequential freezing state with the model. A series of experiments show that a solar water heater designed according to the principle of sequential freezing can operate effectively in winter without drain-down, electricity, and heat exchanger systems.

  20. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution of Arabidopsis for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Austin, Jotham R

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of electron microscopy ultrastructural studies are to examine cellular architecture and relate the cell's structural machinery to dynamic functional roles. This aspiration is difficult to achieve if specimens have not been adequately preserved in a "living state"; hence specimen preparation is of the utmost importance for the success of any electron micrographic study. High-pressure freezing (HPF)/freeze substitution (FS) has long been recognized as the primer technique for the preservation of ultrastructure in biological samples. In most cases a basic HPF/freeze substitution protocol is sufficient to obtain superior ultrastructural preservation and structural contrast, which allows one to use more advanced microscopy techniques such as 3D electron tomography. However, for plant tissues, which have a thick cell wall, large water-filled vacuoles, and air spaces (all of which are detrimental to cryopreservation), these basic HPF/FS protocols often yield undesirable results. In particular, ice crystal artifacts and the staining of membrane systems are often poorly or negatively stained, which make 3D segmentation of a tomogram difficult. To overcome these problems, various aspects of the HPF/FS protocol can be altered, including the cryo-filler(s) used, freeze substitution cocktail, and the resin infiltration process. This chapter will describe these modifications for the preparation of plant tissues for routine electron microscopic studies, immunocytochemistry, and 3D tomographic electron imaging. PMID:24057382

  1. Freezing of gait associated with a corpus callosum lesion.

    PubMed

    Dale, Marian L; Mancini, Martina; Curtze, Carolin; Horak, Fay B; Fling, Brett W

    2016-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FoG) is a debilitating feature of Parkinson's disease and other parkinsonian disorders. This case demonstrates a variant of freezing of gait in a non-parkinsonian patient with a lesion of the anterior corpus callosum. The freezing improved with increased upper extremity sensory input, suggesting that compensatory circuits for use of somatosensory inputs from the arms to postural and locomotor centers were intact. PMID:26835154

  2. Associations among Smoking, Anhedonia, and Reward Learning in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Liverant, Gabrielle I.; Sloan, Denise M.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.; Harte, Christopher B.; Kamholz, Barbara W.; Rosebrock, Laina E.; Cohen, Andrew L.; Fava, Maurizio; Kaplan, Gary B.

    2015-01-01

    Depression and cigarette smoking co-occur at high rates. However, the etiological mechanisms that contribute to this relationship remain unclear. Anhedonia and associated impairments in reward learning are key features of depression, which also have been linked to the onset and maintenance of cigarette smoking. However, few studies have investigated differences in anhedonia and reward learning among depressed smokers and depressed nonsmokers. The goal of this study was to examine putative differences in anhedonia and reward learning in depressed smokers (n = 36) and depressed nonsmokers (n = 44). To this end, participants completed self-report measures of anhedonia and behavioral activation (BAS reward responsiveness scores) and as well as a probabilistic reward task rooted in signal detection theory, which measures reward learning (Pizzagalli, Jahn, & OShea, 2005). When considering self-report measures, depressed smokers reported higher trait anhedonia and reduced BAS reward responsiveness scores compared to depressed nonsmokers. In contrast to self-report measures, nicotine-satiated depressed smokers demonstrated greater acquisition of reward-based learning compared to depressed nonsmokers as indexed by the probabilistic reward task. Findings may point to a potential mechanism underlying the frequent co-occurrence of smoking and depression. These results highlight the importance of continued investigation of the role of anhedonia and reward system functioning in the co-occurrence of depression and nicotine abuse. Results also may support the use of treatments targeting reward learning (e.g., behavioral activation) to enhance smoking cessation among individuals with depression. PMID:25022776

  3. Fast hadron freeze-out generator. II. Noncentral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Amelin, N. S.; Lednicky, R.; Lokhtin, I. P.; Malinina, L. V.; Snigirev, A. M.; Karpenko, Iu. A.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Arsene, I.; Bravina, L.

    2008-01-15

    The fast Monte Carlo procedure of hadron generation developed in our previous work is extended to describe noncentral collisions of nuclei. We consider different possibilities to introduce appropriate asymmetry of the freeze-out hypersurface and flow velocity profile. For comparison with other models and experimental data, we demonstrate the results based on the standard parametrizations of the hadron freeze-out hypersurface and flow velocity profile assuming either a common chemical and thermal freeze-out or the chemically frozen evolution from chemical to thermal freeze-out. The C++ generator code is written under the ROOT framework and is available for public use at http://uhkm.jinr.ru/.

  4. Does the Cryogenic Freezing Process Cause Shorter Telomeres?

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Edmund C.; Ye, Lingling; Silverman, Wayne P.

    2012-01-01

    We have observed evidence of increased telomere shortening in short-term T-lymphocyte cultures following freezing and thawing of the original inoculum obtained by ficoll-paque gradient centrifugation, compared to T-lymphocytes that were cultured immediately without freezing and thawing from the same blood sample from 3 female and 3 male adults. Because freezing may have similar effects on other cell types, and because telomere shortening may only manifest its effects after many years or decades, we suggest there is a pressing need for evaluation of the effects of freezing on any cells envisioned for clinical applications, including embryo implantation. PMID:22465657

  5. Design of a blood-freezing system for leukemia research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. E.; Cygnarowicz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Leukemia research involves the use of cryogenic freezing and storage equipment. In a program being carried out at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), bone marrow (white blood cells) was frozen using a standard cryogenic biological freezer. With this system, it is difficult to maintain the desired rate of freezing and repeatability from sample to sample. A freezing system was developed that satisfies the requirements for a repeatable, constant freezing rate. The system was delivered to NIC and is now operational. This report describes the design of the major subsystems, the analyses, the operating procedure, and final system test results.

  6. Anoxia tolerance and freeze tolerance in hatchling turtles.

    PubMed

    Dinkelacker, S A; Costanzo, J P; Lee, R E

    2005-04-01

    Freezing survival in hatchling turtles may be limited by ischemic anoxia in frozen tissues and the associated accumulation of lactate and reactive oxygen species (ROS). To determine whether mechanisms for coping with anoxia are also important in freeze tolerance, we examined the association between capacities for freezing survival and anoxia tolerance in hatchlings of seven species of turtles. Tolerance to freezing (-2.5 degrees C) was high in Emydoidea blandingii, Chrysemys picta, Terrapene ornata, and Malaclemys terrapin and low in Graptemys geographica, Chelydra serpentina, and Trachemys scripta. Hatchlings survived in a N(2) atmosphere at 4 degrees C for periods ranging from 17 d (M. terrapin) to 50 d (G. geographica), but survival time was not associated with freeze tolerance. Lactate accumulated during both stresses, but plasma levels in frozen/thawed turtles were well below those found in anoxia-exposed animals. Activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase in liver increased markedly with anoxia exposure in most species, but increased with freezing/thawing only in species with low freeze tolerance. Our results suggest that whereas oxygen deprivation occurs during somatic freezing, freeze tolerance is not limited by anoxia tolerance in hatchling turtles. PMID:15739066

  7. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  8. Freezing efficiency of Silver Iodide, ATD and Kaolinite in the contact freezing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, Baban; Marcolli, Claudia; Stetzer, Olaf; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    The importance of heterogeneous ice nucleation via contact freezing is one of the open questions in the atmospheric science community. In our laboratory, we built the Collision Nucleation CHamber (CLINCH) (Ladino et al. 2011) in which falling cloud droplets can collide with aerosol particles. In this study, contact freezing experiments are conducted to investigate the ice nucleation ability of silver iodide (AgI), kaolinite and Arizona Test Dust (ATD). Silver iodide has been known for its ice nucleation ability since 1940s (Vonnegut 1947) while kaolinite is a clay mineral and known to be a moderate ice nucleus. ATD is a commercial dust sample used by many groups to compare different setups. In CLINCH, size selected aerosol particles collide with water droplets of 80 m diameter. With the extension in chamber length it is possible to vary the interaction time of ice nuclei and the droplets. Our experiments are performed between -10 to -36 C for various concentrations of ice nuclei and different interaction times. The frozen fraction of the droplets is determined using the custom-made depolarization detector IODE (Nicolet et al., 2010). Depolarization of linearly polarized incident laser light is used to determine the ratio of frozen droplets to all droplets. Frozen fractions of the three particle types with different residence times from CLINCH will be presented in this study. The number of collisions between a single droplet and several aerosol particles can be calculated by accounting for the theoretical collision efficiency at the experimental conditions in order to obtain the freezing efficiency (frozen fraction/number of collisions). Nucleation efficiency is compared with other contact freezing studies and with immersion freezing

  9. Effect of soil freezing on particulate resuspension

    SciTech Connect

    Duce, S.W.; Shaw, P.G.; Winberg, M.R.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents the results of small scale laboratory tests that were conducted to determine the effect of soil freezing on soil resuspension. Nontransuranic contaminated soil form the Radioactive Waste Management Complex was subjected to a series of test conditions to determine respirable and nonrespirable fractions of airborne dust. A separate fraction of the same soil was spiked with Pu-239 and subjected to the same test conditions. Concentrations of resuspended soil and Pu in air were determined. Test results show that: (a) the largest fraction of soil resuspended is in the nonrespirable size fraction, (b) the concentration of resuspended soil in air is highly dependent on surface air velocity, and (c) freezing is not as effective at reducing resuspension of fine dry soil as it is with coarse soil, and (d) artificially prepared Pu contaminated soil has a high proportion of the total activity distributed on ultrafine material, reacts inversely to the mass movement of soil, and does not adequately imitate Pu movement in an actual contaminated soil. 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Morphological study of endothelial cells during freezing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A; Xu, L X; Sandison, G A; Cheng, S

    2006-12-01

    Microvascular injury is recognized as a major tissue damage mechanism of ablative cryosurgery. Endothelial cells lining the vessel wall are thought to be the initial target of freezing. However, details of this injury mechanism are not yet completely understood. In this study, ECMatrix 625 was used to mimic the tumour environment and to allow the endothelial cells cultured in vitro to form the tube-like structure of the vasculature. The influence of water dehydration on the integrity of this structure was investigated. It was found that the initial cell shape change was mainly controlled by water dehydration, dependent on the cooling rate, resulting in the shrinkage of cells in the direction normal to the free surface. As the cooling was prolonged and temperature was lowered, further cell shape change could be induced by the chilling effects on intracellular proteins, and focal adhesions to the basement membrane. Quantitative analysis showed that the freezing induced dehydration greatly enhanced the cell surface stresses, especially in the axial direction. This could be one of the major causes of the final breaking of the cell junction and cell detachment. PMID:17110769

  11. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes results from experiments performed to help understand certain aspects of the MC-1 engine prestart thermal conditioning procedure. The procedure was constrained by the fact that the engine must chill long enough to get quality LOX at the LOX pump inlet but must be short enough to prevent freezing of RP-1 in the fuel pump. A chill test of an MC-1 LOX impeller was performed in LN2 to obtain data on film boiling, transition boiling and impeller temperature histories. The transition boiling data was important to the chill time so a subsequent experiment was performed chilling simple steel plates in LOX to obtain similar data for LOX. To address the fuel freezing concern, two experiments were performed. First, fuel was frozen in a tray and its physical characteristics were observed and temperatures of the fuel were measured. The result was physical characteristics as a function of temperature. Second was an attempt to measure the frozen thickness of RP-1 on a cold wall submerged in warm RP-1 and to develop a method for calculating that thickness for other conditions.

