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Sample records for french public hospital

  1. Sources of financial pressure and up coding behavior in French public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Irène; Hartmann, Frank G H

    2013-05-01

    Drawing upon role theory and the literature concerning unintended consequences of financial pressure, this study investigates the effects of health care decision pressure from the hospital's administration and from the professional peer group on physician's inclination to engage in up coding. We explore two kinds of up coding, information-related and action-related, and develop hypothesis that connect these kinds of data manipulation to the sources of pressure via the intermediate effect of role conflict. Qualitative data from initial interviews with physicians and subsequent questionnaire evidence from 578 physicians in 14 French hospitals suggest that the source of pressure is a relevant predictor of physicians' inclination to engage in data-manipulation. We further find that this effect is partly explained by the extent to which these pressures create role conflict. Given the concern about up coding in treatment-based reimbursement systems worldwide, our analysis adds to understanding how the design of the hospital's management control system may enhance this undesired type of behavior. PMID:23477807

  2. [Reorganization of blood watch and transfusion safety activities in the Marseille public hospital system in partnership between the French Blood Institute Alps Mediterranean Division (EFS AM)].

    PubMed

    Lassale, B; Legrand, D; Chiaroni, J

    2010-02-01

    The Marseille public hospital system (APHM) has expressed its willingness to pool its services of immunohematology and delivery of labile blood products with those of the French blood institute Alps Mediterranean division (EFS AM). An agreement setting out the terms of this partnership was signed between the two parties. The users of the APHM and EFS AM blood watch wished to preserve the channels of distribution. Implementation of this reorganization has focused on ensuring transfusional safety, reinforcing harmonization of APHM practices, and finding ways to reduce costs. Despite joint information campaigns (to medical and paramedical personnel) carried out by the APHM and EFS AM blood watch, problems have arisen during start-up and adjustments have been necessary on both sides. The success of this project hinges on the involvement of the EFS AM in our transfusional practices, deployment of a system for diffusion of information, and consolidation of physical and human resources at the level of the APHM blood watch. PMID:20106701

  3. [Illness-based payment to hospitals: the French experience].

    PubMed

    De Pouvourville, G; Comar, L; Bouvier, V

    1994-01-01

    Since 1991, the French government is experiencing case based prospective payment mechanisms for public and for profit private hospitals. The experiments are the final objective of a program launched in 1982 to implement Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) in France. Experiments are described and discussed. The relevance of the DRG classification is questioned, as well as the potential incentives embedded in the payment scheme. In the public sector, a case based prospective budgeting method is tested, to re-allocate resources according to case mix and relative costs. In the for profit sector, a prospective payment per case is designed, with price and volume adjustment inside a global cap of expenses. The experiments are a first step towards the unification of payment methods in both sectors. But important differences still remain, dealing with the scope of the payment method and the rate-setting basis. All expenditures will be covered in the public sector, physician fees are excluded in the private sector. The rates are based on actual cost in the public sector, on actual bills for the private sector. PMID:8134668

  4. Societal risk as seen by the French public

    SciTech Connect

    Karpowicz-Lazreg, C.; Mullet, E. )

    1993-06-01

    Mean risk magnitude judgments expressed by French students on 90 hazardous activities are reported and compared with findings on American, Hungarian, and Norwegian samples. In many respects, rating of perceived risk in the French sample is highly comparable to rating in American subjects. American and French people tend to share the same preoccupations to the same extent. The only major differences concern hallucinatory drugs and oral contraceptives. The Norwegians and French ratings differ much more. Norwegians and French people generally have the same preoccupations (which make Norwegian ratings the best predictor of French ratings) but not to the same extent. The French are much more concerned with a whole series of activities connected to violence, the implementation of high technology or agricultural technology. However, like the Norwegians, the French are extremely concerned about the spread of hallucinogenic drugs. The Hungarian and French ratings differ on practically all instances, except on basic activities or substances in all industrialized nations (caffeine, motorcycles, ...). Differences were observed within the French sample itself. Women more than men consider that home appliances in general and large-scale public transportation are potentially dangerous. Science students more than art students tend to fear a certain number of medical techniques and a certain number of toxic substances (e.g., smoking). 7 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Socio-emotional support in French hospitals: Effects on French nurses' and nurse aides' affective commitment.

    PubMed

    Ruiller, Caroline; Van Der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

    2016-02-01

    In spite of the differences in human resource management (HRM) practices between the non-profit health care sector and business life, the majority of health care sector research appears to be based on the HRM (for human resources management) blueprint for business life staff policy and practice. This study is aimed to better understand the impact of workplace social support in the context of French hospitals. Concrete, the first objective of this article comprises a thorough conceptualization and operationalization of workplace social support (i.e. both professional and personal social support). Data were collected in a French hospital among a sample of 62 respondents (for the qualitative part of our study), and among a sample of 171 health care professionals (nurses and nurse aids) (for the quantitative part of our study). Our outcomes indicate that, especially, personal support given by one's supervisor is strongly and positively related to nurses' and nurse aides' affective commitment. After a discussion about the outcomes, followed by some recommendations for future research, the article concludes with some practical implications for management in hospitals. PMID:26856519

  6. Testing payment-for-performance in French acute care hospitals: a point of view from the French Federation of Comprehensive Cancer Centres.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In 2004, France began a diagnosis related groups-based financing system for both public and private acute care hospitals. France opted for a mix of financing systems with over 80% of funding based on diagnosis related groups (DRG). After seven years of DRG-based financing, the French government is testing a payment-for-performance system in acute care hospitals, based on the USA experience. France is currently fine-tuning this model. So far, observations have raised doubts as to whether this approach will improve the value of health care in French hospitals: the budget appears insufficient, the quality of the available indicators is poor and the model is complex. However, it has focused attention on the question of health care quality. PMID:24683810

  7. Clostridium difficile infection in a French university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Khanafer, Nagham; Oltra, Luc; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Vandenesch, Francois; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed with an increase in incidence and severity. Prospective surveillance was therefore implemented in a French university hospital to monitor the characteristics of patients at risk and to recognize local trends. Between 2007 and 2014, all hospitalized patients (≥18 years) with CDI were included. During the survey, the mean incidence rate of CDI was 2.9 per 10,000 hospital-days. In all, 590 patients were included. Most of the episodes were healthcare-associated (76.1%). The remaining cases were community-acquired (18.1%) and unknown (5.9%). The comparison with healthcare-associated cases showed that the community-acquired group had a lower rate of antimicrobial exposure (P < 0.001), proton pump inhibitor (P < 0.001), and immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.02). Over the study period, death occurred in 61 patients (10.3%), with 18 (29.5%) being related to CDI according to the physician in charge of the patient. Active surveillance of CDI is required to obtain an accurate picture of the real dimensions of CDI. PMID:27281101

  8. Scandinavian Mass Communication Research: Publications in English, French and German.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordic Documentation Center for Mass Communication Research, Aarhus (Denmark).

    This update to the bibliographies from Nordicom edited in 1975 and 1976 lists publications on mass communications research from Denmark, Finland, and Norway, that have appeared in one or more of the three languages--English, French, or German. Materials are listed for each country separately, arranged by author (or title if there is no author),…

  9. Cohort Profile: French hospital database on HIV (FHDH-ANRS CO4).

    PubMed

    Mary-Krause, Murielle; Grabar, Sophie; Lièvre, Laurence; Abgrall, Sophie; Billaud, Eric; Boué, François; Boyer, Laurence; Cabié, André; Cotte, Laurent; De Truchis, Pierre; Duval, Xavier; Duvivier, Claudine; Enel, Patricia; Gasnault, Jacques; Gaud, Catherine; Gilquin, Jacques; Guiguet, Marguerite; Katlama, Christine; Khuong-Josses, Marie-Aude; Lacombe, Jean-Marc; Lang, Sylvie; Lascaux, Anne-Sophie; Launay, Odile; Mahamat, Aba; Matheron, Sophie; Meynard, Jean-Luc; Pavie, Juliette; Pilorgé, Fabrice; Piroth, Lionel; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Potard, Valérie; Pradier, Christian; Reynes, Jacques; Rouveix, Elisabeth; Selinger-Leneman, Hana; Simon, Anne; Tattevin, Pierre; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Viard, Jean-Paul; Viget, Nathalie; Costagliola, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    The French Hospital Database on HIV (FHDH) is a hospital-based multicentre open cohort with inclusions ongoing since 1989. The research objectives focus mainly on mid- and long-term clinical outcomes and therapeutic strategies, as well as severe AIDS and non-AIDS morbidities, and public health issues relative to HIV infection. FHDH also serves to describe HIV-infected patients receiving hospital care in France. FHDH includes data on more than 120,000 HIV-infected patients from 70 French general or university hospitals distributed throughout France. Patients are eligible for inclusion if they are infected by HIV-1 or HIV-2 and give their written informed consent. Standardized variables are collected at each outpatient visit or hospital admission during which a new clinical manifestation is diagnosed, a new treatment is prescribed or a change in biological markers is noted, and/or at least every 6 months. Since its inception, variables collected in FHDH include demographic characteristics, HIV-related biological markers, the date and type of AIDS and non AIDS-defining events, antiretroviral treatments and the date and causes of death, as reported in the medical records. Since 2005, data have also been collected on: co-infection with hepatitis B or C virus; alcohol and tobacco use; and non HIV-related biomarkers. Anyone can submit a research project by completing a standardized form available on the FHDH website (http://www.ccde.fr/_fold/fl-1385734776-429.pdf) or from the corresponding author, describing the context and objectives of the study. All projects are reviewed by the scientific committee. PMID:24550249

  10. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    PubMed

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction. PMID:27273960

  11. HMO penetration: has it hurt public hospitals?

    PubMed

    Clement, J P; Grazier, K L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration within the public hospitals' market area affects the financial performance and viability of these institutions, relative to private hospitals. Hospital- and market-specific measures are examined in a fully interacted model of over 2,300 hospitals in 321 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in 1995. Although hospitals located in markets with higher HMO penetration have lower financial performance as reflected in revenues, expenses and operating margin, public hospitals are not more disadvantaged than other hospitals by managed care. PMID:11669291

  12. Soft Budget Constraints in Public Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Donald J

    2016-05-01

    A soft budget constraint arises when a government is unable to commit to not 'bailout' a public hospital if the public hospital exhausts its budget before the end of the budget period. It is shown that if the political costs of a 'bailout' are relatively small, then the public hospital exhausts the welfare-maximising budget before the end of the budget period and a 'bailout' occurs. In anticipation, the government offers a budget to the public hospital that may be greater than or less than the welfare-maximising budget. In either case, the public hospital treats 'too many' elective patients before the 'bailout' and 'too few' after. The introduction of a private hospital reduces the size of any 'bailout' and increases welfare. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25740723

  13. Antibiotic stewardship programmes: legal framework and structure and process indicator in Southwestern French hospitals, 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Dumartin, C; Rogues, A-M; Amadeo, B; Pefau, M; Venier, A-G; Parneix, P; Maurain, C

    2011-02-01

    French hospitals are required to implement antibiotic stewardship programmes (ABS) to improve antibiotic use. We analysed the legal framework on ABS and assessed its impact on hospitals' ABS development in Southwestern France. For each official text, required measures, date of issue, means of control and incentives were analysed. Annual retrospective surveys were conducted in 84 hospitals from 2005 to 2008 to monitor implementation of ABS components: organisation, resources and actions. Evolution of individual measures and of a structure and process indicator (SPI) reflecting ABS was described for each hospital. From 2002, official texts issued by health authorities set out requirements on ABS, based on previous professional guidelines. Incentives and means of control were reinforced in 2006 and in 2007 with mandatory reporting of SPI for public disclosure. ABS implementation improved during the course of the study period. In 2008, at least 98% of hospitals had implemented formularies, antibiotic committees, surgical prophylaxis guidelines, and monitored antibiotic use; antibiotic advisors were appointed in 85% of hospitals. Little progress was made regarding time dedicated by pharmacists to antibiotic management and restrictive dispensation using stop-orders. Computerised tools, continuing education and audits remained under-used. SPI values were higher in private hospitals and rehabilitation centres than in others. Official texts and the SPI public disclosure increased professionals' and hospital managers' commitment to develop ABS, resulting in improvements. However, some actions still need to be reinforced. It appears crucial to monitor practical implementation to better approach ABS effectiveness and to adapt requirements. PMID:20884081

  14. [Treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension under the new French hospital financing system. Recommendations of the Pulmonary Vascular Diseases Working Group of the French Society of Pulmonary Medicine].

    PubMed

    Sitbon, O; Humbert, M; Simonneau, G

    2005-11-01

    Activity-based financing (that is, casemix-based hospital payments, known as T2A) is intended to harmonize and improve the fairness of remuneration of public and private hospitals. T2A will ultimately rely mainly on a flat rate per admission, set according to the diagnosis-related group (DRG). Although payment for drugs is usually included in the DRG price, some expensive drugs will be reimbursed on an additional cost basis after implementation of a "best practices" agreement. Four drugs used for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension are eligible for this additional reimbursement: 3 prostacyclin derivatives (intravenous epoprostenol, inhaled iloprost, and subcutaneous treprostinil), and oral bosentan, an endothelin receptor antagonist. The Pulmonary Vascular Diseases working group of the French Society of Pulmonary Medicine has developed guidelines for the best practices in use of these drugs. PMID:16301977

  15. Funding of South Australian public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Moss, John

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1994-95 financial year, inpatient episodes of care in South Australian public hospitals have been funded according to their casemix. This paper describes the current funding system, sets it in some context and examines what can be established about hospital performance. PMID:11974955

  16. The public hospital of the future.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Jeffrey D

    2003-09-01

    Public hospitals designed for the past are not changing rapidly enough to meet the needs of the future. Changing work practices, increased pressure on bed occupancy, and greater numbers of patients with complex diseases and comorbidities will determine the functions of future hospitals. To maximise the use of resources, hospital "down times" on weekends and public holidays will be a distant memory. Elective surgery will increase in the traditionally "quiet times", such as summer, and decrease in the busy winter period. The patient will be the focus of an efficient information flow, streamlining patient care in hospital and enhancing communication between hospitals and community-based health providers. General and specialty units will need to work more efficiently together, as general physicians take on the role of patient case managers for an increasing proportion of patients. Funding needs to be adequate, and system management should involve clinicians. Safety will be enshrined in hospital systems and procedures, as well as in the minds of hospital staff. If these changes are not implemented successfully, public hospitals will not survive in the future. PMID:12924972

  17. [Cost of cataract surgery in a public hospital].

    PubMed

    Malot, J; Combe, C; Moss, A; Savary, P; Hida, H; Ligeon-Ligeonnet, P

    2011-01-01

    With more than 500,000 operations per year, cataract surgery is currently the most frequently performed surgical operation in France. Several procedural techniques are described, but phacoemulsification after micro-incision is the most common. The cost and reimbursement by the French social security depend on whether the procedure is conducted on an inpatient or outpatient basis. The objectives of this prospective study were to evaluate the cost of cataract surgery in a public hospital setting and to correlate differences in surgical practice with financial impact. One hundred twenty-five operations were observed in the operating room and many data points were recorded for analysis. Topical anesthesia was administered in 87.2% of cases; the mean duration of the surgery was 42minutes. The mean direct cost was 366 € (drugs, sterilization of reused equipment, medical devices, etc). The extended cost of the surgery (infrastructure, hospitalization, food and laundry, etc.) was computed to be 1130 € for outpatients and 1335 € for inpatients assuming a one-night stay in the hospital. In view of the reimbursement provided by social security, this innovative study in a public hospital demonstrates that cataract surgery is a profitable activity, reinforcing our strategic plans. PMID:21145129

  18. Concurrent Dengue and Malaria in Cayenne Hospital, French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Matheus, Severine; Donutil, Gerd; Raulin, Olivia; Nacher, Mathieu; Morvan, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Dengue–malaria co-infection reports are scarce. Of 1,723 consecutive febrile patients in Cayenne Hospital, 238 had dengue (174 early dengue fever cases) and 393 had malaria (371 acute malaria); 17 had both. Diagnosis of 1 of these 2 infections should not rule out testing for the other infection. PMID:19331769

  19. Drug selection in French university hospitals: analysis of formularies for nine competitive pharmacological classes

    PubMed Central

    Gallini, Adeline; Juillard-Condat, Blandine; Saux, Marie-Claude; Taboulet, Florence

    2011-01-01

    AIM To give a panorama of the selectivity and agreement of French university hospitals' drug formularies (HDF) for nine competitive classes. METHODS All university hospitals were asked to send their HDF and selection criteria as of January 2009 for nine competitive pharmacological classes (proton pump inhibitors, serotonin antagonists, low molecular weight heparins, erythropoietins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists, statins, α-adrenoreceptor antagonists and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors). Selectivity of HDF was estimated by the percentage of drug entities selected by the hospital within the pharmacological class. Agreement between hospitals was assessed with modified kappa coefficients for multi-raters. RESULTS Twenty-one out of the 29 hospitals agreed to participate. These hospitals selected between 34% and 63% of the drug entities available for the nine classes, which represented 18 to 35 agents. Regarding the nature of chosen drug entities, the overall level of agreement was ‘fair’ and varied with pharmacological classes. Selection criteria were sent by only 12 hospitals. The technical component was the most important element in all hospitals. The weight of the economic component varied between 20% and 40% in the tender's grade. DISCUSSION Large variations were seen in the number and nature of drugs selected by university hospitals which can be attributable to two successive decision-making processes (evaluation by the Drug and Therapeutics Committee followed by the purchasing process). PMID:21518387

  20. [Canton Hospital and public health in Canton].

    PubMed

    Li, Jichou; Guo, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Canton Hospital was not only the most influential missionary hospital in South China, but also the first one brought the concept and practice of public health to Guangzhou. In the late Qing Dynasty, it conducted free vaccination, plague treatment, health education and so on, demonstrating the importance of public health to the people. In the period of the Republic of China, it extensively cooperated with the government and social organizations in developing school health, maternal and child health, communicable disease control and epidemiological investigations to actively serve the social group. In the 1930s, its public health activities extended towards the rural areas of Guangzhou, and promoted the convergence of rural and urban medical and health services. The three-level medical system that it built provided demonstration model for the establishment of Chinese rural medical system. PMID:26815022

  1. Public-private partnerships for hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Martin; Edwards, Nigel; Atun, Rifat

    2006-01-01

    While some forms of public-private partnerships are a feature of hospital construction and operation in all countries with mixed economies, there is increasing interest in a model in which a public authority contracts with a private company to design, build and operate an entire hospital. Drawing on the experience of countries such as Australia, Spain, and the United Kingdom, this paper reviews the experience with variants of this model. Although experience is still very limited and rigorous evaluations lacking, four issues have emerged: cost, quality, flexibility and complexity. New facilities have, in general, been more expensive than they would have been if procured using traditional methods. Compared with the traditional system, new facilities are more likely to be built on time and within budget, but this seems often to be at the expense of compromises on quality. The need to minimize the risk to the parties means that it is very difficult to "future-proof" facilities in a rapidly changing world. Finally, such projects are extremely, and in some cases prohibitively, complex. While it is premature to say whether the problems experienced relate to the underlying model or to their implementation, it does seem that a public-private partnership further complicates the already difficult task of building and operating a hospital. PMID:17143463

  2. [The main field hospitals of the French and Polish armies behind the lines in 1807].

    PubMed

    Srogosz, T

    2000-01-01

    The health requirements of the French and Polish troops fighting in Pomerania, mainly those of General Zajaczek's Observation Corps (Second Legion), forced the interim Polish authorities to establish main field hospitals in the Spring of 1807. Firstly, at Mława, and then in the former storehouses on the Vistula at Tokary and Dobrzyków. Though the latter were situated in two localities, they nevertheless constituted an administrative whole. Of temporary character, these large hospitals (Mława was capable of accommodating up to 1000 patients, Tokary and Dobrzyków up to 2000 patients) were closed after the end of hostilities. In spite of the temporary character of the field hospitals, the daily death rate was only several persons (sometimes there were a dozen or so fatalities, which also constituted a small number). During the establishment of the main field hospitals, a number of people demonstrated a degree of organisational talent. These included Józef Wybicki, representative of the Governing Committee and Stanisław Breza, director of internal affairs. Later there was Rev. Józef Poniatowski, war commander, also local officials such as Józef Zabłocki and Teodor Mikołaj Dembowski, as well as representatives of the health service such as Dr. Hiacynt Dziarkowski, and Dr. Michał Bergonzoni. Other people worth mentioning include the hospital personnel (Colonel Teodor Pretwitz was Commanding Officer of the field hospitals in Mława, Tokary and Dobrzyków) who helped the sick and wounded soldiers, often under the difficult conditions of supplies and staff shortages. These shortages were a result of the scale of the enterprise, the poor relations between staff members, such as the conflict between Dr. Dziarkowski and Colonel Pretwitz, reservations about the competence of the head doctor Juliusz Szamborski. But most of all these shortages were a result of requisitions ordered by French Commissioners and Ward Heads. In spite of the problems main field hospitals

  3. Readmissions at a Public Safety Net Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Mallory D.; Poon, Kimble; Black, Susan; Schwartz, Shelley; Bholat, Tasneem; Diaz, Norma; Kuo, Allen; Spellberg, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine factors related to avoidability of 30-day readmissions at our public, safety net hospital in the United States (US). Methods We prospectively reviewed medical records of adult internal medicine patients with scheduled and unscheduled 30-day readmissions. We also interviewed patients if they were available. An independent panel used pre-specified, objective criteria to adjudicate potential avoidability. Results Of 153 readmissions evaluated, 68% were unscheduled. Among these, 67% were unavoidable, primarily due to disease progression and development of new diagnoses. Scheduled readmissions accounted for 32% of readmissions and most (69%) were clinically appropriate and unavoidable. The scheduled but avoidable readmissions (31%) were attributed largely to limited resources in our healthcare system. Conclusions Most readmissions at our public, safety net hospital were unavoidable, even among our unscheduled readmissions. Surprisingly, one-third of our overall readmissions were scheduled, the majority reflecting appropriate management strategies designed to reduce unnecessary hospital days. The scheduled but avoidable readmissions were due to constrained access to non-emergent, expensive procedures that are typically not reimbursed given our system’s payor mix, a problem which likely plague other safety net systems. These findings suggest that readmissions do not necessarily reflect inadequate medical care, may reflect resource constraints that are unlikely to be addressable in systems caring for a large burden of uninsured patients, and merit individualized review. PMID:24618829

  4. [Project financing in public hospital trusts].

    PubMed

    Contarino, F; Grosso, G; Mistretta, A

    2009-01-01

    The growing debate in recent years over how to finance public works through private capital has progressively highlighted the role of project finance (PF) and publicprivate partnerships (PPP) in general. More and more European countries are turning to PF to finance their public infrastructure development. The UK, which pioneered the adoption of project finance in this field, has been followed by Italy, Spain, France, Portugal and Germany and more recently by Greece, Czech Republic and Poland. Beginning in the late 1990's, Italy has steadily amplified its use of PF and PPPs in key sectors such as healthcare as an alternative way of funding the modernisation of its health facilities and hospitals. The trend reveal an average annual growth of 10.9% since 2002 with peaks of varying intensity over the five year period. Project finance and PPPs represent an effective response to the country's infrastructure gap and support the competitiveness of local systems and the quality of public services. None of this will transpire, however without energetic new planning efforts and adequate policy at the centre. PMID:19798903

  5. Clostridium difficile infection in a French university hospital: Eight years of prospective surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Khanafer, Nagham; Oltra, Luc; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Vandenesch, Francois; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed with an increase in incidence and severity. Prospective surveillance was therefore implemented in a French university hospital to monitor the characteristics of patients at risk and to recognize local trends. Between 2007 and 2014, all hospitalized patients (≥18 years) with CDI were included. During the survey, the mean incidence rate of CDI was 2.9 per 10,000 hospital-days. In all, 590 patients were included. Most of the episodes were healthcare-associated (76.1%). The remaining cases were community-acquired (18.1%) and unknown (5.9%). The comparison with healthcare-associated cases showed that the community-acquired group had a lower rate of antimicrobial exposure (P < 0.001), proton pump inhibitor (P < 0.001), and immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.02). Over the study period, death occurred in 61 patients (10.3%), with 18 (29.5%) being related to CDI according to the physician in charge of the patient. Active surveillance of CDI is required to obtain an accurate picture of the real dimensions of CDI. PMID:27281101

  6. Public hospital pathology--at what cost?

    PubMed

    White, G H; Pascoe, P J

    1994-01-01

    Public hospital laboratories have in the past fended off financial scrutiny and accountability on the grounds of their complexity and lack of compelling need. However, the cost of providing diagnostic laboratory services has now come under intense scrutiny because of budget reductions and options for private sector competition. Costing of pathology services is not difficult, but their organisation and outputs do have unique features that need to be understood and defined to ensure that the costing model used provides robust data that accurately reflects how resources are consumed. The cost data generated for diagnostic services can then be compared to the various benchmarks widely used for activity-based funding, such as the Commonwealth Medical Benefits Schedule and the pathology component of the AN-DRG Service Weights System, while the requirement and funding for other activities can be rationally determined. PMID:10140592

  7. Understanding the acceptance factors of an Hospital Information System: evidence from a French University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ologeanu-Taddei, R.; Morquin, D.; Domingo, H.; Bourret, R.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the perceived usefulness, the perceived ease of use and the perceived behavioral control of a Hospital Information System (HIS) for the care staff. We administrated a questionnaire composed of open-end and closed questions, based on the main concepts of Technology Acceptance Model. As results, the perceived usefulness, ease of use and behavioral control (self-efficacy and organizational support) are correlated with medical occupations. As an example, we found that a half of the medical secretaries consider the HIS is ease of use, at the opposite to the anesthesiologists, surgeons and physicians. Medical secretaries reported also the highest rate of PBC and a high rate of PU. Pharmacists reported the highest rate of PU but a low rate of PBC, which is similar to the rate of the surgeons and physicians. Content analysis of open questions highlights factors influencing these constructs: ergonomics, errors in the documenting process, insufficient compatibility with the medical department or the occupational group. Consequently, we suggest that the gap between the perceptions of the different occupational groups may be explained by the use of different modules and by interdependency of the care stare staff. PMID:26958237

  8. Satisfactions and dissatisfactions with public and private hospitals.

    PubMed

    Chetwynd, S J

    1988-09-14

    A fully national sample of 1255 people were questioned about their degree of satisfaction with hospital care in New Zealand. Questions covered both public and private hospitals and concerned actual experience of care as well as general attitudes to that care. Almost half the sample (49%) rated public hospital care as "excellent" or "very good", and a similar proportion (48%) assigned those grades to private hospitals. Only 7% of the sample rated public hospital care as "poor" or "very poor" and only 1% rated private hospitals in this way. Major reasons for satisfaction with public hospital care were the high standard of nursing care (41% of sample), the high qualifications of staff (34%) and the availability of appropriate equipment for emergencies (17%). The most common complaints were that hospitals are short-staffed/overworked (15%) and there are long waiting lists (14%). Reasons for satisfaction with private hospital care were no waiting (26%), good standard of care (20%) and good hotel facilities (14%). In general, both public and private hospitals were highly regarded. Dissatisfaction with public hospitals was most evident amongst younger, working people and amongst those in the north and central regions. Dunedin respondents were more satisfied with their hospital care than those in other parts of the country. PMID:3419682

  9. French Standards of Learning for Virginia Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Standards of Learning in this publication represent a major development in public education in Virginia. Adopted in February 2007 by the Virginia Board of Education, these standards emphasize the importance of foreign language instruction in the Commonwealth and, therefore, are an important part of Virginia's efforts to provide challenging…

  10. Clonal Diversity among Streptogramin A-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Collected in French Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Haroche, Julien; Morvan, Anne; Davi, Marilyne; Allignet, Jeanine; Bimet, François; El Solh, Névine

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed 62 clinical isolates of streptogramin A-resistant (SGAr) Staphylococcus aureus collected between 1981 and 2001 in 14 hospitals located in seven French cities. These isolates, including five with decreased susceptibility to glycopeptides, were distributed into 45 antibiotypes and 38 SmaI genotypes. Each of these genotypes included between 1 and 11 isolates, the SmaI patterns of which differed by no more than three bands. Although numerous clones were identified, we observed the spread of monoclonal isolates either within the same hospital or within hospitals in distinct cities and at large time intervals. Hybridization with probes directed against 10 SGAr genes (vatA, vatB, vatC, vatD, vatE, vgaA, vgaB, vgaAv, vgbA, and vgbB) revealed six patterns: vgaAv (21 isolates), vatA-vgbA (24 isolates), vgaAv-vatB-vgaB (14 isolates), vgaAv-vatA-vgbA (1 isolate), vgaAv-vatA-vgbA-vatB-vgaB (1 isolate), and vgaA (1 isolate). We detected at least one SGAr determinant in all of the tested isolates. vgaAv, which is part of the recently characterized transposon Tn5406, was found in 59.7% of the tested isolates. Of the 16 streptogramin B-susceptible isolates, 14 carried vgaAv alone and were susceptible to the mixtures of streptogramins, whereas the 2 isolates carrying vgaAv-vatB-vgaB were resistant to these mixtures. vatA-vgbA was found on plasmids of the same apparent size in 26 (42%) of the tested clinical isolates from 18 unrelated SmaI genotypes. The possible dissemination of some of the multiple clones characterized in the present study with an expected increased selective pressure of streptogramins following the recent licensing of Synercid (quinupristin-dalfopristin) must be carefully monitored. PMID:12574251

  11. Additional funding mechanisms for Public Hospitals in Greece: the case of Chania Mental Health Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether the long term lease of public hospital owned land could be an additional financing mechanism for Greek public (mental) health hospitals. Methods We performed a financial analysis of the official 2008 data of a case - study hospital (Mental Health Hospital of Chania). We used a capital budgeting approach to investigate whether value is created for the public hospital by engaging its assets in a project for the development of a private renal dialysis Unit. Results The development of the private unit in hospital owned land is a good investment decision, as it generates high project Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return. When the project commences generating operating cash flows, nearly €400.000 will be paid annually to the Mental Health Hospital of Chania as rent, thereby gradually decreasing the annual deficit of the hospital. Conclusions Revenue generated from the long term lease of public hospital land is crucial to gradually eliminate hospital deficit. The Ministry of Health should encourage similar forms of Public Private Partnerships in order to ensure the sustainability of public (mental) hospitals. PMID:21067580

  12. The role of public relations activities in hospital choice.

    PubMed

    Tengilimoglu, Dilaver; Yesiltas, Mehmet; Kisa, Adnan; Dziegielewski, Sophia F

    2007-01-01

    Public relations activities for all organizations can have an important effect on consumer decision-making when buying goods or services. This study examines the effect that public relations activities can have regarding consumer decisions and choice. To explore exemplify this relationship a questionnaire was given to 971 patients within public, university and private hospitals in Ankara, Turkey. Study results show that public relations activities were a crucial factor in determining consumer hospital choice. The majority of respondents reported that the behaviors and attitude of personnel as public relations activities that support the hospital's reputation within the public were the primary variables in hospital choice. Health care managers can use these findings to further understand how patients make informed choices related to usage of a health care facility and to develop and/or improve public relations activities. PMID:19042526

  13. [French biomedical competitiveness clusters: opportunities for public-private partnerships].

