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Sample records for frenkel defects

  1. One-Dimensional Poole-Frenkel Conduction in the Single Defect Limit.

    PubMed

    Pan, Deng; Fuller, Elliot J; Gül, O Tolga; Collins, Philip G

    2015-08-12

    A single point defect surrounded on either side by quasi-ballistic, semimetallic carbon nanotube is a nearly ideal system for investigating disorder in one-dimensional (1D) conductors and comparing experiment to theory. Here, individual single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) are investigated before and after the incorporation of single point defects. Transport and local Kelvin Probe force microscopy independently demonstrate high-resistance depletion regions over 1.0 μm wide surrounding one point defect in semimetallic SWNTs. Transport measurements show that conductance through such wide depletion regions occurs via a modified, 1D version of Poole-Frenkel field-assisted emission. Given the breadth of theory dedicated to the possible effects of disorder in 1D systems, it is surprising that a Poole-Frenkel mechanism appears to describe defect scattering and resistance in this semimetallic system. PMID:26189911

  2. Metastable Frenkel pair defect in graphite: source of Wigner energy?

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Telling, R H; El-Barbary, A A; Heggie, M I; Briddon, P R

    2003-07-11

    The atomic processes associated with energy storage and release in irradiated graphite have long been subject to untested speculation. We examine structures and recombination routes for interstitial-vacancy (I-V) pairs in graphite. Interaction results in the formation of a new metastable defect (an intimate I-V pair) or a Stone-Wales defect. The intimate I-V pair, although 2.9 eV more stable than its isolated constituents, still has a formation energy of 10.8 eV. The barrier to recombination to perfect graphite is calculated to be 1.3 eV, consistent with the experimental first Wigner energy release peak at 1.38 eV. We expect similar defects to form in carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes, nested fullerenes, and onions under irradiation. PMID:12906489

  3. Metastable Frenkel Pair Defect in Graphite: Source of Wigner Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewels, C. P.; Telling, R. H.; El-Barbary, A. A.; Heggie, M. I.; Briddon, P. R.

    2003-07-01

    The atomic processes associated with energy storage and release in irradiated graphite have long been subject to untested speculation. We examine structures and recombination routes for interstitial-vacancy (I-V) pairs in graphite. Interaction results in the formation of a new metastable defect (an intimate I-V pair) or a Stone-Wales defect. The intimate I-V pair, although 2.9eV more stable than its isolated constituents, still has a formation energy of 10.8eV. The barrier to recombination to perfect graphite is calculated to be 1.3eV, consistent with the experimental first Wigner energy release peak at 1.38eV. We expect similar defects to form in carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes, nested fullerenes, and onions under irradiation.

  4. Ab initio simulations on Frenkel pairs of radiation defects in corundum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonenko, A.; Piskunov, S.; Zhukovskii, Yu F.; Kotomin, E. A.

    2015-03-01

    Large scale first principles periodic calculations based on the density functional theory within the localized atomic orbital approach (DFT-LCAO) using the hybrid exchange- correlation potential B3PW have been performed in order to study the structural and electronic properties of radiation-induced Frenkel pairs Oi+VO in corundum crystal. As an initial approach, we have used conventional 2x2x1 supercell for defective α-Al2O3 lattice containing 120 atoms. After relaxation of the ideal supercell structure, the optimized doi-vo distance has been found to be ~4.5 Å while the formation energy of Frenkel pair has achieved 11.7 eV. The interstitial Oi atom, both single and a component of Oi+VO pair, spontaneously forms a dumbbell with the adjacent atom in the regular oxygen sublattice (doi-o = 1.404 Å) with the induced charge -1.1 e. On the whole, possibilities of supercell model for proper description of Frenkel pairs with changing inter-defect distance and space orientation inside corundum crystal are rather limited. This is why the alternative cluster model must be developed for this aim.

  5. Creation and clustering of Frenkel defects at high density of electronic excitations in wide-gap materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, A.; Lushchik, Ch.; Schwartz, K.; Savikhin, F.; Shablonin, E.; Shugai, A.; Vasil'chenko, E.

    2012-04-01

    A complex nature of the dependence of the intensity of intrinsic or impurity emission on the excitation density by single electron pulses is determined by the existence or absence of self-trapped holes and/or excitons in ZnS, BaF2, MgO, BeO and Al2O3. A powerful electron (300 keV) or ion (Au, U, ∼2 GeV) irradiation of pure and doped LiF, MgO and Al2O3 crystals induces the optical absorption, certain high-temperature annealing stages of which appear only under high LET conditions. Swift-ion-irradiation causes drastic changes in the spectrum of fundamental reflection of LiF, especially in the region of the exciton resonance. The irradiation providing high density of electronic excitations (LET > 20 keV/nm) leads not only to the creation of stable Frenkel defects but also to the excitation of a whole group of crystal ions, thus, causing the creation of bivacancies, lithium and fluorine interstitials as well as their associations/clusters.

  6. Ground state energy of N Frenkel excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosov, W.; Combescot, M.

    2009-03-01

    By using the composite many-body theory for Frenkel excitons we have recently developed, we here derive the ground state energy of N Frenkel excitons in the Born approximation through the Hamiltonian mean value in a state made of N identical Q = 0 excitons. While this quantity reads as a density expansion in the case of Wannier excitons, due to many-body effects induced by fermion exchanges between N composite particles, we show that the Hamiltonian mean value for N Frenkel excitons only contains a first order term in density, just as for elementary bosons. Such a simple result comes from a subtle balance, difficult to guess a priori, between fermion exchanges for two or more Frenkel excitons appearing in Coulomb term and the ones appearing in the N exciton normalization factor - the cancellation being exact within terms in 1/Ns where Ns is the number of atomic sites in the sample. This result could make us naively believe that, due to the tight binding approximation on which Frenkel excitons are based, these excitons are just bare elementary bosons while their composite nature definitely appears at various stages in the precise calculation of the Hamiltonian mean value.

  7. Poole-frenkel piezoconductive element and sensor

    DOEpatents

    Habermehl, Scott D.

    2004-08-03

    A new class of highly sensitive piezoconductive strain sensor elements and sensors has been invented. The new elements function under conditions such that electrical conductivity is dominated by Poole-Frenkel transport. A substantial piezoconductive effect appears in this regime, allowing the new sensors to exhibit sensitivity to applied strain as much as two orders of magnitude in excess of prior art sensors based on doped silicon.

  8. Frenkel line and solubility maximum in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Brazhkin, V V; Dove, M T; Trachenko, K

    2015-01-01

    A new dynamic line, the Frenkel line, has recently been proposed to separate the supercritical state into rigid-liquid and nonrigid gaslike fluid. The location of the Frenkel line on the phase diagram is unknown for real fluids. Here we map the Frenkel line for three important systems: CO(2), H(2)O, and CH(4). This provides an important demarcation on the phase diagram of these systems, the demarcation that separates two distinct physical states with liquidlike and gaslike properties. We find that the Frenkel line can have a similar trend as the melting line above the critical pressure. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between unexplained solubility maxima and Frenkel line, and we propose that the Frenkel line corresponds to the optimal conditions for solubility. PMID:25679575

  9. Poole-Frenkel conduction in polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Boiko, Y.; Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.

    1996-04-01

    High-field electrical conduction has been studied in undoped polycrystalline diamond over a wide temperature range. The current increases exponentially with the electric field with an exponential factor which increases linearly with the inverse of temperature. The activation energy of the conductivity is found to be strongly field dependent and to decrease linearly with the electric field. The experimental data support a Poole-Frenkel conduction with overlapping centers. The centers are found to be located at around 1.1 eV from the band edge with a density of about 2×1017 cm-3.

  10. [Frenkel: one of the forerunners of neurorehabilitation?].

    PubMed

    Cano-de-la-Cuerda, R

    2016-07-16

    Neurorehabilitation is understood as the process intended to reduce the deficiency, limitation of activity and restriction of participation experienced by people as a result of a neurological diseases, and where the professionals involved in this field will aim to reduce the functional involvement degree of the patient. Due to the ignorance existed about the plastic capacity in the nervous system in humans, the scientific origins of neurological rehabilitation is relatively recent, which are located around the Second World War. However, there are signs that the neurologist Heinrich Sebastian Frenkel (1860-1931) was able to establish the basis of neurorehabilitation before that time. There are historical concerning regarding the work conducted and published by Frenkel that would support the hypothesis, based on the characteristics of their treatment employed and documented methodologies, that what he called 'Ubungstherapie' (neurological gymnastic), it could be considered as the basis of what we consider today as modern neurorehabilitation. This knowledge could have been used by many authors who introduced those experiences and lessons learned to the multiple therapeutic methods that emerged after, even the most innovative and technological, while the roots of neurorehabilitation could be found at the end of the 19th century. PMID:27377984

  11. Superradiance of High Density Frenkel Excitons at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Z.; Zheng, X. G.; Zhao, F. L.; Gao, Z. L.; Yu, Z. X.

    1995-05-01

    Superradiance of high density Frenkel excitons in an R-phycoerythrin single crystal is observed at room temperature for the first time. No fluorescence is observed except the emission at the sharp exciton band when the superradiance of excitons occurs, and the higher the pump density, the sharper the emission bandwidth. A redshift and a blueshift are observed at the rise time and the fall time of the emission pulse, respectively. The experimental results also imply deformed-boson properties of high density Frenkel excitons.

  12. N vacancy, self-interstitial diffusion, and Frenkel-pair formation/dissociation in TiN studied by ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiovanni, Davide G.; Alling, Björn; Hultman, Lars; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-03-01

    We use ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics (AIMD, CMD) to simulate diffusion of N vacancy and N self-interstitial point-defects in B1 TiN. The physical properties of TiN, important material system for thin film and coatings applications, are largely dictated by concentration and mobility of point defects. We determine N dilute-point-defect diffusion pathways, activation energies, attempt frequencies, and diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature. In addition, MD simulations reveal an unanticipated atomistic process, which controls the spontaneous formation of N-self-interstitial/N-vacancy pairs (Frenkel pairs) in defect-free TiN. This entails that a N lattice atom leaves its bulk position and bonds to a neighboring N lattice atom. In most cases, Frenkel-pair NI and NV recombine within a fraction of ns; 50% of these processes result in the exchange of two nitrogen lattice atoms. Occasionally, however, Frenkel-pair N-interstitial atoms permanently escape from the anion vacancy site, thus producing unpaired NI and NV point defects. The Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation (Isotope Project, 2011.0094), the Swedish Research Council (VR) Linköping Linnaeus Initiative LiLi-NFM (Grant 2008-6572), and the Swedish Government Strategic Research (Grant MatLiU 2009-00971).

  13. Thermodynamic properties of supercritical carbon dioxide: Widom and Frenkel lines.

    PubMed

    Fomin, Yu D; Ryzhov, V N; Tsiok, E N; Brazhkin, V V

    2015-02-01

    Supercritical fluids are widely used in a number of important technological applications, yet the theoretical progress in the field has been rather moderate. Fairly recently, a new understanding of the liquidlike and gaslike properties of supercritical fluids has come to the fore, particularly with the advent of the Widom and Frenkel lines that aim to demarcate different physical properties on the phase diagram. Here, we report the results of a computational study of supercritical carbon dioxide, one of the most important fluids in the chemical industry. We study the response functions of CO_{2} in the supercritical state and calculate the locations of their maxima (Widom lines). We also report the preliminary calculations of the Frenkel line, the line of crossover of microscopic dynamics of particles. Our insights are relevant to physical processes in the atmosphere of Venus and its evolution. PMID:25768462

  14. Driven kink in the Frenkel-Kontorova model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, O. M.; Hu, Bambi; Zeltser, A.

    2000-09-01

    The dynamics of dc driven chain of harmonically interacting atoms in the external sinusoidal potential (the Frenkel-Kontorova model) is studied. It is shown that in the underdamped case the motion of the topological soliton (kink) becomes unstable at a high velocity due to excitation of the localized intrinsic kink mode (the discrete shape mode, or discrete breather) in the kink tail. When the amplitude of the breather's oscillation becomes large enough, it decays into a kink-antikink pair. The subsequent collision of newly created kink and antikink leads to a sharp transition to the running state, where all atoms of the chain slide over the external potential almost freely.

  15. Swelling Mechanisms of UO2 Lattices with Defect Ingrowths

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Seçkin D.

    2015-01-01

    The swelling that occurs in uranium dioxide as a result of radiation-induced defect ingrowth is not fully understood. Experimental and theoretical groups have attempted to explain this phenomenon with various complex theories. In this study, experimental lattice expansion and lattice super saturation were accurately reproduced using a molecular dynamics simulation method. Based on their resemblance to experimental data, the simulation results presented here show that fission induces only oxygen Frenkel pairs while alpha particle irradiation results in both oxygen and uranium Frenkel pair defects. Moreover, in this work, defects are divided into two sub-groups, obstruction type defects and distortion type defects. It is shown that obstruction type Frenkel pairs are responsible for both fission- and alpha-particle-induced lattice swelling. Relative lattice expansion was found to vary linearly with the number of obstruction type uranium Frenkel defects. Additionally, at high concentrations, some of the obstruction type uranium Frenkel pairs formed diatomic and triatomic structures with oxygen ions in their octahedral cages, increasing the slope of the linear dependence. PMID:26244777

  16. Swelling Mechanisms of UO2 Lattices with Defect Ingrowths.

    PubMed

    Günay, Seçkin D

    2015-01-01

    The swelling that occurs in uranium dioxide as a result of radiation-induced defect ingrowth is not fully understood. Experimental and theoretical groups have attempted to explain this phenomenon with various complex theories. In this study, experimental lattice expansion and lattice super saturation were accurately reproduced using a molecular dynamics simulation method. Based on their resemblance to experimental data, the simulation results presented here show that fission induces only oxygen Frenkel pairs while alpha particle irradiation results in both oxygen and uranium Frenkel pair defects. Moreover, in this work, defects are divided into two sub-groups, obstruction type defects and distortion type defects. It is shown that obstruction type Frenkel pairs are responsible for both fission- and alpha-particle-induced lattice swelling. Relative lattice expansion was found to vary linearly with the number of obstruction type uranium Frenkel defects. Additionally, at high concentrations, some of the obstruction type uranium Frenkel pairs formed diatomic and triatomic structures with oxygen ions in their octahedral cages, increasing the slope of the linear dependence. PMID:26244777

  17. Emergent friction in two-dimensional Frenkel-Kontorova models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norell, Jesper; Fasolino, Annalisa; de Wijn, Astrid S.

    2016-08-01

    Simple models for friction are typically one-dimensional, but real interfaces are two-dimensional. We investigate the effects of the second dimension on static and dynamic friction by using the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model. We study the two most straightforward extensions of the FK model to two dimensions and simulate both the static and dynamic properties. We show that the behavior of the static friction is robust and remains similar in two dimensions for physically reasonable parameter values. The dynamic friction, however, is strongly influenced by the second dimension and the accompanying additional dynamics and parameters introduced into the models. We discuss our results in terms of the thermal equilibration and phonon dispersion relations of the lattices, establishing a physically realistic and suitable two-dimensional extension of the FK model. We find that the presence of additional dissipation channels can increase the friction and produces significantly different temperature dependence when compared to the one-dimensional case. We also briefly study the anisotropy of the dynamic friction and show highly nontrivial effects, including that the friction anisotropy can lead to motion in different directions depending on the value of the initial velocity.

  18. Interview with Daan Frenkel, Boltzmann Medallist 2016 : Simulating soft matter through the lens of statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Daan; Louët, Sabine

    2016-06-01

    Daan Frenkel has been awarded the most important prize in the field of statistical mechanics, the 2016 Boltzmann Medal, named after the Austrian physicist and philosopher Ludwig Boltzmann. The award recognises Frenkel's seminal contributions to the statistical-mechanical understanding of the kinetics, self-assembly and phase behaviour of soft matter. The honour recognises Frenkel's highly creative large-scale simulations of soft matter capable of explaining the self-assembly of complex macromolecular systems, colloidal and biomolecular systems. Frenkel is Professor of Theoretical Chemistry at the University of Cambridge, UK and has been Editor in Chief of EPJE between 2010 and 2014. The award will be given to both Frenkel and his French colleague Yves Pomeau, during the StatPhys Conference on 20th July 2016 in Lyon, France. In this interview with Sabine Louët, Frenkel gives his views on statistical physics, which has become more relevant than ever for interdisciplinary research. He also offers some pearls of wisdom for the next generation Statistical Mechanics experts. PMID:27349557

  19. Ab initio analysis of the defect structure of ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacherle, T.; Schriever, A.; De Souza, R. A.; Martin, M.

    2013-04-01

    We calculated the formation energies of all simple point defects in cubic fluorite structured CeO2 using density functional theory within the GGA+U approximation. All possible defect charge states were considered, and also polarons CeCe' and associates of polarons with oxygen vacancies: (VO··-CeCe')· and (CeCe'-VO··-CeCe')×. From the individual defect energies, we extracted Schottky, Frenkel, and anti-Frenkel energies: we find that anti-Frenkel disorder has the lowest energy in ceria. Energies for the reduction and the hydration of ceria are also computed, and the results are in good agreement with experiment. Finally, point-defect concentrations and conductivities are predicted for undoped and donor-doped systems as a function of oxygen partial pressure and temperature. The characteristic slopes found in experiment are reproduced.

  20. Study of the Effect of Ellipsoidal Shape on the Kern and Frenkel Patch Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thienbao; Gunton, James; Rickman, Jeffrey

    In their work on the self-assembly of complex structures, Glotzer and Solomon (Nature Materials 6, 557 - 562 (2007)) identified both interaction and shape anisotropy as two of several means to build complex structures. Advances in fabricating materials and new insights into protein biology have revealed the importance of these types of interactions. The Kern and Frenkel (J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9882 (2003) model of hard spheres carrying interaction patches of various sizes has been used extensively to describe interaction anisotropies important in protein phase transitions. However their model did not also account for shape anisotropy. We studied the role of both shape and interaction anisotropy by applying N=2 and N=4 attractive Kern and Frenkel patches with an interaction range to hard ellipsoids with various aspect ratios and patch coverages. Following Kern and Frenkel, we studied the liquid-liquid phase separation of our particles using a Monte Carlo simulation. We found the critical temperatures for our model using the approximate law of rectilinear diameter and compared them with the original results of Kern and Frenkel. We found that the critical temperatures increased both with aspect ratio and percent coverage. G Harold and Leila Y Mathers Foundation.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Defect Production in Collision Cascades in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2005-01-01

    Defect production in collision cascades in zircon has been examined by molecular dynamics simulations using a partial charge model combined with the Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potential. U, Zr, Si and O recoils with energies ranging from 250 eV to 5 keV were simulated in the NVE ensemble. To obtain good statistics, 5-10 cascades in randomly chosen directions were simulated for each ion and energy. The damage consists of mainly Si and O Frenkel pairs, a smaller number of Zr Frenkel pairs, and Zr on Si antisite defects. Defect production, interstitial clustering, ion beam mixing and Si-O-Si polymerization increase with PKA mass and energy.

  2. Specific features of the hybridization of Frenkel and Wannier-Mott excitons in a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovskii, O. A.; Agranovich, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    Polariton states have been investigated in a microcavity, where the energy of the Frenkel exciton in an organic quantum well and the energy of the semiconductor Wannier-Mott exciton in an inorganic quantum well are close to the microcavity optical mode. It has been shown that the interaction of each of these excitons with the microcavity optical mode leads to their interaction with each other and to the formation of mutually coupled hybrid excitations. The influence of the location of the quantum wells in a microcavity on the spectra of hybrid states with different polarizations has been analyzed.

  3. Numerical studies of the trapping of Frenkel excitons in one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, D. L.; Ching, W. Y.

    1990-10-01

    Numerical studies of the trapping of Frenkel excitons on a one-dimensional lattice are reported. The effects of trapping are introduced through a non-Hermitian decay term in the Hamiltonian. Each of the traps, which are assumed to occupy interstitial positions, can receive excitation from a single center. The equations of motion for the exciton correlation functions of a finite array of centers are integrated to obtain the decay of the k = 0 mode and the probability of finding an exciton in any mode, following excitation of the k = 0 mode. Results for the latter are compared with the predictions of calculations by Hemenger and Pearlstein.

  4. Recoil Induced Room Temperature Stable Frenkel Pairs in a-Hafnium Upon Thermal Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, Tilman; Das, Satyendra K.; Dey, Chandi C.; Ghoshal, Shamik

    2013-11-01

    Ultrapure hafnium metal (110 ppm zirconium) was neutron activated with a thermal neutron flux of 6:6 · 1012 cm-2s-1 in order to obtain 181Hf for subsequent time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) experiments using the nuclear probe 181Hf(β-) 181Ta. Apart from the expected nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) signal for a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metal, three further discrete NQIs were observed with a few percent fraction each. The TDPAC spectra were recorded for up to 11 half lives with extreme statistical accuracy. The fitted parameters vary slightly within the temperature range between 248 K and 373 K. The signals corresponding to the three additional sites completely disappear after `annealing' at 453 K for one minute. Based on the symmetry of the additional NQIs and their temperature dependencies, they are tentatively attributed to Frenkel pairs produced by recoil due to the emission of a prompt 5:694 MeV -ray following thermal neutron capture and reported by the nuclear probe in three different positions. These Frenkel pairs are stable up to at least 373 K.

  5. Low-temperature dynamics of weakly localized Frenkel excitons in disordered linear chains.

    PubMed

    Bednarz, M; Malyshev, V A; Knoester, J

    2004-02-22

    We calculate the temperature dependence of the fluorescence Stokes shift and the fluorescence decay time in linear Frenkel exciton systems resulting from the thermal redistribution of exciton population over the band states. The following factors, relevant to common experimental conditions, are accounted for in our kinetic model: (weak) localization of the exciton states by static disorder, coupling of the localized excitons to vibrations in the host medium, a possible nonequilibrium of the subsystem of localized Frenkel excitons on the time scale of the emission process, and different excitation conditions (resonant or nonresonant). A Pauli master equation, with microscopically calculated transition rates, is used to describe the redistribution of the exciton population over the manifold of localized exciton states. We find a counterintuitive nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the Stokes shift. In addition, we show that depending on experimental conditions, the observed fluorescence decay time may be determined by vibration-induced intraband relaxation, rather than radiative relaxation to the ground state. The model considered has relevance to a wide variety of materials, such as linear molecular aggregates, conjugated polymers, and polysilanes. PMID:15268548

  6. Ultrafast Spectroscopy Reveals Frenkel-CT Mixed Excitonic States in Copper Phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younts, Robert; McAfee, Terry; Gautam, Bhoj; Dougherty, Daniel; Ade, Harald; Gundogdu, Kenan

    In organic semiconducting systems, intermolecular charge transport and energy diffusion take place along the π- π stacking direction, which is beneficial for opto-electronic devices. Therefore it is essential to study electronic state structure in the π- π stacking direction in organic solids. We studied a model quasi-one-dimensional molecular crystal copper phthalocyanine, which has strong intermolecular coupling along the π- π stack. In this work, we used polarization resolved transient absorption spectroscopy and identified the coupling of low-lying singlet Frenkel (intramolecular) excitons with CT (intermolecular) excitons. Our study shows an evolution between localized and delocalized excitations which can be utilized to tune charge transport properties in molecular crystals. These studies provide fundamental understanding of electronic state structures, which will be essential for tailoring electronic properties of desired applications.

  7. External pumping of hybrid nanostructures in microcavity with Frenkel and Wannier-Mott excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovskiy, O. A.; Agranovich, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The exciton-exciton interaction in hybrid nanostructures with resonating Frenkel and Wannier-Mott excitons was investigated in many publications. In microcavity the hybrid nanostructures can be exposed to different types of optical pumping, the most common one being pumping through one of the microcavity side. However, not investigated and thus never been discussed the hybrid excitons generation by pumping of confined quantum wells from the side of empty microcavity without nanostructures in a wave guided configuration. Here, we consider the hybrid excitations in cavity with organic and inorganic quantum wells and with different types of pumping from external source. The frequency dependence for intensity of excitations in hybrid structure is also investigated. The results may be used for search of most effective fluorescence and relaxation processes. The same approach may be used when both quantum wells are organic or inorganic.

  8. Transition from Static to Dynamic Macroscopic Friction in the Framework of the Frenkel-Kontorova Model (aplication to Crustal Earthquake)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, N. I.; Bambakidis, G.

    2011-12-01

    A new generation of experiments on dry macroscopic friction [1-4] has revealed that the transition from static to dynamic friction is essentially a spatially and temporally nonuniform process, initiated by a rupture-like detachment front. We show the suitability of the Frenkel-Kontorova model for describing this transition. The model developed predicts the existence of two types of detachment fronts, explaining both the variability and abrupt change of the velocity observed in experiments. The quantitative relation obtained between the velocity of the detachment front and the ratio of shear to normal stress is consistent with experiments (see Figure 1). The model provides a functional dependence (algebraic relations) between slip velocity and shear stress, and predicts that slip velocity is independent of normal stress. Paradoxically transition from static to dynamic friction does not depend explicitly on both static and dynamic friction coefficients even so the beginning and termination of transition process are controlled by those coefficients. In the proposed model, friction occurs due to movement of a certain type of defect (i.e. a dislocation or slip pulse) nucleated on the frictional surfaces by the presence of asperities. This constitutes a fundamental distinction between our approach to macro-friction and the approaches of others such as the Burridge-Knopoff and rate-and-state types of models. The model is suitable to describe quantitatively the relations between kinematic and dynamic parameters of the rupture process during a crustal earthquake [5]. These relations will be demonstrated on 2004 Parkfield earthquake. [1] S. M. Rubinstein, G. Cohen, and J. Fineberg, Nature (London) 430, 1005 (2004) [2] S. M. Rubinstein, G. Cohen, and J. Fineberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 226103 (2007) [3] O. Ben-David, S.M. Rubinstein and J. Fineberg, Nature 463, 76 (2010) [4] O. Ben-David, G. Cohen, J. Fineberg, Science 330, 211 (2010), DOI: 10.1126/science.1194777 [5] N

  9. Electronic effects of defects in one-dimensional channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Elliot J.; Pan, Deng; Corso, Brad L.; Gul, O. Tolga; Collins, Philip G.

    2013-09-01

    As electronic devices shrink to the one-dimensional limit, unusual device physics can result, even at room temperature. Nanoscale conductors like single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are particularly useful tools for experimentally investigating these effects. Our characterization of point defects in SWNTs has focused on these electronic consequences. A single scattering site in an otherwise quasi-ballistic SWNT introduces resistance, transconductance, and chemical sensitivity, and here we investigate these contributions using a combination of transport and scanning probe techniques. The transport measurements determine the two-terminal contributions over a wide range of bias, temperature, and environmental conditions, while the scanning probe work provides complementary confirmation that the effects originate at a particular site along the conduction path in a SWNT. Together, the combination proves that single point defects behave like scattering barriers having Poole-Frenkel transport characteristics. The Poole-Frenkel barriers have heights of 10 - 30 meV and gate-dependent widths that grow as large as 1 μm due to the uniquely poor screening in one dimension. Poole-Frenkel characteristics suggest that the barriers contain at least one localized electronic state, and that this state primarily contributes to conduction under high bias or high temperature conditions. Because these localized states vary from one device to another, we hypothesize that each might be unique to a particular defect's chemical type.

  10. Frenkel-Halsey-Hill equation, dimensionality of adsorption, and pore anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Pomonis, Philippos J; Tsaousi, Eleni T

    2009-09-01

    The Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) equation V/V(m) approximately [log(P(0)/P)](-1/s) is revisited in relation to the meaning of its exponent in a specific intermediate range of pressure where capillary condensation occurs. It has been suggested in the past that plots of the form log V = constant - (D - 3)[loglog(P(0)/P)], or its equivalent log S = const - (D - 2) log r, can be used for the estimation of the dimensionality D of the adsorbing surface from those parts of the slopes at low pressure corresponding to straight lines. In the present study it is shown that, for pores of cylindrical geometry and at a specific range of pressure where those pores are filled-up during the process of capillary condensation, the local slopes d log V/d loglog[(P(0)/P)] or d log S/d log r, of plots similar to the above, may be used to estimate the pore anisotropy b of the adsorbing space from the relationships log b = [[d log V/d loglog[(P(0)/P)] - 3] log(0.5r) or log b = [[d log S/d log r] - 2] log(0.5r). These observations lead to the physicogeometrical conjunction that, during capillary condensation in cylindrical pores, usually assumed in nitrogen porosimetry, the scaling dimension of pore anisotropy b, scaled in units of radius r, is related to the dimensionality D of the process. PMID:19705894

  11. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of themore » FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.« less

  12. Strain waves, earthquakes, slow earthquakes, and afterslip in the framework of the Frenkel-Kontorova model.

    PubMed

    Gershenzon, N I; Bykov, V G; Bambakidis, G

    2009-05-01

    The one-dimensional Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model, well known from the theory of dislocations in crystal materials, is applied to the simulation of the process of nonelastic stress propagation along transform faults. Dynamic parameters of plate boundary earthquakes as well as slow earthquakes and afterslip are quantitatively described, including propagation velocity along the strike, plate boundary velocity during and after the strike, stress drop, displacement, extent of the rupture zone, and spatiotemporal distribution of stress and strain. The three fundamental speeds of plate movement, earthquake migration, and seismic waves are shown to be connected in framework of the continuum FK model. The magnitude of the strain wave velocity is a strong (almost exponential) function of accumulated stress or strain. It changes from a few km/s during earthquakes to a few dozen km per day, month, or year during afterslip and interearthquake periods. Results of the earthquake parameter calculation based on real data are in reasonable agreement with measured values. The distributions of aftershocks in this model are consistent with the Omori law for temporal distribution and a 1/r for the spatial distributions. PMID:19518576

  13. Experimental Study of Spectral Properties of a Frenkel-Kontorova System.

    PubMed

    Lucci, M; Badoni, D; Merlo, V; Ottaviani, I; Salina, G; Cirillo, M; Ustinov, A V; Winkler, D

    2015-09-01

    We report on microwave emission from linear parallel arrays of underdamped Josephson junctions, which are described by the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model. Electromagnetic radiation is detected from the arrays when biased on current singularities (steps) appearing at voltages V(n)=Φ(0)(nc̅/L), where Φ(0)=2.07×10(-15)  Wb is the magnetic flux quantum, and c̅, L, and n are, respectively, the speed of light in the transmission line embedding the array, L its physical length, and n an integer. The radiation, detected at fundamental frequency c̅/2L when biased on different singularities, indicates shuttling of bunched 2π kinks (magnetic flux quanta). Resonance of flux-quanta motion with the small-amplitude oscillations induced in the arrays gives rise to fine structures in the radiation spectrum, which are interpreted on the basis of the FK model describing the resonance. The impact of our results on design and performances of new digital circuit families is discussed. PMID:26382697

  14. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-01

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two interpenetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. As the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of the FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a nonzero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a "devil's staircase" behavior at a finite temperature.

  15. Experimental Study of Spectral Properties of a Frenkel-Kontorova System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, M.; Badoni, D.; Merlo, V.; Ottaviani, I.; Salina, G.; Cirillo, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2015-09-01

    We report on microwave emission from linear parallel arrays of underdamped Josephson junctions, which are described by the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model. Electromagnetic radiation is detected from the arrays when biased on current singularities (steps) appearing at voltages Vn=Φ0(n c ¯ /L ) , where Φ0=2.07 ×10-15 Wb is the magnetic flux quantum, and c ¯, L , and n are, respectively, the speed of light in the transmission line embedding the array, L its physical length, and n an integer. The radiation, detected at fundamental frequency c ¯ /2 L when biased on different singularities, indicates shuttling of bunched 2 π kinks (magnetic flux quanta). Resonance of flux-quanta motion with the small-amplitude oscillations induced in the arrays gives rise to fine structures in the radiation spectrum, which are interpreted on the basis of the FK model describing the resonance. The impact of our results on design and performances of new digital circuit families is discussed.

  16. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of the FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.

  17. Spin dynamics in the Frenkel model with allowance for the variation of the inertial properties of the electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. L.

    2015-05-01

    The equations of motion of the Frenkel model at γ ≫ 1, a e ≲- χ ≪ 1 (where γ is the Lorentz factor, a e = 1/2( g - 2), and χ = √( eF μν p ν)2/ m {/e 3} result in the generalization of the Lorentz and Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equations. The modification is due to the Frenkel addition m Fr to the mass of the electron and can be of interest for currently planned experiments with relativistic beams. The derived Frenkel-Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equation contains a longitudinal part with a time-dependent coefficient, which is nonzero at g = 2. In the case of constant background fields, the equations of trajectory and spin can be integrated with a required accuracy if the antiderivative of the function m Fr(τ) is known. A new representation of the spin-orbit contribution Δ m so to the mass shift has been found in terms of the geometric invariants of world lines. It has been shown that the rate of variation of Δ m so is determined by a e + m Fr/ m e . The possibility of the periodic variation of spin light along the trajectory of beam has been indicated.

  18. Using Defects in Materials to Store Energy: a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, I.-Te; Bernardi, Marco

    We study the energy stored by defects in materials using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Leveraging experimental data to estimate the energy density of defects, expressed as the defect formation energy per unit volume (units of MJ/L) or weight (units of MJ/kg), we identify candidates for high energy density storage, including tungsten, diamond, graphite, silicon, and graphene. DFT calculations are applied to these materials to study the formation energy of vacancies, interstitials, and Frenkel pairs. Our results indicate that the energy density stored by defects in these materials, with experimentally accessible non-equilibrium defect concentrations, can be higher than that of common energy storage technologies such as lithium batteries and supercapacitors. We discuss storage of solar energy and electrical energy (through ion bombardment) using defects.

  19. Ab Initio Study of Defect Properties in YPO4

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Zhou, Yungang; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-03-01

    Ab initio methods based on density functional theory have been used to calculate the formation energies of intrinsic defects, including vacancies, interstitials, antisites and Frenkel pairs in YPO4 under the O-rich and Y2O3-rich, and the O-rich and Y-rich conditions. The larger size of the yttrium atom may give rise to higher formation energy of the phosphorus antisite defect. In general, the formation energies of anion interstitials are much smaller than those of cation interstitials for both conditions considered. It is of greatly interest to find that the relative stabilities among the same types of interstitials are independent of the reference states. The most stable configuration for oxygen interstitials is an O-O split interstitial near the Ta site, while the most stable configuration for cation interstitials is a tetrahedral interstitial near the Ta site. The cation split interstitials are unfavorable in YPO4, with much higher formation energies. Furthermore, the properties of Frenkel pairs are compared with those calculated using empirical potentials. The results reveal that both ab initio and empirical potential calculations show a similar trend in the formation energies of Frenkel pairs, but the formation energies obtained by empirical potentials are much larger than those calculated by ab initio method.

  20. Poole-Frenkel-effect as dominating current mechanism in thin oxide films—An illusion?!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Herbert

    2015-06-01

    In many of the publications, over 50 per year for the last five years, the Poole-Frenkel-effect (PFE) is identified or suggested as dominating current mechanism to explain measured current-electric field dependencies in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) thin film stacks. Very often, the insulating thin film is a metal oxide as this class of materials has many important applications, especially in information technology. In the overwhelming majority of the papers, the identification of the PFE as dominating current mechanism is made by the slope of the current-electric field curve in the so-called Poole-Frenkel plot, i.e., logarithm of current density, j, divided by the applied electric field, F, versus the square root of that field. This plot is suggested by the simplest current equation for the PFE, which comprises this proportionality (ln(j/F) vs. F1/2) leading to a straight line in this plot. Only one other parameter (except natural constants) may influence this slope: the optical dielectric constant of the insulating film. In order to identify the importance of the PFE simulation studies of the current through MIM stacks with thin insulating films were performed and the current-electric field curves without and with implementation of the PFE were compared. For the simulation, an advanced current model has been used combining electronic carrier injection/ejection currents at the interfaces, described by thermionic emission, with the carrier transport in the dielectric, described by drift and diffusion of electrons and holes in a wide band gap semiconductor. Besides the applied electric field (or voltage), many other important parameters have been varied: the density of the traps (with donor- and acceptor-like behavior); the zero-field energy level of the traps within the energy gap, this energy level is changed by the PFE (also called internal Schottky effect); the thickness of the dielectric film; the permittivity of the dielectric film simulating different oxide

  1. Poole-Frenkel-effect as dominating current mechanism in thin oxide films—An illusion?!

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Herbert

    2015-06-07

    In many of the publications, over 50 per year for the last five years, the Poole-Frenkel-effect (PFE) is identified or suggested as dominating current mechanism to explain measured current–electric field dependencies in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) thin film stacks. Very often, the insulating thin film is a metal oxide as this class of materials has many important applications, especially in information technology. In the overwhelming majority of the papers, the identification of the PFE as dominating current mechanism is made by the slope of the current–electric field curve in the so-called Poole-Frenkel plot, i.e., logarithm of current density, j, divided by the applied electric field, F, versus the square root of that field. This plot is suggested by the simplest current equation for the PFE, which comprises this proportionality (ln(j/F) vs. F{sup 1/2}) leading to a straight line in this plot. Only one other parameter (except natural constants) may influence this slope: the optical dielectric constant of the insulating film. In order to identify the importance of the PFE simulation studies of the current through MIM stacks with thin insulating films were performed and the current–electric field curves without and with implementation of the PFE were compared. For the simulation, an advanced current model has been used combining electronic carrier injection/ejection currents at the interfaces, described by thermionic emission, with the carrier transport in the dielectric, described by drift and diffusion of electrons and holes in a wide band gap semiconductor. Besides the applied electric field (or voltage), many other important parameters have been varied: the density of the traps (with donor- and acceptor-like behavior); the zero-field energy level of the traps within the energy gap, this energy level is changed by the PFE (also called internal Schottky effect); the thickness of the dielectric film; the permittivity of the dielectric film simulating

  2. Light-induced defects in hybrid lead halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharia, Onise; Schneider, William

    One of the main challenges facing organohalide perovskites for solar application is stability. Solar cells must last decades to be economically viable alternatives to traditional energy sources. While some causes of instability can be avoided through engineering, light-induced defects can be fundamentally limiting factor for practical application of the material. Light creates large numbers of electron and hole pairs that can contribute to degradation processes. Using ab initio theoretical methods, we systematically explore first steps of light induced defect formation in methyl ammonium lead iodide, MAPbI3. In particular, we study charged and neutral Frenkel pair formation involving Pb and I atoms. We find that most of the defects, except negatively charged Pb Frenkel pairs, are reversible, and thus most do not lead to degradation. Negative Pb defects create a mid-gap state and localize the conduction band electron. A minimum energy path study shows that, once the first defect is created, Pb atoms migrate relatively fast. The defects have two detrimental effects on the material. First, they create charge traps below the conduction band. Second, they can lead to degradation of the material by forming Pb clusters.

  3. Poole-Frenkel effect on electrical characterization of Al-doped ZnO films deposited on p-type GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Liao, Chung-Chi; Ke, Wen-Cheng Chang, Yuan-Ching; Huang, Hao-Ping; Chen, Nai-Chuan

    2014-03-21

    This paper presents the electrical properties of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films directly grown on two types of p-type GaN thin films. The low-pressure p-GaN thin films (LP-p-GaN) exhibited structural properties of high-density edge-type threading dislocations (TDs) and compensated defects (i.e., nitrogen vacancy). Compared with high-pressure p-GaN thin films (HP-p-GaN), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of Ga 3d core levels indicated that the surface Fermi-level shifted toward the higher binding-energy side by approximately 0.7 eV. The high-density edge-type TDs and compensated defects enabled surface Fermi-level shifting above the intrinsic Fermi-level, causing the surface of LP-p-GaN thin films to invert to n-type semiconductor. A highly nonlinear increase in leakage current regarding reverse-bias voltage was observed for AZO/LP-p-GaN. The theoretical fits for the reverse-bias voltage region indicated that the field-assisted thermal ionization of carriers from defect associated traps, which is known as the Poole-Frenkel effect, dominated the I-V behavior of AZO/LP-p-GaN. The fitting result estimated the trap energy level at 0.62 eV below the conduction band edge. In addition, the optical band gap increased from 3.50 eV for as-deposited AZO films to 3.62 eV for 300 °C annealed AZO films because of the increased carrier concentration. The increasing Fermi-level of the 300 °C annealed AZO films enabled the carrier transport to move across the interface into the LP-p-GaN thin films without any thermal activated energy. Thus, the Ohmic behavior of AZO contact can be achieved directly on the low-pressure p-GaN films at room temperature.

  4. Defect-induced emission band in CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, S.; Tanaka, A.; Takeda, F.; Matsuura, K.

    1994-04-01

    We report on a distinct correlation between the 1.47 eV emission band and the dislocation density in bulk CdTe. The 1.47 eV band intensifies around the high-dislocation area (lineage structure) and at the position just on dislocation bundle. On the other hand, the 1.47 eV band was hardly observed in the low-dislocation area (etch pit density less than 2 × 10 5 cm -2) or at the position away from the dislocation bundle. Furthermore, the 1.47 eV band was intensified by γ-ray irradiation of 1.7 × 10 7 Gy, which produced a great number of Frenkel defects. It was shown that the 1.47 eV band is related not only to an extended defect such as a dislocation, but also to a point defect such as a Frenkel defect. These results suggest that the strain field induced in the vicinity of the defects is responsible for the recombination center of the 1.47 eV band.

  5. Defect processes in orthorhombic LnBaCo2O5.5 double perovskites.

    PubMed

    Seymour, I D; Chroneos, A; Kilner, J A; Grimes, R W

    2011-09-01

    Static atomistic simulations based on the Born model were used to investigate intrinsic defect processes in orthorhombic LnBaCo(2)O(5.5) (Ln = Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, and Yb) double perovskites. It was found that Ln/Ba antisite disorder is the lowest energy defect reaction, with the large Ln cations giving rise to smaller antisite energies. On the oxygen sublattice the oxygen Frenkel disorder dominates and also decreases in energy with increasing Ln cation size. The lowest energy oxygen vacancy and interstitial positions are in the LnO(0.5) and CoO(2) layers respectively. Interestingly, the calculations indicate that oxygen vacancies cluster with Ba antisite defects (occupying Ln sites). This suggests that the transport of oxygen vacancies will be influenced not only by the oxygen Frenkel energy but also the antisite energy. We propose that PrBaCo(2)O(5.5) most efficiently balances these two competing effects as it has an oxygen Frenkel energy of just 0.24 eV per defect combined with a high antisite energy (0.94 eV), which ensures that the A cation sublattice will remain more ordered. PMID:21769361

  6. Comment on "Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaco, Anthony D.

    2015-11-01

    A recent publication [Q. Meng, L. Wu, D. O. Welch, and Y. Zhu, Phys. Rev. B 91, 224305 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.224305] examines the quantum normal modes of the Frenkel-Kontorova chain. The authors compare their results to those of an older work [A. D. Novaco, Phys. Rev. B 22, 1645 (1980), 10.1103/PhysRevB.22.1645], attributing the differences to limitations in the numerical analysis of that 1980 paper. We show here that it is not numerical limitations that cause the differences between the two papers, and we argue that the cause of these differences resides with the approaches used in the modeling.

  7. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Birth Defects: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What are birth defects? Birth defects are structural or functional abnormalities present ...