  12. Poststroke Depression: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Robert G.; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the worlds (English-language) publications related to depression following stroke. Method The databases from MEDLINE and PubMed were reviewed for articles related to poststroke depression (PSD), depression and cerebral vascular accident, depression and cerebral vascular disease, and depression and cerebral infarction. Results Most studies examined prevalence rates of depression and the clinical correlates of depression. Based on pooled data, the overall prevalence of major depression was 21.7% and minor depression was 19.5%. The strongest single correlate of depression was severity of impairment in activities of daily living. However, the existence of depression at baseline was found to be associated with greater impairment at follow-up, ranging from 6 weeks to 2 years in 83% of studies. Further, depression following acute stroke was also associated with greater cognitive impairment and increased mortality. PSD has been shown in 6 double-blind controlled studies to be effectively treated with antidepressants, and 1 study has recently shown that PSD can be effectively prevented. Conclusions During the past 20 years, significant progress has been made in the identification and treatment of depression following stroke. In the future, antidepressant treatment will likely play an increasing role in the management of patients with acute stroke. Further research is needed to identify the mechanisms of depression and why antidepressants lead to improved physical and cognitive recovery and decreased mortality. PMID:20540828

  13. Motor Imagery in Unipolar Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bennabi, Djamila; Monnin, Julie; Haffen, Emmanuel; Carvalho, Nicolas; Vandel, Pierre; Pozzo, Thierry; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    Background: Motor imagery is a potential tool to investigate action representation, as it can provide insights into the processes of action planning and preparation. Recent studies suggest that depressed patients present specific impairment in mental rotation. The present study was designed to investigate the influence of unipolar depression on motor imagery ability. Methods: Fourteen right-handed patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for unipolar depression were compared to 14 matched healthy controls. Imagery ability was accessed by the timing correspondence between executed and imagined movements during a pointing task, involving strong spatiotemporal constraints (speed/accuracy trade-off paradigm). Results: Compared to controls, depressed patients showed marked motor slowing on both actual and imagined movements. Furthermore, we observed greater temporal discrepancies between actual and mental movements in depressed patients than in healthy controls. Lastly, depressed patients modulated, to some extent, mental movement durations according to the difficulty of the task, but this modulation was not as strong as that of healthy subjects. Conclusion: These results suggest that unipolar depression significantly affects the higher stages of action planning and point out a selective decline of motor prediction. PMID:25538580

  14. Expression of freeze-responsive proteins, Fr10 and Li16, from freeze-tolerant frogs enhances freezing survival of BmN insect cells.

    PubMed

    Biggar, Kyle K; Kotani, Eiji; Furusawa, Toshiharu; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-08-01

    To date, two novel freeze-responsive proteins, Fr10 and Li16, have been discovered in the wood frog, Rana sylvatica, and likely support freezing survival. Although previous studies have established tissue distribution of each protein, there have been no studies that explore their functional consequences in intolerant cells. To assess the ability of Fr10 and Li16 to confer freeze tolerance, we transfected each protein into a freeze-intolerant silkworm cell line (BmN). Selected controls were the transfection of an unrelated protein (CAT) and a no-transfection sample. Li16 and Fr10 showed 1.8 ± 0.1- and 1.7 ± 0.2-fold, respectively, greater survival after freezing at -6°C for 1 h than did transfection controls. To investigate how these novel proteins protect cells from freezing damage, protein structures were predicted from primary amino acid sequences. Analysis of the structures indicated that Fr10 is a secreted protein and may be a new type IV antifreeze protein, whereas Li16 may have intracellular membrane associated functions. This study shows that freezing protection can be provided to intolerant cells by the overexpression of transfected Li16 and Fr10 frog proteins. Results from this study will provide new insights into adapting intolerant cells for medical organ cryoprotection using a natural vertebrate model of tolerance. PMID:23657819

  15. [Emotional reactivity of patients with depression].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlova, E S; Monosova, A Zh; Beliaev, B S

    1990-01-01

    Emotional reactivity of patients with endogenous depression and healthy test subjects towards classic and rock music was compared. According to the questionnaire data and EEG recording, it was established that in depressed patients, analysis and estimation of the emotionally significant information differ from those in healthy persons. In contrast to normals, the classic music exerts an activation effect on the patients whereas rock music evokes negative emotions. Analysis of the time-course of changes in the EEG points to alterations in the system of nonspecific activation in depressions. PMID:2167595

  16. Effect of repeated freeze-thaw cycles on geographically different populations of the freeze-tolerant worm Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta).

    PubMed

    Fisker, Karina Vincents; Holmstrup, Martin; Malte, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes

    2014-11-01

    Freeze-tolerant organisms survive internal ice formation; however, the adaptations to repeated freeze-thaw cycles are often not well investigated. Here we report how three geographically different populations of Enchytraeus albidus (Germany, Iceland and Svalbard) respond to three temperature treatments - constant thawed (0C), constant freezing (-5C) and fluctuating temperature (0 to -5C) - over a period of 42 days. Survival varied between treatments and populations such that enchytraeids from arctic locations had a higher survival following prolonged freeze periods compared with temperate populations. However, enchytraeids from temperate locations had the same survival rate as arctic populations when exposed to repeated freeze-thaw events. Across all populations, metabolic rate decreased markedly in frozen animals (-5C) compared with thawed controls (0C). This decrease is likely due to the lower temperature of frozen animals, but also to the transition to the frozen state per se. Animals exposed to repeated freeze-thaw events had an intermediate metabolic rate and freeze-thaw events were not associated with pronounced excess energetic costs. Overwintering under either condition was not associated with a decrease in lipid content; however, during exposure to constant freezing and repeated freeze-thaw events there was a noticeable decrease in carbohydrate stores over time. Thus, animals exposed to constant freezing showed a decrease in glycogen stores, while both glucose and glycogen content decreased over time when the organisms were exposed to repeated freezing. The results therefore suggest that carbohydrate resources are important as a fuel for E. albidus during freezing whereas lipid resources are of marginal importance. PMID:25214492

  17. Spray-freeze-drying production of thermally sensitive polymeric nanoparticle aggregates for inhaled drug delivery: effect of freeze-drying adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Ng, Mabel Li Ling; Kho, Katherine; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2011-02-14

    Inhalable dry-powder aggregates of drug-loaded thermally sensitive poly(caprolactone) (PCL) nanoparticles are produced using spray-freeze-drying (SFD) as the low melting point of PCL prohibits the use of high-temperature spray-drying. The effects of freeze-drying adjuvant formulation on the particle morphology, aerodynamic diameter, aqueous re-dispersibility, flowability, and production yield are examined using mannitol and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as the adjuvants. The primary role of the adjuvant is to prevent irreversible nanoparticle coalescences during freeze-drying, thereby the nanoparticle aggregates can readily re-disperse into primary nanoparticles in an aqueous environment hence retaining their therapeutic functions. The nanoparticle aggregates produced using either adjuvant exhibit large, porous, and spherical morphologies suitable for dry-powder-inhaler delivery. The nanoparticle aggregates exhibit good flowability and effective aerosolization off the inhaler. The adjuvant selection governs the resultant nanoparticle-adjuvant structures, where PCL nanoparticles are physically dispersed in porous mannitol matrix, whereas PVA are coated onto the nanoparticle surface. Importantly, nanoparticle aggregates produced by SFD exhibit significantly higher aqueous re-dispersibility than those produced by spray-drying, which signifies the suitability of SFD as the method to produce solid-dosage-form of thermally sensitive nanoparticles. Overall, using PVA as adjuvant leads to more stable morphology, superior aqueous re-dispersibility, and higher production yield compared to the mannitol formulation. PMID:21093560

  18. Effect of long-term freezing and freeze-thaw cycles on indigenous and inoculated microorganisms in dewatered blackwater.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsdttir, Ragnhildur; Mller, Karoline; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Jenssen, Petter Deinboll; Villumsen, Arne

    2012-11-20

    Wastewater treatment in many Arctic regions is inadequate, even nonexisting. Natural freezing of wastewater in those areas may be beneficial for reduction of microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term freezing, and repeated freezing and thawing, on indigenous coliforms, fecal streptococci, and antibiotic-resistant (AR) bacteria, and inoculated Salmonella Enteriditis and E. coli bacteriophage ?X174 in dewatered blackwater. At the end of the long-term freezing experiment (10 months), an MPN recovery study was done, including the microbial groups that had shown the largest reduction, using tryptone soy broth at incubation temperatures of 10 and 20 C overnight for the coliforms and AR bacteria, and buffered peptone water at incubation temperature of 37 C for 18-20 h for Salmonella. Fecal streptococci were more resistant to long-term freezing than the coliform group. Total number of AR bacteria decreased slowly but constantly over the 10-month freezing period. Salmonella rapidly decreased and were nondetectable within a week but exhibited some recovery after 10 months of freezing, whereas limited or no recovery of coliforms and AR-bacteria was detected. Bacteriophages showed limited reduction during the long-term freezing. Repeated freezing and thawing increased the reduction of all tested microbial groups markedly. PMID:23113759

  19. Increased spring freezing vulnerability for alpine shrubs under early snowmelt.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J A; Hoch, G; Corts, A J; Sedlacek, J; Wipf, S; Rixen, C

    2014-05-01

    Alpine dwarf shrub communities are phenologically linked with snowmelt timing, so early spring exposure may increase risk of freezing damage during early development, and consequently reduce seasonal growth. We examined whether environmental factors (duration of snow cover, elevation) influenced size and the vulnerability of shrubs to spring freezing along elevational gradients and snow microhabitats by modelling the past frequency of spring freezing events. We sampled biomass and measured the size of Salix herbacea, Vaccinium myrtillus, Vaccinium uliginosum and Loiseleuria procumbens in late spring. Leaves were exposed to freezing temperatures to determine the temperature at which 50% of specimens are killed for each species and sampling site. By linking site snowmelt and temperatures to long-term climate measurements, we extrapolated the frequency of spring freezing events at each elevation, snow microhabitat and per species over 37 years. Snowmelt timing was significantly driven by microhabitat effects, but was independent of elevation. Shrub growth was neither enhanced nor reduced by earlier snowmelt, but decreased with elevation. Freezing resistance was strongly species dependent, and did not differ along the elevation or snowmelt gradient. Microclimate extrapolation suggested that potentially lethal freezing events (in May and June) occurred for three of the four species examined. Freezing events never occurred on late snow beds, and increased in frequency with earlier snowmelt and higher elevation. Extrapolated freezing events showed a slight, non-significant increase over the 37-year record. We suggest that earlier snowmelt does not enhance growth in four dominant alpine shrubs, but increases the risk of lethal spring freezing exposure for less freezing-resistant species. PMID:24435708