    PubMed

    Vasmant, Daniel

    2009-12-01

    A "competitive cluster" is a partnership between businesses, research units and training centers, working together to generate synergies for innovative projects in a particular geographic area. Since 2005, the first five calls for cluster projects have led to the funding of 645 R&D projects involving 13,000 researchers. Together, the R&D expenditure of these projects has so far totaled nearly Euro 3.6 billion. This included public funding of Euro 1300 million, Euro 840 million of which was provided by central government. In the biomedical field, 80 R&D projects have been funded to the tune of Euro 140 million (Euro 81 million from central government and Euro 59 million from local government). A total of 288 agreements have been signed, 12% with large companies, 36% with SMEs and 49.8% with public research laboratories. Alongside the more classical biomedical research funding sources, such as the National Research Agency and government-sponsored projects (on cancer, Alzheimer's disease, rare diseases, etc.), competitive clusters provide the impetus for profound changes in research culture. They draw on the principle of professional guidance and public-private partnerships to build a bridge between the "academic" and "industrial" research arenas. By facilitating knowledge generation and sharing, competitive clusters create a climate of action-driven mutual respect and trust. PMID:20666016

  14. Management challenges at the intersection of public policy environments and strategic decision making in public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Longest, Beaufort B

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals in the United States are heavily impacted by public policies that affect them. For example, Medicare and Medicaid programs account for more than half the revenue in most of the nation's almost 5,000 community hospitals, including the almost 1,100 public hospitals controlled by state and local governments (American Hospital Association, 2012). The public hospitals are especially closely aligned with and controlled by governmental entities compared with hospitals with other kinds of sponsorship. This article addresses the management challenges at the intersection of the strategic management of public hospitals and their public policy environments. Public hospitals are complicated entities designed not only to provide health services but also in many cases to play key roles in health-related research and education and to play important general economic development roles in their communities. The multi-faceted strategic decision making in these organizations is as heavily affected by their public policy environments as by their business, demographic, technological or other external environments. Effectively managing the intersection of their public policy environments and their strategic management is indeed vital for contemporary public hospitals. This article is intended to clarify certain aspects of this intersection through a description and model of the strategic activity in public hospitals and the connection between this activity and their external environments. Specific attention is focused on the concept of public policy environments and their features. Attention is also given to how managers can assess public policy environments and incorporate the results into strategic activities. PMID:23113418

  15. Organizational Culture and Its Relationship with Hospital Performance in Public Hospitals in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Bundorf, Kate; Chang, Ji; Huang, Jin Xin; Xue, Di

    2011-01-01

    Objective To measure perceptions of organizational culture among employees of public hospitals in China and to determine whether perceptions are associated with hospital performance. Data Sources Hospital, employee, and patient surveys from 87 Chinese public hospitals conducted during 2009. Study Design Developed and administered a tool to assess organizational culture in Chinese public hospitals. Used factor analysis to create measures of organizational culture. Analyzed the relationships between employee type and perceptions of culture and between perceptions of culture and hospital performance using multivariate models. Principal Findings Employees perceived the culture of Chinese public hospitals as stronger in internal rules and regulations, and weaker in empowerment. Hospitals in which employees perceived that the culture emphasized cost control were more profitable and had higher rates of outpatient visits and bed days per physician per day but also had lower levels of patient satisfaction. Hospitals with cultures perceived as customer-focused had longer length of stay but lower patient satisfaction. Conclusions Managers in Chinese public hospitals should consider whether the culture of their organization will enable them to respond effectively to their changing environment. PMID:22092228

  16. The challenge of corporatisation: the experience of Portuguese public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rego, Guilhermina; Nunes, Rui; Costa, José

    2010-08-01

    The inability of traditional state organisations to respond to new economic, technological and social challenges and the associated emerging problems has made it necessary to adopt new methods of health management. As a result, new directions have emerged in the reform of Public Administration together with the introduction of innovative models. The aim is to achieve a type of management that focuses on results as well as on effort and efficiency. We intend to analyse to what extent the adoption of business management models by hospital healthcare units can improve their performance, mainly in terms of standards of efficiency. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) was used to investigate the efficiency of a set of public Portuguese hospitals. The aim was to evaluate the impact of business management in Portuguese public hospitals with regards to efficiency, specifically taking into account the fact that lack of resources and increased health care needs are a present and future reality. From a total of 83 public hospitals, a sample of 59 hospitals was chosen, of which 21 are state-owned hospital enterprises (SA) and 38 are traditional public administration sector hospitals (SPA). This study evaluates hospital performance by calculating two efficiency measures associated with two categories of inputs. The first efficiency measures the costs associated with hospital production lines and the number of beds (representing fixed capacity) as inputs. The annual costs generated by the hospitals in the consumption of capital and work (direct and indirect costs) are used. A second measure of efficiency is calculated separately. This measure includes in the inputs the number of beds as well as the human resources available (number of doctors, number of nurses and other personnel) in each hospital. With regard to output, the variables that best reflect the hospital services rendered were considered: number of inpatient days, patients discharged, outpatient visits, emergencies

  17. Taxation as metaphor. The hospital and public responsibility.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E

    1992-01-01

    In the debate over the tax status of voluntary hospitals, most hospital executives and trustees do not seem to comprehend--or want to comprehend--the underlying issues. First, the terror of being associated with a tax hike has led many politicians to seek other "revenue enhancements" that are more ingenious than they are honest. On the other hand, many of these governments have legitimate financial problems and are seeking new sources of revenue. A second, related issue is uncertainty over what should be done about the uninsured and Medicaid populations. In the absence of an acceptable solution, we will continue to provide direct public support to public hospitals and indirect public support to private providers--including charitable tax exemptions. The third underlying issue is hospitals' curiously narrow view of their private-sector status. Most of the functions hospitals provide are not only publicly funded; they are, in fact, public functions. Finally, hospitals believe they are inherently moral organizations because they provide an inherently moral service. But hospitals grew to their present role in society almost by accident; their services are neither unique nor ethically superior. It is in how hospitals provide care that their morality can be measured, not in the fact that they provide some kind of care to somebody. An honest appraisal of these issues will help each hospital answer the basic question: As an ethical and moral matter, should this organization be paying taxes? But is this fight really about taxes? I believe society and government are using taxation as a metaphor for trust in hospitals. PMID:10115599

  18. The moth Hylesia metabus and French Guiana lepidopterism: centenary of a public health concern

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, F.; Girod, R.; Vassal, J.M.; Chandre, F.; Lagneau, C.; Fouque, F.; Guiral, D.; Raude, J.; Robert, V.

    2012-01-01

    The females of the moths Hylesia metabus have their abdomens covered by urticating hairs looking like micro-arrows and causing a puriginous dermatitis to humans known as “papillonite” in French Guiana and also called yellowtail moth dermatitis or Caripito itch. The densities of the moths show great seasonal and annual variations depending on mechanisms mostly unknown. When H. metabus infestations occur, numerous cases of dermatologic manifestations are reported from people living near the mangrove swamps where the moths are developing. One hundred years after the first “papillonite” epidemic reported from French Guiana in 1912, the data presented herein summarize the actual state of knowledge on H. metabus biology and ecology and on the lepidopterism. Some recommendations are proposed for the surveillance and warning systems of H. metabus infestations and to avoid contact with the moths. Research priorities are suggested to improve the control against this problem emerging between nuisance and public health. PMID:22550622

  19. Efficiency improvements of public hospitals under a capitation payment scheme.

    PubMed

    García-Lacalle, Javier; Martín, Emilio

    2013-07-01

    In a context of cost containment and demands for better quality in public health care, payment systems are used as an instrument to promote efficiency improvements in service providers. Andalusia has adopted an original type of risk-adjusted capitation payment mechanism to reimburse public hospitals. This paper presents the main characteristics of the reimbursement mechanism of the Andalusian Health Service highlighting some differences with the mechanisms adopted in other parts of Europe. The paper also explores the evolution of the efficiency and quality of the hospitals after its implementation using the Malmquist index. Results indicate that hospitals have slightly improved their efficiency, particularly urban hospitals, and these improvements are not significantly related to a negative evolution of quality. However, it is not possible to assert to what extent, improvements are the consequence of the new payment system. The organisation of the Servicio Andaluz de Salud and the limited competition between hospitals reduce the effectiveness of the reform. PMID:23343663

  20. The legal risks of quality assurance in Australian public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cavell, Richard

    2007-10-01

    Quality assurance techniques aim to measure and uphold the quality of patient care. Tools have been developed that investigate bad outcomes, and identify system errors that may lead to bad outcomes. Hospital administrators are motivated to use these tools, but worry that quality assurance may itself cause legal risks to a hospital. For example, if a hospital finds and documents substandard care, a patient who has suffered a bad outcome might discover this and try to use it in litigation against the hospital. This article examines the legal doctrine behind document discovery, freedom of information, legal professional privilege, medical professional privilege, qualified privilege and defamation, to explore how patients and their relatives may, first, come across and obtain quality assurance findings, and second, use them in legal action. With this knowledge, public hospital administrators might then be able to engage in quality assurance without unduly causing legal risk for their hospital. PMID:18035841

  1. The French bioethics public consultation and the anonymity doctrine: empirical ethics and normative assumptions.

    PubMed

    Spranzi, Marta; Brunet, Laurence

    2015-03-01

    The French bioethics laws of 1994 contain the principles of the anonymity and non commodification of all donations of body parts and products including gametes in medically assisted reproduction. The two revisions of the law, in 2004 and 2011 have upheld the rule. In view of the latest revision process, the French government organized a large public consultation in 2009 ("Etats généraux de la bioéthique"). Within the event a "consensus conference" was held in Rennes about different aspects of assisted reproduction (access, anonymity, gratuity and surrogacy). In what follows we shall first describe the anonymity clause for gamete donations in the French law and the debates surrounding it. We shall then analyse the procedure used for the 2009 public consultation and the related consensus conference, as well as its upshot concerning the anonymity doctrine. In this respect we shall compare the citizens' own recommendations on the gamete anonymity issue and its translation in the consultation's final report drafted by a philosopher mandated by the organizing committee. Whereas the final report cited some fundamental ethical arguments as reason for upholding the provisions of the law-most notably the refusal of the 'all biological' approach to reproductive issues-citizens were more careful and tentative in their position although they also concluded that for pragmatic reasons the anonymity rule should continue to hold. We shall argue that the conservative upshot of the public consultation is due to some main underlying presuppositions concerning the citizens' role and expertise as well as to the specific design of the consensus conference. Our conclusion will be that public consultations and consensus conferences can only serve as an empirical support for devising suitable bioethics norms by using second-order normative assumptions. PMID:25783454

  2. [Evaluation of the efficiency and quality of hospitals publicly owned with private management and hospitals of the public sector].

    PubMed

    Giraldes, Maria Do Rosário

    2007-01-01

    , and by the Garcia de Orta Hospital, which are the less efficient hospitals. In Group V, with central hospitals and hospitals with functions of central hospital, it is the Hospital of Vila Real/Régua, EPE, to present the best situation of the Composite Efficiency Indicator, followed by the Santo António Hospital, EPE, the Santa Maria Hospital, EPE, and the HUC, while the hospitals with a worst situation of the Composite Efficiency Indicator are the Hospitals of Faro, Evora and S. José. In Group VI hospitals with a better Composite Efficiency Indicator are the hospitals of Santa Marta, Gama Pinto Institute and Orthopedic Hospital of Outão, while the Estefânia Hospital is the most inefficient. Tondela, Valongo and Peniche Hospitals (Group I), have a good value of the Composite Efficiency and Quality Indicator, while Barcelos, Oliveira de Azeméis and Póvoa de Varzim/Vila do Conde Hospitals (Group II) present also good values of this indicator. The Hospitals of Vila Franca de Xira, Bragança and Setúbal (Group III), the Hospitals of Santarém, Garcia de Orta, and Curry Cabral (Group IV), the Hospital of Vila Real/Régua, the Egas Moniz Hospital and the Santa Maria Hospital (Group V), and the Gama Pinto Institute, the Orthopedic Hospital of Outão, and the Santa Cruz Hospital (Group VI) are the best classified in their groups. EPE Hospitals (Hospitals publicly owned with private management) are the best classified in their groups in what efficiency is concerned, what is a better result tan the one shown in 2003. The lower inequality in relation to management indicators, in all hospital groups, exists in the areas of expenditure with inpatient care by user, what shows the existence of a norm of proceeding, in this traditional hospital area. The higher inequalities are those of day hospital, drugs in day hospital, drugs in outpatient care and rehabilitation by user. In what management indicators are concerned incentives must be created. The most efficient hospitals

  3. Developing financial autonomy in public hospitals in India: Rajasthan's model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Hotchkiss, D R

    2001-01-01

    In India's state-administered health care system, many government decision-makers are exploring the introduction or expansion of hospital autonomy as a means of improving the efficiency and financial sustainability of the overall public health care system. One initiative that has recently received a considerable amount of attention is the introduction of Medicare Relief Societies (MRS) in the state of Rajasthan. The societies are autonomous organizations that are formed with the objective of complementing and supplementing existing service provision in public hospitals. The state has provided incentives for the formation of MRS by relaxing state-imposed restrictions on the collection and use of revenue by hospitals, thereby encouraging the use of alternative financing mechanisms such as user-fee schemes and in-hospital pharmacies. The purpose of this article is to describe and critically evaluate Rajasthan's experience with MRS. Emphasis is placed on whether and how the introduction of these societies have influenced two key aspects of hospital autonomy - operations and management, and financing. Data for the study come from a survey of representatives from each of the 69 hospitals in Rajasthan that contain 100 or more beds. Information was collected on whether a society was operating within the hospital, the management of the society, the range of activities carried out, and the revenue and expenditures of each activity. The results are used to identify key strengths and weakness of the MRS initiative in Rajasthan, and how future hospital autonomy efforts can be strengthened. PMID:11137185

  4. Public hospitals in peril: factors associated with financial distress.

    PubMed

    Ramamonjiarivelo, Zo; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Hearld, Larry; Pradhan, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    As "safety net providers," public hospitals have played a major role in health care delivery, especially in serving the indigent and the uninsured. For several decades, public hospitals have been operating in a challenging environment, and some of them have experienced financial difficulties. The purpose of this study was to explore the organizational and environmental factors associated with public hospitals' financial distress. This study used a national sample of public hospitals based on longitudinal panel data from 1997 to 2009, resulting in a sample size of 7,257 hospital-year observations. The Altman Z-score method was applied to assess hospitals' financial condition. The significant findings from a random effects logistic regression model with state and year fixed-effects indicated that higher Medicare HMO penetration was associated with financial distress. Organizational variables such as health network, size, occupancy rate, and outpatient mix decreased the odds of financial distress; and membership in a multihospital system increased the odds of financial distress. PMID:25223157

  5. Asbestos in public hospitals: are employees at risk?

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Henroy P; Postlethwait, Edward; Delzell, Elizabeth; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Oestenstad, R Kent

    2012-01-01

    Asbestos is an established human carcinogen. Asbestos-containing building materials (ACBM) are used in surfacing materials, thermal system insulation (TSI), and miscellaneous materials, and they have been used in buildings in Jamaica in the past. The objective of the study described here was to identify ACBM, its characteristics, and its determinants in Jamaican hospitals. A walk-through survey of all hospitals was undertaken and 152 bulk samples were collected from 26 public and private hospitals. The samples were analyzed using polarized light microscopy. Sixteen (61.5%) hospitals had ACBM used mainly as TSI. The ACBM in most cases was friable and in a poor condition indicative of fiber release and contained the fibers chrysotile, amosite, and crocidolite. The age of hospitals was not associated with the presence of ACBM. Results indicated potential risk of asbestos exposure in hospitals. The hospital authorities should formulate and implement an asbestos policy for hospitals and undertake proper management of asbestos in all hospitals. PMID:22329205

  6. Conflict and Compromise: Catholic and Public Hospital Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Barbra Mann

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the tensions and uneasy negotiations, based on a case study, that occurred among Catholic sisters, administrators, bishops, physicians, and the Vatican for more than seven years at a hospital in Austin, Texas. Here, the largest health care system in the city, which was Catholic, joined with the local public, tax-supported hospital that provided the majority of reproductive health care services in the region. A clash resulted over whether the hospital could continue providing sterilization and contraceptive services to its primarily poor patients. This article examines the fierce debates that occurred, especially over emergency contraception and attempts to develop creative solutions after a hierarchical crackdown from the Vatican. The end result was a compromise that included the creation of a “hospital within a hospital.” PMID:20067093

  7. Public-private partnerships and public hospital performance in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    La Forgia, Gerard M; Harding, April

    2009-01-01

    Public hospitals that are directly managed by government perform poorly in many developing countries. Approaches to improving them through internal managerial reforms have failed, and effective alternatives are much needed. Policymakers are considering reforms through public-private partnerships (PPPs)--a promising but so far unevaluated approach. We present results of a successful reform in São Paulo, Brazil. The PPP model gave facility managers latitude to manage human resources--a factor critical to success. Given the prevalence of direct management of public hospitals in developing countries, the São Paulo experience has implications for policymakers seeking to improve hospital performance. PMID:19597211

  8. Modeling population access to New Zealand public hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Brabyn, Lars; Skelly, Chris

    2002-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a method for estimating the geographical accessibility of public hospitals. Cost path analysis was used to determine the minimum travel time and distance to the closest hospital via a road network. This analysis was applied to 38,000 census enumeration district centroids in New Zealand allowing geographical access to be linked to local populations. Average time and distance statistics have been calculated for local populations by modeling the total travel of a population if everybody visited a hospital once. These types of statistics can be generated for different population groups and enable comparisons to be made between regions. This study has shown that the northern and southern parts of New Zealand have high average travel times to hospital services. PMID:12459048

  9. Transfusion monitoring: care practice analysis in a public teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Valesca Nunes; Paixão, Isabella Bertolin; Perrone, Ana Carolina Amaral de São José; Monteiro, Maria Inês; dos Santos, Kelli Borges

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze the process of recording transfusion monitoring at a public teaching hospital. Methods A descriptive and retrospective study with a quantitative approach, analyzing the instruments to record transfusion monitoring at a public hospital in a city in the State of Minas Gerais (MG). Data were collected on the correct completion of the instrument, time elapsed from transfusions, records of vital signs, type of blood component more frequently transfused, and hospital unit where transfusion was performed. Results A total of 1,012 records were analyzed, and 53.4% of them had errors in filling in the instruments, 6% of transfusions started after the recommended time, and 9.3% of patients had no vital signs registered. Conclusion Failures were identified in the process of recording transfusion monitoring, and they could result in more adverse events related to the administration of blood components. Planning and implementing strategies to enhance recording and to improve care delivered are challenging. PMID:27074233

  10. Access to innovation: is there a difference in the use of expensive anticancer drugs between French hospitals?

    PubMed

    Bonastre, Julia; Chevalier, Julie; Van der Laan, Chantal; Delibes, Michel; De Pouvourville, Gerard

    2014-06-01

    In DRG-based hospital payment systems, expensive drugs are often funded separately. In France, specific expensive drugs (including a large proportion of anticancer drugs) are fully reimbursed up to national reimbursement tariffs to ensure equity of access. Our objective was to analyse the use of expensive anticancer drugs in public and private hospitals, and between regions. We had access to sales per anticancer drug and per hospital in the year 2008. We used a multilevel model to study the variation in the mean expenditure of expensive anticancer drugs per course of chemotherapy and per hospital. The mean expenditure per course of chemotherapy was €922 [95% CI: 890-954]. At the hospital level, specialisation in chemotherapies for breast cancers was associated with a higher expenditure of anticancer drugs per course for those hospitals with the highest proportion of cancers at this site. There were no differences in the use of expensive drugs between the private and the public hospital sector after controlling for case mix. There were no differences between the mean expenditures per region. The absence of disparities in the use of expensive anticancer drugs between hospitals and regions may indicate that exempting chemotherapies from DRG-based payments and providing additional reimbursement for these drugs has been successful at ensuring equal access to care. PMID:24314625

  11. Selecting public relations personnel of hospitals by analytic network process.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sen-Kuei; Chang, Kuei-Lun

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the use of analytic network process (ANP) in the Taiwanese hospital public relations personnel selection process. Starting with interviewing 48 practitioners and executives in north Taiwan, we collected selection criteria. Then, we retained the 12 critical criteria that were mentioned above 40 times by theses respondents, including: interpersonal skill, experience, negotiation, language, ability to follow orders, cognitive ability, adaptation to environment, adaptation to company, emotion, loyalty, attitude, and Response. Finally, we discussed with the 20 executives to take these important criteria into three perspectives to structure the hierarchy for hospital public relations personnel selection. After discussing with practitioners and executives, we find that selecting criteria are interrelated. The ANP, which incorporates interdependence relationships, is a new approach for multi-criteria decision-making. Thus, we apply ANP to select the most optimal public relations personnel of hospitals. An empirical study of public relations personnel selection problems in Taiwan hospitals is conducted to illustrate how the selection procedure works. PMID:19197656

  12. [Evolution of the hospital pharmacies in public and private hospitals in the cancer network in Lorraine: Oncolor].

    PubMed

    May, I; Paulus, C; Vigneron, J; Watelet, M; Veyrier, B; Bichet, F; Bideaux, S; Bey, P

    2001-04-01

    With the objective of improvement of quality in oncology, an assessment of chemotherapy practice in hospital pharmacies in public and private hospitals was carried out by the regional committee of oncology in Lorraine. The 36 hospitals reporting using chemotherapy, had varied practices. The results of this survey lead to the elaboration of guideline for hospital pharmacies in the oncology regional network Oncolor. This paper describes the different aspects of the hospital pharmacies in public and private hospitals included in the network Oncolor from 1996 to 2000. In 1996, 9 hospital pharmacies had centralized preparation for chemotherapy, whereas at the end of 2000, 26 pharmacies on 28 will fulfill the guidelines. PMID:11371380

  13. A comparative public health and budget impact analysis of pneumococcal vaccines: The French case

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiling; Gervais, Frédéric; Gauthier, Aline; Baptiste, Charles; Martinon, Prescilla; Bresse, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In 2002, a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was introduced to French infants and toddlers. A change has been witnessed in the incidence of pneumococcal diseases in adults: the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) of serotypes covered by PCV decreased, and serotypes not covered by PCV increased. This study aimed to quantify the public health and budget impact of pneumococcal vaccination strategies in at-risk adults in France over 5 years. A previously published population-based Markov model was adapted to the French situation. At-risk adults received either PPV23 (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine; for the immunocompetent) or PCV13 (for the immunosuppressed). The strategy was compared to PCV13 alone. Uncertainty was addressed using extreme scenario analyses. Between 2014 and 2018, vaccination with PPV23/PCV13 led to a higher reduction in terms of IPD and non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia cases avoided in most scenarios analyzed when compared to PCV13 alone. For budget impact, none of the scenarios was in favor of PCV13. Under conservative coverage assumptions, the total incremental budget impact ranged from € 39.8 million to € 69.3 million if PCV13 were to replace PPV23 in the immunocompetent. With the epidemiological changes of pneumococcal diseases and the broader serotype coverage of PPV23, the current program remains an optimal strategy from public health perspective. Given the additional budget required for the use of PCV13 alone and its uncertain public health benefits, vaccination with PPV23 remains the preferred strategy. PMID:26267239

  14. A comparative public health and budget impact analysis of pneumococcal vaccines: The French case.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiling; Gervais, Frédéric; Gauthier, Aline; Baptiste, Charles; Martinon, Prescilla; Bresse, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In 2002, a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was introduced to French infants and toddlers. A change has been witnessed in the incidence of pneumococcal diseases in adults: the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) of serotypes covered by PCV decreased, and serotypes not covered by PCV increased. This study aimed to quantify the public health and budget impact of pneumococcal vaccination strategies in at-risk adults in France over 5 years. A previously published population-based Markov model was adapted to the French situation. At-risk adults received either PPV23 (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine; for the immunocompetent) or PCV13 (for the immunosuppressed). The strategy was compared to PCV13 alone. Uncertainty was addressed using extreme scenario analyses. Between 2014 and 2018, vaccination with PPV23/PCV13 led to a higher reduction in terms of IPD and non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia cases avoided in most scenarios analyzed when compared to PCV13 alone. For budget impact, none of the scenarios was in favor of PCV13. Under conservative coverage assumptions, the total incremental budget impact ranged from € 39.8 million to € 69.3 million if PCV13 were to replace PPV23 in the immunocompetent. With the epidemiological changes of pneumococcal diseases and the broader serotype coverage of PPV23, the current program remains an optimal strategy from public health perspective. Given the additional budget required for the use of PCV13 alone and its uncertain public health benefits, vaccination with PPV23 remains the preferred strategy. PMID:26267239

  15. Cost accounting and public reimbursement schemes in Spanish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Fernando; Abellán-Perpiñán, José-María; Martínez-Pérez, Jorge-Eduardo; Puig-Junoy, Jaume

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a description and analysis of the main costing and pricing (reimbursement) systems employed by hospitals in the Spanish National Health System (NHS). Hospitals cost calculations are mostly based on a full costing approach as opposite to other systems like direct costing or activity based costing. Regional and hospital differences arise on the method used to allocate indirect costs to cost centres and also on the approach used to measure resource consumption. Costs are typically calculated by disaggregating expenditure and allocating it to cost centres, and then to patients and DRGs. Regarding public reimbursement systems, the impression is that unit costs are ignored, except for certain type of high technology processes and treatments. PMID:17016928

  16. An Internet supported workflow for the publication process in UMVF (French Virtual Medical University).

    PubMed

    Renard, Jean-Marie; Bourde, Annabel; Cuggia, Marc; Garcelon, Nicolas; Souf, Nathalie; Darmoni, Stephan; Beuscart, Régis; Brunetaud, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    The " Université Médicale Virtuelle Francophone" (UMVF) is a federation of French medical schools. Its main goal is to share the production and use of pedagogic medical resources generated by academic medical teachers. We developed an Open-Source application based upon a workflow system, which provides an improved publication process for the UMVF. For teachers, the tool permits easy and efficient upload of new educational resources. For web masters it provides a mechanism to easily locate and validate the resources. For librarian it provide a way to improve the efficiency of indexation. For all, the utility provides a workflow system to control the publication process. On the students side, the application improves the value of the UMVF repository by facilitating the publication of new resources and by providing an easy way to find a detailed description of a resource and to check any resource from the UMVF to ascertain its quality and integrity, even if the resource is an old deprecated version. The server tier of the application is used to implement the main workflow functionalities and is deployed on certified UMVF servers using the PHP language, an LDAP directory and an SQL database. The client tier of the application provides both the workflow and the search and check functionalities. A unique signature for each resource, was needed to provide security functionality and is implemented using a Digest algorithm. The testing performed by Rennes and Lille verified the functionality and conformity with our specifications. PMID:17344092

  17. Theoretical and perceived balance of power inside Spanish public hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Background The hierarchical pyramid inside Spanish public hospitals was radically changed by the Health Reform Law promulgated in 1986. According to it, the manpower of the hospitals was divided into three divisions (Medical, Nursing, General Services/Administration), which from then on occupied the same level, only subject to the general manager. Ten years after the implementation of the law, the present study was designed in order to investigate if the legal changes had indeed produced a real change in the balance of power inside the hospitals, as perceived by the different workers within them. Materials and Methods A questionnaire was administered to 1,027 workers from four different public hospitals (two university-based and two district hospitals). The participants belonged to all divisions, and to all three operative levels (staff, supervisory and managerial) within them. The questionnaire inquired about the perceived power inside each division and hierarchical level, as well as about that of the other divisions and hierarchical levels. Results Every division attributed the least power to itself. The Nursing and the Administrative division attributed the highest power to the physicians, and these attributed the highest power to the General Services/Administrative division. All hierarchical levels (including the formal top of the pyramid) attributed significantly more power to the other than to them. Conclusions More than ten years after the implementation of the new law, the majority of workers still perceive that the real power within the hospitals is held by the physicians (whereas these feel that it has shifted to the administrators). No division or hierarchical level believes it holds any significant degree of power, and this carries with it the danger of also not accepting any responsibility. PMID:11574049

  18. Participation of French Hospital Physicians to Continuing Medical Education Events: A Survey with 300 Physicians to Assess Duration, Methods, Financing, and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisonneuve, Herve; Touboul, Chantal; Bonnelye, Genevieve; Bertrand, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Little data on the educational needs and practices of French hospital physicians have been obtained through surveys. Given that continuing medical education (CME) information is now available on http://www.cnfmc.fr and providers are accredited, we investigated CME practices and knowledge of the CME system with the use of a…

  19. Prioritizing lean management practices in public and private hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Matloub; Malik, Mohsin

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to prioritize 21 healthcare wastes in public and private hospitals of United Arab Emirates (UAE). Design/methodology/approach - Seven healthcare wastes linked with lean management are further decomposed in to sub-criteria and to deal with this complexity of multi criteria decision-making process, analytical hierarchical process (AHP) method is used in this research. Findings - AHP framework for this study resulted in a ranking of 21 healthcare wastes in public and private hospitals of UAE. It has been found that management in private healthcare systems of UAE is putting more emphasis on the inventory waste. On the other hand, over processing waste has got highest weight in public hospitals of UAE. Research limitations/implications - The future directions of this research would be to apply a lean set of tools for the value stream optimization of the prioritized key improvement areas. Practical implications - This is a contribution to the continuing research into lean management, giving practitioners and designers a practical way for measuring and implementing lean practices across health organizations. Originality/value - The contribution of this research, through successive stages of data collection, measurement analysis and refinement, is a set of reliable and valid framework that can be subsequently used in conceptualization, prioritization of the waste reduction strategies in healthcare management. PMID:27119397

  20. Maternal satisfaction with organized perinatal care in Serbian public hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the experiences and expectations of women across the continuum of antenatal, perinatal, and postnatal care is important to assess the quality of maternal care and to determine problematic areas which could be improved. The objective of this study was to identify the factors associated with maternal satisfaction with hospital-based perinatal care in Serbia. Methods Our survey was conducted from January 2009 to January 2010 using a 28-item, self-administered questionnaire. The sample consisted of 50% of women who expected childbirths during the study period from all 76 public institutions with obstetric departments in Serbia. The following three composite outcome variables were constructed: satisfaction with technical and professional aspects of care; communication and interpersonal aspects of care; and environmental factors. Results We analyzed 34,431 completed questionnaires (84.2% of the study sample). The highest and lowest average satisfaction scores (4.43 and 3.25, respectively) referred to the overall participation of midwives during delivery and the quality of food served in the hospital, respectively. Younger mothers and multiparas were less concerned with the environmental conditions (OR = 0.55, p = 0.006; OR = 1.82, p = 0.004). Final model indicated that mothers informed of patients’ rights, pregnancy and delivery through the Maternal Counseling Service were more likely to be satisfied with all three outcome variables. The highest value of the Pearson’s coefficient of correlation was between the overall satisfaction score and satisfaction with communication and interpersonal aspects of care. Conclusions Our study illuminated the importance of interpersonal aspects of care and education for maternal satisfaction. Improvement of the environmental conditions in hospitals, the WHO program, Baby-friendly Hospital, and above all providing all pregnant women with antenatal education, are recommendations which would

  1. Evolution of patients' complaints in a French university hospital: is there a contribution of a law regarding patients' rights?

    PubMed Central

    Giugliani, Camila; Gault, Nathalie; Fares, Valia; Jegu, Jérémie; Trolli, Sergio Eleni dit; Biga, Julie; Vidal-Trecan, Gwenaelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Legislative measures have been identified as one effective way of changing attitude or behaviour towards health care. The aim of this study was to describe trends in patients' complaints for medical issues; to evaluate the contribution of a law regarding patients' rights, and to identify factors associated to patients' perception of a medical error. Methods Patients with a complaint letter for medical issues in a French university hospital were included. Trends in complaint rates were analysed. Comparisons were made between a first (1998–2000) and a second (2001–2004) time period, before and after the diffusion of the law, and according to the perception of a medical error. Results Complaints for medical issues increased from 1998 to 2004. Of 164 complaints analysed, 66% were motivated by the perception of a medical error (47% during the first time period vs. 73% during the second time period; p = 0.001). Error or delay in diagnosis/treatment and surgical/medical complication were the main reasons for complaints. Surgical departments had the higher number of complaints. Second time period, substandard care, disability, and adverse effect of a health product were independently associated with the perception of a medical error, positively for the formers, and negatively for the latter. Conclusion This study revealed an increase with time in the number of complaints for medical issues in a university hospital, as well as an increase in the perception of a medical error after the passing of a law regarding patients' rights in France. PMID:19660131

  2. Epidemiology of atrial fibrillation in France: extrapolation of international epidemiological data to France and analysis of French hospitalization data.