  8. First-principles DFT+U modeling of defect behaviors in anti-ferromagnetic uranium mononitride

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Zi-Chen; Wu, Qiong; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Shi, Wei-Qun; Chai, Zhi-Fang

    2013-12-14

    A series of point defects in uranium mononitride (UN) have been studied by first-principles DFT+U calculations. The influence of intrinsic defects on the properties of UN was explored by considering the anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) order along the [001] direction. Our results show that all the point defects lead to obvious volume swelling of UN crystal. Energetically, the interstitial nitrogen defect is the most favorable one among single-point defects in UN crystal with the formation energy of 4.539 eV, while the N-Frenkel pair becomes the most preferable one among double-point defects. The AFM order induces obvious electron spin polarization of uranium towards neighboring uranium atoms with opposite spin orientations in UN crystal.

  9. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  10. Ab initio calculations on the defect structure of β-Ga2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacherle, T.; Schmidt, P. C.; Martin, M.

    2013-06-01

    The intrinsic point defects of β-Ga2O3 are investigated using density functional theory. We have chosen two different exchange-correlation potentials: the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and a hybrid potential (HSE06). Defect formation energies were determined taking into account finite-size effects. Schottky, anti-Frenkel, and Frenkel energies have been extracted for T=0 K. We calculate formation entropies for an oxygen and a gallium vacancy and determine the Gibbs energy of Schottky disorder. Furthermore, we investigate the defect concentrations as a function of the oxygen partial pressure. The obtained purely intrinsic defect concentrations for charged defects are very small and result in a pO2 dependence of the electron concentration of [e']˜ pO2-1/6, whereas experimentally [e']˜ pO2-1/4 is found. So we assume that, experimentally, a small unintentional donor doping is unavoidable. A small extrinsic donor concentration [D·] = 1018 cm-3 (10 ppm) changes the electron concentration to [e']˜ pO2-1/4 and gives an activation energy of the conductivity σ of 1.7 eV in good agreement to experimental values. So we propose as majority disorder 3[VGa'''] = [D·] with electrons being minority defects.

  11. Coherent potential approximation for the absorption spectra and the densities of states of cubic Frenkel exciton systems with Gaussian diagonal disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgin, I.; Boukahil, A.; Huber, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    Using the coherent potential approximation, we investigate the optical absorption and the density of states of Frenkel exciton systems on simple, body centered, and face centered cubic lattices with nearest-neighbor interactions and a Gaussian distribution of transition frequencies (i.e. Gaussian diagonal disorder). The analysis is based on an elliptic integral approach with a variety of variances. The results for the simple cubic lattice are in good agreement with the finite array calculations of Schreiber and Toyozawa. Our findings suggest that the coherent potential approximation can be useful in interpreting the optical properties of cubic crystals where the optically excited states are Frenkel excitons with the dominant interactions limited to nearest-neighbors.

  12. An efficient and reliable model to simulate microscopic mechanical friction in the Frenkel-Kontorova-Tomlinson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhama, F.; Marín, F.; Moreno, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    The Frenkel-Kontorova-Tomlinson model is composed of a large number of non-linear, coupled differential equations that reproduce the friction occurring in mechanical systems in which the atomic smooth surfaces of two bodies slide against each other. The problem is very interesting since the possible solutions, which are very sensitive to the parameters of the system, range from simple stable harmonic solutions (in which the spectrum of the movement of individual atoms contains one frequency) to chaotic solutions (where the spectrum contains a series of incommensurable frequencies), passing through intermediate solutions formed by a spectrum of commensurable finite frequencies. The design of the model both for the static and dynamic problem, which follows the network method rules, is explained in detail and the model is run on standard electrical circuit simulation software to provide, in its own graphic ambient, the average total friction force, the Fast Fourier Transforms of atom displacement and the phase diagrams. The influence of the main parameters of the system (interaction force amplitude and stiffness between surface atoms and substrate) on the type of pattern of the solution is studied for a practical range of these parameters.

  13. Static Structure Factor of Frenkel-Kontorowa Systems at High-Temperatures: Application to K-Hollandite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Tadao

    1983-12-01

    Discussion of the static structure factor S(q) for the Frenkel-Kontorowa systems is made on the basis of a high-temperature expansion of the transfer-integral equation [TIE]. The approximate solution of the TIE can be expressed in terms of an arbitrary order of the modified Bessel function In, the use of which for S(q) within the 20th-order of In reveals that S(q) converges quite well, for example, in the regions of the substrate potential U/kBT{=}Uβ≲4 for the correlation length κa-1{=}3.1. Application to the K-hollandite [K1.54Mg0.77Ti7.23O16] shows that S(q) for Uβ≲4 does not properly reproduce the experimental result, but gives rise to a consistent result for Uβ{=}8 and κa-1{=}3.1 whose values are in good agreement with 6 and 5.1, respectively, theoretically obtained by Beyeler-Pietronero-Strässler from their configurational model analysis. An effect of U turns out to be evident in the K-hollandite.

  14. Energetics of intrinsic point defects in ZrSiO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, J.M.; Artacho, Emilio

    2005-03-01

    Using first principles calculations we have studied the formation energies, electron and hole affinities, and electronic levels of intrinsic point defects in zircon. The atomic structures of charged interstitials, vacancies, Frenkel pairs, and antisite defects are obtained. The limit of high concentration of point defects, relevant for the use of this material in nuclear waste immobilization, was studied with a variable lattice relaxation that can simulate the swelling induced by radiation damage. The limit of low concentration of defects is simulated with larger cells and fixed lattice parameters. Using known band offset values at the interface of zircon with silicon, we analyze the foreseeable effect of the defects on the electronic properties of zircon used as gate in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  15. Influence of calcium substitution on defect disorder in barium titanate by atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, D. V.; Santos, J. C. A.; Rezende, M. V. dos S.; Valerio, M. E. G.; Silva, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, classical atomistic simulation was employed to study the intrinsic disorder influenced by calcium substitution in BaTiO3 structure. The defects were modeled using the Mott-Littleton approximation, in which: a spherical region of the lattice surrounding the defect is treated explicitly, all interactions are considered, and more distant parts of the lattice are treated using a continuum approach. Frenkel, Schottky, pseudo-Schottky and anti-Schottky defects in Ba1-x Ca x TiO3 (x  =  0-1) were investigated. It was found that the most probable defects to occur in this system are CaO pseudo-Schottky defect and the incorporation of \\text{Ca}\\text{Ti}\\prime \\prime with compensation by oxygen vacancy.

  16. Coherent Dynamics of Mixed Frenkel and Charge-Transfer Excitons in Dinaphtho[2,3-b:2'3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]-thiophene Thin Films: The Importance of Hole Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Atahan-Evrenk, Sule; Sawaya, Nicolas P D; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-04-01

    Charge-transfer states in organic semiconductors play crucial roles in processes such as singlet fission and exciton dissociation at donor/acceptor interfaces. Recently, a time-resolved spectroscopy study of dinaphtho[2,3-b:2'3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]-thiophene (DNTT) thin films provided evidence for the formation of mixed Frenkel and charge-transfer excitons after the photoexcitation. Here, we investigate optical properties and excitation dynamics of the DNTT thin films by combining ab initio calculations and a stochastic Schrödinger equation. Our theory predicts that the low-energy Frenkel exciton band consists of 8-47% CT character. The quantum dynamics simulations show coherent dynamics of Frenkel and CT states in 50 fs after the optical excitation. We demonstrate the role of charge delocalization and localization in the mixing of CT states with Frenkel excitons as well as the role of their decoherence. PMID:27011327

  17. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-26

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in irradiated materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1.0a0 to 3.3a0 have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomic level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a0 by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster. PMID:26241190

  18. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-01

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in irradiated materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1.0a0 to 3.3a0 have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomic level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a0 by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  19. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-01-01

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a₀ to 3:3a₀ have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomic level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a₀ by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  20. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-01-01

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a₀ to 3:3a₀ have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomicmore » level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a₀ by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.« less

  1. Ear defects.

    PubMed

    Shonka, David C; Park, Stephen S

    2009-08-01

    The projection and exposure of the auricle make it particularly susceptible to actinic injury and thus to cutaneous malignancies. Auricular reconstruction is challenging because of its unique surface anatomy and undulating topography. This article organizes auricular defects into different categories based on anatomic location and extent of tissue loss, including skin-only defects, small composite defects, full-thickness defects involving or sparing the upper third of the ear, and total auricular loss. The authors share an algorithm for repair of the array of auricular defects. PMID:19698921

  2. Energy Dissipation and Defect Generation for Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Weber, William J.

    2010-05-05

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to study defect generation and primary damage state in nano crystalline (NC) SiC of average grain diameters from 5 to 21 nm. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) kinetic energies of 10 keV are simulated, and cascade structures in NC SiC with a grain size smaller than 12 nm are generally different from those generated in single crystalline SiC. It is found that the local stresses near the grain boundaries (GBs) strongly affect the behavior of the PKA and secondary recoil atoms (SRAs), and the GBs act as sinks for deposition of kinetic energy. A striking feature is that the PKA and SRAs preferentially deposit energy along the GBs for grains with average size less 12 nm, which results in atomic displacements primarily within the GBs; whereas for larger grain sizes, most defects are produced within the grains. There exists a crossover in defect production, which is manifested in switching from grain boundary damage to grain damage. The most common defects created in NC SiC are antisite defects, following by vacancies and interstitials, in contrast to those produced in a single crystalline SiC, where the dominate defects are Frenkel pairs. Defect production efficiency increases with increasing the grain size, with a typical value of 0.18 for small grains and rising to 0.5 for larger grains.

  3. Energy dissipation and defect generation in nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Weber, W. J.; Chen, D.; Hu Wangyu

    2010-05-01

    Large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations have been employed to study defect generation and primary damage state in nanocrystalline (NC) SiC of average grain diameters from 5 to 21 nm. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) kinetic energies of 10 keV are simulated and cascade structures in NC SiC with a grain size smaller than 12 nm are generally different from those generated in single-crystalline SiC. It is found that the local stresses near the grain boundaries (GBs) strongly affect the behavior of the PKA and secondary recoil atoms (SRAs), and the GBs act as sinks for deposition of kinetic energy. A striking feature is that the PKA and SRAs preferentially deposit energy along the GBs for grains with average size less 12 nm, which results in atomic displacements primarily within the GBs; whereas for larger grain sizes, most defects are produced within the grains. The defect production within gains generally increases with increasing grain size, which is manifested in switching from grain boundary damage to grain damage. The most common defects created in NC SiC are antisite defects, following by vacancies and interstitials, in contrast to those produced in a single-crystalline SiC, where the dominate defects are Frenkel pairs. Defect production efficiency increases with increasing grain size, with a typical value of 0.18 for small grains and rising to 0.5 for larger grains.

  4. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2014-11-01

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  5. Low power zinc-oxide based charge trapping memory with embedded silicon nanoparticles via poole-frenkel hole emission

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Ozcan, Ayse; Alkis, Sabri; Okyay, Ali K.; Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara

    2014-01-06

    A low power zinc-oxide (ZnO) charge trapping memory with embedded silicon (Si) nanoparticles is demonstrated. The charge trapping layer is formed by spin coating 2 nm silicon nanoparticles between Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO steps. The threshold voltage shift (ΔV{sub t}) vs. programming voltage is studied with and without the silicon nanoparticles. Applying −1 V for 5 s at the gate of the memory with nanoparticles results in a ΔV{sub t} of 3.4 V, and the memory window can be up to 8 V with an excellent retention characteristic (>10 yr). Without nanoparticles, at −1 V programming voltage, the ΔV{sub t} is negligible. In order to get ΔV{sub t} of 3.4 V without nanoparticles, programming voltage in excess of 10 V is required. The negative voltage on the gate programs the memory indicating that holes are being trapped in the charge trapping layer. In addition, at 1 V the electric field across the 3.6 nm tunnel oxide is calculated to be 0.36 MV/cm, which is too small for significant tunneling. Moreover, the ΔV{sub t} vs. electric field across the tunnel oxide shows square root dependence at low fields (E < 1 MV/cm) and a square dependence at higher fields (E > 2.7 MV/cm). This indicates that Poole-Frenkel Effect is the main mechanism for holes emission at low fields and Phonon Assisted Tunneling at higher fields.

  6. Defects and metastable structures of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.P.; Yan, M.; Grimes, R.W.; Vyas, S.; Gale, J.D.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents calculated properties of normal and inverse spinel structures of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and of point defects in the spinel structure. These results provide information for further study of possible metastable states. Calculated properties of ``amorphous`` structure are also presented. Atomistic simulations show that in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel structure, the exchange of an Mg{sup 2+} ion with an Al{sup 3+} ion has the lowest energy increase, 0. 92eV/atom. The Schottky defect increases the energy by 3.71 eV/atom. Frenkel defects are difficult to form, increasing the energy at least 4.59eV/atom for the Mg{sup 2+} Frenkel defect. Proposed rock salt structure of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} has smaller volume and larger Young modulus, and the amorphosu state has larger volume and smaller Young modulus than the MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel.

  7. Elastic constants of defected and amorphous silicon with the environment-dependent interatomic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, Clark L.; Yuan Xianglong; Hobbs, Linn W.; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2004-10-01

    The elastic constants of a wide range of models of defected crystalline and amorphous silicon are calculated, using the environment-dependent interatomic potential (EDIP). The defected crystalline simulation cells contain randomly generated defect distributions. An extensive characterization of point defects is performed, including structure, energy and influence on elastic constants. Three important conclusions are drawn. (1) Defects have independent effects on the elastic constants of silicon up to (at least) a defect concentration of 0.3%. (2) The linear effect of Frenkel pairs on the <110> Young's modulus of silicon is -1653 GPa per defect fraction. (3) 17 different point defect types cause a very similar decrease in the <110> Young's modulus: -(0.28{+-}0.05)% when calculated in isolation using a 1728-atom cell. These principles will be very useful for predicting the effect of radiation damage on the elastic modulus of silicon in the typical case in which point-defect concentrations can be estimated, but the exact distribution and species of defects is unknown. We also study amorphous samples generated in quenching the liquid with EDIP, including an ideal structure of perfect fourfold coordination, samples with threefold and fivefold coordinated defects, one with a nanovoid, and one with an amorphous inclusion in a crystalline matrix. In the last case, a useful finding is that the change in the Young's modulus is simply related to the volume fraction of amorphous material, as has also been observed by experiment.

  8. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Eckern, Ulrich; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work.

  9. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    PubMed Central

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Eckern, Ulrich; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work. PMID:27256905

  10. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers.

    PubMed

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M; Eckern, Ulrich; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The electronic transport through Au-(Cu2O)n-Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green's function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work. PMID:27256905

  11. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... with birth defects may need surgery or other medical treatments. Today, doctors can diagnose many birth defects in the womb. This enables them to treat or even correct some problems before the baby is born. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  12. The Frenkel Kontorova Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floría, L. M.; Baesens, C.; Gómez-Gardeñes, J.

    In the preface to his monograph on the structure of Evolutionary Theory [1], the late professor Stephen Jay Gould attributes to the philosopher Immanuel Kant the following aphorism in Science Philosophy: "Percepts without concepts are blind; concepts without percepts are empty". Using with a bit of freedom these Kantian terms, one would say that a scientific model is a framework (or network) of interrelated concepts and percepts where experts build up scientific consistent explanations of a given set of observations. Good models are those which are both, conceptually simple and universal in their perceptions. Let us illustrate with examples the meaning of this statement.

  13. The stability of irradiation-induced defects in NiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, J.A. , Villigen ); Pedraza, D.F. )

    1990-01-01

    Vacancies, interstitials and antisite defects are produced in intermetallic compounds by irradiation with energetic particles. The manner in which these defects evolve during irradiation may contribute to microstructural changes such as the generation of dislocations, dislocation loops, voids, phase transformations and amorphization. In this work, the embedded-atom potentials for nickel and aluminum developed by Foiles, Baskes and Daw were used to calculate the energy of formation of antisite defects, of vacancies, and of various possible interstitial configurations in the B2 NiAl compound. The crowdion in the <111> direction that incorporates an extra nickel atom is found to be the lowest energy interstitial configuration. Using the same potentials, the distance for spontaneous recombination of Frenkel pairs is found to be third-nearest neighbor provided the chemical order is maintained. However, if the chemical order of the sites nearest to the interstitial is altered at a bcc cell adjacent to the cell occupied by the vacancy at the cell center, recombination is inhibited in several cases in which the Frenkel pair is found to be stable. The implications of these results for irradiation-induced amorphization are discussed. 20 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  14. Defect energetics in α-Al2O3 and rutile TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlow, C. R. A.; James, R.; Mackrodt, W. C.; Stewart, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    We report a theoretical survey of defect energetics in α-Al2O3 and rutile TiO2 which we relate to structural and transport properties of these materials. The study of these crystals has required us to modify our computational methods based on the Mott-Littleton theory, which were previously confined to the treatment of cubic materials. We discuss the theoretical aspects of a new and quite general computational procedure, HADES III, which can be used for defect calculations on crystals of any symmetry. Our discussion pays particular attention to the effects on the calculated energetics of the use of Mott-Littleton methods adapted for anisotropic crystals. Other features, considered in detail, are the sensitivity of calculated defect energies to the choice of lattice potential and to the size of the atomistically simulated region surrounding the defect. We also compare our results for α-Al2O3 and those of an earlier study of Dienes et al. Our calculations are then used to discuss the simplest features of the defect properties of pure and doped α-Al2O3 and TiO2. The present results support the dominance of Schottky disorder in both crystals; cation Frenkel energies are high and anion Frenkel pairs may be of significance in α-Al2O3. In addition we present a survey of doped alumina and of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on the defect structure of this material. Our results suggest that defect clustering will have a major influence on the properties of doped Al2O3.

  15. Analysis of leakage current mechanisms in Pt/Au Schottky contact on Ga-polarity GaN by Frenkel-Poole emission and deep level studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Peta Koteswara; Park, Byungguon; Lee, Sang-Tae; Noh, Young-Kyun; Kim, Moon-Deock; Oh, Jae-Eung

    2011-07-01

    We report the Frenkel-Poole emission in Pt/Au Schottky contact on Ga-polarity GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy using current-voltage-temperature (I-V-T) characteristics in the temperature ranging from 200 K to 375 K. Using thermionic emission model, the estimated Schottky barrier height is 0.49 eV at 200 K and 0.83 eV at 375 K, respectively, and it is observed that the barrier height increases with increase in temperature. The extracted emission barrier height ({phi}{sub t}) for Ga-polarity GaN Schottky diode by Frenkel-Poole theory is about 0.15 eV. Deep level transient spectroscopy study shows a deep level with activation energy of 0.44 eV, having capture cross-section 6.09 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}, which is located between the metal and semiconductor interface, and trap nature is most probably associated with dislocations in Ga-polarity GaN. The analysis of I-V-T characteristics represents that the leakage current is due to effects of electrical field and temperature on the emission of electron from a trap state near the metal-semiconductor interface into continuum states associated with conductive dislocations in Ga-polarity GaN Schottky diode.

  16. Efficient dipole-dipole coupling of Mott-Wannier and Frenkel excitons in (Ga,In)N quantum well/polyfluorene semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itskos, G.; Heliotis, G.; Lagoudakis, P. G.; Lupton, J.; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Pereira, S.; Watson, I. M.; Dawson, M. D.; Feldmann, J.; Murray, R.; Bradley, D. D. C.

    2007-07-01

    We investigate interactions between Mott-Wannier (MW) and Frenkel excitons in a family of hybrid structures consisting of thin organic (polyfluorene) films placed in close proximity (systematically adjusted by GaN cap layer thickness) to single inorganic [(Ga,In)N/GaN] quantum wells (QWs). Characterization of the QW structures using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and atomic force microscopy allows direct measurement of the thickness and the morphology of the GaN cap layers. Time-resolved photoluminescence experiments in the 8-75K temperature range confirm our earlier demonstration that nonradiative energy transfer can occur between inorganic and organic semiconductors. We assign the transfer mechanism to resonant Förster (dipole-dipole) coupling between MW exciton energy donors and Frenkel exciton energy acceptors and at 15K we find transfer efficiencies of up to 43%. The dependence of the energy transfer rate on the distance R between the inorganic QW donor dipole and organic film acceptor dipole indicates that a plane-plane interaction, characterized by a 1/R2 variation, best describes the situation found in our structures.

  17. Analysis of leakage current mechanisms in Pt/Au Schottky contact on Ga-polarity GaN by Frenkel-Poole emission and deep level studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Peta Koteswara; Park, Byungguon; Lee, Sang-Tae; Noh, Young-Kyun; Kim, Moon-Deock; Oh, Jae-Eung

    2011-07-01

    We report the Frenkel-Poole emission in Pt/Au Schottky contact on Ga-polarity GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy using current-voltage-temperature (I-V-T) characteristics in the temperature ranging from 200 K to 375 K. Using thermionic emission model, the estimated Schottky barrier height is 0.49 eV at 200 K and 0.83 eV at 375 K, respectively, and it is observed that the barrier height increases with increase in temperature. The extracted emission barrier height (ϕt) for Ga-polarity GaN Schottky diode by Frenkel-Poole theory is about 0.15 eV. Deep level transient spectroscopy study shows a deep level with activation energy of 0.44 eV, having capture cross-section 6.09 × 10-14 cm2, which is located between the metal and semiconductor interface, and trap nature is most probably associated with dislocations in Ga-polarity GaN. The analysis of I-V-T characteristics represents that the leakage current is due to effects of electrical field and temperature on the emission of electron from a trap state near the metal-semiconductor interface into continuum states associated with conductive dislocations in Ga-polarity GaN Schottky diode.

  18. Stabilization of primary mobile radiation defects in MgF2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsyn, V. M.; Lisitsyna, L. A.; Popov, A. I.; Kotomin, E. A.; Abuova, F. U.; Akilbekov, A.; Maier, J.

    2016-05-01

    Non-radiative decay of the electronic excitations (excitons) into point defects (F-H pairs of Frenkel defects) is main radiation damage mechanism in many ionic (halide) solids. Typical time scale of the relaxation of the electronic excitation into a primary, short-lived defect pair is about 1-50 ps with the quantum yield up to 0.2-0.8. However, only a small fraction of these primary defects are spatially separated and survive after transformation into stable, long-lived defects. The survival probability (or stable defect accumulation efficiency) can differ by orders of magnitude, dependent on the material type; e.g. ∼10% in alkali halides with f.c.c. or b.c.c. structure, 0.1% in rutile MgF2 and <0.001% in fluorides MeF2 (Me: Ca, Sr, Ba). The key factor determining accumulation of stable radiation defects is stabilization of primary defects, first of all, highly mobile hole H centers, through their transformation into more complex immobile defects. In this talk, we present the results of theoretical calculations of the migration energies of the F and H centers in poorely studied MgF2 crystals with a focus on the H center stabilization in the form of the interstitial F2 molecules which is supported by presented experimental data.

  19. Monte Carlo Simulations of Defect Recovery within a 10 keV Collision Cascade in 3C-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Zhouwen; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2007-11-26

    A kinetic lattice Monte Carlo (KLMC) model is developed to investigate the recovery and clustering of defects during annealing of a single 10 keV cascade in cubic silicon carbide. The 10 keV Si cascade is produced by molecular dynamics (MD), and a method of transferring the defects created by MD simulations to the KLMC model is developed. The KLMC model parameters are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations of defect migration, recombination and annihilation. The defects are annealed isothermally from 100 K to 1000 K in the KLMC model. Two distinct recovery stages for close Frenkel pairs are observed at about 200 and 550 K, and the growth of complex clusters is observed above 400 K. These simulation results are in good agreement with available experimental results.

  20. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  1. Semilocal defects

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J. )

    1992-11-15

    I analyze the interplay of gauge and global symmetries in the theory of topological defects. In a two-dimensional model in which both gauge symmetries and {ital exact} global symmetries are spontaneously broken, stable vortices may fail to exist even though magnetic flux is topologically conserved. Following Vachaspati and Achucarro, I formulate the condition that must be satisfied by the pattern of symmetry breakdown for finite-energy configurations to exist in which the conserved magnetic flux is spread out instead of confined to a localized vortex. If this condition is met, vortices are always unstable at sufficiently weak gauge coupling. I also describe the properties of defects in models with an accidental'' symmetry that is partially broken by gauge-boson exchange. In some cases, the spontaneously broken accidental symmetry is not restored inside the core of the defect. Then the structure of the defect can be analyzed using an effective field theory; the details of the physics responsible for the spontaneous symmetry breakdown need not be considered. Examples include domain walls and vortices that are classically unstable, but are stabilized by loop corrections, and magnetic monopoles that have an unusual core structure. Finally, I examine the general theory of the electroweak strings'' that were recently discussed by Vachaspati. These arise only in models with gauge-boson mixing,'' and can always end on magnetic monopoles. Cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  2. First-principles calculation of defect-formation energies in the Y2 (Ti,Sn,Zr)2 O7 pyrochlore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panero, Wendy R.; Stixrude, Lars; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2004-08-01

    Isometric pyrochlore, A2B2O7 , with compositions in the Y2(Ti,Sn,Zr)2O7 ternary system, are of particular interest because there are dramatic changes in properties, such as ionic conductivity, and response to radiation damage, as a function of disordering of the A- and B-site cations and oxygen vacancies. First-principles calculations using density functional theory and the plane-wave pseudopotential method, predict lattice constants (1.0049-1.0463 nm), atomic coordinates, and bulk moduli (176-205 GPa) that are linearly dependent on the B-site cation radius (0.062-0.072 nm). However, the energetics for the formation of cation-antisite (0-2 eV) and Frenkel-pair (4-11 eV) defects do not correlate with cation size, underscoring the importance of the specific electronic configuration of the B-site cation. The greater degree of covalent bonding between ⟨Sn4+-O⟩ as compared with ⟨Ti4+-O⟩ or ⟨Zr4+-O⟩ results in defect formation energies otherwise unexpected solely due to the radius ratios of the cation species. Y2Sn2O7 shows 2-4 eV greater defect formation energies than otherwise predicted through mean B-site cation sizes. Relaxed calculations on coupled cation-antisite and Frenkel-pair defects show that cation-antisite reactions likely drive the oxygen-Frenkel pair defect formation process that ultimately leads to increased oxygen mobility and completely aperiodic structures. Total charge and partial density of states calculations show strikingly different behavior of oxygen on two different crystallographic positions, emphasizing the need for a full account of the electronic structure.

  3. Displacement cascades and defects annealing in tungsten, Part I: Defect database from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to generate a comprehensive database of surviving defects due to displacement cascades in bulk tungsten. Twenty-one data points of primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies ranging from 100 eV (sub-threshold energy) to 100 keV (~780×Ed, where Ed = 128 eV is the average displacement threshold energy) have been completed at 300 K, 1025 K and 2050 K. Within this range of PKA energies, two regimes of power-law energy-dependence of the defect production are observed. A distinct power-law exponent characterizes the number of Frenkel pairs produced within each regime. The two regimes intersect at a transition energy which occurs at approximately 250×Ed. The transition energy also marks the onset of the formation of large self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters (size 14 or more). The observed defect clustering behavior is asymmetric, with SIA clustering increasing with temperature, while the vacancy clustering decreases. This asymmetry increases with temperature such that at 2050 K (~0.5Tm) practically no large vacancy clusters are formed, meanwhile large SIA clusters appear in all simulations. The implication of such asymmetry on the long-term defect survival and damage accumulation is discussed. In addition, <100> {110} SIA loops are observed to form directly in the highest energy cascades, while vacancy <100> loops are observed to form at the lowest temperature and highest PKA energies, although the appearance of both the vacancy and SIA loops with Burgers vector of <100> type is relatively rare.

  4. Energetics of intrinsic defects and their complexes in ZnO investigated by density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidya, R.; Ravindran, P.; Fjellvåg, H.; Svensson, B. G.; Monakhov, E.; Ganchenkova, M.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Formation energies of various intrinsic defects and defect complexes in ZnO have been calculated using a density-functional-theory-based pseudopotential all-electron method. The various defects considered are oxygen vacancy (VO), zinc vacancy (VZn), oxygen at an interstitial site (Oi), Zn at an interstitial site (Zni), Zn at VO (ZnO), O at VZn(OZn), and an antisite pair (combination of the preceding two defects). In addition, defect complexes like (VO+Zni) and Zn-vacancy clusters are studied. The Schokkty pair (VO+VZn) and Frenkel pairs [(VO+Oi) and (VZn+Zni)] are considered theoretically for the first time. Upon comparing the formation energies of these defects, we find that VO would be the dominant intrinsic defect under both Zn-rich and O-rich conditions and it is a deep double donor. Both ZnO and Zni are found to be shallow donors. The low formation energy of donor-type intrinsic defects could lead to difficulty in achieving p-type conductivity in ZnO. Defect complexes have charge transitions deep inside the band gap. The red, yellow, and green photoluminescence peaks of undoped samples can be assigned to some of the defect complexes considered. It is believed that the red luminescence originates from an electronic transition in VO, but we find that it can originate from the antisite ZnO defect. Charge density and electron-localization function analyses have been used to understand the effect of these defects on the ZnO lattice. The electronic structure of ZnO with intrinsic defects has been studied using density-of-states and electronic band structure plots. The acceptor levels introduced by VZn are relatively localized, making it difficult to achieve p-type conductivity with sufficient hole mobility.

  5. Isochronal annealing study of X-ray induced defects in single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Yuki; Itoh, Chihiro; Kisoda, Kenji

    2013-09-21

    X-ray induced defects in single-walled (SWCNTs) and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) were characterized by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Frenkel defects, interstitial-vacancy pairs, were revealed to form in both SWCNTs and DWCNTs after X-ray irradiation because these defects were entirely healed by thermal annealing. In order to clarify the structure of the X-ray induced defect in SWCNT and DWCNT, isochronal-annealing experiments were performed on the irradiated samples and the activation energy for defect healing was estimated. The intensity of D band (defect induced band) on Raman spectra was used as a measure of the density of X-ray induced defects. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulated values using second order reaction model, which indicated that the defect healing was determined by the migration energy of interstitials on the carbon layer. We also found that the activation energy for defect healing of SWCNT and DWCNT were around 0.5 eV and 0.32 eV, respectively. The X-ray induced defects in SWCNTs were more stable than those in DWCNTs. Compared these estimated activation energies to previous theoretical reports, we concluded that bridge and/or dumbbell interstitials are formed in both SWCNT and DWCNT by X-ray irradiation.

  6. Enhancing metal-insulator-insulator-metal tunnel diodes via defect enhanced direct tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Alimardani, Nasir; Conley, John F.

    2014-08-25

    Metal-insulator-insulator-metal tunnel diodes with dissimilar work function electrodes and nanolaminate Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} bilayer tunnel barriers deposited by atomic layer deposition are investigated. This combination of high and low electron affinity insulators, each with different dominant conduction mechanisms (tunneling and Frenkel-Poole emission), results in improved low voltage asymmetry and non-linearity of current versus voltage behavior. These improvements are due to defect enhanced direct tunneling in which electrons transport across the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} via defect based conduction before tunneling directly through the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, effectively narrowing the tunnel barrier. Conduction through the device is dominated by tunneling, and operation is relatively insensitive to temperature.

  7. Interaction of defects and H in proton-irradiated GaN(Mg, H)

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Seager, C.H.

    2005-05-01

    Magnesium-doped, p-type GaN containing H was irradiated with MeV protons at room temperature and then annealed at a succession of increasing temperatures, with the behavior of defects and H in the material being followed through infrared absorption spectroscopy, nuclear-reaction analysis of the H, and photoluminescence. The results support the annihilation of Ga Frenkel pairs near room temperature, leaving the N interstitial and N vacancy to influence the elevated-temperature behavior. Multiple changes are observed with increasing temperature, ending with thermal release of the H above 700 deg. C. These effects are interpreted in terms of a succession of complexes involving Mg, the point defects, and H.

  8. Analysis of defect formation in semiconductor cryogenic bolometric detectors created by heavy dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazanu, Ionel; Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia; Lazanu, Sorina

    2013-04-01

    The cryogenic detectors in the form of bolometers are presently used for different applications, in particular for very rare or hypothetical events associated with new forms of matter, specifically related to searches for dark matter. In the detection of particles with a semiconductor as target and detector, usually two signals are measured: ionization and heat. The amplification of the thermal signal is obtained with the prescriptions from the Luke-Neganov effect. The energy deposited in the semiconductor lattice as stable defects in the form of Frenkel pairs at cryogenic temperatures, following the interaction of a dark matter particle, is evaluated and consequences for measured quantities are discussed. This contribution is included in the energy balance of the Luke effect. Applying the present model to germanium and silicon, we found that for the same incident weakly interacting massive particle the energy deposited in defects in germanium is about twice the value for silicon.

  9. Poole Frenkel current and Schottky emission in SiN gate dielectric in AlGaN/GaN metal insulator semiconductor heterostructure field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Mina J.; Zhao, Han; Lee, Jack C.

    2012-10-01

    We analyze the anomalous I-V behavior in SiN prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for use as a gate insulator in AlGaN/GaN metal insulator semiconductor heterostructure filed effect transistors (HFETs). We observe leakage current across the dielectric with opposite polarity with respect to the applied electric field once the voltage sweep reaches a level below a determined threshold. This is observed as the absolute minimum of the leakage current does not occur at minimum voltage level (0 V) but occurs earlier in the sweep interval. Curve-fitting analysis suggests that the charge-transport mechanism in this region is Poole-Frenkel current, followed by Schottky emission due to band bending. Despite the current anomaly, the sample devices have shown a notable reduction of leakage current of over 2 to 6 order of magnitudes compared to the standard Schottky HFET. We show that higher pressures and higher silane concentrations produce better films manifesting less trapping. This conforms to our results that we reported in earlier publications. We found that higher chamber pressure achieves higher sheet carrier concentration that was found to be strongly dependent on the trapped space charge at the SiN/GaN interface. This would suggest that a lower chamber pressure induces more trap states into the SiN/GaN interface.

  10. Frenkel to Wannier-Mott Exciton Transition: Calculation of FRET Rates for a Tubular Dye Aggregate Coupled to a CdSe Nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Plehn, Thomas; Ziemann, Dirk; Megow, Jörg; May, Volkhard

    2015-06-18

    The coupling is investigated of Frenkel-like exciton states formed in a tubular dye aggregate (TDA) to Wannier-Mott-like excitations of a semiconductor nanocrystal (NC). A double well TDA of the cyanine dye C8S3 with a length of 63.4 nm and a diameter of 14.7 nm is considered. The TDA interacts with a spherical Cd819Te630 NC of 4.5 nm diameter. Electronic excitations of the latter are described in a tight-binding model of the electrons and holes combined with a configuration interaction scheme to consider their mutual Coulomb coupling. To achieve a proper description of TDA excitons, a recently determined structure has been used, the energy transfer coupling has been defined as a screened interaction of atomic centered transition charges, and the site energies of the dye molecules have been the subject of a polarization correction. Even if both nanoparticles are in direct contact, the energy transfer coupling between the exciton levels of the TDA and of the NC stays below 1 meV. It results in FRET-type energy transfer with rates somewhat larger than 10(9)/s. They coincide rather well with recent preliminary experiments. PMID:25531181

  11. From square-well to Janus: Improved algorithm for integral equation theory and comparison with thermodynamic perturbation theory within the Kern-Frenkel model

    SciTech Connect

    Giacometti, Achille; Gögelein, Christoph; Lado, Fred; Sciortino, Francesco; Ferrari, Silvano

    2014-03-07

    Building upon past work on the phase diagram of Janus fluids [F. Sciortino, A. Giacometti, and G. Pastore, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 237801 (2009)], we perform a detailed study of integral equation theory of the Kern-Frenkel potential with coverage that is tuned from the isotropic square-well fluid to the Janus limit. An improved algorithm for the reference hypernetted-chain (RHNC) equation for this problem is implemented that significantly extends the range of applicability of RHNC. Results for both structure and thermodynamics are presented and compared with numerical simulations. Unlike previous attempts, this algorithm is shown to be stable down to the Janus limit, thus paving the way for analyzing the frustration mechanism characteristic of the gas-liquid transition in the Janus system. The results are also compared with Barker-Henderson thermodynamic perturbation theory on the same model. We then discuss the pros and cons of both approaches within a unified treatment. On balance, RHNC integral equation theory, even with an isotropic hard-sphere reference system, is found to be a good compromise between accuracy of the results, computational effort, and uniform quality to tackle self-assembly processes in patchy colloids of complex nature. Further improvement in RHNC however clearly requires an anisotropic reference bridge function.

  12. From square-well to Janus: improved algorithm for integral equation theory and comparison with thermodynamic perturbation theory within the Kern-Frenkel model.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Achille; Gögelein, Christoph; Lado, Fred; Sciortino, Francesco; Ferrari, Silvano; Pastore, Giorgio

    2014-03-01

    Building upon past work on the phase diagram of Janus fluids [F. Sciortino, A. Giacometti, and G. Pastore, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 237801 (2009)], we perform a detailed study of integral equation theory of the Kern-Frenkel potential with coverage that is tuned from the isotropic square-well fluid to the Janus limit. An improved algorithm for the reference hypernetted-chain (RHNC) equation for this problem is implemented that significantly extends the range of applicability of RHNC. Results for both structure and thermodynamics are presented and compared with numerical simulations. Unlike previous attempts, this algorithm is shown to be stable down to the Janus limit, thus paving the way for analyzing the frustration mechanism characteristic of the gas-liquid transition in the Janus system. The results are also compared with Barker-Henderson thermodynamic perturbation theory on the same model. We then discuss the pros and cons of both approaches within a unified treatment. On balance, RHNC integral equation theory, even with an isotropic hard-sphere reference system, is found to be a good compromise between accuracy of the results, computational effort, and uniform quality to tackle self-assembly processes in patchy colloids of complex nature. Further improvement in RHNC however clearly requires an anisotropic reference bridge function. PMID:24606350

  13. Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Risk • Symptoms & Diagnosis • Care & Treatment • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  14. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina bifida, ...

  15. Electrical characterization of defects introduced in n-Ge during electron beam deposition or exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, S. M. M.; Auret, F. D.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Nel, J. M.

    2013-11-07

    Schottky barrier diodes prepared by electron beam deposition (EBD) on Sb-doped n-type Ge were characterized using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Pt EBD diodes manufactured with forming gas in the chamber had two defects, E{sub 0.28} and E{sub 0.31}, which were not previously observed after EBD. By shielding the samples mechanically during EBD, superior diodes were produced with no measureable deep levels, establishing that energetic ions created in the electron beam path were responsible for the majority of defects observed in the unshielded sample. Ge samples that were first exposed to the conditions of EBD, without metal deposition (called electron beam exposure herein), introduced a number of new defects not seen after EBD with only the E-center being common to both processes. Substantial differences were noted when these DLTS spectra were compared to those obtained using diodes irradiated by MeV electrons or alpha particles indicating that very different defect creation mechanisms are at play when too little energy is available to form Frenkel pairs. These observations suggest that when EBD ions and energetic particles collide with the sample surface, inducing intrinsic non-localised lattice excitations, they modify defects deeper in the semiconductor thus rendering them observable.

  16. Study of Near-Neighbor Structure of Point Defects in α-FE by Displacement Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Lu; Liu, Wei; Wu, Xuebang; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.; Huang, Qun-Ying; Wu, Y. C.

    2012-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the primary damage formation in α-Fe by collision cascades in the recoil energy range 0.5-20 keV. Two near-neighbor analysis methods including the near-neighbor defect density (NPDD) analysis and cluster analysis were introduced to characterize the spatial aggregation of point defects and the morphologies of clusters, respectively. It is found that the NPDD of self-interstitial atom (SIA) and the number of Frenkel pairs show a similar variation trend, while the NPDD of vacancy exhibits a peak at shorter time than that of SIA. Furthermore, we find that the clusters of point defects exist mostly in the form of chainlike structure in the course and the end of cascades, but the proportion of chainlike clusters decreases with increasing the number of point defects included in one cluster. Therefore, the present methods are found to be effective to characterize the aggregation and the near-neighbor structure of point defects by displacement cascades at any time.

  17. Ab-initio modelling of defects in MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. A.; Smith, R.; Kenny, S. D.

    2007-02-01

    The energetics of the key defects that are observed to occur during simulations of radiation damage in MgO are analysed using density functional theory. The results are compared with those from the empirical potentials used to carry out the radiation damage studies. The formation energies of vacancies, interstitials, Frenkel pairs, di-vacancies and di-interstitials are calculated as a function of the increasing supercell size in order to ensure good convergence. The supercell geometries were chosen to maximise the separation distance between periodic images. Their sizes ranged from cells containing 32 atoms up to cells containing 180 atoms. Results are presented for the formation energies of the first, second and third nearest neighbour defects. Results show that the di-vacancy formation energy is in the region of 4-6 eV and that formation energies for di-interstitials are more than double this, lying in the range 12-16 eV. Comparison of the results show that empirical potentials overestimate the formation energy of di-vacancies by 1-3 eV and underestimate the formation energies of di-interstitials by about 1-2 eV. The relative stability of the defects is, however, correctly predicted by the empirical potentials. The direction and the magnitude of the displacements of the atoms surrounding the defects are in good agreement for all the systems containing interstitials. For the systems containing vacancies the direction of the displacements are in agreement but the empirical potentials predict larger displacements in all cases.

  18. Formation and annihilation of intrinsic defects induced by electronic excitation in high-purity crystalline SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-04-14

    Formation and thermal annihilation of intrinsic defects in {alpha}-quartz were examined using high-purity samples, while minimizing the contributions of reactions involving metallic impurities. Electronic excitation with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays was employed to avoid radiation-induced amorphization. The results clearly show that formation of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) as a result of decomposition of regular Si-O-Si bonds (Frenkel process) is the dominant intrinsic defect process. Compared with amorphous SiO{sub 2}, in {alpha}-quartz, the formation yield of Si-Si bonds is an order of magnitude smaller, the 7.6 eV optical absorption band is less broadened, and their thermal annihilation is complete at a lower temperature, around the {alpha}-{beta} quartz transition. In contrast, radiation-induced interstitial oxygen atoms practically do not form interstitial oxygen molecules.

  19. Carrier-induced transient defect mechanism for non-radiative recombination in InGaN light-emitting devices

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Y. Y.; Song, Jung-Hoon; Zhang, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Non-radiative recombination (NRR) of excited carriers poses a serious challenge to optoelectronic device efficiency. Understanding the mechanism is thus crucial to defect physics and technological applications. Here, by using first-principles calculations, we propose a new NRR mechanism, where excited carriers recombine via a Frenkel-pair (FP) defect formation. While in the ground state the FP is high in energy and is unlikely to form, in the electronic excited states its formation is enabled by a strong electron-phonon coupling of the excited carriers. This NRR mechanism is expected to be general for wide-gap semiconductors, rather than being limited to InGaN-based light emitting devices. PMID:27075818

  20. Carrier-induced transient defect mechanism for non-radiative recombination in InGaN light-emitting devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Y. Y.; Song, Jung -Hoon; Zhang, S. B.

    2016-04-14

    Non-radiative recombination (NRR) of excited carriers poses a serious challenge to optoelectronic device efficiency. Understanding the mechanism is thus crucial to defect physics and technological applications. Here, by using first-principles calculations, we propose a new NRR mechanism, where excited carriers recombine via a Frenkel-pair (FP) defect formation. While in the ground state the FP is high in energy and is unlikely to form, in the electronic excited states its formation is enabled by a strong electron-phonon coupling of the excited carriers. As a result, this NRR mechanism is expected to be general for wide-gap semiconductors, rather than being limited tomore » InGaN-based light emitting devices.« less

  1. First-principles Modelling of Radiation Defects in Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kotomin, Eugene Alexej; Gryaznov, D.; Grimes, R. W.; Parfitt, D.; Zhukovskii, Yuri F.; Mastrikov, Yuri A.; Van Uffelen, Paul; Rondinella, Vincenzo V.; Konings, RJ M.