  20. Embolism formation during freezing in the wood of Picea abies.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Stefan; Cochard, Herv; Amglio, Thierry; Kikuta, Silvia B

    2007-01-01

    Freeze-thaw events can cause embolism in plant xylem. According to classical theory, gas bubbles are formed during freezing and expand during thawing. Conifers have proved to be very resistant to freeze-thaw induced embolism, because bubbles in tracheids are small and redissolve during thawing. In contrast, increasing embolism rates upon consecutive freeze-thaw events were observed that cannot be explained by the classical mechanism. In this study, embolism formation during freeze-thaw events was analyzed via ultrasonic and Cryo-scanning electron microscope techniques. Twigs of Picea abies L. Karst. were subjected to up to 120 freeze-thaw cycles during which ultrasonic acoustic emissions, xylem temperature, and diameter variations were registered. In addition, the extent and cross-sectional pattern of embolism were analyzed with staining experiments and Cryo-scanning electron microscope observations. Embolism increased with the number of freeze-thaw events in twigs previously dehydrated to a water potential of -2.8 MPa. In these twigs, acoustic emissions were registered, while saturated twigs showed low, and totally dehydrated twigs showed no, acoustic activity. Acoustic emissions were detected only during the freezing process. This means that embolism was formed during freezing, which is in contradiction to the classical theory of freeze-thaw induced embolism. The clustered pattern of embolized tracheids in cross sections indicates that air spread from a dysfunctional tracheid to adjacent functional ones. We hypothesize that the low water potential of the growing ice front led to a decrease of the potential in nearby tracheids. This may result in freezing-induced air seeding. PMID:17041033

  1. A historical perspective on cold tolerance in the Canal Point Sugarcane Breeding Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing sugarcane cultivars with greater freeze tolerance is an important objective of the USDA-ARS Canal Point breeding program, as temperatures around -3oC (27oF) cause serious sugar yield losses during the harvest season. To estimate if progress was made in freeze tolerance by breeding for can...

  2. Interplay between demixing and freezing in two-dimensional symmetrical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Patrykiejew, A; Soko?owski, S

    2010-01-01

    The interplay between demixing and freezing in two-dimensional symmetrical binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones particles is studied using Monte Carlo simulation. It is demonstrated that different scenarios are possible. For example, the line of continuous liquid demixing transition can start at the liquid side of the vapor-liquid coexistence at the lower critical end point and then it can terminate at the liquid side of the liquid-demixed solid coexistence at the upper critical end point. Other situations are also possible. We distinguish four different scenarios depending on the interactions between unlike particles. PMID:20365417

  3. Preliminary trial: motility comparisons of a unique freezing technology (UFT) to liquid nitrogen mist methodology for cryopreservation of porcine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Goolsby, H A; Blanton, J R; Cotter, P Z; Prien, S D

    2004-10-01

    The motility outcomes of boar semen frozen with newly developed freezing techniques using a new unique freezing technology (UFT) compared with traditional liquid nitrogen methodology were investigated with the intent of improving current fertility outcomes using semen. The UFT is an electronically controlled cooling chamber that houses an organic fluid bath that can be maintained at temperatures below 0 degrees C without solidifying to freeze samples. Four ejaculates from four different boars were collected for this trial. Samples were handled consistently during the pre- and post-freeze processing. From each ejaculate, samples were separated into eight cryopreservation treatment groups, six UFT variations and two control liquid nitrogen groups, immediately before freezing, in replicates of two. After the initial cryopreservation was complete, all samples were stored in liquid nitrogen for at least 48 h. Post-thaw motilities and original motility return percentages were assessed on a random, individual-sample basis. After the initial evaluations, samples from two boars were recollected and frozen using the UFT for breeding purposes. Four sows were bred with the UFT frozen semen to confirm fertility capability. When assessing the individual UFT techniques, all of six UFT techniques had improved post-thaw motilities. However, treatments F (micro = 29%, return micro = 37%) and J (micro = 27%, return micro = 34%) showed the highest statistical improvement for post-thaw (p < 0.05) and original motility percent returns (p < 0.05) when compared with either the control cryo-tube (micro = 15%, return micro = 19%) or straw groups (micro = 12%, return micro = 16%). The UFT semen had a 50% conception rate, with an average of seven piglets from the sows that farrowed. Our preliminary data suggest a higher motility return with a slower pre-freeze phase below the freezing point before the acceleration to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The preliminary data suggest that the UFT could be utilized as a potential cryopreservation option for boar semen. PMID:15367265

  4. Thermal conductivity measurements in phase change materials under freezing in presence of nanoinclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angayarkanni, S. A.; Philip, John

    2015-09-01

    We study the thermal properties and internal microstructures of n-hexadecane alkane containing nanoinclusions of copper nanowire, multi walled carbon nanotube, and graphene nanoplatelets of different volume fractions. Just below the freezing point, a large thermal contrast is observed in all the three systems. The thermal conductivity decreases with temperature below the freezing temperature and stabilizes at ˜10 °C below the freezing point. More than 100% of thermal conductivity enhancement is observed with 0.01 wt. % of nanofillers during the liquid to solid phase change. It is speculated that the reduction in the interfacial thermal resistance and the internal stress generated during the first order phase transition, due to the presence of nanoinclusions at grain boundaries of alkane crystals, led to the observed increase in the thermal conductivity. We found that an optimal nanoparticle loading with the space filling agglomerates in a phase change alkane can provide an extremely large thermal conductivity. Though the thermal conductivity enhancement at higher particle loading was independent of the bulk thermal conductivity of dispersed nanomaterials, an anomalously large thermal contrast is observed at a very low concentration in copper nanowire suspension. These results provide new approaches to achieve large thermal storage in organic phase change materials.

  5. Effect of sugars on headgroup mobility in freeze-dried dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers: solid-state 31P NMR and FTIR studies.

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkova, N M; Phillips, B L; Crowe, L M; Crowe, J H; Risbud, S H

    1998-01-01

    The effect of the carbohydrates trehalose, glucose, and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) on the motional properties of the phosphate headgroup of freeze-dried dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes was studied by means of 31P NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results show that trehalose, which is a strong glass former (Tg = 115 degreesC), elevates the onset of the lipid headgroup rotations and preserves some rotational mobility of the phosphate headgroups after cooling from the liquid-crystalline state. Glucose (Tg = 30 degreesC), a very effective depressant of the phase transition temperature of freeze-dried DPPC, markedly elevates the initiation of the temperature of headgroup rotations. On the other hand, the monosaccharide does not preserve the headgroup disordering when cooled from the liquid-crystalline state. These effects are consistent with formation of hydrogen bonds between the OH groups of the sugar and the polar headgroups of DPPC. They show, however, that hydrogen bonding is not sufficient for preservation of the dynamic properties of freeze-dried DPPC. HES, although a very good glass former (Tg > 110 degreesC), does not depress the phase transition temperature and affects only slightly the rotational properties of freeze-dried DPPC. This lack of effect of HES is associated with the absence of direct interactions with the lipid phosphates, as evidenced by the FTIR results. These data show that vitrification of the additive is not sufficient to affect the dynamic properties of dried DPPC. PMID:9826615

  6. Effect of sugars on headgroup mobility in freeze-dried dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers: solid-state 31P NMR and FTIR studies.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, N M; Phillips, B L; Crowe, L M; Crowe, J H; Risbud, S H

    1998-12-01

    The effect of the carbohydrates trehalose, glucose, and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) on the motional properties of the phosphate headgroup of freeze-dried dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes was studied by means of 31P NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results show that trehalose, which is a strong glass former (Tg = 115 degreesC), elevates the onset of the lipid headgroup rotations and preserves some rotational mobility of the phosphate headgroups after cooling from the liquid-crystalline state. Glucose (Tg = 30 degreesC), a very effective depressant of the phase transition temperature of freeze-dried DPPC, markedly elevates the initiation of the temperature of headgroup rotations. On the other hand, the monosaccharide does not preserve the headgroup disordering when cooled from the liquid-crystalline state. These effects are consistent with formation of hydrogen bonds between the OH groups of the sugar and the polar headgroups of DPPC. They show, however, that hydrogen bonding is not sufficient for preservation of the dynamic properties of freeze-dried DPPC. HES, although a very good glass former (Tg > 110 degreesC), does not depress the phase transition temperature and affects only slightly the rotational properties of freeze-dried DPPC. This lack of effect of HES is associated with the absence of direct interactions with the lipid phosphates, as evidenced by the FTIR results. These data show that vitrification of the additive is not sufficient to affect the dynamic properties of dried DPPC. PMID:9826615

  7. 7 CFR 305.18 - Quick freeze treatment schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment schedule. 305.18 Section 305.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Quick Freeze Treatments 305.18 Quick...

  8. Logistic Regression Analysis of Freezing Tolerance in Winter Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four winter wheat cultivars, Eltan, Froid, Kestrel, and Tiber, were cold-acclimated for five weeks and then tested for freezing tolerance in a programmable freezer. The temperature of the soil was recorded every two minutes and the freezing episode was described as five parameters: the minimum temp...

  9. 47 CFR 64.1190 - Preferred carrier freezes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... electronic authorization should confirm appropriate verification data (e.g., the subscriber's date of birth... subscriber's date of birth or social security number) and the information required in § 64.1190(d)(3)(ii)(A... carrier administering the freeze and the subscriber in order to lift a freeze. When engaged in...

  10. Generalized motor inhibitory deficit in Parkinson's disease patients who freeze.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Patrick G; Logan, Gordon D; van Wouwe, Nelleke C; Tolleson, Christopher M; Phibbs, Fenna T; Claassen, Daniel O; Wylie, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    Freezing of gait is a disabling symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) that involves failure to initiate and continue motor activity appropriately. PD disrupts fronto-basal ganglia circuitries that also implement the inhibition of responses, leading to the hypothesis that freezing of gait may involve fundamental changes in both initiation and inhibition of motor actions. We asked whether PD patients who show freezing of gait show selective deficits in their ability to inhibit upper and lower extremity reactions. We compared older healthy controls, older PD controls without freezing of gait, and older PD participants with freezing of gait, in stop-signal tasks that measured the initiation (go trials) and inhibition (stop trials) of both hand and foot responses. When only go trials were presented, all three groups showed similar initiation speeds across lower and upper extremity responses. When stop-signal trials were introduced, both PD groups slowed their reactions nearly twice as much as healthy controls. While this adjustment helped PD controls stop their actions as quickly as healthy controls, PD patients with freezing showed significantly delayed inhibitory control of both upper and lower extremities. When anticipating the need to stop their actions urgently, PD patients show greater adjustments (i.e., slowing) to reaction speed than healthy controls. Despite these proactive adjustments, PD patients who freeze show marked impairments in inhibiting both upper and lower extremity responses, suggesting that freezing may involve a fundamental disruption to the brain's inhibitory control system. PMID:26354102

  11. Using infrared thermography to study freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that determine when and to what extent a plant will freeze are complex. While thermocouples have served as the main method of monitoring the freezing process in plants, infrared thermography offers distinct advantages, and the use of this latter technology has provided new insights on the p...