    PubMed

    Charlemagne, Agnès; Blacher, Jacques; Cohen, Ariel; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Diévart, François; de Groote, Pascal; Hanon, Olivier; Leenhardt, Antoine; Pinel, Jean-François; Pisica-Donose, George; Le Heuzey, Jean-Yves

    2011-02-01

    The prevalence of atrial fibrillation is steadily increasing throughout the world because of ageing populations and better management of coronary heart disease. An international literature review was conducted to estimate the prevalence and incidence of atrial fibrillation in France. A review of the literature on comorbidities was also performed. Finally, French mortality and hospitalization data were analysed using the PMSI database. The prevalence of atrial fibrillation is estimated to be between 600,000 and 1 million people; of these, two-thirds are aged >75 years. The incidence is estimated at between 110,000 and 230,000 new cases per year. In 2008, 412,000 hospitalized patients had a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation; this figure increased by 26% in the 3-year period between 2005 and 2008. These findings highlight the importance of targeting therapy, of upstream therapy, and of therapy that provides clear clinical and economic advantages over the well-established reductions already achieved in atrial fibrillation morbidity, mortality and cost. In addition, new prevention strategies should be developed, particularly secondary prevention strategies in patients with cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21402346

  3. Peritonsillar abscess (PTA): clinical characteristics, microbiology, drug exposures and outcomes of a large multicenter cohort survey of 412 patients hospitalized in 13 French university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lepelletier, D; Pinaud, V; Le Conte, P; Bourigault, C; Asseray, N; Ballereau, F; Caillon, J; Ferron, C; Righini, C; Batard, E; Potel, G

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of hospitalized patients with peritonsillar abscess (PTA). We conducted a multicenter survey in 13 French university hospitals in 2009-2012 describing 412 patients. Median age was 29 year (range, 2-84) and current smoking habit was reported by 177 (43 %) patients. Most of the patients (92 %) had consulted a physician for sore throat within 10 days before admission for PTA diagnosis. Additional symptoms such as visible tonsil abnormalities (83 %), tender cervical adenopathy (57 %) and fever ≥ 38.5 °C (53 %) were also reported. A total of 65 % patients (269/412) reported recent systemic anti-inflammatory agents (AIAs) exposure by medical prescription (70 %), self-medication (22 %), or both (8 %); 61 % and 27 % reported recent exposure to antibiotic and topical treatments for sore throat, respectively. Non-steroidal AIAs were used most often (45 %), particularly arylpropionic derivatives. A rapid diagnosis antigen test (RDT) for Streptococcus pyogenes was performed in 70 (17 %) patients and was positive in 17 (24 %), of whom 9 (53 %) were exposed to AIAs and 14 (82 %) to antibiotics. To treat PTA, antibiotic therapy was given to 392 (95 %) patients. Of 333 antibiotic prescriptions, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and metronidazole were the most prescribed antibiotics (42 and 17 %, respectively). Surgical drainage of the abscess was performed in 119 (29 %) cases and tonsillectomy in 75 (18 %) cases. The clinical outcome was favorable during the hospital stay in 404 (98 %) patients. In conclusion, patients with sore throat are often exposed to AIAs before PTA diagnosis, and antibiotic prescription was not often based on the RDT positivity. PMID:26942743

  4. A comparison of monomicrobial versus polymicrobial Enterococcus faecalis bacteriuria in a French University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fourcade, C; Canini, L; Lavigne, J-P; Sotto, A

    2015-08-01

    Enterococci are of considerable relevance in the hospital setting. Their most common location is the urinary tract, where they may be responsible for both colonization and infections. They are often associated with the presence of other microorganisms. The aim was to compare monomicrobial and polymicrobial Enterococcus faecalis bacteriuria. A retrospective study was performed on the demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of 299 patients who had presented with E. faecalis bacteriuria in 2012 at a University Hospital. The bacteriuria was polymicrobial in 46.1 % of cases and in 36.4 % of cases was responsible for a urinary tract infection. Infections appeared to be more prevalent in the polymicrobial than the monomicrobial group (42 % vs 32 %, p = 0.06). Half of the patients who presented with urinary tract colonization received antibiotic treatment (54/ out of 10). A multivariate analysis adjusted for age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.02 per year, p = 0.006), gender (AOR = 2.2, p = 0.007), and clinical classification (colonization or infection, AOR = 1.6, p = 0.091), showed that diabetes mellitus (AOR = 2.0, p = 0.04), hospital length of stay exceeding 28 days (AOR = 2.0, p = 0.03), and presence of a urinary catheter (AOR = 2.4, p = 0.001) were all factors associated with polymicrobial E. faecalis bacteriuria. A reduction in the length of hospital stay and the use of urinary catheters would appear to be required to decrease the incidence of urinary tract colonization and infections by polymicrobial E. faecalis. Improper use of antibiotics to treat urinary tract colonization remains a major concern. PMID:25987245

  5. Public-private partnerships: a Canadian hospital's perspective.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Thomas G

    2007-01-01

    The McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) is undergoing a $1.579 billion redevelopment project, placing it amongst the largest hospital redevelopment projects in the world. As the Quebec government and the MUHC were considering the Public-Private Partnership (PPP) procurement alternative, the MUHC embarked upon an investigation of various jurisdictions' experiences with PPPs. The studies concluded that there are various frameworks available and that the specific characteristics of a project should be considered when determining which model to use. PMID:18399267

  6. Carbapenem use in French hospitals: A nationwide survey at the patient level.

    PubMed

    Gauzit, Rémy; Pean, Yves; Alfandari, Serge; Bru, Jean-Pierre; Bedos, Jean-Pierre; Rabaud, Christian; Robert, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of carbapenem use in French healthcare settings in order to guide future actions. Healthcare facilities voluntarily participated in a nationwide cross-sectional survey in 2011. Medical data and reasons for carbapenem treatment (CPR) and discontinuation were recorded for all patients treated with carbapenems. A total of 2338 patients were recorded by 207 facilities. The median duration of CPR was 8 days, and 31.4% of patients received CPR for >10 days. An antibiotic consultant was involved in the initial choice of CPR in 36.8% of cases. CPR was chosen on an empirical (EP) basis for 1229 patients (52.6%), mainly because of severe sepsis (48.6%) or a perceived risk of bacterial resistance (33.7%). Among EP patients, de-escalation was more frequent in the case of intervention of an antibiotic consultant (35.1%) than without intervention (22.9%) (P<0.01). Among the 1109 patients receiving CPR initially based on bacteriological results, 607 (54.7%) had ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and 397 (35.8%) had Gram-negative bacilli susceptible to at least one β-lactam other than carbapenems or to fluoroquinolones. Among the latter, de-escalation was performed in 59 cases (14.9%). The intervention of an antibiotic consultant did not favour de-escalation in this group. In conclusion, carbapenems are frequently used for treating suspected or confirmed multidrug-resistant bacteria, and overall CPR duration is long. De-escalation is frequently not implemented despite isolates being susceptible to other drugs. More frequent antibiotic consultant intervention may help to decrease carbapenem use in the case of EP treatment. PMID:26508585

  7. Cultural circumcision in EU public hospitals--an ethical discussion.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Margherita; Barilan, Y Michael

    2009-10-01

    The paper explores the ethical aspects of introducing cultural circumcision of children into the EU public health system. We reject commonplace arguments against circumcision: considerations of good medical practice, justice, bodily integrity, autonomy and the analogy from female genital mutilation. From the unique structure of patient-medicine interaction, we argue that the incorporation of cultural circumcision into EU public health services is a kind of medicalization, which does not fit the ethos of universal healthcare. However, we support a utilitarian argument that finds hospital based circumcision safer than non-medicalized alternatives. The argument concerning medicalization and the utilitarian argument both rely on preliminary empirical data, which depend on future validation PMID:19076127

  8. [Medical-hospital material management and the working process in a public hospital].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Simone Domingues; Haddad, Maria do Carmo Lourenço; Dellaroza, Mara Solange Gomes; Costa, Daniele Bernardi da; Miranda, Juranda Maia de

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an exploratory-descriptive study structured in a qualitative approach. The main objective was to identify the perception of medical-hospital materials on the work process of professionals in a medium complexity public hospital. Information has been collected using the research question: How does the materials management process influence work process? The report analysis has identified five different categories: lack of autonomy in the choice of materials, lack of maintenance of equipment, bureaucracy in the purchasing process, poor quality and absence of professional involvement in the materials management. It is concluded that the materials management is focused on the nursing direction, which requires greater involvement of other professionals in the materials choice used to reduce the weakness in that process. PMID:22911419

  9. A cost and performance comparison of Public Private Partnership and public hospitals in Spain.

    PubMed

    Caballer-Tarazona, Maria; Clemente-Collado, Antonio; Vivas-Consuelo, David

    2015-12-01

    Public-private partnership (PPP) initiatives are extending around the world, especially in Europe, as an innovation to traditional public health systems, with the intention of making them more efficient.There is a varied range of PPP models with different degrees of responsibility from simple public sector contracts with the private, up to the complete privatisation of the service. As such, we may say the involvement of the private sector embraces the development, financing and provision of public infrastructures and delivery services.In this paper, one of the oldest PPP initiatives developed in Spain and transferred to other European and Latin American countries is evaluated for first time: the integrated healthcare delivery Alzira model.Through a comparison of public and PPP hospital performance, cost and quality indicators, the efficiency of the PPP experience in five hospitals is evaluated to identify the influence of private management in the results.Regarding the performance and efficiency analysis, it is seen that the PPP group obtains good results, above the average, but not always better than those directly managed. It is necessary to conduct studies with a greater number of PPP hospitals to obtain conclusive results. PMID:27180236

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of a circulating hepatitis C virus recombinant strain 1b/1a isolated in a French hospital centre.

    PubMed

    Morel, Virginie; Ghoubra, Faten; Izquierdo, Laure; Martin, Elodie; Oliveira, Catarina; François, Catherine; Brochot, Etienne; Helle, François; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine

    2016-06-01

    Genetic recombination is now a well-established feature of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) variability and evolution, with the recent identification of circulating recombinant forms. In Amiens University Hospital Centre (France), a discrepancy of genotyping results was observed for 9 samples, between their 5' untranslated region assigned to genotype 1b and their NS5B region assigned to genotype 1a, suggesting the existence of a recombinant strain. In the present study, clinical and phylogenetic analyses of these isolates were conducted and a putative relationship with previously identified HCV 1b/1a recombinants was investigated. The results revealed that all 9 strains displayed a breakpoint within the beginning of the core protein, were closely related between each other and with the H23 strain identified in Uruguay (Moreno et al., 2009). Then, the clinical characteristics of the 9 unlinked individuals infected with this 1b/1a genotype were analysed. This is the first report on the circulation, in a French population, of a HCV recombinant strain 1b/1a. The identification of this genotype in other patients and in other geographical zones would allow to further investigate its prevalence in the population and to better understand its molecular epidemiology. PMID:26444584

  11. Postgraduate training in public health medicine: St George's Hospital Medical School Library public health information service.

    PubMed

    Rook, R; Adshead, F

    2001-03-01

    This article examines the development of the St George's Hospital Medical School Library public health information service. Begun in 1997 as a pilot project to support Public Health Specialist Registrars in South Thames West, it is now an established part of postgraduate training in the region. An outline of the service is described, including the evolution of the post of Public Health Librarian. Issues influencing the development of the service, and the establishment of the Librarian as part of the public health network are discussed. This is a transferable model of public health information provision, which as a centralized resource makes best use of available funding. As a LIS model it is an effective and efficient way of maximizing resources, and delivering a service to a specialist user group that is spread across a wide geographical area. PMID:11260291

  12. [Adult autopsies in a French university hospital (CHU Amiens) for the period 1975-2005].

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Denis; Brevet, Marie; Guernou, Malika; Manaouil, Cécile; Leclercq, Fabienne; Bruniau, Alexis; Cordonnier, Carole; Sevestre, Henri

    2007-09-01

    We have reviewed the pathological reports of adult necropsies performed in Amiens hospital during the 1975-2005 period. 1,639 autopsies were performed in 1,049 men and 590 women. We distinguished three periods: 1975-1987 (period 1) with a high number of autopsies (86/year), 1988-1996 (period 2) with a huge decrease of autopsies performed (43/year) and 1997-2005 (period 3) with few autopsies performed (14/year). Patients were younger during period 3, 38% were less than 50 years old versus 26% and 29% during periods 1 and 2. The sex ratio M/F increased during period 3 (2.7 versus 1.7 and 1.9 during periods 1 and 2). Period 3 showed an increase of major diagnoses discovered during autopsies (36% versus 28% of autopsies performed during periods 1 and 2) and showed an increase of autopsies performed after iatrogenic events (20% versus 12% and 13% of autopsies of periods 1 and 2). Period 3 showed an increase of the delay between the death of patients and autopsy and a decrease of the delay of transmission of pathological reports. 2% of autopsies were never answered by the pathologists. In conclusion, our study confirms the major decline of autopsies during the last 30 years. Patients autopsied are currently young men and the autopsies are more frequently performed in potential forensic circumstances. Selection biases explain that major diagnoses are more frequently found at autopsies nowadays than 30 years ago. PMID:18185448

  13. Working together: collaboration between midwives and doctors in public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Reiger, Kerreen M; Lane, Karen L

    2009-05-01

    While collaborative, multidisciplinary teamwork is widely espoused as the goal of contemporary hospitals, it is hard to achieve. In maternity care especially, professional rivalries and deep-seated philosophical differences over childbirth generate significant tensions. This article draws on qualitative research in several Victorian public maternity units to consider the challenges to inter-professional collaboration. It reports what doctors and midwives looked for in colleagues they liked to work with - the attributes of a "good doctor" or a "good midwife". Although their ideals did not entirely match, both groups respected skill and hard work and sought mutual trust, respect and accountability. Yet effective working together is limited both by tensions over role boundaries and power and by incivility that is intensified by increasing workloads and a fragmented labour force. The skills and qualities that form the basis of "professional courtesy" need to be recognised as essential to good collaborative practice. PMID:19563323

  14. Explaining Local Authority Choices on Public Hospital Provision in the 1930s: A Public Policy Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This article summarises the findings of recent work on local authority public hospital services in England and Wales in the inter-war years and identifies the lack of a robust hypothesis to explain the variations found, particularly one that would explain the actions of county councils as well as county boroughs. Using public policy techniques on a group of local authorities in the far South West it proposes that variations can be explained by an understanding of the deep core beliefs of councillors, their previous experience of ‘commissioner’ and ‘provider’ roles, and the availability or otherwise of a dedicated policy entrepreneur to promote change. PMID:23752983

  15. Explaining local authority choices on public hospital provision in the 1930s: a public policy hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Neville, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This article summarises the findings of recent work on local authority public hospital services in England and Wales in the inter-war years and identifies the lack of a robust hypothesis to explain the variations found, particularly one that would explain the actions of county councils as well as county boroughs. Using public policy techniques on a group of local authorities in the far South West it proposes that variations can be explained by an understanding of the deep core beliefs of councillors, their previous experience of 'commissioner' and 'provider' roles, and the availability or otherwise of a dedicated policy entrepreneur to promote change. PMID:23752983

  16. Cream skimming and hospital transfers in a mixed public-private system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Terence C; Haisken-DeNew, John P; Yong, Jongsay

    2015-05-01

    The increasing prominence of the private sector in health care provision has generated considerable interest in understanding its implications on quality and cost. This paper investigates the phenomenon of cream skimming in a mixed public-private hospital setting using the novel approach of analysing hospital transfers. We analyse hospital administrative data of patients with ischemic heart disease from the state of Victoria, Australia. The data set contains approximately 1.77 million admission episodes in 309 hospitals, of which 132 are public hospitals, and 177 private hospitals. We ask if patients transferred between public and private hospitals differ systematically in the severity and complexity of their medical conditions; and if so, whether utilisation also differs. We find that patients with higher disease severity are more likely to be transferred from private to public hospitals whereas the opposite is true for patients transferred to private hospitals. We also find that patients transferred from private to public hospitals stayed longer and cost more than private-to-private transfer patients, after controlling for patients' observed health conditions and personal characteristics. Overall, the evidence is suggestive of the presence of cream skimming in the Victorian hospital system, although we cannot conclusively rule out other mechanisms that might influence hospital transfers. PMID:25813730

  17. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  18. Comparison of childbirth care models in public hospitals, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Sibylle Emilie; da Silva, Kátia Silveira; Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare collaborative and traditional childbirth care models. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 655 primiparous women in four public health system hospitals in Belo Horizonte, MG, Southeastern Brazil, in 2011 (333 women for the collaborative model and 322 for the traditional model, including those with induced or premature labor). Data were collected using interviews and medical records. The Chi-square test was used to compare the outcomes and multivariate logistic regression to determine the association between the model and the interventions used. RESULTS Paid work and schooling showed significant differences in distribution between the models. Oxytocin (50.2% collaborative model and 65.5% traditional model; p < 0.001), amniotomy (54.3% collaborative model and 65.9% traditional model; p = 0.012) and episiotomy (collaborative model 16.1% and traditional model 85.2%; p < 0.001) were less used in the collaborative model with increased application of non-pharmacological pain relief (85.0% collaborative model and 78.9% traditional model; p = 0.042). The association between the collaborative model and the reduction in the use of oxytocin, artificial rupture of membranes and episiotomy remained after adjustment for confounding. The care model was not associated with complications in newborns or mothers neither with the use of spinal or epidural analgesia. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that collaborative model may reduce interventions performed in labor care with similar perinatal outcomes. PMID:24897052

  19. Stress level of people with psoriasis at a public hospital*

    PubMed Central

    Leovigildo, Érida Silva; David, Rose Ana Rios; Mendes, Andreia Santos

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis is a chronic dermatosis of unknown etiology with a tendency to relapse after treatment. The disease is frequently linked to psychological stress due to the embarrassment caused by the lesions. Objective To analyze the stress level presented by psoriasis patients followed at the Dermatology Service of a public hospital in Salvador, Bahia state, Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study of a consecutive convenience sample composed of 60 participants. We used Lipp's Stress Symptoms Inventory for Adults to assess stress levels. The questionnaire identifies and classifies physical and psychological symptoms according to three stages of stress: alarming, resistance, and exhaustion. We also collected socio-demographic and clinical data that could be associated with psoriasis. Results 85% of the participants presented stress. Lipp's questionnaire results revealed that 48% were in the resistance stage and 37% in the exhaustion stage. Women presented higher levels of stress. Of the total 28 women, 64% were in exhaustion stage, 29% in the resistance stage, and only 7% presented no stress symptoms. Of the total 32 men, 44% were in resistance stage, 34% in exhaustion stage, and 22% presented no stress symptoms. Regarding physical and psychological symptoms, psychological symptomatology was prevalent (55%). Conclusions Based on the number of patients in exhaustion stage, we can conclude that stress levels of the participants were high regardless the type of psoriasis and treatment duration. PMID:27579739

  20. Diffusion of Electronic Medical Record Based Public Hospital Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Won; Kim, Seong Min; An, Chang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the adoption behavior of a newly developed Electronic Medical Record (EMR)-based information system (IS) at three public hospitals in Korea with a focus on doctors and nurses. Methods User satisfaction scores from four performance layers were analyzed before and two times after the newly develop system was introduced to evaluate the adoption process of the IS with Rogers' diffusion theory. Results The 'intention to use' scores, the most important indicator for determining whether or not to adopt the IS in Rogers' confirmation stage for doctors, were very high in the third survey (4.21). In addition, the scores for 'reduced medication errors', which is the key indicator for evaluating the success of the IS, increased in the third survey for both doctors and nurses. The factors influencing 'intention to use' with a high odds ratio (>1.5) were the 'frequency of attendance of user training sessions', 'mandatory use of system', 'reduced medication errors', and 'reduced medical record documentation time' for both doctors and nurses. Conclusions These findings show that the new EMR-based IS was well accepted by doctors. Both doctors and nurses also positively considered the effects of the new IS on their clinical environments. PMID:26279954

  1. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hospital care under 38 U.S.C. 1710 or 38 CFR 17.46. Use of Public or Private Hospitals ... Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51 Pensions... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public...

  2. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hospital care under 38 U.S.C. 1710 or 38 CFR 17.46. Use of Public or Private Hospitals ... Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51 Pensions... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public...

  3. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hospital care under 38 U.S.C. 1710 or 38 CFR 17.46. Use of Public or Private Hospitals ... Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51 Pensions... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public...

  4. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hospital care under 38 U.S.C. 1710 or 38 CFR 17.46. Use of Public or Private Hospitals ... Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51 Pensions... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public...

  5. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hospital care under 38 U.S.C. 1710 or 38 CFR 17.46. Use of Public or Private Hospitals ... Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51 Pensions... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public...

  6. Provision of essential health package in public hospitals: a case of Homabay County hospitals, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Opon, Shadrack Ochieng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Essential Health Packages (EHP) delivery is likely to strengthen service delivery. Healthcare utilization rate is 77% for the sick. 44% and 18% who don't seek care are hindered by cost and distance respectively. The overall child mortality rate in Kenya is 121/1000. In Homabay County, child mortality rate is 91/1000, and maternal mortality rate of 583/100000. The study looked into the provision of EHP in public hospitals in Homabay County. Methods Cross-sectional research design was used. Two hospitals were conveniently due to their municipality location. The study targeted 213 Health workers and 350 patients. Stratified sampling and proportionate sampling was used among different health workers. Sample size was determined by Yamane Formula. The study sampled 138 health workers and 186 patients. Questionnaire and key interview guide were used to collect data. Results There are inadequate health workers based on 138 (100%) health workers. Insufficient drugs were reported by 138 (100%) health workers, and 120 (64.5%) patients. 115 (83.3%) health workers say ambulances are not operational. 26 (18.8%) health workers noted lack medical equipment, 138 (100%) are aware of patients referred elsewhere due to lack of medical equipment. 153 (82.3%) and 135 (72.6%) patients’ health access is hindered by cost and distance respectively. 159 (85.5%) patients don't always find services needed. 159 (85.5%) patients affected by long waiting time. Conclusion Low service provision/utilization rate in Homabay County results from lack of health workers, inadequate drugs, poor health infrastructure, and lack of access in terms of affordability, availability and distance. PMID:27583072

  7. Hospital Libraries and the Public Library System in France: How Can They Work Together?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Claudie

    This paper discusses cooperation between hospital and public libraries in France. The first section provides an overview of hospital libraries, including historical and regulatory background, as well as the current situation. The second section considers the network of public libraries, including increasing awareness of the duty to provide all…

  8. Preparedness actions towards seismic risk mitigation for the general public in Martinique, French Lesser Antilles: a mid-term appraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audru, J. C.; Vernier, J. L.; Capdeville, B.; Salindre, J. J.; Mouly, É.

    2013-08-01

    Martinique is a French island in the Lesser Antilles, with a high seismic hazard. In 2006, Martinican stakeholders involved in seismic safety formed the "Réplik" working group ("Aftershock" in French), the first of its kind in this region. This paper addresses a mid-term appraisal of the first seismic awareness campaign organised by Réplik from 2006 to 2011, and how it has modified, or not, local earthquake and tsunami preparedness. Despite efforts from Réplik to assess its efficiency through surveys, a growing gap is noted between the observed awareness and the actual preparedness of the public. As usual, gender, age, educational level, then boredom and saturation contribute to this discrepancy; strong cultural items may also influence the perception of actions. To remain efficient and respond to the public's expectations, Réplik must redirect its actions towards a cultural congruence of information: consideration of religion and local beliefs, comprehensive messages on TV and radio, use of the Creole language, participatory experiences and drills, and a little science. With this, the Réplik stakeholders can hope to increase Martinicans' involvement into the preparedness process, to cope quickly with a strong earthquake and this know-how can be shared with other seismically active islands in the Caribbean.

  9. Handwashing compliance in a French university hospital: new perspective with the introduction of hand-rubbing with a waterless alcohol-based solution.

    PubMed

    Girou, E; Oppein, F

    2001-08-01

    The baseline compliance with handwashing in a French university hospital was as low as the compliance rates reported in other countries, i.e., less than 50%. By introducing the use of hand-rubbing with an alcoholic solution, as a substitution method for both handwashing with soap and handwashing with an antiseptic agent, we significantly improved hand-cleansing compliance. Despite these encouraging results, mainly due to the accessibility of these non-aqueous products, three major obstacles remain before a wide acceptance by healthcare workers: distrust in terms of efficacy, distrust in terms of skin tolerance and lack of knowledge on hand-cleansing indications. PMID:11759028

  10. Comparative Study of Three Commonly Used Methods for Hospital Efficiency Analysis in Beijing Tertiary Public Hospitals, China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guo-Chao; Zheng, Jian; Zhou, Zi-Jun; Zhou, Chuan-Kun; Zhao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tertiary hospitals serve as the medical service center within the region and play an important role in the medical and health service system. They are also the key targets of public hospital reform in the new era in China. Through the reform of health system, the public hospital efficiency has changed remarkably. Therefore, this study aimed to provide some advice for efficiency assessment of public hospitals in China by comparing and analyzing the consistency of results obtained by three commonly used methods for examining hospital efficiency, that is, ratio analysis (RA), stochastic frontier analysis (SFA), and data envelopment analysis (DEA). Methods: The theoretical basis, operational processes, and the application status of RA, SFA, and DEA were learned through literature analysis. Then, the empirical analysis was conducted based on measured data from 51 tertiary public hospitals in Beijing from 2009 to 2011. Results: The average values of hospital efficiency calculated by SFA with index screening and principal component analysis (PCA) results and those calculated by DEA with index screening results were relatively stable. The efficiency of specialized hospitals was higher than that of general hospitals and that of traditional Chinese medicine hospitals. The results obtained by SFA with index screening results and the results obtained by SFA with PCA results showed a relatively high correlation (r-value in 2009, 2010, and 2011 were 0.869, 0.753, and 0.842, respectively, P < 0.01). The correlation between results obtained by DEA with index screening results and PCA results and results obtained by other methods showed statistical significance, but the correlation between results obtained by DEA with index screening results and PCA results was lower than that between results obtained by SFA with index screening results and PCA results. Conclusions: RA is not suitable for multi-index evaluation of hospital efficiency. In the given conditions, SFA is a

  11. "Evil reports" for "ignorant minds"? Patient experience and public confidence in the emerging modern hospital: Vancouver General Hospital, 1912.

    PubMed

    Gagan, D; Gagan, R

    2001-01-01

    The process whereby the 19th-century Canadian charity hospital for the sick poor was transformed into a centre for scientific health care for the whole community was well in hand by World War I. To fund this transition, and to cope with the subsequent unrelieved demand from all social classes for accessibility to hospitalization, hospitals instituted differentiated services, offering premium care and privacy to paying patients whose fees, in turn, sustained a more economical level of open ward maintenance for indigent patients. As the record of a 1912 public investigation into patient grievances and complaints against the Vancouver General Hospital reveals, the commodification of hospital-based health care reproduced in the hospital environment the social attitudes, controls, and structures of the wider community. This development appeared to contradict the hospitals promise of undifferentiated, scientifically-mediated, medical efficiency and efficacy for all, and its reputation as a humane and caring institution. Notwithstanding the inquiry's conclusion that these grievances were "evil reports" designed to appeal to "ignorant minds," they reveal a patient population of already informed consumers ready, willing and able to discriminate between the promise and the reality of hospital-centred health care for all. PMID:14518465

  12. Attitudes and beliefs of the French public about schizophrenia and major depression: results from a vignette-based population survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In their study ‘Mental Health in the General Population: Images and Realities’ Jean-Luc Roelandt et al. found a huge divide between the French public’s conceptualizations of insanity and depression. The study aims to examine whether such differences can be replicated using modern operationalized diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. Methods In 2012, an online survey was conducted using a representative sample drawn from the adult French population (N = 1600). After presentation of a case-vignette depicting a person with either schizophrenia or major depressive disorder a fully structured interview was carried out. Results Despite some similarities marked differences between both disorders emerge regarding beliefs and attitudes. While respondents presented with the schizophrenia vignette more frequently defined symptoms as the expression of an illness with a stronger biological component and a less favorable prognosis, demanding psychiatric treatment, respondents presented with the depression vignette considered the occurrence of symptoms more frequently as the consequence of current psychosocial stress, benefitting not only from established but also from alternative treatments. People with schizophrenia were more frequently perceived as unpredictable and dangerous, there was a stronger need to separate one-self from them, they were more frequently met with fear and less frequently reacted to with pro-social feelings, and they also faced more rejection. Conclusions The French public draws a clear line between schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. This applies equally to beliefs about both disorders and to attitudes towards the persons afflicted. There is a need for interventions trying to reduce existing misconceptions in order to improve the care of patients. PMID:24252540

  13. Cost estimate of hospital stays for premature newborns in a public tertiary hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Desgualdo, Claudia Maria; Riera, Rachel; Zucchi, Paola

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the direct costs of hospital stays for premature newborns in the Interlagos Hospital and Maternity Center in São Paulo, Brazil and to assess the difference between the amount reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System and the real cost of care for each premature newborn. METHODS: A cost-estimate study in which hospital and professional costs were estimated for premature infants born at 22 to 36 weeks gestation during the calendar year of 2004 and surviving beyond one hour of age. Direct costs included hospital services, professional care, diagnoses and therapy, orthotics, prosthetics, special materials, and blood products. Costs were estimated using tables published by the Unified Health System and the Brasíndice as well as the list of medical procedures provided by the Brazilian Classification of Medical Procedures. RESULTS: The average direct cost of care for initial hospitalization of a premature newborn in 2004 was $2,386 USD. Total hospital expenses and professional services for all premature infants in this hospital were $227,000 and $69,500 USD, respectively. The costs for diagnostic testing and blood products for all premature infants totaled $22,440 and $1,833 USD. The daily average cost of a premature newborn weighing less than 1,000 g was $115 USD, and the daily average cost of a premature newborn weighing more than 2,500 g was $89 USD. Amounts reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System corresponded to only 27.42% of the real cost of care. CONCLUSIONS: The cost of hospital stays for premature newborns was much greater than the amount reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System. The highest costs corresponded to newborns with lower birth weight. Hospital costs progressively and discretely decreased as the newborns' weight increased. PMID:22012050

  14. Narratives of change and reform processes: global and local transactions in French psychiatric hospital reform after the Second World War.

    PubMed

    Henckes, Nicolas

    2009-02-01

    As with the rest of biomedicine, psychiatry has, since the Second World War, developed under the strong influence of the transnational accumulation of a whole series of practices and knowledge. Anthropology has taught us to pay attention to the transactions between local-level actors and those operating at the global level in the construction of this new world of medicine. This article examines the role played by the recommendations of the WHO Expert Committee of Mental Health in the reform of the French mental health system during the 1950s. Rooted in the experience of practitioners and administrators participating in the process of reforming local psychiatric systems, the recommendations of the WHO Expert Committee developed a new vision of regulating psychiatry, based on professionalism and an idea of a normativity of the doctor-patient relation. This article shows how, by mobilizing the WHO reports' recommendations, French administrators and doctors succeeded in creating a typically French object: "the psychiatric sector", founded on elaborating a new mandate for the psychiatric profession. The article thus questions the deinstitutionalization model as an explanation of transformations of the structure of the French psychiatry system in the post-war period. PMID:19041168

  15. Invited commentary: how research on public school closures can inform research on public hospital closures.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alison K; Ahern, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    The literature on social capital and civic engagement as they relate to health and health services outcomes is nuanced and sometimes conflicting, and has been a topic of much investigation in the pages of Social Science and Medicine. Ko et al. (2014) add to this research by considering two health services outcomes: the closure and privatization of public hospitals. We draw from education research on the role of community/civic engagement in public school closures to identify areas for future research to better understand these nuances. Qualitative research on school closures suggest that there are both well-managed and poorly managed closure decisions, and there are diverse community groups with interests in the decision who can interact with each other in nuanced ways. Furthermore, across stakeholder groups, there is not always agreement as to if closure would help or harm their students' education. We encourage health and health services researchers to glean insights from education research and other disciplines disparate but related and relevant to public health when developing research questions and considering alternative methodologies. PMID:24840783

  16. Mass Communication Researchers in Sweden. Swedish Mass Communication Research: Publications in English, French and German.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Ulla, Ed.

    This listing of researchers and publications in mass communications research in Sweden is integrated into a single list arranged by the name of the researchers and noting their publications (if any) in the appropriate languages. In addition to publications, information provided for each researcher includes title and academic degree, project,…

  17. Measuring public hospital costs: empirical evidence from the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M A; La Forgia, G M; Sulvetta, M B

    1996-07-01

    Effective analysis of hospital performance requires the existence of accurate cost and output data. However, these are missing ingredients in most developing countries due to lack of information systems or other sources of data. Typically, expenditures are substituted for actual costs in analyzing hospital finance. This paper presents a methodology and analysis of the actual costs of inpatient, emergency, and outpatient services in a Dominican hospital. Through applying a set of survey instruments to a large sample of patients, the study measures and costs all hospital staff time, in-kind goods (drugs, medical supplies, reagents, etc.), overhead, and the depreciated value of plant and equipment related to the treatment of each patient. The results are striking. The budget is over 50% higher than the actual costs of services, reflecting the high cost of waste, down time, and low productivity. For example, high fixed costs translate into immunizations that on the average cost over 20% more than outpatient surgical interventions. The most disturbing finding is that although physicians represent the bulk of personnel spending, the surveys could account for only 12% of the contracted time of staff physicians, including time dedicated to treatment, supervision, administration, and teaching. As a proportion of the hospital total budget, personnel spending represents a high 84%. Yet staff costs for patient treatment never exceed 12%. These results suggest gross inefficiency, chaotic medical care organization, and poor hospital management. PMID:8844926

  18. Management practices in Australian healthcare: can NSW public hospitals do better?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Renu; Green, Roy; Agarwal, Neeru; Randhawa, Krithika

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of best management practices in an Australian state-run healthcare system, namely New South Wales (NSW), and studies the impact of a range of hospital factors in driving best management practices as a means of enhancing healthcare delivery. Design/methodology/approach - This study adapts a unique survey instrument globally tested to quantify the multi-dimensional nature of hospital management practices in 42 acute care public hospitals of NSW. The authors then analysed the role of hospital-specific characteristics in driving best management practices, namely hospital size (measured by the number of hospital beds, employees and doctors), level of skill and education, degree of hospital manager autonomy and organisational hierarchy. Findings - The findings of this study show the areas of strength and potential areas of improvement in NSW hospitals. The authors find a positive association between the adoption of better management practices and hospital size (measured by the number of hospital beds and employees), level of skills and education, degree of hospital manager autonomy and organisational hierarchy. However, hospital size as measured by the number of doctors did not have a statistically significant relationship. Practical implications - This paper is of interest to both hospital administrators, clinical doctors and healthcare policy-makers who want to improve and develop strategies for better management in the healthcare sector. Originality/value - This study provides an internationally comparable robust measure of management capability in public hospitals, and contributes to the evidence-base of management practices and performance in hospitals. PMID:27119390

  19. Performance evaluation of hospitals that provide care in the public health system, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Marcelo Cristiano de Azevedo; da Cruz, Lucila Pedroso; Kishima, Vanessa Chaer; Pollara, Wilson Modesto; de Lira, Antônio Carlos Onofre; Couttolenc, Bernard François

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if size, administrative level, legal status, type of unit and educational activity influence the hospital network performance in providing services to the Brazilian Unified Health System. METHODS This cross-sectional study evaluated data from the Hospital Information System and the Cadastro Nacional de Estabelecimentos de Saúde (National Registry of Health Facilities), 2012, in Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. We calculated performance indicators, such as: the ratio of hospital employees per bed; mean amount paid for admission; bed occupancy rate; average length of stay; bed turnover index and hospital mortality rate. Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation. The groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni correction. RESULTS The hospital occupancy rate in small hospitals was lower than in medium, big and special-sized hospitals. Higher hospital occupancy rate and bed turnover index were observed in hospitals that include education in their activities. The hospital mortality rate was lower in specialized hospitals compared to general ones, despite their higher proportion of highly complex admissions. We found no differences between hospitals in the direct and indirect administration for most of the indicators analyzed. CONCLUSIONS The study indicated the importance of the scale effect on efficiency, and larger hospitals had a higher performance. Hospitals that include education in their activities had a higher operating performance, albeit with associated importance of using human resources and highly complex structures. Specialized hospitals had a significantly lower rate of mortality than general hospitals, indicating the positive effect of the volume of procedures and technology used on clinical outcomes. The analysis related to the administrative level and legal status did not show any significant performance differences between the categories of public hospitals. PMID:26247385

  20. Performance evaluation of hospitals that provide care in the public health system, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Marcelo Cristiano de Azevedo; da Cruz, Lucila Pedroso; Kishima, Vanessa Chaer; Pollara, Wilson Modesto; de Lira, Antônio Carlos Onofre; Couttolenc, Bernard François

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if size, administrative level, legal status, type of unit and educational activity influence the hospital network performance in providing services to the Brazilian Unified Health System. METHODS This cross-sectional study evaluated data from the Hospital Information System and the Cadastro Nacional de Estabelecimento s de Saúde (National Registry of Health Facilities), 2012, in Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. We calculated performance indicators, such as: the ratio of hospital employees per bed; mean amount paid for admission; bed occupancy rate; average length of stay; bed turnover index and hospital mortality rate. Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation. The groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni correction. RESULTS The hospital occupancy rate in small hospitals was lower than in medium, big and special-sized hospitals. Higher hospital occupancy rate and bed turnover index were observed in hospitals that include education in their activities. The hospital mortality rate was lower in specialized hospitals compared to general ones, despite their higher proportion of highly complex admissions. We found no differences between hospitals in the direct and indirect administration for most of the indicators analyzed. CONCLUSIONS The study indicated the importance of the scale effect on efficiency, and larger hospitals had a higher performance. Hospitals that include education in their activities had a higher operating performance, albeit with associated importance of using human resources and highly complex structures. Specialized hospitals had a significantly lower rate of mortality than general hospitals, indicating the positive effect of the volume of procedures and technology used on clinical outcomes. The analysis related to the administrative level and legal status did not show any significant performance differences between the categories of public hospitals. PMID:26247385

  1. 38 CFR 17.50 - Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the Department of... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.50 Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to...