    2008-06-01

    We present and discuss the results of the first-principles calculations of Frenkel defects and O impurities in uranium mononitride (UN) perspective for fast reactor nuclear fuels. Special attention is paid to the calculation of defect migration energies. We demonstrate that the interstitialcy mechanism (with the formation of a N–N dumbbell along the [111] axis) is energetically more favorable than the direct [100] hops. As a result, for the interstitial N ions we predict a diffusion mechanism similar to that known in isostructural fcc materials with a different chemical nature (KCl, MgO). The calculated effective N charge considerably depends on the ion position and environment (a host lattice site, interstitial or saddle point) which strongly limits the applicability of classical defect modelling based on formal invariant charges. Lastly, the calculated migration energy for the interstitial impurity O ions is quite low (2.84 eV), which indicates their high mobility and ability for reactions with other defects.

  2. Birth Defects Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... chromosomal disorder or heart defect in the baby. Second Trimester Screening Second trimester screening tests are completed between weeks 15 ... look for certain birth defects in the baby. Second trimester screening tests include a maternal serum screen ...

  3. Atrial septal defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coronary angiography (for patients over 35 years old) ECG Heart MRI Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) Treatment ASD may ... of the complications can be prevented with early detection. Alternative Names Congenital heart defect - ASD; Birth defect ...

  4. Facts about Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a baby ...

  5. Energetics of intrinsic defects and their complexes in ZnO investigated by density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Vidya, R.; Ravindran, P.; Fjellvaag, H.; Svensson, B. G.; Monakhov, E.; Ganchenkova, M.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2011-01-15

    Formation energies of various intrinsic defects and defect complexes in ZnO have been calculated using a density-functional-theory-based pseudopotential all-electron method. The various defects considered are oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}), zinc vacancy (V{sub Zn}), oxygen at an interstitial site (O{sub i}), Zn at an interstitial site (Zn{sub i}), Zn at V{sub O} (Zn{sub O}), O at V{sub Zn}(O{sub Zn}), and an antisite pair (combination of the preceding two defects). In addition, defect complexes like (V{sub O}+Zn{sub i}) and Zn-vacancy clusters are studied. The Schokkty pair (V{sub O}+V{sub Zn}) and Frenkel pairs [(V{sub O}+O{sub i}) and (V{sub Zn}+Zn{sub i})] are considered theoretically for the first time. Upon comparing the formation energies of these defects, we find that V{sub O} would be the dominant intrinsic defect under both Zn-rich and O-rich conditions and it is a deep double donor. Both Zn{sub O} and Zn{sub i} are found to be shallow donors. The low formation energy of donor-type intrinsic defects could lead to difficulty in achieving p-type conductivity in ZnO. Defect complexes have charge transitions deep inside the band gap. The red, yellow, and green photoluminescence peaks of undoped samples can be assigned to some of the defect complexes considered. It is believed that the red luminescence originates from an electronic transition in V{sub O}, but we find that it can originate from the antisite Zn{sub O} defect. Charge density and electron-localization function analyses have been used to understand the effect of these defects on the ZnO lattice. The electronic structure of ZnO with intrinsic defects has been studied using density-of-states and electronic band structure plots. The acceptor levels introduced by V{sub Zn} are relatively localized, making it difficult to achieve p-type conductivity with sufficient hole mobility.

  6. Defect Chemistry, Oxygen Ion Conduction, and Proton Conduction of Oxides with Brownmillerite and Related Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guobin

    This dissertation presents a study on defect structure, oxygen ion conductivity, proton conductivity, electronic conductivity, and high temperature equilibrium redox properties of brownmillerite related oxides with general formula A _{rm n}B _{rm n}O_ {rm 3n-1} (n = 2 to infty ). A defect chemistry model is proposed for the brownmillerite oxides with high oxygen ion conductivity. Ba_2 In_2O_5 was chosen as the model material and its electrical conductivity and transport properties have been studied in detail. The oxygen ion conduction above the order-disorder temperature, T_{rm d} ~ 925^circC, and a mixed ionic-electronic conduction below T _{rm d}, was studied by conductivity and EMF measurements as a function of temperature and oxygen activity. The main defects are intrinsic anion Frenkel defects below T_{rm d}, and above T_{rm d} the oxide can be treated as acceptor doped perovskite with extrinsic oxygen vacancies. Charge compensation involves only ionic defects over the whole P(O_2 ) range used in this study. The formation and mobility enthalpies of the Frenkel defects, the redox enthalpies, and the band gap have been obtained for this oxide. A similar study has been done for other compositions in Ba _{rm n}In _2Zr_{rm n-2} O_{rm 3n-1} system. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental results. Evidence for protonic conduction was also found in these materials, especially at low temperatures. Three regions of protonic conduction in the Arrhenius plot have been observed and analyzed. The proton formation and mobility enthalpies have been obtained. The observed proton conductivity transition at the oxygen order-disorder transition temperature directly confirms the proton formation mechanism by incorporation of H_2O molecules into oxygen vacancies. A defect chemistry study was also conducted for the brownmillerite oxides with high electronic conductivity with Ca_2(Al_{ rm x}Fe_{rm 2-x})O_5 chosen as the model system. The main defects are

  7. Defect production in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Kinoshita, C.

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  8. Topological defect lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knitter, Sebastian; Fatt Liew, Seng; Xiong, Wen; Guy, Mikhael I.; Solomon, Glenn S.; Cao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a topological defect to a regular photonic crystal defect cavity with anisotropic unit cell. Spatially localized resonances are formed and have high quality factor. Unlike the regular photonic crystal defect states, the localized resonances in the topological defect structures support powerflow vortices. Experimentally we realize lasing in the topological defect cavities with optical pumping. This work shows that the spatially inhomogeneous variation of the unit cell orientation adds another degree of freedom to the control of lasing modes, enabling the manipulation of the field pattern and energy flow landscape.

  9. Postdevelopment defect evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Osamu; Kiba, Yukio; Ono, Yuko

    2001-08-01

    Reduction of defects after development is a critical issue in photolithography. A special category of post development defects is the satellite defect which is located in large exposed areas generally in proximity to large unexposed regions of photoresist. We have investigated the formation of this defect type on ESCAP and ACETAL DUV resists with and without underlying organic BARCs, In this paper, we will present AFM and elemental analysis data to determine the origin of the satellite defect. Imaging was done on a full-field Nikon 248nm stepper and resist processing was completed on a TEL CLEAN TRACK ACT 8 track. Defect inspection and review were performed on a KLA-Tencor and Hitachi SEM respectively. Results indicate that the satellite defect is generated on both BARC and resist films and defect counts are dependent on the dark erosion. Elemental analysis indicates that the defects are composed of sulfur and nitrogen compounds. We suspect that the defect is formed as a result of a reaction between PAG, quencher and TMAH. This defect type is removed after a DIW re-rinse.

  10. Theoretical investigation of thermodynamic stability and mobility of the intrinsic point defects in Ti3AC2 (A = Si, Al).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiemin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jingyang; Zhou, Yanchun

    2015-04-14

    Nano-laminated Ti3AC2 (A = Si, Al) are highlighted as nuclear materials for a generation IV (GIV) reactor because they show high tolerance to radiation damage and remain crystalline under irradiation of high fluence heavy ions. In this paper, the energetics of formation and migration of intrinsic point defects are predicted by density functional theory calculations. We find that the space near the A atomic plane acts as a point defect sink and can accommodate lattice disorder. The migration energy barriers of Si/Al vacancy and TiSi anti-site defects along the atomic plane A are in the range of 0.3 to 0.9 eV, indicating their high mobility and the fast recovery of Si/Al Frenkel defects and Ti-A antisite pairs after irradiation. This layered structure induced large disorder accommodation and fast defect recovery must play an important role in the micro-structural response of Ti3AC2 to irradiation. PMID:25749398

  11. Unraveling energy conversion modeling in the intrinsic persistent upconverted luminescence of solids: a study of native point defects in antiferromagnetic Er2O3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bolong

    2016-05-11

    We investigated the mechanism of the intrinsic persistent luminescence of Er2O3 in the A-type lattice based on first-principles calculations. We found that the native point defects were engaged in mutual subtle interactions in the form of chemical reactions between different charge states. The release of energy related to lattice distortion facilitates the conversion of energy for electrons to be transported between the valence band and the trap levels or even between the deep trap levels so as to generate persistent luminescence. The defect transitions that take place along the zero-phonon line release energy to enable optical transitions, with the exact amount of negative effective correlation energy determined by the lattice distortions. Our calculations on the thermodynamic transition levels confirm that both the visible and NIR experimentally observed intrinsic persistent luminescence (phosphor or afterglow) are related to the thermodynamic transition levels of oxygen-related defects, and the thermodynamic transition levels within different charge states for these defects are independent of the chemical potentials of the given species. Lattice distortion defects such as anion Frenkel (a-Fr) pair defects play an important role in transporting O-related defects between different lattice sites. To obtain red persistent luminescence that matches the biological therapeutic window, it is suggested to increase the electron transition levels between high-coordinated O vacancies and related metastable a-Fr defects; a close-packed core-shell structure is required to quench low-coordinated O-related defects so as to reduce the green band luminescence. We further established a conversed chain reaction (CCR) model to interpret the energy conversion process of persistent luminescence in terms of the inter-reactions of native point defects between different charge states. It is advantageous to use the study of defect levels combined with formation energies to suggest limits

  12. On the interactions of point defects, dopants and light element impurities in silicon as stimulated by 200 kV electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Nathan Gregory

    The purpose of this research has been the investigation of atomic manipulation in silicon. It has been demonstrated that bulk vacancies and interstitials are created and spatially separated one Frenkel pair at a time during 200 kV electron irradiation of nitrogen-doped silicon. The mechanism by which the nitrogen pair allows Frenkel pair separation is shown to be a combination of the lowering of the energy barrier to a knock-on event combined with a more stable end-state. Anomalous nitrogen diffusion has been observed as a result of low energy ion milling, and the diffusion of nitrogen is studied theoretically, revealing a new, low energy model for N2 pair diffusion. For the first time, 200 kV irradiation has been demonstrated not only to create Frenkel pairs during broad-beam irradiation, but also to allow the formation of extended defects like voids, oxygen precipitates and interstitial complexes. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with first principles simulations, dark and bright areas induced in Z contrast images by 200 kV irradiation are demonstrated to be due to vacancy and self-interstitial complexes, respectively, with N > 2. Finally, the manipulation of dopants in silicon is induced by using the difference in energy transferable from a 200 kV electron to light versus heavy elements (e.g. B vs. Sb). Atomic Force Microscopy is used to demonstrate that n-type regions with a size corresponding to the beam diameter are created in p-type material by short periods of 200 kV e-beam exposure. In this way, a method can be developed to create p-n-p type devices of arbitrary size in codoped silicon using a room temperature process.

  13. Structure and properties of surface and subsurface defects in graphite accounting for van der Waals and spin-polarization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teobaldi, G.; Tanimura, K.; Shluger, A. L.

    2010-11-01

    The geometries, formation energies, and diffusion barriers of surface and subsurface intrinsic defects in graphite are calculated using spin-polarized density-functional theory and the generalized gradient approximation with a semiempirical van der Waals (vdW) correction for dispersion interactions. The calculated formation energies and diffusion barriers of subsurface interstitial (I) atoms deviate qualitatively and quantitatively from those of surface adatoms. The same trend is found also for subsurface and adatom clusters (I2,I3) . In spite of the semiquantitative agreement on the optimized geometries, the formation energies and diffusion barriers of surface and subsurface vacancies (V), divacancies (VV), and intimate (I-V) Frenkel pairs differ significantly from the values for the analogous defects in the bulk of graphite. This suggests limited transferability of the bulk and subsurface defect models to the surface of graphite. These findings are rationalized in terms of the balance between the covalent and vdW interaction terms at the surface, subsurface, and bulk of graphite. Finally, pairing of individual defects (adatoms, I and V) is calculated to be energetically advantageous both on the surface and in the subsurface regions. This process is shown to either saturate residual dangling bonds or produce singlet spin states, thus contributing to the quenching of residual spin polarization from damaged graphite surfaces.

  14. Micrograph Defect Indentifier

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-10-11

    Micrograph image defect identifier is a computer code written in MATLAB to automatically detect defects on scanned image of thin film membrane samples employing three methods: global threshold, line detection and k-means segmentation. The results are segmented binary images of thin film with defects identified. Defect area fractions are also calculated. The users may use default functional variables calculated by program, or input preferred value from user’s experience. This will empower the user to processingmore » the image with more flexibility. MDI was designed to identify defects of thin films fabricated. It is also used in phase identification, porosity study on SEM, OM, TEM images. Different methods were applied in this software package: global threshold, line detection and k-means segmentation.« less

  15. Micrograph Defect Indentifier

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-10-11

    Micrograph image defect identifier is a computer code written in MATLAB to automatically detect defects on scanned image of thin film membrane samples employing three methods: global threshold, line detection and k-means segmentation. The results are segmented binary images of thin film with defects identified. Defect area fractions are also calculated. The users may use default functional variables calculated by program, or input preferred value from user’s experience. This will empower the user to processing the image with more flexibility. MDI was designed to identify defects of thin films fabricated. It is also used in phase identification, porosity study on SEM, OM, TEM images. Different methods were applied in this software package: global threshold, line detection and k-means segmentation.

  16. Defect Chemistry of Nanocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhuang

    2015-03-01

    Defects can rule the properties of a crystal. This effect is particularly intriguing in atom-thick materials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene, where electrons, excitons, phonons, and spin may strongly couple at the defect sites due to reduced dimensionality. In this talk, we will discuss our recent progress in fundamental understanding and molecular control of sp3 defects in sp2 carbon lattices, and their applications. An sp3 defect (tetrahedral bonding, diamond-like) is created by covalently attaching a functional group to the sp2 carbon lattice (trigonal planar, honeycomb-like) of a carbon nanotube or graphene. The beauty of this type of defect is its well-defined structure and chemical tunability at the molecular level. Our experimental results have unraveled a series of intriguing and surprising roles of defects. Specific examples will be given to illustrate how defects may be used to drive reaction propagation on sp2 carbon lattices, brighten carbon nanotube photoluminescence, and create selective chemical sensors.

  17. Wavelength dependent mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen; Butt, Shahid; Burnham, Jay; Faure, Tom; Hibbs, Michael; Rankin, Jed; Thibault, David; Watts, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    For years there has been a mismatch between the photomask inspection wavelength and the usage conditions. While the non-actinic inspection has been a source for concern, there has been essentially no evidence that a defect "escaped" the mask production process due to the inspection mismatch. This paper will describe the discovery of one such defect, as well as the diagnostic and inspection techniques used to identify the location, analyze the composition, and determine the source of the printed wafer defect. Conventional mask inspection techniques revealed no defects, however an actinic Aerial Image Metrology System (AIMS) revealed a 1.5 mm region on the mask with up to 59% transmission reduction at 193 nm. Further diagnostics demonstrated a strong wavelength dependence which accounted for the near invisibility of the defect at I line (365 nm) or even DUV (248 nm) wavelengths, which had 0% and 5% respective transmission reductions. Using some creative imaging techniques via AIMS tool and modeling, the defect was deduced to have a three dimensional Gaussian absorption character, with total width approximately 1.5 mm. Several non-destructive diagnostic techniques were developed to determine the composition and location of the defect within the substrate. These results will be described in addition to identifying methods for ensuring product quality in the absence of actinic inspection.

  18. Point defects diagrams for pure and doped copper oxide Cu{sub 2{+-}{delta}}O in the temperature range of 873-1473 K

    SciTech Connect

    Stoklosa, A.

    2012-10-15

    Point defects diagrams for the Cu{sub 2{+-}{delta}}O, both pure and doped with M{sup 2+} metal ions with all the types of defects in the cation sublattice considered are presented in this work. The calculations of the diagrams were performed by a novel method. The calculations were based on the data from the results of the studies of the deviation from stoichiometry and the electrical conductivity in the temperature range of 873-1473 K. The values of {Delta}G{sup o} of the formation of Frenkel-type defects, of copper vacancies, and of interstitial copper atoms were determined and their temperature dependence. It was shown that character of the dependence of the sum of concentrations of electronic defects ([h{sup Bullet }]+b[e Prime ]) on p{sub O{sub 2}} is fully consistent with its dependence of the electrical conductivity. Their mobility ({mu}{sub e}/{mu}{sub h}=b), vary from 1300 to 30. The dope M{sup 2+} increases the concentration of electrons and shifts the minimum of electrical conductivity toward higher oxygen pressures. - Graphical abstract: This work presents point defects diagrams for the Cu{sub 2{+-}{delta}}O, with all the types of defects in the cation sublattice considered. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The point defects diagrams. Copper oxide Cu{sub 2{+-}{delta}}O, for pure and M{sup 2+} doped. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of {Delta}G{sup o} of the formation of Frenkel-type defects were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of {Delta}G{sup o} of the formation QUOTE QUOTE of singly-ionized copper vacancies were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of {Delta}G{sup o} of the formation of electroneutral copper vacancies were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of {Delta}G{sup o} of the formation and of interstitial copper atoms were determined.

  19. Defect solitons in photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianke; Chen, Zhigang

    2006-02-01

    Nonlinear defect modes (defect solitons) and their stability in one-dimensional photonic lattices with focusing saturable nonlinearity are investigated. It is shown that defect solitons bifurcate out from every infinitesimal linear defect mode. Low-power defect solitons are linearly stable in lower bandgaps but unstable in higher bandgaps. At higher powers, defect solitons become unstable in attractive defects, but can remain stable in repulsive defects. Furthermore, for high-power solitons in attractive defects, we found a type of Vakhitov-Kolokolov (VK) instability which is different from the usual VK instability based on the sign of the slope in the power curve. Lastly, we demonstrate that in each bandgap, in addition to defect solitons which bifurcate from linear defect modes, there is also an infinite family of other defect solitons which can be stable in certain parameter regimes. PMID:16605473

  20. What Are Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Neural Tube Defects (NTDs): Condition Information Skip sharing on ... media links Share this: Page Content What are neural tube defects? Neural (pronounced NOOR-uhl ) tube defects ...

  1. Atrial Septal Defect (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Atrial Septal Defect KidsHealth > For Teens > Atrial Septal Defect Print A ... Care of Yourself What Is an Atrial Septal Defect? Having a doctor listen to your heart is ...

  2. Automated Defect Classification (ADC)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-01-01

    The ADC Software System is designed to provide semiconductor defect feature analysis and defect classification capabilities. Defect classification is an important software method used by semiconductor wafer manufacturers to automate the analysis of defect data collected by a wide range of microscopy techniques in semiconductor wafer manufacturing today. These microscopies (e.g., optical bright and dark field, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, etc.) generate images of anomalies that are induced or otherwise appear on wafermore » surfaces as a result of errant manufacturing processes or simple atmospheric contamination (e.g., airborne particles). This software provides methods for analyzing these images, extracting statistical features from the anomalous regions, and applying supervised classifiers to label the anomalies into user-defined categories.« less

  3. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & ... defects. Clefting can be surgically repaired after birth. Cerebral palsy usually isn't found until weeks to months ...

  4. Birth defects monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Klingberg, M.A.; Papier, C.M.; Hart, J.

    1983-01-01

    Population monitoring of birth defects provides a means for detecting relative changes in their frequency. Many varied systems have been developed throughout the world since the thalidomide tragedy of the early 1960s. Although it is difficult to pinpoint specific teratogenic agents based on rises in rates of a particular defect or a constellation of defects, monitoring systems can provide clues for hypothesis testing in epidemiological investigations. International coordination of efforts in this area resulted in the founding of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Monitoring Systems (ICBDMS) in 1974. In this paper we will describe the functions and basic requirements of monitoring systems in general, and look at the development and activities of the ICBDMS. A review of known and suspected environmental teratogenic agents (eg, chemical, habitual, biological, physical, and nutritional) is also presented.

  5. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  6. Similarities and distinctions of defect production by fast electron and proton irradiation: Moderately doped silicon and silicon carbide of n-type

    SciTech Connect

    Emtsev, V. V. Ivanov, A. M.; Kozlovski, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A.; Oganesyan, G. A.; Strokan, N. B.; Wagner, G.

    2012-04-15

    Effects of irradiation with 0.9 MeV electrons as well as 8 and 15 MeV protons on moderately doped n-Si grown by the floating zone (FZ) technique and n-SiC (4H) grown by chemical vapor deposition are studied in a comparative way. It has been established that the dominant radiation-produced defects with involvement of V group impurities differ dramatically in electron- and proton-irradiated n-Si (FZ), in spite of the opinion on their similarity widespread in literature. This dissimilarity in defect structures is attributed to a marked difference in distributions of primary radiation defects for the both kinds of irradiation. In contrast, DLTS spectra taken on electron- and proton-irradiated n-SiC (4H) appear to be similar. However, there are very much pronounced differences in the formation rates of radiation-produced defects. Despite a larger production rate of Frenkel pairs in SiC as compared to that in Si, the removal rates of charge carriers in n-SiC (4H) were found to be considerably smaller than those in n-Si (FZ) for the both electron and proton irradiation. Comparison between defect production rates in the both materials under electron and proton irradiation is drawn.

  7. Birth Defects. Matrix No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, Robert L.

    This report discusses the magnitude of the problem of birth defects, outlines advances in the birth defects field in the past decade, and identifies those areas where research is needed for the prevention, treatment, and management of birth defects. The problem of birth defects has consumed a greater portion of our health care resources because of…

  8. Reconstruction of Mandibular Defects

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Harvey; Salgado, Christopher J.; Mardini, Samir; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Defects requiring reconstruction in the mandible are commonly encountered and may result from resection of benign or malignant lesions, trauma, or osteoradionecrosis. Mandibular defects can be classified according to location and extent, as well as involvement of mucosa, skin, and tongue. Vascularized bone flaps, in general, provide the best functional and aesthetic outcome, with the fibula flap remaining the gold standard for mandible reconstruction. In this review, we discuss classification and approach to reconstruction of mandibular defects. We also elaborate upon four commonly used free osteocutaneous flaps, inclusive of fibula, iliac crest, scapula, and radial forearm. Finally, we discuss indications and use of osseointegrated implants as well as recent advances in mandibular reconstruction. PMID:22550439

  9. Wire insulation defect detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greulich, Owen R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Wiring defects are located by detecting a reflected signal that is developed when an arc occurs through the defect to a nearby ground. The time between the generation of the signal and the return of the reflected signal provides an indication of the distance of the arc (and therefore the defect) from the signal source. To ensure arcing, a signal is repeated at gradually increasing voltages while the wire being tested and a nearby ground are immersed in a conductive medium. In order to ensure that the arcing occurs at an identifiable time, the signal whose reflection is to be detected is always made to reach the highest potential yet seen by the system.

  10. Quantum computing with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, Joel

    2011-03-01

    The development of a quantum computer is contingent upon the identification and design of systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information. One of the most promising candidates consists of a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center, since it is an individually-addressable quantum system that can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. While the success of the NV-1 stems from its nature as a localized ``deep-center'' point defect, no systematic effort has been made to identify other defects that might behave in a similar way. We provide guidelines for identifying other defect centers with similar properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate systems. To elucidate these points, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV-1 center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). Using hybrid functionals, we report formation energies, configuration-coordinate diagrams, and defect-level diagrams to compare and contrast the properties of these defects. We find that the NC VSi - 1 center in SiC, a structural analog of the NV-1 center in diamond, may be a suitable center with very different optical transition energies. We also discuss how the proposed criteria can be translated into guidelines to discover NV analogs in other tetrahedrally coordinated materials. This work was performed in collaboration with J. R. Weber, W. F. Koehl, B. B. Buckley, A. Janotti, C. G. Van de Walle, and D. D. Awschalom. This work was supported by ARO, AFOSR, and NSF.

  11. Supersymmetric k-defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Michael; Trodden, Mark

    2016-04-01

    In supersymmetric theories, topological defects can have nontrivial behaviors determined purely by whether or not supersymmetry is restored in the defect core. A well-known example of this is that some supersymmetric cosmic strings are automatically superconducting, leading to important cosmological effects and constraints. We investigate the impact of nontrivial kinetic interactions, present in a number of particle physics models of interest in cosmology, on the relationship between supersymmetry and supercurrents on strings. We find that in some cases it is possible for superconductivity to be disrupted by the extra interactions.

  12. Defect-dependent carrier transport behavior of polymer:ZnO composites/electrodeposited CdS/indium tin oxide devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yow-Jon You, C. F.

    2015-07-28

    Currents through the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrenesulfonate) and ZnO nanoparticles (PEDOT:PSS:ZnO)/CdS/indium tin oxide (ITO) hetero-structures are studied. The authors introduced the electrodeposition technique with sulfide treatment to improve the film quality of CdS. It is shown that sulfide treatment leads to a reduction in the number of donor-like defects (that is, sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitials) in the CdS films, which leads to the conversion of carrier transport behavior from Poole-Frenkel emission to thermionic emission-diffusion for PEDOT:PSS:ZnO/CdS/ITO devices. A correlation is identified for providing a guide to control the current transport behavior of PEDOT:PSS:ZnO/CdS/ITO devices.

  13. Suppression of nonradiative recombination in ionic insulators by defects: Role of fast electron trapping in Tl-doped CsI

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Junhyeok; Wang, Zheming; Gao, Fei; Meng, Sheng; Zhang, Shengbai

    2013-05-23

    In semiconductors, defects often assist non-radiative relaxation. However, Tl doping can significantly suppress the non-radiative relaxation in alkali halides to increase scintillation efficiency. Without the Tl, it is known that the creation of Frenkel pairs at self-trapped excitons, assisted by excited electron and hole relaxations, is the reason for the non-radiative relaxation. Here we show by first-principles calculation that Tl doping introduces Tl p states inside the band gap to trap the excited electrons. The trapping is highly effective to within several ps, as revealed by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. It alters the non-radiative relaxation process to result in a noticeable increase in the relaxation barrier from 0.3 to 0.63 eV, which reduces the non-radiative relaxation by roughly a factor of 105 at room temperature.

  14. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina bifida, the fetal spinal column doesn't close completely. There is usually nerve damage that causes at least some paralysis of the legs. In anencephaly, ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  15. Quantum computing with defects.

    PubMed

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors. PMID:20404195

  16. Ventricular Septal Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that are present at birth in ... common, accounting for 20% to 30% of all congenital heart defects. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 42 out ...

  17. Defects in flexoelectric solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Sheng; Purohit, Prashant K.

    2015-11-01

    A solid is said to be flexoelectric when it polarizes in proportion to strain gradients. Since strain gradients are large near defects, we expect the flexoelectric effect to be prominent there and decay away at distances much larger than a flexoelectric length scale. Here, we quantify this expectation by computing displacement, stress and polarization fields near defects in flexoelectric solids. For point defects we recover some well known results from strain gradient elasticity and non-local piezoelectric theories, but with different length scales in the final expressions. For edge dislocations we show that the electric potential is a maximum in the vicinity of the dislocation core. We also estimate the polarized line charge density of an edge dislocation in an isotropic flexoelectric solid which is in agreement with some measurements in ice. We perform an asymptotic analysis of the crack tip fields in flexoelectric solids and show that our results share some features from solutions in strain gradient elasticity and piezoelectricity. We also compute the energy release rate for cracks using simple crack face boundary conditions and use them in classical criteria for crack growth to make predictions. Our analysis can serve as a starting point for more sophisticated analytic and computational treatments of defects in flexoelectric solids which are gaining increasing prominence in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  18. Deep-level defects introduced by 1 MeV electron radiation in AlInGaP for multijunction space solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Khan, A.; Takamoto, T.; Agui, T.; Kamimura, K.; Kaneiwa, M.; Imaizumi, M.; Ohshima, T.; Itoh, H.

    2005-11-01

    Presented in this paper are 1 MeV electron irradiation effects on wide-band-gap (1.97 eV) (Al0.08Ga0.92)0.52In0.48P diodes and solar cells. The carrier removal rate estimated in p-AlInGaP with electron fluence is about 1 cm-1, which is lower than that in InP and GaAs. From high-temperature deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, a deep-level defect center such as majority-carrier (hole) trap H2 (Eν+0.90+/-0.05 eV) was observed. The changes in carrier concentrations (Δp) and trap densities as a function of electron fluence were compared, and as a result the total introduction rate, 0.39 cm-1, of majority-carrier trap centers (H1 and H2) is different from the carrier removal rate, 1 cm-1, in p-AlInGaP. From the minority-carrier injection annealing (100 mA/cm2), the annealing activation energy of H2 defect is ΔE=0.60 eV, which is likely to be associated with a vacancy-phosphorus Frenkel pair (Vp-Pi). The recovery of defect concentration and carrier concentration in the irradiated p-AlInGaP by injection relates that a deep-level defect H2 acts as a recombination center as well as compensator center.

  19. First principles studies on the impact of point defects on the phase stability of (AlxCr1-x)2O3 solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, C. M.; Koutná, N.; Ramm, J.; Kolozsvári, S.; Paulitsch, J.; Holec, D.; Mayrhofer, P. H.

    2016-02-01

    Density Functional Theory applying the generalised gradient approximation is used to study the phase stability of (AlxCr1-x)2O3 solid solutions in the context of physical vapour deposition (PVD). Our results show that the energy of formation for the hexagonal α phase is lower than for the metastable cubic γ and B1-like phases-independent of the Al content x. Even though this suggests higher stability of the α phase, its synthesis by physical vapour deposition is difficult for temperatures below 800 °C. Aluminium oxide and Al-rich oxides typically exhibit a multi-phased, cubic-dominated structure. Using a model system of (Al0.69Cr0.31)2O3 which experimentally yields larger fractions of the desired hexagonal α phase, we show that point defects strongly influence the energetic relationships. Since defects and in particular point defects, are unavoidably present in PVD coatings, they are important factors and can strongly influence the stability regions. We explicitly show that defects with low formation energies (e.g. metal Frenkel pairs) are strongly preferred in the cubic phases, hence a reasonable factor contributing to the observed thermodynamically anomalous phase composition.

  20. Defect creation caused by the decay of cation excitons and hot electron hole recombination in wide-gap dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, A.; Lushchik, Ch.; Kirm, M.; Nagirnyi, V.; Savikhin, F.; Vasil'chenko, E.

    2006-09-01

    Insufficient radiation resistance of construction materials is the Achilles heel for thermonuclear energetics. In wide-gap dielectrics, Frenkel defects are created not only because of the knock-out (impact) mechanism but also because of the decay of the electronic excitations formed during the irradiation (i.e. due to nonimpact mechanisms). The processes of the defect creation at the irradiation of highly pure LiF single crystals at 6-8 K by 1-30-keV electrons, X-rays, or synchrotron radiation of 12-70 eV have been investigated. The annealing processes of these defects in a temperature range up to 200 K have been studied as well. In LiF, creation has been revealed for the following: (1) F-H pairs caused by the decay of anion excitons or by the recombination of electrons and holes, (2) F'-H-V K and F-I-V K defect groups at the decay of cation excitons (62 eV), or (3) 20-keV electron irradiation. The mechanism of defect creation at the recombination of hot holes and hot electrons has been discussed for α-SiO 2 crystals with an energy gap between the subbands of a valence band. One of the possible ways to suppress this mechanism ("luminescent defence") is doping a material by luminescent impurities able to capture a part of the energy of hot carriers before their relaxation and recombination (e.g. in MgO:Cr).

  1. Facts about Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of CHDs. The types marked with a star (*) are considered critical CHDs. Atrial Septal Defect Atrioventricular Septal Defect Coarctation of the Aorta * Double-outlet right ventricle* d-Transposition of the great ...

  2. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr ... topic from the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: ...

  3. Ventricular Septal Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart and surrounding organs an electrocardiogram (EKG) , which records the electrical activity of the heart ... What to Expect Congenital Heart Defects Getting an EKG (Video) Heart Murmurs Atrial Septal Defect EKG (Video) ...

  4. Birth Defects Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Websites About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Data & Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... of birth defects in the United States. For data on specific birth defects, please visit the specific ...

  5. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with one or more heart defects has congenital heart disease . Surgery is needed if the defect could harm ... 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  6. Guidance for Preventing Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lip and Palate Craniosynostosis Down Syndrome Eye Defects Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders Gastroschisis Heart Defects Coarctation of the Aorta ... drank alcohol during the pregnancy, are known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) . The best advice for women is to ...

  7. Reducing Risks of Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education FAQs Reducing Risks of Birth Defects Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Reducing Risks of Birth Defects FAQ146, February 2016 ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  8. Neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are severe birth defects of the central nervous system that originate during embryonic development when the neural tube fails to close completely. Human NTDs are multifactorial, with contributions from both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is not yet well understood, but several nongenetic risk factors have been identified as have possibilities for prevention by maternal folic acid supplementation. Mechanisms underlying neural tube closure and NTDs may be informed by experimental models, which have revealed numerous genes whose abnormal function causes NTDs and have provided details of critical cellular and morphological events whose regulation is essential for closure. Such models also provide an opportunity to investigate potential risk factors and to develop novel preventive therapies. PMID:25032496

  9. Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Nicholas D.E.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are severe birth defects of the central nervous system that originate during embryonic development when the neural tube fails to close completely. Human NTDs are multifactorial, with contributions from both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is not yet well understood, but several nongenetic risk factors have been identified as have possibilities for prevention by maternal folic acid supplementation. Mechanisms underlying neural tube closure and NTDs may be informed by experimental models, which have revealed numerous genes whose abnormal function causes NTDs and have provided details of critical cellular and morphological events whose regulation is essential for closure. Such models also provide an opportunity to investigate potential risk factors and to develop novel preventive therapies. PMID:25032496

  10. Controversies in Parotid Defect Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tamplen, Matthew; Knott, P Daniel; Fritz, Michael A; Seth, Rahul

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of the parotid defect is a complex topic that encompasses restoration of both facial form and function. The reconstructive surgeon must consider facial contour, avoidance of Frey syndrome, skin coverage, tumor surveillance, potential adjuvant therapy, and facial reanimation when addressing parotid defects. With each defect there are several options within the reconstructive ladder, creating controversies regarding optimal management. This article describes surgical approaches to reconstruction of parotid defects, highlighting areas of controversy. PMID:27400838

  11. Mask Blank Defect Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M A; Sommargren, G E

    2000-02-04

    Mask blanks are the substrates that hold the master patterns for integrated circuits. Integrated circuits are semiconductor devices, such as microprocessors (mPs), dynamic random access memory (DRAMs), and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) that are central to the computer, communication, and electronics industries. These devices are fabricated using a set of master patterns that are sequentially imaged onto light-sensitive coated silicon wafers and processed to form thin layers of insulating and conductive materials on top of the wafer. These materials form electrical paths and transistors that control the flow of electricity through the device. For the past forty years the semiconductor industry has made phenomenal improvements in device functionality, compactness, speed, power, and cost. This progress is principally due to the exponential decrease in the minimum feature size of integrated circuits, which has been reduced by a factor of {radical}2 every three years. Since 1992 the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has coordinated the efforts of producing a technology roadmap for semiconductors. In the latest document, ''The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors: 1999'', future technology nodes (minimum feature sizes) and targeted dates were specified and are summarized in Table 1. Lithography is the imaging technology for producing a de-magnified image of the mask on the wafer. A typical de-magnification factor is 4. Mask blank defects as small as one-eighth the equivalent minimum feature size are printable and may cause device failure. Defects might be the result of the surface preparation, such as polishing, or contamination due to handling or the environment. Table 2 shows the maximum tolerable defect sizes on the mask blank for each technology node. This downward trend puts a tremendous burden on mask fabrication, particularly in the area of defect detection and reduction. A new infrastructure for mask inspection will be

  12. Defect mapping system

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-04-11

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. 20 figures.

  13. Defect mapping system

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities.

  14. Impact of defect occupation on conduction in amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5.

    PubMed

    Kaes, Matthias; Salinga, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Storage concepts employing the resistance of phase-change memory (PRAM) have matured in recent years. Attempts to model the conduction in the amorphous state of phase-change materials dominating the resistance of PRAM devices commonly invoke a connection to the electronic density-of-states (DoS) of the active material in form of a "distance between trap states s". Here, we point out that s depends on the occupation of defects and hence on temperature. To verify this, we numerically study how the occupation in the DoS of Ge2Sb2Te5 is affected by changes of temperature and illumination. Employing a charge-transport model based on the Poole-Frenkel effect, we correlate these changes to the field- and temperature-dependent current-voltage characteristics of lateral devices of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5, measured in darkness and under illumination. In agreement with our calculations, we find a pronounced temperature-dependence of s. As the device-current depends exponentially on the value of s, accounting for its temperature-dependence has profound impact on device modeling. PMID:27526783

  15. Impact of defect occupation on conduction in amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5

    PubMed Central

    Kaes, Matthias; Salinga, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Storage concepts employing the resistance of phase-change memory (PRAM) have matured in recent years. Attempts to model the conduction in the amorphous state of phase-change materials dominating the resistance of PRAM devices commonly invoke a connection to the electronic density-of-states (DoS) of the active material in form of a “distance between trap states s”. Here, we point out that s depends on the occupation of defects and hence on temperature. To verify this, we numerically study how the occupation in the DoS of Ge2Sb2Te5 is affected by changes of temperature and illumination. Employing a charge-transport model based on the Poole-Frenkel effect, we correlate these changes to the field- and temperature-dependent current-voltage characteristics of lateral devices of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5, measured in darkness and under illumination. In agreement with our calculations, we find a pronounced temperature-dependence of s. As the device-current depends exponentially on the value of s, accounting for its temperature-dependence has profound impact on device modeling. PMID:27526783

  16. Single and double acceptor-levels of a carbon-hydrogen defect in n-type silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stübner, R.; Scheffler, L.; Kolkovsky, Vl.; Weber, J.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we discuss the origin of two dominant deep levels (E42 and E262) observed in n-type Si, which is subjected to hydrogenation by wet chemical etching or a dc H-plasma treatment. Their activation enthalpies determined from Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy measurements are EC-0.06 eV (E42) and EC-0.51 eV (E262). The similar annealing behavior and identical depth profiles of E42 and E262 correlate them with two different charge states of the same defect. E262 is attributed to a single acceptor state due to the absence of the Poole-Frenkel effect and the lack of a capture barrier for electrons. The emission rate of E42 shows a characteristic enhancement with the electric field, which is consistent with the assignment to a double acceptor state. In samples with different carbon and hydrogen content, the depth profiles of E262 can be explained by a defect with one H-atom and one C-atom. From a comparison with earlier calculations [Andersen et al., Phys. Rev. B 66, 235205 (2002)], we attribute E42 to the double acceptor and E262 to the single acceptor state of the CH1AB configuration, where one H atom is directly bound to carbon in the anti-bonding position.

  17. The effect of prolonged irradiation on defect production and ordering in Fe-Cr and Fe-Ni alloys.

    PubMed

    Vörtler, K; Juslin, N; Bonny, G; Malerba, L; Nordlund, K

    2011-09-01

    The understanding of the primary radiation damage in Fe-based alloys is of interest for the use of advanced steels in future fusion and fission reactors. In this work Fe-Cr alloys (with 5, 6.25, 10 and 15% Cr content) and Fe-Ni alloys (with 10, 40, 50 and 75% Ni content) were used as model materials for studying the features of steels from a radiation damage perspective. The effect of prolonged irradiation (neglecting diffusion), i.e. the overlapping of single 5 keV displacement cascade events, was studied by molecular dynamics simulation. Up to 200 single cascades were simulated, randomly induced in sequence in one simulation cell, to study the difference between fcc and bcc lattices, as well as initially ordered and random crystals. With increasing numbers of cascades we observed a saturation of Frenkel pairs in the bcc alloys. In fcc Fe-Ni, in contrast, we saw a continuous accumulation of defects: the growth of stacking-fault tetrahedra and a larger number of self-interstitial atom clusters were seen in contrast to bcc alloys. For all simulations the defect clusters and the short range order parameter were analysed in detail depending on the number of cascades in the crystal. We also report the modification of the repulsive part of the Fe-Ni interaction potential, which was needed to study the non-equilibrium processes. PMID:21846941

  18. Insights into stability, electronic properties, defect properties and Li ions migration of Na, Mg and Al-doped LiVPO4F for cathode materials of lithium ion batteries: A first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Xu, Zhenming; Li, Jie; Chen, Jiangan; Liu, Qingsheng

    2016-07-01

    The effects of Na, Mg and Al doping on the structure, electronic property, defect property and Li ions migration of LiVPO4F were investigated by the first-principles method. Calculations show that the processes of forming Li0.875Na0.125VPO4F, α- and β-LiMg0.375V0.75PO4F, α- and β-LiAl0.125V0.875PO4F are all feasible. Na, Mg and Al doping significantly improve the electrical conductivity of LiVPO4F and simultaneously maintain their structural stability attributing to the reduction of band gaps through variations of V-3d spin up orbitals. Li vacancy defects of LiVPO4F are not ignorable, and vacancy defects with a lower activation energy for Li atom are far more likely to occur than Frenkel defects for Li and vacancy defects for other atoms. For pristine LiVPO4F, path D along [0.012 0 . 17 ̅ 0.572] direction is found to have the lowest activation energy of 0.418 eV, suggesting that anisotropic nature of Li ion conduction and LiVPO4F is a one-dimensional (1D)-ion conductor. The corresponding diffusion coefficient was estimated to be 2.82×10-9 cm2/s, which is in good agreement with those experimental values.

  19. Simulation of temperature dependent dielectric breakdown in n+-polySi/SiO2/n-6H-SiC structures during Poole-Frenkel stress at positive gate bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Piyas; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2016-08-01

    We present for the first time a thorough investigation of trapped-hole induced gate oxide deterioration and simulation results of time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) of thin (7-25 nm) silicon dioxide (SiO2) films thermally grown on (0 0 0 1) silicon (Si) face of n-type 6H-silicon carbide (n-6H-SiC). Gate oxide reliability was studied during both constant voltage and current stress with positive bias on the degenerately doped n-type poly-crystalline silicon (n+-polySi) gate at a wide range of temperatures between 27 and 225 °C. The gate leakage current was identified as the Poole-Frenkel (PF) emission of electrons trapped at an energy 0.92 eV below the SiO2 conduction band. Holes were generated in the n+-polySi anode material as well as in the oxide bulk via band-to-band ionization depending on the film thickness tox and the energy of the hot-electrons (emitted via PF mechanism) during their transport through oxide films at oxide electric fields Eox ranging from 5 to 10 MV/cm. Our simulated time-to-breakdown (tBD) results are in excellent agreement with those obtained from time consuming TDDB measurements. It is observed that irrespective of stress temperatures, the tBD values estimated in the field range between 5 and 9 MV/cm better fit to reciprocal field (1/E) model for the thickness range studied here. Furthermore, for a 10 year projected device lifetime, a good reliability margin of safe operating field from 8.5 to 7.5 MV/cm for 7 nm and 8.1 to 6.9 MV/cm for 25 nm thick SiO2 was observed between 27 and 225 °C.