  12. Savanna Tree Seedlings are Physiologically Tolerant to Nighttime Freeze Events

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Kimberly; Nippert, Jesse B.; Swemmer, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Freeze events can be important disturbances in savanna ecosystems, yet the interactive effect of freezing with other environmental drivers on plant functioning is unknown. Here, we investigated physiological responses of South African tree seedlings to interactions of water availability and freezing temperatures. We grew widely distributed South African tree species (Colophospermum mopane, Combretum apiculatum, Acacia nigrescens, and Cassia abbreviata) under well-watered and water-limited conditions and exposed individuals to nighttime freeze events. Of the four species studied here, C. mopane was the most tolerant of lower water availability. However, all species were similarly tolerant to nighttime freezing and recovered within one week following the last freezing event. We also show that water limitation somewhat increased freezing tolerance in one of the species (C. mopane). Therefore, water limitation, but not freezing temperatures, may restrict the distribution of these species, although the interactions of these stressors may have species-specific impacts on plant physiology. Ultimately, we show that unique physiologies can exist among dominant species within communities and that combined stresses may play a currently unidentified role in driving the function of certain species within southern Africa. PMID:26870065

  13. St. Lawrence River Freeze-Up Forecast Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assel, R. A.

    A standard operating procedure (SOP) is presented for calculating the date of freeze-up on the St. Lawrence River at Massena, N.Y. The SOP is based on two empirical temperature decline equations developed for Kingston, Ontario, and Massena, N.Y., respectively. Input data needed to forecast freeze-up consist of the forecast December flow rate and…

  14. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.7 Quick freeze...

  15. Savanna Tree Seedlings are Physiologically Tolerant to Nighttime Freeze Events.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Kimberly; Nippert, Jesse B; Swemmer, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    Freeze events can be important disturbances in savanna ecosystems, yet the interactive effect of freezing with other environmental drivers on plant functioning is unknown. Here, we investigated physiological responses of South African tree seedlings to interactions of water availability and freezing temperatures. We grew widely distributed South African tree species (Colophospermum mopane, Combretum apiculatum, Acacia nigrescens, and Cassia abbreviata) under well-watered and water-limited conditions and exposed individuals to nighttime freeze events. Of the four species studied here, C. mopane was the most tolerant of lower water availability. However, all species were similarly tolerant to nighttime freezing and recovered within one week following the last freezing event. We also show that water limitation somewhat increased freezing tolerance in one of the species (C. mopane). Therefore, water limitation, but not freezing temperatures, may restrict the distribution of these species, although the interactions of these stressors may have species-specific impacts on plant physiology. Ultimately, we show that unique physiologies can exist among dominant species within communities and that combined stresses may play a currently unidentified role in driving the function of certain species within southern Africa. PMID:26870065

  16. Stopping biological time: The freezing of living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental physical-chemical events that occur during the freezing and thawing of cells are outlined and the manner in which cell permeability determines the response of the cell to freezing is discussed both in terms of physical response and in terms of survival. 40 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Understanding freeze stress in biological tissues: thermodynamics of interfacial water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thermodynamic approach to distinguish forms of freeze energy that injure plants as the temperature decreases is developed. The pattern resulting from this analysis dictated the sequence of thermal requirements for water to exist as an independent state. Improvement of freezing tolerance in biolo...

  18. Design of freeze-drying processes for pharmaceuticals: practical advice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaolin; Pikal, Michael J

    2004-02-01

    Design of freeze-drying processes is often approached with a "trial and error" experimental plan or, worse yet, the protocol used in the first laboratory run is adopted without further attempts at optimization. Consequently, commercial freeze-drying processes are often neither robust nor efficient. It is our thesis that design of an "optimized" freeze-drying process is not particularly difficult for most products, as long as some simple rules based on well-accepted scientific principles are followed. It is the purpose of this review to discuss the scientific foundations of the freeze-drying process design and then to consolidate these principles into a set of guidelines for rational process design and optimization. General advice is given concerning common stability issues with proteins, but unusual and difficult stability issues are beyond the scope of this review. Control of ice nucleation and crystallization during the freezing step is discussed, and the impact of freezing on the rest of the process and final product quality is reviewed. Representative freezing protocols are presented. The significance of the collapse temperature and the thermal transition, denoted Tg', are discussed, and procedures for the selection of the "target product temperature" for primary drying are presented. Furthermore, guidelines are given for selection of the optimal shelf temperature and chamber pressure settings required to achieve the target product temperature without thermal and/or mass transfer overload of the freeze dryer. Finally, guidelines and "rules" for optimization of secondary drying and representative secondary drying protocols are presented. PMID:15032301

  19. Prospective Primary School Teachers' Perceptions on Boiling and Freezing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senocak, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of prospective primary school teachers on the physical state of water during the processes of boiling and freezing. There were three stages in the investigation: First, open-ended questions concerning the boiling and freezing of water were given to two groups of prospective primary school…

  20. 7 CFR 305.7 - Quick freeze treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment requirements. 305.7 Section 305.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS 305.7 Quick freeze...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1135 - Regulation for parking freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulation for parking freeze. 52.1135 Section 52.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Massachusetts 52.1135 Regulation for parking freeze. (a) Definitions:...

  2. STEFINS: a steel freezing integral simulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.V.

    1980-09-01

    STEFINS (STEel Freezing INtegral Simulation) is a computer program for the calculation of the rate of solidification of molten steel on solid steel. Such computations arize when investigating core melt accidents in fast reactors. In principle this problem involves a coupled two-dimensional thermal and hydraulic approach. However, by physically reasonable assumptions a decoupled approach has been developed. The transient solidification of molten steel on a cold wall is solved in the direction normal to the molten steel flow and independent from the solution for the molten steel temperature and Nusselt number along the direction of flow. The solutions to the applicable energy equations have been programmed in cylindrical and slab geometries. Internal gamma heating of steel is included.

  3. Freezing of Martian streams under climatic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The valley networks of Mars are widely believed to have formed at a time when climatic conditions on the planet were significantly different from those that currently prevail. This view arises from the following observations: (1) the valleys form integrated branching networks which suggests fluid drainage, and water is the most plausible fluid, (2) the present atmosphere contains only minute amounts of water, (3) the networks appear to be more akin to terrestrial valleys that are eroded by streams of modest discharges than features that form by catastrophic floods, and (4) small streams of water will rapidly freeze under present climatic conditions. Climatic conditions at the time of formation of the valleys are studied based on the assumption that they were cut by running water.

  4. Depression and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information on Heart Disease Citations Reprints Depression and Heart Disease Order a free hardcopy En Espaol Introduction ... see the NIMH booklet on Depression . What is heart disease? Heart disease refers to a number of ...

  5. Learning about depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... help manage your depression, such as: Get enough sleep Follow a healthy diet. Take medicines correctly. Learn how to manage side effects. Watch for early signs that depression is getting worse. Have a ...

  6. Depression and Suicide Risk

    MedlinePLUS

    Depression and Suicide Risk (2014) Definition: A mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and ... i Prevalence: 1. Ranges of lifetime risk for depression: from 6.7% overall to 40% in men, ...

  7. Managing your depression - teens

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Jansen KL, Cloy JA. Treatment of childhood and adolescent depression. Am Fam Physician . 2012;86:442-448. PMID: ... Services Task Force. Screening and treatment for major depressive ... Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Pediatrics . ...

  8. Screening for Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance Crisis Hotline Information Coping with a Crisis Suicide Prevention Information Psychiatric Hospitalization ... training, events Visit the podcast archive Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring Illnesses/ ...

  9. Depression and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Depression and Pregnancy Thursday, 20 March 2014 In every ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to depression may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  10. Postpartum Depression Action Plan

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Postpartum Depression | Postpartum Depression Action Plan Patient __________________________ Physician/NP/PA __________________ Clinic ____________________________ Phone Number ____________________ Choose one area and add other areas as you begin to ...

  11. [Depression in childhood].

    PubMed

    Messerschmitt, P

    1993-03-01

    Depressive syndromes occur at any age and require appropriate therapy. Available classifications include the French Classification of Mental Disorders in Children, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IIIrd edition Revised (DSM-III-R), and the International Classification of Diseases. Prevalence of depression approximates 1% to 3% in children and adults. Recent studies have investigated relationships between depression and anxiety or behavior disorders familial clustering of depression, and adult outcome of depression in children and adolescents. Early onset of major depression (before the age of 20) is an established risk factor for depression in adulthood. Pediatricians may encounter depression in emotionally deprived infants (hospitalism), victims of child abuse, and children who attempt suicide. Concepts concerning major affective disorders are changing; adolescents have specific characteristics regarding symptoms and risk of subsequent relapsing disease. Although biochemical and sleep pattern markers have not as yet been adequately studied in pediatric patients, the clinical efficacy of drug therapy has been established. PMID:8484664

  12. Depression - stopping your medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ... at risk for: Returning symptoms, such as severe depression Increased risk of suicide (for some people) Withdrawal ...

  13. Climatic variability and the evolution of insect freeze tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Brent J; Addo-Bediako, A; Chown, Steven L

    2003-05-01

    Insects may survive subzero temperatures by two general strategies: Freeze-tolerant insects withstand the formation of internal ice, while freeze-avoiding insects die upon freezing. While it is widely recognized that these represent alternative strategies to survive low temperatures, and mechanistic understanding of the physical and molecular process of cold tolerance are becoming well elucidated, the reasons why one strategy or the other is adopted remain unclear. Freeze avoidance is clearly basal within the arthropod lineages, and it seems that freeze tolerance has evolved convergently at least six times among the insects (in the Blattaria, Orthoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Diptera and Lepidoptera). Of the pterygote insect species whose cold-tolerance strategy has been reported in the literature, 29% (69 of 241 species studied) of those in the Northern Hemisphere, whereas 85 % (11 of 13 species) in the Southern Hemisphere exhibit freeze tolerance. A randomization test indicates that this predominance of freeze tolerance in the Southern Hemisphere is too great to be due to chance, and there is no evidence of a recent publication bias in favour of new reports of freeze-tolerant species. We conclude from this that the specific nature of cold insect habitats in the Southern Hemisphere, which are characterized by oceanic influence and climate variability must lead to strong selection in favour of freeze tolerance in this hemisphere. We envisage two main scenarios where it would prove advantageous for insects to be freeze tolerant. In the first, characteristic of cold continental habitats of the Northern Hemisphere, freeze tolerance allows insects to survive very low temperatures for long periods of time, and to avoid desiccation. These responses tend to be strongly seasonal, and insects in these habitats are only freeze tolerant for the overwintering period. By contrast, in mild and unpredictable environments, characteristic of habitats influenced by the Southern Ocean, freeze tolerance allows insects which habitually have ice nucleators in their guts to survive summer cold snaps, and to take advantage of mild winter periods without the need for extensive seasonal cold hardening. Thus, we conclude that the climates of the two hemispheres have led to the parallel evolution of freeze tolerance for very different reasons, and that this hemispheric difference is symptomatic of many wide-scale disparities in Northern and Southern ecological processes. PMID:12803420