  2. 38 CFR 17.50 - Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the Department of... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.50 Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to...

  3. 38 CFR 17.50 - Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the Department of... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.50 Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to...

  4. 38 CFR 17.50 - Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the Department of... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.50 Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to...

  5. 38 CFR 17.50 - Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the Department of... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.50 Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to...

  6. The hospital of the future in China: China's reform of public hospitals and trends from industrialized countries.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sarah L; Borowitz, Michael; Bekedam, Henk; Ma, Jin

    2014-05-01

    Hospitals compose a large share of total health spending in most countries, and thus have been the target of reforms to improve efficiency and reduce costs. In China, the government implemented national health care reform to improve access to essential services and reduce high out-of-pocket medical spending. A key component is the comprehensive reform of public hospitals on a pilot basis, although it remains one of the least understood aspects of health care reform in China. This article outlines the main goals of the reform of public hospitals in China, progress to date and the direction of reform between now and 2015. Then, we review experiences from industrialized countries and discuss the applicability to the Chinese reform process. Based on the policy directions focusing on efficiency and quality, and reflecting on how hospital systems in other countries have responded, the article concludes that the hospital of the future in China operates at county level. Barriers to realizing this are discussed. PMID:23612847

  7. Behavioural Indicators of Perceived Managerial and Leadership Effectiveness within Romanian and British Public Sector Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Robert G.; Patel, Taran

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report the results of a replication study of perceived managerial and leadership effectiveness within a Romanian public sector hospital, and to discuss the extent to which they are similar to and different from findings from equivalent studies carried out in two British NHS Trust hospitals. Design/methodology/approach:…

  8. The future of public hospitals in a globalized world: corporate governance, corporatization or privatization?

    PubMed

    Mordelet, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This paper contributes to research in health systems and hospitals governance by examining the reasons and expected outcomes of the generalization of corporate governance rules in both public and private non-profit hospitals, all over the world, in order to achieve its clinical, quality and financial objectives. PMID:18549030

  9. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes among hospital workers at a public teaching and national referral hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Makori, L.; Gikera, M.; Wafula, J.; Chakaya, J.; Edginton, M. E.; Kumar, A. M. V.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), Nairobi, Ken-ya, a large referral and teaching hospital. Objective: 1) To document tuberculosis (TB) case notification rates and trends; 2) to describe demographic, clinical and workplace characteristics and treatment outcomes; and 3) to examine associations between demographic and clinical characteristics, HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome) treatment and anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes among hospital workers with TB at KNH during the period 2006–2011. Design: A retrospective cohort study involving a review of medical records. Results: The TB case notification rate among hospital staff ranged between 413 and 901 per 100 000 staff members per year; 51% of all cases were extra-pulmonary TB; 74% of all cases were among medical, paramedical and support staff. The TB-HIV coinfection rate was 60%. Only 75% had a successful treatment outcome. Patients in the retreatment category, those with unknown HIV status and those who were support staff had a higher risk of poor treatment outcomes. Conclusion: The TB case rate among hospital workers was unacceptably high compared to that of the general population, and treatment outcomes were poor. Infection control in the hospital and management of staff with TB requires urgent attention. PMID:26393055

  10. Investigating the health care delivery system in Japan and reviewing the local public hospital reform

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Oyama, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Japan’s health care system is considered one of the best health care systems in the world. Hospitals are one of the most important health care resources in Japan. As such, we investigate Japanese hospitals from various viewpoints, including their roles, ownership, regional distribution, and characteristics with respect to the number of beds, staff, doctors, and financial performance. Applying a multivariate analysis and regression model techniques, we show the functional differences between urban populated prefectures and remote ones; the equality gap among all prefectures with respect to the distribution of the number of beds, staff, and doctors; and managerial differences between private and public hospitals. We also review and evaluate the local public hospital reform executed in 2007 from various financial aspects related to the expenditure and revenue structure by comparing public and private hospitals. We show that the 2007 reform contributed to improving the financial situation of local public hospitals. Strategic differences between public and private hospitals with respect to their management and strategy to improve their financial situation are also quantitatively analyzed in detail. Finally, the remaining problems and the future strategy to further improve the Japanese health care system are described. PMID:27051323

  11. French Language Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    This guide presents the philosophy, goals, and objectives, as well as the scope and sequence of French instruction at four levels for the public schools of Hawaii. The emphasis is on cultural awareness and communicative competence in French. The goals, objectives, and performance expectations are presented as guides from which teachers can derive…

  12. E-Procurement, from Project to Practice: Empirical Evidence from the French Public Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvallet, Godefroy; Boughzala, Younès; Assar, Saïd

    Public procurement constitutes a significant portion of national PIB in all countries and electronic platforms for supporting public transactions are an important application of e-government. In France, new regulations since 2005 are pushing public and private actors to adopt electronic means for handling all steps of the purchase process in public organisations. Based on quantitative and qualitative surveys made between 2005 and 2008, this chapter presents the general topic of e-procurement and specifically discusses the problem of e-procurement adoption in public institutions in France. The conclusions of these investigations spanning a three years period, are that public e-procurement is constantly progressing, although difficulties related to insufficient technical skills and the complexity of the juridical context hinder seriously its full adoption. They also show that a digital and an organisational divide is appearing between big administrations which have the adequate resources and skills to fully adopt e-procurement, and small administration (i.e. local authorities) which are still reluctant or unable to conduct a purchase in a digital manner.

  13. Factors affecting the informal payments in public and teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Aboutorabi, Ali; Ghiasipour, Maryam; Rezapour, Aziz; Pourreza, Abolghasem; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Tanoomand, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Informal payments in the health sector of many developing countries are considered as a major impediment to health care reforms. Informal payments are a form of systemic fraud and have adverse effects on the performance of the health system. In this study, the frequency and extent of informal payments as well as the determinants of these payments were investigated in general hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 300 discharged patients were selected using multi-stage random sampling method. First, three hospitals were selected randomly; then, through a simple random sampling, we recruited 300 discharged patients from internal, surgery, emergency, ICU & CCU wards. All data were collected by structured telephone interviews and questionnaire. We analyzed data using Chi- square, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The results indicated that 21% (n=63) of individuals paid informally to the staff. About 4% (n=12) of the participants were faced with informal payment requests from hospital staff. There was a significant relationship between frequency of informal payments with marital status of participants and type of hospitals. According to our findings, none of the respondents had informal payments to physicians. The most frequent informal payments were in cash and were made to the hospitals’ housekeeping staff to ensure more and better services. There was no significant relationship between the informal payments with socio-demographic characteristics, residential area and insurance status. Conclusion: Our findings revealed that many strategies can be used for both controlling and reducing informal payments. These include training patients and hospitals’ staff, increasing income levels of employees, improving the quantity and quality of health services and changing the entrenched beliefs that necessitate informal payments. PMID:27390685

  14. Private medical services in the Italian public hospitals: the case for improving HRM.

    PubMed

    De Pietro, Carlo

    2006-08-22

    This study explores how Italian public hospitals can use private medical activities run by their employed physicians as a human resources management (HRM) tool. It is based on field research in two acute-care hospitals and a review of Italian literature and laws. The Italian National Health Service (NHS) allows employed physicians to run private, patient-funded activities ("private beds", surgical operations, hospital outpatient clinics, etc.). Basic regulation is set at the national level, but it can be greatly improved at the hospital level. Private activities, if poorly managed, can damage efficiency, equity, quality of care, and public trust in the NHS. On the other hand, hospitals can also use them as leverage to improve HRM, with special attention to three issues: (1) professional evaluation, development, and training; (2) compensation policies; (3) competition for, and retention of, professionals in short supply. The two case studies presented here show great differences between the two hospitals in terms of regulation and organizational solutions that have been adopted to deal with such activities. However, in both hospitals, private activities do not seem to benefit HRM. Private activities are not systematically considered in compensation policies. Moreover, private revenues are strongly concentrated in a few physicians. Hospitals use very little of the information provided by the private activities to improve knowledge management, career development, or training planning. Finally, hospitals do not use private activities management as a tool for competing in the labor market for health professionals who are in short supply. PMID:16253384

  15. What Could We Learn from the Influence of Age on Perceptions of a CIS by the Clinical Staff of a French Hospital?

    PubMed

    Ologeanu-Taddei, Roxana; Vitari, Claudio; Morquin, David

    2016-01-01

    Previous research highlighted generation and age effects on the perceptions and uses of technology. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between age and perceptions of a Clinical Information System (CIS) for the clinical staff (especially physicians, nurses, medical secretaries). A survey was conducted in September 2015 in a French Teaching Hospital, based on a questionnaire consisting of items on the Likert scale. As results, the impact of age has a strong impact on Perceived Ease of Use, anxiety and Self-Efficacy. The result related to Perceived Ease of Use is unexpected. Younger staff reported to be less comfortable with technology than older staff. This result is not consistent with literature. We propose an explanation consisting in the importance of clinical process and organization knowledge and skills while general technology skills of young generations may be less significant. PMID:27577331

  16. Quality of Public Hospitals Websites: A Cross-Sectional Analytical Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Salarvand, Shahin; Samadbeik, Mahnaz; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad; Salarvand, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, hospitals have turned increasingly towards the Internet and develop their own web presence. Hospital Websites could be operating as effective web resources of information and interactive communication mediums to enhance hospital services to the public. Aim: Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the quality of websites in Tehran’s public hospitals. Material and methods: This cross-sectional analysis involved all public hospitals in Iran’s capital city, Tehran, with a working website or subsites between April and June, 2014 (N=59). The websites were evaluated using three validated instruments: a localized checklist, Google page rank, and the Alexa traffic ranking. The mentioned checklist consisted of 112 items divided into five sections: technical characteristics, hospital information and facilities, medical services, interactive on-line services and external activities. Data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: The mean website evaluation score was 45.7 out of 224 for selected public hospitals. All the studied websites were in the weak category based on the earned quality scores. There was no statistically significant association between the website evaluation score with Google page rank (P=0.092), Alexa global traffic rank and Alexa traffic rank in Iran (P>0.05). The hospital websites had a lower quality score in the interactive online services and external activities criteria in comparing to other criteria. Due to the low quality level of the studied websites and the importance of hospital portals in providing information and services on the Internet, the authorities should do precise planning for the appreciable improvement in the quality of hospital websites. PMID:27147806

  17. Control Costs, Enhance Quality, and Increase Revenue in Three Top General Public Hospitals in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lue-Ping; Yu, Guo-Pei; Liu, Hui; Ma, Xie-Min; Wang, Jing; Kong, Gui-Lan; Li, Yi; Ma, Wen; Cui, Yong; Xu, Beibei; Yu, Na; Bao, Xiao-Yuan; Guo, Yu; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yan; Xie, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Bao-Guo; Ke, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. Methods We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS), cost per day (CPD), inpatient mortality rate (IMR), and length of stay (LOS), using a generalized additive model. Findings There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (P<0.001), from CNY 1,531 in 2006 to CNY 2,169 in 2010. The increasing CPD seemed synchronous with the steady rising of the national annual income per capita. Surgical cost was the main contributor to the temporal change of CPD, while medicine and examination costs tended to be stable over time. From 2006 and 2010, IMR decreased by 36%, while LOS reduced by 25%. Increasing hospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. Interpretations These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role. However, purely

  18. Public hospital management in times of crisis: lessons learned from Cienfuegos, Cuba (1996-2008).

    PubMed

    De Vos, Pol; Orduñez-García, Pedro; Santos-Peña, Moisés; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Cuba's public health system is well known for its integrated first line services based on family medicine. Less publicized is the country's experience in public hospital management. After a harsh economic crisis in the first half of the 1990s had brought the Cienfuegos hospital near to collapse, from 1996 onwards the hospital management team took advantage of the incipient economic recovery to launch an ambitious recovery process. This article reconstructs this endeavor, based on annual hospital reports, scientific publications by the hospital staff, and interviews with key decision-makers. First the endless waiting list for elective surgery was tackled through a more efficient use of the surgery department, and an increase of ambulatory surgery. Next, overall hospital efficiency was improved in the aim to drastically reduce the average length of stay, reaching a decrease from an average stay of 12 days to a little more than 6 days in 1999. Also the emergency department was reorganized, setting up a triage system based on a color code, linked to specific emergency protocols. Attention for improving the clinical efficiency for AMI and stroke coincided with a drop in their intrahospital lethality. Clinical guidelines for the most important diagnoses were collectively developed, adapting international evidence to the local setting. An individual and collective performance evaluation system was elaborated in a participatory way, and further evolved into a 'total quality management' process. This experience of Cienfuegos hospital provides an interesting example on how a public hospital--embedded in a well developed national public health system--can be effective and efficient, even in circumstances of limited resources. PMID:20106544

  19. The Community Health Information Network: A Model for Hospital and Public Library Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartenfeld, Ellen

    1978-01-01

    The Community Health Information Network, a cooperative library network established between a community hospital and six public libraries, is described. This model program provides health education and information services to patient/consumers and library services to health personnel through their public libraries. Funding, factors leading to the…

  20. America's Tolerance for French Radicalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolin, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The publication of Francois Cusset's "French Theory" raises a series of fascinating questions concerning the trans-Atlantic transmission and circulation of ideas. Most important, it impels everyone to inquire why for a time French thought managed to flourish in American universities while French intellectuals rapidly abandoned the entire paradigm.…

  1. [ACADEMY AND PUBLIC HOSPITALS - MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL AND SYNERGISTIC RELATIONSHIP].

    PubMed

    Zarka, Salman

    2016-04-01

    Modern medicine deals with the combined quality of the profession and the medical service. The first rule of medicine is Primum non nocere" (first, do no harm). However, the essence of this unique profession cannot be confined by this basic message phrased by negation, but should be based on the principle of doing one's best to save the patient's life and to cure him. In this academic and dynamic profession, the physician keeps asking himself frequently whether the provided treatment is the best one possible. The internal need to answer this question and the concomitant curiosity, create the necessary critical integration between the physician and the researcher. Medical research is essential for the promotion of the profession, and it is a vital tool that leads to excellence in healthcare services. Throughout recent years the hospitals in Israel's Northern District, from Nazareth and Nahariya to Ziv, are in a continuous process of development and advancement with the aim to provide modern and available medical services of the highest quality to the residents of the area, tourists, IDF soldiers and even for those who arrive from across the border. This growth and development is reflected in the provision of new services, alongside the improvement of existing resources, and is based on collaboration between experienced and new staff transferred from various regions in Israel. The Medical Faculty of Bar Ilan University in Safed plays a significant and dominant part in this change. The affiliation of the hospitals to the faculty, the establishment of new research laboratories in hospitals, additional educational services for students, such as the pathology laboratory in Ziv, and, of course, the medical students studying in different departments - all of these constitute a thriving engine for the academy, combining teaching with promotion of research. Researchers and physicians from the hospitals are integrated in the medical school, in teaching, research and mentoring

  2. Is the Colombian health system reform improving the performance of public hospitals in Bogotá?

    PubMed

    McPake, Barbara; Yepes, Francisco Jose; Lake, Sally; Sanchez, Luz Helena

    2003-06-01

    Many countries are experimenting with public hospital reform - both increasing the managerial autonomy with which hospitals conduct their affairs, and separating 'purchaser' and 'provider' sides of the health system, thus increasing the degree of market pressure brought to bear on hospitals. Evidence suggesting that such reform will improve hospital performance is weak. From a theoretical perspective, it is not clear why public hospitals should be expected to behave like firms and seek to maximize profits as this model requires. Empirically, there is very slight evidence that such reforms may improve efficiency, and reason to be concerned about their equity implications. In Colombia, an ambitious reform programme includes among its measures the attempt to universalize a segmented health system, the creation of a purchaser-provider split and the transformation of public hospitals into 'autonomous state entities'. By design, the Colombian reform programme avoids the forces that produce equity losses in other developing countries. This paper reports the results of a study that has tried to track hospital performance in other dimensions in the post-reform period in Bogotá. Trends in hospital inputs, production and productivity, quality and patient satisfaction are presented, and qualitative data based on interviews with hospital workers are analyzed. The evidence we have been able to collect is capable of providing only a partial response to the study question. There is some evidence of increased activity and productivity and sustained quality despite declining staffing levels. Qualitative data suggest that hospital workers have noticed considerable changes, which include greater responsiveness to patients but also a heavier administrative burden. It is difficult to attribute specific causality to all of the changes measured and this reflects the inherent difficulty of judging the effects of large-scale reform programmes as well as weaknesses and gaps in the data

  3. Hospitalization flow in the public and private systems in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Moreira, Marizélia Leão

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the migration flows of demand for public and private hospital care among the health regions of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. METHODS Study based on a database of hospitalizations in the public and private systems of the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. We analyzed data from 17 health regions of the state, considering people hospitalized in their own health region and those who migrated outwards (emigration) or came from other regions (immigration). The index of migration effectiveness of patients from both systems was estimated. The coverage (hospitalization coefficient) was analyzed in relation to the number of inpatient beds per population and the indexes of migration effectiveness. RESULTS The index of migration effectiveness applied to the hospital care demand flow allowed characterizing health regions with flow balance, with high emigration of public and private patients, and with high attraction of public and private patients. CONCLUSIONS There are differences in hospital care access and opportunities among health regions in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. PMID:26465661

  4. [The chief surgeon Claude Louis Sommé (1772-1855) French military physician, surgeon of Antwerp hospital].

    PubMed

    Tricot, Jean-pierre

    2015-01-01

    Claude Louis Sommé was born in Paris in 1772. After surgical studies between 1790 and 1792, he successfully embraced a military career in the armies of Napoleon at different fronts and in several hospitals. In 1806 he submitted his doctoral thesis at the Special Medical School of Strasburg, Dissertation upon Pain. The same year he presented his dismissal from he imperial armies and became chief-surgeon at the St Elisabeth hospital of Antwerp where he stayed on duty until his death in 1855. Sommé wrote a lot of medical books: surgical, anatomical and physiological. After the battle of Waterloo one third of the injured soldiers were transferred to Antwerp and were attended in his department. He also played an important role as a professor at the Primary Medical School of Antwerp. Sommé also created the botanical garden of Antwerp, close to the hospital. PMID:27029134

  5. Bodies of risk: constructing motherhood in a Mexican public hospital.

    PubMed

    Smith-Oka, Vania

    2012-12-01

    This article addresses the connection between risk and motherhood at an urban obstetrics hospital in Mexico. It primarily aims to explore the ways that clinicians define risk as well as how they conflate risk with bad motherhood. It discusses how clinicians' perceptions of their patients' social lives shape their interactions and decisions about the women's health. The study was based on interviews and participant observation in June 2008 and June-July 2011 with 71 obstetrical patients, 30 physicians, 9 nurses, and 12 midwives in the city of Puebla. Results show that birth itself was defined as a risky event, clinicians conflated social factors with biological factors in their management of risk, and the patients were a priori classified as bad mothers. This article proposes a reproductive habitus to explain the connection between health institutions, class, responsibility, blame, and clinical decision-making to analyze how risk is managed and blame enacted upon women's bodies. PMID:22981837

  6. Science and superstition: Comets and the French public in the 18th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Philip

    1986-01-01

    The confirmation in 1759 of Halley's prediction for the return of the comet of 1682 was a triumphant scientific event, helping to convince a broad public that comets, like other celestial bodies, were knowable natural objects. Nevertheless, the frightening possibility that an unknown comet could appear at any time led to a startling degree of panic on a later occasion, when a study by Lalande on the statistical probability of a collision between earth and a comet was construed by rumor as a prophecy of imminent destruction.

  7. Public hospital care: equal for all or equal for some? Evidence from the Philippines.

    PubMed

    James, Chris D; Peabody, John; Hanson, Kara; Solon, Orville

    2015-03-01

    In low- and middle-income countries, government budgets are rarely sufficient to cover a public hospital's operating costs. Shortfalls are typically financed through a combination of health insurance contributions and user charges. The mixed nature of this financing arrangement potentially creates financial incentives to treat patients with equal health need unequally. Using data from the Philippines, the authors analyzed whether doctors respond to such incentives. After controlling for a patient's condition, they found that patients using insurance, paying more for hospital accommodation, and being treated in externally monitored hospitals were likely to receive more care. This highlights the worrying possibility that public hospital patients with equal health needs are not always equally treated. PMID:23420059

  8. Residential segregation and the survival of U.S. urban public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ko, Michelle; Needleman, Jack; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Laugesen, Miriam J; Ponce, Ninez A

    2014-06-01

    Residential segregation is associated geographic disparities in access to care, but its impact on local health care policy, including public hospitals, is unknown. We examined the effects of racial residential segregation on U.S. urban public hospital closures from 1987 to 2007, controlling for hospital, market, and policy characteristics. We found that a high level of residential segregation moderated the protective effects of Black population composition, such that a high level of residential segregation, in combination with a high percentage of poor residents, conferred a higher likelihood of hospital closure. More segregated and poorer communities face disadvantages in access to care that may be compounded as a result of instability in the health care safety net. Policy makers should consider the influence of social factors such as residential segregation on the allocation of the safety net resources. PMID:24362646

  9. Factors affecting decision-making of patients choosing acupuncture in a public hospital

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Thean Howe Bryan; Kong, Keng He; Low, Yin Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background With increasing evidence to support its practice, acupuncture has been integrated within many hospitals around the world. The purpose of this study is to understand the factors affecting decision making of patients as they select acupuncture treatment for their medical conditions and symptoms within a public hospital. Methods A qualitative study consisting of in depth interviews with 14 patients was conducted. All patients attended an acupuncture clinic within a public hospital. Data collected was analysed via thematic analysis. Results Four main factor groups affecting decision making of patients were identified- factors affecting the level and value of patient-centric care, the confidence and trust patients place within the acupuncture service, the presence of collaborative efforts between acupuncturists and Western medicine practitioners, and the knowledge, culture and belief society has regarding the role of acupuncture and Western medicine. All participants interviewed had more than one factor group present as enablers toward their eventual selection of acupuncture for ailment management. It was also noted that although the majority of participants had sufficient knowledge regarding acupuncture, there were a select few who had misperceptions or no knowledge regarding certain aspects of acupuncture. Conclusions There may be certain patterns in the way patients choose to utilise acupuncture services in public hospitals. Further studies should also be carried out in other public hospitals to analyse the factor groups identified further. PMID:26697443

  10. Comparison of thromboprophylaxis patterns in arthroplasty in public and private hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Cortada, Aline Pinheiro dos Santos; da Silva, Telma Gomes; da Silva, André Campos; Golmia, Ricardo Prado; Guerra, Renata Leborato; Takemoto, Maíra Libertad Soligo; Monteiro, Roberta Dyonisio Canaveira; Scheinberg, Morton Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare therapy for prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism and costs related to hospitalization of patients undergoing total knee and hip replacement within the context of the Brazilian health system. Methods A retrospective study of patients undergoing arthroplasty in 2010 in a public hospital and two private hospitals in the state of São Paulo, conducted by means of medical record review. Costs were estimated based on the use of health care resources during hospitalization. A descriptive analysis was performed using frequency and mean (standard deviation) according to the type of care delivered (by public or private organization). Results A total of 215 patients were evaluated, and 56.3% were submitted to knee surgery and 43.7%, to hip replacement. Approximately 88% and 98% of patients from public and private health services, respectively, received some form of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, and enoxaparin was the drug most widely used in both systems. The total cost of prophylaxis was R$ 1,873.01 (R$ 26.38 per patient) in the public service and R$ 21,559.73 (R$ 163.33 per patient) in the private service. For the individuals who presented with thromboembolism, the average cost of hospitalization was R$ 6,210.80 and R$ 43,792.59 per patient in public and private health services, respectively. Conclusion Thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients undergoing arthroplasty is most commonly used in the private health services than public organizations, despite its high costs in both services. The cost per patient with thrombosis during hospitalization was higher than the total cost of prophylaxis, suggesting that prevention is associated to better cost-benefit ratio. PMID:26313439

  11. Low Acceptability of A/H1N1 Pandemic Vaccination in French Adult Population: Did Public Health Policy Fuel Public Dissonance?

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzinger, Michaël; Flicoteaux, Rémi; Cortarenoda, Sébastien; Obadia, Yolande; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background In July 2009, French public health authorities embarked in a mass vaccination campaign against A/H1N1 2009 pandemic-influenza. We explored the attitudes and behaviors of the general population toward pandemic vaccination. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a cross-sectional online survey among 2,253 French representative adults aged 18 to 64 from November 17 to 25, 2009 (completion rate: 93.8%). The main outcome was the acceptability of A/H1N1 vaccination as defined by previous receipt or intention to get vaccinated (“Yes, certainly”, “Yes, probably”). Overall 17.0% (CI 95%, 15.5% to 18.7%) of respondents accepted A/H1N1 vaccination. Independent factors associated with acceptability included: male sex (p = .0001); older age (p = .002); highest or lowest level of education (p = .016); non-clerical occupation (p = .011); having only one child (p = .008); and having received seasonal flu vaccination in prior 3 years (p<.0001). Acceptability was also significantly higher among pregnant women (37.9%) and other at risk groups with chronic diseases (34.8%) (p = .002). Only 35.5% of respondents perceived A/H1N1 influenza illness as a severe disease and 12.7% had experienced A/H1N1 cases in their close relationships with higher acceptability (p<.0001 and p = .006, respectively). In comparison to 26.0% respondents who did not consult their primary care physician, acceptability was significantly higher among 8.0% respondents who were formally advised to get vaccinated, and lower among 63.7% respondents who were not advised to get vaccinated (respectively: 15.8%, 59.5% and 11.7%- p<.0001). Among respondents who refused vaccination, 71.2% expressed concerns about vaccine safety. Conclusions/Significance Our survey occurred one week before the peak of the pandemic in France. We found that alarming public health messages aiming at increasing the perception of risk severity were counteracted by daily personal experience which

  12. The development of medical record services in Hong Kong public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fung, V

    1994-12-01

    Medical record service in Hong Kong public hospitals have been developing at different levels. Since 1992, various improvements in medical record services have been carried out in public hospitals, e.g. professional management, record storage, organized medical records, computerization, completion of discharge summaries, and the introduction of a more precise coding system. The aim of the reform is to provide timely, accurate, organized and meaningful clinical information for end-users. Evolving from this reform, work has been started on developing Patient Related Groups and Specialty Clinical Information Systems. PMID:10142476

  13. Redistribution of Emergency Department Patients After Disaster-Related Closures of a Public Versus Private Hospital in New York City.

    PubMed

    Lee, David C; Smith, Silas W; Carr, Brendan G; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Polsky, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Sudden hospital closures displace patients from usual sources of care and force them to access facilities that lack their prior medical records. For patients with complex needs and for nearby hospitals already strained by high volume, disaster-related hospital closures induce a public health emergency. Our objective was to analyze responses of patients from public versus private emergency departments after closure of their usual hospital after Hurricane Sandy. Using a statewide database of emergency visits, we followed patients with an established pattern of accessing 1 of 2 hospitals that closed after Hurricane Sandy: Bellevue Hospital Center and NYU Langone Medical Center. We determined how these patients redistributed for emergency care after the storm. We found that proximity strongly predicted patient redistribution to nearby open hospitals. However, for patients from the closed public hospital, this redistribution was also influenced by hospital ownership, because patients redistributed to other public hospitals at rates higher than expected by proximity alone. This differential response to hospital closures demonstrates significant differences in how public and private patients respond to changes in health care access during disasters. Public health response must consider these differences to meet the needs of all patients affected by disasters and other public health emergencies. PMID:25777992

  14. A Qualitative Analysis of Hospital Leaders’ Opinions About Publicly Reported Measures of Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Sarah L.; Lagu, Tara; Pekow, Penelope S.; Hannon, Nicholas S.; Hinchey, Kristen L.; Jackowitz, Talia A.; Tolosky, Patrick J.; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Article-at-a-Glance Background Hospital leaders play an important role in the success of quality improvement (QI) initiatives, yet little is known about how leaders engaged in QI currently view quality performance measures. In a follow-up to a quantitative study conducted in 2012, a study employing qualitative content analysis was conducted to (1) describe leaders’ opinions about the quality measures reported on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare website, (2) to generate hypotheses about barriers/facilitators to improving hospitals’ performance, and (3) to elicit recommendations about how to improve publicly reported quality measures. Methods The opinions of leaders from a stratified sample of 630 hospitals across the United States regarding quality measures were assessed with an open-ended prompt that was part of a 21-item questionnaire about quality measures publicly reported by CMS. Their responses were qualitatively analyzed in an iterative process, resulting in the identification of the presence and frequency of major themes and subthemes. Results Participants from 131 (21%) of the 630 hospitals surveyed replied to the open-ended prompt; 15% were from hospitals with higher-than-average performance scores, and 52% were from hospitals with lower-than-average scores. Major themes included (1) concerns regarding quality measurement (measure validity, importance, and fairness) and/ or public reporting; 76%); (2) positive views of quality measurement (stimulate improvement, focus efforts; 13%); and (3) recommendations for improving quality measurement. Conclusions Among hospital leaders responding to an open-ended survey prompt, some supported the concept of measuring quality, but the majority criticized the validity and utility of current quality measures. Although quality measures are frequently being reevaluated and new measures developed, the ability of such measures to stimulate improvement may be limited without greater buy

  15. Can cost sharing measures improve the function of outpatient departments of public hospitals: the opinions of administrative directors.