  20. Common Tests for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Defect - Fetal Circulation • Care & Treatment • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  1. Coloring with defect

    SciTech Connect

    Cowen, L.J.; Goddard, W.; Jesurum, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    An (ordinary vertex) coloring is a partition of the vertices of a graph into independent sets. The chromatic number is the minimum number of colors needed to produce such a partition. This paper considers a relaxation of coloring in which the color classes partition the vertices into subgraphs of degree at most d. d is called the defect of the coloring. A graph which admits a vertex coloring into k color classes, where each vertex is adjacent to at most d self-colored neighbors is said to be (k, d) colorable. We consider defective coloring on graphs of bounded degree, bounded genus, and bounded chromatic number, presenting complexity results and algorithms. For bounded degree graphs, a classic result of Lovasz yields a (k, [{Delta}/k]) coloring for graphs with E edges of maximum degree {Delta} in O({Delta}E) time. For graphs of bounded genus, (2, d), for d > 0 and (3,1)-coloring are proved NP-Complete, even for planar graphs. Results of easily can be transformed to (3,2) color any planar graph in linear time. We show that any toroidal graph is (3,2)- and (5, 1)-colorable, and quadratic-time algorithms are presented that find the colorings. For higher surfaces, we give a linear time algorithm to (3, {radical}12{gamma} + 6) color a graph of genus {gamma} > 2. It is also shown that any graph of genus {gamma} is ({radical}12{gamma}/(d + 1) + 6, d) colorable, and an O(d{radical}{gamma}E + V) algorithm is presented that finds the coloring. These bounds are within a constant factor of what is required for the maximum clique embeddable in the surface. Reductions from ordinary vertex coloring show that (k, d) coloring is NP-complete, and there exists an c > 0 such that no polynomial time algorithm can n{sup {epsilon}}-approximate the defective chromatic number unless P = NP. Most approximation algorithms to approximately color 3-colorable graphs can be extend to allow defects.

  2. The role of native defects in the transport of charge and mass and the decomposition of Li4BN3H10.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Khang; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G

    2014-12-14

    Li4BN3H10 is of great interest for hydrogen storage and for lithium-ion battery solid electrolytes because of its high hydrogen content and high lithium-ion conductivity, respectively. The practical hydrogen storage application of this complex hydride is, however, limited due to irreversibility and cogeneration of ammonia (NH3) during the decomposition. We report a first-principles density-functional theory study of native point defects and defect complexes in Li4BN3H10, and propose an atomistic mechanism for the material's decomposition that involves mass transport mediated by native defects. In light of this specific mechanism, we argue that the release of NH3 is associated with the formation and migration of negatively charged hydrogen vacancies inside the material, and it can be manipulated by the incorporation of suitable electrically active impurities. We also find that Li4BN3H10 is prone to Frenkel disorder on the Li sublattice; lithium vacancies and interstitials are highly mobile and play an important role in mass transport and ionic conduction. PMID:25335576

  3. Dipole defects in beryl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, B. A.; Cordeiro, R. C.; Blak, A. R.

    2010-11-01

    Dipole defects in gamma irradiated and thermally treated beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18) samples have been studied using the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) technique. TSDC experiments were performed in pink (morganite), green (emerald), blue (aquamarine) and colourless (goshenite) natural beryl. TSDC spectra present dipole peaks at 190K, 220K, 280K and 310K that change after gamma irradiation and thermal treatments. In morganite samples, for thermal treatments between 700K and 1100K, the 280K peak increase in intensity and the band at 220K disappears. An increase of the 280K peak and a decrease of the 190K peak were observed in the TSDC spectra of morganite after a gamma irradiation of 25kGy performed after the thermal treatments. In the case of emerald samples, thermal treatments enhanced the 280K peak and gamma irradiation partially destroyed this band. The goshenite TSDC spectra present only one band at 280K that is not affected either by thermal treatments or by gamma irradiation. All the observed peaks are of dipolar origin because the intensity of the bands is linearly dependent on the polarization field, behaviour of dipole defects. The systematic study, by means of TSDC measurements, of ionizing irradiation effects and thermal treatments in these crystals makes possible a better understanding of the role played by the impurities in beryl crystals.

  4. [Congenital defects and incapacity].

    PubMed

    Jouve de la Barreda, Nicolás

    2009-01-01

    As a whole the congenital defects constitute an important section of the medical attention affecting near 3% of the population. A 15% of spontaneous abortions take place of which the greater frequency corresponds to the chromosome anomalies (25%) and the monogenic mutations (20%) and in a lesser extent to the effects of teratogenic agents. Between the genetic causes determining the congenital defects the mutations that affect genes acting in the early stages of development occupy a main place. These alterations can affect to homeotic genes or monogenic systems that act during the critical phases of the organogenesis. It seems evident that an alteration in the expression of a necessary gene for the appearance of a morphogenetic change constitutes the angular stone to understand resurging of a malformation or discapacity. In the last years has been demonstrated the importance of the teratogenic or environmental agents on the delicate internal physiological balance during the critical stages of the development. In this context must be included the inductive environmental factors inducing epigenetic modifications in the early stage of the development of the embryos produced by fertilization in vitro. PMID:19799481

  5. Topological defects in extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Kolb, Edward W.; Liddle, Andrew R.

    1990-01-01

    The production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended inflation models was considered. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large scale structure via cosmic strings.

  6. Honeycomb lattices with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Meryl A.; Ziff, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a variant of the honeycomb lattice in which we create defects by randomly exchanging adjacent bonds, producing a random tiling with a distribution of polygon edges. We study the percolation properties on these lattices as a function of the number of exchanged bonds using an alternative computational method. We find the site and bond percolation thresholds are consistent with other three-coordinated lattices with the same standard deviation in the degree distribution of the dual; here we can produce a continuum of lattices with a range of standard deviations in the distribution. These lattices should be useful for modeling other properties of random systems as well as percolation.

  7. New defect spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beling, C. D.

    2002-06-01

    This paper will review progress being made on developing more defect selective forms of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) at the University of Hong Kong. The first of these, positron deep-level transient spectroscopy (PDLTS), parallels conventional deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) except that the positron is used as the probe, either to tell if the defects have vacancies attached to their microstructure (type I PDLTS) or as a simple electric field probe (type II PDLTS). It is shown the more important type I PDLTS has an intrinsic problem brought about by the high donor densities required to operate electrical trap filling. The problem—namely fast positron drift out of the active deep-level region into the reverse biased junction—is suggested as having two solutions. The first is to move to higher positron beam intensities and take spectra of 10 9 events. The second is that by using lower dopant densities (<10 15 cm -3) deep levels may be filled by inter-band optical excitation thus forming the workable technique positron optical (PO)-DLTS. Other techniques briefly considered in this paper are deconvoluted-coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) and Fourier transform (FT)-CDBS. Such are seen from a different perspective than most contemporary works, which tend to concentrate on the high momentum region. It is pointed out that the additional root-of-two improvement in hardware resolution and the factor of three improvement gained through deconvolution, can produce final effective resolutions similar to ACAR. Moreover, since in deconvolution, the natural space for regularized solutions is "real crystal space"—it is suggested that the autocorrelation function B2 γ( r) be taken as the experimental CDBS data—not just because it provides easier visualization,—but because data in this form lies directly on the crystal lattice.

  8. Background Defect Density Reduction Using Automated Defect Inspection And Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirauch, Steven C.

    1988-01-01

    Yield maintenance and improvement is a major area of concern in any integrated circuit manufacturing operation. A major aspect of this concern is controlling and reducing defect density. Obviously, large defect excursions must be immediately addressed in order to maintain yield levels. However, to enhance yields, the subtle defect mechanisms must be reduced or eliminated as well. In-line process control inspections are effective for detecting large variations in the defect density on a real time basis. Examples of in-line inspection strategies include after develop or after etch inspections. They are usually effective for detecting when a particular process segment has gone out of control. However, when a process is running normally, there exists a background defect density that is generally not resolved by in-line process control inspections. The inspection strategies that are frequently used to monitor the background defect density are offline inspections. Offline inspections are used to identify the magnitude and characteristics of the background defect density. These inspections sample larger areas of product wafers than the in-line inspections to allow identification of the defect generating mechanisms that normally occur in the process. They are used to construct a database over a period of time so that trends may be studied. This information enables engineering efforts to be focused on the mechanisms that have the greatest impact on device yield. Once trouble spots in the process are identified, the data base supplies the information needed to isolate and solve them. The key aspect to the entire program is to utilize a reliable data gathering mechanism coupled with a flexible information processing system. This paper describes one method of reducing the background defect density using automated wafer inspection and analysis. The tools used in this evaluation were the KLA 2020 Wafer Inspector, KLA Utility Terminal (KLAUT), and a new software package developed

  9. Common Types of Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... heart defect, treatment options and expected results. The descriptions and pictures of common heart defects that follow ...

  10. Facts about Atrial Septal Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevalence estimates for selected birth defects in the United States, 2004-2006. Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2010;88(12):1008-16. Related Links Disability & Health Family Health History & Genetics Healthy Pregnancy Planning for Pregnancy A-Z ...

  11. Birth Defects Prevalence and Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the prevalence of birth defects present at birth and mortality rates among infants in the United States between from 1999-2008 and 1979-2007, respectively. Some scientific studies have linked birth defects with environmental exposures. This indicator p...

  12. Topological defects at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bazeia, D.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Guerra, J.M. Jr.; Marques, G.C.

    1987-11-15

    We obtain the phase diagram of gauge theories by studying the influence of topologically nontrivial boundary conditions. For this reason, we develop a scheme for computing the free energy of topological defects at finite temperature. As an application, the free energy of topological defects for the minimal SU(5) model are evaluated in the semiclassical approximation.

  13. Amphoteric native defects in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.

    1989-05-22

    We show that a new concept of amphoteric native defects with strongly Fermi level dependent defect formation energy provides the basis for a unified explanation of a large variety of phenomena in semiconductors. Formation of Schottky barriers, particle irradiation induced compensation, doping-induced superlattice intermixing, and limits of free-carrier concentration find for the first time a common simple explanation.

  14. Toward Intelligent Software Defect Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Markland J.

    2011-01-01

    Source code level software defect detection has gone from state of the art to a software engineering best practice. Automated code analysis tools streamline many of the aspects of formal code inspections but have the drawback of being difficult to construct and either prone to false positives or severely limited in the set of defects that can be detected. Machine learning technology provides the promise of learning software defects by example, easing construction of detectors and broadening the range of defects that can be found. Pinpointing software defects with the same level of granularity as prominent source code analysis tools distinguishes this research from past efforts, which focused on analyzing software engineering metrics data with granularity limited to that of a particular function rather than a line of code.

  15. Global topological k-defects

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, E.

    2006-10-15

    We consider global topological defects in symmetry-breaking models with a noncanonical kinetic term. Apart from a mass parameter entering the potential, one additional dimensional parameter arises in such models - a kinetic mass. The properties of defects in these models are quite different from standard global domain walls, vortices, and monopoles, if their kinetic mass scale is smaller than their symmetry-breaking scale. In particular, depending on the concrete form of the kinetic term, the typical size of such a defect can be either much larger or much smaller than the size of a standard defect with the same potential term. The characteristic mass of a nonstandard defect, which might have been formed during a phase transition in the early universe, depends on both the temperature of a phase transition and the kinetic mass.

  16. Antisite defects at oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanghui; Millis, Andrew

    We use ab initio calculations to estimate formation energies of cation (transition metal) antisite defects at oxide interfaces and to understand the basic physical effects that drive or suppress the formation of these defects. We find that antisite defects are favored in systems with substantial charge transfer across the interface, while Jahn-Teller distortions and itinerant ferromagnetism can prevent antisite defects and help stabilize atomically sharp interfaces. Our results enable identification of classes of systems that are more and less susceptible to the formation of antisite defects and motivate a range of experimental studies and further theoretical calculations to further explicate the oxide interface systems. This research was supported by National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1120296 (H. Chen) and DOE-ER-046169 (A. J. Millis).

  17. Holographic Chern-Simons defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Mitsutoshi; Melby-Thompson, Charles M.; Meyer, René; Sugimoto, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    We study SU( N ) Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory in the presence of defects that shift the Chern-Simons level from a holographic point of view by embedding the system in string theory. The model is a D3-D7 system in Type IIB string theory, whose gravity dual is given by the AdS soliton background with probe D7 branes attaching to the AdS boundary along the defects. We holographically renormalize the free energy of the defect system with sources, from which we obtain the correlation functions for certain operators naturally associated to these defects. We find interesting phase transitions when the separation of the defects as well as the temperature are varied. We also discuss some implications for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and for 2-dimensional QCD.

  18. Nonconsecutive Pars Interarticularis Defects.

    PubMed

    Elgafy, Hossein; Hart, Ryan C; Tanios, Mina

    2015-12-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis is a well-recognized condition occurring in adolescents because of repetitive overuse in sports. Nonconsecutive spondylolysis involving the lumbar spine is rare. In contrast to single-level pars defects that respond well to conservative treatment, there is no consensus about the management of multiple-level pars fractures; a few reports indicated that conservative management is successful, and the majority acknowledged that surgery is often required. The current study presents a rare case of pars fracture involving nonconsecutive segments and discusses the management options. In this case report, we review the patient's history, clinical examination, radiologic findings, and management, as well as the relevant literature. An 18-year-old man presented to the clinic with worsening lower back pain related to nonconsecutive pars fractures at L2 and L5. After 6 months of conservative management, diagnostic computed tomography-guided pars block was used to localize the symptomatic level at L2, which was treated surgically; the L5 asymptomatic pars fracture did not require surgery. At the last follow-up 2 years after surgery, the patient was playing baseball and basketball, and denied any back pain. This article reports a case of rare nonconsecutive pars fractures. Conservative management for at least 6 months is recommended. Successful management depends on the choice of appropriate treatment for each level. Single-photon emission computed tomography scan, and computed tomography-guided pars block are valuable preoperative tools to identify the symptomatic level in such a case. PMID:26665257

  19. 2010 Defects in Semiconductors GRC

    SciTech Connect

    Shengbai Zhang

    2011-01-06

    Continuing its tradition of excellence, this Gordon Conference will focus on research at the forefront of the field of defects in semiconductors. The conference will have a strong emphasis on the control of defects during growth and processing, as well as an emphasis on the development of novel defect detection methods and first-principles defect theories. Electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale semiconductors will be discussed in detail. In contrast to many conferences, which tend to focus on specific semiconductors, this conference will deal with point and extended defects in a broad range of electronic materials. This approach has proved to be extremely fruitful for advancing fundamental understanding in emerging materials such as wide-band-gap semiconductors, oxides, sp{sup 2} carbon based-materials, and photovoltaic/solar cell materials, and in understanding important defect phenomena such as doping bottleneck in nanostructures and the diffusion of defects and impurities. The program consists of about twenty invited talks and a number of contributed poster sessions. The emphasis should be on work which has yet to be published. The large amount of discussion time provides an ideal forum for dealing with topics that are new and/or controversial.

  20. Serine biosynthesis and transport defects.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W

    2016-07-01

    l-serine is a non-essential amino acid that is biosynthesized via the enzymes phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP). Besides its role in protein synthesis, l-serine is a potent neurotrophic factor and a precursor of a number of essential compounds including phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, glycine, and d-serine. Serine biosynthesis defects result from impairments of PGDH, PSAT, or PSP leading to systemic serine deficiency. Serine biosynthesis defects present in a broad phenotypic spectrum that includes, at the severe end, Neu-Laxova syndrome, a lethal multiple congenital anomaly disease, intermediately, infantile serine biosynthesis defects with severe neurological manifestations and growth deficiency, and at the mild end, the childhood disease with intellectual disability. A serine transport defect resulting from deficiency of the ASCT1, the main transporter for serine in the central nervous system, has been recently described in children with neurological manifestations that overlap with those observed in serine biosynthesis defects. l-serine therapy may be beneficial in preventing or ameliorating symptoms in serine biosynthesis and transport defects, if started before neurological damage occurs. Herein, we review serine metabolism and transport, the clinical, biochemical, and molecular aspects of serine biosynthesis and transport defects, the mechanisms of these diseases, and the potential role of serine therapy. PMID:27161889

  1. Defect dynamics in active nematics

    PubMed Central

    Giomi, Luca; Bowick, Mark J; Mishra, Prashant; Sknepnek, Rastko; Cristina Marchetti, M

    2014-01-01

    Topological defects are distinctive signatures of liquid crystals. They profoundly affect the viscoelastic behaviour of the fluid by constraining the orientational structure in a way that inevitably requires global changes not achievable with any set of local deformations. In active nematic liquid crystals, topological defects not only dictate the global structure of the director, but also act as local sources of motion, behaving as self-propelled particles. In this article, we present a detailed analytical and numerical study of the mechanics of topological defects in active nematic liquid crystals. PMID:25332389

  2. Self healing of defected graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianhui; Shi, Tuwan; Cai, Tuocheng; Wu, Xiaosong; Yu, Dapeng; Xu, Tao; Sun, Litao

    2013-03-11

    For electronics applications, defects in graphene are usually undesirable because of their ability to scatter charge carriers, thereby reduce the carrier mobility. It would be extremely useful if the damage can be repaired. In this work, we employ Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electrical measurements to study defects in graphene introduced by argon plasma bombardment. We have found that majority of these defects can be cured by a simple thermal annealing process. The self-healing is attributed to recombination of mobile carbon adatoms with vacancies. With increasing level of plasma induced damage, the self-healing becomes less effective.

  3. Folic acid and birth defect prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of certain birth defects. These include spina bifida, anencephaly, and some heart defects. Experts recommend women who ... Women who have had a baby with a neural tube defect may need a higher dose of folic acid. ...

  4. Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  5. Effects of defects in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sendeckyj, G. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of defects in composite structures is addressed. Defects in laminates such as wrinkles, foreign particles, scratches and breaks are discussed. Effects of plygap plywaviness and machining defects are also studied.

  6. Reproduction and Survival After Cardiac Defect Repair

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Defect, Congenital Heart; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Transposition of Great Vessels; Ductus Arteriosus, Patent; Heart Septal Defects, Atrial; Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular; Down Syndrome; Tetralogy of Fallot; Pulmonic Stenosis; Coarctation of Aorta

  7. Herpes simplex virus amplicon: effect of size on replication of constructed defective genomes containing eucaryotic DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, A D; Frenkel, N

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies (R. R. Spaete and N. Frenkel, Cell 30:295-304, 1982) have documented the potential use of defective virus vectors (amplicons) derived from herpes simplex virus for the efficient introduction of foreign DNA sequences into eucaryotic cells. Specifically, cotransfection of cells with helper virus DNA and cloned amplicons (8 to 10 kilobases [kb]) containing bacterial plasmid DNA sequences linked to a set of herpes simplex virus cis-acting propagation signals (a replication origin and a cleavage-packaging signal) resulted in the generation of virus stocks containing packaged defective genomes that consisted of uniform head-to-tail reiterations of the chimeric seed amplicon sequences. The chimeric defective genomes could be stably propagated in virus stocks and could thus be used to efficiently infect cells. We now report on additional studies designed to propagate relatively large sets of eucaryotic DNA sequences within chimeric packaged defective genomes. These studies have utilized a 12-kb chicken DNA sequence encoding the chicken ovalbumin gene and cloned by Lai et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:244-248, 1980) in the plasmid pOV12. Virus stocks derived from cells cotransfected with helper virus DNA and chimeric amplicons (overall size of 19.8 kb, of which 12 kb corresponded to the chicken DNA) contained defective genomes composed of reiterations of the 19.8-kb seed amplicon sequences. However, in addition to the authentically sized repeat units, defective genomes in the derivative virus stocks contained smaller repeat units representing deleted versions of the seed 19.8-kb amplicons. The recombinational events leading to the formation of deleted repeats did not appear to occur at unique sites, as shown by comparative analyses of multiple, independently generated virus series propagated from separate transfections. In contast, seed amplicons ranging in size from 11 to 15 kb and containing subsets of the 12-kb chicken DNA sequences replicated

  8. EUVL defect printability: an industry challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyuk Joo; Teki, Ranganath; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Cordes, Aaron

    2012-02-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) patterning appears feasible using currently available EUV exposure tools, but some issues must still be resolved for EUV patterning to be used in production. Defects in EUV mask blanks are one such major issue, as evidenced by the research focused on defect printability. Inspection tools are needed to detect phase defects on EUV mask blanks that could possibly print on the wafer. Currently available inspection tools can capture defects on the mask, but they also need to be able to classify possible printable defects. Defect classification for repair and mitigation of printable defects is very difficult using DUV inspection tools; however, if the actinic inspection tool (AIT) could gather defect information from more multilayer stacks, it may be able to separate printable defects from unprintable defects. If unprintable defects could be eliminated, the defect information could be used for mask pattern shifts to reduce printable defects. Fewer defects would need to be repaired if there were a better chance of capturing printable defects using an actinic inspection tool. Being able to detect printable defects on EUV blanks is therefore critical in mask making. In this paper, we describe the characterization of native phase defects in the manufacturing of EUV mask blanks using the state-of-the-art mask metrology equipment in SEMATECH's Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC). Commercially available quartz substrates were used and Mo/Si multilayers were deposited on the substrates to characterize phase defects. Programmed defects of various dimensions were also prepared using e-beam patterning technology on which multilayers were deposited. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study multilayer profile changes, while SEMATECH's AIT was used to image defects and predict their printability. A defect library for native defects and printability of programmed phase defects is introduced. Finally technical challenges for EUV defect

  9. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in utero. previous continue Common Heart Defects (cont.) Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) The ductus arteriosus is a ... newborn's lungs. PDA is common in premature babies . Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) The patent foramen ovale is ...

  10. Facts about Ventricular Septal Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... The size of the ventricular septal defect will influence what symptoms, if any, are present, and whether ... this image. Close Information For... Media Policy Makers Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do ...

  11. Sequential detection of web defects

    DOEpatents

    Eichel, Paul H.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Stalker, K. Terry; Yee, Amy A.

    2001-01-01

    A system for detecting defects on a moving web having a sequential series of identical frames uses an imaging device to form a real-time camera image of a frame and a comparitor to comparing elements of the camera image with corresponding elements of an image of an exemplar frame. The comparitor provides an acceptable indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically identical; and a defective indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically not identical. If the pair of elements is neither acceptable nor defective, the comparitor recursively compares the element of said exemplar frame with corresponding elements of other frames on said web until one of the acceptable or defective indications occur.

  12. Impact of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... complex lesions, limitations are common. Some children with congenital heart disease have developmental delay or other learning difficulties. What ... defects? Successful treatment requires highly specialized care. Severe congenital heart disease requires extensive financial resources both in and out ...

  13. Stable line defects in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-11-01

    Line defects in two-dimensional (2D) materials greatly modulate various properties of their pristine form. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, we investigate the structural reconstructions of different kinds of grain boundaries in the silicene sheets. It is evident that depending upon the presence of silicon adatoms and edge shape of grain boundaries (i.e., armchair or zigzag), stable extended line defects (ELDs) can be introduced in a controlled way. Further studies show the stability of these line-defects in silicene, grown on Ag(111) surface at room-temperature. Importantly, unlike most of the 2D sheet materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, 5-5-8 line defects modify the nonmagnetic semimetallic pristine silicene sheet to spin-polarized metal. As ferromagnetically ordered magnetic moments remain strongly localized at the line defect, a one-dimensional spin channel gets created in silicene. Interestingly, these spin channels are quite stable because, unlike the edge of nanoribbons, structural reconstruction or contamination cannot destroy the ordering of magnetic moments here. Zigzag silicene nanoribbons with a 5-5-8 line defect also exhibit various interesting electronic and magnetic properties depending upon their width as well as the nature of the magnetic coupling between edge and defect spin states. Upon incorporation of other ELDs, such as 4-4-4 and 4-8 defects, 2D sheets and nanoribbons of silicene show a nonmagnetic metallic or semiconducting ground state. Highlighting the controlled formation of ELDs and consequent emergence of technologically important properties in silicene, we propose new routes to realize silicene-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  14. Topological defects from the multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Many theories of the early universe predict the existence of a multiverse where bubbles continuously nucleate giving rise to observers in their interior. In this paper, we point out that topological defects of several dimensionalities will also be produced in de Sitter like regions of the multiverse. In particular, defects could be spontaneously nucleated in our parent vacuum. We study the evolution of these defects as they collide with and propagate inside of our bubble. We estimate the present distribution of defects in the observable part of the universe. The expected number of such nearby defects turns out to be quite small, even for the highest nucleation rate. We also study collisions of strings and domain walls with our bubble in our past light cone. We obtain simulated full-sky maps of the loci of such collisions, and find their angular size distribution. Similarly to what happens in the case of bubble collisions, the prospect of detecting any collisions of our bubble with ambient defects is greatly enhanced in the case where the cosmological constant of our parent vacuum is much higher than the vacuum energy density during inflation in our bubble.

  15. Topological defects from the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2015-05-28

    Many theories of the early universe predict the existence of a multiverse where bubbles continuously nucleate giving rise to observers in their interior. In this paper, we point out that topological defects of several dimensionalities will also be produced in de Sitter like regions of the multiverse. In particular, defects could be spontaneously nucleated in our parent vacuum. We study the evolution of these defects as they collide with and propagate inside of our bubble. We estimate the present distribution of defects in the observable part of the universe. The expected number of such nearby defects turns out to be quite small, even for the highest nucleation rate. We also study collisions of strings and domain walls with our bubble in our past light cone. We obtain simulated full-sky maps of the loci of such collisions, and find their angular size distribution. Similarly to what happens in the case of bubble collisions, the prospect of detecting any collisions of our bubble with ambient defects is greatly enhanced in the case where the cosmological constant of our parent vacuum is much higher than the vacuum energy density during inflation in our bubble.

  16. Core hysteresis in nematic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Samo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2002-08-01

    We study field-induced transformations in the biaxial core of a nematic disclination with strength m=1, employing the Landau-de Gennes order tensor parameter Q. We first consider the transition from the defectless escaped radial structure into the structure hosting a line defect with a negative uniaxial order parameter along the axis of a cylinder of radius R. The critical field of the transition monotonically increases with R and asymptotically approaches a value corresponding to ξb/ξf~0.3, where the correlation lengths ξb and ξf are related to the biaxial order and the external field, respectively. Then, in the same geometry, we focus on the line defect structure with a positive uniaxial ordering along the axis, surrounded by the uniaxial sheath, the uniaxial cylinder of radius ξu with negative order parameter and director in the transverse direction. We study the hysteresis in the position of the uniaxial sheath upon increasing and decreasing the field strength. In general, two qualitatively different solutions exist, corresponding to the uniaxial sheath located close to the defect symmetry axis or close to the cylinder wall. This latter solution exists only for strong enough anchorings. The uniaxial sheath is for a line defect what the uniaxial ring is for a point defect: by resorting to an approximate analytic estimate, we show that essentially the same hysteresis exhibited by the uniaxial sheath is expected to occur at the uniaxial ring in the core structure of a point defect.

  17. The Electronic and Structural Properties of KDP: Effect of Hydrogen Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    2003-03-01

    Potassium dihydrogen phosphate, KH_2PO_4(KDP), is the prototype for a series of hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics whose properties have attracted wide and sustained interest, due to its nonlinear optical and electro-optical properties. However, laser-induced optical absorption may appear, which in turn leads to limitation in device performance. Hydrogen point defects occurring during crystal growth or produced by radiation during use, have been suggested to play an important role in the optical damage process of KDP materials. We have carried out ab initio total-energy density functional theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations for 1) the paraelectric and ferroelectric phases of pure KDP, and 2) for the intrinsic (Frenkel pair) and extrinsic (vacancy or interstitial) H point defects in both their neutral and charged states. For the pure KDP, the calculations reveal that the distance, δ, between the two equilibrium positions of the H along the O-O bond in the paraelectric phase depends on both the O-O bond length and the coordinated motion of the heavier P and K atoms. The results reconcile the previously proposed tunneling and geometric phenomenological models. For the H vacancy, the added hole is trapped and shared by the two O atoms adjacent to the vacancy, reducing dramatically the O-O bond length and introducing states in the gap, in sharp contrast with its neutral state. Thus, the calculations confirm the experimental suggestion that the positively charged vacancy is the relevant absorbing center. On the other hand, the H vacancy in its negatively charged state leads to an increase of the two O atoms close to H vacancy and does not induce states in the gap. The H interstitial in its negatively charged state causes a H atom to leave its regular lattice site and to form a H2 molecule, leaving behind a H vacancy. This result is also in agreement with experimental suggestions. The calculated diffusion paths and energy barriers indicate that the presence of

  18. Deep-level defects introduced by 1 MeV electron radiation in AlInGaP for multijunction space solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Khan, A.; Takamoto, T.; Agui, T.; Kamimura, K.; Kaneiwa, M.; Imaizumi, M.; Ohshima, T.; Itoh, H.

    2005-11-01

    Presented in this paper are 1 MeV electron irradiation effects on wide-band-gap (1.97 eV) (Al{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}){sub 0.52}In{sub 0.48}P diodes and solar cells. The carrier removal rate estimated in p-AlInGaP with electron fluence is about 1 cm{sup -1}, which is lower than that in InP and GaAs. From high-temperature deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, a deep-level defect center such as majority-carrier (hole) trap H2 (E{sub {nu}}+0.90{+-}0.05 eV) was observed. The changes in carrier concentrations ({delta}p) and trap densities as a function of electron fluence were compared, and as a result the total introduction rate, 0.39 cm{sup -1}, of majority-carrier trap centers (H1 and H2) is different from the carrier removal rate, 1 cm{sup -1}, in p-AlInGaP. From the minority-carrier injection annealing (100 mA/cm{sup 2}), the annealing activation energy of H2 defect is {delta}E=0.60 eV, which is likely to be associated with a vacancy-phosphorus Frenkel pair (V{sub p}-P{sub i}). The recovery of defect concentration and carrier concentration in the irradiated p-AlInGaP by injection relates that a deep-level defect H2 acts as a recombination center as well as compensator center.

  19. Defects formation and wave emitting from defects in excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Xu, Ying; Tang, Jun; Wang, Chunni

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal electrical activities in neuronal system could be associated with some neuronal diseases. Indeed, external forcing can cause breakdown even collapse in nervous system under appropriate condition. The excitable media sometimes could be described by neuronal network with different topologies. The collective behaviors of neurons can show complex spatiotemporal dynamical properties and spatial distribution for electrical activities due to self-organization even from the regulating from central nervous system. Defects in the nervous system can emit continuous waves or pulses, and pacemaker-like source is generated to perturb the normal signal propagation in nervous system. How these defects are developed? In this paper, a network of neurons is designed in two-dimensional square array with nearest-neighbor connection type; the formation mechanism of defects is investigated by detecting the wave propagation induced by external forcing. It is found that defects could be induced under external periodical forcing under the boundary, and then the wave emitted from the defects can keep balance with the waves excited from external forcing.

  20. Effective actions for bosonic topological defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    A gauge field theory is considered which admits p-dimensional topological defects, expanding the equations of motion in powers of the defect thickness. In this way an effective action and effective equation of motion is derived for the defect in terms of the coordinates of the p-dimensional worldsurface defined by the history of the core of the defect.

  1. Defects in conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billò, Marco; Gonçalves, Vasco; Lauria, Edoardo; Meineri, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We discuss consequences of the breaking of conformal symmetry by a flat or spherical extended operator. We adapt the embedding formalism to the study of correlation functions of symmetric traceless tensors in the presence of the defect. Two-point functions of a bulk and a defect primary are fixed by conformal invariance up to a set of OPE coefficients, and we identify the allowed tensor structures. A correlator of two bulk primaries depends on two cross-ratios, and we study its conformal block decomposition in the case of external scalars. The Casimir equation in the defect channel reduces to a hypergeometric equation, while the bulk channel blocks are recursively determined in the light-cone limit. In the special case of a defect of codimension two, we map the Casimir equation in the bulk channel to the one of a four-point function without defect. Finally, we analyze the contact terms of the stress-tensor with the extended operator, and we deduce constraints on the CFT data. In two dimensions, we relate the displacement operator, which appears among the contact terms, to the reflection coefficient of a conformal interface, and we find unitarity bounds for the latter.

  2. Defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, M. D.; Jokela, S. J.

    2009-10-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band gap semiconductor with potential applications in optoelectronics, transparent electronics, and spintronics. The high efficiency of UV emission in this material could be harnessed in solid-state white lighting devices. The problem of defects, in particular, acceptor dopants, remains a key challenge. In this review, defects in ZnO are discussed, with an emphasis on the physical properties of point defects in bulk crystals. As grown, ZnO is usually n-type, a property that was historically ascribed to native defects. However, experiments and theory have shown that O vacancies are deep donors, while Zn interstitials are too mobile to be stable at room temperature. Group-III (B, Al, Ga, and In) and H impurities account for most of the n-type conductivity in ZnO samples. Interstitial H donors have been observed with IR spectroscopy, while substitutional H donors have been predicted from first-principles calculations but not observed directly. Despite numerous reports, reliable p-type conductivity has not been achieved. Ferromagnetism is complicated by the presence of secondary phases, grain boundaries, and native defects. The famous green luminescence has several possible origins, including Cu impurities and Zn vacancies. The properties of group-I (Cu, Li, and Na) and group-V (N, P, As, and Sb) acceptors, and their complexes with H, are discussed. In the future, doping of ZnO nanocrystals will rely on an understanding of these fundamental properties.

  3. Defect CFTs and holographic multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Fiol, Bartomeu

    2010-07-01

    We investigate some aspects of a recent proposal for a holographic description of the multiverse. Specifically, we focus on the implications on the suggested duality of the fluctuations of a bubble separating two universes with different cosmological constants. We do so by considering a similar problem in a 2+1 CFT with a codimension one defect, obtained by an M5-brane probe embedding in AdS{sub 4} × S{sup 7}, and studying its spectrum of fluctuations. Our results suggest that the kind of behavior required by the spectrum of bubble fluctuations is not likely to take place in defect CFTs with an AdS dual, although it might be possible if the defect supports a non-unitary theory.

  4. Topological defects on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Mong, Roger; Fendley, Paul

    We construct defects in two-dimensional classical lattice models and one-dimensional quantum chains that are topologically invariant in the continuum limit. We show explicitly that these defect lines and their trivalent junctions commute with the transfer matrix/Hamiltonian. The resulting splitting and joining properties of the defect lines are exactly those of anyons in a topological phase. One useful consequence is an explicit definition of twisted boundary conditions that yield the precise shift in momentum quantization, and so provide a natural way of relating microscopic and macroscopic properties. Another is a generalization of Kramers-Wannier duality to a wide class of height models. Even more strikingly, we derive the modular transformation matrices explicitly and exactly from purely lattice considerations. We develop this construction for a variety of examples including the two-dimensional Ising model. Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, an NSF physics frontier center with support from the Moore Foundation. NSERC-PGSD.

  5. [Visual field defects in hydrocephalus].

    PubMed

    Kojima, N; Tamaki, N; Hosoda, K; Matsumoto, S

    1985-03-01

    Eight patients representing visual field defects associated with hydrocephalus are reviewed. Seven cases had aqueductal stenosis and one had congenital communicating hydrocephalus. We found five cases of defects in visual field typical of a chiasmal or optic nerve lesion: (1) inferior altitudinal hemianopia with inferior nasal quadrantanopia in the opposite eye; (2) inferior binasal quadrantanopia; (3) unilateral inferior nasal depression; (4) unilateral temporal defect; (5) bilateral central scotoma. In these cases CT demonstrated moderate or marked symmetrical dilatation of the third and lateral ventricles. Four out of five cases showed bulging of the third ventricle anteriorly into the sella turcica on CT or ventriculography. Other three patients had incongruous homonymous hemianopia. Characteristic asymmetrical dilatation of the lateral ventricles was noted in all three cases. The more enlarged lateral ventricles were ipsilateral with the affected visual pathways. The sites of lesion responsible for these field defects seemed to be optic tract in one case and optic radiation in two cases. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed in five out of seven cases. Impaired visual field improved in three patients after shunt insertion. A 28-year-old female who had history of blurred vision fos 14 days showed improvement in visual acuity and field when the enlarged ventricles became slit-like by shunting. In the other two patients defects in visual fields improved in spite of consistent ventriculomegaly. These facts suggested that not only the mechanical forces with distended third ventricle but also increased intracranial pressure played an important role in producing visual field defects in hydrocephalic patients. PMID:3874634

  6. Interface effects on calculated defect levels for oxide defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Arthur; Barnaby, Hugh; Schultz, Peter; Pineda, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has had impressive recent success predicting defect levels in insulators and semiconductors [Schultz and von Lillienfeld, 2009]. Such success requires care in accounting for long-range electrostatic effects. Recently, Komsa and Pasquarello have started to address this problem in systems with interfaces. We report a multiscale technique for calculating electrostatic energies for charged defects in oxide of the metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) system, but where account is taken of substrate doping density, oxide thickness, and gate bias. We use device modeling to calculate electric fields for a point charge a fixed distance from the interface, and used the field to numerically calculate the long-range electrostatic interactions. We find, for example, that defect levels in the oxide do depend on both the magnitude and the polarity the substrate doping density. Furthermore, below 20 Å, oxide thickness also has significant effects. So, transferring results directly from bulk calculations leads to inaccuracies up to 0.5 eV- half of the silicon band gap. We will present trends in defect levels as a function of device parameters. We show that these results explain previous experimental results, and we comment on their potential impact on models for NBTI. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under co.

  7. Defects in metals. [Positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1982-06-01

    The application of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) to the study of defects in metals has led to increased knowledge on lattice-defect properties during the past decade in two areas: the determination of atomic defect properties, particularly those of monovacancies, and the monitoring and characterization of vacancy-like microstructure development during post-irradiation and post-quench annealing. The study of defects in metals by PAS is reviewed within the context of the other available techniques for defect studies. The strengths and weaknesses of PAS as a method for the characterization of defect microstructures are considered. The additional possibilities for using the positron as a localized probe of the atomic and electronic structures of atomic defects are discussed, based upon theoretical calculations of the annihilation characteristics of defect-trapped positrons and experimental observations. Finally, the present status and future potential of PAS as a tool for the study of defects in metals is considered. 71 references, 9 figures.

  8. Screening Tests for Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Member Login Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Resources & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Screening Tests for Birth Defects Home For Patients Search FAQs ...

  9. Photographic Screening for Eye Defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Images of retinas examined for characteristic patterns. Color photographs of retinas taken. Proper alinement of eye obtained by asking subject to gaze at light-emitting diode. "Red-eye" patterns in resulting color photographs examined by trained observers for signs of ocular defects. System used to check power of contact lenses and eyeglasses by taking photographs with these items in place.

  10. Birth Defects and Adolescent Pregnancies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, James

    1975-01-01

    Home economists who work with adolescents can help prepare them for responsible parenthood later in life by explaining the known causes of various birth defects; providing basic information about human genetics, prenatal nutrition, and drug and alcohol effects; and motivating adolescents to exercise increased responsibility in their sexual…

  11. Birth Defects Research and Tracking

    MedlinePlus

    ... support families affected by them. Read about the work taking place in each state » National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) CDC supports and collaborates with the NBDPN. The NBDPN is a group of over 225 individuals working at the national, state, and local levels, who ...

  12. Defect Location Using Capacitative Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, G. G.; Hutchins, D. A.; Gan, T. H.

    2008-02-01

    Further details of a novel capacitance sensing technique are presented, which is capable of imaging defects within a range of materials, including insulators, conductors and fibre reinforced composites. Representative results from each of these separate classes of material are presented here as are the results of real-life field trials in the inspection of civil structures.

  13. Brane inflation and defect formation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Brax, Philippe; van de Bruck, Carsten

    2008-08-28

    Brane inflation and the production of topological defects at the end of the inflationary phase are discussed. After a description of the inflationary set-up, we discuss the properties of the cosmic strings produced at the end of inflation. Specific examples of brane inflation are described, such as D-D , D3/D7 and modular inflations. PMID:18534933

  14. Thermal properties of defect melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami, S.; Hofsäss, T.; Horsley, R.

    1984-03-01

    Using mean field theory and high temperature expansions the transition temperature, entropy jump and heat capacity are calculated in the recent microscopic model of defect melting proposed by Kleinert. The results are compared with the experimental data for almost isotropic substances.

  15. Surface defects on thin cryosections.

    PubMed

    Frederik, P M; Busing, W M; Persson, A

    1984-01-01

    The electron microscopic observation of thin cryosections is frequently impaired by the occurrence of surface defects. To investigate the possible causes of these surface defects the structure of cryosections ( CTEM ) from frozen biological material was correlated with the structure of the block-face (SEM) from which the sections were obtained. Both sections and block-face showed steps with a periodicity larger than 0.5 micron. Upon dry sectioning of hard plastic comparable features were observed in the section ( CTEM /SEM) and block-face (SEM). Thin cryosections cut below 143 K were found to be smooth apart from defects introduced by imperfections of the knife. In addition to "long" wave length distortions, a periodical distortion smaller than 120 nm can be observed in cryosections from biological material. At a given temperature the frequency is related to the sectioning speed. At all sectioning temperatures studied, distortions of this high frequency/short wave length type have been observed although they were less conspicuous in thinner sections. The surface defects observed in cryosections from biological material resemble the defects found after metal cutting and chip-formation. Shear forces seem to be the main causes for the observed periodic deformations on both cryosections as well as on sections from metals and plastics. This may imply that material is collected and periodically shedded from a dead zone around the knife edge. In metal cutting such a dead zone can have the form of a built-up-edge on top of the knife or as a small overhang in front of the knife edge. PMID:6377477

  16. Defects and disorder in metal organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Anthony K; Bennett, Thomas D; Coudert, François-Xavier; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2016-03-14

    The wide-ranging properties of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) rely in many cases on the presence of defects within their structures and the disorder that is inevitably associated with such defects. In the present work we review several aspects of defects in MOFs, ranging from simple substitutional defects at metal cation or ligand positions, to correlated defects on a larger length scale and the extreme case of disorder associated with amorphous MOFs. We consider both porous and dense MOFs, and focus particularly on the way in which defects and disorder can be used to tune physical properties such as gas adsorption, catalysis, photoluminescence, and electronic and mechanical properties. PMID:26836459

  17. Electrical characterization of alpha radiation-induced defects in p-GaAs grown by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Naz, Nazir A.; Qurashi, Umar S.; Iqbal, M. Zafar

    2007-03-15

    Investigations of the alpha particle irradiation-induced defects in low-pressure metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition grown p-GaAs have been carried out. By employing deep-level transient spectroscopy, at least seven radiation-induced deep-level defects have been observed in the lower half of the band gap in the temperature range of 12-475 K. Double-correlation deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements show three prominent levels: two known radiation-induced levels namely, H{alpha}1 and H{alpha}5, and one inadvertent center HSA, present before irradiation, to exhibit a significant dependence of thermal emission rate on the junction electric field. For H{alpha}1 and HSA the field-enhanced emission data are well fitted with a Poole-Frenkel model, using a three-dimensional square-well potential with radius r=3.2 and 1.43 nm, respectively. The field effect for H{alpha}5 has been explained by a square-well potential in combination with a phonon-assisted tunneling process. Detailed data on the carrier capture cross section for all three levels have been obtained. The hole capture cross section for the levels H{alpha}1 and H{alpha}5 are found to be temperature independent, while for HSA, the hole capture data show a dependence on temperature. The dependence of hole capture cross section of HSA on temperature has been explained in terms of multiphonon capture mechanism, yielding a capture barrier of 0.13 eV and {sigma}({infinity})=1.5x10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. These analyses lead us to conclude that the levels H{alpha}1 and HSA are associated with a charged center, while the level H{alpha}5 is most likely a substitutional defect in GaAs.