  14. Versatile Aerogel Fabrication by Freezing and Subsequent Freeze-Drying of Colloidal Nanoparticle Solutions.

    PubMed

    Freytag, Axel; Snchez-Paradinas, Sara; Naskar, Suraj; Wendt, Natalja; Colombo, Massimo; Pugliese, Giammarino; Poppe, Jan; Demirci, Cansunur; Kretschmer, Imme; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Behrens, Peter; Bigall, Nadja C

    2016-01-01

    A versatile method to fabricate self-supported aerogels of nanoparticle (NP) building blocks is presented. This approach is based on freezing colloidal NPs and subsequent freeze drying. This means that the colloidal NPs are directly transferred into dry aerogel-like monolithic superstructures without previous lyogelation as would be the case for conventional aerogel and cryogel fabrication methods. The assembly process, based on a physical concept, is highly versatile: cryogelation is applicable for noble metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs, and no impact of the surface chemistry or NP shape on the resulting morphology is observed. Under optimized conditions the shape and volume of the liquid equal those of the resulting aerogels. Also, we show that thin and homogeneous films of the material can be obtained. Furthermore, the physical properties of the aerogels are discussed. PMID:26638874

  15. What happens in freezing bodies? Experimental study of histological tissue change caused by freezing injuries.

    PubMed

    Schfer, A T; Kaufmann, J D

    1999-06-28

    In order to evaluate histological features of freezing damages to human tissue after death, we froze samples of liver and heart tissue to temperatures of -12 degrees C, -28 degrees C and -80 degrees C, and stored them for 24 and 72 h, respectively, at those temperatures. After thawing and routine preparation for histology, the samples were evaluated both by microscope and with an electronic image analyzer. In all cases, we found extended extracellular spaces and shrunken cells resulting from the freeze-thaw cycle. These features were more pronounced in tissues stored for longer durations. Such findings seem to be typical of tissue that has been frozen prior to examination. Two cases of dead bodies found outdoors at subzero temperatures demonstrate that formerly frozen and unfrozen tissues can be distinguished histologically. The findings are examined in relation to the fundamental laws of cryobiology. PMID:10464930

  16. Method of treating depression

    DOEpatents

    Henn, Fritz

    2012-01-24

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  17. Method of treating depression

    DOEpatents

    Henn, Fritz

    2013-04-09

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  18. Photomicrographic Investigation of Spontaneous Freezing Temperatures of Supercooled Water Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.; Hacker, P. T.

    1950-01-01

    A photomicrographic technique for investigating eupercooled. water droplets has been devised and. used. to determine the spontaneous freezing temperatures of eupercooled. water droplets of the size ordinarily found. in the atmosphere. The freezing temperatures of 4527 droplets ranging from 8.75 to 1000 microns in diameter supported on a platinum surface and 571 droplets supported on copper were obtained. The average spontaneous freezing temperature decreased with decrease in the size of the droplets. The effect of size on the spontaneous freezing temperature was particularly marked below 60 microns. Frequency-distribution curves of the spontaneous freezing temperatures observed for droplets of a given size were obtained. Although no droplet froze at a temperature above 20 0 F, all droplets melted at 32 F. Results obtained with a copper support did not differ essentially from those obtained with a platinum surface.

  19. [Effect of freezing and cooking on the texture and electrophoretic pattern of the proteins of octopus arms (Octopus vulgaris)].

    PubMed

    Reyes, Genara; Nirchio, Mauro; Bello, Rafael; Borderías, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Texture is the most valuable feature in cephalopods. Factors that mainly affect the texture of octopus are: freezing, scalding and cooking. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of freezing, scalding and length of cooking time on the texture and electrophoretic pattern of proteins of octopus arms. Octopuses were trapped near Margarita Island and carried with ice to the laboratory where they were packed and subjected to: a) freezing at -27 degrees C or at -20 degrees C b) scalding c) cooking for 25 min, 35 min or 45 min. Shear force was determined by Kramer cell on strips of octopus arms. SDS-PAGE was done according to the Laemmli method with 12% polyacrilamide gels. A sensory evaluation of the preference of texture was carried out using a hedonic scale of 7-points and a non-trained panel. Octopus texture was not affected by freezing temperature or scalding. Frozen octopus was softer after cooking than fresh. The longer the cooking time was, the softer the octopus was. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not significantly affected by scalding or cooking; however large aggregates heavier than MHC, new bands and loss of resolution of the bands appeared. Myosin and paramyosin bands were more affected by freezing prior to cooking. PMID:26137796

  20. Large scale synthesis of nanostructured zirconia-based compounds from freeze-dried precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, A.; Villanueva, R.; Vie, D.; Murcia-Mascaros, S.; Martinez, E.; Beltran, A.; Sapina, F.; Vicent, M.; Sanchez, E.

    2013-01-15

    Nanocrystalline zirconia powders have been obtained at the multigram scale by thermal decomposition of precursors resulting from the freeze-drying of aqueous acetic solutions. This technique has equally made possible to synthesize a variety of nanostructured yttria or scandia doped zirconia compositions. SEM images, as well as the analysis of the XRD patterns, show the nanoparticulated character of those solids obtained at low temperature, with typical particle size in the 10-15 nm range when prepared at 673 K. The presence of the monoclinic, the tetragonal or both phases depends on the temperature of the thermal treatment, the doping concentration and the nature of the dopant. In addition, Rietveld refinement of the XRD profiles of selected samples allows detecting the coexistence of the tetragonal and the cubic phases for high doping concentration and high thermal treatment temperatures. Raman experiments suggest the presence of both phases also at relatively low treatment temperatures. - Graphical abstract: Zr{sub 1-x}A{sub x}O{sub 2-x/2} (A=Y, Sc; 0{<=}x{<=}0.12) solid solutions have been prepared as nanostructured powders by thermal decomposition of precursors obtained by freeze-drying, and this synthetic procedure has been scaled up to the 100 g scale. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zr{sub 1-x}A{sub x}O{sub 2-x/2} (A=Y, Sc; 0{<=}x{<=}0.12) solid solutions have been prepared as nanostructured powders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthetic method involves the thermal decomposition of precursors obtained by freeze-drying. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The temperature of the thermal treatment controls particle sizes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The preparation procedure has been scaled up to the 100 g scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method is appropriate for the large-scale industrial preparation of multimetallic systems.

  1. Suicide and Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for a person to feel depressed. More commonly depression comes on over a period of time with many factors going on at once in a person’s life. People of all ages, including children, youth and adolescents, can suffer from depressive illnesses. Since they may ...

  2. Heart disease and depression

    MedlinePLUS

    Heart disease and depression often go hand-in-hand. You are are more likely to feel sad or depressed after a heart attack ... heart disease. The good news is that treating depression may help improve both your mental and physical ...

  3. Category Accessibility and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, C. Douglas; Gotlib, Ian H.

    Cognitive processes, particularly in regard to negative content schemata, seem to play an instrumental role in the development and maintenance of depression. In order to better understand the nature of negative schemata in depressed individuals, both depressed and nondepressed subjects participated in two studies in which they were required to

  4. Depression and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Marshall, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains four articles related to depression and aging. Compares normal adults with those having a major depressive disorder. Focuses on life satisfaction in the elderly, describing an individualized measure of life satisfaction. Describes similarities and differences between grief and depression. Contains a psychometric analysis of the Zung…

  5. Evaluation and Validation of the Messinger Freezing Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important non-dimensional parameters used in ice-accretion modeling and scaling studies is the freezing fraction defined by the heat-balance analysis of Messinger. For fifty years this parameter has been used to indicate how rapidly freezing takes place when super-cooled water strikes a solid body. The value ranges from 0 (no freezing) to 1 (water freezes immediately on impact), and the magnitude has been shown to play a major role in determining the physical appearance of the accreted ice. Because of its importance to ice shape, this parameter and the physics underlying the expressions used to calculate it have been questioned from time to time. Until now, there has been no strong evidence either validating or casting doubt on the current expressions. This paper presents experimental measurements of the leading-edge thickness of a number of ice shapes for a variety of test conditions with nominal freezing fractions from 0.3 to 1.0. From these thickness measurements, experimental freezing fractions were calculated and compared with values found from the Messinger analysis as applied by Ruff. Within the experimental uncertainty of measuring the leading-edge thickness, agreement of the experimental and analytical freezing fraction was very good. It is also shown that values of analytical freezing fraction were entirely consistent with observed ice shapes at and near rime conditions: At an analytical freezing fraction of unity, experimental ice shapes displayed the classic rime shape, while for conditions producing analytical freezing fractions slightly lower than unity, glaze features started to appear.

  6. Multiple glass transitions and freezing events of aqueous citric acid.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J; Tenhu, Heikki; Loerting, Thomas

    2015-05-14

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10-64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid-glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid-glass and reverse glass-liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  7. Multiple Glass Transitions and Freezing Events of Aqueous Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 1064 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquidglass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquidglass and reverse glassliquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  8. Effect of wettability on sessile drop freezing: when superhydrophobicity stimulates an extreme freezing delay.

    PubMed

    Boinovich, Ludmila; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M; Korolev, Vadim V; Pashinin, Andrei S

    2014-02-18

    An increasing number of studies directed at supercooling water droplets on surfaces with different wettabilities have appeared in recent years. This activity has been stimulated by the recognition that water supercooling phenomena can be effectively used to develop methods for protecting outdoor equipment and infrastructure elements against icing and snow accretion. In this article, we discuss the nucleation kinetics of supercooled sessile water droplets on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces under isothermal conditions at temperatures of -8, -10, and -15 °C and a saturated water vapor atmosphere. The statistics of nucleation events for the ensembles of freezing sessile droplets is completed by the detailed analysis of the contact angle temperature dependence and freezing of individual droplets in a saturated vapor atmosphere. We have demonstrated that the most essential freezing delay is characteristic of the superhydrophobic coating on aluminum, with the texture resistant to contact with ice and water. This delay can reach many hours at T = -8 °C and a few minutes at -23 °C. The observed behavior is analyzed on the basis of different nucleation mechanisms. The dissimilarity in the total nucleation rate, detected for two superhydrophobic substrates having the same apparent contact angle of the water drop but different resistivities of surface texture to the contact with water/ice, is associated with the contribution of heterogeneous nucleation on external centers located at the water droplet/air interface. PMID:24491217

  9. Importance of Depression in Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustman, Patrick J.; Clouse, Ray E.; Anderson, Ryan J.