    PubMed

    Tsirona, Christina; Siskou, Olga; Galanis, Peter; Kaitelidou, Daphne; Tsavalias, Konstantinos; Ragkousi, Argyro; Semertziadi, Maria; Anagnostopoulou, Ioanna; Vafiadis, John; Liaropoulos, Lycourgos

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a study aiming to investigate the opinions of administrative personnel concerning the effectiveness of a cost sharing mechanism (of euro 5/visit) at public hospitals' outpatient departments. Data was derived through a structured questionnaire (developed by the researchers) which appealed to 112 administrative directors of public hospitals. Results highlighted a positive attitude concerning the function of the cost - sharing mechanism at public hospitals, a rather fair measure for the users (vulnerable groups are excluded) which probably is enhancing the monetary flow in public hospitals. PMID:23823426

  16. Proficiency Program for Real-Time PCR Diagnosis of Bordetella pertussis Infections in French Hospital Laboratories and at the French National Reference Center for Whooping Cough and other Bordetelloses▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Valérie; Guiso, Nicole; Alberti, Corinne; Liguori, Sandrine; Burucoa, Christophe; Couetdic, Gérard; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Ferroni, Agnès; Papin-Gibaud, Sophie; Grattard, Florence; Réglier-Poupet, Hélène; Raymond, Josette; Soler, Catherine; Bouchet, Sylvie; Charreau, Sandrine; Couzon, Brigitte; Leymarie, Isabelle; Tavares, Nicole; Choux, Mathilde; Bingen, Edouard; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    With the support of a ministerial program for innovative and expensive technologies, dedicated to the economic evaluation of laboratory diagnosis of pertussis by real-time PCR, external quality assessment for real-time IS481 PCR was carried out. Coordinated by the National Centre of Reference of Pertussis and other Bordetelloses (NCR), this study aimed to harmonize and to assess the performances of eight participating microbiology hospital laboratories throughout the French territory. Between January 2006 and February 2007, 10 proficiency panels were sent by the NCR (ascending proficiency program), representing a total of 49 samples and including eight panels to analyze and evaluate the global sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR, one to assess the limit of detection, and one to evaluate nucleic acid extraction methods. As part of the descending proficiency program, extracted DNA from clinical samples was sent by the eight participating laboratories in different panels and analyzed by the NCR. In the ascending proficiency analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of the real-time PCR methods were 92.2% and 94.3%, respectively. The limit of detection of the different methods ranged between 0.1 and 1 fg/μl (0.2 to 2 CFU/μl). The nucleic acid extraction methods showed similar performances. During the descending proficiency analysis, performed with 126 samples, the result of the NCR for 15 samples (11.9%) was discordant with the result obtained by the source laboratory. Despite several initial differences, harmonization was easy and performances were homogeneous. However, the risk of false-positive results remains quite high, and we strongly recommend establishment of uniform quality control procedures performed regularly. PMID:19692562

  17. Financing and planning of public and private not-for-profit hospitals in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ceri R; McKee, Martin

    2004-03-01

    While much has been written about health care financing in Europe in recent years, discussion has almost entirely focused on revenue. In contrast, there has been remarkably little written on financing of capital investment in European health care systems. Yet major changes are underway in several countries, in particular involving new forms of public-private partnerships (PPP). At the same time, there is growing recognition of the way in which the inherited structure of the health care delivery system constrains the system's ability to adapt to changing circumstances. This paper reports the results of a survey undertaken among key informants in the member states of the European Union to begin to ascertain existing practices and future plans in relation to hospital planning and financing amongst public and private not-for-profit hospitals. The locus of hospital planning decisions reflect the constitutional framework of the country involved, and thus the emphasis on national or local plans. There has been an expansion of private sector involvement, with four basic models identified: private loans direct to the hospital; private loans to a regional health body; a PPP where the private sector's role is to build, design and operate the non-clinical functions of the hospital; and, finally, a PPP, where the private sector's involvement also includes management of the clinical functions of the hospital. It is too early to say whether these approaches will be more successful than the models they are replacing. PMID:15036816

  18. Fewer Hospitalizations for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Communities With Smoke-Free Public Policies

    PubMed Central

    Rayens, Mary Kay; Adkins, Sarah; Simpson, Nick; Frazier, Susan; Mannino, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the impact of smoke-free municipal public policies on hospitalizations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods. We conducted a secondary analysis of hospital discharges with a primary diagnosis of COPD in Kentucky between July 1, 2003, and June 30, 2011 using Poisson regression. We compared the hospitalization rates of regions with and without smoke-free laws, adjusting for personal and population covariates, seasonality, secular trends over time, and geographic region. Results. Controlling for covariates such as sex, age, length of stay, race/ethnicity, education, income, and urban–rural status, among others, we found that those living in a community with a comprehensive smoke-free law or regulation were 22% less likely to experience hospitalizations for COPD than those living in a community with a moderate–weak law or no law. Those living in a community with an established law were 21% less likely to be hospitalized for COPD than those with newer laws or no laws. Conclusions. Strong smoke-free public policies may provide protection against COPD hospitalizations, particularly after 12 months, with the potential to save lives and decrease health care costs. PMID:24825207

  19. [Hospital pharmacist has a rule for best practice use and French hospital activity tariffs. Example of a pharmaceutical quality control for drugs reimbursed in addition of DRGs].

    PubMed

    Hedoux, S; Dode, X; Pivot, C; Couray-Targe, S; Aulagner, G

    2012-07-01

    The best practice contract has given a new objective to the hospital pharmacists for the reimbursement in addition to Diagnosis Related Groups' (DRGs) tariffs. We built our pharmaceutical quality control for the administration traceability follow-up regarding the DRGs and the cost of care, for two reasons: the nominal drugs dispensation in link with the prescription made by pharmacist and the important expenditure of these drugs. Our organization depends on the development level of the informatized drugs circuit and minimizes the risk of financial shortfalls or wrong benefits, possible causes of economic penalties for our hospital. On the basis of this follow-up, we highlighted our activity and identified problems of management and drugs circuit organization. The quality of the administration traceability impacts directly on the quality of the medical records and the reimbursements of the expensive drugs. A better knowledge of prescription software is also required for a better quality and security of the medical data used in the medical informatic systems. The drugs management and the personal treatment in and between the care units need to be improved too. We have to continue and improve our organization with the future financial model for ATU drugs and the FIDES project. The health personnel awareness and the development of best informatic tools are also required. PMID:22818260

  20. Patient satisfaction questionnaire and quality achievement in hospital care: the case of a Greek public university hospital.

    PubMed

    Matis, Georgios K; Birbilis, Theodossios A; Chrysou, Olga I

    2009-11-01

    The scope of this research has been to investigate the satisfaction of Greek patients hospitalized in a tertiary care university public hospital in Alexandroupolis, Greece, in order to improve medical, nursing and organizational/administrative services. It is a cross-sectional study involving 200 patients hospitalized for at least 24 h. We administered a satisfaction questionnaire previously approved by the Greek Health Ministry. Four aspects of satisfaction were employed (medical, hotel facilities/organizational, nursing, global). Using principal component analysis, summated scales were formed and tested for internal consistency with the aid of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The non-parametric Spearman rank correlation coefficient was also used. The results reveal a relatively high degree of global satisfaction (75.125%), yet satisfaction is higher for the medical (89.721%) and nursing (86.432%) services. Moreover, satisfaction derived from the hotel facilities and the general organization was found to be more limited (76.536%). Statistically significant differences in participant satisfaction were observed (depending on age, gender, citizenship, education, number of previous admissions and self-assessment of health status at the first and last day of patients' stay) for the medical, nursing and hotel facilities/organizational dimension, but not for global satisfaction. The present study confirms the results of previously published Greek surveys. PMID:19875841

  1. Teaching French.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Fernand

    This comprehensive analysis of French teaching methodology reveals basic problems underlying the current philosophy of language learning, while presenting new ideas based on extensive research. Two books, "Active French; Dialogues" and "Active French: Foundations Course" (Books 1 and 2), which stress well specified learning objectives, were…

  2. Mortality, Length of Stay, and Inpatient Charges for Heart Failure Patients at Public versus Private Hospitals in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Park, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study compared in-hospital mortality within 30 days of admission, lengths of stay, and inpatient charges among patients with heart failure admitted to public and private hospitals in South Korea. Materials and Methods We obtained health insurance claims data for all heart failure inpatients nationwide between November 1, 2011 and May 31, 2012. These data were then matched with hospital-level data, and multi-level regression models were examined. A total of 8406 patients from 253 hospitals, including 31 public hospitals, were analyzed. Results The in-hospital mortality rate within 30 days of admission was 0.92% greater and the mean length of stay was 1.94 days longer at public hospitals than at private hospitals (mortality: 5.18% and 4.26%, respectively; LOS: 12.08 and 10.14 days, respectively). The inpatient charges were 11.4% lower per case and 24.5% lower per day at public hospitals than at private hospitals. After adjusting for patient- and hospital-level confounders, public hospitals had a 1.62-fold higher in-hospital mortality rate, a 16.5% longer length of stay, and an 11.7% higher inpatient charge per case than private hospitals, although the charges of private hospitals were greater in univariate analysis. Conclusion We recommend that government agencies and policy makers continue to monitor quality of care, lengths of stay in the hospital, and expenditures according to type of hospital ownership to improve healthcare outcomes and reduce spending. PMID:25837196

  3. Epidemiology, risk factor, species distribution, antifungal resistance and outcome of Candidemia at a single French hospital: a 7-year study.

    PubMed

    Tadec, Laurent; Talarmin, Jean-Philippe; Gastinne, Thomas; Bretonnière, Cédric; Miegeville, Michel; Le Pape, Patrice; Morio, Florent

    2016-05-01

    Candidemia remains a major cause of disease worldwide and is associated with a high mortality rate. We conducted a retrospective study of candidemia at Nantes Hospital, France, between 2004 and 2010. A total of 191 episodes (n = 188 patients) were reviewed. Incidence, demographics, risk factors, antifungal management, species identification, in vitro susceptibility and 12 weeks survival were analysed. Global incidence of candidemia was 0.37‰ admissions. Higher incidences were observed in haematology (6.65‰) and intensive care units (2‰). Central venous catheter and antibiotic exposure were the most frequent risk factors (77% and 76% respectively). Candida albicans was the predominant species (51.8%) followed by C. parapsilosis (14.5%), C. glabrata (9.8%), C. tropicalis (9.8%) and C. krusei (4.1%). However, species distribution differed significantly between medical units with frequency of C. tropicalis being higher in haematology compared to other medical units. Fluconazole and caspofungin were the main antifungals given as first-line therapy. Although not significant, 12 weeks mortality rate was 30.9%, being higher for C. tropicalis (44.4%) than for C. parapsilosis (16%). Acquired azole or echinocandin resistance was noted in some isolates, underlining the need for systematic antifungal susceptibility testing in patients with candidemia. These epidemiological findings will be of interest for antifungal stewardship at our hospital. PMID:26806101

  4. Policy and Practice Model of Public-Private Partnership in Public Hospitals during the New Medical Reform Period.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ju-Yang; Long, Ru-Yin; Yan, Hai; Yang, Qing; Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Since the beginning of the new health care reform in 2009, the state has illustrated the top design and health care improvement strategy of "encouraging social capital to participate in the reform of public hospitals", in accordance with the program's general objective. All areas have been explored on this matter and the results obtained are very interesting, not to mention the acquisition of significant experience. At present, the existing business models in China are mainly the following: Rebuild-Operate-Transfer (ROT), franchise business model, Build-Own-Operate-Transfer (BOOT) model, mixed ownership model and business insurance model. This paper introduces a variety of alternative models, and provides a simple analysis of the advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, for the reform of public hospitals, the government shares should go into franchise mode or mixed ownership, and all property rights should be transferred to the government to ensure the conservation and proliferation of state-owned assets. PMID:27273961

  5. Public versus private hospital maternity length of stay: a gamma mixture modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H; Xiao, J; Codde, J P; Ng, A S K

    2002-02-01

    Application of a gamma mixture model to obstetrical diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) revealed heterogeneity of maternity length of stay (LOS). The proportion of long-stay subgroups identified, which can account for 30% of admissions, varied between DRGs. The burden of long-stay patients borne was estimated to be much higher in private hospitals than public hospitals for normal delivery, but vice versa for Caesarean section. Such differences highlights the impact of DRG-based casemix funding on inpatient LOS and have significant implications for health insurance companies to integrate casemix funding across the public and private sectors. The analysis also benefits hospital administrators and managers to budget expenditures accordingly. PMID:11854995

  6. Sense of place, organizational context and the strategic management of publicly funded hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, N T

    2001-11-01

    An era of managerialism in health care delivery systems is now well ensconced throughout the nations of the OECD. This development has occurred, in large part, as a response to funding pressures in institutionally based health care delivery imposed by principal third party insurers. In the case of publicly funded hospitals, the more traditional concerns for stewardship and appeasement of professional groups is being replaced by a greater emphasis on cost consciousness and corporate-style leadership as these organizations seek to reposition themselves in new funding and regulatory environments. While institutional theory and strategic management perspectives help illuminate these issues, this paper argues that a place-based perspective is also needed to understand the changes currently underway in health care delivery and publicly funded human services more generally. This is illustrated with reference to developments in the strategic management of public hospitals in the province of Ontario. Evidence from a survey of senior administrators of public hospitals, distributed at the height of these policy reform initiatives, is examined to shed light on local level management responses to changing policy and fiscal pressures. The data suggest that the latest policy directions in the province of Ontario will 'encourage' hospital executives in particular community settings to steer their organizations in very unfamiliar directions. The findings suggest a need for greater attention to context and setting in health services research and policy. PMID:11551664

  7. Conflict management in public university hospitals in Turkey: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tengilimoglu, Dilaver; Kisa, Adnan

    2005-01-01

    By nature, hospitals are extremely complex organizations, combining many different professional groups within an intricate administrative structure. Conflicts therefore expectedly arise between individuals, groups, and departments. It is in the interest of health care administrators to periodically assess the major factors giving rise to these conflicts. In this study, a questionnaire designed to measure sources of conflict in the workplace was completed by 204 staff members at Gazi University Hospital. Of the participants, 30.9% were physicians, and 12.5% were administrators at various levels; 61.5% were female, and 38.5% were male. In terms of work experience, 52.6% of participants had worked less than 5 years at the hospital. The results of the study show that educational differences among the hospital staff were a major barrier to good communication and information flow between groups. Professionals in the same specialties experienced fewer conflicts. Another source of conflict was that resource allocation was considered unfair across departments. Although the hospital management provided an ombudsman for staff concerns, staff rarely resorted to the ombudsman because of the stigma associated with complaining. A lack of opportunity for career advancement was mentioned by 52% of the participants as a source of conflict. At present, job performance and rewards are not closely related in public university hospitals in Turkey because promotions and pay raises are strictly limited by law. Bureaucracy was also perceived to be a source of conflict, with 48.4% of participants saying that their performance was less than optimal because of the presence of multiple supervisors. This pilot study suggests that in Turkey, legislative reform is needed to give public university hospitals more flexibility regarding work incentives, open-door policies at the administrative level, and social interactions to improve teamwork among hospital staff. PMID:15825820

  8. Oral drug dosage forms administered to hospitalized children: Analysis of 117,665 oral administrations in a French paediatric hospital over a 1-year period.

    PubMed

    Lajoinie, A; Henin, E; Nguyen, K A; Malik, S; Mimouni, Y; Sapori, J M; Bréant, V; Cochat, P; Kassai, B

    2016-03-16

    Selecting the most appropriate dosage form, that ensures safe administration and adherence of medications, is a major issue for children. Marketed drugs, however, have rarely been tested for their use in children. There is a need for more data on drug formulations administered to children to identify unmet needs, and drive future paediatric research. We observed, over a 12-month follow-up, 117,665 oral drug administrations to 1998 hospitalized children. Nine-tenths belonged to five Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classes: Alimentary tract & metabolism, Nervous system, Cardiovascular system, Anti-infectives for systemic use and Blood & blood forming organs, one third of drug doses administered to school-age children and adolescents were liquids, and extemporaneous capsules were commonly used in younger children. Our study shows that despite the advantages of solid dosage forms and recent evidence from randomized controlled trials showing their acceptability in infants, they are seldom used in paediatric practice. PMID:26804927

  9. Incidence and Predictive Factors of Central Nervous System Dysfunction in Patients Consulting for Dengue Fever in Cayenne Hospital, French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Djossou, Félix; Vesin, Guillaume; Bidaud, Bastien; Mosnier, Emilie; Simonnet, Christine; Matheus, Séverine; Prince, Christelle; Balcaen, John; Donutil, Gerd; Egmann, Gérald; Okandze, Antoine; Malvy, Denis; Nacher, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The frequency, the clinical characteristics, and the prognosis of dengue is highly variable. Dengue fever is associated with a range of neurological manifestations. The objective of the present study was to determine the incidence of neurological signs and their predictive factors using data from cases of dengue seen and followed in Cayenne Hospital during the Dengue 2 epidemic in 2013. Methods In 2013, a longitudinal study using data from all cases of dengue seen in Cayenne hospital was collected. Medical records used a standardized form to collect demographic information, clinical signs and biological results and the date at which they were present. The analysis used Cox proportional modeling to obtain adjusted Hazard ratios. Results A total of 1574 patients were included 221 of whom developed central nervous system signs. These signs were spontaneously resolutive. There were 9298person days of follow-up and the overall incidence rate for central nervous system signs was 2.37 per 100 person-days. The variables independently associated with central nervous system anomalies were headache, Adjusted Hazard ratio (AHR) = 1.9(95%CI = 1.4–2.6), bleeding AHR = 2 ((95%CI = 1.3–3.1), P = 0.001, abdominal pain AHR = 1.9 ((95%CI = 1.4–2.6), P<0.001, aches AHR = 2.1 ((95%CI = 1.5–2.9), P<0.001, and fatigue AHR = 1.5 ((95%CI = 1.3–1.7), P<0.001. Discussion Overall, the present study suggests that neurological signs of dengue are not exceptional even in patients without the most severe features of dengue. These manifestations were spontaneously resolutive. Here it was not possible to distinguish between encephalitis or encephalopathy. Further studies would require more in depth exploration of the patients. PMID:26981859

  10. Resistance and virulence potential of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients hospitalized in urology departments: a French prospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Bruyère, Franck; Bernard, Louis; Combescure, Christophe; Ronco, Esthel; Lanotte, Philippe; Coloby, Patrick; Thibault, Michel; Cariou, Gérard; Desplaces, Nicole; Costa, Pierre; Sotto, Albert

    2016-06-01

    We characterized antibiotic resistance and virulence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains isolated from urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients hospitalized in urology departments. A prospective multicentre study was initiated from March 2009 and lasted until February 2010 in French urology units. All patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), acute cystitis, acute pyelonephritis or acute prostatitis in whom UPEC was detected were included. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors were compared among the different groups. To identify independent associations between virulence markers and the risk of UTI, we used a multivariate logistic regression. We included 210 patients (mean age: 65.8 years; 106 female). Episode of UTI was community acquired in 72.4 %. ABU was diagnosed in 67 cases (31.9 %), cystitis in 52 cases (24.7 %), pyelonephritis in 35 cases (16.7 %) and prostatitis in 56 cases (26.7 %). ABU was more frequent in patients with a urinary catheter (76.1 vs 23.9 %, P<0.001). The resistance rate was 7.6 and 24.8 % for cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin, respectively. UPEC isolated from infections belonged more frequently to phylotypes B2 and D (P =0.07). The papG allele II and papA, papC, papE, kpsMTII and iutA genes were significantly more frequent in infecting strains (P<0.05). In multivariate analysis, strains susceptible to ciprofloxacin were significantly associated with papG allele II (P=0.007), kpsMTK1 (P<0.001) and hlyA (P<0.001) compared with the ciprofloxacin-resistant strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the antibiotic resistance and virulence features of UPEC isolated from patients hospitalized in urology departments. High resistance rates were observed, notably for ciprofloxacin, highlighting the importance of a reinforced surveillance in this setting. PMID:26953145

  11. Public spending for illegal drug and alcohol treatment in hospitals: an EU cross-country comparison

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In view of the current economic crisis and the resulting austerity measures being implemented by governments across Europe, public expenditure for substance abuse treatment has increasingly become a subject of discussion. An EU cross-country comparison would allow an estimation of the total amount of public resources spent on substance abuse treatment, compare various substance abuse treatment funding options, and evaluate the division of expenditures between alcohol and illegal drugs. The purpose of this study is to estimate the public spending of EU countries for alcohol and illegal drug abuse treatment in hospitals. Methods Our study uses a uniform methodology in order to enable valid cross-national comparisons. Our data are drawn from the Eurostat database, which provides anno 2010 data on government spending for the treatment of illegal drug and alcohol abuse in 21 EU member states. The cross-country comparison is restricted to hospitals, since data were unavailable for other types of treatment providers. The systematic registration of in- and outpatient data is essential to monitoring public expenditures on substance abuse treatment using international databases. Results Total public spending for hospital-based treatment of illegal drug and alcohol abuse in the 21 EU member states studied is estimated to be 7.6 billion euros. Per capita expenditures for treatment of illegal drug abuse vary, ranging from 0.1 euros in Romania to 13 euros in Sweden. For alcohol abuse, that figure varied from 0.9 euros in Bulgaria to 24 euros in Austria. These results confirm other studies indicating that public expenditures for alcohol treatment exceed that for illegal drug treatment. Conclusions Multiple factors may influence the number of hospital days for alcohol or illegal substance abuse treatment, and expenditures fluctuate accordingly. In this respect, we found a strong correlation between gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and public expenditures per

  12. An empirical analysis of the public's attitudes toward advertising hospital services: a comparative cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Moser, H Ronald; Freeman, Gordon L

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates current opinions about hospital advertising and compares them to the attitudes expressed 25 years ago. It replicates a survey done in 1985, using the same questionnaire and population to compare responses longitudinally. The study indicates some changes in the public's opinions of hospital advertising. Although the image of hospitals remains positive, most of the 2010 respondents' opinions were rather mixed regarding whether it is proper for hospitals to advertise. The study also confirmed that the quality of service and reputation of hospitals remain more important to the public than price. PMID:24617720

  13. [Surveillance of antibiotic consumption in hospitals: tasks of the Public Health Service].

    PubMed

    Schweickert, B; Eckmanns, T; Bärwolff, S; Wischnewski, N; Meyer, E

    2014-04-01

    According to the German Protection Against Infection Act (IfSG; section 23 paragraph 4, July 2011), hospitals and clinics for ambulatory surgery are obliged to establish a continuous monitoring of antibiotic consumption in their institute. The introduction of the surveillance of antibiotic consumption aims to contribute to an optimization of antibiotic prescription practices in order to confine the development and spread of resistant pathogens. The local public health authority is entitled to supervise the implementation of legal requirements in the hospital setting. The main aim of this article is to support local public health authorities in coping with this task by providing background information on the surveillance of antibiotic consumption and its role as a key component of antibiotic stewardship programs. Furthermore, criteria suitable for assessing the implementation of a functioning surveillance system are proposed. The possibilities and limitations of the activities of public health authorities in this context are addressed. PMID:24658669

  14. [Hospitals and the Public-Private Combination in the Portuguese Health System].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Adalberto Campos; Nunes, Alexandre Morais

    2016-03-01

    The Portuguese health system has been characterized by the existence of a constant relationship between public and private sector, both in providing and financing health care. In recent decades, the private sector increased their responsiveness of care, extending the engagement in the relationship with the public sector. This relationship stems from the legal framework set out in the law, developing agreements, conventions and more recently through the model of public-private partnerships. In hospital network, this new dynamic relationship contributed, in the last two decades, to accentuate the mixed characteristics of the system, through a clear strengthening of the private component in the hospital network, particularly by investing in differentiated units. PMID:27285098

  15. Determinants of telemedicine acceptance in selected public hospitals in Malaysia: clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Zailani, Suhaiza; Gilani, Mina Sayyah; Nikbin, Davoud; Iranmanesh, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the determinants of telemedicine acceptance in selected public hospitals in Malaysia and to investigate the effect of health culture on the relationship between these determinants and telemedicine acceptance. Data were gathered by means of a survey of physicians and nurses as the main group of users of telemedicine technology from hospitals that are currently using telemedicine technology. The results indicated that government policies, top management support, perception of usefulness and computer self-efficiency have a positive and significant impact on telemedicine acceptance by public hospitals in Malaysia. The results also confirmed the moderating role of health culture on the relationship between government policies as well as perceived usefulness on telemedicine acceptance by Malaysian hospitals. The results are useful for decision-makers as well as managers to recognize the potential role of telemedicine and assist in the process of implementation, adoption and utilization, and, therefore, spread the usage of telemedicine technology in more hospitals in the country. PMID:25038891

  16. Family caregivers in public tertiary care hospitals in Bangladesh: Risks and opportunities for infection control

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. Saiful; Luby, Stephen P.; Sultana, Rebeca; Rimi, Nadia Ali; Zaman, Rashid Uz; Uddin, Main; Nahar, Nazmun; Rahman, Mahmudur; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Gurley, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Family caregivers are integral to patient care in Bangladeshi public hospitals. This study explored family caregivers’ activities and their perceptions and practices related to disease transmission and prevention in public hospitals. Methods Trained qualitative researchers conducted a total of 48 hours of observation in 3 public tertiary care hospitals and 12 in-depth interviews with family caregivers. Results Family caregivers provided care 24 hours a day, including bedside nursing, cleaning care, and psychologic support. During observations, family members provided 2,065 episodes of care giving, 75% (1,544) of which involved close contact with patients. We observed family caregivers washing their hands with soap on only 4 occasions. The majority of respondents said diseases are transmitted through physical contact with surfaces and objects that have been contaminated with patient secretions and excretions, and avoiding contact with these contaminated objects would help prevent disease. Conclusion Family caregivers are at risk for hospital-acquired infection from their repeated exposure to infectious agents combined with their inadequate hand hygiene and knowledge about disease transmission. Future research should explore potential strategies to improve family caregivers’ knowledge about disease transmission and reduce family caregiver exposures, which may be accomplished by improving care provided by health care workers. PMID:24406254

  17. Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association: integrating palliative care in public hospitals in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Zipporah

    2016-01-01

    Background In Kenya, cancers as a disease group rank third as a cause of death after infectious and cardiovascular diseases. It is estimated that the annual incidence of cancer is about 37,000 new cases with an annual mortality of 28,000 cases (Kenya National Cancer Control Strategy 2010). The incidence of non-communicable diseases accounts for more than 50% of total hospital admissions and over 55% of hospital deaths (Kenya National Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Non Communicable Diseases 2015–2020). The prevalence of HIV is 6.8 (KIAS 2014). Most of these patients will benefit from palliative care services, hence the need to integrate palliative care services in the public healthcare system. Method The process of integrating palliative care in public hospitals involved advocacy both at the national level and at the institutional level, training of healthcare professionals, and setting up services within the hospitals that we worked with. Technical support was provided to each individual institution as needed. Results Eleven provincial hospitals across the country have now integrated palliative care services (Palliative Care Units) and are now centres of excellence. Over 220 healthcare providers have been trained, and approximately, over 30,000 patients have benefited from these services. Oral morphine is now available in the hospital palliative care units. Conclusion As a success of the pilot project, Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association (KEHPCA) is now working with the Ministry of Health Kenya to integrate palliative care services in 30 other county hospitals across the country, thus ensuring more availability and access to more patients. Other developing countries can learn from Kenya’s successful experience.

  18. Limited access to HIV prevention in French prisons (ANRS PRI2DE): implications for public health and drug policy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Overpopulation, poor hygiene and disease prevention conditions in prisons are major structural determinants of increased infectious risk within prison settings but evidence-based national and WHO guidelines provide clear indications on how to reduce this risk. We sought to estimate the level of infectious risk by measuring how French prisons adhere to national and WHO guidelines. Methods A nationwide survey targeting the heads of medical (all French prisons) and psychiatric (26 French prisons) units was conducted using a postal questionnaire and a phone interview mainly focusing on access to prevention interventions, i.e. bleach, opioid substitution treatment (OST), HBV vaccination and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for French prisoners. Two scores were built reflecting adherence to national and WHO international guidelines, ranging from 0 (no adherence) to 10 (maximum adherence) and 0 to 9 respectively. Results A majority (N = 113 (66%)) of the 171 prisons answered the questionnaires, representing 74% coverage (46,786 prisoners) of the French prison population: 108 were medical units and 12 were psychiatric units. Inmate access to prevention was poor. The median[IQR] score measuring adherence to national guidelines was quite low (4.5[2.5; 5.5]) but adherence to WHO guidelines was even lower 2.5[1.5; 3.5]; PEP was absent despite reported risky practices. Unsuitable OST delivery practices were frequently observed. Conclusions A wide gap exists between HIV prevention policies and their application in prisons. Similar assessments in other countries may be needed to guide a global policy reform in prison settings. Adequate funding together with innovative interventions able to remove structural and ideological barriers to HIV prevention are now needed to motivate those in charge of prison health, to improve their working environment and to relieve French prisoners from their currently debilitating conditions. PMID:21619573

  19. Does language matter? A case study of epidemiological and public health journals, databases and professional education in French, German and Italian.

    PubMed

    Baussano, Iacopo; Brzoska, Patrick; Fedeli, Ugo; Larouche, Claudia; Razum, Oliver; Fung, Isaac C-H

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiology and public health are usually context-specific. Journals published in different languages and countries play a role both as sources of data and as channels through which evidence is incorporated into local public health practice. Databases in these languages facilitate access to relevant journals, and professional education in these languages facilitates the growth of native expertise in epidemiology and public health. However, as English has become the lingua franca of scientific communication in the era of globalisation, many journals published in non-English languages face the difficult dilemma of either switching to English and competing internationally, or sticking to the native tongue and having a restricted circulation among a local readership. This paper discusses the historical development of epidemiology and the current scene of epidemiological and public health journals, databases and professional education in three Western European languages: French, German and Italian, and examines the dynamics and struggles they have today. PMID:18826570

  20. Does language matter? A case study of epidemiological and public health journals, databases and professional education in French, German and Italian

    PubMed Central

    Baussano, Iacopo; Brzoska, Patrick; Fedeli, Ugo; Larouche, Claudia; Razum, Oliver; Fung, Isaac C-H

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiology and public health are usually context-specific. Journals published in different languages and countries play a role both as sources of data and as channels through which evidence is incorporated into local public health practice. Databases in these languages facilitate access to relevant journals, and professional education in these languages facilitates the growth of native expertise in epidemiology and public health. However, as English has become the lingua franca of scientific communication in the era of globalisation, many journals published in non-English languages face the difficult dilemma of either switching to English and competing internationally, or sticking to the native tongue and having a restricted circulation among a local readership. This paper discusses the historical development of epidemiology and the current scene of epidemiological and public health journals, databases and professional education in three Western European languages: French, German and Italian, and examines the dynamics and struggles they have today. PMID:18826570

  1. Relative efficiency and productivity: a preliminary exploration of public hospitals in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Third-grade hospitals in Beijing have been rapidly developing in capacity and scale for many years. These hospitals receive a large number of patients, and ensuring their efficient operation is crucial in meeting people’s healthcare needs. In this context, a study of their relative efficiency and productivity would be helpful to identify the driving factors and further improve their performance. Methods After a review of literature, the current numbers of open beds and employees were selected as input variables. The number of outpatient and emergency visits and the number of discharged patients were selected as output variables. A total of 12 third-grade Class A general public hospitals in Beijing were selected for a preliminary study. The panel data from 2006–2009 were collected by the National Institute of Hospital Administration, Ministry of Health of P.R. China. Descriptive analysis and data envelopment analysis were used to analyze the data using Stata 10.0 and DEAP(V2.1) software. Results In the 2006–2009 period, descriptive results show that sample hospitals continuously expanded their capacity and scale, with growth rate of total revenue being the highest among all variables. The DEA results show that the average annual growth rate of productivity was 26.7%, and the rates were 47.3%, 21.3% and 13.8% respectively for two consecutive years. The average annual growth rate of technological change was 28.3%, and the rates were 49.4%, 21.5% and 16.4% respectively for two consecutive years. The average annual growth rate of technical efficiency change was -1.3%, and the rates were -1.4%, -0.02% and -2.2% respectively for two consecutive years. Conclusions The sample hospitals in Beijing experienced substantial productivity growth, but annual growth rates were declining. Substantial technological change was the main contributor to the growth. Although some hospitals exhibited improvements in technical efficiency, there was a slight decline in

  2. Costs of vaginal delivery and Caesarean section at a tertiary level public hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Public hospitals in developing countries, rather than the preventive and primary healthcare sectors, are the major consumers of healthcare resources. Imbalances in rational, equitable and efficient allocation of scarce resources lie in the scarcity of research & information on economic aspects of health care. The objective of this study was to determine the average cost of a spontaneous vaginal delivery and Caesarean section in a tertiary level government hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan and to estimate the out of pocket expenditures to households using these services. Methods This hospital based cost accounting cross sectional study determines the average cost of vaginal delivery and Caesarean section from two perspectives, the patient's and the hospital. From the patient's perspective direct and indirect expenditures of 133 post-partum mothers (65 delivered by Caesarean section & 68 by spontaneous vaginal delivery) admitted in the maternity general ward were determined. From the hospital perspective the step down methodology was adopted, capital and recurrent costs were determined from inputs and cost centers. Results The average cost for a spontaneous vaginal delivery from the hospital's side was 40 US$ (2688 rupees) and from the patient's perspective was 79 US$ (5278 rupees). The average cost for a Caesarean section from the hospital side was 162 US$ (10868 rupees) and 204 US$ (13678 rupees) from the patient's side. Average monthly household income was 141 ± 87 US$ for spontaneous vaginal delivery and 168 ± 97 US$ for Caesarean section. Three fourth (74%) of households had a monthly income of less than 149 US$ (10000 rupees). Conclusion The apparently "free" maternity care at government hospitals involves substantial hidden and unpredicted costs. The anticipated fear of these unpredicted costs may be major factor for many poor households to seek cheaper alternate maternity healthcare. PMID:20085662

  3. The First Stages of Liberalization of Public Hospitals in Iran: Establishment of Autonomous Hospitals and the Barriers

    PubMed Central

    MARKAZI-MOGHADDAM, Nader; ARYANKHESAL, Aidin; ARAB, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Liberalization and decentralization of public sector has been triggered in some developing countries and in Iran by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME) that granted autonomy to 54 public hospitals. However, establishment of such a complex organizational reform was rather unsuccessful. We aimed to explore the obstacles and barriers caused such a failure and their mechanisms. Methods: Using a qualitative approach in 2013, we consulted key informants at the autonomous hospitals and their affiliating universities. Data collection was done within two phases: (i) 276 unstructured questionnaires asking respondents of barriers, and (ii) 23 semi-structured interviews from the first phase’s key respondents. The first phase data were analyzed using thematic analysis and the second’s by framework approach based on the frame shaped at the first phase. Results: Nine obstacles were recognized including “autonomous hospitals’ board composition”, “delay in announcing autonomous hospitals’ charges by the MOHME”, “lack of financing by the committed organizations”, “poor follow up for implementation of the reform”, “irregular board meetings”, “lack of an external overseer”, “shortage of full-time physicians”, “lack of management stability”, and “health insurance organizations’ delayed payments”. Conclusion: The MOHME and insurance organizations did not pay the reform expenses. There were some competing motives as well to slow the reform or to shut it down. The stages of policy formulation and implementation were done separately in Iran, so this big organizational reform encountered serious obstacles. PMID:26171356

  4. Characterization of carbapenem resistance mechanisms and integrons in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from blood samples in a French hospital.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Cavalié, Laurent; Dubois, Damien; Oswald, Eric; Torres, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), porin OprD, integrons, virulence factors and the clonal relationships were characterized in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IRPA) isolates. Fifty-six IRPA strains were recovered from blood samples of different patients at a Toulouse teaching hospital from 2011 to 2013. Susceptibility testing of 14 antibiotics was performed by the disc diffusion method. Detection and characterization of MBLs, the oprD gene and integrons were studied by PCR and sequencing. Thirteen genes involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa were analysed. Molecular typing of IRPA strains was performed by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing. In this study, 61 % of the IRPA isolates showed a multi-resistance phenotype. The MBL phenotype, detected in three isolates (5.4 %), was linked to the blaVIM-2 gene. The oprD gene was amplified in 55 (98.2 %) IRPA strains, and variations were observed in 54 of them. Insertion sequences (IS) truncating oprD were detected in eight IRPA strains, with the novel ISPa56 identified in two strains. Class 1 integrons were detected in 24 (42.9 %) IRPA strains. The blaVIM-2 gene was found inside the class 1 integron arrangements. The new integrons In1054 (intI1-aacA56-qacEΔ1-sul1) and In1160 (intI1-aacA4-aacC1d-ISKpn4-gcuE-qacEΔ1-sul1) have been described for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in this study. A high clonal diversity was found in our strains. Among the variety of sequence types (STs) found, ST175, ST233, ST235, ST244 and ST654 were noteworthy as epidemic clones. In conclusion, 5.4 % of IRPA strains showed an MBL phenotype linked to the blaVIM-2 gene. The identified oprD high polymorphism could be implicated in the variable resistance to carbapenems in IRPA strains. The dissemination of high-risk clones is a cause of concern. PMID:26838942

  5. Analyzing patient's waiting time in emergency & trauma department in public hospital - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslan, Shazwa; Tahir, Herniza Md; Nordin, Noraimi Azlin Mohd; Zaharudin, Zati Aqmar

    2014-09-01

    Emergency and Trauma Department (ETD) is an important element for a hospital. It provides medical service, which operates 24 hours a day in most hospitals. However overcrowding is not exclusion for ETD. Overflowing occurs due to affordable services provided by public hospitals, since it is funded by the government. It is reported that a patient attending ETD must be treated within 90 minutes, in accordance to achieve the Key Performance Indicator (KPI). However, due to overcrowd situations, most patients have to wait longer than the KPI standard. In this paper, patient's average waiting time is analyzed. Using Chi-Square Test of Goodness, patient's inter arrival per hour is also investigated. As conclusion, Monday until Wednesday was identified as the days that exceed the KPI standard while Chi-Square Test of Goodness showed that the patient's inter arrival is independent and random.