  18. Instabilities, defects, and defect ordering in an overdamped active nematic.

    PubMed

    Putzig, Elias; Redner, Gabriel S; Baskaran, Arvind; Baskaran, Aparna

    2016-05-01

    We consider a phenomenological continuum theory for an extensile, overdamped active nematic liquid crystal, applicable in the dense regime. Constructed from general principles, the theory is universal, with parameters independent of any particular microscopic realization. We show that it exhibits two distinct instabilities, one of which arises due to shear forces, and the other due to active torques. Both lead to the proliferation of defects. We focus on the active torque bend instability and find three distinct nonequilibrium steady states including a defect-ordered nematic in which +½ disclinations develop polar ordering. We characterize the phenomenology of these phases and identify the relationship of this theoretical description to experimental realizations and other theoretical models of active nematics. PMID:26983376

  19. 3D surface defect analysis and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Jia, M.; Song, G. J.; Tao, L.; Harding, K. G.

    2008-08-01

    A method is proposed for surface defect analysis and evaluation. Good 3D point clouds can now be obtained through a variety of surface profiling methods such as stylus tracers, structured light, or interferometry. In order to inspect a surface for defects, first a reference surface that represents the surface without any defects needs to be identified. This reference surface can then be fit to the point cloud. The algorithm we present finds the least square solution for the overdetermined equation set to obtain the parameters of the reference surface mathematical description. The distance between each point within the point cloud and the reference surface is then calculated using to the derived reference surface equation. For analysis of the data, the user can preset a threshold distance value. If the calculated distance is bigger than the threshold value, the corresponding point is marked as a defect point. The software then generates a color-coded map of the measured surface. Defect points that are connected together are formed into a defect-clustering domain. Each defect-clustering domain is treated as one defect area. We then use a clustering domain searching algorithm to auto-search all the defect areas in the point cloud. The different critical parameters used for evaluating the defect status of a point cloud that can be calculated are described as: P-Depth,a peak depth of all defects; Defect Number, the number of surface defects; Defects/Area, the defect number in unit area; and Defect Coverage Ratio which is a ratio of the defect area to the region of interest.

  20. 7 CFR 51.2659 - Condition defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2659 Condition defects. Condition defects means... soft cherries and such factors as pitting, shriveling, sunken areas, brown discoloration and...

  1. Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition Home : Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Celiac disease manifestations ... affecting any organ or body system. One manifestation—dental enamel defects—can help dentists and other health ...

  2. 16 CFR 1115.4 - Defect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... understanding the concept of defect as used in the CPSA, the following examples are offered: (a) An electric... hazard it presents. The kite contains a design defect. (d) A power tool is not accompanied by...

  3. Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... health problems than their parents. Learn more about genetic counseling . Single gene: Rarely, congenital heart defects are caused ... of Congenital Heart Defects • Understand Your Risk Introduction Genetic Counseling • Symptoms & Diagnosis • Care & Treatment • Tools & Resources Related Sites ...

  4. METROPOLITAN ATLANTA CONGENITAL DEFECTS PROGRAM (MACDP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP) was established in 1967 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with Emory University and the Georgia Mental Health Institute as the nation's first population-based active ascertainment birth defects surveillan...

  5. Defect characterization in plastically deformed gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Leipner, H.S.; Huebner, C.; Storbeck, O.; Polity, A.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    1996-12-31

    The defect spectrum in plastically deformed GaAs is analyzed by positron lifetime measurements. Different types of defects, such as vacancy clusters or antisites, are identified and their thermal annealing behavior is studied.

  6. Automatic classification of blank substrate defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettiger, Tom; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Ronald, Rob; Rost, Dan; Samir, Bhamidipati

    2014-10-01

    Mask preparation stages are crucial in mask manufacturing, since this mask is to later act as a template for considerable number of dies on wafer. Defects on the initial blank substrate, and subsequent cleaned and coated substrates, can have a profound impact on the usability of the finished mask. This emphasizes the need for early and accurate identification of blank substrate defects and the risk they pose to the patterned reticle. While Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) is a well-developed technology for inspection and analysis of defects on patterned wafers and masks in the semiconductors industry, ADC for mask blanks is still in the early stages of adoption and development. Calibre ADC is a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of defects on mask blanks. Accurate, automated classification of mask blanks leads to better usability of blanks by enabling defect avoidance technologies during mask writing. Detailed information on blank defects can help to select appropriate job-decks to be written on the mask by defect avoidance tools [1][4][5]. Smart algorithms separate critical defects from the potentially large number of non-critical defects or false defects detected at various stages during mask blank preparation. Mechanisms used by Calibre ADC to identify and characterize defects include defect location and size, signal polarity (dark, bright) in both transmitted and reflected review images, distinguishing defect signals from background noise in defect images. The Calibre ADC engine then uses a decision tree to translate this information into a defect classification code. Using this automated process improves classification accuracy, repeatability and speed, while avoiding the subjectivity of human judgment compared to the alternative of manual defect classification by trained personnel [2]. This paper focuses on the results from the evaluation of Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) product at MP Mask

  7. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  8. Window defect planar mapping technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, F. R.; Minton, U. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method of planar mapping defects in a window having an edge surface and a planar surface. The method is comprised of steps for mounting the window on a support surface. Then a light sensitive paper is placed adjacent to the window surface. A light source is positioned adjacent to the window edge. The window is then illuminated with the source of light for a predetermined interval of time. Defects on the surface of the glass, as well as in the interior of the glass are detected by analyzing the developed light sensitive paper. The light source must be in the form of optical fibers or a light tube whose light transmitting ends are placed near the edge surface of the window.

  9. Optics near a hyperbolic defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumeron, Sébastien; Berche, Bertrand; Santos, Fernando; Pereira, Erms; Moraes, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    We examine the properties of a family of defects called hyperbolic disclinations, and discuss their possible use for the design of perfect optical absorbers. In hyperbolic metamaterials, the ratio of ordinary and extraordinary permittivities is negative, which leads to an effective metric of Kleinian signature (two timelike coordinates). Considering a disclination in the hyperbolic nematic host matrix, we show that the timelike geodesics are Poinsot spirals, i.e., whatever the impact parameter of an incident light beam, it is confined and whirls about the defect core. The trapping effect does not require light to be coherent. This property also remains in the wave formalism, which may be the sign for many potential applications.

  10. Cooperation and Defection in Ghetto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    We consider ghetto as a community of people ruled against their will by an external power. Members of the community feel that their laws are broken. However, attempts to leave ghetto makes their situation worse. We discuss the relation of the ghetto inhabitants to the ruling power in context of their needs, organized according to the Maslow hierarchy. Decisions how to satisfy successive needs are undertaken in cooperation with or defection the ruling power. This issue allows to construct the tree of decisions and to adopt the pruning technique from the game theory. Dynamics of decisions can be described within the formalism of fundamental equations. The result is that the strategy of defection is stabilized by the estimated payoff.

  11. Structural defects in crystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirtl, E.

    1985-01-01

    The basic photovoltaic properties of a given crystalline silicon specimen seem to be governed by density and nature of two to three dimensional lattice defects. These are mainly generated by primary growth conditions as grain boundaries of more or less intrinsic character or second phase precipitates from supersaturated solutions of carbon or oxygen. Considerably high values of both solubility and diffusivity in connection with their abundance in common refractory material systems account for the predominance of the two particular elements. Unsaturated dislocations of different types very often can be seen as a consequence of the existence of more dimensional defects as described initially. The final performance of a solar cell is dependent of the concentration and distribution of recombination active centers in the different regions of this device. Typical representatives are fast diffusing transition metals in form of either single atoms or simple complexes. Their avoidance, annihilation, or removal is of great concern in different fields of electronic materials development.

  12. Endotracheal Tube Obstruction: A Manufacturing Defect.

    PubMed

    Baldemir, Ramazan; Akçaboy, Yavuz; Akçaboy, Zeynep Nur; Göğüş, Nermin

    2015-02-01

    Various manufacturing defects of endotracheal tubes are encountered in anaesthesia practice. One of the important defects of an endotracheal tube is that a partial or complete obstruction can be potentially life-threatening. Manufacturing defects may not be ascertainable by routine inspection. In this case report, we report a partial airway obstruction caused by a plastic membrane in the connector of an endotracheal tube as a manufacturing defect. PMID:27366468

  13. COMPARISON OF SELECTED WELD DEFECT EXTRACTION METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, R.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Chady, T.; Rucinski, W.; Swiadek, K.; Caryk, M.; Lopato, P.

    2008-02-28

    This paper presents three different methods of welding defects detection from radiographs. First two methods are dedicated for extraction of flaws directly from radiograms. Fuzzy logic system considers whether the pixel belongs to crack (or background) using defects probability maps together with simple fuzzy rules. Neural network method uses knowledge gathered from radiographs with known defects. Indirect method extracts defects by subtracting background from the radiograph and next using various local thresholding methods.

  14. Inspection of lithographic mask blanks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2001-01-01

    A visible light method for detecting sub-100 nm size defects on mask blanks used for lithography. By using optical heterodyne techniques, detection of the scattered light can be significantly enhanced as compared to standard intensity detection methods. The invention is useful in the inspection of super-polished surfaces for isolated surface defects or particulate contamination and in the inspection of lithographic mask or reticle blanks for surface defects or bulk defects or for surface particulate contamination.

  15. Decay of metastable topological defects

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J. ); Vilenkin, A. Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 )

    1993-03-15

    We systematically analyze the decay of metastable topological defects that arise from the spontaneous breakdown of gauge or global symmetries. Quantum-mechanical tunneling rates are estimated for a variety of decay processes. The decay rate for a global string, vortex, domain wall, or kink is typically suppressed compared to the decay rate for its gauged counterpart. We also discuss the decay of global texture, and of semilocal and electroweak strings.

  16. Visual field defects in onchocerciasis.

    PubMed Central

    Thylefors, B; Tønjum, A M

    1978-01-01

    Lesions in the posterior segment of the eye in onchocerciasis may give visual field defects, but so far no detailed investigation has been done to determine the functional visual loss. Examination of the visual fields in 18 selected cases of onchocerciasis by means of a tangent screen test revealed important visual field defects associated with lesions in the posterior segment of the eye. Involvement of the optic nerve seemed to be important, giving rise to severely constricted visual fields. Cases of postneuritic optic atrophy showed a very uniform pattern of almost completely constricted visual fields, with only 5 to 10 degree central rest spared. Papillitis gave a similar severe constriction of the visual fields. The pattern of visual fields associated with optic neuropathy in onchocerciasis indicates that a progressive lesion of the optic nerve from the periphery may be responsible for the loss of vision. The visual field defects in onchocerciasis constitute a serious handicap, which must be taken into consideration when estimating the socioeconomic importance of the disease. Images PMID:678499

  17. 30 CFR 57.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment defects. 57.7002 Section 57.7002... Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7002 Equipment defects. Equipment defects affecting safety shall be corrected before the equipment is used....

  18. Method for mask repair using defect compensation

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Donald W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    A method for repair of amplitude and/or phase defects in lithographic masks. The method involves modifying or altering a portion of the absorber pattern on the surface of the mask blank proximate to the mask defect to compensate for the local disturbance (amplitude or phase) of the optical field due to the defect.

  19. Templates Aid Removal Of Defects From Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrickson, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    Templates used to correlate defects in castings with local wall thicknesses. Placed on part to be inspected after coated with penetrant dye. Positions of colored spots (indicative of defects) noted. Ultrasonic inspector measures thickness of wall at unacceptable defects only - overall inspection not necessary.

  20. 7 CFR 51.2659 - Condition defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Condition defects. 51.2659 Section 51.2659 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2659 Condition defects. Condition defects...

  1. The bilobed flap for popliteal defect reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kelahmetoglu, Osman; Yagmur, Caglayan; Aslan, Ozan; Firinciogullari, Remzi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bilobed flaps were first introduced to close small nasal defects. We reconstructed a defect of the popliteal fossa using a random-pattern bilobed flap. We recommend the use of random-pattern bilobed flaps as a reliable technique for covering defects of the popliteal fossa.

  2. Electronic excitations and defect creation in wide-gap MgO and Lu3Al5O12 crystals irradiated with swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, A.; Kärner, T.; Lushchik, Ch.; Schwartz, K.; Savikhin, F.; Shablonin, E.; Shugai, A.; Vasil'chenko, E.

    2012-09-01

    A comparative study of radiation effects in two groups of single crystals with an energy gap of about 8 eV possessing drastically different lattice and electron energy structures - fcc MgO and Lu3Al5O12 with 160 atoms per a unit cell - has been performed using crystal irradiation with vacuum ultraviolet radiation, electrons, fast fission neutrons and, in particular, ˜2.2 GeV uranium ions. In MgO with the absence of self-trapping for valence holes, the localization of holes near impurity ions or bivacancies (both as-grown or induced by a plastic stress) has been detected. In LuAG, the peculiarities of the motion of hole polarons and excitons, the radius of which is smaller than the size of a unit cell, have been revealed and analysed. The irradiation of MgO and LuAG with swift heavy ions providing an extremely high density of electronic excitations causes also the nonimpact creation of long-lived Frenkel defects in an oxygen sublattice.

  3. Second workshop role of point defects/defect complexes in silicon device fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Abstracts are presented of 24 papers, arranged under the following session/panel headings: defects and impurities in commercial photovoltaic Si substrates, point defects and point defect processes, impurity gettering for Si solar cells, gettering in Si solar cells, and passivation of impurities and defects.

  4. Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re; Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie

    2014-05-05

    Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

  5. Computational stoning method for surface defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Zhu, Xinhai

    2013-12-01

    Surface defects on outer panels of automotive bodies must be controlled in order to improve the surface quality. The detection and quantitative evaluation of surface defects are quite difficult because the deflection of surface defects is very small. One of detecting methods for surface defects used in factories is a stoning method in which a stone block is moved on the surface of a stamped panel. The computational stoning method was developed to detect surface low defect by authors based on a geometry contact algorithm between a stone block and a stamped panel. If the surface is convex, the stone block always contacts with the convex surface of a stamped panel and the contact gap between them is zero. If there is a surface low, the stone block does not contact to the surface and the contact gap can be computed based on contact algorithm. The convex surface defect can also be detected by applying computational stoning method to the back surface of a stamped panel. By performing two way stoning computations from both the normal surface and the back surface, not only the depth of surface low defect but also the height of convex surface defect can be detected. The surface low defect and convex surface defect can also be detected through multi-directions. Surface defects on the handle emboss of outer panels were accurately detected using the computational stoning method and compared with the real shape. A very good accuracy was obtained.

  6. Selecting the best defect reduction methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, C.M.; Barkan, P.

    1994-04-01

    Defect rates less than 10 parts per million, unimaginable a few years ago, have become the standard of world-class quality. To reduce defects, companies are aggressively implementing various quality methodologies, such as Statistical Quality Control Motorola`s Six Sigma, or Shingo`s poka-yok. Although each quality methodology reduces defects, selection has been based on an intuitive sense without understanding their relative effectiveness in each application. A missing link in developing superior defect reduction strategies has been a lack of a general defect model that clarifies the unique focus of each method. Toward the goal of efficient defect reduction, we have developed an event tree which addresses a broad spectrum of quality factors and two defect sources, namely, error and variation. The Quality Control Tree (QCT) predictions are more consistent with production experience than obtained by the other methodologies considered independently. The QCT demonstrates that world-class defect rates cannot be achieved through focusing on a single defect source or quality control factor, a common weakness of many methodologies. We have shown that the most efficient defect reduction strategy depend on the relative strengths and weaknesses of each organization. The QCT can help each organization identify the most promising defect reduction opportunities for achieving its goals.

  7. Resist process optimization for further defect reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keiichi; Iseki, Tomohiro; Marumoto, Hiroshi; Takayanagi, Koji; Yoshida, Yuichi; Uemura, Ryouichi; Yoshihara, Kosuke

    2012-03-01

    Defect reduction has become one of the most important technical challenges in device mass-production. Knowing that resist processing on a clean track strongly impacts defect formation in many cases, we have been trying to improve the track process to enhance customer yield. For example, residual type defect and pattern collapse are strongly related to process parameters in developer, and we have reported new develop and rinse methods in the previous papers. Also, we have reported the optimization method of filtration condition to reduce bridge type defects, which are mainly caused by foreign substances such as gels in resist. Even though we have contributed resist caused defect reduction in past studies, defect reduction requirements continue to be very important. In this paper, we will introduce further process improvements in terms of resist defect reduction, including the latest experimental data.

  8. Yield impacting systematic defects search and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Xu, Qingxiu; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Xing; Ning, Jay; Cheng, Guojie; Chen, Shijie; Zhang, Gary; Vikram, Abhishek; Su, Bo

    2012-03-01

    Despite great effort before design tapeout, there are still some pattern related systematic defects showing up in production, which impact product yield. Through various check points in the production life cycle endeavor is made to detect these defective patterns. It is seen that apart from the known defective patterns, slight variations of polygon sizes and shapes in the known defective patterns also cause yield loss. This complexity is further compounded when interactions among multiple process layers causes the defect. Normally the exact pattern matching techniques cannot detect these variations of the defective patterns. With the currently existing tools in the fab it is a challenge to define the 'sensitive patterns', which are arbitrary variations in the known 'defective patterns'. A design based approach has been successfully experimented on product wafers to detect yield impacting defects that greatly reduces the TAT for hotspot analysis and also provides optimized care area definition to enable high sensitivity wafer inspection. A novel Rule based pattern search technique developed by Anchor Semiconductor has been used to find sensitive patterns in the full chip design. This technique allows GUI based pattern search rule generation like, edge move or edge-to-edge distance range, so that any variations of a particular sensitive pattern can be captured and flagged. Especially the pattern rules involving multiple process layers, like M1-V1-M2, can be defined easily using this technique. Apart from using this novel pattern search technique, design signatures are also extracted around the defect locations in the wafer and used in defect classification. This enhanced defect classification greatly helps in determining most critical defects among the total defect population. The effectiveness of this technique has been established through design to defect correlation and SEM verification. In this paper we will report details of the design based experiments that

  9. If Your Child Has a Heart Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... septal defect , atrial septal defect , atrioventricular canal, and patent ductus arteriosus). Or the congestion could be the ... for Congenital Heart Defects Many heart abnormalities (including patent ductus arteriosus , ventricular septal defect , truncus arteriosus, atrioventricular ...

  10. Facts about Upper and Lower Limb Reduction Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Specific Birth Defects Anencephaly Anophthalmia/Microphthalmia Anotia/Microtia Cleft Lip / Cleft Palate Congenital Heart Defects Atrial Septal Defect ... Podcasts & Video E-Cards Flu Badge Real Stories Cleft Lip and Palate Craniosynostosis Down Syndrome Eye Defects Fetal ...

  11. Advanced defect and metrology solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Cost, weight, performance, and lifetime requirements for precision components used throughout the aerospace and defense industries are driving innovative mechanical designs, manufacturing processes and use of new materials. In turn, these advanced components typically require tighter dimensional and surface tolerances to function as designed. Scratch testers, microscope-based systems, and other traditional metrology systems are inadequate for roughness, small-scale geometry, and defect determination on many of these parts. This talk will examine the advantages and disadvantages of some of the new technologies developed to provide more robust, versatile, and sensitive measurements of precision components for advanced manufacturing environments.

  12. Improvement in accuracy of defect size measurement by automatic defect classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samir, Bhamidipati; Pereira, Mark; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Chung, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Gi-Sung; Jung, Hong-Yul

    2015-10-01

    The blank mask defect review process involves detailed analysis of defects observed across a substrate's multiple preparation stages, such as cleaning and resist-coating. The detailed knowledge of these defects plays an important role in the eventual yield obtained by using the blank. Defect knowledge predominantly comprises of details such as the number of defects observed, and their accurate sizes. Mask usability assessment at the start of the preparation process, is crudely based on number of defects. Similarly, defect size gives an idea of eventual wafer defect printability. Furthermore, monitoring defect characteristics, specifically size and shape, aids in obtaining process related information such as cleaning or coating process efficiencies. Blank mask defect review process is largely manual in nature. However, the large number of defects, observed for latest technology nodes with reducing half-pitch sizes; and the associated amount of information, together make the process increasingly inefficient in terms of review time, accuracy and consistency. The usage of additional tools such as CDSEM may be required to further aid the review process resulting in increasing costs. Calibre® MDPAutoClassify™ provides an automated software alternative, in the form of a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of blank defects. Elaborate post-processing algorithms are applied on defect images generated by inspection machines, to extract and report significant defect information such as defect size, affecting defect printability and mask usability. The algorithm's capabilities are challenged by the variety and complexity of defects encountered, in terms of defect nature, size, shape and composition; and the optical phenomena occurring around the defect [1]. This paper mainly focuses on the results from the evaluation of Calibre® MDPAutoClassify™ product. The main objective of this evaluation is to assess the capability of

  13. Analyzing the impact of ISO on digital imager defects with an automatic defect trace algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Jenny; Chapman, Glenn H.; Choi, Yong H.; Thomas, Rohit; Koren, Israel; Koren, Zahava

    2010-01-01

    Reliability of image sensors is limited by the continuous development of in-field defects. Laboratory calibration on 21 DSLRs has revealed hot pixels as the main defect type found in all tested cameras, with 78% of the identified defects having a time-independent offset. The expanded ISO range that exists in new cameras enables natural light photography. However, the gain applied to all pixels also enhances the appearance of defects. Analysis of defects at varying ISO levels shows that compared to the number of defects at ISO 400, the number of defects at ISO 1600 is 2-3 times higher. Amplifying the defect parameters helps differentiate faults from noise, thus detecting larger defect sets and causes some hot pixels to become saturated. The distribution of defect parameters at various ISO levels shows that the gain applied to faults with moderate defect magnitude caused 2-10% of the defects to saturate at short exposure times (0.03-0.5s). With our expanded defect collection, spatial analysis confirmed the uniform distribution of defects, indicating a random defect source. In our extended study, the temporal growth of defects is analyzed using our defecttracing algorithm. We introduce an improved defect model which incorporates the ISO gain, allowing the detection of defects even in short exposure images at high ISO and thus providing a wider selection of historical images and more accurate defect tracing. Larger area sensors show more hot pixels, while hot pixel rates strongly grow as the pixel size decreases to 2.2 microns.

  14. Long term simulation of point defect cluster size distributions from atomic displacement cascades in Fe70Cr20Ni10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souidi, A.; Hou, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; De Backer, A.

    2015-06-01

    We have used an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model to simulate the long term evolution of the primary damage in Fe70Cr20Ni10 alloys. The mean number of Frenkel pairs created by different Primary Knocked on Atoms (PKA) was estimated by Molecular Dynamics using a ternary EAM potential developed in the framework of the PERFORM-60 European project. This number was then used to obtain the vacancy-interstitial recombination distance required in the calculation of displacement cascades in the Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) with code MARLOWE (Robinson, 1989). The BCA cascades have been generated in the 10-100 keV range with the MARLOWE code and two different screened Coulomb potentials, namely, the Molière approximation to the Thomas-Fermi potential and the so-called "Universal" potential by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark (ZBL). These cascades have been used as input to the OKMC code LAKIMOCA (Domain et al., 2004), with a set of parameters for describing the mobility of point defect clusters based on ab initio calculations and experimental data. The cluster size distributions have been estimated for irradiation doses of 0.1 and 1 dpa, and a dose rate of 10-7 dpa/s at 600 K. We demonstrate that, like in the case of BCC iron, cluster size distributions in the long term are independent of the cascade energy and that the recursive cascade model suggested for BCC iron in Souidi et al. (2011) also applies to FCC Fe70Cr20Ni10. The results also show that the influence of the BCA potential is sizeable but the qualitative correspondence in the predicted long term evolution is excellent.

  15. Molecularly Tunable Fluorescent Quantum Defects.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyejin; Furmanchuk, Al'ona; Kim, Mijin; Meany, Brendan; Guo, Yong; Schatz, George C; Wang, YuHuang

    2016-06-01

    We describe the chemical creation of molecularly tunable fluorescent quantum defects in semiconducting carbon nanotubes through covalently bonded surface functional groups that are themselves nonemitting. By variation of the surface functional groups, the same carbon nanotube crystal is chemically converted to create more than 30 distinct fluorescent nanostructures with unique near-infrared photoluminescence that is molecularly specific, systematically tunable, and significantly brighter than that of the parent semiconductor. This novel exciton-tailoring chemistry readily occurs in aqueous solution and creates functional defects on the sp(2) carbon lattice with highly predictable C-C bonding from virtually any iodine-containing hydrocarbon precursor. Our new ability to control nanostructure excitons through a single surface functional group opens up exciting possibilities for postsynthesis chemical engineering of carbon nanomaterials and suggests that the rational design and creation of a large variety of molecularly tunable quantum emitters-for applications ranging from in vivo bioimaging and chemical sensing to room-temperature single-photon sources-can now be anticipated. PMID:27159413

  16. Gravitational energy of conical defects

    SciTech Connect

    Maluf, J.W.; Kneip, A.

    1997-01-01

    The energy density {epsilon}{sub g} of asymptotically flat gravitational fields can be calculated from a simple expression involving the trace of the torsion tensor. The integral of this energy density over the whole space yields the Arnowitt{endash}Deser{endash}Misner (ADM) energy. Such energy expression can be justified within the framework of the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity, which is an alternative geometrical formulation of Einstein{close_quote}s general relativity. In this paper we apply {epsilon}{sub g} to the evaluation of the energy per unit length of a class of conical defects of topological nature, which include disclinations and dislocations (in the terminology of crystallography). Disclinations correspond to cosmic strings, and for a space{endash}time endowed with only such a defect the well known expression of energy per unit length is obtained precisely. However for a pure space{endash}time dislocation the total gravitational energy is zero. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Effects of in-cascade defect clustering on near-term defect evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1997-08-01

    The effects of in-cascade defect clustering on the nature of the subsequent defect population are being studied using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the simulations illustrates the strong influence of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state on subsequent defect evolution. The large differences in mobility and stability of vacancy and interstitial defects and the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades have been shown to be significant factors affecting the evolution of the defect distribution. In recent work, the effects of initial cluster sizes appear to be extremely important.

  18. Altering graphene line defect properties using chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Smitha; White, Carter; Gunlycke, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    First-principles calculations are presented of a fundamental topological line defect in graphene that was observed and reported in Nature Nanotech. 5, 326 (2010). These calculations show that atoms and smaller molecules can bind covalently to the surface in the vicinity of the graphene line defect. It is also shown that the chemistry at the line defect has a strong effect on its electronic and magnetic properties, e.g. the ferromagnetically aligned moments along the line defect can be quenched by some adsorbates. The strong effect of the adsorbates on the line defect properties can be understood by examining how these adsorbates affect the boundary-localized states in the vicinity of the Fermi level. We also expect that the line defect chemistry will significantly affect the scattering properties of incident low-energy particles approaching it from graphene.

  19. Defect-Engineered Metal–Organic Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhenlan; Bueken, Bart; De Vos, Dirk E; Fischer, Roland A

    2015-01-01

    Defect engineering in metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) is an exciting concept for tailoring material properties, which opens up novel opportunities not only in sorption and catalysis, but also in controlling more challenging physical characteristics such as band gap as well as magnetic and electrical/conductive properties. It is challenging to structurally characterize the inherent or intentionally created defects of various types, and there have so far been few efforts to comprehensively discuss these issues. Based on selected reports spanning the last decades, this Review closes that gap by providing both a concise overview of defects in MOFs, or more broadly coordination network compounds (CNCs), including their classification and characterization, together with the (potential) applications of defective CNCs/MOFs. Moreover, we will highlight important aspects of “defect-engineering” concepts applied for CNCs, also in comparison with relevant solid materials such as zeolites or COFs. Finally, we discuss the future potential of defect-engineered CNCs. PMID:26036179

  20. Atomic Defects in Two Dimensional Materials.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Haider I; Ophus, Colin; Zettl, Alex

    2015-10-14

    Atomic defects in crystalline structures have pronounced affects on their bulk properties. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy has proved to be a powerful characterization tool for understanding the bonding structure of defects in materials. In this article, recent results on the characterization of defect structures in two dimensional materials are discussed. The dynamic behavior of defects in graphene shows the stability of zigzag edges of the material and gives insights into the dislocation motion. Polycrystalline graphene is characterized using advanced electron microscopy techniques, revealing the global crystal structure of the material, as well as atomic-resolution observation of the carbon atom positions between neighboring crystal grains. Studies of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) are also visited, highlighting the interlayer bonding, which occurs upon defect formation, and characterization of grain boundary structures. Lastly, defect structures in monolayer polycrystalline transition metal dichalcogenides grown by CVD are discussed. PMID:25946075

  1. Semiconductor yield improvements through automatic defect classification

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, S.; Kulkarni, A.

    1995-09-30

    Automatic detection of defects during the fabrication of semiconductor wafers is largely automated, but the classification of those defects is still performed manually by technicians. Projections by semiconductor manufacturers predict that with larger wafer sizes and smaller line width technology the number of defects to be manually classified will increase exponentially. This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) and KLA Instruments developed concepts, algorithms and systems to automate the classification of wafer defects to decrease inspection time, improve the reliability of defect classification, and hence increase process throughput and yield. Image analysis, feature extraction, pattern recognition and classification schemes were developed that are now being used as research tools for future products and are being integrated into the KLA line of wafer inspection hardware. An automatic defect classification software research tool was developed and delivered to the CRADA partner to facilitate continuation of this research beyond the end of the partnership.

  2. Agricultural Compounds in Water and Birth Defects.

    PubMed

    Brender, Jean D; Weyer, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Agricultural compounds have been detected in drinking water, some of which are teratogens in animal models. The most commonly detected agricultural compounds in drinking water include nitrate, atrazine, and desethylatrazine. Arsenic can also be an agricultural contaminant, although arsenic often originates from geologic sources. Nitrate has been the most studied agricultural compound in relation to prenatal exposure and birth defects. In several case-control studies published since 2000, women giving birth to babies with neural tube defects, oral clefts, and limb deficiencies were more likely than control mothers to be exposed to higher concentrations of drinking water nitrate during pregnancy. Higher concentrations of atrazine in drinking water have been associated with abdominal defects, gastroschisis, and other defects. Elevated arsenic in drinking water has also been associated with birth defects. Since these compounds often occur as mixtures, it is suggested that future research focus on the impact of mixtures, such as nitrate and atrazine, on birth defects. PMID:27007730

  3. Perception of risk from automobile safety defects.

    PubMed

    Slovic, P; MacGregor, D; Kraus, N N

    1987-10-01

    Descriptions of safety engineering defects of the kind that compel automobile manufacturers to initiate a recall campaign were evaluated by individuals on a set of risk characteristic scales that included overall vehicle riskiness, manufacturer's ability to anticipate the defect, importance for vehicle operation, severity of consequences and likelihood of compliance with a recall notice. A factor analysis of the risk characteristics indicated that judgments could be summarized in terms of two composite scales, one representing the uncontrollability of the damage the safety defect might cause and the other representing the foreseeability of the defect by the manufacturer. Motor vehicle defects were found to be highly diverse in terms of the perceived qualities of their risks. Location of individual defects within the factor space was closely associated with perceived riskiness, perceived likelihood of purchasing another car from the same manufacturer, perceived likelihood of compliance with a recall notice, and actual compliance rates. PMID:3675807

  4. Wafer Mapping Using Deuterium Enhanced Defect Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, K.; Holland, O. W.; Hellmer, R.; Vanmil, B.; Bubulac, L. O.; Golding, T. D.

    2010-07-01

    Deuterium (as well as other hydrogen isotopes) binds with a wide range of morphological defects in semiconductors and, as such, becomes distributed similarly to those defects. Thus, the deuterium profile within the sample serves as the basis of a technique for defect mapping known as amethyst wafer mapping (AWM). The efficiency of this technique has been demonstrated by evaluation of ion-induced damage in implanted Si, as well as as-grown defects in HgCdTe (MCT) epilayers. The defect tagging or decoration capability of deuterium is largely material independent and applicable to a wide range of defect morphologies. A number of analytical techniques including ion channeling and etch pit density measurements were used to evaluate the AWM results.

  5. Pinning of flux lines by planar defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Aleksandra; Emig, Thorsten; Nattermann, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    The influence of randomly distributed point impurities and planar defects on order and transport in type-II superconductors and related systems is studied. It is shown that the Bragg glass phase is unstable with respect to planar defects. Even a single weak defect plane oriented parallel to the magnetic field as well as to one of the main axes of the Abrikosov flux-line lattice is a relevant perturbation in the Bragg glass. A defect that is aligned with the magnetic field restores the flux density oscillations, which decay algebraically with the distance from the defect. The theory exhibits striking similarities to the physics of a Luttinger liquid with a frozen impurity. The exponent for the flux-line creep in the direction perpendicular to a relevant defect is derived. We find that the flux-line lattice exhibits in the presence of many randomly distributed parallel planar defects aligned to the magnetic field a glassy phase which we call planar glass. The planar glass is characterized by diverging shear and tilt moduli, a transverse Meissner effect, and resistance against shear deformations. We also obtain sample-to-sample fluctuations of the longitudinal magnetic susceptibility and an exponential decay of translational long-range order in the direction perpendicular to the defects. The flux creep perpendicular to the defects leads to a nonlinear resistivity ρ(J→0)˜exp[-(JD/J)3/2] . Strong planar defects enforce arrays of dislocations that are located at the defects with a Burgers vector parallel to the defects in order to relax shear strain.

  6. Processed-induced defects in EFG ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, B.; Ast, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    The defect structure of processed edge defined film-fed growth (EFG) silicon ribbons was studied using a variety of electron microscopic techniques. Comparison between the present results and previous studies on as-grown ribbons has shown that solar cell processing introduces additional defects into the ribbons. The creation of point defects during high temperature phosphorus diffusion induces dislocation climb, resulting in the formation of dislocation helices in the diffused layer.

  7. Detection of tanker defects with infrared thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    Infrared scanning technique for finding defects in secondary barrier of liquid natural gas (LNG) tank has been successfully tested on ship under construction at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company. Technique determines defects with minimal expenditure of time and manpower. Tests could be repeated during life of tanker and make more complicated testing unnecessary. Tests also confirmed that tank did not have any major defects, and tank was certified.

  8. Research In Diagnosing Bearing Defects From Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T.; Earhart, E.; Fiorucci, T.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes research in bearing-defect signature analysis - use of vibration-signal analysis to diagnose defects in roller and ball bearings. Experiments performed on bearings in good condition and other bearings in which various parts scratched to provide known defects correlated with vibration signals. Experiments performed on highly instrumented motor-driven rotor assembly at speeds up to 10,050 r/min, using accelerometers, velocity probes, and proximity sensors mounted at various locations on assembly to measure vibrations.

  9. Multimode model based defect characterization in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Holland, S.; Gregory, E.

    2016-02-01

    A newly-initiated research program for model-based defect characterization in CFRP composites is summarized. The work utilizes computational models of the interaction of NDE probing energy fields (ultrasound and thermography), to determine 1) the measured signal dependence on material and defect properties (forward problem), and 2) an assessment of performance-critical defect properties from analysis of measured NDE signals (inverse problem). Work is reported on model implementation for inspection of CFRP laminates containing delamination and porosity. Forward predictions of measurement response are presented, as well as examples of model-based inversion of measured data for the estimation of defect parameters.

  10. Screening for Open Neural Tube Defects.

    PubMed

    Krantz, David A; Hallahan, Terrence W; Carmichael, Jonathan B

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical prenatal screening was initiated with the use of maternal serum alpha fetoprotein to screen for open neural tube defects. Screening now includes multiple marker and sequential screening protocols involving serum and ultrasound markers to screen for aneuploidy. Recently cell-free DNA screening for aneuploidy has been initiated, but does not screen for neural tube defects. Although ultrasound is highly effective in identifying neural tube defects in high-risk populations, in decentralized health systems maternal serum screening still plays a significant role. Abnormal maternal serum alpha fetoprotein alone or in combination with other markers may indicate adverse pregnancy outcome in the absence of open neural tube defects. PMID:27235920

  11. Defect interactions within a group of subcascades

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1996-10-01

    The evolution of the defect distributions within high energy cascades that contain multiple subcascades is studied as a function of temperature for cascades in copper. Low energy cascades generated with molecular dynamics are placed in close proximity to simulate the arrangement of subcascades within a high energy event, then the ALSOME code follows the evolution of the cascade damage during short term annealing. The intersubcascade defect interactions during the annealing stage are found to be minimal. However, no conclusions regarding effects of subcascades on defect production should be drawn until intersubcascade defect interactions during the quenching stage are examined.

  12. Energy Barriers for Defects in Disordered Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijtmans, Sven; Manning, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    In solids, defects govern flow and failure. In crystals, defects are easily-identified dislocations, while in disordered solids, defects can be found by analyzing the vibrational modes of the system, which are eigenvectors of the matrix describing the linear response. The low frequency modes are typically quasi-localized hybrids of excitations localized at the defects and plane-wave like modes. Additional analysis can separate these components, giving the location of a defect and displacement of particles along that defect. To define an energy barrier for each defect, we displace particles along an isolated defect mode and calculate the energy at which the system transitions to a new energy basin. Different definitions of a new basin, such as a change in the particle contact network or particle displacements above a specific threshold, give different results. We identify several criteria that are consistent and provide a reasonable, robust definition of an energy barrier. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that energy barriers for isolated defects are generally higher than energy barriers for typical quasi-localized modes in the system.

  13. Electricity generation from defective tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Namita; Fogg, Alex; Wilder, Joseph; Franco, Daniel; Komisar, Simeon; Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana

    2016-12-01

    The United States faces a significant burden in treating 0.61billionkg of defective tomatoes (culls) every year. We present a proof-of-concept for generating electricity from culled tomatoes in microbial-electrochemical systems (MESs). This study delineates impedance behavior of the culled tomatoes in MESs and compares its impedance spectra with that of soluble substrates (dextrose, acetate, and wastewater). A series of AC and DC diagnostic tests have revealed the superior performance of the culled tomatoes compared to the pure substrates. Cyclic voltammetry results have indicated the active role of indigenous, diffusible redox-active pigments in the culled tomatoes on overall electricity production. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results have elucidated the role of peel and seed on the oxidation behavior of the culled tomatoes. PMID:27474917

  14. Defect reduction through Lean methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kathleen; Kindt, Louis; Densmore, Jim; Benson, Craig; Zhou, Nancy; Leonard, John; Whiteside, Cynthia; Nolan, Robert; Shanks, David

    2010-09-01

    Lean manufacturing is a systematic method of identifying and eliminating waste. Use of Lean manufacturing techniques at the IBM photomask manufacturing facility has increased efficiency and productivity of the photomask process. Tools, such as, value stream mapping, 5S and structured problem solving are widely used today. In this paper we describe a step-by-step Lean technique used to systematically decrease defects resulting in reduced material costs, inspection costs and cycle time. The method used consists of an 8-step approach commonly referred to as the 8D problem solving process. This process allowed us to identify both prominent issues as well as more subtle problems requiring in depth investigation. The methodology used is flexible and can be applied to numerous situations. Advantages to Lean methodology are also discussed.

  15. SEMATECH produces defect-free EUV mask blanks: defect yield and immediate challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antohe, Alin O.; Balachandran, Dave; He, Long; Kearney, Patrick; Karumuri, Anil; Goodwin, Frank; Cummings, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Availability of defect-free reflective mask has been one of the most critical challenges to extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). To mitigate the risk, significant progress has been made on defect detection, pattern shifting, and defect repair. Clearly such mitigation strategies are based on the assumption that defect counts and sizes from incoming mask blanks must be below practical levels depending on mask specifics. The leading industry consensus for early mask product development is that there should be no defects greater than 80 nm in the quality area, 132 mm x 132 mm. In addition less than 10 defects smaller than 80 nm may be mitigable. SEMATECH has been focused on EUV mask blank defect reduction using Veeco Nexus TM IBD platform, the industry standard for mask blank production, and assessing if IBD technology can be evolved to a manufacturing solution. SEMATECH has recently announced a breakthrough reduction of defects in the mask blank deposition process resulting in the production of two defect-free EUV mask blanks at 54 nm inspection sensitivity (SiO2 equivalent). This paper will discuss the dramatic reduction of baseline EUV mask blank defects, review the current deposition process run and compare results with previous process runs. Likely causes of remaining defects will be discussed based on analyses as characterized by their compositions and whether defects are embedded in the multilayer stack or non-embedded.

  16. Quantum defect analysis of HD photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Du, N.Y.; Greene, C.H.

    1986-11-15

    A multichannel quantum defect calculation is shown to reproduce most observed features in several portions of the HD photoabsorption spectrum. The rovibrational frame transformation theory of Atabek, Dill, and Jungen is reformulated in terms of a quantum defect matrix. The calculation accounts for spectral regions far from dissociation thresholds despite its neglect of g--u mixing.

  17. First principles calculations for defects in U

    SciTech Connect

    B. Beeler; B. Good; S. Rashkeev; C. Deo; M. Baskes; M. Okuniewski

    2010-12-01

    Uranium (U) exhibits a high temperature body-centered cubic (bcc) allotrope that is often stabilized by alloying with transition metals such as Zr, Mo, and Nb for technological applications. One such application involves U–Zr as nuclear fuel, where radiation damage and diffusion (processes heavily dependent on point defects) are of vital importance. Several systems of U are examined within a density functional theory framework utilizing projector augmented wave pseudopotentials. Two separate generalized gradient approximations of the exchange-correlation are used to calculate defect properties and are compared. The bulk modulus, the lattice constant, and the Birch–Murnaghan equation of state for the defect free bcc uranium allotrope are calculated. Defect parameters calculated include energies of formation of vacancies in the a and ? allotropes, as well as self-interstitials, Zr interstitials, and Zr substitutional defects for the ? allotrope. The results for vacancies agree very well with experimental and previous computational studies. The most probable self-interstitial site in ?-U is the 110 dumbbell, and the most probable defect location for dilute Zr in ?-U is the substitutional site. This is the first detailed study of self-defects in the bcc allotrope of U and also the first comprehensive study of dilute Zr defects in ?-U.

  18. Biomaterials for reconstruction of cranial defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of cranial defect is commonly performed in neurosurgical operations. Many materials have been employed for repairing cranial defects. In this paper, materials used for cranioplasty, including autografts, allografts, and synthetic biomaterials are comprehensively reviewed. This paper also gives future perspective of the materials and development trend of manufacturing process for cranioplasty implants.

  19. Stem-end chip defect update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem-end chip defect is characterized by dark fried color along the vasculature and adjacent tissues at a position in the chip that corresponds to the tuber stem end. Stem-end chip defect occurs erratically over years and locations. In some years and in some regions, it can be a pervasive and costly...

  20. Defect-assisted plasmonic crystal sensor

    PubMed Central

    Briscoe, Jayson L.; Cho, Sang-Yeon; Brener, Igal

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate enhanced sensitivity of a nanostructured plasmonic sensor that utilizes resonance in intentional structural defects within a plasmonic crystal. The measured sensitivity of the fabricated nanosensor is ~500 nm/RIU showing improvement over traditional nanohole array sensors. Furthermore, the defects provide an additional design parameter to increase sensitivity by engineering plasmon lifetime. PMID:23939114

  1. Sizing Dye-Penetrant Indications Of Defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Orlando G.

    1988-01-01

    Sizes of cracks and holes viewed through borescope measured. Reference chart makes it possible to estimate sizes of borescope-observed defects on inner walls of tubes or otherwise hidden. Used both for round defects like pits or pores and for elongated ones like cracks.