    Depression doubles the likelihood of comorbid depression, which presents as major depression in 11% and subsyndromal depression in 31% of patients with the medical illness. The course of depression is chronic, and afflicted patients suffer an average of one episode annually. Depression has unique importance in diabetes because of its association

  10. Mesophyll freezing and effects of freeze dehydration visualized by simultaneous measurement of IDTA and differential imaging chlorophyll fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Jrgen; Spindelbck, Joachim Paul; Neuner, Gilbert

    2008-11-01

    Infrared differential thermal analysis (IDTA) and differential imaging chlorophyll fluorescence (DIF) were employed simultaneously to study the two-dimensional pattern of ice propagation in leaves and mesophyll freeze dehydration as detected by a significant increase of basic chlorophyll fluorescence (F(0)). IDTA and DIF technique gave different insights into the freezing process of leaves that was highly species-specific. IDTA clearly visualized the freezing process consisting of an initial fast spread of ice throughout the vascular system followed by mesophyll freezing. While mesophyll freezing was homogeneously in Poa alpina, Rhododendron ferrugineum and Senecio incanus as determined by IDTA, DIF showed a distinct pattern only in S. incanus, with the leaf tips being affected earlier. In Cinnamomum camphora, a mottled freezing pattern of small mesophyll compartments was observed by both methods. In IDTA images, a random pattern predominated, while in DIF images, compartments closer to lower order veins were affected earlier. The increase of F(0) following mesophyll freezing started after a species-specific time lag of up to 26 min. The start of the F(0) increase and its slope were significantly enhanced at lower temperatures, which suggest a higher strain on mesophyll protoplasts when freezing occurs at lower temperatures. PMID:18761699

  11. Freezing of HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O solutions at stratospheric temperatures: Nucleation statistics and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Koop, T.; Luo, B.; Biermann, U.M.; Crutzen, P.J.; Peter, T.

    1997-02-06

    Calorimetric freezing experiments with aqueous sulfuric and nitric acid solutions are presented and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). We show that the nucleation of hydrates from these solutions is a stochastic process and that nucleation rates and their uncertainties can be determined using Poisson statistics. Under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions above the ice frost point, the homogeneous nucleation rates of stratospheric aerosols are exceedingly low, ruling out homogeneous freezing as a pathway for PSC formation. Several stratospherically important substrates were tested concerning their ability to induce heterogeneous nucleation. None of the experiments indicated a relevant enhancement of the freezing probability of liquid aerosols. Moreover, the experiments reveal that the freezing process of the solutions under stratospheric conditions is limited by the nucleation rates of the hydrates, rather than their crystal growth rates, thus ruling out the possibility of a glassy state of stratospheric aerosol droplets. Also, we argue why a glacial state of the aerosols seems to be unlikely. The only processes leading to freezing of the hydrates appear to be the heterogeneous nucleation on water ice crystals forming below the frost point and the homogeneous freezing of almost binary HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O droplets with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentrations below approximately 0.01 wt%. 68 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Studies on Freezing RAM Semen in Absence of Glycerol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnaby, Abdelhady Abdelhakeam

    1988-12-01

    Glycerol is widely used as a major cryoprotective agent for freezing spermatozoa of almost all species. However, it reduces fertility of sheep inseminated cervically compared with intrauterine insemination. Studies were conducted to develop a method and procedure for freezing ram semen in the absence of glycerol. Post -thaw survival of ram spermatozoa frozen in the absence of glycerol was affected by time and temperature after collection and before dilution and time after dilution and before freezing. Increase in time at 5^ circC before or after dilution and before freezing increased both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter. A cold dilution method was developed. Slow cooling of fresh ram semen and diluting at 5^circ C 2-3 hr. after collection, then freezing 1 hr. after dilution improved both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter compared with immediate dilution at 30-37^circC after collection and freezing 3-4 hr. later (P < 0.05). An extender was developed to freeze ram semen in the absence of glycerol. An increase in post-thaw motility was obtained when semen was extended in TES titrated with Tris to pH 7.0 (TEST) and osmotic pressure of 375-400 mOsm/kg, containing 25-30% (v/v) egg yolk and 10% (v/v) maltose. A special device (boat) for freezing was constructed to insure the same height of the sample above LN _2 and thus the same freezing rate from freeze to freeze. Freezing of semen in 0.25cc straws at 5-10 cm above LN_2 (73.8 to 49.5 ^circC/min) yielded higher post-thaw motility than the rates resulted from freezing at 15 cm above LN_2 or 1 cm above LN _2. Faster Thawing in 37^ circC water for 30 sec. (7.8^ circC/sec.) increased post-thaw motility compared with slower thawing in 5 or 20^circ C water (P < 0.05). A lambing rate of 52.2% was obtained in one fertility trial conducted with ram semen frozen without glycerol and 17.1% in a second trial. One injection (IM) of 15 mg PGF_{2alpha}/ewe for estrus synchronization during breeding season resulted in higher heat response and lambing rate than two injections given 10 days apart.

  13. Thermal stability of surface freezing films in Ga-based alloys: an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Halka, V; Freyland, W

    2007-07-21

    We have investigated the thickness and surface structure of surface freezing films in Ga-Bi and Ga-Pb alloys over a wide temperature range between room temperature and the respective surface freezing transitions by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). For the example of a Ga-Bi alloy dilute in Bi, XPS measurements show that the surface freezing film has a nearly constant value of approximately 25 A between the surface freezing temperature of 130 degrees C and room temperature if the sample is cooled slowly (5 Kh). On heating to 130 degrees C the film thickness exhibits a clear hysteresis on melting. On quenching the alloy sample (>100 Kh) the film thickness increases by almost a factor of 10. These observations indicate that the surface freezing films are metastable. The surface structure of the surface freezing films of various Ga-rich Ga-Bi and Ga-Pb alloys has been probed for the first time by STM at different temperatures below and above the bulk eutectic point. Atomically resolved STM images show the surface structures of pure Bi (0001) and Pb (111), respectively, at room temperature. On heating above the eutectic temperature the surface structure of the films does not change significantly as judged from the size and thickness of Pb or Bi terraces. These observations together with the film thickness variation with temperature indicate that the surface freezing films behave like a metastable independent surface phase. These results together with the wetting characteristics of these alloys suggest that surface freezing in these systems is a first order surface phase transition between wetting and metastable surface freezing films. The energy barrier for nucleation is strongly reduced due to a lowering of the interfacial energy if the nucleus is completely immersed in the respective wetting layer. PMID:17655450

  14. Depression in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kitching, David

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY People with dementia of any type have a high incidence of major depression. The occurrence of a first major depressive episode in an older adult is a risk factor for developing dementia. Management of depression in a person with dementia should be enthusiastic with an aim to optimise quality of life. Non-pharmacological and pharmacological strategies are both important in treating depression in dementia and management of these patients requires a collaborative approach. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first-line pharmacotherapy for depression in dementia, although they are less likely to be effective in older people. PMID:26843714

  15. [Depression and psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Bouguon, K; Misery, L

    2008-02-01

    Psychiatric co-morbidity is very frequently associated with psoriasis. Depression is observed in numerous patients with psoriasis. Early detection and treatment are very important. There is a vicious circle psoriasis- alteration of quality of life- depression, but psoriasis improvement is not always followed by an improvement of depression. A contrario, it is obvious that a depressive patient has a bad observance of treatment. Links between psoriasis and depression are not only psychopathological. Biological factors, such as increase of blood amounts of substance P and TNF or decrease of serotonine could also explain this association. PMID:18466793

  16. Depressive symptoms in institutionalized older adults

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Lvia Maria; Mattos, Ins Echenique

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms among institutionalized elderly individuals and to analyze factors associated with this condition. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving 462 individuals aged 60 or older, residents in long stay institutions in four Brazilian municipalities. The dependent variable was assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. Poissons regression was used to evaluate associations with co-variables. We investigated which variables were most relevant in terms of presence of depressive symptoms within the studied context through factor analysis. RESULTS Prevalence of depressive symptoms was 48.7%. The variables associated with depressive symptoms were: regular/bad/very bad self-rated health; comorbidities; hospitalizations; and lack of friends in the institution. Five components accounted for 49.2% of total variance of the sample: functioning, social support, sensory deficiency, institutionalization and health conditions. In the factor analysis, functionality and social support were the components which explained a large part of observed variance. CONCLUSIONS A high prevalence of depressive symptoms, with significant variation in distribution, was observed. Such results emphasize the importance of health conditions and functioning for institutionalized older individuals developing depression. They also point to the importance of providing opportunities for interaction among institutionalized individuals. PMID:24897042

  17. Clarification on Mechanical Characteristic in State of Stress of Osteoarthritis of the Hip Joint Using Stress Freezing Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezaki, Nobutaka; Ezumi, Tsutomu; Hachiya, Masashi

    In this research, the Osteoarthritis of Hip Joint was pick up, the 3-dimensional stress freezing method of photoelastic method was applied, and the state of the stress in the normality hip joint and the transformable hip joint was examined. The direction and the singular point of principal stress and stress distribution were experimentally examined. At result, The Osteoarthritis of Hip Joint touches by 2 points, Osteoarthritis of Hip Joint occurrence of the new singular point with flat of the femoral head, They change the direction of the principal stress line in an existing singular point is cause.

  18. HIV infection and depression.

    PubMed

    Arseniou, Stylianos; Arvaniti, Aikaterini; Samakouri, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Major depression is highly prevalent among HIV-positive patients (HIVpp). The prevalence of depression ranges between 18% and 81%, depending on the population studied and the methodology of the study. The etiology of depression in HIVpp is likely determined by: (i) biological factors (alterations in the white matter structure, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid dysfunction, Tat-protein-induced depressive behavior); (ii) psychosocial factors (HIV stigma, occupational disability, body image changes, isolation and debilitation); (iii) history or comorbidity of psychiatric illness; and (iv) the perinatal period in HIVpp women. Symptomatology of depression differs between HIVpp and HIV-negative patients (HIVnp). Depression may also alter the function of lymphocytes in HIVpp and decrease natural killer cell activity, contributing to the increased mortality in these patients. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors are considered the first-line treatment. Treatment of depression can improve quality of life and lead to a better prognosis of HIV infection. PMID:24552630

  19. Immersion freezing on mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Grothe, Hinrich; Pummer, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Mineral dust is considered to play a major role in ice cloud nucleation in the troposphere. More than 1.000 Tg of mineral dust are aerosolized from the ground every year, 1-10% of these reach the upper troposphere [1]. At an altitude of about 8 km ice residual particle analysis has shown that about 50% of all ice nuclei (IN) are mineral dust[2]. In principle, natural occurring dusts may either be IN-active themselves or are carriers of organic and/or biological IN. Up to now the ice nucleation, i.e. cloud glaciation, has not been quantized. However, different authors report a high IN-activity for many mineral dust samples, although a systematic comparison between different minerals is still missing. Therefore, we studied selected mineral dust samples which were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy before use. Oil immersion measurements were performed on the most common minerals, clay materials and volcanic ash. The median freezing temperatures range from -21C up to homogenous freezing at 38C. Even though quite a few dust samples show a reasonable high IN-activity, their median freezing temperatures are low compared to biological samples [3, 4]. Furthermore, heat treatment of the dusts was applied in order to decompose and to denaturize organic and/or biological surfactants. Finally, some dust samples had a high loss of activity and thus were subjects of further experiments. These mineral dust particles were suspended in water and after an incubation time were removed. In some cases the washing water had become IN-active, but lost its activity after enzymatic treatment. The observed high IN-activity can thus be explained by adsorbed biological materials. The results suggest that some mineral dusts are IN-active, and if it is not intrinsic they may even enhance IN-activity of organic and biological IN if these are adsorbed on the dust particle surface. A relatively high IN-activity of the pure mineral dusts was only observed in quartz, clays, and mixed natural dusts (ATD), which are mainly composed of SiO2 and clays. References. [1] C. S. Zender, R. L. Miller and I. Tegen, Eos Trans. AGU, 2004,85, 509. [2] K. A. Pratt, P. J. DeMott, J. R. French, Z. Wang, D. L. Westphal, A. J. Heymsfield, C. H. Twohy, A. J. Prenni, K. A. Prather, Nat. Geosci., 2009, 2, 397-400. [3] B. Pummer, H. Bauer, J. Bernardi, S. Bleicher and H. Grothe, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2012, 12, 2541-2550. [4] V. T. J. Phillips, C. Andronache, B. Christner, C. E. Morris, D. C. Sands, A. Bansemer, A. Lauer, C. McNaughton and C. Seman, Biogeosciences, 2009, 6, 987-1014.