  6. [Production chain supply management for public hospitals: a logistical approach to healthcare].

    PubMed

    Infante, Maria; dos Santos, Maria Angélica Borges

    2007-01-01

    Despite their importance for hospital operations, discussions of healthcare organization logistics and supply and materials management are notably lacking in Brazilian literature. This paper describes a methodology for organizing the supply of medical materials in public hospitals, based on an action-research approach. Interventions were based on the assumption that a significant portion of problems in Brazil's National Health System (SUS) facilities derive from the fact that their clinical and administrative departments do not see themselves as belonging to the same production chain - neither the hospital nor the supply department is aware of what the other produces. The development of the methodology and its main steps are presented and discussed, against a background of recent literature and total quality and supply chain management concepts. PMID:17680153

  7. [Costs of chronic dialysis in a public hospital: myths and realities].

    PubMed

    Lamas, J; Alonso, M; Saavedra, J; García-Trío, G; Rionda, M; Ameijeiras, M

    2001-01-01

    In this study regular dialysis treatment costs during 1998 and 1999 in a public hospital, which is responsible for a population of 178,000, has been analysed. Hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) costs have been differentiated and compared with those of external providers. The best technical and productive efficiency of both treatments have been estimated by analyzing the "treatment cost/human resources of the community utilized" relationship. The HD treatment costs per patient per year were 20,343 and 18,871 euros in 1988 and 1,999, respectively, lower than the costs reported in other studies. In 1999 these costs were similar to those of external providers and lower than the PD treatment costs (23,295 euros). HD retains its advantage even after costs of erythropoietin, hospital admissions and transport are included. In the hospital studied, the best technical efficiency in HD would be reached with 64 patients on treatment (17,851 euros per patient per year) and in PD with 48 patients (21,167 euros per patient per year). If we take into account our population characteristics and consider a patient distribution of 70% on HD and 30% on PD, the best productive efficiency would be reached with 56 patients on HD (17,916 euros per patient per year) and 24 patients on PD (21,813 euros per patient per year). HD confers the greatest economic and social benefits on the population supplied by the hospital since it provides the community with more jobs than PD in relation to treatment costs while the two yield the same clinical results. In conclusion, HD in a public hospital, at least in our environment, may be efficient and competitive with HD from external providers and it may be more efficient and provide a bigger economic and social profit for the population serviced by the hospital than PD, at least while the current supply systems for this treatment in our country are maintained. PMID:11471309

  8. Distinctiveness of management in a university psychiatric hospital as a public health institution.

    PubMed

    Koncina, Miroslav

    2008-06-01

    The distinctiveness of management of a university psychiatric hospital which has the status of a public health institution is manifested in the following ways: * Distinctive features and characteristics of managing service provider organizations compared to those whose operational results involve tangible products; * Distinctive features of management which originate from its role as a regional hospital and a tertiary research and educational institution in the field of psychiatry, with special importance for the Republic of Slovenia as a whole; * Distinctive features of management that are defined by the social and legal framework of operation of public health institutions and their special social mission. This paper therefore discusses the specific theoretical and practical findings regarding management of service provider organizations from the viewpoint of their social mission and significance, as well as their legal organization, internal structure and values. PMID:18587280

  9. Levels of career commitment and career entrenchment of nurses from public and private hospitals1

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Mauren Pimentel; Costa, Vânia Medianeira Flores; Lopes, Luis Felipe Dias; Balsan, Laércio André Gassen; dos Santos, Andressa Schaurich; Tomazzoni, Gean Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to determine the prevalence of the types of relations to career - commitment and entrenchment - of nurses from public and private hospitals. Methods: field survey with a quantitative approach. A total of 237 nurses participated in the survey through a questionnaire with 43 questions about sociodemographic data, occupation, and relation to career. Descriptive statistics, frequency analysis, and Mann-Whitney U test were used for data analysis. Results: nurses from public and private hospitals have a high level of career commitment and a median level of career entrenchment. Conclusions: nurses have a stronger relation of affection and identification to career than a relation of stagnation, maintained primarily due to investments, followed by emotional costs and lack of alternatives. This fact is associated with individuals continuing in nursing and having a strong commitment to activities. PMID:26625993

  10. Re-engineering the public hospital system: saving the safety net.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, B.

    1996-01-01

    Cities across America are grappling with the problem of how to provide care for the indigent and those on Medicaid. All levels of government are reducing their public funding for health care of indigent persons, and the rapid growth of managed care is making traditional cost-shifting more difficult as it transforms the practice of medicine itself. These issues are most acute in cities like Los Angeles and New York, which traditionally have relied on public hospital systems to serve as a safety net. This article focuses on the changes being wrought at the largest health-care system in the country for indigents, the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), on the progress it made during the first 18 months of a major re-engineering process, and on potential options for its future reform. PMID:8982526

  11. Preventive services advertised to the public by private hospitals in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, J A; Chee, S

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate the preventive activities offered to the public by private hospitals in Hong Kong, we obtained information from 11 of the 12 private hospitals about their screening programmes and evaluated them against the standards of the Canadian and United States task forces on preventive health care. We found that not all proven preventive activities are being offered, and many unproven or even possibly harmful actions are provided. The services focus on the application of technology rather than on behaviour change and immunisation, which are the most effective preventive strategies. This focus on testing may give the wrong impression to the public and divert effort from these worthwhile actions. A clear guideline focused on Hong Kong epidemiology and health care would be helpful. PMID:11177165

  12. Public Health and Hospitals: Lessons Learned From Partnerships in a Changing Health Care Environment.

    PubMed

    Scutchfield, F Douglas; Prybil, Lawrence; Kelly, Ann V; Mays, Glen P

    2016-01-01

    Recent changes in policymaking, such as the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, have ushered in a new era in community health partnerships. To investigate characteristics of effective collaboration between hospitals, their parent systems, and the public health community, with the support of major hospital, medical, and public health associations, we compiled a list of 157 successful partnerships. This set was subsequently narrowed to 12 successful and diverse partnerships. After conducting site visits in each of the partnerships' communities and interviews with key partnership participants, we extracted lessons about their success. The lessons we have learned from our investigation have the potential to assist others as they develop partnerships. PMID:26562110

  13. Public and Private Hospital Nurses’ Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in Their Work Settings, Sari City, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Ali Asghar; Hesamzadeh, Ali; Khademloo, Mohammad; Khalili, Salimeh; Hesamzadeh, Shamim; Berger, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nurses’ perceptions of ethical climate patterns have certain undeniable effects on hospitals. There is little evidence of possible differences in this element between public and private hospitals and contributing factors. Objectives: This study investigated whether the perceptions of the ethical climate in nurses’ working in public hospitals differ from that of nurses in private hospitals, and which factors may affect nurses’ perceptions. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of randomly selected registered nurses (n = 235), working in four public hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, and three private hospitals, was conducted in Sari City, Iran. A self-administered questionnaire, containing demographic characteristics and the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS), were used to assess registered nurses’ perceptions of public and private hospitals ethical climate. An independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: Across the five factors of HECS, the highest and lowest mean scores pertained to managers and physicians, respectively, in both public and private hospitals. Nurses who had a conditional employment situation and those working in pediatric intensive care units showed significantly more positive perceptions of the ethical work climate when compared to their peers (P < 0.05). Although the mean score of ethical work climate in private hospitals (3.82 ± 0.61) was higher than that in public hospitals (3.76 ± 0.54), no significant difference was found (P = 0.44). Conclusions: Hospital managers need to discover better ways to promote safety and health programs for their staff according to nurses’ area of work and their type of units. They should also encourage greater levels of participation in safety-enhancing initiatives in the hospital’s ethical climate, especially in the areas of nurses’ perceptions of their physician colleagues, and for nurses with a conditional

  14. Accreditation of Management Communication and Information Systems in Public Hospitals of Sabzevar City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farzianpour, Fereshteh; Shojaei, Saeed; Arab, Mohammad; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Information systems are “computer systems that collect, store, process, retrieve, show, and provide timely information required in practice, education, management, and research”. The purpose of these systems is to support hospital activities in practical, tactical, and strategic levels in order to provide better service to patients. This study aimed to evaluate the communication and information system (MCI) in public hospitals in Sabzevar city in 2014 from the perspective of human resources according to international standards of the Joint Commission Accreditation Hospital (JCAH). Methods: This study was a practical, descriptive, cross-sectional study. The study population consisted of Sabzevar nurses who used hospital information system. Sampling was done by classification method and in proportion to the number of nurses in each health care units in hospitals in 2014. The sample size was 200 and after referring to hospitals, 200 questionnaires were completed. Sample size was calculated by the formula n=Z2P (1-P)/d2 with P=0.5, α=0.05, d=0.05, and Z=1.96. Data collection tool was the questionnaire of assessment of hospital information systems of JCAH, which has 124 specific questions, including 6 areas. To assess the effect of demographic variables with MCI standards of two questionnaires (feasibility and implementation), the following steps were taken. 1. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to determine whether responses were normal or not. 2. In case of normal data, t-test was used for dual groups and one-way ANOVA test for groups of three or more. 3. If not normal, Mann-Whitney test was used for dual groups and Kruskal-Wallis test for groups of three or more. Results: Research findings show the mean results of feasibility and implementation of all 6 areas of international standards MCI have feasibility in three hospitals in Sabzevar in 20 sections (H1=105.01±10.468), (H1=196.31±4.662), (H2=104.26±9.099), (H2=195.33±3.778) (H3=106.48±11.545) and

  15. [A guide to successful public relations for hospitals and emergency medical services].

    PubMed

    Ausserer, J; Schwamberger, J; Preloznik, R; Klimek, M; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2014-04-01

    Tragic accidents, e.g. involving celebrity patients or severe incidents in hospital occur suddenly without any advance warning, often produce substantial interest by the media and quickly overburden management personnel involved in both hospitals and emergency medical services. While doctors, hospitals and emergency medical services desire objective media reports, the media promote emotionalized and dramatized reports to ensure maximum attention and circulation. When briefing the media, the scales may quickly tilt from professional, well-deliberated information to unfortunate, often unintended disinformation. Such phenomena may result in continuing exaggerated reports in the tabloid press, which in the presence of aggressive lawyers and a competitive hospital environment can turn into image and legal problems. In this article, several aspects are discussed in order to achieve successful public relations.Interviews should be given only after consultation with the responsible press officer and the director of the respective department or hospital director. Requests for information by the media should always be answered as otherwise one-sided, unintentional publications can result that are extremely difficult to correct later. One should be available to be contacted easily by journalists, regular press conferences should be held and critics should be taken seriously and not be brushed off. Questions by journalists should be answered in a timely manner as journalists are continuously under time pressure and do not understand unnecessary delays. Information for the media should always be provided at the same time, no publication should be given preference and an absolutely current list of E-mail contacts is required. When facing big events a press conference is preferred as many questions can be answered at once. Always be well prepared for an interview or even for just a statement. Each interview should be regarded as an opportunity to put a story forward which you

  16. [Two French pioneers of plastic surgery: François Dubois and Raymond Passot].

    PubMed

    Derquenne, François

    2015-01-01

    After World War, especially during the interwar years, new plastic surgical techniques were highly developed by I two French surgeons: Dr Raymond Passot, a pupil of Pr Hippolyte Morestin, Head of surgery department in Val-de-Grâce military hospital, Father of the Gueules cassées and Dr François Dubois, a pupil of Pr Sébileau, head of ear nose throat disorders department at Lariboisière Hospital in Paris. By the way of papers, publications and interviews to media, they described new French cosmetic techniques (rhitidectomy, sutures, liposuccion) and extensively developed this outpatient surgery. They used to renove famous actresse's and actors' face and nose and those of hundreds of patients. They participate to French societies of plastic surgery meetings and publications. Their enthusiastic dare largely participated to the current success of cosmetic surgery in France. PMID:26050425

  17. Spatial distribution and accessibility to public sector tertiary care teaching hospitals in Karachi: A Geographic Information Systems application.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Masood Ali; Ali, Mir Shabbar

    2016-07-01

    Optimal utilization of specialized curative healthcare services is contingent on spatial access to tertiary-care hospitals by the targeted population. The objectives of this study were to determine the spatial distribution of public sector tertiary-care teaching hospitals in Karachi, and to use GIS and network analysis for modeling the accessibility to these hospitals for Karachi residents. Maps of three, six, and nine kilometer buffers were created around the five selected hospitals to determine which towns of Karachi are either entirely or partially covered/accessible. Most of the towns in Karachi were covered either partially or completely by the three buffers and service areas of 3,6, and 9 kilometers around the five selected hospitals. This study highlights the limitations of using publicly available data for road network, and the need for creating and making available in public domain, comprehensive road network vector dataset in conjunction with population breakdowns by administrative subdivisions. PMID:27427142

  18. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases among Enterobacteriaceae isolated in a public hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dropa, Milena; Balsalobre, Livia C; Lincopan, Nilton; Mamizuka, Elsa M; Murakami, Thays; Cassettari, Valéria C; Franco, Fábio; Guida, Stella M; Balabakis, Angelica J; Passadore, Lilian F; Santos, Silvia R; Matté, Glavur R; Matté, Maria H

    2009-01-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) in enterobacteria are recognized worldwide as a great hospital problem. In this study, 127 ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated in one year from inpatients and outpatients at a public teaching hospital at São Paulo, Brazil, were submitted to analysis by PCR with specific primers for bla SHV, bla TEM and bla CTX-M genes. From the 127 isolates, 96 (75.6%) Klebsiella pneumoniae, 12 (9.3%) Escherichia coli, 8 (6.2%) Morganella morganii, 3 (2.3%) Proteus mirabilis, 2 (1.6%) Klebsiella oxytoca, 2 (1.6%) Providencia rettgeri, 2 (1.6%) Providencia stuartti, 1 (0.8%) Enterobacter aerogenes and 1 (0.8%) Enterobacter cloacae were identified as ESBL producers. Bla SHV, bla TEM and bla CTX-M were detected in 63%, 17.3% and 33.9% strains, respectively. Pulsed field gel eletrophoresis genotyping of K. pneumoniae revealed four main molecular patterns and 29 unrelated profiles. PCR results showed a high variety of ESBL groups among strains, in nine different species. The results suggest the spread of resistance genes among genetically different strains of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae in some hospital wards, and also that some strongly related strains were identified in different hospital wards, suggesting clonal spread in the institutional environment. PMID:19739000

  19. Technical and organisational aspects in enterprise resource planning systems implementation: lessons from a Spanish public hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Rodriguez, Tomas; Escobar-Pérez, Bernabe; Monge-Lozano, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    Public resources should always be managed efficiently, more so in times of crisis. Due to the specific characteristics of the healthcare sector, there is a need for special attention, especially in regards to hospitals. Administrators need useful tools to be able to efficiently manage available resources, such as enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Therefore, an analysis of the effects of their implementation and use in hospitals is valuable. This study has two purposes. One is to analyse the role ERP systems play in aiding the integration of hospital data, with focus on user satisfaction as well as possible resistance to change. The other purpose is to analyse the effects of implanting and using ERP systems in the hospital environment and identifying how certain variables influence the process, especially the existence of different organisational cultures. Results indicate that clinical information has become notably more integrated, despite the lack of flow in the economic-financial area. The heterogeneous nature of the different groups, clinical (Medical, Nursing) and non-clinical (Economic-Financial, Accounting), had a negative influence on the implementation process, and limited the integration of information as well as the system's performance.

  20. Association Rules and Data Mining in Hospital Infection Control and Public Health Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Brossette, Stephen E.; Sprague, Alan P.; Hardin, J. Michael; Waites, Ken B.; Jones, Warren T.; Moser, Stephen A.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The authors consider the problem of identifying new, unexpected, and interesting patterns in hospital infection control and public health surveillance data and present a new data analysis process and system based on association rules to address this problem. Design: The authors first illustrate the need for automated pattern discovery and data mining in hospital infection control and public health surveillance. Next, they define association rules, explain how those rules can be used in surveillance, and present a novel process and system—the Data Mining Surveillance System (DMSS)—that utilize association rules to identify new and interesting patterns in surveillance data. Results: Experimental results were obtained using DMSS to analyze Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection control data collected over one year (1996) at University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital. Experiments using one-, three-, and six-month time partitions yielded 34, 57, and 28 statistically significant events, respectively. Although not all statistically significant events are clinically significant, a subset of events generated in each analysis indicated potentially significant shifts in the occurrence of infection or antimicrobial resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: The new process and system are efficient and effective in identifying new, unexpected, and interesting patterns in surveillance data. The clinical relevance and utility of this process await the results of prospective studies currently in progress. PMID:9670134

  1. The role of public clinics in preventable hospitalizations among vulnerable populations.

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, A J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if the availability of public ambulatory clinics affects preventable hospitalization (PH) rates of low-income and elderly populations. DATA SOURCES: PH rates were calculated using elderly and low-income discharges from 1995-97 Virginia hospital discharge data. Other data sources include the 1990 Census, the 1998 Area Resource File, the 1996 American Hospital Association Survey, the Virginia Department of Health, the Virginia Primary Care Association, and the Bureau of Primary Health Care. STUDY DESIGN: Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between ambulatory clinic availability and PH rates, controlling for population and other provider characteristics in a cross-section of zip code clusters. DATA EXTRACTION METHODS: Clusters with populations of at least 2,000 were assembled from zip codes in each county in the state of Virginia. Overlapping medical market service areas were constructed around the population centroid of each cluster. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Populations in medically underserved areas (MUAs) served by a Federally Qualified Health Center had significantly lower PH rates than did other MUA populations. The presence of a free clinic had a marginally significant association with lower PH rates. CONCLUSIONS: The availability of public ambulatory clinics is associated with better access to primary care among low-income and elderly populations. PMID:11409820

  2. The Difference in the Online Medical Information Searching Behaviors of Hospital Patients and Their Relatives versus the General Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hung-Yuan; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: to explore the differences in online medical information searching behaviors, including evaluative standards and search strategies, of the general public (general group) and those of hospital patients and their relatives (hospital group); and to compare the predictive relationship between the evaluative…

  3. Incorporation of public hospitals: a "silver bullet" against overcapacity, managerial bottlenecks and resource constraints? Case studies from Austria and Estonia.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Armin H; Haslinger, Reinhard R; Hofmarcher, Maria M; Jesse, Maris; Palu, Toomas

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for incorporating public hospitals by contrasting the experience from an "old" EU country (Austria) with a new EU member state (Estonia). In the EU (including the new member states) hospital overcapacity is a serious problem, from a technical, fiscal and political perspective. Few countries have succeeded in establishing an appropriate framework for resource management and for guaranteeing long-term financial viability of their hospital network. Many countries are in search of effective policies for improved hospital management and more cost-effective resource use in the health sector. Over the past decade, experiences in Austria and Estonia have emerged as innovative examples which may provide lessons for other EU countries and beyond. This paper describes the evolution of public hospitals from public budgetary units and public management to incorporated autonomous organizations under private corporate law, resulting in a contractual relationship between (public) owners and private hospital management. Outdated and inefficient public sector structures were replaced by more agile corporate management. The arrangement allows for investments, operating costs and budgeting according to strategic business goals as opposed to political "fiat". Shielding hospitals from local political influence is an important aspect of this concept. Horizontal integration through networking of public hospitals and introducing private management helps create a new corporate culture, allowing for more flexibility to achieve efficiencies through downsizing and economies of scale. Based on contracts the new balance between ownership and managerial functions create strong incentives for a more business-like, results-oriented and consumer-friendly management. This was achieved both in Austria and Estonia in a politically sensitive way, adopting a long-term vision and by protecting the interests of hospital owners and staff. PMID:16919838

  4. Measuring cost efficiency in the Nordic Hospitals—a cross-sectional comparison of public hospitals in 2002

    PubMed Central

    Häkkinen, Unto; Peltola, Mikko; Magnussen, Jon; Anthun, Kjartan S.; Kittelsen, Sverre; Roed, Annette; Olsen, Kim; Medin, Emma; Rehnberg, Clas

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of hospital care in four Nordic countries: Norway, Finland, Sweden and Denmark. Using national discharge registries and cost data from hospitals, cost efficiency in the production of somatic hospital care was calculated for public hospitals. Data were collected using harmonised definitions of inputs and outputs for 184 hospitals and data envelopment analysis was used to calculate Farrell efficiency estimates for the year 2002. Results suggest that there were marked differences in the average hospital efficiency between Nordic countries. In 2002, average efficiency was markedly higher in Finland compared to Norway and Sweden. This study found differences in cost efficiency that cannot be explained by input prices or differences in coding practices. More analysis is needed to reveal the causes of large efficiency disparities between Nordic hospitals. PMID:20680466

  5. Kodamaea (Pichia) ohmeri fungemia in a pediatric patient admitted in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    De Barros, Jadson Duque; Do Nascimento, Suerda Maria Nogueira; De Araújo, Fernanda Janaína Silva; Braz, Regina De Fátima Dos Santos; Andrade, Vania Sousa; Theelen, Bart; Boekhout, Teun; Illnait-Zaragozi, Maria Teresa; Gouveia, Maria Narriman Guimarães; Fernandes, Maria Conceição; Monteiro, Maria Goretti Lins; De Oliveira, Maria Tereza Barreto

    2009-11-01

    Kodamaea (Pichia) ohmeri is a yeast species that has not been reported to be a frequent cause of human infections. The current report describes a case of fungemia caused by K. ohmeri in a 3-year-old female patient hospitalized in the public hospital Maria Alice Fernandes, Natal, RN, Brazil. The patient had previously received antimicrobial therapy due to a peritoneal infection and nosocomial pneumonia, and had a central venous catheter implanted. Kodamaea ohmeri was isolated from blood and the tip of the catheter, 48 h after its implantation. The yeast was identified by standard microbiological methods and sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains and the ITS 1 + 2 spacer regions of the ribosomal DNA. On CHROMagar Candida medium, the isolate showed a color change from pink to blue. The yeast was susceptible to amphotericin B, and liposomal AmB was used successfully to clear the infection. PMID:19888811

  6. Financial expense incurred by medical leaves of health professionals in Rondonia public hospitals, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Junkes, Maria Bernadete; Pessoa, Valdir Filgueiras

    2010-01-01

    The study investigates the additional payroll expense caused by absenteeism due to illness among nursing professionals and physicians at two public hospitals at Cacoal, Rondonia, Brazil. Non-programmed absences of up to 15 days which occurred at the hospital units between 2004 to 2007 were verified in the database of the institutions human resource sector. From 1,704 non-programmed absences, 1,486 were justified by medical declarations. It was verified that absenteeism caused by illness was responsible for 87.2% of all non-programmed absences. When these data are grouped by professional categories, it was observed that the nurse absenteeism due to illness reached 83.3%, when compared with 16.7% for physicians. The general absenteeism index, adding up nurses and physicians, corresponded to 0.85%, resulting in an additional payroll expense of 5.2% and 7.4% in the salaries of nursing professionals and physicians, respectively. PMID:20721430

  7. Geographic variation of failure-to-rescue in public acute hospitals in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Assareh, Hassan; Ou, Lixin; Chen, Jack; Hillman, Kenneth; Flabouris, Arthas; Hollis, Stephanie J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide acceptance of Failure-to-Rescue (FTR) as a patient safety indicator (defined as the deaths among surgical patients with treatable complications), no study has explored the geographic variation of FTR in a large health jurisdiction. Our study aimed to explore the spatiotemporal variations of FTR rates across New South Wales (NSW), Australia. We conducted a population-based study using all admitted surgical patients in public acute hospitals during 2002-2009 in NSW, Australia. We developed a spatiotemporal Poisson model using Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation (INLA) methods in a Bayesian framework to obtain area-specific adjusted relative risk. Local Government Area (LGA) was chosen as the areal unit. LGA-aggregated covariates included age, gender, socio-economic and remoteness index scores, distance between patient residential postcode and the treating hospital, and a quadratic time trend. We studied 4,285,494 elective surgical admissions in 82 acute public hospitals over eight years in NSW. Around 14% of patients who developed at least one of the six FTR-related complications (58,590) died during hospitalization. Of 153 LGAs, patients who lived in 31 LGAs, accommodating 48% of NSW patients at risk, were exposed to an excessive adjusted FTR risk (10% to 50%) compared to the state-average. They were mostly located in state's centre and western Sydney. Thirty LGAs with a lower adjusted FTR risk (10% to 30%), accommodating 8% of patients at risk, were mostly found in the southern parts of NSW and Sydney east and south. There were significant spatiotemporal variations of FTR rates across NSW over an eight-year span. Areas identified with significantly high and low FTR risks provide potential opportunities for policy-makers, clinicians and researchers to learn from the success or failure of adopting the best care for surgical patients and build a self-learning organisation and health system. PMID:25310260

  8. Motivation of health workers and associated factors in public hospitals of West Amhara, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Weldegebriel, Zemichael; Ejigu, Yohannes; Weldegebreal, Fitsum; Woldie, Mirkuzie

    2016-01-01

    Background Health professionals’ motivation reflects the interaction between health professionals and their work environment. It can potentially affect the provision of health services; however, this important attribute of the workplace climate in public hospitals is not usually given serious attention to the desired level. For this reason, the authors of this study have assessed the level of motivation of health professionals and associated factors in public hospitals of West Amhara, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in eight public hospitals of West Amhara from June 1 to July 30, 2013. A total of 304 health professionals were included in this study. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software version 20. The reliability of the instrument was assessed through Cronbach’s α. Factor scores were generated for the items found to represent the scales (eigenvalue greater than one in varimax rotation) used in the measurement of the variables. The scores were further analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, t-tests, Pearson’s correlation, and hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses. The cut-off point for the regression analysis to determine significance was set at β (95% confidence interval, P<0.05). Results Mean motivation scores (as the percentage of maximum scale scores) were 58.6% for the overall motivation score, 71.0% for the conscientiousness scale, 52.8% for the organizational commitment scale, 58.3% for the intrinsic motivation scale, and 64.0% for organizational burnout scale. Professional category, age, type of the hospital, nonfinancial motivators like performance evaluation and management, staffing and work schedule, staff development and promotion, availability of necessary resources, and ease of communication were found to be strong predictors of health worker motivation. Across the hospitals and professional categories, health workers’ overall level of motivation with absolute

  9. Changing patterns in volatile anaesthetic agent consumption over seven years in Victorian public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, L; Tay, S; Aykanat, V; Segal, R; Tan, C O; Peyton, P; McNicol, L; Story, D A

    2014-09-01

    Evidence-based choices of volatile agents can increase health cost efficiencies. In this pharmaco-economic study, we evaluated the trends and costs of volatile agent use in Australian public hospitals. The total number of volatile agent (isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane) bottles ordered and inflation-adjusted costs were collected from 65 Victorian public hospitals from 2005 to 2011. Environmental costs were measured through the 100-year global warming potential index as carbon dioxide equivalents. During this time period, the aggregate inflation-adjusted expenditure was $39,209,878. Time series analysis showed that bottles of isoflurane ordered decreased by 419/year (99% confidence interval (CI): -603 to -235); costs decreased by $56,017/year (99% CI: -$93,243 to -$18,791). Bottles of sevoflurane increased by 1,330/year (99% CI: 1141 to 1,519); costs decreased by $423,3573/year (99% CI: -$720,030 to -112,783). Bottles of desflurane increased by 726/year (99% CI: 288 to 1,164); costs increased by $171,578/year (99% CI: $136,951 to $206,205). The amount of calculated greenhouse gas emissions released into the atmosphere over this period was 37,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents, with isoflurane contributing 6%, sevoflurane 17%, and desflurane 77% of this total. In conclusion, isoflurane is no longer being used in the majority of Victorian public hospitals, with sevoflurane and desflurane remaining as the primary volatile agents, utilised respectively at a ratio of 2.2 to 1, and costs at 0.8 to 1. PMID:25233170

  10. Public and Private Hospital Services Reform Using Data Envelopment Analysis to Measure Technical, Scale, Allocative, and Cost Efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhzadeh, Yaghoub; Roudsari, Abdul V.; Vahidi, Reza Gholi; Emrouznejad, Ali; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to suggest a suitable context to develop efficient hospital systems while maintaining the quality of care at minimum expenditures. Methods: This research aimed to present a model of efficiency for selected public and private hospitals of East Azerbaijani Province of Iran by making use of Data Envelopment Analysis approach in order to recognize and suggest the best practice standards. Results: Among the six inefficient hospitals, 2 (33%) had a technical efficiency score of less than 50% (both private), 2 (33%) between 51 and 74% (one private and one public) and the rest (2, 33%) between 75 and 99% (one private and one public). Conclusion: In general, the public hospitals are relatively more efficient than private ones; it is recommended for inefficient hospitals to make use of the followings: transferring, selling, or renting idle/unused beds; transferring excess doctors and nurses to the efficient hospitals or other health centers; pensioning off, early retirement clinic officers, technicians/technologists, and other technical staff. The saving obtained from the above approaches could be used to improve remuneration for remaining staff and quality of health care services of hospitals, rural and urban health centers, support communities to start or sustain systematic risk and resource pooling and cost sharing mechanisms for protecting beneficiaries against unexpected health care costs, compensate the capital depreciation, increasing investments, and improve diseases prevention services and facilities in the provincial level. PMID:24688915

  11. Determinants of patient satisfaction with outpatient health services at public and private hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Woldie, Mirkuzie; Ololo, Shimeles

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients have explicit desires or requests for services when they visit hospitals. However, inadequate discovery of their needs may result in patient dissatisfaction. This study aimed to determine the levels and determinants of patient satisfaction with outpatient health services provided at public and private hospitals in Addis Ababa, Central Ethiopia. Methods A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted from 27 March to 30 April 2010. The study included 5 private and 5 public hospitals. Participants were selected using systematic random sampling. A pre-tested and contextually prepared structured questionnaire was used to conduct interviews. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, factor analysis and multiple linear regressions were performed using computer software (SPSS 16.0). Results About 18.0% of the patients at the public hospitals were very satisfied whilst 47.9% were just satisfied with the corresponding proportions a bit higher at private hospitals. Self-judged health status, expectation about the services, perceived adequacy of consultation duration, perceived providers’ technical competency, perceived welcoming approach and perceived body signalling were determinants of satisfaction at both public and private hospitals. Conclusions Although patients at the private hospitals were more satisfied than those at the public hospitals with the health care they received, five of the predictors of patient satisfaction in this study were common to both settings. Thus, hospitals in both categories should work to improve the competencies of their employees, particularly health professionals, to win the interests of the clients and have a physical structure that better fits the expectations of the patients.