  2. Defect-Tolerant Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Mohnish; Rasmussen, Filip A; Kuhar, Korina; Olsen, Thomas; Jacobsen, Karsten W; Thygesen, Kristian S

    2016-04-13

    Localized electronic states formed inside the band gap of a semiconductor due to crystal defects can be detrimental to the material's optoelectronic properties. Semiconductors with a lower tendency to form defect induced deep gap states are termed defect-tolerant. Here we provide a systematic first-principles investigation of defect tolerance in 29 monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) of interest for nanoscale optoelectronics. We find that the TMDs based on group VI and X metals form deep gap states upon creation of a chalcogen (S, Se, Te) vacancy, while the TMDs based on group IV metals form only shallow defect levels and are thus predicted to be defect-tolerant. Interestingly, all the defect sensitive TMDs have valence and conduction bands with a very similar orbital composition. This indicates a bonding/antibonding nature of the gap, which in turn suggests that dangling bonds will fall inside the gap. These ideas are made quantitative by introducing a descriptor that measures the degree of similarity of the conduction and valence band manifolds. Finally, the study is generalized to nonpolar nanoribbons of the TMDs where we find that only the defect sensitive materials form edge states within the band gap. PMID:27027786

  3. 49 CFR 215.123 - Defective couplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Defective couplers. 215.123 Section 215.123 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....123 Defective couplers. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if— (a) The car...

  4. 49 CFR 215.123 - Defective couplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Defective couplers. 215.123 Section 215.123 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....123 Defective couplers. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if— (a) The car...

  5. 49 CFR 215.123 - Defective couplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Defective couplers. 215.123 Section 215.123 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....123 Defective couplers. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if— (a) The car...

  6. 49 CFR 215.123 - Defective couplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Defective couplers. 215.123 Section 215.123 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....123 Defective couplers. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if— (a) The car...

  7. 27 CFR 11.32 - Defective products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Defective products. 11.32 Section 11.32 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Beverages Exchanges and Returns for Ordinary and Usual Commercial Reasons § 11.32 Defective...

  8. Eggshell defects detection based on color processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alegre, Maria C.; Ribeiro, Angela; Guinea, Domingo; Cristobal, Gabriel

    2000-03-01

    The automatic classification of defective eggs constitutes a fundamental issue at the poultry industry for both economical and sanitary reasons. The early separation of eggs with spots and cracks is a relevant task as the stains can leak while progressing on the conveyor-belts, degrading all the mechanical parts. Present work is focused on the implementation of an artificial vision system for detecting in real time defective eggs at the poultry farm. First step of the algorithmic process is devoted to the detection of the egg shape to fix the region of interest. A color processing is then performed only on the eggshell to obtain an image segmentation that allows the discrimination of defective eggs from clean ones in critic time. The results are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed visual process on a wide sample of both defective and non-defective eggs.

  9. Orbifolds, defects and sphere partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosomichi, Kazuo

    2016-02-01

    Gauge theories in the presence of codimension two vortex defects are known to be related to the theories on orbifolds. By using this relation we study the localized path integrals of 2D {N}=(2,2) SUSY gauge theories with point-like vortex defects. We present a formula for the correlation functions of vortex defects inserted at the north and the south poles of squashed spheres. For Abelian gauge theories the correlators are locally constant as functions of the parameters of the defect, but exhibit discontinuity at some threshold values determined from the R-charges of the matter multiplets. For non-Abelian gauge groups the correlators depend non-trivially on the types of gauge symmetry breaking due to the defects.

  10. Topological defect dynamics in operando battery nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvestad, Andrew; Meng, Shirley; Shpyrko, Oleg

    2015-03-01

    Topological defects are ubiquitous in physics and manifest themselves as magnetic monopoles in quantum field theories and crystallographic imperfections in condensed matter systems. In the latter, the defect properties determine many of the material's properties and as such represent substantial novel opportunities for design and optimization of desired functionalities through deliberate defect engineering and manipulation. However, this approach of ``defect choreography'' currently suffers from the lack of suitable nanoscale probes to track buried single defects in-situ and in-operando. Here we report 3D imaging of single edge dislocations and their motion in an individual nanoparticle under operando conditions in a Lithium ion battery. We further observe the dislocation act as a nucleation point during the structural phase transformation. We find that the region near the dislocation enters a negative Poisson's ratio, or auxetic, regime at high voltage. Dislocation imaging is thus a powerful nanotechnology and it opens a new, powerful avenue for facilitating improvement of nanostructured devices.

  11. Urgent global opportunities to prevent birth defects.

    PubMed

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Oakley, Godfrey P; Brent, Robert L

    2014-06-01

    Birth defects are an urgent global health priority. They affect millions of births worldwide. But their prevalence and impact are largely under-ascertained, particularly in middle- and low-income countries. Fortunately, a large proportion of birth defects can be prevented. This review examines the global prevalence and primary prevention methods for major preventable birth defects: congenital rubella syndrome, folic acid-preventable spina bifida and anencephaly, fetal alcohol syndrome, Down syndrome, rhesus hemolytic disease of the fetus and the newborn; and those associated with maternal diabetes, and maternal exposure to valproic acid or iodine deficiency during pregnancy. Challenges to prevention efforts are reviewed. The aim of this review is to bring to the forefront the urgency of birth defects prevention, surveillance, and prenatal screening and counseling; and to help public health practitioners develop population-based birth defects surveillance and prevention programs, and policy-makers to develop and implement science-based public health policies. PMID:24333206

  12. Native point defects in GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Kujala, J.; Segercrantz, N.; Tuomisto, F.; Slotte, J.

    2014-10-14

    We have applied positron annihilation spectroscopy to study native point defects in Te-doped n-type and nominally undoped p-type GaSb single crystals. The results show that the dominant vacancy defect trapping positrons in bulk GaSb is the gallium monovacancy. The temperature dependence of the average positron lifetime in both p- and n-type GaSb indicates that negative ion type defects with no associated open volume compete with the Ga vacancies. Based on comparison with theoretical predictions, these negative ions are identified as Ga antisites. The concentrations of these negatively charged defects exceed the Ga vacancy concentrations nearly by an order of magnitude. We conclude that the Ga antisite is the native defect responsible for p-type conductivity in GaSb single crystals.

  13. Geodesic defect anchoring on nematic shells.

    PubMed

    Mirantsev, Leonid V; Sonnet, André M; Virga, Epifanio G

    2012-08-01

    Nematic shells are colloidal particles coated with nematic liquid crystal molecules, which may freely glide and rotate on the colloid's surface while keeping their long axis on the local tangent plane. Molecular dynamics simulations on a nanoscopic spherical shell indicate that under appropriate adhesion conditions for the molecules on the equator, the equilibrium nematic texture exhibits at each pole a pair of +1/2 defects so close to one another to be treated as one +1 defect. Spirals connect the polar defects, though the continuum limit of the interaction potential would not feature any elastic anisotropy. A molecular averaging justifies an anchoring defect energy that feels the geodesics emanating from the defect. All our observations are explained by such a geodesic anchoring, which vanishes on flat manifolds. PMID:23005713

  14. Wafer plane inspection for advanced reticle defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Rajesh; Ghadiali, Firoz; Kim, Jun; Huang, Tracy; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    Readiness of new mask defect inspection technology is one of the key enablers for insertion & transition of the next generation technology from development into production. High volume production in mask shops and wafer fabs demands a reticle inspection system with superior sensitivity complemented by a low false defect rate to ensure fast turnaround of reticle repair and defect disposition (W. Chou et al 2007). Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to mask defect inspection, complementing the high resolution inspection capabilities of the TeraScanHR defect inspection system. WPI is accomplished by using the high resolution mask images to construct a physical mask model (D. Pettibone et al 1999). This mask model is then used to create the mask image in the wafer aerial plane. A threshold model is applied to enhance the inspectability of printing defects. WPI can eliminate the mask restrictions imposed on OPC solutions by inspection tool limitations in the past. Historically, minimum image restrictions were required to avoid nuisance inspection stops and/or subsequent loss of sensitivity to defects. WPI has the potential to eliminate these limitations by moving the mask defect inspections to the wafer plane. This paper outlines Wafer Plane Inspection technology, and explores the application of this technology to advanced reticle inspection. A total of twelve representative critical layers were inspected using WPI die-to-die mode. The results from scanning these advanced reticles have shown that applying WPI with a pixel size of 90nm (WPI P90) captures all the defects of interest (DOI) with low false defect detection rates. In validating CD predictions, the delta CDs from WPI are compared against Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMS), where a good correlation is established between WPI and AIMSTM.

  15. Constitutional and thermal defects in nickel aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Korzhavyi, P.A.; Abrikosov, I.A.; Johansson, B.

    1999-07-01

    The formation energies of intrinsic point defects and the interaction energies of possible defect pairs in NiAl are calculated from first principles within an order-N, locally self-consistent Green's function method in conjunction with the multipole electrostatic corrections to the atomic sphere approximation. The theory correctly reproduces the ground-state properties of the off-stoichiometric NiAl alloys. The constitutional defects (antisite Ni atoms in Ni-rich and Ni vacancies in Al-rich NiAl) are shown to form ordered structures in the ground state, in which the defects of the same kind tend to avoid each other at the shortest separation distance on their sublattice. A mean-field theory is applied to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of thermal defects. The statistics of thermal defects is interpreted in terms of dominant composition-conserving complex defects which are shown to be triple defects in Ni-rich and nearly stoichiometric NiAl. In the Al-rich region a novel thermal excitation dominates where two constitutional Ni vacancies are replaced by one antisite Al atom. The number of vacancies, as well as the total number of point defects decrease with temperature in Al-rich NiAl. The boundary between the two regions is treated analytically. The vacancy concentration exhibits a minimum in its temperature dependence at the boundary. Similar analysis is applied to study constitutional and thermal defects in Ni{sub 3}Al as a function of concentration is in excellent agreement with recent experimental data.

  16. The role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report and papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.Y.

    1994-08-01

    This report is the summary of the third workshop on the role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. The workshop was organized: (1) to discuss recent progress in the material quality produced by photovoltaic Si manufacturers, (2) to foster the understanding of point defect issues in Si device processing, (3) to review the effects of inhomogeneities on large- area solar cell performance, (4) to discuss how to improve Si solar cell processing, and (5) to develop a new understanding of gettering, defect passivation, and defect annihilation. Separate abstract were prepared for the individual papers, for the database.

  17. Interleukin-6 Stimulates Defective Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Ganga; Milagre, Carla; Pearce, Oliver M T; Reynolds, Louise E; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan; Leinster, David A; Zhong, Haihong; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Thompson, Richard; Whiteford, James R; Balkwill, Frances

    2015-08-01

    The cytokine IL6 has a number of tumor-promoting activities in human and experimental cancers, but its potential as an angiogenic agent has not been fully investigated. Here, we show that IL6 can directly induce vessel sprouting in the ex vivo aortic ring model, as well as endothelial cell proliferation and migration, with similar potency to VEGF. However, IL6-stimulated aortic ring vessel sprouts had defective pericyte coverage compared with VEGF-stimulated vessels. The mechanism of IL6 action on pericytes involved stimulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 as well as angiopoietin2 (Ang2). When peritoneal xenografts of ovarian cancer were treated with an anti-IL6 antibody, pericyte coverage of vessels was restored. In addition, in human ovarian cancer biopsies, there was an association between levels of IL6 mRNA, Jagged1, and Ang2. Our findings have implications for the use of cancer therapies that target VEGF or IL6 and for understanding abnormal angiogenesis in cancers, chronic inflammatory disease, and stroke. PMID:26081809

  18. Intraventricular haemorrhage and haemostasis defects.

    PubMed Central

    Beverley, D W; Chance, G W; Inwood, M J; Schaus, M; O'Keefe, B

    1984-01-01

    Twenty five of 106 preterm infants of 34 weeks' gestation or less developed intraventricular haemorrhage within the first 48 hours of life. A comparison of infants with and without intraventricular haemorrhage showed no significant differences in their haemostatic parameters at birth. At age 48 hours the group with intraventricular haemorrhage showed a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and reduced factor II, VII, and X activity. There was a significant correlation between the severity of intraventricular haemorrhage and the degree of haemostasis abnormality both in cord blood and in blood obtained at age 48 hours. Those infants sustaining grade IV intraventricular haemorrhage had a significantly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, reduced factor II, VII, and X activity; and a decreased fibrinogen concentration at birth. At age 48 hours these defects were accompanied by reduced platelet counts and an increased megathrombocyte index. Although intraventricular haemorrhage is multifactorial, we postulate that correction of haemostasis abnormalities at birth may prevent progression to more severe grades of haemorrhage. PMID:6732274

  19. Symmetry fractionalization and twist defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantino, Nicolas; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2016-03-01

    Topological order in two-dimensions can be described in terms of deconfined quasiparticle excitations—anyons—and their braiding statistics. However, it has recently been realized that this data does not completely describe the situation in the presence of an unbroken global symmetry. In this case, there can be multiple distinct quantum phases with the same anyons and statistics, but with different patterns of symmetry fractionalization—termed symmetry enriched topological order. When the global symmetry group G, which we take to be discrete, does not change topological superselection sectors—i.e. does not change one type of anyon into a different type of anyon—one can imagine a local version of the action of G around each anyon. This leads to projective representations and a group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, with the second cohomology group {H}2(G,{{ A }}{{abelian}}) being the relevant group. In this paper, we treat the general case of a symmetry group G possibly permuting anyon types. We show that despite the lack of a local action of G, one can still make sense of a so-called twisted group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, and show how this data is encoded in the associativity of fusion rules of the extrinsic ‘twist’ defects of the symmetry. Furthermore, building on work of Hermele (2014 Phys. Rev. B 90 184418), we construct a wide class of exactly-solvable models which exhibit this twisted symmetry fractionalization, and connect them to our formal framework.

  20. Oral contraceptives and birth defects.

    PubMed

    Smithells, R W

    1981-06-01

    Although OCs (oral contraceptives) are not designed to be taken during pregnancy, in Europe and the U.S. they are taken by 2-5% of women in early pregnancy and by 1/4-1/3 of women 3-4 months prior to conception. The effects of OCs on folic acid and other vitamin metabolism are well known and provide a theoretical basis for possible teratogenicity, even when stopped prior to conception. Both hormone support therapy for threatened abortions and hormonal pregnancy tests have been abandoned in recent years, the first because it proved inefficacious, the second because there are better alternatives available. In neither of these cases were sex hormones shown to be teratogenic. Most cohort (prospective) and many case-control (retrospective) studies have shown no association between OC use and birth defects. Case-control methodology can be criticized because of recall bias and because of the difficulty of choosing entirely matched controls. Several studies have shown OC users to have characteristics slightly different from the general population, e.g., they are younger, more often unmarried, and are more likely to smoke during pregnancy. Any of these characteristics might influence the occurrence of teratogenicity. It is impossible to prove that OCs constitute a low-level teratogen. The author considers them nonteratogenic. PMID:7250546

  1. DIVAS: fully automated simulation based mask defect dispositioning and defect management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Saghir; Bald, Daniel J.; Tolani, Vikram; Ghadiali, Firoz; Lieberman, Barry

    2004-12-01

    This article presents the evolution of the first fully automated simulation based mask defect dispositioning and defect management system used since late 2002 in a production environment at Intel Mask Operation (IMO). Given that inspection tools flag defects which may or may not have any lithographic significance, it makes sense to repair only those defects that resolve on the wafer. The system described here is a fully automated defect dispositioning system, where the lithographic impact of a defect is determined through computer simulation of the mask level image. From the simulated aerial images, combined with image processing techniques, the system can automatically determine the actual critical dimension (CD) impact (in nanometers). Then, using the product specification as a criteria, can pass or fail the defect. Furthermore, this system allows engineers and technicians in the factory to track defects as they are repaired, compare defects at various inspection steps and annotate repair history. Trends such as yield and defect commonality can also be determined. The article concludes with performance results, indicating the speed and accuracy of the system, as well as the savings in the number of defects needing repair.

  2. An overview of hgcdte mbe defects and analysis of defect size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Kurt Robert

    HgCdTe is the most widely used material for high performance infrared detection applications. Growth of HgCdTe epitaxial layers by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has ushered in advanced devices that take advantage of the unique properties of the material. Formation of defects during the growth process is one of the largest drawbacks to this technology, and must be minimized to increase device operability. In this paper, the defects encountered in HgCdTe are categorized, along with formation mechanisms and possible means of reduction. A new method of defect identification is proposed, which takes advantage of full wafer defect mapping capabilities. A correlation between the thickness of the grown film and the size of defects initiated at the substrate surface is found. This allows further defect information to be extracted from the size and density of the defects.

  3. DIVAS: an integrated networked system for mask defect dispositioning and defect management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Saghir; Bald, Dan; Tolani, Vikram; Ghadiali, Firoz

    2003-06-01

    Mask quality is a prime concern to the Intel Mask Operation (IMO) and the Intel wafer fabrication customers. Extreme concern is taken to inspect and repair all defects before shipment. Given that the classification and repair of defects detected by inspection systems is labor intensive, the procedure is prone to human error. Futhermore, since operators manually disposition hundreds of defects each day, it is virtually impossible to eliminate all misclassifications. Due to diffraction effects, not all defects resolve on a wafer. Hence, a defect that an operator may classify as 'real' may indeed be 'lithographically insignifincant'. Conversely an operator may miss a defect that prints, causing a serious reduction in product yield. The DIVAS (Defect, Inspection, Viewing, Archiving and Simulation) system has been described previously and was developed to address these manual classification issues. This paper outlines the fully automated system deployed in a production environment.

  4. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    Single crystal silicon wafers are the fundamental elements of semiconductor manufacturing industry. The wafers produced by Czochralski (CZ) process are very high quality single crystalline materials with known defects that are formed during the crystal growth or modified by further processing. While defects can be unfavorable for yield for some manufactured electrical devices, a group of defects like oxide precipitates can have both positive and negative impacts on the final device. The spatial distribution of these defects may be found by scattering techniques. However, due to limitations of scattering (i.e. light wavelength), many crystal defects are either poorly classified or not detected. Therefore a high throughput and accurate characterization of their shape and dimension is essential for reviewing the defects and proper classification. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can provide high resolution twodimensional images, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is essential for obtaining three-dimensional information of the defects of interest (DOI) as it is known to provide the highest vertical resolution among all techniques [1]. However AFM's low throughput, limited tip life, and laborious efforts for locating the DOI have been the limitations of this technique for defect review for 300 mm wafers. To address these limitations of AFM, automatic defect review AFM has been introduced recently [2], and is utilized in this work for studying DOI on 300 mm silicon wafer. In this work, we carefully etched a 300 mm silicon wafer with a gaseous acid in a reducing atmosphere at a temperature and for a sufficient duration to decorate and grow the crystal defects to a size capable of being detected as light scattering defects [3]. The etched defects form a shallow structure and their distribution and relative size are inspected by laser light scattering (LLS). However, several groups of defects couldn't be properly sized by the LLS due to the very shallow depth and low

  5. Geometric defects in quantum Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Andrey

    2016-08-01

    We describe a geometric (or gravitational) analog of the Laughlin quasiholes in fractional quantum Hall states. Analogously to the quasiholes, these defects can be constructed by an insertion of an appropriate vertex operator into the conformal block representation of a trial wave function; however, unlike the quasiholes these defects are extrinsic and do not correspond to true excitations of the quantum fluid. We construct a wave function in the presence of such defects and explain how to assign an electric charge and a spin to each defect and calculate the adiabatic, non-Abelian statistics of the defects. The defects turn out to be equivalent to the genons in that their adiabatic exchange statistics can be described in terms of representations of the mapping class group of an appropriate higher genus Riemann surface. We present a general construction that, in principle, makes it possible to calculate the statistics of Zn genons for any "parent" topological phase. We illustrate the construction on the example of the Laughlin state and perform an explicit calculation of the braiding matrices. In addition to non-Abelian statistics, geometric defects possess a universal Abelian overall phase, determined by the gravitational anomaly.

  6. Platelet rich fibrin in jaw defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Diana; Ianes, Emilia; Pricop, Marius

    2016-03-01

    Platelet rich fibrin (PRF) is a tissue product of autologous origin abundant in growth factors, widely used in regenerative procedures. Aim of the study: Evaluation of the regenerative effect of PRF added in the bony defects (after tooth removal or after cystectomy) Material and methods: The comparative nonrandomized study included 22 patients divided into 2 groups. The first group (the test group) included 10 patients where the bony defects were treated without any harvesting material. The second group included 12 patients where the bony defects were filled with PRF. The bony defect design was not critical, with one to two walls missing. After the surgeries, a close clinically monitoring was carried out. The selected cases were investigated using both cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) and radiographic techniques after 10 weeks postoperatively. Results: Faster bone regeneration was observed in the bony defects filled with PRF comparing with the not grafted bony defects. Conclusions: PRF added in the bony defects accelerates the bone regeneration. This simplifies the surgical procedures and decreases the economic costs.

  7. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jinhua; Hu, Zhixin; Probert, Matt; Li, Kun; Lv, Danhui; Yang, Xinan; Gu, Lin; Mao, Nannan; Feng, Qingliang; Xie, Liming; Zhang, Jin; Wu, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Jin, Chuanhong; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Xixiang; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment–theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 1013 cm−2 is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices. PMID:25695374

  8. Resist dispense system for further defect reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yusuke; Nishi, Kouzo; Takayanagi, Koji; Okubo, Takahiro; Furusho, Toshinobu; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Shibata, Tsuyoshi

    2011-04-01

    As pattern size becomes smaller, requirement for defect reduction is getting higher and higher. It is known that defects occur in various steps of lithography process. In this study, we focus on defects related to the resist dispense system. Of those defects, the most typical is bridge type defect which caused by foreign substances contained in resist film. The source of those is considered to be insoluble substances, such as resist gels, in resist liquid. So far, the conventional countermeasure has been the development of resist line filters (optimization of materials, shrinking of pore size, and so on). But, according to the recent reports and our experimental result, we can say that not only filter type but also filtration condition has certain influence on bridge type defect generation. In this study, we examine the influences of resist dispense system and its parameters on bridge type defect generation. This paper provides some experimental data and introduces our approaches to the optimization of resist dispense system and its effects.

  9. Robust defect segmentation in woven fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Sari-Sarraf, H.; Goddard, J.S. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a robust segmentation algorithm for the detection and localization of woven fabric defects. The essence of the presented segmentation algorithm is the localization of those events (i.e., defects) in the input images that disrupt the global homogeneity of the background texture. To this end, preprocessing modules, based on the wavelet transform and edge fusion, are employed with the objective of attenuating the background texture and accentuating the defects. Then, texture features are utilized to measure the global homogeneity of the output images. If these images are deemed to be globally nonhomogeneous (i.e., defects are present), a local roughness measure is used to localize the defects. The utility of this algorithm can be extended beyond the specific application in this work, that is, defect segmentation in woven fabrics. Indeed, in a general sense, this algorithm can be used to detect and to localize anomalies that reside in images characterized by ordered texture. The efficacy of this algorithm has been tested thoroughly under realistic conditions and as a part of an on-line fabric inspection system. Using over 3700 images of fabrics, containing 26 different types of defects, the overall detection rate of this approach was 89% with a localization accuracy of less than 0.2 inches and a false alarm rate of 2.5%.

  10. Defects and metrology of ultrathin resist films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Cobb, Jonathan L.; Dentinger, Paul M.; Henderson, Craig C.; Rao, Veena; Monahan, Kevin M.; Luo, David; Pike, Christopher

    2000-06-01

    Defectivity in spin-coated, but unpatterned ultrathin resist (UTR) films (defectivity will present an issue in EUV (13.4-nm) and 157-nm lithographic technologies. These are the lithographic regimes where absorption issues mandate the use of ultrathin resists. Four resist samples formulated from the same Shipley UV6 polymer batch and having the same polymer molecular weight properties but different viscosities, were spin-coated at spin speeds ranging from 1000 to 5000 RPM on a production-grade track in a Class 1 pilot line facility. Defect inspection was carried out with KLA SP1/TBI tool, while defect review was carried out with JEOL 7515 SEM tool and KLA Ultrapointe Confocal Review Station (CRS) Microscope. The results obtained are related to the physical properties of the resist polymers, as well as to spin coating parameters. Also, the results of the defect inspection, review, characterization, and pareto are compared to those obtained on baseline thick resists (>= 3500 Angstrom) processed under similar condition as the ultra-thin resists. The results show that for a well-optimized coating process and within the thickness range explored (800 - 4200 Angstrom), there is no discernible dependence of defectivity on film thickness of the particular resists studied and on spin speed. Also assessed is the capability of the current metrology toolset for inspecting, reviewing, and classifying the various types of defects in UTR films.

  11. [Congenital thoracic defects demonstrated by radiophotography].

    PubMed

    Jonescu, N; Ionescu, G C

    1991-01-01

    Costal congenital defects are malformations or anomalies of dimension, location or structure of the ribs, generated by disturbances of prenatal development. These anomalies appear in mesoderm which also gives rise to skeleton, muscles, serums, conjunctive tissues, circulatory system and urogenital apparatus. Of the 59,225 persons examined, 502 had costal congenital defects. The presence of azygos lobe (Wrisberg's lobe) in 158 cases (0.26%), of right aortic (arcs high dextroposition of cross) in 2 cases and (3%000) dextroposition of heart in 6 cases (10%000), out of which a situs inversus (complete cardiovascular transposition) were noticed as congenital defects with common origin in embryonic mesoderm. Medical radiophotography can be used as a method in detecting congenital costal defects. Other defects in other organs can be also detected. The congenital costal defects found in an rf examined population, representing a part of the total of congenital malformations, may be one of their indirect epidemiologic indices. Their existence may lead to the explanation of the symptomatology of the nervous compressive type on brachiocephalic vascular, etc. plexus. As some of the defects are an excess of osseous and cartilaginous matter, they may be used, when indicated, as autografts. PMID:1823198

  12. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jinhua; Hu, Zhixin; Probert, Matt; Li, Kun; Lv, Danhui; Yang, Xinan; Gu, Lin; Mao, Nannan; Feng, Qingliang; Xie, Liming; Zhang, Jin; Wu, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Jin, Chuanhong; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Xixiang; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment-theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 10(13) cm(-2) is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices. PMID:25695374

  13. Point defects in yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellberg, C. Stephen; Bernstein, Noam; Erwin, Steven C.

    The densification that occurs during sintering of certain ceramics has been observed to occur more rapidly and at lower temperatures when a weak external electric field is applied.1 We compute the formation energies of point defects in yttria-stabilized zirconia using first principles density functional theory. We examine interstitials, vacancies, and vacancy complexes including Schottky defects in a Y2Zr14O31 computational cell, which corresponds to approximately 7 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia. We relate our results to recent experimental work on electric-field-assisted sintering in yttria-stabilized zirconia, showing how how the expansion of lattice constants observed in diffraction measurements results from increasing defect densities.

  14. CDC Reports Six Cases of Birth Defects Caused by Zika

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports Six Cases of Birth Defects Caused by Zika Three babies born with defects, while three pregnancies ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In the first reporting of Zika-related birth defects in the United States, federal ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 1 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 is a disorder characterized ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 2 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 is a disorder characterized ...

  17. Defect chemistry and defect engineering of TiO2-based semiconductors for solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Janusz; Alim, Mohammad Abdul; Bak, Tadeusz; Idris, Mohammad Asri; Ionescu, Mihail; Prince, Kathryn; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Sigmund, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    This tutorial review considers defect chemistry of TiO2 and its solid solutions as well as defect-related properties associated with solar-to-chemical energy conversion, such as Fermi level, bandgap, charge transport and surface active sites. Defect disorder is discussed in terms of defect reactions and the related charge compensation. Defect equilibria are used in derivation of defect diagrams showing the effect of oxygen activity and temperature on the concentration of both ionic and electronic defects. These defect diagrams may be used for imposition of desired semiconducting properties that are needed to maximize the performance of TiO2-based photoelectrodes for the generation of solar hydrogen fuel using photo electrochemical cells (PECs) and photocatalysts for water purification. The performance of the TiO2-based semiconductors is considered in terms of the key performance-related properties (KPPs) that are defect related. It is shown that defect engineering may be applied for optimization of the KPPs in order to achieve optimum performance. PMID:26446476

  18. Defect classes - an overdue paradigm for CMOS IC testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, C.F.; Soden, J.M.; Righter, A.W.; Ferguson, F.J.

    1994-09-01

    The IC test industry has struggled for more than 30 years to establish a test approach that would guarantee a low defect level to the customer. We propose a comprehensive strategy for testing CMOS ICs that uses defect classes based on measured defect electrical properties. Defect classes differ from traditional fault models. Our defect class approach requires that the test strategy match the defect electrical properties, while fault models require that IC defects match the fault definition. We use data from Sandia Labs failure analysis and test facilities and from public literature. We describe test pattern requirements for each defect class and propose a test paradigm.

  19. The Knobbed Acrosome Defect in Beef Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Albert D.

    1986-01-01

    The knobbed acrosome defect was found at levels of 25 to 100 percent of spermatozoa from 16 of 2054 beef bulls. The incidence of this defect appeared to be particularly high in the Charolais breed. Pedigree analysis of some of the affected Charolais bulls indicated there may be a genetic predisposition for this sperm defect. In eosin-nigrosin stained semen smears the most common form of the abnormality was a flattened or indented apex of the sperm head. A refractile bead at the apex of the sperm head was seen less commonly. Electron microscopy of the spermatozoa from one bull showed that the abnormality was similar to the knobbed sperm defect previously described in Friesian bulls. A breeding trial confirmed that bulls producing spermatozoa with a high incidence of knobbed acrosomes are infertile. ImagesFigure 2 and 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6 and 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:17422706

  20. Topological defect dynamics in operando battery nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvestad, A.; Singer, A.; Clark, J. N.; Cho, H. M.; Kim, J. W.; Harder, R.; Maser, J.; Meng, Y. S.; Shpyrko, O. G.

    2015-06-01

    Topological defects can markedly alter nanomaterial properties. This presents opportunities for “defect engineering,” where desired functionalities are generated through defect manipulation. However, imaging defects in working devices with nanoscale resolution remains elusive. We report three-dimensional imaging of dislocation dynamics in individual battery cathode nanoparticles under operando conditions using Bragg coherent diffractive imaging. Dislocations are static at room temperature and mobile during charge transport. During the structural phase transformation, the lithium-rich phase nucleates near the dislocation and spreads inhomogeneously. The dislocation field is a local probe of elastic properties, and we find that a region of the material exhibits a negative Poisson’s ratio at high voltage. Operando dislocation imaging thus opens a powerful avenue for facilitating improvement and rational design of nanostructured materials.

  1. Living with a Congenital Heart Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... well the heart’s chambers and valves are working. Health Insurance and Employment Adults who have congenital heart defects ... carefully consider how changing jobs will affect their health insurance coverage. Some health plans have waiting periods or ...

  2. When Your Baby Has a Birth Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & ... as heart defects, cleft lip and palate, or cerebral palsy, you may find yourself having to serve as ...

  3. Holographic entanglement entropy of surface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentle, Simon A.; Gutperle, Michael; Marasinou, Chrysostomos

    2016-04-01

    We calculate the holographic entanglement entropy in type IIB supergravity solutions that are dual to half-BPS disorder-type surface defects in N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The entanglement entropy is calculated for a ball-shaped region bisected by a surface defect. Using the bubbling supergravity solutions we also compute the expectation value of the defect operator. Combining our result with the previously-calculated one-point function of the stress tensor in the presence of the defect, we adapt the calculation of Lewkowycz and Maldacena [1] to obtain a second expression for the entanglement entropy. Our two expressions agree up to an additional term, whose possible origin and significance is discussed.

  4. 49 CFR 213.113 - Defective rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... center or nucleus inside the head from which it spreads outward as a smooth, bright, or dark round or... transverse fissure from other types of fractures or defects are the crystalline center or nucleus and...

  5. National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... were taking multivitamins before their pregnancy. [ Read Summary ] Air Pollution and Congenital Heart Defects Many pregnant women, especially ... research is needed to learn what levels of air pollution affect an unborn baby. [ Read Summary ] The Potential ...

  6. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26, ... person with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address ...

  7. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than themore » conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.« less

  8. Folic Acid Helps Prevent Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Folic Acid Helps Prevent Neural Tube Defects Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The feature you selected is no longer available. In 10 seconds you will be automatically redirected to the CDC. ...

  9. Color Vision Defects: What Teachers Should Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Barbara A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the nature of color vision defects as they relate to reading instruction. Suggests ways that teachers can adapt instruction to help provide maximal learning opportunities for the color deficient child. (RS)

  10. Highly Defective Graphene: The thinnest insulating membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lherbier, Aurelien; Roche, Stephan; Restrepo, Oscar A.; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Delcorte, Arnaud; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2012-02-01

    The electronic structure and transport properties of two-dimensional highly defective sp2 graphene are investigated theoretically. Using classical molecular dynamics, large planes of highly defective graphene-based sheets are first generated. An accurate empirical tight-binding Hamiltonian is then elaborated, allowing the prediction of elastic mean free paths, conductivities, and charge mobilities using a real-space order-N Kubo-Greenwood method. In sharp contrast to pristine graphene, the highly defective sp2 carbon sheet displays high density of states close to the Dirac energy. However, the dynamics of the corresponding electronic wavepackets reveals extremely short mean free paths (below 1 nanometer) and quantum interferences, both yielding to particularly strong localization phenomena. Consequently, these highly defective graphene-based sheets, although exhibiting a metallic character through the density of states, are from an electronic transport perspective among the most insulating two-dimensional one-atom-thick membrane ever made.

  11. [Defect replacement with osteogenin containing gelatin].

    PubMed

    Thielemann, F W; Feller, A M; Schmidt, K

    1984-01-01

    In order to demonstrate an alternative way to correct diaphyseal defects allogenic cortical bone prepared as "osteogenin containing gelatine (OCG)" was used in sheep. Animals without any implants served as controls. Healing was assessed by radiological examination after 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks and histological examination after 12 weeks. In the control group there was no bridging of the defect in all of the four animals. Out of the six animals of the OCG-group one animal suffered from a postoperative infection and one animal failed because of a breakdown of the osteosynthesis. The other four animals exhibited a complete reconstruction of the former defect roentgenologically after 9 weeks. Histologically a new formed spongious bone could be demonstrated in the former defective site. The OCG-implants were completely resorbed after 12 weeks. PMID:6395536

  12. Vacancies and antisite defects in ordered alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.; Brown, J.R. )

    1992-12-01

    Equations for the concentrations of vacancies and antisite defects in ordered alloys in thermodynamic equilibrium at and near stoichiometry have been derived as functions of defect energies and a Lagrangian parameter. While the resulting equations cannot be solved analytically and in general require iterative calculations, an approximation is given that permits simple numerical evaluation with just a minor loss of accuracy. Using defect energies obtained from an embedded-atom method calculation for Cu[sub 3]Au, it is found that the adjustment for off-stoichiometric compositions is accounted for primarily by the creation of antisite defects rather than vacancies, and the vacancy concentration on Au sites is orders of magnitude less than that on Cu sites. There is a significant increase in the Au vacancy concentration but a slight decrease in the net vacancy content with increasing Cu fraction.

  13. 47 CFR 25.112 - Defective applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... application requests authority to operate a space station in a frequency band that is not allocated... § 25.158. (b) Applications for space station authority found defective under paragraph (a)(3) of...

  14. 47 CFR 25.112 - Defective applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... application requests authority to operate a space station in a frequency band that is not allocated...) Applications for space station authority found defective under paragraph (a)(3) of this section will not...

  15. 47 CFR 25.112 - Defective applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... application requests authority to operate a space station in a frequency band that is not allocated...) Applications for space station authority found defective under paragraph (a)(3) of this section will not...

  16. 47 CFR 25.112 - Defective applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... application requests authority to operate a space station in a frequency band that is not allocated...) Applications for space station authority found defective under paragraph (a)(3) of this section will not...

  17. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than the conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.

  18. Premelting at Defects Within Bulk Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsayed, A. M.; Islam, M. F.; Zhang, J.; Collings, P. J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2005-08-01

    Premelting is the localized loss of crystalline order at surfaces and defects at temperatures below the bulk melting transition. It can be thought of as the nucleation of the melting process. Premelting has been observed at the surfaces of crystals but not within. We report observations of premelting at grain boundaries and dislocations within bulk colloidal crystals using real-time video microscopy. The crystals are equilibrium close-packed, three-dimensional colloidal structures made from thermally responsive microgel spheres. Particle tracking reveals increased disorder in crystalline regions bordering defects, the amount of which depends on the type of defect, distance from the defect, and particle volume fraction. Our observations suggest that interfacial free energy is the crucial parameter for premelting in colloidal and atomic-scale crystals.

  19. Nanoparticle Solubility in Liquid Crystalline Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Armas-Perez, Julio C.; Joshi, Abhijeet A.; Roberts, Tyler F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2013-03-01

    Liquid crystalline materials often incorporate regions (defects) where the orientational ordering present in the bulk phase is disrupted. These include point hedgehogs, line disclinations, and domain boundaries. Recently, it has been shown that defects will accumulate impurities such as small molecules, monomer subunits or nanoparticles. Such an effect is thought to be due to the alleviation of elastic stresses within the bulk phase, or to a solubility gap between a nematic phase and the isotropic defect core. This presents opportunities for encapsulation and sequestration of molecular species, in addition to the formation of novel structures within a nematic phase through polymerization and nanoparticle self-assembly. Here, we examine the solubility of nanoparticles within a coarse-grained liquid crystalline phase and demonstrate the effects of nanoparticle size and surface interactions in determining sequestration into defect regions.

  20. Residual Defect Density in Random Disks Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Topic, Nikola; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the residual distribution of structural defects in very tall packings of disks deposited randomly in large channels. By performing simulations involving the sedimentation of up to 50 × 109 particles we find all deposits to consistently show a non-zero residual density of defects obeying a characteristic power-law as a function of the channel width. This remarkable finding corrects the widespread belief that the density of defects should vanish algebraically with growing height. A non-zero residual density of defects implies a type of long-range spatial order in the packing, as opposed to only local ordering. In addition, we find deposits of particles to involve considerably less randomness than generally presumed. PMID:26235809

  1. Defect-enhanced nematic surface order reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrožič, Milan; Kralj, Samo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2007-03-01

    Within the Landau-de Gennes phenomenological theory, we study the influence of an applied electric field with average strength Ea on the position of a nematic line defect with topological charge M=±(1)/(2) in a hybrid cell. We explore the biaxial structure of the defect core and we describe its expulsion from the cell upon increasing Ea . We show that prior to the expulsion the defect core displays dramatic changes for strong enough surface anchorings. At a critical value of Ea , the core broadens and merges into a surface layer with a large biaxiality. This transition corresponds to the reconstruction of the nematic order already observed in the bulk in response to an applied electric field. A similar order reconstruction could take place even in the absence of defects, but at a higher threshold.

  2. Neutron-induced defects in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzolo, S.; Morana, A.; Cannas, M.; Bauer, S.; Perisse, J.; Mace, J.-R.; Boscaino, R.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.; Nacir, B.; Girard, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present a study on 0.8 MeV neutron-induced defects up to fluences of 1017 n/cm2 in fluorine doped optical fibers by using electron paramagnetic resonance, optical absorption and confocal micro-luminescence techniques. Our results allow to address the microscopic mechanisms leading to the generation of Silica-related point-defects such as E', H(I), POR and NBOH Centers.

  3. Neutron-induced defects in optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzolo, S.; Morana, A.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.; Girard, S.; Cannas, M.; Boscaino, R.; Bauer, S.; Perisse, J.; Mace, J-R.; Nacir, B.

    2014-10-21

    We present a study on 0.8 MeV neutron-induced defects up to fluences of 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2} in fluorine doped optical fibers by using electron paramagnetic resonance, optical absorption and confocal micro-luminescence techniques. Our results allow to address the microscopic mechanisms leading to the generation of Silica-related point-defects such as E', H(I), POR and NBOH Centers.

  4. Defect characterization in the diamond cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Zeren, Muzaffer . E-mail: zeren@kou.edu.tr; Karagoez, Sadi

    2006-08-15

    In this study, a general defect characterization in the diamond cutting tools used in natural stone cutting has been investigated. Transverse rupture tests were carried out with different matrix and diamond compositions. In these defect characterization studies on diamond cutting tool materials various microstructural analyses were performed using the techniques of light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersed X-ray spectrography (EDX) and image analysis (IA)

  5. Reconstructing the extended nasal tip defect.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Reconstruction of large facial defects requires surgical skill, an understanding of engineering principles, an artistic eye, and patience to design the most elegant solution for each patient. Extended nasal tip defects, which may involve additional facial subunits, require even more thoughtful analysis and planning. Reconstructive surgeons need to be aware of the pros and cons of various options for flaps, the use of a delay stage, and sequencing and scheduling of staged operations to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:24037937

  6. Defect structure of web silicon ribbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, B.; Strunk, H.; Ast, D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a preliminary study of two dendritic web samples are presented. The structure and electrical activity of the defects in the silicon webs were studied. Optical microscopy of chemically etched specimens was used to determine dislocation densities. Samples were mechanically polished, then Secco etched for approximately 5 minutes. High voltage transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the crystallographic nature of the defects.

  7. Topological defects with long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, B. A.; González, J. A.; Guerrero, L. E.; López-Atencio, E.

    1998-07-01

    We investigate a modified sine-Gordon equation which possesses soliton solutions with long-range interaction. We introduce a generalized version of the Ginzburg-Landau equation which supports long-range topological defects in D = 1 and D > 1. The interaction force between the defects decays so slowly that it is possible to enter the non-extensivity regime. These results can be applied to non-equilibrium systems, pattern formation and growth models.

  8. INNOVATIVE EDDY CURRENT PROBE FOR MICRO DEFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Telmo G.; Vilaca, Pedro; Quintino, Luisa; Santos, Jorge dos; Rosado, Luis

    2010-02-22

    This paper reports the development of an innovative eddy current (EC) probe, and its application to micro-defects on the root of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The new EC probe presents innovative concept issues, allowing 3D induced current in the material, and a lift-off independence. Validation experiments were performed on aluminium alloys processed by FSW. The results clearly show that the new EC probe is able to detect and sizing surface defects about 60 microns depth.

  9. Innovative Eddy Current Probe for Micro Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Telmo G.; Vilaça, Pedro; dos Santos, Jorge; Quintino, Luísa; Rosado, Luís

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports the development of an innovative eddy current (EC) probe, and its application to micro-defects on the root of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The new EC probe presents innovative concept issues, allowing 3D induced current in the material, and a lift-off independence. Validation experiments were performed on aluminium alloys processed by FSW. The results clearly show that the new EC probe is able to detect and sizing surface defects about 60 microns depth.

  10. EUV actinic defect inspection and defect printability at the sub-32 nm half pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Sungmin; Kearney, Patrick; Wurm, Stefan; Goodwin, Frank; Han, Hakseung; Goldberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopp; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2009-08-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask blanks with embedded phase defects were inspected with a reticle actinic inspection tool (AIT) and the Lasertec M7360. The Lasertec M7360, operated at SEMA TECH's Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC) in Albany, NY, has a sensitivity to multilayer defects down to 40-45 nm, which is not likely sufficient for mask blank development below the 32 nm half-pitch node. Phase defect printability was simulated to calculate the required defect sensitivity for a next generation blank inspection tool to support reticle development for the sub-32 nm half-pitch technology node. Defect mitigation technology is proposed to take advantage of mask blanks with some defects. This technology will reduce the cost of ownership of EUV mask blanks. This paper will also discuss the kind of infrastructure that will be required for the development and mass production stages.