  20. A water activity based model of heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics for freezing of water and aqueous solution droplets.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Alpert, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous solutions by particles acting as ice nuclei (IN) is a common process of heterogeneous ice nucleation which occurs in many environments, especially in the atmosphere where it results in the glaciation of clouds. Here we experimentally show, using a variety of IN types suspended in various aqueous solutions, that immersion freezing temperatures and kinetics can be described solely by temperature, T, and solution water activity, a(w), which is the ratio of the vapour pressure of the solution and the saturation water vapour pressure under the same conditions and, in equilibrium, equivalent to relative humidity (RH). This allows the freezing point and corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, J(het), to be uniquely expressed by T and a(w), a result we term the a(w) based immersion freezing model (ABIFM). This method is independent of the nature of the solute and accounts for several varying parameters, including cooling rate and IN surface area, while providing a holistic description of immersion freezing and allowing prediction of freezing temperatures, J(het), frozen fractions, ice particle production rates and numbers. Our findings are based on experimental freezing data collected for various IN surface areas, A, and cooling rates, r, of droplets variously containing marine biogenic material, two soil humic acids, four mineral dusts, and one organic monolayer acting as IN. For all investigated IN types we demonstrate that droplet freezing temperatures increase as A increases. Similarly, droplet freezing temperatures increase as the cooling rate decreases. The log10(J(het)) values for the various IN types derived exclusively by Tand a(w), provide a complete description of the heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics. Thus, the ABIFM can be applied over the entire range of T, RH, total particulate surface area, and cloud activation timescales typical of atmospheric conditions. Lastly, we demonstrate that ABIFM can be used to derive frozen fractions of droplets and ice particle production for atmospheric models of cirrus and mixed phase cloud conditions. PMID:24601020

  1. Dynamical freeze-out in three-fluid hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Russkikh, V. N.; Ivanov, Yu. B.

    2007-11-15

    The freeze-out procedure accepted in a model of three-fluid dynamics is analyzed. This procedure is formulated in terms of drain terms in hydrodynamic equations. The dynamics of freeze-out is illustrated by one-dimensional simulations. It is demonstrated that the resulting freeze-out reveals a nontrivial dynamics depending on initial conditions in the expanding 'fireball'. The freeze-out front is not just defined 'geometrically' on the condition of the freeze-out criterion met but rather is a subject of fluid evolution. It competes with the fluid flow and does not always reach the place where the freeze-out criterion is met. Dynamics of the freeze-out in three-dimensional simulations is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the late stage of central nuclear collisions at the top energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron is of the form of three (two baryon-rich and one baryon-free) fireballs separated from each other.

  2. Water Relations of Pachysandra Leaves during Freezing and Thawing 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jian-Jun; Beck, Erwin

    1991-01-01

    The evergreen herb Pachysandra terminalis becomes moderately frost-hardy in winter. The water relations of its frost-hardy leaves were studied during a freeze-thaw cycle. Leaf water potentials, measured by psychrometry at subfreezing temperatures, were identical with those of ice, indicating equilibrium freezing. Microscopic observations showed extracellular freezing of tissue water. As evidenced by thermal analysis, the freezing process starts with the crystallization of a minor volume which was identified as apoplasmic water. The following long-lasting exotherm indicated slow export of water from the protoplasts driven by extracellular crystallization. In partially frozen leaves, the fractions of liquid water were measured at several subfreezing temperatures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. They were consistently greater than those calculated from the osmotic potentials of cellular fluid, and the differences increased with decreasing temperature. About 50% of the differences could be abolished by freeze-killing of the leaf and was thus ascribed to the effect of a (negative) pressure reinforcing the osmotic potential. The persistent part of the differences may have reflected a matric component. At ?7C, the absolute values of both potentials were ?1.7 megapascals each. The water relations of Pachysandra leaves clearly indicate nonideal equilibrium freezing where negative pressures and matric potentials contribute to the leaf water potential and thus alleviate freeze-dehydration of the tissue. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5 PMID:16668501

  3. Freeze-Thaw Durability of Air-Entrained Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Huai-Shuai; Yi, Ting-Hua

    2013-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles). The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss) and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity). The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results. PMID:23576906

  4. Cold-Induced Freezing Tolerance in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Leslie A.; Junttila, Olavi

    1999-01-01

    Changes in the physiology of plant leaves are correlated with enhanced freezing tolerance and include accumulation of compatible solutes, changes in membrane composition and behavior, and altered gene expression. Some of these changes are required for enhanced freezing tolerance, whereas others are merely consequences of low temperature. In this study we demonstrated that a combination of cold and light is required for enhanced freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis leaves, and this combination is associated with the accumulation of soluble sugars and proline. Sugar accumulation was evident within 2 h after a shift to low temperature, which preceded measured changes in freezing tolerance. In contrast, significant freezing tolerance was attained before the accumulation of proline or major changes in the percentage of dry weight were detected. Many mRNAs also rapidly accumulated in response to low temperature. All of the cold-induced mRNAs that we examined accumulated at low temperature even in the absence of light, when there was no enhancement of freezing tolerance. Thus, the accumulation of these mRNAs is insufficient for cold-induced freezing tolerance. PMID:10364390

  5. Metabolic Changes in Avena sativa Crowns Recovering from Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Cynthia A.; Duke, Stanley H.; Livingston, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of fall-sown cereal plants due to their economic importance; however, little has been reported on the biochemical changes occurring over time after the freezing conditions are replaced by conditions favorable for recovery and growth such as would occur during spring. In this study, GC-MS was used to detect metabolic changes in the overwintering crown tissue of oat (Avena sativa L.) during a fourteen day time-course after freezing. Metabolomic analysis revealed increases in most amino acids, particularly proline, 5-oxoproline and arginine, which increased greatly in crowns that were frozen compared to controls and correlated very significantly with days after freezing. In contrast, sugar and sugar related metabolites were little changed by freezing, except sucrose and fructose which decreased dramatically. In frozen tissue all TCA cycle metabolites, especially citrate and malate, decreased in relation to unfrozen tissue. Alterations in some amino acid pools after freezing were similar to those observed in cold acclimation whereas most changes in sugar pools after freezing were not. These similarities and differences suggest that there are common as well as unique genetic mechanisms between these two environmental conditions that are crucial to the winter survival of plants. PMID:24675792

  6. Is Enceladus' Internal Ocean Doomed to Freeze?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Barr, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Enceladus is geologically hyperactive, with plumes of water vapor, other volatiles such as ammonia, and salty particles erupting from its South Polar Terrain. The plumes are spatially associated with a region of greatly increased local heat flux, with a total power output 15.8 3.1 GW spread over an area of 70,000 km2 (e.g., Spencer and Nimmo 2013, AREPS 41), corresponding to a regional heat flux of 180-270 mW m-2. Tidal strains of the magnitude only possible in an ice shell that is decoupled from a rocky interior by an internal ocean or regional sea are required to generate this much heat (e.g., Behounkova et al. 2012, Icarus 219). Yet, numerous studies conclude that Enceladus' ocean cannot be in present-day thermodynamic steady state with a conductive or convective ice I shell (e.g., Roberts and Nimmo 2008, Icarus 194; Behounkova et al. 2012). Regardless of where Enceladus' tidal heating is concentrated (i.e., the poles), and regardless of whether its outer ice I shell convects, Enceladus' ocean is predicted to freeze on a geologically rapid time scale, implying that activity on Enceladus is only a transient or episodic phenomenon. These arguments strictly apply only to pure water ice oceans, however. We have previously argued that if the presence of salts or ammonia is allowed for, the ocean may be cooler and can be maintained essentially permanently by tidal heating in the ice above (McKinnon and Barr 2008, LPS XXXIX). Here we elaborate on the conditions under which Enceladus' ocean can be stabilized or even increase in thickness due to present-day tidal heating within the ice shell and the presence of salts and ammonia, which we now know are there (Waite et al. 2009, Nature 460; Postberg et al. 2011, Nature 474). As previous work has found, we cannot explain the present-day heat flow, but there is no fundamental reason that Enceladus' ocean or sea should completely freeze for present-day orbital eccentricities.

  7. Spatiotemporal measurement of freezing-induced deformation of engineered tissues

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Ka Yaw; Dutton, J. Craig; Han, Bumsoo

    2010-01-01

    In order to cryopreserve functional engineered tissues (ETs), the microstructure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) should be maintained as well as the cellular viability since the functionality is closely related to the ECM microstructure. Since the post-thaw ECM microstructure is determined by the deformation of ETs during cryopreservation, freezing-induced deformation of ETs was measured with a newly developed quantum dot (QD)-mediated cell image deformetry system using dermal equivalents as a model tissue. The dermal equivalents were constructed by seeding QD-labeled fibroblasts in type I collagen matrices. After 24 hour incubation, the ETs were directionally frozen by exposing them to a spatial temperature gradient (from 4 °C to −20 °C over a distance of 6 mm). While being frozen, the ETs were consecutively imaged, and consecutive pairs of these images were two-dimensionally cross-correlated to determine the local deformation during freezing. The results showed that freezing induced the deformation of ET, and its magnitude varied with both time and location. The maximum local dilatation was 0.006 s−1 and was always observed at the phase change interface. Due to this local expansion, the unfrozen region in front of the freezing interface experienced compression. This expansion-compression pattern was observed throughout the freezing process. In the unfrozen region, the deformation rate gradually decreased away from the freezing interface. After freezing/thawing, the ET experienced an approximately 28% decrease in thickness and 8% loss in weight. These results indicate that freezing-induced deformation caused the transport of interstitial fluid and the interstitial fluid was extruded. In summary, the results suggest that complex cell-fluid-matrix interactions occur within ETs during freezing, and these interactions determine the post-thaw ECM microstructure and eventual post-thaw tissue functionality. PMID:20459191

  8. Sucrose Diffusion in Decellularized Heart Valves for Freeze-Drying.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shangping; Oldenhof, Harritte; Goecke, Tobias; Ramm, Robert; Harder, Michael; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres; Wolkers, Willem Frederik