  12. Orthopedics nursing patients' profile of a public hospital in Salvador-Bahia

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Renata Reis Matutino; Ribeiro, Natália Fonseca; de Andrade, Aline Mendonça; Jaques, Bruno Dórea

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the profile of patients treated in the trauma and orthopedics nursing of a trauma care referral public hospital of in the state of Bahia. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in which data were collected from medical records of patients in the period from July to December 2008. RESULTS: The profile of the patients involved was formed by subjects mostly male young subjects, victims of trauma from accidents, especially those with motorcycles or car runover. On the other hand,the most frequent traumas associated with urban violence were perforations by gunshot and stab wounds. The primary injury presented by these individuals was exposed fracture of the femur and the most common treatment was external fixation. The most frequent in-hospital complication was wound infection, which required another surgical approach. Most inpatients were discharged and only one death was reported during this period. CONCLUSION: The results of this study corroborate those from other institutions in the country, which may contribute to elaborate public policies for accidents and violence prevention. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453666

  13. Patients satisfaction with laboratory services at antiretroviral therapy clinics in public hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that Ethiopia has scale up antiretroviral treatment (ART) program, little is known about the patient satisfaction with ART monitoring laboratory services in health facilities. We therefore aimed to assess patient satisfaction with laboratory services at ART clinics in public hospitals. Methods Hospital based, descriptive cross sectional study was conducted from October to November 2010 among clients attending in nine public hospitals ART clinics in Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Patients’ satisfaction towards laboratory services was assessed using exit interview structured questionnaire. Data were coded and entered using EPI info 2002 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA) and analyzed using SPSS version 15 software (SPSS INC, Chicago, IL, USA). Results A total of 406 clients were involved in the study. Of these 255(62.8%) were females. The overall satisfaction rate for ART monitoring laboratory services was (85.5%). Patients were satisfied with measures taken by health care providers to keep confidentiality and ability of the person drawing blood to answer question (98.3% and 96.3% respectively). Moreover, the finding of this study revealed, statistical significant associations between the overall patients’ satisfaction with waiting time to get blood drawing service, availability of ordered laboratory tests and waiting time to get laboratory result with (p < 0.05). Patients receiving blood drawing service less than 30 minute were 7.59 times (95% CI AOR: 3.92–14.70) to be more satisfied with ART monitoring laboratory services compared to those who underwent for more than 30 minutes. Conclusions Overall, the satisfaction survey showed, most respondents were satisfied with ART monitoring laboratory services. However, factors such as improving accessibility and availability of latrines should be taken into consideration in order to improve the overall satisfaction. PMID:22520145

  14. Costs of Dengue Control Activities and Hospitalizations in the Public Health Sector during an Epidemic Year in Urban Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Thalagala, Neil; Tissera, Hasitha; Palihawadana, Paba; Amarasinghe, Ananda; Ambagahawita, Anuradha; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Shepard, Donald S.; Tozan, Yeşim

    2016-01-01

    Background Reported as a public health problem since the 1960s in Sri Lanka, dengue has become a high priority disease for public health authorities. The Ministry of Health is responsible for controlling dengue and other disease outbreaks and associated health care. The involvement of large numbers of public health staff in dengue control activities year-round and the provision of free medical care to dengue patients at secondary care hospitals place a formidable financial burden on the public health sector. Methods We estimated the public sector costs of dengue control activities and the direct costs of hospitalizations in Colombo, the most heavily urbanized district in Sri Lanka, during the epidemic year of 2012 from the Ministry of Health’s perspective. The financial costs borne by public health agencies and hospitals are collected using cost extraction tools designed specifically for the study and analysed retrospectively using a combination of activity-based and gross costing approaches. Results The total cost of dengue control and reported hospitalizations was estimated at US$3.45 million (US$1.50 per capita) in Colombo district in 2012. Personnel costs accounted for the largest shares of the total costs of dengue control activities (79%) and hospitalizations (46%). The results indicated a per capita cost of US$0.42 for dengue control activities. The average costs per hospitalization ranged between US$216–609 for pediatric cases and between US$196–866 for adult cases according to disease severity and treatment setting. Conclusions This analysis is a first attempt to assess the economic burden of dengue response in the public health sector in Sri Lanka. Country-specific evidence is needed for setting public health priorities and deciding about the deployment of existing or new technologies. Our results suggest that dengue poses a major economic burden on the public health sector in Sri Lanka. PMID:26910907

  15. The skills gap in hospital management in the South African public health sector.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Rubin

    2008-01-01

    A lack of management capacity has been identified as the key stumbling block to the transformation and reconceptualization of the public sector in South Africa into a more effective, efficient, and responsive system of health delivery. As part of the overall management development process, this research aimed to identify the skills important for public sector health management and to evaluate managers' self-assessed proficiency in each of these skills. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted among hospital managers in the South African public health sector. Respondents were asked to rate the level of importance that each proposed competency had in their job and to indicate their proficiency in each skill. Self-assessment of levels of competency showed that managers felt most competent in strategic planning, people management, and self-management, and relatively less competent in the task-related skills and their ability to deliver healthcare. People management, self-management, and task-related skills were rated as being most important, followed by strategic management and health delivery skills, respectively. The largest differences between mean importance rating and mean skill rating were for people management skills, task-related and self-management skills. These findings reflect the reality of the local health service environment and the needs of health managers and will be useful in the conceptualization, design, and delivery of health management programs aimed at enhancing current and future management and leadership capacity in the public health sector in South Africa. PMID:18708881

  16. Public hospital quality report awareness: evidence from National and Californian Internet searches and social media mentions, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Huesch, Marco D; Currid-Halkett, Elizabeth; Doctor, Jason N

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Publicly available hospital quality reports seek to inform consumers of important healthcare quality and affordability attributes, and may inform consumer decision-making. To understand how much consumers search for such information online on one Internet search engine, whether they mention such information in social media and how positively they view this information. Setting and design A leading Internet search engine (Google) was the main focus of the study. Google Trends and Google Adwords keyword analyses were performed for national and Californian searches between 1 August 2012 and 31 July 2013 for keywords related to ‘top hospital’, best hospital’, and ‘hospital quality’, as well as for six specific hospital quality reports. Separately, a proprietary social media monitoring tool was used to investigate blog, forum, social media and traditional media mentions of, and sentiment towards, major public reports of hospital quality in California in 2012. Primary outcome measures (1) Counts of searches for keywords performed on Google; (2) counts of and (3) sentiment of mentions of public reports on social media. Results National Google search volume for 75 hospital quality-related terms averaged 610 700 searches per month with strong variation by keyword and by state. A commercial report (Healthgrades) was more commonly searched for nationally on Google than the federal government's Hospital Compare, which otherwise dominated quality-related search terms. Social media references in California to quality reports were generally few, and commercially produced hospital quality reports were more widely mentioned than state (Office of Statewide Healthcare Planning and Development (OSHPD)), or non-profit (CalHospitalCompare) reports. Conclusions Consumers are somewhat aware of hospital quality based on Internet search activity and social media disclosures. Public stakeholders may be able to broaden their quality dissemination initiatives by

  17. Sleeping porch through french doors off master bedroom (southern unit) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sleeping porch through french doors off master bedroom (southern unit) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers' Quarters, West Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hutton Street, Southwest Corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Optimal Decision Model for Sustainable Hospital Building Renovation—A Case Study of a Vacant School Building Converting into a Community Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Yi-Kai; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Perng, Yeng-Horng; Castro-Lacouture, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to hospitals environments since modern pandemics have emerged. The building sector is considered to be the largest world energy consumer, so many global organizations are attempting to create a sustainable environment in building construction by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, maintaining high standards of hygiene while reducing energy consumption has become a major task for hospitals. This study develops a decision model based on genetic algorithms and A* graph search algorithms to evaluate existing hospital environmental conditions and to recommend an optimal scheme of sustainable renovation strategies, considering trade-offs among minimal renovation cost, maximum quality improvement, and low environmental impact. Reusing vacant buildings is a global and sustainable trend. In Taiwan, for example, more and more school space will be unoccupied due to a rapidly declining birth rate. Integrating medical care with local community elder-care efforts becomes important because of the aging population. This research introduces a model that converts a simulated vacant school building into a community public hospital renovation project in order to validate the solutions made by hospital managers and suggested by the system. The result reveals that the system performs well and its solutions are more successful than the actions undertaken by decision-makers. This system can improve traditional hospital building condition assessment while making it more effective and efficient. PMID:27347986

  19. Optimal Decision Model for Sustainable Hospital Building Renovation-A Case Study of a Vacant School Building Converting into a Community Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yi-Kai; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Perng, Yeng-Horng; Castro-Lacouture, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to hospitals environments since modern pandemics have emerged. The building sector is considered to be the largest world energy consumer, so many global organizations are attempting to create a sustainable environment in building construction by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, maintaining high standards of hygiene while reducing energy consumption has become a major task for hospitals. This study develops a decision model based on genetic algorithms and A* graph search algorithms to evaluate existing hospital environmental conditions and to recommend an optimal scheme of sustainable renovation strategies, considering trade-offs among minimal renovation cost, maximum quality improvement, and low environmental impact. Reusing vacant buildings is a global and sustainable trend. In Taiwan, for example, more and more school space will be unoccupied due to a rapidly declining birth rate. Integrating medical care with local community elder-care efforts becomes important because of the aging population. This research introduces a model that converts a simulated vacant school building into a community public hospital renovation project in order to validate the solutions made by hospital managers and suggested by the system. The result reveals that the system performs well and its solutions are more successful than the actions undertaken by decision-makers. This system can improve traditional hospital building condition assessment while making it more effective and efficient. PMID:27347986

  20. Behavioral differences between public and private not-for-profit hospitals in the Italian National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Barbetta, Gian Paolo; Turati, Gilberto; Zago, Angelo M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to identify behavioral differences between public and private not-for-profit hospitals, by exploiting the introduction of the DRG-based payment system in the Italian NHS during the second half of the 1990s. We estimate the technical efficiency of a sample of hospitals for the period 1995-2000 considering an output distance function, and adopting both parametric (COLS and SF) and nonparametric (DEA) approaches. Our results show a convergence of mean efficiency scores between not-for-profit and public hospitals, and seem to suggest that differences in economic performances between competing ownership forms are more the result of the institutional settings in which they operate than the effect of the incentive structures embedded in the different proprietary forms. We also observe a decline in technical efficiency, probably due to policies aimed at reducing hospitalization rates. PMID:16929498

  1. Affordability of emergency obstetric and neonatal care at public hospitals in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ayako; Randaoharison, Pierana Gabriel; Matsui, Mitsuaki

    2011-05-01

    Timely access to emergency obstetric care is necessary to save the lives of women experiencing complications at delivery, and for newborn babies. Out-of-pocket costs are one of the critical factors hindering access to such services in low- and middle-income countries. This study measured out-of-pocket costs for caesarean section and neonatal care at an urban tertiary public hospital in Madagascar, assessed affordability in relation to household expenditure and investigated where families found the money to cover these costs. Data were collected for 103 women and 73 newborns at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga in the Boeny region of Madagascar between September 2007 and January 2008. Out-of-pocket costs for caesarean section were catastrophic for middle and lower socio-economic households, and treatment for neonatal complications also created a big financial burden, with geographical and other financial barriers further limiting access to hospital care. This study identified 12 possible cases where the mother required an emergency caesarean section and her newborn required emergency care, placing a double burden on the household. In an effort to make emergency obstetric and neonatal care affordable and available to all, including those living in rural areas and those of medium and lower socio-economic status, well-designed financial risk protection mechanisms and a strong commitment by the government to mobilise resources to finance the country's health system are necessary. PMID:21555082

  2. Postmortem findings and opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients from a public hospital in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Eza, Dominique; Cerrillo, Gustavo; Moore, David A.J.; Castro, Cecilia; Ticona, Eduardo; Morales, Domingo; Cabanillas, Jose; Barrantes, Fernando; Alfaro, Alejandro; Benavides, Alejandro; Rafael, Arturo; Valladares, Gilberto; Arevalo, Fernando; Evans, Carlton A.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    There is a paucity of HIV autopsy data from South America and none that document the postmortem findings in patients with HIV/AIDS in Peru. The purpose of this autopsy study was to determine the spectrum of opportunistic infections and the causes of mortality in HIV-positive patients at a public hospital in Lima. Clinico-epidemiological information regarding HIV infection in Peru is also reviewed. Sixteen HIV-related hospital postmortems, performed between 1999 and 2004, were included in this retrospective analysis. The primary cause of death was established in 12 patients: one died of neoplasia and 11 of infectious diseases, including 3 from pulmonary infection, 7 from disseminated infection, and 2 from central nervous system infection (one case had dual pathology). Opportunistic infections were identified in 14 cases, comprising cytomegalovirus, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia, aspergillosis, tuberculosis, varicella zoster virus, and cryptosporidiosis. Fourteen patients had at least one AIDS-related disease that had been neither clinically suspected nor diagnosed premortem. Moreover, 82% of the diagnoses considered to be of important clinical significance had not been suspected antemortem. The spectrum and frequency of certain opportunistic infections differed from other South American autopsy studies, highlighting the importance of performing HIV/AIDS postmortems in resource-limited countries where locally specific disease patterns may be observed. PMID:16979302

  3. Public health experts urge U.S. hospitals to be prepared as Ebola outbreak accelerates.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    With the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EBD) accelerating in West Africa, public health authorities are urging frontline providers in the United States to be vigilant in questioning patients who present with a suspected infectious disease, and in adhering to infection control practices. Recent travel to West Africa and contact with others who may have been exposed to EVD are key points that need to be covered at triage, say experts. The World Health Organization (WHO) indicates that mortality from the latest outbreak is 55%, although it is as high as 75% in Guinea. Health care workers are particularly vulnerable to EVD, with WHO noting that more than 250 workers in West Africa have contracted EVD and at least 120 have died from the disease. Experts say that one of the greatest times of risk for health care workers is while a patient is at triage because he or she has not yet been placed in isolation precautions. The CDC is recommending that hospitals rigorously apply standard infection control policies at a minimum, and that extra protective equipment may be required when there are body fluids in the patient environment. Hospitals in 27 states have reported dozens of suspected cases of EVD to the CDC, but at press time, none had yet tested positive. PMID:25291835

  4. Performance Evaluation of Public Hospital Information Systems by the Information System Success Model

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Won; Bae, Sung-Kwon; Ryu, Ji-Hye; Kim, Kyeong Na; An, Chang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was to evaluate the performance of the newly developed information system (IS) implemented on July 1, 2014 at three public hospitals in Korea. Methods User satisfaction scores of twelve key performance indicators of six IS success factors based on the DeLone and McLean IS Success Model were utilized to evaluate IS performance before and after the newly developed system was introduced. Results All scores increased after system introduction except for the completeness of medical records and impact on the clinical environment. The relationships among six IS factors were also analyzed to identify the important factors influencing three IS success factors (Intention to Use, User Satisfaction, and Net Benefits). All relationships were significant except for the relationships among Service Quality, Intention to Use, and Net Benefits. Conclusions The results suggest that hospitals should not only focus on systems and information quality; rather, they should also continuously improve service quality to improve user satisfaction and eventually reach full the potential of IS performance. PMID:25705557

  5. [Environmental impact of a public hospital in the city of Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Bambarén-Alatrista, Celso; Alatrista-Gutiérrez de Bambarén, María del Socorro

    2014-01-01

    The operation of hospitals produces negative effects on the environment which contributes to air pollution and climate change. The institution in this study is a category III health care facility located in the city of Lima. It generates 4.89 kg/bed/day of solid waste, and consumes 1.36 m3/bed/day of water; 25.22 kWh/bed/day of electricity, and 2.76 liters/bed/day of fuel. The level of PM10 and measured parameters of disposal to the public network are within legal limits, while mobile source noise exceeds the maximum allowable limit. The institution releases into the atmosphere 2,291 tons of CO2 equivalents per year. In conclusion, the institution studied generates a negative impact on the environment. PMID:25597723

  6. Leadership in surgery for public sector hospitals in Jamaica: strategies for the operating room.

    PubMed

    Cawich, Shamir O; Harding, Hyacinth E; Crandon, Ivor W; McGaw, Clarence D; Barnett, Alan T; Tennant, Ingrid; Evans, Necia R; Martin, Allie C; Simpson, Lindberg K; Johnson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The barriers to health care delivery in developing nations are many: underfunding, limited support services, scarce resources, suboptimal health care worker attitudes, and deficient health care policies are some of the challenges. The literature contains little information about health care leadership in developing nations. This discursive paper examines the impact of leadership on the delivery of operating room (OR) services in public sector hospitals in Jamaica.Delivery of OR services in Jamaica is hindered by many unique cultural, financial, political, and environmental barriers. We identify six leadership goals adapted to this environment to achieve change. Effective leadership must adapt to the environment. Delivery of OR services in Jamaica may be improved by addressing leadership training, workplace safety, interpersonal communication, and work environment and by revising existing policies. Additionally, there should be regular practice audits and quality control surveys. PMID:24355903

  7. Building Sustainable Capacity for Cardiovascular Care at a Public Hospital in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Binanay, Cynthia A; Akwanalo, Constantine O; Aruasa, Wilson; Barasa, Felix A; Corey, G Ralph; Crowe, Susie; Esamai, Fabian; Einterz, Robert; Foster, Michael C; Gardner, Adrian; Kibosia, John; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Koech, Myra; Korir, Belinda; Lawrence, John E; Lukas, Stephanie; Manji, Imran; Maritim, Peris; Ogaro, Francis; Park, Peter; Pastakia, Sonak D; Sugut, Wilson; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Yanoh, Reuben; Velazquez, Eric J; Bloomfield, Gerald S

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease deaths are increasing in low- and middle-income countries and are exacerbated by health care systems that are ill-equipped to manage chronic diseases. Global health partnerships, which have stemmed the tide of infectious diseases in low- and middle-income countries, can be similarly applied to address cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we present the experiences of an academic partnership between North American and Kenyan medical centers to improve cardiovascular health in a national public referral hospital. We highlight our stepwise approach to developing sustainable cardiovascular services using the health system strengthening World Health Organization Framework for Action. The building blocks of this framework (leadership and governance, health workforce, health service delivery, health financing, access to essential medicines, and health information system) guided our comprehensive and sustainable approach to delivering subspecialty care in a resource-limited setting. Our experiences may guide the development of similar collaborations in other settings. PMID:26653630

  8. Leadership in Surgery for Public Sector Hospitals in Jamaica: Strategies for the Operating Room

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O; Harding, Hyacinth E; Crandon, Ivor W; McGaw, Clarence D; Barnett, Alan T; Tennant, Ingrid; Evans, Necia R; Martin, Allie C; Simpson, Lindberg K; Johnson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The barriers to health care delivery in developing nations are many: underfunding, limited support services, scarce resources, suboptimal health care worker attitudes, and deficient health care policies are some of the challenges. The literature contains little information about health care leadership in developing nations. This discursive paper examines the impact of leadership on the delivery of operating room (OR) services in public sector hospitals in Jamaica. Delivery of OR services in Jamaica is hindered by many unique cultural, financial, political, and environmental barriers. We identify six leadership goals adapted to this environment to achieve change. Effective leadership must adapt to the environment. Delivery of OR services in Jamaica may be improved by addressing leadership training, workplace safety, interpersonal communication, and work environment and by revising existing policies. Additionally, there should be regular practice audits and quality control surveys. PMID:24355903

  9. INCIDENCE AND ANATOMIC LOCALIZATION OF ORAL CANDIDIASIS IN PATIENTS WITH AIDS HOSPITALIZED IN A PUBLIC HOSPITAL IN BELO HORIZONTE, MG, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Gabler, Ilanna G.; Barbosa, Anne C.; Vilela, Raquel R.; Lyon, Sandra; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence, anatomic localization and yeast species isolated from each clinical type of oral candidiasis. The clinical samples were obtained from 67 patients with AIDS with CD4 cell counts below 200 cells/mm3 and hospitalized in a public hospital (Eduardo de Menezes Hospital) in the city of Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. Yeasts were isolated using Chromagar® Candida. The results show that 50.7% of these patients had oral candidiasis. The pseudomembranous form was the most frequent clinical manifestation of oral candidiasis, followed by the erythematous and angular cheilite forms. The most common site of these clinical forms of oral candidiasis was the tongue. Candida albicans was the most common yeast species isolated from the lesions. However, other species were also found to be associated with these forms of oral candidiasis. PMID:19089255

  10. The Oregon Health and Science University-Oregon State Hospital Collaboration: Reflections on an Evolving Public-Academic Partnership.

    PubMed

    Chien, Joseph; Novosad, David; Mobbs, Karl E

    2016-03-01

    This column describes the conceptualization and implementation of an innovative collaboration between Oregon State Hospital and Oregon Health and Science University that was created to address understaffing and improve the quality of care. The hospital created a forensic evaluation rotation to address the growing population of forensic patients, which created a valuable recruiting tool for the hospital. One of the authors, a recent recruit, provides a first-person account of his experience working within the collaboration. The model could be emulated by other public-sector facilities facing similar challenges with psychiatrist recruitment and retention. PMID:26695498

  11. Not French manicure but onycholysis.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Anca; Stanciu, Roxana; Brzezinski, Piotr; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-09-01

    French manicure, a simple and elegant manicure style, caught the public's attention by the 19th century in French nail salons. Now this style has spread all over the world and is the first choice of 80% of women in the USA and Europe. It consists of a natural, pink, beige, or nude base tipped with pure white at the distal end.Onycholysis is a disease of the nails characterized by separation of the nail plate from the nail bed, with variable causes. We present 2 cases of onycholysis that resemble the beautiful and elegant French manicure. PMID:25244179

  12. A comparison of populations vaccinated in a public service and in a private hospital setting in the same area

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Graziani, Maria C; Ieraci, Roberto; Cavagni, Giovanni; Tozzi, Alberto E

    2008-01-01

    Background Improving immunisation rates in risk groups is one of the main objectives in vaccination strategies. However, achieving high vaccination rates in children with chronic conditions is difficult. Different types of vaccine providers may differently attract high risk children. Aim To describe the characteristics of two populations of children who attended a private and a public immunisation provider in the same area. Secondarily, to determine if prevalence of patients with underlying diseases by type of provider differs and to study if the choice of different providers influences timeliness in immunisation. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study on parents of children 2 – 36 months of age who attended a private hospital immunisation service or a public immunisation office serving the same metropolitan area of Rome, Italy. Data on personal characteristics and immunisation history were collected through a face to face interview with parents of vaccinees, and compared by type of provider. Prevalence of underlying conditions was compared in the two populations. Timeliness in immunisation and its determinants were analysed through a logistic regression model. Results A total of 202 parents of children 2–36 months of age were interviewed; 104 were in the public office, and 98 in the hospital practice. Children immunised in the hospital were more frequently firstborn female children, breast fed for a longer period, with a lower birthweight, and more frequently with a previous hospitalisation. The prevalence of high risk children immunised in the hospital was 9.2 vs 0% in the public service (P = 0.001). Immunisation delay for due vaccines was higher in the hospital practice than in the public service (DTP, polio, HBV, and Hib: 39.8% vs 22.1%; P = 0.005). Anyway multivariate analyses did not reveal differences in timeliness between the public and private hospital settings. Conclusion Children with underlying diseases or a low birthweight were more

  13. [French national health insurance. The current situation].

    PubMed

    Huguier, Michel; Lagrave, Michel; Marcelli, Aline; Rossignol, Claude; Tillement, Jean-Paul

    2010-06-01

    An audit of the French national health insurance system would be justified by economic considerations alone, but this would risk overlooking the notions of solidarity and freedom to which the French are rightly attached. European comparisons suggest, however, that our system could be made more efficient without undermining public health. The national health insurance system allows each member of the population to receive high-quality medical care. Practitioners have near-total freedom of prescription and practice. Medical care contributes to the ongoing increase in life expectancy, which is currently 73 years and second only to Japan. Healthcare is also a source of a million jobs. Macro-economic spending controls have failed, owing to medical progress and population aging, and also to medical consumerism favored by an unprecedented range of examinations and treatments, the increasing reimbursement of medical care, and the extension of direct payment by the insurer. Many ineffective measures have been implemented, such as tarification according to activity, and hospital certification. Health spending is also increased unnecessarily by bureaucratisation of healthcare spending and the transfer of professionals to posts for which they are not qualified. Some controversial medical prescriptions are not adequately controlled by the health service. Many reforms are based on over-optimistic economic predictions that fail to take related overheads into account. Lobbying by special interests groups undermines reform and the public interest. Too many independent administrative bodies have been created, and many are less efficient than the public structures they replaced. In sum, the French national health insurance system has become less and less efficient over the years. PMID:21513139

  14. The Royal North Shore Hospital inquiry: an analysis of the recommendations and the implications for quality and safety in Australian public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Anthony P; Hunyor, Stephen N

    2008-04-21

    In October 2007, the New South Wales Parliament appointed a Joint Select Committee to inquire into the quality of patient care at Royal North Shore Hospital (RNSH). The inquiry was initiated in response to the publicity and complaints surrounding a patient who had a miscarriage in the toilets of the RNSH emergency department waiting area. The Committee held four public hearings and received 103 submissions. It handed down 45 recommendations in its report on 20 December 2007. There has been criticism from clinicians and others that the recommendations are too general and will not effect significant change for the severe systemic problems affecting the hospital. This article represents the view of some of the clinicians who work at RNSH, and who gave evidence at the inquiry, on the recommendations and some possible solutions for the health system in general. PMID:18429715

  15. A diversity of blood smear examination system of Thai public hospital.

    PubMed

    Vattanaviboon, P; Manochiopinij, S; Sirisali, K; Tankeyul, B

    1999-01-01

    A good laboratory practice is the heart of clinical laboratory quality. One must establish a standard system in order to achieve the quality. However, standard system is not only the technical but also a state of the art. The socioeconomic and culture are the influence factors. At present, technique of reporting the blood smear examination is still a nation controversy. We surveyed the blood smear examination reporting system of the public hospital in Thailand. There were 77 hospitals participated in this study. A questionnaire comprised of 23 questions was distributed to 105 clinical laboratory staffs of the public health hospitals. Results showed that there was a diversity of blood smear examination reporting system. Generally, there were 2 ways of blood smear review. Every smeared slide and only abnormal slides were re-examined by the conventional technique. When an abnormal white blood cell blood picture was observed. The presence of either blast cell or atypical lymphocyte has clinical significance. A majority of laboratory would report in form "counting number of abnormal cell within 100% of the differential count". For other abnormalities of white blood cell; i.e. the neutrophils with toxic granules, most of laboratory reported as "presence". Interestingly, the red blood cell reporting system varied from laboratory to laboratory. There was a total of nine reporting patterns. Results indicated that pattern 4 (few or some, 1+,2+,3+,4+ are 5-10%, 11-25%, 26-50%, 51-75% and 51-100% cell/oil field, respectively) was the most popular one in reporting anisocytosis and poikilocytosis. However, the reporting pattern on red blood cell staining was difference. Pattern 4 and pattern 7 (grading by the size of central pallor) obtained a same popularity on the consideration of hypochromia. But the pattern 9 (few or some, 1+,2+,3+ are 0-1, 1-3, 4-6 and >6 cell/oil field, respectively) was the most frequently used in reporting of polychromasia. Fortunately we found that the

  16. Trend and forecasting rate of cancer deaths at a public university hospital using univariate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A.; Hassan, Noor I.

    2013-09-01

    Cancer is one of the principal causes of death in Malaysia. This study was performed to determine the pattern of rate of cancer deaths at a public hospital in Malaysia over an 11 year period from year 2001 to 2011, to determine the best fitted model of forecasting the rate of cancer deaths using Univariate Modeling and to forecast the rates for the next two years (2012 to 2013). The medical records of the death of patients with cancer admitted at this Hospital over 11 year's period were reviewed, with a total of 663 cases. The cancers were classified according to 10th Revision International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Data collected include socio-demographic background of patients such as registration number, age, gender, ethnicity, ward and diagnosis. Data entry and analysis was accomplished using SPSS 19.0 and Minitab 16.0. The five Univariate Models used were Naïve with Trend Model, Average Percent Change Model (ACPM), Single Exponential Smoothing, Double Exponential Smoothing and Holt's Method. The overall 11 years rate of cancer deaths showed that at this hospital, Malay patients have the highest percentage (88.10%) compared to other ethnic groups with males (51.30%) higher than females. Lung and breast cancer have the most number of cancer deaths among gender. About 29.60% of the patients who died due to cancer were aged 61 years old and above. The best Univariate Model used for forecasting the rate of cancer deaths is Single Exponential Smoothing Technique with alpha of 0.10. The forecast for the rate of cancer deaths shows a horizontally or flat value. The forecasted mortality trend remains at 6.84% from January 2012 to December 2013. All the government and private sectors and non-governmental organizations need to highlight issues on cancer especially lung and breast cancers to the public through campaigns using mass media, media electronics, posters and pamphlets in the attempt to decrease the rate of cancer deaths in Malaysia.

  17. Poor standards of care in small, private hospitals in Maharashtra, India: implications for public-private partnerships for maternity care.

    PubMed

    Bhate-Deosthali, Padma; Khatri, Ritu; Wagle, Suchitra

    2011-05-01

    The private health sector in India is generally unregulated. Maharashtra is among the few states which require registration of private hospitals. This paper reports on a study of standards of care in small, private hospitals (less than 30 beds) in Maharashtra state, India, with a focus on maternity care, based on interviews with the hospitals' owners or senior staff, and observation. In the absence of reliable information on the number of private hospitals in the state, a physical listing was carried out in 11 districts and an estimate drawn up; 10% of hospitals found in each location were included in the study sample. We found poor standards of care in many cases, and few or no qualified nurses or a duty medical officer in attendance. Of the 261 hospitals visited, 146 provided maternity services yet 137 did not have a qualified midwife, and though most claimed they provided emergency care, including caesarean section, only three had a blood bank and eight had an ambulance. Government plans to promote public-private partnerships with such hospitals, including for maternity services, create concern, given our findings. The need to enforce existing regulations and collect information on health outcomes and quality of care before the state involves these hospitals further in provision of maternity care is called for. PMID:21555084

  18. Extent, Nature, and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence in Public Tertiary Hospitals in China: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Zhao, Siqi; Jiao, Mingli; Wang, Jingtao; Peters, David H; Qiao, Hong; Zhao, Yuchong; Li, Ye; Song, Lei; Xing, Kai; Lu, Yan; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-06-01

    Using a cross-sectional survey design from 11 public tertiary hospitals (a specialist hospital, four Chinese medicine hospitals, and six general hospitals) in the urban areas of Heilongjiang, we determined the nature of workplace violence that medical staff have encountered in Chinese hospitals and identified factors associated with those experiences of violence. A total of 1129 health workers participated. The specialist hospital had the highest prevalence of physical violence (35.4%), while the general hospitals had the highest prevalence of non-physical violence (76%). Inexperienced medical staff (p < 0.001) were more likely to suffer non-physical violence than physical violence in Chinese medicine hospitals compared to experienced staff. Medical units (p = 0.001) had a high risk of non-physical violence, while surgical units (p = 0.005) had a high risk of physical violence. In general hospitals, staff with higher levels of anxiety about workplace violence were more vulnerable to both physical violence (1.67, 95% CI 1.36-2.10) and non-physical violence (1.309, 95% CI 1.136-1.508) compared to those with lower levels of anxiety, while rotating shift workers had a higher odds of physical violence (2.2, 95% CI 1.21-4.17) and non-physical violence (1.65, 95% CI 1.13-2.41) compared to fixed day shift workers. Thus, prevention should focus not only on high-risk sections of hospitals, but also on the nature of the hospital itself. PMID:26086703

  19. Extent, Nature, and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence in Public Tertiary Hospitals in China: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Zhao, Siqi; Jiao, Mingli; Wang, Jingtao; Peters, David H.; Qiao, Hong; Zhao, Yuchong; Li, Ye; Song, Lei; Xing, Kai; Lu, Yan; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional survey design from 11 public tertiary hospitals (a specialist hospital, four Chinese medicine hospitals, and six general hospitals) in the urban areas of Heilongjiang, we determined the nature of workplace violence that medical staff have encountered in Chinese hospitals and identified factors associated with those experiences of violence. A total of 1129 health workers participated. The specialist hospital had the highest prevalence of physical violence (35.4%), while the general hospitals had the highest prevalence of non-physical violence (76%). Inexperienced medical staff (p < 0.001) were more likely to suffer non-physical violence than physical violence in Chinese medicine hospitals compared to experienced staff. Medical units (p = 0.001) had a high risk of non-physical violence, while surgical units (p = 0.005) had a high risk of physical violence. In general hospitals, staff with higher levels of anxiety about workplace violence were more vulnerable to both physical violence (1.67, 95% CI 1.36–2.10) and non-physical violence (1.309, 95% CI 1.136–1.508) compared to those with lower levels of anxiety, while rotating shift workers had a higher odds of physical violence (2.2, 95% CI 1.21–4.17) and non-physical violence (1.65, 95% CI 1.13–2.41) compared to fixed day shift workers. Thus, prevention should focus not only on high-risk sections of hospitals, but also on the nature of the hospital itself. PMID:26086703

  20. Direct Costs of Dengue Hospitalization in Brazil: Public and Private Health Care Systems and Use of WHO Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Vieira Machado, Alessandra A.; Estevan, Anderson Oliveira; Sales, Antonio; Brabes, Kelly Cristina da Silva; Croda, Júlio; Negrão, Fábio Juliano

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue, an arboviral disease, is a public health problem in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. In Brazil, epidemics have become increasingly important, with increases in the number of hospitalizations and the costs associated with the disease. This study aimed to describe the direct costs of hospitalized dengue cases, the financial impact of admissions and the use of blood products where current protocols for disease management were not followed. Methods and Results To analyze the direct costs of dengue illness and platelet transfusion in Brazil based on the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, we conducted a retrospective cross-sectional census study on hospitalized dengue patients in the public and private Brazilian health systems in Dourados City, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. The analysis involved cases that occurred from January through December during the 2010 outbreak. In total, we examined 8,226 mandatorily reported suspected dengue cases involving 507 hospitalized patients. The final sample comprised 288 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients, who accounted for 56.8% of all hospitalized cases. The overall cost of the hospitalized dengue cases was US $210,084.30, in 2010, which corresponded to 2.5% of the gross domestic product per capita in Dourados that year. In 35.2% of cases, blood products were used in patients who did not meet the blood transfusion criteria. The overall median hospitalization cost was higher (p = 0.002) in the group that received blood products (US $1,622.40) compared with the group that did not receive blood products (US $550.20). Conclusion The comparative costs between the public and the private health systems show that both the hospitalization of and platelet transfusion in patients who do not meet the WHO and Brazilian dengue guidelines increase the direct costs, but not the quality, of health care. PMID:25188295