  11. Printability of native blank defects and programmed defects and their stack structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyuk Joo; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Teki, Ranganath; Cordes, Aaron; Nakajima, Toshio; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yamaguchi, Yuya; Kinoshita, Hiroo

    2011-11-01

    We describe the characterization of native phase defects in the manufacturing of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask blanks using the state-of-the-art mask metrology equipment in SEMATECH's Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC). We used commercially available quartz substrates and deposited Mo/Si multilayers on the substrates to characterize phase defects. We also prepared programmed defects of various dimensions using e-beam patterning technology on which multilayers were deposited. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study multilayer profile changes, while SEMATECH's actinic inspection tool (AIT) was used to image defects and predict their printability. Defect images at different focal depths of the AIT are correlated to TEM cross sections and atomic force microscopy (AFM) dimensions. The printability of native and programmed defects was also investigated.

  12. Topological Defects in Liquid Crystals: Studying the Correlation between Defects and Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Topological defects have recently been the subject of many fascinating studies in soft condensed matter physics. In particular, linking the evolution of topological defects to curvature changes has been a focus, leading possible applications in the areas such as cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and electronics. In this study, defects in nematic liquid crystal droplets are investigated via laboratory and theoretical techniques. Nematic liquid crystal defects are reproduced via Monte Carlo simulations using a modified 2D XY-Model Hamiltonian. The simulation is performed on a curved surface to replicate a nematic droplet and examine possible defect configurations. To complement this theoretical work, we have trapped nematic droplets inside a dual-beam optical trap. This system allows controllable non-contact droplet deformation on a microscope based platform. Future work will focus on using the trap to stretch nematic droplets, correlating the changing topological defects with theoretical predictions.

  13. Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ritherdon, J

    2001-05-15

    The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes results gathered during powder separation trials, conducted by the University of Groningen, Netherlands and coordinated by the University of Liverpool, involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-III''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out and all work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.

  14. [Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and birth defects].

    PubMed

    Lin, S S; Huang, Y; Wang, C Y; Ren, A G

    2016-06-01

    Birth defects are one of the most common adverse birth outcomes, which create a heavy economic burden to the country, society and family. And they are also one of the biggest problems facing public health today. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of toxic pollutants existing in the environment widely, resulting from incomplete organic matter combustion, and can be taken into the body through various ways including the digestive tract, respiratory tract and so on. Recent researches suggest that the exposure of PAHs may be associated with various birth defects, while the special mechanism isn't very clear. This paper is a review of the relationship between PAHs and birth defects from the aspects of epidemiological data, experimental evidence on animals, which indicates that exposure of PAHs during pregnancy may be associated with birth defects including congenital heart defects, neural tube defects and cleft lip/plate. Furthermore, we explored the possible mechanism, including oxidative stress, oxidative damage and the changes of signal transduction pathway in order to provide some recommendations and suggestions on the future work. PMID:27256742

  15. Intrinsic structural defects in monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wu; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a two-dimensional direct band gap semiconductor with distinctive mechanical, electronic, optical and chemical properties that can be utilized for novel nanoelectronics and optoelectronics devices. The performance of these electronic devices strongly depends on the quality and defect morphology of the MoS2 layers. Yet, little is known about the atomic structure of defects present in monolayer MoS2 and their influences on the material properties. Here we provide a systematic study of various intrinsic structural defects, including point defects, grain boundaries, and edges, in chemical vapor phase grown monolayer MoS2 via direct atomic resolution imaging, and explore their energy landscape and electronic properties using first-principles calculations. We discover that one-dimensional metallic wires can be created via two different types of 60 grain boundaries consisting of distinct 4-fold ring chains. A new type of edge reconstruction, representing a transition state during growth, was also identified, providing insights into the material growth mechanism. The atomic scale study of structural defects presented here brings new opportunities to tailor the properties of MoS2 via controlled synthesis and defect engineering.

  16. A novel inspection system for cosmetic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, S.; Roy, R.; Williams, D.; Aylmore, R.; Hollingdale, D.

    2013-12-01

    The appearance of automotive skin panels creates desirability for a product and differentiates it from the competition. Because of the importance of skin panels, considerable care is taken in minimizing defects such as the 'hollow' defect that occur around door-handle depressions. However, the inspection process is manual, subjective and time-consuming. This paper describes the development of an objective and inspection scheme for the 'hollow' defect. In this inspection process, the geometry of a panel is captured using a structured lighting system. The geometry data is subsequently analyzed by a purpose-built wavelet-based algorithm to identify the location of any defects that may be present and to estimate the perceived severity of the defects without user intervention. This paper describes and critically evaluates the behavior of this physically-based algorithm on an ideal and real geometry and compares its result to an actual audit. The results show that the algorithm is capable of objectively locating and classifying 'hollow' defects in actual panels.

  17. Quality metrics for product defectiveness at KCD

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, J.V.

    1993-07-01

    Metrics are discussed for measuring and tracking product defectiveness at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). Three new metrics, the metric (percent defective) that preceded the new metrics, and several alternatives are described. The new metrics, Percent Parts Accepted, Percent Parts Accepted Trouble Free, and Defects Per Million Observations, (denoted by PPA, PATF, and DPMO, respectively) were implemented for KCD-manufactured product and purchased material in November 1992. These metrics replace the percent defective metric that had been used for several years. The PPA and PATF metrics primarily measure quality performance while DPMO measures the effects of continuous improvement activities. The new metrics measure product quality in terms of product defectiveness observed only during the inspection process. The metrics were originally developed for purchased product and were adapted to manufactured product to provide a consistent set of metrics plant- wide. The new metrics provide a meaningful tool to measure the quantity of product defectiveness in terms of the customer`s requirements and expectations for quality. Many valid metrics are available and all will have deficiencies. These three metrics are among the least sensitive to problems and are easily understood. They will serve as good management tools for KCD in the foreseeable future until new flexible data systems and reporting procedures can be implemented that can provide more detailed and accurate metric computations.

  18. Fluorescent Defects in Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exarhos, Annemarie L.; Oser, Kameron; Hopper, David A.; Grote, Richard R.; Bassett, Lee C.

    Mono- and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) can host defects whose electronic states lie deep within the bandgap, similar to the nitrogen-vacancy color center in bulk diamond. Here, we study defect creation in h-BN through irradiation and thermal annealing. We employ confocal photoluminescence (PL) imaging and spectroscopy under various excitation energies on both supported and suspended h-BN to identify and characterize the emission of isolated defect centers. Polarization- and temperature-dependent measurements of the observed PL are used to map out the electronic structure of the defects, enabling optical control of fluorescent defects in h-BN. This knowledge, coupled with the spatial confinement to 2D and the unique electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of h-BN, will enable the use of these defects for quantum sensing and other applications in quantum information processing. Work supported by the ARO (W911NF-15-1-0589) and NSF MRSEC (DMR-1120901).

  19. Simulation of EUV multilayer mirror buried defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brukman, Matthew J.; Deng, Yunfei; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2000-07-01

    A new interface has been created to link existing deposition/etching and electromagnetic simulation software, allowing the user to program deposition and etching conditions and then find the reflective properties of the resultant structure. The application studied in this paper is the problem of three-dimensional defects which become buried during fabrication of multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet lithography. The software link reads in surface information in the form of linked triangles, determines all nodes within the triangles, and then creates nodes lying between triangles of different layers to create a 3- dimensional inhomogeneous matrix containing the materials' indices of refraction. This allows etching and depositions to be input into SAMPLE-3D, a multi-surface topology to be generated, and then the electromagnetic properties of the structure to be assessed with TEMPEST. This capability was used to study substrate defects in multilayer mirrors by programming a defect and then sputter-depositing some forty layers on top of the defect. Specifically examined was how the topography depended on sputter conditions and determined the defects' impact on the mirrors' imaging properties. While this research was focused on application to EUV lithography, the general technique may be extended to other optical processes such as alignment and mask defects.

  20. A theoretical study of intrinsic point defects and defect clusters in magnesium aluminate spinel.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C A; Smith, R; Kenny, S D; Murphy, S T; Grimes, R W; Ball, J A

    2009-07-01

    Point and small cluster defects in magnesium aluminate spinel have been studied from a first principles viewpoint. Typical point defects that occur during collision cascade simulations are cation anti-site defects, which have a small formation energy and are very stable, O and Mg split interstitials and vacancies. Isolated Al interstitials were found to be energetically unfavourable but could occur as part of a split Mg-Al pair or as a three atom-three vacancy Al 'ring' defect, previously observed in collision cascades using empirical potentials. The structure and energetics of the defects were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared to simulations using empirical fixed charge potentials. Each point defect was studied in a variety of supercell sizes in order to ensure convergence. It was found that empirical potential simulations significantly overestimate formation energies, but that the type and relative stability of the defects are well predicted by the empirical potentials both for point defects and small defect clusters. PMID:21828490

  1. A theoretical study of intrinsic point defects and defect clusters in magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. A.; Smith, R.; Kenny, S. D.; Murphy, S. T.; Grimes, R. W.; Ball, J. A.

    2009-07-01

    Point and small cluster defects in magnesium aluminate spinel have been studied from a first principles viewpoint. Typical point defects that occur during collision cascade simulations are cation anti-site defects, which have a small formation energy and are very stable, O and Mg split interstitials and vacancies. Isolated Al interstitials were found to be energetically unfavourable but could occur as part of a split Mg-Al pair or as a three atom-three vacancy Al 'ring' defect, previously observed in collision cascades using empirical potentials. The structure and energetics of the defects were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared to simulations using empirical fixed charge potentials. Each point defect was studied in a variety of supercell sizes in order to ensure convergence. It was found that empirical potential simulations significantly overestimate formation energies, but that the type and relative stability of the defects are well predicted by the empirical potentials both for point defects and small defect clusters.

  2. Automated defect review of the wafer bevel with a defect review scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarvey, Steve; Kanezawa, Masakazu

    2009-03-01

    One of the few remaining bastions of non-regulated Integrated Circuit defectivity is the wafer bevel. Recent internal Integrated Circuit Manufacturing studies have suggested that the edge bevel may be responsible for as much as a two to three percent yield loss during a defect excursion on the manufacturing line and a one to two percent yield loss during ongoing wafer manufacturing. A new generation of defect inspection equipment has been introduced to the Research and Development, Integrated Circuit, MEM's and Si wafer manufacturing markets that has imparted the ability for the end equipment user to detect defects located on the bevel of the wafer. The inherent weakness of the current batch of wafer bevel inspection equipment is the lack of automatic discrete defect classification data into multiple, significant classification bins and the lack of discrete elemental analysis data. Root cause analysis is based on minimal discrete defect analysis as a surrogate for a statistically valid sampling of defects from the bevel. This paper provides a study of the methods employed with a Hitachi RS-5500EQEQ Defect Review Scanning Electron Microscope (DRSEM) to automatically capture high resolution/high magnification images and collect elemental analysis on a statistically valid sample of the discrete defects that were located by a bevel inspection system.

  3. USE OF BIOCERAMICS IN FILLING BONE DEFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Carlos Antõnio; Sampaio, Tania Clarete Fonseca Vieira Sales

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present the results from using biological ceramics for filling bone defects resulting from post-traumatic or orthopedic injuries. Methods: Thirty-six patients with bone defects caused by trauma or orthopedic injury were evaluated. Nineteen patients were male (52.8%) and 17 were female (47.2%). Their ages ranged from 19 to 84 years, with a mean of 45.7 years and median of 37 years. Only patients with defects that required at least five grams of biological ceramic were included. Eighteen cases were classified as orthopedic: bone defects were observed in 11 cases of total hip arthroplasty; one case of primary total hip arthroplasty, due to coxarthrosis; five cases of femoral or tibial open wedge osteotomy; and one case of tarsal arthrodesis. There were 18 cases of trauma-related defects; uninfected pseudarthrosis, eight cases; recent fractures of the tibial plateau with compression of the spongy bone, three cases; and exposed fractures treated with external fixators, seven cases. The surgical technique consisted of curetting and debriding the injury until bone suitable for grafting was found. Biological ceramic was then used to fill the defect and some kind of fixation was applied. Results: Among the 36 patients evaluated, it was seen that 35 (97.2%) presented integration of the biological ceramic, while one case of open fracture treated with external fixation had poor integration of the biological ceramic. Conclusion: Treatment of bone defects of orthopedic or post-traumatic etiology using a phosphocalcium ceramic composed of hydroxyapatite was shown to be a practical, effective and safe method. PMID:27022576

  4. Equilibrium defects and concentrations in nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, B.; Collins, G.S.

    1999-07-01

    Perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays was applied to determine properties of equilibrium defects in B2 NiAl near the stoichiometric composition. Point defects were detected through quadrupole interactions they induce at In probe atoms on the Al sublattice. Well-resolved signals were observed for probe atoms having zero, one or two Ni-vacancies (V{sub Ni}) in the first neighbor shell. The fractions of probes in different sites are analyzed using a thermodynamic model to determine defect properties as follows. The equilibrium high-temperature defect is determined to be the triple defect combination (two V{sub Ni} and one Ni-antisite atom) through the variation of the vacancy concentration with composition and not, for example, the Schottky vacancy pair. The binding enthalpy of V{sub Ni} with a probe atom was determined to be in the range 0.18--0.24 eV. Site fractions were measured for three samples having 50.03, 50.14 and 50.91 at.% Ni at temperatures up to 1300 C. Vacancy concentrations were deduced from the site fractions and binding enthalpy. The equilibrium constant for formation of the triple defect was determined as a function of temperature from the vacancy concentrations and sample compositions. The formation enthalpy was found to be in the range 1.65--1.83 eV, depending on the binding enthalpy. The formation entropy was found to be {minus}3.2(4)k{sub B}. The large, negative value of the formation entropy probably cannot be explained in terms of a binding entropy, and the authors speculate that triple defects harden the B2 lattice, perhaps by disrupting the well-known 1/3 {l{underscore}angle}111{r{underscore}angle} soft mode lattice instability in B2 and bcc materials.

  5. 7 CFR 42.106 - Classifying and recording defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classifying and recording defects. 42.106 Section 42... § 42.106 Classifying and recording defects. (a) Classifying defects. Examine each sample unit for the.... Other defects, not specifically listed, shall be classified according to their effect on the...

  6. 7 CFR 42.106 - Classifying and recording defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classifying and recording defects. 42.106 Section 42... § 42.106 Classifying and recording defects. (a) Classifying defects. Examine each sample unit for the.... Other defects, not specifically listed, shall be classified according to their effect on the...

  7. 7 CFR 42.106 - Classifying and recording defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classifying and recording defects. 42.106 Section 42... § 42.106 Classifying and recording defects. (a) Classifying defects. Examine each sample unit for the.... Other defects, not specifically listed, shall be classified according to their effect on the...

  8. 7 CFR 42.106 - Classifying and recording defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Classifying and recording defects. 42.106 Section 42... § 42.106 Classifying and recording defects. (a) Classifying defects. Examine each sample unit for the.... Other defects, not specifically listed, shall be classified according to their effect on the...

  9. 7 CFR 42.106 - Classifying and recording defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classifying and recording defects. 42.106 Section 42... § 42.106 Classifying and recording defects. (a) Classifying defects. Examine each sample unit for the.... Other defects, not specifically listed, shall be classified according to their effect on the...

  10. 7 CFR 51.3416 - Classification of defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Classification of defects. 51.3416 Section 51.3416... § 51.3416 Classification of defects. External Defects Defects Maximum allowed for U.S. No. 1 processing... within the vascular ring Hollow Heart or Hollow Heart with Discoloration Area affected not to exceed...

  11. Efficient Co-Replication of Defective Novirhabdovirus

    PubMed Central

    Rouxel, Ronan N.; Mérour, Emilie; Biacchesi, Stéphane; Brémont, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We have generated defective Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Viruses (VHSV) which express either the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or a far-red fluorescent protein (mKate) by replacing the genes encoding the nucleoprotein N or the polymerase-associated P protein. To recover viable defective viruses, rVHSV-ΔN-Red and rVHSV-ΔP-Green, fish cells were co-transfected with both deleted cDNA VHSV genomes, together with plasmids expressing N, P and L of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. After one passage of the transfected cell supernatant, red and green cell foci were observed. Viral titer reached 107 PFU/mL after three passages. Infected cells were always red and green with the very rare event of single red or green cell foci appearing. To clarify our understanding of how such defective viruses could be so efficiently propagated, we investigated whether (i) a recombination event between both defective genomes had occurred, (ii) whether both genomes were co-encapsidated in a single viral particle, and (iii) whether both defective viruses were always replicated together through a complementation phenomenon or even as conglomerate. To address these hypotheses, genome and viral particles have been fully characterized and, thus, allowing us to conclude that rVHSV-ΔN-Red and rVHSV-ΔP-Green are independent viral particles which could propagate only by simultaneously infecting the same cells. PMID:26959049

  12. Laser intensity modulation by nonabsorbing defects

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    Nonabsorbing bulk defects can initiate laser damage in transparent materials. Defects such as voids, microcracks and localized stress concentrations can serve as positive or negative lenses for the incident laser light. The resulting interference pattern between refracted and diffracted light can result in intensity increases on the order of a factor of 2 some distance away from a typical negative microlens, and even larger for a positive microlens. Thus, the initial damage site can be physically removed from the defect which initiates damage. The parameter that determines the strength of such lensing is (Ka){sup 2}{Delta}{epsilon}, where the wavenumber K is 2{pi}/{lambda} linear size of the defect and AF, is the difference in dielectric coefficient between matrix and scatterer. Thus, even a small change in refractive index results in a significant effect for a defect large compared to a wavelength. Geometry is also important. Three dimensional (eg. voids) as well as linear and planar (eg. cracks) microlenses can all have strong effects. The present paper evaluates the intensification due to spherical voids and high refractive index inclusions. We wish to particularly draw attention to the very large intensification that can occur at inclusions.

  13. Laser intensity modulation by nonabsorbing defects

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M.D., Rubenchik, A.M.

    1996-11-20

    Nonabsorbing defects can lead to laser damage. Defects such as voids, microcracks, and localized stressed concentrations, even if they differ from the surrounding medium only by refractive index, can serve as positive or negative lenses for the incident laser light. The resulting interference pattern between refracted and diffracted light can result in intensity increases on the order of a factor of 2 some distance away from a typical negative microlens, and even larger for a positive microlens. Thus, the initial damage site can be physically removed from the defect which initiates damage. The parameter that determines the strength of such lensing is (Ka){sup 2}{Delta}{epsilon}, where the wavenumber K is 2{pi}/{lambda}, 2a is the linear size of the defect, and {Delta}{epsilon} is the difference in dielectric coefficient between matrix and scatterer. Thus, even a small change in refractive index results in a significant effect for a defect large compared to a wavelength. Geometry is also important. Three dimensional (e.g. voids) as well as linear and planar (e.g. cracks) microlenses can all have strong effects. This paper evaluates intensification due to spherical voids and high refractive index inclusions.

  14. Structure Defect Property Relationships in Binary Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medasani, Bharat; Ding, Hong; Chen, Wei; Persson, Kristin; Canning, Andrew; Haranczyk, Maciej; Asta, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Ordered intermetallics are light weight materials with technologically useful high temperature properties such as creep resistance. Knowledge of constitutional and thermal defects is required to understand these properties. Vacancies and antisites are the dominant defects in the intermetallics and their concentrations and formation enthalpies could be computed by using first principles density functional theory and thermodynamic formalisms such as dilute solution method. Previously many properties of the intermetallics such as melting temperatures and formation enthalpies were statistically analyzed for large number of intermetallics using structure maps and data mining approaches. We undertook a similar exercise to establish the dependence of the defect properties in binary intermetallics on the underlying structural and chemical composition. For more than 200 binary intermetallics comprising of AB, AB2 and AB3 structures, we computed the concentrations and formation enthalpies of vacancies and antisites in a small range of stoichiometries deviating from ideal stoichiometry. The calculated defect properties were datamined to gain predictive capabilities of defect properties as well as to classify the intermetallics for their suitability in high-T applications. Supported by the US DOE under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231 under the Materials Project Center grant (Award No. EDCBEE).

  15. Li diffusion through doped and defected graphene.

    PubMed

    Das, Deya; Kim, Seungchul; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Singh, Abhishek K

    2013-09-28

    We investigate the effect of nitrogen and boron doping on Li diffusion through defected graphene using first principles based density functional theory. While a high energy barrier rules out the possibility of Li- diffusion through the pristine graphene, the barrier reduces with the incorporation of defects. Among the most common defects in pristine graphene, Li diffusion through the divacancy encounters the lowest energy barrier of 1.34 eV. The effect of nitrogen and boron doping on the Li diffusion through doped defected-graphene sheets has been studied. N-doping in graphene with a monovacancy reduces the energy barrier significantly. The barrier reduces with the increasing number of N atoms. On the other hand, for N doped graphene with a divacancy, Li binds in the plane of the sheet, with an enhanced binding energy. The B doping in graphene with a monovacancy leads to the enhancement of the barrier. However, in the case of B-doped graphene with a divacancy, the barrier reduces to 1.54 eV, which could lead to good kinetics. The barriers do not change significantly with B concentration. Therefore, divacancy, B and N doped defected graphene has emerged as a better alternative to pristine graphene as an anode material for Li ion battery. PMID:23925460

  16. Defects of thiamine transport and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Brown, Garry

    2014-07-01

    Thiamine, in the form of thiamine pyrophosphate, is a cofactor for a number of enzymes which play important roles in energy metabolism. Although dietary thiamine deficiency states have long been recognised, it is only relatively recently that inherited defects in thiamine uptake, activation and the attachment of the active cofactor to target enzymes have been described, and the underlying genetic defects identified. Thiamine is transported into cells by two carriers, THTR1 and THTR2, and deficiency of these results in thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anaemia and biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease respectively. Defective synthesis of thiamine pyrophosphate has been found in a small number of patients with episodic ataxia, delayed development and dystonia, while impaired transport of thiamine pyrophosphate into the mitochondrion is associated with Amish lethal microcephaly in most cases. In addition to defects in thiamine uptake and metabolism, patients with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency and maple syrup urine disease have been described who have a significant clinical and/or biochemical response to thiamine supplementation. In these patients, an intrinsic structural defect in the target enzymes reduces binding of the cofactor and this can be overcome at high concentrations. In most cases, the clinical and biochemical abnormalities in these conditions are relatively non-specific, and the range of recognised presentations is increasing rapidly at present as new patients are identified, often by genome sequencing. These conditions highlight the value of a trial of thiamine supplementation in patients whose clinical presentation falls within the spectrum of documented cases. PMID:24789339

  17. Efficient Co-Replication of Defective Novirhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Rouxel, Ronan N; Mérour, Emilie; Biacchesi, Stéphane; Brémont, Michel

    2016-03-01

    We have generated defective Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Viruses (VHSV) which express either the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or a far-red fluorescent protein (mKate) by replacing the genes encoding the nucleoprotein N or the polymerase-associated P protein. To recover viable defective viruses, rVHSV-ΔN-Red and rVHSV-ΔP-Green, fish cells were co-transfected with both deleted cDNA VHSV genomes, together with plasmids expressing N, P and L of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. After one passage of the transfected cell supernatant, red and green cell foci were observed. Viral titer reached 10⁷ PFU/mL after three passages. Infected cells were always red and green with the very rare event of single red or green cell foci appearing. To clarify our understanding of how such defective viruses could be so efficiently propagated, we investigated whether (i) a recombination event between both defective genomes had occurred, (ii) whether both genomes were co-encapsidated in a single viral particle, and (iii) whether both defective viruses were always replicated together through a complementation phenomenon or even as conglomerate. To address these hypotheses, genome and viral particles have been fully characterized and, thus, allowing us to conclude that rVHSV-ΔN-Red and rVHSV-ΔP-Green are independent viral particles which could propagate only by simultaneously infecting the same cells. PMID:26959049

  18. Defects in Germinal Center Selection in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Megan; Zou, Yong-Rui; Davidson, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are the primary site at which clonal expansion and affinity maturation of B cells occur. B cells encounter antigen and receive T cell help in the GC light zone (LZ) and then migrate to the dark zone where they proliferate and undergo somatic mutation before cycling back to the LZ for further rounds of selection. Tolerance to autoantigens is frequently lost de novo as GC B cells undergo class switching and somatic mutation. This loss of tolerance is regulated by a variety of mechanisms including cell death, failure to compete for T cell help, and failure to differentiate into effector cells. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by loss of tolerance to nucleic acid antigens. While defects in tolerance occur in the naïve repertoire of SLE patients, pathogenic autoantibodies also arise in the GC by somatic mutation from non-autoreactive precursors. Several B cell defects contribute to the loss of GC tolerance in SLE, including polymorphisms of genes encoded by the Sle1 locus, excess TLR7 signaling, defects in FcRIIB expression, or defects of B cell apoptosis. Extrinsic soluble factors, such as Type-1 IFN and B cell-activating factor, or an increased number of T follicular helper cells in the GC also alter B cell-negative selection. Finally, defects in clearance of apoptotic debris within the GC result in BCR-mediated internalization of nucleic acid containing material and stimulation of autoantibody production by endosomal TLR-driven mechanisms. PMID:26322049

  19. Lattice Defects in the Kitaev Honeycomb Model.

    PubMed

    Brennan, John; Vala, Jiří

    2016-05-19

    The Kitaev honeycomb lattice system is an important model of topological materials whose phase diagram exhibits both abelian and non-abelian topological phases. The latter, a so-called Ising phase, is related to topological superconductors. Its quasiparticle excitations, which are formed by Majorana fermions attached to vortices, show non-abelian fractional statistics and are known as Ising anyons. We investigate dislocation defects in the Ising phase of the Kitaev honeycomb model. After introducing them to the system, we accordingly generalize our solution of this model to the situation with the defects. The important part of this effort is developing an appropriate Jordan-Wigner fermionization procedure. It is expected that the presence of defects manifests itself by the formation of fermionic zero-energy modes around the defect end points. We numerically confirm this expectation and further investigate properties of these modes. The computational potential of our technique is demonstrated for both diagonalization and dynamical simulations. The latter focuses on the process of fusion of the vortex zero-energy modes with the Majorana fermions attached to the defect. This process simulates fusion of non-abelian Ising anyons. PMID:26886150

  20. Development of defects detection in gluing glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zongming; Yang, Wei; Fan, Tianquan

    2012-09-01

    The defects engendering in the process of glass gluing are mainly flaws and delaminations which will reduce the stability and processing availability of the optical component. How to detect these defects has become a technical problem for a long time. Several Non-Destructive Test (NDT) methods such as ultrasonic C-scan, bubble tester and infrared thermography are effective in inspection of it at present. In this paper, these three techniques' detection principle, advantages and disadvantages are introduced. On the basis of detection demands, photothermal radiometry that it has become a powerful tool to detect subsurface defects in composites because of its non-contact and highly sensitivity is used to detect defects in the gluing process of glass for the first time. The basic idea that glass-layer transmits the spectrum and the spectrum energy is absorbed by glue-layer is also put forward creatively. By monitoring the temperature variation of glue-layer in time domain using infrared thermal imager, the defects can be discovered.

  1. Algorithm for Generating Defective Graphene Sheets.

    PubMed

    Nutt, David R; Weller, Hilary

    2009-07-14

    An algorithm is presented for the generation of molecular models of defective graphene fragments, containing a majority of 6-membered rings with a small number of 5- and 7-membered rings as defects. The structures are generated from an initial random array of points in 2D space, which are then subject to Delaunay triangulation. The dual of the triangulation forms a Voronoi tessellation of polygons with a range of ring sizes. An iterative cycle of refinement, involving deletion and addition of points followed by further triangulation, is performed until the user-defined criteria for the number of defects are met. The array of points and connectivities are then converted to a molecular structure and subject to geometry optimization using a standard molecular modeling package to generate final atomic coordinates. On the basis of molecular mechanics with minimization, this automated method can generate structures, which conform to user-supplied criteria and avoid the potential bias associated with the manual building of structures. One application of the algorithm is the generation of structures for the evaluation of the reactivity of different defect sites. Ab initio electronic structure calculations on a representative structure indicate preferential fluorination close to 5-ring defects. PMID:26610012

  2. Determining the Critcial Size of EUV Mask Substrate Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Mccall, Monnikue M; Han, Hakseung; Cho, Wonil; Goldberg, Kenneth; Gullikson, Eric; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Wurm, Stefan

    2008-02-28

    Determining the printability of substrate defects beneath the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflecting multilayer stack is an important issue in EUVL lithography. Several simulation studies have been performed in the past to determine the tolerable defect size on EUV mask blank substrates but the industry still has no exact specification based on real printability tests. Therefore, it is imperative to experimentally determine the printability of small defects on a mask blanks that are caused by substrate defects using direct printing of programmed substrate defect in an EUV exposure tool. SEMATECH fabricated bump type program defect masks using standard electron beam lithography and performed printing tests with the masks using an EUV exposure tool. Defect images were also captured using SEMATECH's Berkeley Actinic Imaging Tool in order to compare aerial defect images with secondary electron microscope images from exposed wafers. In this paper, a comprehensive understanding of substrate defect printability will be presented and printability specifications of EUV mask substrate defects will be discussed.

  3. A practical approach for modeling EUVL mask defects

    SciTech Connect

    Gullikson, E.M.; Cerjan, C.; Stearns, D.J.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Sweeney, D.W.

    2001-06-01

    An approximate method is proposed to calculate the EUV scattering from a defect within a multilayer coating. In this single surface approximation (SSA) the defective multilayer structure is replaced by a single reflecting surface with the shape of the top surface of the multilayer. The range of validity of this approximation has been investigated for Gaussian line defects using 2D finite-difference-time-domain simulations. The SSA is found to be valid for sufficiently low aspect ratio defects such as those expected for the critical defects nucleated by particles on the mask substrate. The critical EUVL defect size is calculated by combining the SSA with a multilayer growth model and aerial image simulations. Another approximate method for calculating the aerial image of an unresolved defect is also discussed. Although the critical substrate defects may be larger than the resolution of higher NA cameras, the point defect approximation provides a useful framework for understanding the printability of a wide range of defects.

  4. Determining the critical size of EUV mask substrate defects

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Han, Hakseung; Cho, Wonil; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Wurm, Stefan

    2008-05-26

    Determining the printability of substrate defects beneath the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflecting multilayer stack is an important issue in EUVL lithography. Several simulation studies have been performed in the past to determine the tolerable defect size on EUV mask blank substrates but the industry still has no exact specification based on real printability tests. Therefore, it is imperative to experimentally determine the printability of small defects on a mask blanks that are caused by substrate defects using direct printing of programmed substrate defect in an EUV exposure tools. SEMATECH fabricated bump type program defect masks using standard electron beam lithography and performed printing tests with the masks using an EUV exposure tool. Defect images were also captured using SEMATECH's Berkeley Actinic Imaging Tool in order to compare aerial defect images with secondary electron microscope images from exposed wafers. In this paper, a comprehensive understanding of substrate defect printability will be presented and printability specifications of EUV mask substrate defects will be discussed.

  5. 48 CFR 1615.407-1 - Rate reduction for defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data. 1615.407-1 Section 1615.407-1 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 1615.407-1 Rate reduction for defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data. The clause set forth in section...

  6. 48 CFR 1652.215-70 - Rate Reduction for Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data. 1652.215-70 Section 1652.215-70 Federal Acquisition... CLAUSES AND FORMS CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of FEHBP Clauses 1652.215-70 Rate Reduction for Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data. As prescribed in 1615.407-1, the following clause shall...

  7. 48 CFR 1615.407-1 - Rate reduction for defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data. 1615.407-1 Section 1615.407-1 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 1615.407-1 Rate reduction for defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data. The clause set forth in section...

  8. 48 CFR 1652.215-70 - Rate Reduction for Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data. 1652.215-70 Section 1652.215-70 Federal Acquisition... CLAUSES AND FORMS CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of FEHBP Clauses 1652.215-70 Rate Reduction for Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data. As prescribed in 1615.407-1, the following clause shall...

  9. 48 CFR 1615.407-1 - Rate reduction for defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data. 1615.407-1 Section 1615.407-1 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 1615.407-1 Rate reduction for defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data. The clause set forth in section...

  10. 48 CFR 1615.407-1 - Rate reduction for defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data. 1615.407-1 Section 1615.407-1 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 1615.407-1 Rate reduction for defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data. The clause set forth in section...

  11. 48 CFR 1652.215-70 - Rate Reduction for Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data. 1652.215-70 Section 1652.215-70 Federal Acquisition... CLAUSES AND FORMS CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of FEHBP Clauses 1652.215-70 Rate Reduction for Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data. As prescribed in 1615.407-1, the following clause shall...

  12. 48 CFR 1652.215-70 - Rate Reduction for Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data. 1652.215-70 Section 1652.215-70 Federal Acquisition... CLAUSES AND FORMS CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of FEHBP Clauses 1652.215-70 Rate Reduction for Defective Pricing or Defective Cost or Pricing Data. As prescribed in 1615.407-1, the following clause shall...

  13. 48 CFR 1615.407-1 - Rate reduction for defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data. 1615.407-1 Section 1615.407-1 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 1615.407-1 Rate reduction for defective pricing or defective cost or pricing data. The clause set forth in section...

  14. Laterality defects in the national birth defects prevention study 1998-2007 birth prevalence and descriptive epidemiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known epidemiologically about laterality defects. Using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS), a large multi-site case-control study of birth defects, we analyzed prevalence and selected characteristics in children born with laterality defects born from 1998 to 2007...

  15. Birth defects in pregestational diabetes: Defect range, glycemic threshold and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Reece, E Albert; Wang, Fang; Yang, Peixin

    2015-04-15

    Currently, 60 million women of reproductive age (18-44 years old) worldwide, and approximately 3 million American women have diabetes mellitus, and it has been estimated that this number will double by 2030. Pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGD) is a significant public health problem that increases the risk for structural birth defects affecting both maternal and neonatal pregnancy outcome. The most common types of human structural birth defects associated with PGD are congenital heart defects and central nervous system defects. However, diabetes can induce birth defects in any other fetal organ. In general, the rate of birth defects increases linearly with the degree of maternal hyperglycemia, which is the major factor that mediates teratogenicity of PGD. Stringent prenatal care and glycemic control are effective means to reduce birth defects in PGD pregnancies, but cannot reduce the incidence of birth defects to the rate of that is seen in the nondiabetic population. Studies in animal models have revealed that PGD induces oxidative stress, which activates cellular stress signalling leading to dysregulation of gene expression and excess apoptosis in the target organs, including the neural tube and embryonic heart. Activation of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-forkhead transcription factor 3a (FoxO3a)-caspase 8 pathway causes apoptosis in the developing neural tube leading to neural tube defects (NTDs). ASK1 activates the c-Jun-N-Terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), which leads to activation of the unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Deletion of the ASK1 gene, the JNK1 gene, or the JNK2 gene, or inhibition of ER stress by 4-Phenylbutyric acid abrogates diabetes-induced apoptosis and reduces the formation of NTDs. Antioxidants, such as thioredoxin, which inhibits the ASK1-FoxO3a-caspase 8 pathway or ER stress inhibitors, may prevent PGD-induced birth defects. PMID:25897357

  16. Birth defects in pregestational diabetes: Defect range, glycemic threshold and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Reece, E Albert; Wang, Fang; Yang, Peixin

    2015-01-01

    Currently, 60 million women of reproductive age (18-44 years old) worldwide, and approximately 3 million American women have diabetes mellitus, and it has been estimated that this number will double by 2030. Pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGD) is a significant public health problem that increases the risk for structural birth defects affecting both maternal and neonatal pregnancy outcome. The most common types of human structural birth defects associated with PGD are congenital heart defects and central nervous system defects. However, diabetes can induce birth defects in any other fetal organ. In general, the rate of birth defects increases linearly with the degree of maternal hyperglycemia, which is the major factor that mediates teratogenicity of PGD. Stringent prenatal care and glycemic control are effective means to reduce birth defects in PGD pregnancies, but cannot reduce the incidence of birth defects to the rate of that is seen in the nondiabetic population. Studies in animal models have revealed that PGD induces oxidative stress, which activates cellular stress signalling leading to dysregulation of gene expression and excess apoptosis in the target organs, including the neural tube and embryonic heart. Activation of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-forkhead transcription factor 3a (FoxO3a)-caspase 8 pathway causes apoptosis in the developing neural tube leading to neural tube defects (NTDs). ASK1 activates the c-Jun-N-Terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), which leads to activation of the unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Deletion of the ASK1 gene, the JNK1 gene, or the JNK2 gene, or inhibition of ER stress by 4-Phenylbutyric acid abrogates diabetes-induced apoptosis and reduces the formation of NTDs. Antioxidants, such as thioredoxin, which inhibits the ASK1-FoxO3a-caspase 8 pathway or ER stress inhibitors, may prevent PGD-induced birth defects. PMID:25897357

  17. A Defect Reduction Methodology For Increased Sort Yield Using Automated Defect Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radin, Christopher

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses the task of finding the source of defects that cause die failure at sort on semiconductor wafers. To do this, one must be able to determine defect type and density, in process, in order to determine where in the manufacturing process they are being created. Two methods have been commonly used. First is operator performed inspection of product or test wafers using a microscope. The second is short loop experiments using electrical test structures. Each of these methods have significant limitations when used for engineering analysis on VLSI technologies. Data generated by operator performed inspections show lack of reproducibility and large variations from operator to operator. Also, operator sensitivity declines to very low levels for defect sizes approaching linewidths in current semiconductor technologies. Electrical test structures require a conductive thin film to be patterned and etched. To get finer resolution of the section of the process causing a defect, indirect methods are required. This greatly constrains the options for experimental procedures. Because of the limitations on the methods described so far, defect reduction projects have been difficult, time consuming and prone to failure due to the difficulty of identifying the source of defects. Automated defect inspection, using the KLA-2020 automated wafer inspector, addresses these problems. This results in greatly increased efficiency and success rate. Presented in this paper is a discussion of the capabilities of automated defect inspection as compared to operator performed inspections and electrical test structure based short loop experiments. Also, a defect reduction methodology utilizing automated inspection will be described by presenting an actual example of its application. The methodology consists of using standard problem solving and experiment design techniques to isolate and solve major defect mechanisms. The example presented describes a series of short loop

  18. Three dimensional echocardiography in congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Shirali, Girish S.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional echocardiography (3DE) is a new, rapidly evolving modality for cardiac imaging. Important technological advances have heralded an era where practical 3DE scanning is becoming a mainstream modality. We review the modes of 3DE that can be used. The literature has been reviewed for articles that examine the applicability of 3DE to congenital heart defects to visualize anatomy in a spectrum of defects ranging from atrioventricular septal defects to mitral valve abnormalities and Ebstein's anomaly. The use of 3DE color flow to obtain echocardiographic angiograms is illustrated. The state of the science in quantitating right and left ventricular volumetrics is reviewed. Examples of novel applications including 3DE transesophageal echocardiography and image-guided interventions are provided. We also list the limitations of the technique, and discuss potential future developments in the field. PMID:20300232

  19. Ribosome defects in disorders of erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Narla, Anupama; Hurst, Slater N; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2011-02-01

    Over the past decade, genetic lesions that cause ribosome dysfunction have been identified in both congenital and acquired human disorders. These discoveries have established a new category of disorders, known as ribosomopathies, in which the primary pathophysiology is related to impaired ribosome function. The protoptypical disorders are Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a congenital bone marrow failure syndrome, and the 5q- syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome. In both of these disorders, impaired ribosome function causes a severe macrocytic anemia. In this review, we will discuss the evidence that defects in ribosomal biogenesis cause the hematologic phenotype of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and the 5q- syndrome. We will also explore the potential mechanisms by which a ribosomal defect, which would be expected to have widespread consequences, may lead to specific defects in erythropoiesis. PMID:21279816

  20. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    PubMed Central

    Reilingh, Mikel L.; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone plate. The ankle joint has a high congruency. During loading, compressed cartilage forces its water into the microfractured subchondral bone, leading to a localized high increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone. This will result in local osteolysis and can explain the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion, but is most probably caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking, which results in stimulation of the highly innervated subchondral bone underneath the cartilage defect. Understanding the natural history of osteochondral defects could lead to the development of strategies for preventing progressive joint damage. PMID:20151110

  1. Defects and degeneracies in supersymmetry protected phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokkema, Thessa; Schoutens, Kareljan

    2015-08-01

    We analyse a class of 1D lattice models, known as \\text{M}k models, which are characterised by an order-k clustering of spin-less fermions and by N}=2 lattice supersymmetry. Our main result is the identification of a class of (bulk or edge) defects, that are in one-to-one correspondence with so-called spin fields in a corresponding {Z}k parafermion CFT. In the gapped regime, injecting such defects leads to ground-state degeneracies that are protected by the supersymmetry. The defects, which are closely analogous to quasi-holes over the fermonic Read-Rezayi quantum Hall states, display characteristic fusion rules, which are of Ising type for k = 2 and of Fibonacci type for k = 3.

  2. Structural control design and defective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattulli, Vincenzo; Potenza, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    The intersection between the two concepts of structural control and defectiveness is discussed. Two simple oscillators differently connected by serial spring-dashpot arrangement are used to simply simulate technically relevant cases: dissipatively coupled adjacent free-standing structures, structures equipped by TMD and base-isolated structures. Eigensolution loci of the two classes of systems are tracked against one or more significant parameters to determine the potential benefits realized by different combinations of stiffness and viscosity. In both studied cases, codimension-two manifolds in the four-parameter space corresponding to coalescing eigenvalues are determined by analytical expressions. Conditions to discern semi-simple eigenvalues from defective ones confirm that the latter is the generic case laying in a two-parameter space while the former span a one-parameter subspace. The knowledge of the location of the defective systems in the parameter space permits to determine regions with specific dynamical properties useful for control design purpose.