    2015-09-01

    Decellularized heart valves can be used as starter matrix implants for heart valve replacement therapies in terms of guided tissue regeneration. Decellularized matrices ideally need to be long-term storable to assure off-the-shelf availability. Freeze-drying is an attractive preservation method, allowing storage at room temperature in a dried state. However, the two inherent processing steps, freezing and drying, can cause severe damage to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and the overall tissue histoarchitecture and thus impair biomechanical characteristics of resulting matrices. Freeze-drying therefore requires a lyoprotective agent that stabilizes endogenous structural proteins during both substeps and that forms a protective glassy state at room temperature. To estimate incubation times needed to infiltrate decellularized heart valves with the lyoprotectant sucrose, temperature-dependent diffusion studies were done using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Glycerol, a cryoprotective agent, was studied for comparison. Diffusion of both protectants was found to exhibit Arrhenius behavior. The activation energies of sucrose and glycerol diffusion were found to be 15.9 and 37.7?kJmol(-1), respectively. It was estimated that 4?h of incubation at 37C is sufficient to infiltrate heart valves with sucrose before freeze-drying. Application of a 5% sucrose solution was shown to stabilize acellular valve scaffolds during freeze-drying. Such freeze-dried tissues, however, displayed pores, which were attributed to ice crystal damage, whereas vacuum-dried scaffolds in comparison revealed no pores after drying and rehydration. Exposure to a hygroscopic sucrose solution (80%) before freeze-drying was shown to be an effective method to diminish pore formation in freeze-dried ECMs: matrix structures closely resembled those of control samples that were not freeze-dried. Heart valve matrices were shown to be in a glassy state after drying, suggesting that they can be stored at room temperature. PMID:25809201

  9. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  10. Heterogeneous freezing of droplets with immersed mineral dust particles - measurements and parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, D.; Hartmann, S.; Shaw, R. A.; Covert, D.; Mentel, T. F.; Schneider, J.; Poulain, L.; Reitz, P.; Spindler, C.; Clauss, T.; Kiselev, A.; Hallbauer, E.; Wex, H.; Mildenberger, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2010-04-01

    During the measurement campaign FROST (FReezing Of duST), LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator) was used to investigate the immersion freezing behavior of size selected, coated and uncoated Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles with a mobility diameter of 300 nm. Particles were coated with succinic acid (C4H6O4), sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4). Ice fractions at mixed-phase cloud temperatures ranging from 233.15 K to 239.15 K (0.60 K) were determined for all types of particles. In this temperature range, pure ATD particles and those coated with C4H6O4 or small amounts of H2SO4 were found to be the most efficient ice nuclei (IN). ATD particles coated with (NH4)2SO4 were the most inefficient IN. Since the supercooled droplets were highly diluted before freezing occurred, a freezing point suppression due to the soluble material on the particles (and therefore in the droplets) cannot explain this observation. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that the coatings lead to particle surface alterations which cause the differences in the IN abilities. Two different theoretical approaches based on the stochastic and the singular hypotheses were applied to clarify and parameterize the freezing behavior of the particles investigated. Both approaches describe the experimentally determined results, yielding parameters that can subsequently be used to compare our results to those from other studies. However, we cannot clarify at the current state which of the two approaches correctly describes the investigated immersion freezing process. But both approaches confirm the assumption that the coatings lead to particle surface modifications lowering the nucleation efficiency. The stochastic approach interprets the reduction in nucleation rate from coating as primarily due to an increase in the thermodynamic barrier for ice formation (i.e., changes in interfacial free energies). The singular approach interprets the reduction as resulting from a reduced surface density of active sites.

  11. Marital Processes around Depression: A Gendered and Relational Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Thomeer, Mieke Beth; Umberson, Debra; Pudrovska, Tetyanna

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive evidence of the importance of marriage and marital processes for mental health, little is known about the interpersonal processes around depression within marriage and the extent to which these processes are gendered. We use a mixed methods approach to explore the importance of gender in shaping processes around depression within marriage; we approach this in two ways. First, using quantitative longitudinal analysis of 2,601 couples from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), we address whether depressive symptoms in one spouse shape the other spouse's depressive symptoms and whether men or women are more influential in this process. We find that a wife's depressive symptoms influence her husband's future depressive symptoms but a husband's depressive symptoms do not influence his wife's future symptoms. Second, we conduct a qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with 29 couples wherein one or both spouses experienced depression to provide additional insight into how gender impacts depression and reactions to depression within marriage. Our study points to the importance of cultural scripts of masculinity and femininity in shaping depression and emotional processes within marriage and highlights the importance of applying a gendered couple-level approach to better understand the mental health effects of marital processes. PMID:25914855

  12. Freeze Tape Casting of Functionally Graded Porous Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofie, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Freeze tape casting is a means of making preforms of ceramic sheets that, upon subsequent completion of fabrication processing, can have anisotropic and/or functionally graded properties that notably include aligned and graded porosity. Freeze tape casting was developed to enable optimization of the microstructures of porous ceramic components for use as solid oxide electrodes in fuel cells: Through alignment and grading of pores, one can tailor surface areas and diffusion channels for flows of gas and liquid species involved in fuel-cell reactions. Freeze tape casting offers similar benefits for fabrication of optimally porous ceramics for use as catalysts, gas sensors, and filters.

  13. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water transport, thereby leading to previously unconsidered mechanisms of cell freezing response. In addition, cellular water transport is identified as the critical limiting factor on the amount of freezing-induced tissue deformation, particularly in native tissues with high cell densities. Finally, effects of cryopreservation on post-thaw biological functionality of collagen engineered tissue constructs is investigated where cell-matrix interactions during fibroblast migration are considered as the functional response. Simultaneous cell migration and extracellular matrix deformation are characterized. Results show diminished cell-matrix coupling by freeze/thaw accompanied by a subtle decrease in cell migration. A connection between these results and freezing-induced collagen fibril damage is also suggested. Overall, this dissertation provides new fundamental knowledge on cryodamage mechanisms and a collection of novel multi-purpose engineering tools that will open the way for rational design of cryomedicine technologies.

  14. The Intrinsic and Extrinsic Aspects of Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Freezing of gait appears to result from a number of fundamental problems in patients with Parkinson disease. Automaticity is impaired, putting more stress on voluntary mechanisms. Internal drivers of movement are impaired, likely because of deficient basal ganglia function. Deficiency of internal forces to initiate movement is a major factor in freezing. This deficiency gives a greater influence to external or sensory factors. The sensory factors can both help or hinder freezing. Analogous to the problem with set-shifting, there is also some difficulty in regulation of internal versus external factors and in regulation of different external factors. PMID:18668625

  15. Detecting depression among adolescents in Santiago, Chile: sex differences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression among adolescents is common but most cases go undetected. Brief questionnaires offer an opportunity to identify probable cases but properly validated cut-off points are often unavailable, especially in non-western countries. Sex differences in the prevalence of depression become marked in adolescence and this needs to be accounted when establishing cut-off points. Method This study involved adolescents attending secondary state schools in Santiago, Chile. We compared the self-reported Beck Depression Inventory-II with a psychiatric interview to ascertain diagnosis. General psychometric features were estimated before establishing the criterion validity of the BDI-II. Results The BDI-II showed good psychometric properties with good internal consistency, a clear unidimensional factorial structure, and good capacity to discriminate between cases and non-cases of depression. Optimal cut-off points to establish caseness for depression were much higher for girls than boys. Sex discrepancies were primarily explained by differences in scores among those with depression rather than among those without depression. Conclusions It is essential to validate scales with the populations intended to be used with. Sex differences are often ignored when applying cut-off points, leading to substantial misclassification. Early detection of depression is essential if we think that early intervention is a clinically important goal. PMID:23617306

  16. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze.

    PubMed

    Preston, Jill C; Sandve, Simen R

    2013-01-01

    Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve. PMID:23761798

  17. Effect of geometrical frustration on inverse freezing.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Morais, C V; Zimmer, F M

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between geometrical frustration (GF) and inverse freezing (IF) is studied within a cluster approach. The model considers first-neighbor (J_{1}) and second-neighbor (J_{2}) intracluster antiferromagnetic interactions between Ising spins on a checkerboard lattice and long-range disordered couplings (J) among clusters. We obtain phase diagrams of temperature versus J_{1}/J in two cases: the absence of J_{2} interaction and the isotropic limit J_{2}=J_{1}, where GF takes place. An IF reentrant transition from the spin-glass (SG) to paramagnetic (PM) phase is found for a certain range of J_{1}/J in both cases. The J_{1} interaction leads to a SG state with high entropy at the same time that can introduce a low-entropy PM phase. In addition, it is observed that the cluster size plays an important role. The GF increases the PM phase entropy, but larger clusters can give an entropic advantage for the SG phase that favors IF. Therefore, our results suggest that disordered systems with antiferromagnetic clusters can exhibit an IF transition even in the presence of GF. PMID:26871062

  18. Estimating collision efficiencies from contact freezing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-04-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH Collision Ice Nucleation Chamber CLINCH. Freely falling 80 μm water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500-5000 cm-3, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The chamber is kept at ice saturation in the temperature range from 236-261 K leading to slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency of 0.13 is around one order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is to the authors knowledge the first dataset of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and particle diameters are needed to improve our understanding of collision processes acting together.

  19. Satellite freeze forecast system: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A satellite-based temperature monitoring and prediction system consisting of a computer controlled acquisition, processing, and display system and the ten automated weather stations called by that computer was developed and transferred to the national weather service. This satellite freeze forecasting system (SFFS) acquires satellite data from either one of two sources, surface data from 10 sites, displays the observed data in the form of color-coded thermal maps and in tables of automated weather station temperatures, computes predicted thermal maps when requested and displays such maps either automatically or manually, archives the data acquired, and makes comparisons with historical data. Except for the last function, SFFS handles these tasks in a highly automated fashion if the user so directs. The predicted thermal maps are the result of two models, one a physical energy budget of the soil and atmosphere interface and the other a statistical relationship between the sites at which the physical model predicts temperatures and each of the pixels of the satellite thermal map.

  20. Effect of geometrical frustration on inverse freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Morais, C. V.; Zimmer, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between geometrical frustration (GF) and inverse freezing (IF) is studied within a cluster approach. The model considers first-neighbor (J1) and second-neighbor (J2) intracluster antiferromagnetic interactions between Ising spins on a checkerboard lattice and long-range disordered couplings (J ) among clusters. We obtain phase diagrams of temperature versus J1/J in two cases: the absence of J2 interaction and the isotropic limit J2=J1 , where GF takes place. An IF reentrant transition from the spin-glass (SG) to paramagnetic (PM) phase is found for a certain range of J1/J in both cases. The J1 interaction leads to a SG state with high entropy at the same time that can introduce a low-entropy PM phase. In addition, it is observed that the cluster size plays an important role. The GF increases the PM phase entropy, but larger clusters can give an entropic advantage for the SG phase that favors IF. Therefore, our results suggest that disordered systems with antiferromagnetic clusters can exhibit an IF transition even in the presence of GF.