  1. The Effects of Competition from Private Schooling on French Public School Districts in the Province of Quebec

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldas, Stephen J.; Bernier, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    The Province of Quebec subsidizes nearly 50% of private education, and at the same time heavily regulates private schools. To date, no studies have been done to determine the effect of the unique nature of competition from K-12 private schools on public school education of the sort found in Quebec. The authors used multiple regression to determine…

  2. The indirect costs of agency nurses in South Africa: a case study in two public sector hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rispel, Laetitia C.; Moorman, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background Globally, flexible work arrangements – through the use of temporary nursing staff – are an important strategy for dealing with nursing shortages in hospitals. Objective The objective of the study was to determine the direct and indirect costs of agency nurses, as well as the advantages and the problems associated with agency nurse utilisation in two public sector hospitals in South Africa. Methods Following ethical approval, two South African public sector hospitals were selected purposively. Direct costs were determined through an analysis of hospital expenditure information for a 5-year period from 2005 until 2010, obtained from the national transversal Basic Accounting System database. At each hospital, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the chief executive officer, executive nursing services manager, the maternity or critical care unit nursing manager, the human resource manager, and the finance manager. Indirect costs measured were the time spent on pre-employment checks, and nurse recruitment, orientation, and supervision. All expenditure is expressed in South African Rands (R: 1 USD=R7, 2010 prices). Results In the 2009/10 financial year, Hospital 1 spent R38.86 million (US$5.55 million) on nursing agencies, whereas Hospital 2 spent R10.40 million (US$1.49 million). The total estimated time spent per week on indirect cost activities at Hospital 1 was 51.5 hours, and 60 hours at Hospital 2. The estimated monetary value of this time at Hospital 1 was R962,267 (US$137,467) and at Hospital 2 the value was R300,121 (US$42,874), thus exceeding the weekly direct costs of nursing agencies. Agency nurses assisted the selected hospitals in dealing with problems of nurse recruitment, absenteeism, shortages, and skills gaps in specialised clinical areas. The problems experienced with agency nurses included their perceived lack of commitment, unreliability, and providing sub-optimal quality of patient care. Conclusion Hospital managers and

  3. Are managers' and the general public's perceptions of risk communication needs in line? A French alpine valley case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrière, Marie; Sprague, Teresa; Bogaard, Thom; Greiving, Stefan; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2013-04-01

    Risk communication is a crucial element of risk management. It contributes to social capacity building by influencing the knowledge, attitude, behavior, psychology, as well as social and organizational aspects1,2. It is globally recognized that effective risk communication should address needs and requirements of targeted audiences, especially those of the public. This study compares needs and requirements related to risk communication as seen by the risk managers, with the needs and requirements as expressed by the general public. Two surveys were conducted in a mountainous region facing multi-hazards, the Ubaye valley (France). The first survey, conducted within the context of the Marie Curie Research and Training Network 'Mountain Risk', was addressed to the local community. It aimed at gathering perceptions, needs and requirements of the general public (344 respondents) on risk communication3. The second survey, conducted in the context of the Marie Curie Initial Training Network 'CHANGES', targeted risk managers (16 stakeholders of the authorities, technical services and emergency units) at both the local and the regional scale to evaluate their perceptions regarding risk communication with the general public. The needs and requirements were analyzed with respect to several dimensions: 1) the information provided to the public, 2) the legal requirements for communication, 3) the level of trust the population has in risk managers, 4) insights on awareness and preparedness, and 5) information on the media used in past communication efforts. Results of the analysis concerning the last dimension reveal that, while the general public mentioned press, official reports and technical reports as the top three media by which they received information, the risk managers cited the press but in contrast also selected radio and television. Other results indicate that a potential mismatch exists as more than 80% of the respondents of the population find all listed topics

  4. Factors influencing inpatients’ satisfaction with hospitalization service in public hospitals in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiping; Li, Meina; Wang, Jingrui; Xue, Chen; Ding, Tao; Nong, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Lulu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to observe the current status of inpatient satisfaction and analyze the possible factors influencing patient satisfaction during hospitalization. Methods A cross-sectional investigation was conducted to obtain basic information about inpatient satisfaction, and statistical methods were used to describe and analyze the data. A total of 878 questionnaires were included in this study. A 5-point Likert scale rating was employed to assess items related to hospitalization care. Nonparametric tests and ordinal logistic analysis were used to explore the relationship between predictors and the patients’ overall satisfaction. Results Among the respondents, 89.75% were satisfied overall with the service they received during hospitalization, while 0.57% reported dissatisfaction. Inpatient demographic characteristics such as sex of the patients, occupation, age, and residence had significant associations with satisfaction, while monthly income and marital status did not. Additionally, the statistical outcome indicated that doctors’ and nurses’ service attitudes, and expenditure and environment were found to have an impact on the inpatient satisfaction ratings, with odds ratio of 2.43, 3.19, and 2.72, respectively. Conclusion This study emphasizes the influence of sex of the patients, the service attitudes of the doctors and nurses, and expenditure and environment on inpatient satisfaction. An increase in satisfaction ratings concerning the areas of doctors’ and nurses’ service attitudes, and expenditure and environment can improve the overall satisfaction levels. Responsible health management departments should pay attention to patient satisfaction and improve the quality of relevant health services, thus ultimately enhancing inpatients’ hospitalization experiences. PMID:27110101

  5. [Optimizing French scientific and economic performance: the Cifre system of public-private partnership in doctoral research and Servier's contribution].

    PubMed

    Canet, Emmanuel; Grassy, Gérard

    2006-01-01

    The European Union has set itself the daunting target of becoming the world's most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy by 2010. Any hope of success against the United States and the Asian tiger economies lies in the quality of scientific and technological research. In France, postgraduate training has long labored under a deep academia/industry divide. Although the universities have introduced supervised 3 year doctoral courses along the lines of the English-speaking countries, they still produce too many postdocs with little experience or understanding of, and little taste for, the private sector. This ignores career realities: the public sector can offer employment to only half the postdocs it produces. The rest must fall back on positions in the private sector, in some cases with a sense of failure, ill suiting them to drive the intellectual economy forwards compared to their international competitors. To combat the divide and emphasize the quality of the research training available within industry, the public/private National Association for Technical Research (ANRT), acting on behalf of the Ministry of Research, created the Industrial Research Training Agreement (Cifre) scheme in 1981. Higher education laboratories and private companies combine to offer doctoral students the opportunity to undertake their 3 year course in a mixed public/private environment (the exact ratio is not defined but in the case of the Servier Research Group, an early and active participant in the scheme, at least one third of the course is spent in the private sector). The doctoral thesis is thereby transformed into a meaningful career qualification. Funded by the Ministry, with maintenance grants to the students and compensatory payments to the companies, the Cifre scheme, which is currently being expanded, has produced 12,000 postdocs personally and intellectually equipped for careers transiting seamlessly between the public and private sectors, to the enrichment of each

  6. Community benefits and health reform: creating new links for public health and not-for-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Ann L

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) put new requirements on not-for-profit (NFP) hospitals to document provision of community benefits, to justify their tax-exempt status. Specific PPACA provisions include requirements that NFP hospitals conduct or participate in a community health needs assessment and work to address the needs identified. Consideration is given to these particular PPACA mandates and to Internal Revenue Service (IRS) actions to implement them. The background of concerns that have been expressed about whether the NFP hospitals' tax exemption should be continued and a brief history of that exemption is noted. Not-for-profit hospitals have resources that the federal government is requiring them to bring to public health improvement, during a time when the public health agencies at the federal and state level continue to experience reductions in funding. Linking of the NFP hospitals' compliance activities with the public health agency community health planning activities will help fulfill its PPACA requirements and the regulatory reporting requirements for the IRS. PMID:21964364

  7. Deaths Rates in Public Hospitals of Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Buso, DL; Longo-Mbenza, B; Bovet, P; van den Borne, B; Okwe, A Nge; Mzingelwa, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: South Africa (SA) is experiencing a rapid epidemiologic transition as a consequence of political, economic and social changes. In this study we described, based on hospital data, the mortality patterns of Non communicable Diseases (NCD), Communicable Diseases (CD), the NCD/CD ratios, and the trends of deaths. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all deaths occurring in several public hospitals in the Eastern Cape Province of SA between 2002 and 2006. Causes of deaths were coded according to the ICD 10 Edition. Results: A total of 107380 admissions responded to the inclusion criteria between 2002 and 2006. The crude death rate was 4.3% (n=4566) with a mean age of 46±21 years and a sex ratio of 3.1 men (n=3453): 1 woman (n=1113). Out of all deaths, there were 62.9% NCD (n=2872) vs. 37.1% CD (n=1694) with NCD/CD ratio of 1.7. The ratio NCD/CD deaths in men was 1.3 (n=1951/1502) vs. NCD/CD deaths in women of 1.9 (n=735/378). The peak of deaths was observed in winter season. The majority of NCD deaths were at age of 30–64 years, whereas the highest rate of CD deaths was at age< 30 years. The trend of deaths including the majority of NCD, increased from 2002 to 2006. There was a tendency of increase in tuberculosis deaths, but a tendency of decrease in HIV/AIDS deaths was from 2002 to 2006. Conclusion: Non-communicable diseases are the leading causes of deaths in rural Eastern Cape province of SA facing Post-epidemiologic transition stages. We recommend overarching priority actions for the response to the Non-communicable Diseases: policy change, prevention, treatment, international cooperation, research, monitoring, accountability, and re-orientation of health systems. PMID:23641386

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for gastroschisis in a public hospital from west México.

    PubMed

    Robledo-Aceves, Mireya; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Mellín-Sánchez, Estrella Lizbeth; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo; Pérez-Molina, J Jesús; Cárdenas-Ruiz Velasco, Juan José; Corona-Rivera, Jorge Román

    2015-05-01

    Mexico is recognized as a country with a high prevalence of gastroschisis, although the cause of this remains unclear. We define the prevalence and potential risk factors for gastroschisis in a public hospital from west México. A case-control study was conducted among 270 newborns, including 90 patients with nonsyndromic gastroschisis (cases) and 180 infants without birth defects (controls), born all during the period 2009 to 2013 at the Hospital Civil de Guadalajara "Dr. Juan I. Menchaca" (Guadalajara, Mexico), from a total of 51,145 live births. Potential maternal risk factors for gastroschisis were compared using multivariate logistic regression analysis to evaluate the deviance explained by different variables of interest. The overall prevalence of gastroschisis in live births was 17.6 per 10,000 births (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.0-21.2), whereas in offspring of women ≤ 19 years old was 29.9 per 10,000 births (95% CI 21.9-38.0). Mothers ≤ 19 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.8: 95% CI 1.5-5.1), anemia during pregnancy (aOR 10.7; 95% CI 2.0-56.9), first-trimester exposure to hormonal contraceptives (aOR 3.7; 95% CI 1.0-13.0), and first-trimester alcohol consumption (aOR 3.4; 95% CI 1.6-7.3), were associated with gastroschisis. Contrarily, adjusted OR for pre-pregnancy body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2) has protective odds (aOR 0.2; 95% CI 0.1-0.5). Our results suggest an increased risk for gastroschisis among mothers under the age of 20, with anemia during pregnancy, and those who used hormonal contraceptives or consumed alcohol during early pregnancy, whereas, pre-pregnancy overweight has a protective OR, and they are discussed as clues in its pathogenesis. PMID:25243388

  9. Profit vs. public welfare goals in investor-owned and not-for-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kralewski, J; Gifford, G; Porter, J

    1988-01-01

    A study of goal formation in a matched sample of investor-owned and not-for-profit hospitals was conducted to determine differences in the perceptions of employees regarding their hospitals' commitments to patient/community welfare goals versus profit maximization. These perceptions were compared to available operating data for the same hospitals. While the investor-owned hospitals as a group generally were found to emphasize patient/community welfare values less than their not-for-profit counterparts, this did not hold true when matched pairs were analyzed. In some of the matched subsets, the not-for-profit hospitals were much more profit-oriented than the investor-owned hospitals. This research reveals that strong patient/community service values do not universally characterize not-for-profit hospitals, and conversely investor-owned hospitals cannot always be characterized as profit maximizers. PMID:10288636

  10. Discussion on a Public Hospital's Practice in Culture Shaping and Innovative Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiying

    2015-05-01

    Culture shaping is an important part of a hospital's quality management to enhance its medical service, improve doctor-patient relations, and cement its brand image (Jianping and Hong in Chinese Hospital Management 29(1):36-37, 2009). First built in 1953, Xuzhou Central Hospital is a tertiary general hospital in the Huaihai Economic Zone and has won a series of honorary titles for its reforms, innovations, and the level of medical services provided. In recent years, the hospital has increased its efforts in culture shaping through the construction of special departments, medical services, hospital culture, and professional ethics. This has resulted in substantial progress in the hospital's medical capabilities and service quality, and laid a solid foundation to achieve its ambitious goal of becoming a nationally prestigious hospital, among the best in Jiangsu and a regional healthcare center in the Huaihai Economic Zone. PMID:25534489

  11. Submerged discontent and patterns of accommodation: a case study of doctors' pay in two public hospitals in China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuebing

    2014-01-01

    The article evaluates submerged discontent among Chinese public hospital doctors (Note1) regarding their pay and patterns of accommodation, including doctors' responses through formal and informal actions in the context of health service marketization. On the basis of a case study of two public hospitals, the article illustrates the dynamical impact of marketization on Chinese doctors' pay-related dissatisfaction and health service employment relationship. Because of the authoritarian management and compliant trade unions, the conflict between doctors and hospitals is unable to be accommodated through collective methods. Instead, doctors' discontent is often channelled through informal, individual and subtle activities. Meanwhile, doctors' professional society is gradually influential, showing its potential of developing doctors' group identity and protecting members' interests in future. PMID:23737394

  12. Training Needs of Nurses in Public Hospitals in Australia: Review of Current Practices and Future Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Joanna; Bhanugopan, Ramudu; Fish, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to provide an overview of the concept of training needs analysis (TNA), current practice, models and the impact that training needs analysis currently has on nurses in public hospitals in Australia. Thus, the paper should aid future research in the area of TNA of nurses through helping researchers to clarify the…

  13. Q Fever in French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Eldin, Carole; Mahamat, Aba; Demar, Magalie; Abboud, Philippe; Djossou, Félix; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is present worldwide. Recent studies have shown that this bacterium is an emerging pathogen in French Guiana and has a high prevalence (24% of community-acquired pneumonia). In this review, we focus on the peculiar epidemiology of Q fever in French Guiana. We place it in the context of the epidemiology of the disease in the surrounding countries of South America. We also review the clinical features of Q fever in this region, which has severe initial presentation but low mortality rates. These characteristics seem to be linked to a unique genotype (genotype 17). Finally, we discuss the issue of the animal reservoir of C. burnetii in French Guiana, which is still unknown. Further studies are necessary to identify this reservoir. Identification of this reservoir will improve the understanding of the Q fever epidemic in French Guiana and will provide new tools to control this public health problem. PMID:25092817

  14. Oncogenetics service and the Brazilian public health system: the experience of a reference Cancer Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Palmero, Edenir I.; Galvão, Henrique C.R.; Fernandes, Gabriela C.; de Paula, André E.; Oliveira, Junea C.; Souza, Cristiano P.; Andrade, Carlos E.; Romagnolo, Luis G.C.; Volc, Sahlua; C., Maximiliano; Sabato, Cristina; Grasel, Rebeca; Mauad, Edmundo; Reis, Rui M.; Michelli, Rodrigo A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The identification of families at-risk for hereditary cancer is extremely important due to the prevention potential in those families. However, the number of Brazilian genetic services providing oncogenetic care is extremely low for the continental dimension of the country and its population. Therefore, at-risk patients do not receive appropriate assistance. This report describes the creation, structure and management of a cancer genetics service in a reference center for cancer prevention and treatment, the Barretos Cancer Hospital (BCH). The Oncogenetics Department (OD) of BCH offers, free of charge, to all patients/relatives with clinical criteria, the possibility to perform i) genetic counseling, ii) preventive examinations and iii) genetic testing with the best quality standards. The OD has a multidisciplinary team and is integrated with all specialties. The genetic counseling process consists (mostly) of two visits. In 2014, 614 individuals (371 families) were seen by the OD. To date, over 800 families were referred by the OD for genetic testing. The support provided by the Oncogenetics team is crucial to identify at-risk individuals and to develop preventive and personalized behaviors for each situation, not only to the upper-middle class population, but also to the people whose only possibility is the public health system. PMID:27192127

  15. [Generating health elicits illness? The contradictions of work performed in emergency care units of public hospitals].

    PubMed

    Rosado, Iana Vasconcelos Moreira; Russo, Gláucia Helena Araújo; Maia, Eulália Maria Chaves

    2015-10-01

    In general terms, health is influenced and generated by the interaction of biological, social, economic, political and cultural factors. From this standpoint, the scope of this paper was to analyze the relationship between working in emergency care units of public hospitals and the health/sickness of the professionals who work in them. It involved a quantitative and qualitative survey, in which 240 health professionals (doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, dentists, nutritionists, audiologists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists) filled out a questionnaire. All the results acknowledged the importance of work to ensure favorable conditions for good health. However, they highlighted its deleterious physical and mental effects on workers, which included stress, lack of a healthy life-style, high blood pressure and musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal and sleep disorders. It is therefore important to tackle this reality in order to enhance the health of professionals and, consequently, the quality of care provided to the user, since illnesses among health workers are strongly linked to the existing health model in society. PMID:26465845

  16. Knowledge about breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer among nurses in a public hospital 1

    PubMed Central

    Prolla, Carmen Maria Dornelles; da Silva, Patrícia Santos; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Goldim, José Roberto; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nurses involved in the care of oncology patients in a public university hospital, regarding breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer, and to verify the use of such knowledge in their daily practice. METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained through a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Out of 154 nurses, 137 (88.9%) agreed to participate in the study. Two questionnaires were excluded such that 135 questionnaires were analyzed. RESULTS: The global percentage of correct answers was not associated with age (p=0.173) or degree/specialization (p=0.815). Questions were classified into categories. In categories involving knowledge of established breast cancer risk factors and indicators of hereditary breast cancer, the rate of correct answers was 65.8% and 66.4%, respectively. On the practice of genetic counseling, 40.7% of those interviewed were not sure about the definition of genetic counseling and 78.5% reported never having identified or referred a patient at genetic risk for specialized risk assessment. Practice of educational actions regarding this subject was reported by 48.5% of those interviewed. CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the need to develop qualifying actions for nurses, so that strategies to control breast cancer become effective in their health care practice. PMID:25806636

  17. [Public hospital emergency department visits due to burns in Brazil, 2009].

    PubMed

    Gawryszewski, Vilma Pinheiro; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata; Silva, Nilza Nunes da; Morais Neto, Otaliba Libânio de; Silva, Marta Maria Alves da; Mascarenhas, Márcio Dênis Medeiros; Sá, Naíza Nayla Bandeira de; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Malta, Deborah Carvalho

    2012-04-01

    The objective was to analyze the characteristics of burn injuries treated in emergency departments (ED) and associated factors. This was a cross-sectional study of 761 ED visits collected through the National Injury Surveillance System in 2009. The majority of patients were males (58.6%), and the most prevalent age brackets were 30-49 years (23.1%) and 0-4 years (23%). Most burns occurred at home (62.1%), especially among females and children, and in commerce/services/industry/construction (19.1%), mainly among males 20-49 years. Work-related burns comprised 29.1% of the overall sample. Alcohol use prior to the injury was reported in 5.1% of cases. Causal agents across all age brackets were: contact with hot substances (43.6%) and exposure to fire and flames (24.2%); among the economically productive age groups, association with chemicals substances was common. Burns in children 0-14 years were associated with injuries at home, contact with heat and hot substances, and subsequent hospitalization; burns in the 15-49-year bracket were associated with exposure to fire/flames and electrical current, injuries occurring in public places, and outpatient treatment and discharge. The study highlights the importance of burn prevention strategies targeting children and workers. PMID:22488309

  18. Frequency of Magnetic Resonance Imaging patterns of tuberculous spondylitis in a public sector hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Sumera; Haider, Shahbaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine frequencies of different MRI patterns of tuberculous spondylitisin a public sector hospital in Karachi. Methods: This descriptive multidisciplinary case series study was done from October 25, 2011 to May 28, 2012 in Radiology Department and Department of Medicine in the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center Karachi. MRI scans (dorsal / lumbosacral spine) of the Patients presenting with backache in Medical OPD, were performed in Radiology Department. Axial and sagittal images of T1 weighted, T2 weighted and STIR sequences of the affected region were taken. A total of 140 patients who were diagnosed as having tuberculous spondylitis were further evaluated and analyzed for having different patterns of involvement of the spine and compared with similar studies. Results: Among frequencies of different MRI pattern of tuberculous spondylitis, contiguous vertebral involvement was 100%, discal involvement 98.6%, paravertebral abscess 92.1% cases, epidural abscess 91.4%, spinal cord / thecal sac compression 89.3%, vertebral collapse 72.9%, gibbus deformity 42.9% and psoas abscess 36.4%. Conclusion: Contiguous vertebral involvement was commonest MRI pattern, followed by disk involvement, paravertebral & epidural abscesses, thecal sac compression and vertebral collapse. PMID:27022369

  19. The Efficiency and Budgeting of Public Hospitals: Case Study of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yusefzadeh, Hasan; Ghaderi, Hossein; Bagherzade, Rafat; Barouni, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospitals are the most costly and important components of any health care system, so it is important to know their economic values, pay attention to their efficiency and consider factors affecting them. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the technical scale and economic efficiency of hospitals in the West Azerbaijan province of Iran, for which Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) was used to propose a model for operational budgeting. Materials and Methods This study was a descriptive-analysis that was conducted in 2009 and had three inputs and two outputs. Deap2, 1 software was used for data analysis. Slack and radial movements and surplus of inputs were calculated for selected hospitals. Finally, a model was proposed for performance-based budgeting of hospitals and health sectors using the DEA technique. Results The average scores of technical efficiency, pure technical efficiency (managerial efficiency) and scale efficiency of hospitals were 0.584, 0.782 and 0.771, respectively. In other words the capacity of efficiency promotion in hospitals without any increase in costs and with the same amount of inputs was about 41.5%. Only four hospitals among all hospitals had the maximum level of technical efficiency. Moreover, surplus production factors were evident in these hospitals. Conclusions Reduction of surplus production factors through comprehensive planning based on the results of the Data Envelopment Analysis can play a major role in cost reduction of hospitals and health sectors. In hospitals with a technical efficiency score of less than one, the original and projected values of inputs were different; resulting in a surplus. Hence, these hospitals should reduce their values of inputs to achieve maximum efficiency and optimal performance. The results of this method was applied to hospitals a benchmark for making decisions about resource allocation; linking budgets to performance results; and controlling and improving hospitals performance

  20. Public-private settlement and hospital mortality per sources of payment

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Juliana Pires; Martins, Mônica; Leite, Iuri da Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze if the adjusted hospital mortality varies according to source of payment of hospital admissions, legal nature, and financing settlement of hospitals. METHODS Cros-ssectional study with information source in administrative databases. Specific hospital admission reasons were selected considering the volume of hospital admissions and the list of quality indicators proposed by the North-American Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Were analyzed 852,864 hospital admissions of adults, occurred in 789 hospitals between 2008 and 2010, in Sao Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul, applying multilevel logistic regression. RESULTS At hospital admission level, showed higher chances of death male patients in more advanced age groups, with comorbidity, who used intensive care unit, and had the Brazilian Unified Health System as source of payment. At the level of hospitals, in those located in the mean of the distribution, the adjusted probability of death in hospital admissions financed by plan or private was 5.0%, against 9.0% when reimbursed by the Brazilian Unified Health System. This probability increased in hospital admissions financed by the Brazilian Unified Health System in hospitals to two standard deviations above the mean, reaching 29.0%. CONCLUSIONS In addition to structural characteristics of the hospitals and the profile of the patients, interventions aimed at improving care should also consider the coverage of the population by health plans, the network shared between beneficiaries of plans and users of the Brazilian Unified Health System, the standard of care to the various sources of payment by hospitals and, most importantly, how these factors influence the clinical performance. PMID:27463256

  1. Transforming Practice Through Publication: A Community Hospital Approach to the Creation of a Research-Intensive Environment.

    PubMed

    Brockopp, Dorothy; Hill, Karen; Moe, Krista; Wright, Lonnie

    2016-01-01

    Publication of 28 data-based articles in peer-reviewed journals over a 4-year period is the result of a commitment to conducting and publishing research at a 383-bed Magnet®-redesignated community hospital. The research-intensive environment in nursing at this institution supports publication as the desired outcome of all projects. The provision of appropriate resources, the development of 2 models to guide the conduct of research and nursing leadership that encourages and supports research activities enables nurses to submit manuscripts describing their work. Steps taken to support the publication of findings can be adapted for other practice settings. PMID:26641469

  2. The effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services: a pilot study in public hospitals in Northern Greece

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services, particularly in public hospitals in Northern Greece. Methods A questionnaire with three sections was used. The first one referred to internal marketing by using Foreman and Money's scale, while the second one contained questions on job satisfaction based on Stamps and Piermonte's work. The last section included demographic questions. Three categories of health care professionals, nurses, doctors and paramedic personnel working in public hospitals have participated. Results Doctors tend to be more satisfied with their job than nurses in the same hospitals. Male personnel also tend to be more satisfied with their job than female. Time-defined work contract personnel have a greater level of job satisfaction than permanent personnel. Marital status, position, and educational level have no statistically significant impact on job satisfaction. A slight decline in job satisfaction occurs as the personnel age. Conclusions Internal marketing has a positive effect on the job satisfaction of hospital staff in Northern Greece. Also, doctors and male personnel seem to have greater levels of job satisfaction. Staff with time-defined work contracts with the hospital are more satisfied than permanent staff, and as the staff age, there is a slight decline in job satisfaction. PMID:21981753

  3. Income, location, and the demand for health care from public, nonprofit, and for-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Brown, H S

    2001-01-01

    Although, empirically, for-profit hospitals serve few poor and indigent patients, they may be able to shift capital more quickly than hospitals of other ownership types, thereby spatially avoiding poor patients. However, in a market with a relatively high proportion of for-profit hospitals, spatial avoidance of poor patients is not possible because spatial competition will exist in non-poor areas. The study examines hospital choice for maternity care in a market with many for-profits using a gravity model or conditional logit. The analysis shows that poor and Medicaid populations choose for-profit hospitals overall. Income, along with distance, is an important factor in hospital choice. PMID:11434711

  4. Variations in the Quality of Care at Large Public Hospitals in Beijing, China: A Condition-Based Outcome Approach

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Liu, Yuanli; Shu, Ting; Yang, Wei; Liang, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Background Public hospitals deliver over ninety percent of all outpatient and inpatient services in China. Their quality is graded into three levels (A, B, and C) largely based on structural resources, but empirical evidence on the quality of process and outcome of care is extremely scarce. As expectations for quality care rise with higher living standards and cost of care, such evidence is urgently needed and vital to improve care and to inform future health reforms. Methods We compiled and analyzed a multicenter database of over 4 million inpatient discharge summary records to provide a comprehensive assessment of the level and variations in clinical outcomes of hospitalization at 39 tertiary hospitals in Beijing. We assessed six outcome measures of clinical quality: in-hospital mortality rates (RSMR) for AMI, stroke, pneumonia and CABG, post-procedural complication rate (RS-CR), and failure-to-rescue rate (RS-FTR). The measures were adjusted for pre-admission patient case-mix using indirect standardization method with hierarchical linear mixed models. Results We found good overall quality with large variations by hospital and condition (mean/range, in %): RSMR-AMI: 6.23 (2.37–14.48), RSMR-stroke: 4.18 (3.58–4.44), RSMR-pneumonia: 7.78 (7.20–8.59), RSMR-CABG: 1.93 (1.55–2.23), RS-CR: 11.38 (9.9–12.88), and RS-FTR: 6.41 (5.17–7.58). Hospital grade was not significantly associated with any risk-adjusted outcome measures. Conclusions Going to a higher grade public hospital does not always lead to better patient outcome because hospital grade only contains information about hospital structural resources. A hospital report card with some outcome measures of quality would provide valuable information to patients in choosing providers, and for regulators to identify gaps in health care quality. Reducing the variations in clinical practice and patient outcome should be a focus for policy makers in the next round of health sector reforms in China. PMID

  5. Hospital Nurse Staffing and Public Health Emergency Preparedness: Implications for Policy

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Hospital restructuring policies and an impending nursing workforce shortage have threatened the nation’s emergency preparedness. Current emergency response plans rely on sources of nurses that are limited and overestimated. A national investment in nursing education and workforce infrastructure, as well as incentives for hospitals to efficiently maximize nurse staffing, are needed to ensure emergency preparedness in the United States. This review highlights the challenges of maintaining hospital nursing surge capacity and policy implications of a nursing shortage. PMID:20840714

  6. Manual of Tape Scripts: French, Level 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Gladys; And Others

    Designed specifically for use in the oral phase of first-level French classes in New York City Public Schools, these scripts may be used as supplemental drill or review material in any beginning conversational French course with or without the accompanying audio tapes. The two-part manual treats through a variety of drills such aspects of grammar…

  7. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in pregnant women in a public hospital in northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Álvarez, Antonio; Narro-Duarte, Sergio Guadalupe; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Díaz-García, Juan Humberto; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Martínez-García, Sergio Arturo; Canales-Molina, Arturo

    2006-01-01

    Background Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection in pregnant women represents a risk for congenital disease. There is scarce information about the epidemiology of T. gondii infection in pregnant women in Mexico. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalence of T. gondii infection and associated socio-demographic, clinical and behavioural characteristics in a population of pregnant women of Durango City, Mexico. Methods Three hundred and forty three women seeking prenatal care in a public hospital of Durango City in Mexico were examined for T. gondii infection. All women were tested for anti-T. gondii IgM and IgG antibodies by using IMx Toxo IgM and IMx Toxo IgG 2.0 kits (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL, USA), respectively. Socio-demographic, clinical and behavioural characteristics from each participant were also obtained. Results Twenty one out of the 343 (6.1%) women had IgG anti-T. gondii antibodies. None of the 343 women had IgM anti-T. gondii antibodies. Multivariate analysis using logic regression showed that T. gondii infection was associated with living in a house with soil floor (adjusted OR = 7.16; 95% CI: 1.39–36.84), residing outside of Durango State (adjusted OR = 4.25; 95% CI: 1.72–10.49), and turkey meat consumption (adjusted OR = 3.85; 95% CI: 1.30–11.44). Other characteristics as cat contact, gardening, and food preferences did not show any association with T. gondii infection. Conclusion The prevalence of T. gondii infection in pregnant women of Durango City is low as compared with those reported in other regions of Mexico and the majority of other countries. Poor housing conditions as soil floors, residing in other Mexican States, and turkey meat consumption might contribute to acquire T. gondii infection. PMID:16839423

  8. French Neurologists during World War I.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier; Tatu, Laurent; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The Great War accelerated the development of neurological knowledge. Many neurological signs and syndromes, as well as new nosological entities such as war psychoneuroses, were described during the conflict. The period between 1914 and 1918 was the first time in which many neurologists were concentrated in wartime neurology centres and confronted with a number of neurological patients never seen before. This concentration led to the publication of papers concerning all fields of neurological sciences, and these reports pervaded scientific journals during the conflict and the post-war years. The careers of French neurologists during the war were highly varied. Some were mobilised, whilst others enlisted voluntarily. They worked as regiment physicians at the front or in wartime neurology centres at the front or at the rear. Others were academics who were already authoritative names in the field of neurology. Whilst they were too old to be officially mobilised, they nevertheless worked in their militarised neurology departments of civil hospitals. We present here the careers of a few French neurologists during the Great War, including Charles Foix (1882-1927), René Cruchet (1875-1959), Georges Guillain (1876-1961), Jean Lhermitte (1877-1959), Clovis Vincent (1879-1947), Gustave Roussy (1874-1948), and Paul Sollier (1861-1933). PMID:27035726

  9. Library Services to Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Section. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library services to hospital personnel, hospital patients, and housebound or handicapped persons, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "Education and Training for Health Care Librarianship," in which Antonia J. Bunch (United Kingdom) discusses the scope of and…

  10. Western Australia's public hospital system: some aspects of finance and control.

    PubMed

    Bell, J

    1988-01-01

    In 1829 the Governor of the Swan River Colony founded a government-controlled and financed hospital for the destitute but, by charging those who could afford to pay, recognised the admission of patients other than the destitute. In the 1850s and 1860s the Colonial Surgeon, without legislative authority, encouraged District Medical Officers (DMOs) to establish small government hospitals in country districts. Thus a pattern of government financed and controlled hospitals was set early in the State's history. From the 1890s to the 1930s successive governments made many attempts to off-load hospital control onto elected committees and the financing of hospitals onto voluntary subscribers and later taxpayers. PMID:10302917