  3. Quantitative defect characterization via guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoliang

    Pipeline inspection systems are being developed to locate critical defects, and more recently to characterize and size them efficiently in order to prevent potential leakage or catastrophic failure, as well as to assist in the decision process of wait or replace. Ultrasonic guided waves have demonstrated their abilities and advantages of detecting a variety of defect types that occur in a plate or hollow cylindrical structure compared to other conventional methods. Yet defect classification and sizing in these structures by guided waves is still a major issue. In this work, the Boundary Element Method (BEM) combined with the guided wave normal mode expansion technique is used to study the interaction of various guided wave packets of energy with various crack and corrosion boundaries in a structure. Attempts are made to find the best modes and frequency with the best chance of success in carrying out the defect classification and sizing process. To simplify the problem, a plate model is used to approximate the wall structure of a hollow cylinder of large diameter-to-wall-thickness ratio. The dispersion relation and wave structures of Shear Horizontal (SH) waves along the circumference of a hollow cylinder is derived and calculated. A parametric study with the hollow cylinder wall thickness to diameter ratio is conducted. Together with similar studies on circumferential Lamb waves in a pipe wall, a quantitative criterion as when a hollow cylinder wall can indeed be treated as a plate is given. A two-dimensional boundary element method (BEM) FORTRAN code was developed for surface breaking defect characterization and sizing in a plate using guided waves. A new code is developed for internal inclusion types of defect that are considered benign to see whether they will give false alarms. Parametric studies on different incident wave modes and frequencies establish a guideline on how to characterize a defect in a two-dimensional wave guide. In reality, all defects are

  4. Ultrastructure of internal jugular vein defective valves

    PubMed Central

    Tisato, V; Menegatti, E; Mascoli, F; Gianesini, S; Salvi, F; Secchiero, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the ultrastructure of intraluminal defects found in the internal jugular vein by using a scanning electron microscopy. Methods Using a scanning electron microscopy, intraluminal septa and/or defective valves blocking the flow in the distal internal jugular vein of seven patients were studied together with the adjacent wall and compared with control specimen. Results The internal jugular veins’ wall showed a significant derangement of the endothelial layer as compared to controls. Surprisingly, no endothelial cells were found in the defective cusps, and the surface of the structure is covered by a fibro-reticular lamina. Conclusions Although the lack of endothelial cells in the internal jugular vein intraluminal obstacles is a further abnormality found in course of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, our investigation cannot clarify whether this finding is primary or caused by progressive loss of endothelium in relation to altered haemodynamic forces and/or to a past post-thrombotic/inflammatory remodelling. PMID:24972760

  5. Genetic defects in ciliary structure and function.

    PubMed

    Zariwala, Maimoona A; Knowles, Michael R; Omran, Heymut

    2007-01-01

    Cilia, hair-like structures extending from the cell membrane, perform diverse biological functions. Primary (genetic) defects in the structure and function of sensory and motile cilia result in multiple ciliopathies. The most prominent genetic abnormality involving motile cilia (and the respiratory tract) is primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). PCD is a rare, usually autosomal recessive, genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by sino-pulmonary disease, laterality defects, and male infertility. Ciliary ultrastructural defects are identified in approximately 90% of PCD patients and involve the outer dynein arms, inner dynein arms, or both. Diagnosing PCD is challenging and requires a compatible clinical phenotype together with tests such as ciliary ultrastructural analysis, immunofluorescent staining, ciliary beat assessment, and/or nasal nitric oxide measurements. Recent mutational analysis demonstrated that 38% of PCD patients carry mutations of the dynein genes DNAI1 and DNAH5. Increased understanding of the pathogenesis will aid in better diagnosis and treatment of PCD. PMID:17059358

  6. Flap Coverage of Anterior Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Justin M.; Broyles, Justin M.; Baumann, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of complex defects of the anterior abdomen is both challenging and technically demanding for reconstructive surgeons. Advancements in the use of pedicle and free tissue transfer along with the use of bioprosthetic and synthetic meshes have provided for novel approaches to these complex defects. Accordingly, detailed knowledge of abdominal wall and lower extremity anatomy in combination with insight into the design, implementation, and limitations of various flaps is essential to solve these complex clinical problems. Although these defects can be attributed to a myriad of etiologic factors, the objectives in abdominal wall reconstruction are consistent and include the restoration of abdominal wall integrity, protection of intraabdominal viscera, and the prevention of herniation. In this article, the authors review pertinent anatomy and the various local, regional, and distant flaps that can be utilized in the reconstruction of these complex clinical cases of the anterior abdomen. PMID:23372457

  7. Defect Detection Using Hidden Markov Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogandžić, Aleksandar; Eua-anant, Nawanat; Zhang, Benhong

    2005-04-01

    We derive an approximate maximum a posteriori (MAP) method for detecting NDE defect signals using hidden Markov random fields (HMRFs). In the proposed HMRF framework, a set of spatially distributed NDE measurements is assumed to form a noisy realization of an underlying random field that has a simple structure with Markovian dependence. Here, the random field describes the defect signals to be estimated or detected. The HMRF models incorporate measurement locations into the statistical analysis, which is important in scenarios where the same defect affects measurements at multiple locations. We also discuss initialization of the proposed HMRF detector and apply to simulated eddy-current data and experimental ultrasonic C-scan data from an inspection of a cylindrical Ti 6-4 billet.

  8. Preliminary work on the quantum defect measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcherson, Lindsay; Sanders, Justin; Han, Jianing

    2016-05-01

    Van der Waals interactions are generally studied in physics, chemistry, biology, and other fields of science. In order to fine-tune van der Waals interactions, the atomic energy levels need to be known very accurately. That is, we must accurately determine the quantum defects. Quantum defects of 85Rb have been recently measured, and the quantum defects of 87Rb have also been measured for nS and nD states with the resolution of 1 MHz. this experiment will focus on the P, F, and G states, which are higher angular momentum states and more sensitive to electric fields. These states are crucial for collisions, which may lead to some of the interesting phenomena in ultracold atoms, such as ultracold plasma. In this presentation, a progress report will be given on this project. The authors would like to acknowledge the travel Grants from DDOE and the University of South Alabama.

  9. Global defect topology in nematic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Machon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We give the global homotopy classification of nematic textures for a general domain with weak anchoring boundary conditions and arbitrary defect set in terms of twisted cohomology, and give an explicit computation for the case of knotted and linked defects in R3, showing that the distinct homotopy classes have a 1–1 correspondence with the first homology group of the branched double cover, branched over the disclination loops. We show further that the subset of those classes corresponding to elements of order 2 in this group has representatives that are planar and characterize the obstruction for other classes in terms of merons. The planar textures are a feature of the global defect topology that is not reflected in any local characterization. Finally, we describe how the global classification relates to recent experiments on nematic droplets and how elements of order 4 relate to the presence of τ lines in cholesterics. PMID:27493576

  10. Defect unbinding on a toroidal nematic shell.

    PubMed

    Jesenek, Dalija; Kralj, Samo; Rosso, Riccardo; Virga, Epifanio G

    2015-03-28

    We study nematic liquid crystal textures exhibiting topological defects (TDs) on a two-dimensional (2D) toroidal shell. For the toroidal topology the total topological charge of TDs is equal to zero. We use a mesoscopic Landau-de Gennes approach which features a 2D nematic order tensor Q. We show that fat tori unbind TDs. If no extrinsic free energy couples Q with the Weingarten tensor of the torus, then defects and antidefects are assembled along the innermost and the outermost circles of the torus, respectively. In this case, we estimate the critical condition for the onset of TDs using an electrostatic analogy. If, on the other hand, an extrinsic free energy is present, then defects are repelled from these regions. PMID:25662487

  11. Air pollution and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Agay-Shay, Keren; Friger, Michael; Linn, Shai; Peled, Ammatzia; Amitai, Yona; Peretz, Chava

    2013-07-01

    Environmental factors such as ambient air pollution have been associated with congenital heart defects. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between gestational exposure to air pollution and the risk of congenital heart defects. We conducted a registry-based cohort study with a total of 135,527 live- and still-births in the Tel-Aviv region during 2000-2006. We used a Geographic Information System-based spatiotemporal approach with weekly inverse distance weighting modeling to evaluate associations between gestational exposure to ambient air pollution during weeks 3-8 of pregnancy and the risk for congenital heart defects. The following pollutants were studied: carbon monoxide, nitrogen-dioxide, ozone, sulfur-dioxide and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm and 2.5 μm (PM10, PM2.5 respectively). Logistic models, adjusted for socio-demographic covariates were used to evaluate the associations. We found that maternal exposure to increased concentrations of PM10 was associated with multiple congenital heart defects (adjusted OR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.10 for 10 μg/m(3) increment). An inverse association was observed between concentrations of PM2.5 and isolated patent ductus arteriosus (adjusted OR 0.78, 95% CI: 0.68 to 0.91 for 5 µg/m(3) increment). Sensitivity analyses showed that results were consistent. Generally there were no evidence for an association between gaseous air pollutants and congenital heart defects.Our results for PM10 and congenital heart defects confirm results from previous studies. The results for PM2.5 need further investigations. PMID:23623715

  12. Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ritherdon, J

    2003-11-17

    The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes work regarding the manipulation of grain structures via deformation processing and further results gathered during powder separation trials involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-IV''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out except for some of that dependent on the acquisition of materials from other sources. However, wherever omissions from the ''Plan of Action'' detailed in the ''Statement of Work'' have occurred due to lack of suitable materials, other related experimental work has been devised to fill the gaps where possible. All work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.

  13. Toward defect guard-banding of EUV exposures by full chip optical wafer inspection of EUV mask defect adders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halle, Scott D.; Meli, Luciana; Delancey, Robert; Vemareddy, Kaushik; Crispo, Gary; Bonam, Ravi; Burkhardt, Martin; Corliss, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The detection of EUV mask adder defects has been investigated with an optical wafer defect inspection system employing a methodology termed Die-to-"golden" Virtual Reference Die (D2VRD). Both opaque and clear type mask absorber programmed defects were inspected and characterized over a range of defect sizes, down to (4x mask) 40 nm. The D2VRD inspection system was capable of identifying the corresponding wafer print defects down to the limit of the defect printability threshold at approximately 30 nm (1x wafer). The efficacy of the D2VRD scheme on full chip wafer inspection to suppress random process defects and identify real mask defects is demonstrated. Using defect repeater analysis and patch image classification of both the reference die and the scanned die enables the unambiguous identification of mask adder defects.

  14. Dirac oscillator interacting with a topological defect

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, J.; Furtado, C.; Moraes, F.

    2011-09-15

    In this work we study the interaction problem of a Dirac oscillator with gravitational fields produced by topological defects. The energy levels of the relativistic oscillator in the cosmic string and in the cosmic dislocation space-times are sensible to curvature and torsion associated to these defects and are important evidence of the influence of the topology on this system. In the presence of a localized magnetic field the energy levels acquire a term associated with the Aharonov-Bohm effect. We obtain the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues and see that in the nonrelativistic limit some results known in standard quantum mechanics are reached.

  15. Haemostatic defects in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, P; Värendh, G; Lundström, N R

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of defects of the haemostatic mechanism in 41 children with cyanotic congenital heart disease concluded that such abnormalities were common and normally involved factors synthesised in the liver, that is the vitamin K dependent factors (rothrombin, factors VII and IX) and factor V. No evidence was found of activation of the coagulation or fibrinolytic systems. The defects can be explained by deficient synthesis resulting from systemic hypoxia as well as from sluggishness of the local microcirculation caused by high blood viscosity. Vitamin K parenterally had no demonstrable effect. Replacement of these factors, possibly combined with measures to improve the microcirculation, therefore, appears to be the appropriate treatment. PMID:426953

  16. GaN: Defect and Device Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-09

    The role of extended and point defects, and key impurities such as C, O and H, on the electrical and optical properties of GaN is reviewed. Recent progress in the development of high reliability contacts, thermal processing, dry and wet etching techniques, implantation doping and isolation and gate insulator technology is detailed. Finally, the performance of GaN-based electronic and photonic devices such as field effect transistors, UV detectors, laser diodes and light-emitting diodes is covered, along with the influence of process-induced or grown-in defects and impurities on the device physics.

  17. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Steini Moura, Cassio; Balzaretti, Naira Maria; Amaral, Livio; Gribel Lacerda, Rodrigo; Pimenta, Marcos A.

    2012-03-15

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  18. Holographic dual of a conical defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefeva, I. Ya.; Bagrov, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a moving conical defect in the pure AdS3 space-time and calculate two-point correlation functions of a corresponding two-dimensional boundary quantum field theory in the geodesic approximation. We show that the presence of the defect leads to a gravitational lensing of geodesics, and this results in a finite number of similar terms in the Green's function that correspond to winding geodesics in the bulk around the conical singularity. We show that for the quantized deficit angle γ = π/2n, the lensing produces domain wall excitations in the spectrum of the boundary theory.

  19. Defect dynamics in crystalline buckled membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzutti, Aldo D.; Vega, Daniel A.

    2011-07-01

    We study the dynamics of defect annihilation in flexible crystalline membranes suffering a symmetry-breaking phase transition. The kinetic process leading the system toward equilibrium is described through a Brazovskii-Helfrich-Canham Hamiltonian. In membranes, a negative disclination has a larger energy than a positive disclination. Here we show that this energetic asymmetry does not only affect equilibrium properties, like the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperature, but also plays a fundamental role in the dynamic of defects. Both unbinding of dislocations and Carraro-Nelson “antiferromagnetic” interactions between disclinations slow down the dynamics below the Lifshitz-Safran regime observed in flat hexagonal systems.

  20. Construction of Radial Defect Models in Rabbits to Determine the Critical Size Defects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-Chao; Gui, Ke-Ke; Xiong, Min; Yin, Wang-Ping; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Many studies aimed at investigating bone repair have been conducted through animal models in recent years. However, limitations do exist in these models due to varying regeneration potential among different animal species. Even using the same animal, big differences exist in the size of critical size defects (CSD) involving the same region. This study aimed to investigate the standardization of radial bone defect models in rabbits and further establish more reliable CSD data. A total of 40 6-month-old New Zealand white rabbits of clean grade totaling 80 radial bones were prepared for bone defect models, according to the principle of randomization. Five different sizes (1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.7 and 2.0 cm) of complete periosteal defects were introduced under anesthesia. At 12 weeks postoperatively, with the gradual increase in defect size, the grades of bone growth were significantly decreased in all 5 groups. X-ray, CT scans and H&E staining of the 1.4, 1.7, and 2.0-cm groups showed lower grades of bone growth than that of the 1.0 and 1.2-cm groups respectively (P < 0.05). Using rabbit radial defect model involving 6-month-old healthy New Zealand white rabbits, this study indicates that in order to be critical sized, defects must be greater than 1.4 cm. PMID:26731011

  1. Accurate defect die placement and nuisance defect reduction for reticle die-to-die inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Vincent; Huang, L. R.; Lin, C. J.; Tseng, Y. N.; Huang, W. H.; Tuo, Laurent C.; Wylie, Mark; Chen, Ellison; Wang, Elvik; Glasser, Joshua; Kelkar, Amrish; Wu, David

    2015-10-01

    Die-to-die reticle inspections are among the simplest and most sensitive reticle inspections because of the use of an identical-design neighboring-die for the reference image. However, this inspection mode can have two key disadvantages: (1) The location of the defect is indeterminate because it is unclear to the inspector whether the test or reference image is defective; and (2) nuisance and false defects from mask manufacturing noise and tool optical variation can limit the usable sensitivity. The use of a new sequencing approach for a die-to-die inspection can resolve these issues without any additional scan time, without sacrifice in sensitivity requirement, and with a manageable increase in computation load. In this paper we explore another approach for die-to-die inspections using a new method of defect processing and sequencing. Utilizing die-to-die double arbitration during defect detection has been proven through extensive testing to generate accurate placement of the defect in the correct die to ensure efficient defect disposition at the AIMS step. The use of this method maintained the required inspection sensitivity for mask quality as verified with programmed-defectmask qualification and then further validated with production masks comparing the current inspection approach to the new method. Furthermore, this approach can significantly reduce the total number of defects that need to be reviewed by essentially eliminating the nuisance and false defects that can result from a die-to-die inspection. This "double-win" will significantly reduce the effort in classifying a die-to-die inspection result and will lead to improved cycle times.

  2. Defect production and recombination during low-energy ion processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerman, B.K.; Floro, J.A.; Chason, E.; Brice, D.K.; Picraux, S.T.; White, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    Low-energy ion processing produces damaged, microroughened semiconductor surfaces due to the production of point defects. The authors present a study of point defect production and annealing on the Ge(001)-2x1 surface during low-energy inert ion bombardment as a function of ion energy, ion mass and substrate temperature. Ion-induced surface point defect production was quantified experimentally in real time using in situ Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction. The observed surface defect yield decreased abruptly around room temperature as the substrate temperature was increased from 175 K to 475 K. The authors have developed Monte Carlo simulations of defect diffusion to model defect recombination both in the bulk and on the surface. Bulk defect production statistics generated by a binary collision simulator, TRIMRC, were coupled with our bulk diffusion simulator to predict the number of ion-induced surface defects. A comparison between the experimental results and the simulation predictions indicated that defects produced in the bulk may represent a significant contribution to the observed surface defect yield and suggested that TRIMRC may overestimate the depth distribution of the defects. The simulations further indicated that the abrupt drop in the experimental yield with increasing substrate temperature does not arise from bulk defect recombination. The Monte Carlo simulations of surface diffusion (applicable to any crystalline surface) support a defect annealing mechanism (at low ion fluxes) that involves surface recombination of defects generated within a single cascade.

  3. Defect mode properties of two-dimensional plasma-filled defective metallic photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, T.; Yang, Z.; Tang, X.; Shi, Z.; Lan, F.

    2014-01-15

    This paper studies the frequency and amplitude properties of a defect mode which is only in a plasma-filled metallic photonic crystal with defect layer. Results show that the frequency almost has no change and the amplitude declines gradually with the growth of the number of the layers. The frequency of the defect mode not only can be modulated by filling ratio but also can be tuned by plasma density without modifying the structure. The amplitude can be modified by plasma angular frequency as well. These characteristics provide a foundation to design tunable filters, high power millimeter devices.

  4. Tegmental defects and cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, H; Geyer, C; Tarlov, E; Heilman, C; Poe, D

    2001-01-01

    Congenital tegmental defects that present as unsuspected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea are diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. We reviewed 5 such patients to determine an optimal strategy for evaluation. Five patients presented with watery otorrhea, 4 of them after ventilation tube placement, and only 1 with rhinorrhea. The preoperative analysis of middle ear effusion for beta(2)-transferrin was positive in 2/4, equivocal in 1/4 and false negative in 1/4. Computerized tomography (CT) revealed nonspecific tegmental defects in all 5 patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated meningoencephalocele in 3/5 and dural irregularity in 1/5. Tegmental defects were confirmed at surgery in all cases, demonstrating meningocele or arachnoid granulations in 2/5 and encephalocele in 2/5 patients. We recommend a combination of beta(2)-transferrin analysis to verify CSF, high resolution CT (axial and coronal planes) to diagnose tegmental defects, and MRI (multiplanar) to evaluate the type of herniation. A combination mastoid and middle fossa approach for definitive repair is suggested. PMID:11174062

  5. 9 CFR 91.30 - Defective fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Defective fittings. 91.30 Section 91.30 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... used fittings aboard an ocean vessel are employed, any portion thereof found by the inspector to...

  6. Fuzzy Logic Connectivity in Semiconductor Defect Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, S.S.; Kamowski, T.P.; Tobin, K.W.

    1999-01-24

    In joining defects on semiconductor wafer maps into clusters, it is common for defects caused by different sources to overlap. Simple morphological image processing tends to either join too many unrelated defects together or not enough together. Expert semiconductor fabrication engineers have demonstrated that they can easily group clusters of defects from a common manufacturing problem source into a single signature. Capturing this thought process is ideally suited for fuzzy logic. A system of rules was developed to join disconnected clusters based on properties such as elongation, orientation, and distance. The clusters are evaluated on a pair-wise basis using the fuzzy rules and are joined or not joined based on a defuzzification and threshold. The system continuously re-evaluates the clusters under consideration as their fuzzy memberships change with each joining action. The fuzzy membership functions for each pair-wise feature, the techniques used to measure the features, and methods for improving the speed of the system are all developed. Examples of the process are shown using real-world semiconductor wafer maps obtained from chip manufacturers. The algorithm is utilized in the Spatial Signature Analyzer (SSA) software, a joint development project between Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) and SEMATECH.

  7. Alcohol Related Birth Defects: Implications for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamanna, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Discusses background and nature of alcohol-related birth defects. Describes a continuum of impairment to offspring of drinking mothers that is dose-related and produces serious behavioral/learning deficits. The continuum includes young people of normal intelligence who perform below expected levels and find school adjustment difficult. Offers…

  8. [Placental developmental defects in cloned mammalian animals].

    PubMed

    Ao, Zheng; Liu, Dewu; Cai, Gengyuan; Wu, Zhenfang; Li, Zicong

    2016-05-01

    The cloning technique, also called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), has been successfully established and gradually applied to various mammalian species. However, the developmental rate of SCNT mammalian embryos is very low, usually at 1% to 5%, which limits the application of SCNT. Placental developmental defects are considered as the main cause of SCNT embryo development inhibition. Almost all of SCNT-derived mammalian placentas exhibit various abnormalities, such as placental hyperplasia, vascular defects and umbilical cord malformation. Mechanistically, these abnormalities result from failure of establishment of correct epigenetic modification in the trophectoderm genome, which leads to erroneous expression of important genes for placenta development-related, particularly imprinted genes. Consequently, aberrant imprinted gene expression gives rise to placental morphologic abnormalities and functional defects, therefore decreases developmental competence of cloned embryos. Currently, although numerous methods that can improve the developmental ability of SCNT-derived embryos have been reported, most of them are unable to substantially enhance the success rate of SCNT due to failure to eliminate the placental development defects. In this review, we summarize placental abnormalities and imprinted gene expression in mammalian cloning, and propose directions for the future research aiming to improve the cloning efficiency. PMID:27232488

  9. Volterra distortions, spinning strings, and cosmic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puntigam, Roland A.; Soleng, Harald H.

    1997-05-01

    Cosmic strings, as topological spacetime defects, show striking resemblance to defects in solid continua: distortions, which can be classified into disclinations and dislocations, are line-like defects characterized by a delta-function-valued curvature and torsion distribution giving rise to rotational and translational holonomy. We exploit this analogy and investigate how distortions can be adapted in a systematic manner from solid-state systems to Einstein - Cartan gravity. As distortions are efficiently described within the framework of an 0264-9381/14/5/017/img5 gauge theory of solid continua with line defects, we are led in a straightforward way to a Poincaré gauge approach to gravity which is a natural framework for introducing the notion of distorted spacetimes. Constructing all ten possible distorted spacetimes, we recover, inter alia, the well known exterior spacetime of a spin-polarized cosmic string as a special case of such a geometry. In a second step, we search for matter distributions which, in Einstein - Cartan gravity, act as sources of distorted spacetimes. The resulting solutions, appropriately matched to the distorted vacua, are cylindrically symmetric and are interpreted as spin-polarized cosmic strings and cosmic dislocations.

  10. Oil defect detection of electrowetting display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Hou-Chi; Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Yan, Yung-Jhe; Huang, Ting-Wei; Mang, Ou-Yang

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, transparent display is an emerging topic in display technologies. Apply in many fields just like mobile device, shopping or advertising window, and etc. Electrowetting Display (EWD) is one kind of potential transparent display technology advantages of high transmittance, fast response time, high contrast and rich color with pigment based oil system. In mass production process of Electrowetting Display, oil defects should be found by Automated Optical Inspection (AOI) detection system. It is useful in determination of panel defects for quality control. According to the research of our group, we proposed a mechanism of AOI detection system detecting the different kinds of oil defects. This mechanism can detect different kinds of oil defect caused by oil overflow or material deteriorated after oil coating or driving. We had experiment our mechanism with a 6-inch Electrowetting Display panel from ITRI, using an Epson V750 scanner with 1200 dpi resolution. Two AOI algorithms were developed, which were high speed method and high precision method. In high precision method, oil jumping or non-recovered can be detected successfully. This mechanism of AOI detection system can be used to evaluate the oil uniformity in EWD panel process. In the future, our AOI detection system can be used in quality control of panel manufacturing for mass production.

  11. Optical system defect propagation in ABCD systems.

    PubMed

    McKinley, W G; Yura, H T; Hanson, S G

    1988-05-01

    We describe how optical system defects (tilt/jitter, decenter, and despace) propagate through an arbitrary paraxial optical system that can be described by an ABCD ray transfer matrix. A pedagogical example is given that demonstrates the effect of alignment errors on a typical optical system. PMID:19745889

  12. Defect accommodation in nanostructured soft crystals.

    PubMed

    Exner, Alexander; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Fischer, Steffen; Lindner, Peter; Förster, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the structure of lyotropic micellar FCC soft crystals was performed by scanning small-angle neutron scattering. Soft crystals have a large number of structural defects, leading to characteristic features in the scattering patterns such as secondary Bragg peaks, diffuse scattering lines, and paracrystalline distortions. We find that the presence of a large number of defects locally breaks the three-dimensional symmetry of the crystal, leading to weakly correlated assemblies of stacked {111} layers. Positional correlations of micelles in different layers are very short ranged, with correlation lengths corresponding to only a few layers. Within the layers, in-plane positional correlations are somewhat longer ranged, but still corresponding to only a few unit cells. Depending on the polydispersity, soft crystals accommodate defects to form mesocrystals of iso-oriented mosaic domains, or paracrystals. The soft layer structures already show characteristic features of two-dimensional systems, exhibiting short-range positional order and longer-ranged orientational order, with similarities to hexatic and recently observed soft quasicrystalline structures. The study shows that defects can be differently accommodated in soft crystals, thereby strongly affecting local and macroscopic positional and orientational order. PMID:24336833

  13. Biomimetic approaches to complex craniofacial defects.

    PubMed

    Teven, Chad M; Fisher, Sean; Ameer, Guillermo A; He, Tong-Chuan; Reid, Russell R

    2015-01-01

    The primary goals of craniofacial reconstruction include the restoration of the form, function, and facial esthetics, and in the case of pediatric patients, respect for craniofacial growth. The surgeon, however, faces several challenges when attempting a reconstructive cranioplasty. For that reason, craniofacial defect repair often requires sophisticated treatment strategies and multidisciplinary input. In the ideal situation, autologous tissue similar in structure and function to that which is missing can be utilized for repair. In the context of the craniofacial skeleton, autologous cranial bone, or secondarily rib, iliac crest, or scapular bone, is most favorable. Often, this option is limited by the finite supply of available bone. Therefore, alternative strategies to repair craniofacial defects are necessary. In the field of regenerative medicine, tissue engineering has emerged as a promising concept, and several methods of bone engineering are currently under investigation. A growth factor-based approach utilizing bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) has demonstrated stimulatory effects on cranial bone and defect repair. When combined with cell-based and matrix-based models, regenerative goals can be optimized. This manuscript intends to review recent investigations of tissue engineering models used for the repair of craniofacial defects with a focus on the role of BMPs, scaffold materials, and novel cell lines. When sufficient autologous bone is not available, safe and effective strategies to engineer bone would allow the surgeon to meet the reconstructive goals of the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:26389027

  14. Biomimetic approaches to complex craniofacial defects

    PubMed Central

    Teven, Chad M.; Fisher, Sean; Ameer, Guillermo A.; He, Tong-Chuan; Reid, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    The primary goals of craniofacial reconstruction include the restoration of the form, function, and facial esthetics, and in the case of pediatric patients, respect for craniofacial growth. The surgeon, however, faces several challenges when attempting a reconstructive cranioplasty. For that reason, craniofacial defect repair often requires sophisticated treatment strategies and multidisciplinary input. In the ideal situation, autologous tissue similar in structure and function to that which is missing can be utilized for repair. In the context of the craniofacial skeleton, autologous cranial bone, or secondarily rib, iliac crest, or scapular bone, is most favorable. Often, this option is limited by the finite supply of available bone. Therefore, alternative strategies to repair craniofacial defects are necessary. In the field of regenerative medicine, tissue engineering has emerged as a promising concept, and several methods of bone engineering are currently under investigation. A growth factor-based approach utilizing bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) has demonstrated stimulatory effects on cranial bone and defect repair. When combined with cell-based and matrix-based models, regenerative goals can be optimized. This manuscript intends to review recent investigations of tissue engineering models used for the repair of craniofacial defects with a focus on the role of BMPs, scaffold materials, and novel cell lines. When sufficient autologous bone is not available, safe and effective strategies to engineer bone would allow the surgeon to meet the reconstructive goals of the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:26389027

  15. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Equipment defects. 56.7002 Section 56.7002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  16. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equipment defects. 56.7002 Section 56.7002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  17. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equipment defects. 56.7002 Section 56.7002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  18. 7 CFR 52.3761 - Defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Defects. 52.3761 Section 52.3761 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 PROCESSED FRUITS AND...

  19. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Equipment defects. 56.7002 Section 56.7002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  20. 7 CFR 51.2740 - Minor defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minor defects. 51.2740 Section 51.2740 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES...

  1. 7 CFR 51.2762 - Minor defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minor defects. 51.2762 Section 51.2762 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES...

  2. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment defects. 56.7002 Section 56.7002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  3. 7 CFR 51.2720 - Minor defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minor defects. 51.2720 Section 51.2720 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1565 - Internal defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Internal defects. 51.1565 Section 51.1565 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1565 - Internal defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Internal defects. 51.1565 Section 51.1565 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1565 - Internal defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Internal defects. 51.1565 Section 51.1565 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1565 Internal.... Occurring entirely within the vascular ring Hollow Heart or Hollow Heart with Discoloration Area...

  7. 7 CFR 51.2659 - Condition defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Condition defects. 51.2659 Section 51.2659 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions §...

  8. Bulk and defect properties of ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.L.; Yoo, M.H.

    1993-12-31

    First-principles calculations based on the local-density-functional theory have been used to investigate the factors governing strength of ordered intermetallic alloys. Unlike Ni{sub 3}Al, calculated elastic constants and shear fault energies indicate anomalous yield strength behavior is not likely to occur in Ni{sub 3}Si. This suggests the inadequacy of cross-slip-pinning model to explain the strength anomaly in the L1{sub 2} structure. For strongly ordered NiAl, the defect structure is dominated by two types of defects -- monovacancies on the Ni sites and substitutional antisite defects on the Al sites. By contrast, for Ni{sub 3}Al, absence of structural vacancies and deviations from stoichiometry are accommodated by substitutional antisite defects on both sublattices. Intrinsic strengthening mechanisms in TiAl are discussed in terms of calculated elastic constants and shear fault energies. Because of reduced fault energies at the {gamma}/{alpha}{sub 2} interface, slip and twinning contribute significantly to high shear deformation of the lamellar structure.

  9. 49 CFR 215.105 - Defective axle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components Suspension System § 215.105 Defective axle. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if— (a) An axle on the car has a crack or is broken; (b) An axle on the car has a gouge in the surface that is— (1)...

  10. 49 CFR 215.105 - Defective axle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components Suspension System § 215.105 Defective axle. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if— (a) An axle on the car has a crack or is broken; (b) An axle on the car has a gouge in the surface that is— (1)...

  11. 49 CFR 215.105 - Defective axle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components Suspension System § 215.105 Defective axle. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if— (a) An axle on the car has a crack or is broken; (b) An axle on the car has a gouge in the surface that is— (1)...

  12. 49 CFR 215.123 - Defective couplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components Draft System § 215.123 Defective couplers. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if— (a) The car is... automatically with the adjacent car; (b) The car has a coupler that has a crack in the highly stressed...

  13. Condensation of topological defects and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Wotzasek, Clovis

    2004-11-01

    We study the static quantum potential for a theory of antisymmetric tensor fields that results from the condensation of topological defects, within the framework of the gauge-invariant but path-dependent variables formalism. Our calculations show that the interaction energy is the sum of a Yukawa and a linear potentials, leading to the confinement of static probe charges.

  14. Defect-free ultrahigh flux asymmetric membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, Ingo; Koros, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Defect-free, ultrahigh flux integrally-skinned asymmetric membranes having extremely thin surface layers (<0.2 .mu.m) comprised of glassy polymers are disclosed. The membranes are formed by casting an appropriate drope followed by forced convective evaporation of solvent to obtain a dry phase separated asymmetrical structure. The structure is then washed in a precipitation liquid and dried.

  15. Shock-induced defects in bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper examples of the shock-induced defects produced during shock compression which correlate with microstructure/mechanical property changes induced in materials due to shock prestraining are discussed. The characteristics of the shock impulse(peak shock pressure, pulse duration, and rarefaction rate) imparted to the material under investigation and the shock-induced defects produced in numerous metals and alloys are compared with their deformation behavior at ordinary rates of deformation. Examples of the range of defects observed in shock-recovered metals and alloys, include: dislocations, deformation twins, point defects, and residual metastable remnants from pressure-induced phase transformations. Results concerning the influence of interstitial content on the propensity of {omega}-phase formation and its structure in high-purity and A-7O Ti are presented. The influence of shock-wave deformation on the phase stability and substructure evolution of high-purity (low-interstitial) titanium and A-7O (3,700 ppm oxygen) titanium were probed utilizing real-time velocity interferometry (VISAR) and soft shock-recovery techniques. Suppression of the {alpha}-{omega} pressure-induced phase transformation in A-70 Ti, containing a high interstitial oxygen content, is seen to simultaneously correspond with the suppression of deformation twinning.

  16. Annihilation of defects in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetec, M.; Ambrožič, M.; Kralj, S.

    The annihilation of defect is studied theoretically in liquid crystals (LCs). We consider the annihilation of point disclinations in nematic and line edge dislocations in smectic A LC phase, respectively. We stress qualitative similarities in these processes. The whole annihilation regime is taken into account, consisting of the pre-collision, collision, and post-collision stage.

  17. Thermal defects in B2 iron aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.S.; Peng, L.S.J.; Wei, M.

    1999-07-01

    Thermal defects in B2 FeAl samples with compositions between 49.5 and 54.7 at.% Fe were investigated using perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays (PAC). Vacancies on the Fe-sublattice were detected through quadrupole interactions induced at adjacent {sup 111}In/Cd probe atoms on the Al-sublattice. Five high-frequency quadrupole-interaction signals were detected (greater than 50 Mrad/s) that are attributed to complexes involving 1, 2, 3, 4 and (with less certainty) 5 Fe-vacancies in the first neighbor shells of the probes. These attribution are based on (1) a comparison between measured quadrupole interaction parameters and point-charge calculations of electric-field gradients for possible vacancy-probe complexes; and (2) numerical simulation of the evolution of site fractions of probes in the complexes at lower temperatures. Measurements were made at temperatures up to 950 C. Assuming that the equilibrium high-temperature is the triple defect (2 Fe-vacancies and one Fe-antisite atom), measurements over the range 600--900 C yield a formation enthalpy of 1.1(1) eV for the triple defect. Below about 600 C, Fe-vacancies are quenched-in with a fractional concentration of the order of 1 at.% close to stoichiometry. However, quenched-in vacancies continue to jump over short distances and trap next to the impurity probes atoms in day-long measurements down to 200 C. Simulations of site fractions below 700 C were used to determine binding enthalpies of vacancies with probe complexes. Binding enthalpies obtained for the first four vacancies were 0.23, 0.23, 0.15 and 0.18 eV. Simulations in the range 200--700 C suggest a negative value for the formation entropy. The negative value indicates either that triple defects stiffen the B2 lattice or that repulsive defect-defect interactions become important at the high defect concentrations in FeAl.

  18. Thermographic Imaging of Defects in Anisotropic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Y. A.; Winfree, W. P.

    2000-01-01

    Composite materials are of increasing interest to the aerospace industry as a result of their weight versus performance characteristics. One of the disadvantages of composites is the high cost of fabrication and post inspection with conventional ultrasonic scanning systems. The high cost of inspection is driven by the need for scanning systems which can follow large curve surfaces. Additionally, either large water tanks or water squirters are required to couple the ultrasonics into the part. Thermographic techniques offer significant advantages over conventional ultrasonics by not requiring physical coupling between the part and sensor. The thermographic system can easily inspect large curved surface without requiring a surface following scanner. However, implementation of Thermal Nondestructive Evaluations (TNDE) for flaw detection in composite materials and structures requires determining its limit. Advanced algorithms have been developed to enable locating and sizing defects in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). Thermal Tomography is a very promising method for visualizing the size and location of defects in materials such as CFRP. However, further investigations are required to determine its capabilities for inspection of thick composites. In present work we have studied influence of the anisotropy on the reconstructed image of a defect generated by an inversion technique. The composite material is considered as homogeneous with macro properties: thermal conductivity K, specific heat c, and density rho. The simulation process involves two sequential steps: solving the three dimensional transient heat diffusion equation for a sample with a defect, then estimating the defect location and size from the surface spatial and temporal thermal distributions (inverse problem), calculated from the simulations.

  19. CDC Grand Rounds: Understanding the Causes of Major Birth Defects - Steps to Prevention.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Regina M; Feldkamp, Marcia L; Reefhuis, Jennita; Mitchell, Allen A; Gilboa, Suzanne M; Honein, Margaret A; Iskander, John

    2015-10-01

    Major birth defects (birth defects) are defined as structural abnormalities, present at birth, with surgical, medical, or cosmetic importance. Each year in the United States, 3% of live births (approximately 120,000 infants) have an identifiable structural birth defect. Examples of birth defects include neural tube defects, such as spina bifida; orofacial clefts; abdominal wall defects, such as gastroschisis; and congenital heart defects, such as hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Collectively, congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects (27%), followed by musculoskeletal defects (18%), genitourinary defects (15%), orofacial defects (5%), and neural tube defects (2%). PMID:26447345

  20. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    A blank mask and its preparation stages, such as cleaning or resist coating, play an important role in the eventual yield obtained by using it. Blank mask defects' impact analysis directly depends on the amount of available information such as the number of defects observed, their accurate locations and sizes. Mask usability qualification at the start of the preparation process, is crudely based on number of defects. Similarly, defect information such as size is sought to estimate eventual defect printability on the wafer. Tracking of defect characteristics, specifically size and shape, across multiple stages, can further be indicative of process related information such as cleaning or coating process efficiencies. At the first level, inspection machines address the requirement of defect characterization by detecting and reporting relevant defect information. The analysis of this information though is still largely a manual process. With advancing technology nodes and reducing half-pitch sizes, a large number of defects are observed; and the detailed knowledge associated, make manual defect review process an arduous task, in addition to adding sensitivity to human errors. Cases where defect information reported by inspection machine is not sufficient, mask shops rely on other tools. Use of CDSEM tools is one such option. However, these additional steps translate into increased costs. Calibre NxDAT based MDPAutoClassify tool provides an automated software alternative to the manual defect review process. Working on defect images generated by inspection machines, the tool extracts and reports additional information such as defect location, useful for defect avoidance[4][5]; defect size, useful in estimating defect printability; and, defect nature e.g. particle, scratch, resist void, etc., useful for process monitoring. The tool makes use of smart and elaborate post-processing algorithms to achieve this. Their elaborateness is a consequence of the variety and

  1. The role of defects in laser damage of multilayer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, M.R.; Chow, R.

    1993-12-21

    Laser induced damage to optical coatings is generally a localized phenomenon associated with coating defects. The most common of the defect types are the well-known nodule defect. This paper reviews the use of experiments and modeling to understand the formation of these defects and their interaction with laser light. Of particular interest are efforts to identify which defects are most susceptible to laser damage. Also discussed are possible methods for stabilizing these defects (laser conditioning) or preventing their initiation (source stabilization, spatter particle trapping).

  2. Carrier scattering by native defects in heavily doped semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA )

    1990-05-15

    Calculations of the effect of charged native defects on carrier mobility in semiconductors are presented. The concentrations of native defects are calculated within the framework of the recently proposed amphoteric-native-defect model. The model provides a simple rule for identification of semiconductor systems in which defect scattering is important. It is shown that native-defect scattering is a dominant mechanism limiting electron mobilities in heavily doped {ital n}-type GaAs. It is also shown that native defects do not play any significant role in {ital p}-type GaAs.

  3. Charge storage in oxygen deficient phases of TiO2: defect Physics without defects.

    PubMed

    Padilha, A C M; Raebiger, H; Rocha, A R; Dalpian, G M

    2016-01-01

    Defects in semiconductors can exhibit multiple charge states, which can be used for charge storage applications. Here we consider such charge storage in a series of oxygen deficient phases of TiO2, known as Magnéli phases. These Magnéli phases (TinO2n-1) present well-defined crystalline structures, i.e., their deviation from stoichiometry is accommodated by changes in space group as opposed to point defects. We show that these phases exhibit intermediate bands with an electronic quadruple donor transitions akin to interstitial Ti defect levels in rutile TiO2. Thus, the Magnéli phases behave as if they contained a very large pseudo-defect density: ½ per formula unit TinO2n-1. Depending on the Fermi Energy the whole material will become charged. These crystals are natural charge storage materials with a storage capacity that rivals the best known supercapacitors. PMID:27364139

  4. Charge storage in oxygen deficient phases of TiO2: defect Physics without defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilha, A. C. M.; Raebiger, H.; Rocha, A. R.; Dalpian, G. M.

    2016-07-01

    Defects in semiconductors can exhibit multiple charge states, which can be used for charge storage applications. Here we consider such charge storage in a series of oxygen deficient phases of TiO2, known as Magnéli phases. These Magnéli phases (TinO2n‑1) present well-defined crystalline structures, i.e., their deviation from stoichiometry is accommodated by changes in space group as opposed to point defects. We show that these phases exhibit intermediate bands with an electronic quadruple donor transitions akin to interstitial Ti defect levels in rutile TiO2. Thus, the Magnéli phases behave as if they contained a very large pseudo-defect density: ½ per formula unit TinO2n‑1. Depending on the Fermi Energy the whole material will become charged. These crystals are natural charge storage materials with a storage capacity that rivals the best known supercapacitors.

  5. Building capacity for birth defects surveillance in Africa: Implementation of an intermediate birth defects surveillance workshop

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Alina; Valencia, Diana; Sekkarie, Ahlia; Hillard, Christina L.; Williams, Jennifer; Groisman, Boris; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; Bauwens, Lieven; Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Each year around the world, it is estimated that 300,000 neonates are born with a neural tube defect. Many countries, however, are still lacking comprehensive birth defects surveillance registries. Comprehensive birth defects surveillance systems can help countries understand the magnitude and distribution of the problem. These systems can also provide information about biological, contextual, social and environmental determinants of birth defects. This information in turn can be used to identify effective and implementable solutions, and to evaluate prevention and management strategies to improve quality performance. This paper summarizes the development and implementation of an online pre-course training and in-person surveillance workshop conducted between 2014 December and 2015 March for representatives from six African countries. Feedback given by participants provided valuable lessons learned that can be applied to subsequent trainings and workshops. PMID:26753106

  6. Role of defect coordination environment on point defects formation energies in Ni-Al intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennessen, Emrys; Rondinelli, James

    We present a relationship among the point defect formation energies and the bond strengths, lengths, and local coordination environment for Ni-Al intermetallic alloys based on density functional calculations, including Ni3Al, Ni5Al3, NiAl,Ni3Al4, Ni2Al3 and NiAl3. We find the energetic stability of vacancy and anti-site defects for the entire family can be attributed primarily to changes in interactions among first nearest neighbors, owing to spatially localized charge density reconstructions in the vicinity of the defect site. We also compare our interpretation of the local coordination environment with a DFT-based cluster expansion and discuss the performance of each approach in predicting defect stability in the Ni-Al system.

  7. Charge storage in oxygen deficient phases of TiO2: defect Physics without defects

    PubMed Central

    Padilha, A. C. M.; Raebiger, H.; Rocha, A. R.; Dalpian, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in semiconductors can exhibit multiple charge states, which can be used for charge storage applications. Here we consider such charge storage in a series of oxygen deficient phases of TiO2, known as Magnéli phases. These Magnéli phases (TinO2n−1) present well-defined crystalline structures, i.e., their deviation from stoichiometry is accommodated by changes in space group as opposed to point defects. We show that these phases exhibit intermediate bands with an electronic quadruple donor transitions akin to interstitial Ti defect levels in rutile TiO2. Thus, the Magnéli phases behave as if they contained a very large pseudo-defect density: ½ per formula unit TinO2n−1. Depending on the Fermi Energy the whole material will become charged. These crystals are natural charge storage materials with a storage capacity that rivals the best known supercapacitors. PMID:27364139

  8. Behavior of chemically amplified resist defects in TMAH solution: III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yuko; Shimoaoki, Takeshi; Naito, Ryoichiro; Kitano, Junichi

    2004-05-01

    As the minimum feature size of electronic devices shrinks to less than 0.25 μm, it is critically important that we reduce the defects that occur in lithography processes. Moreover, as the defects to be controlled become ever smaller, this makes them increasingly difficult to detect by conventional fault detection equipment. In order to detect these minute defects in the context of shrinking device geometries, it is essential that we develop a clear understanding of the behavior of micro defects in developer. In principle, there are three ways in which these defects might be dealt with: (1) defects can be prevented from occurring in the first place, (2) defects can be prevented from adhering to the device, or (3) defects can be eliminated after they occur. Our recent work has mainly been concerned with the first and most effective approach of preventing defects from occurring in the first place, and this motivated the present study to investigate the mechanisms by which defects occur. We believe that defects occur in chemically amplified (CA) resists that are insufficiently unprotected at boundary regions between unexposed and exposed areas or in unexposed areas, so that the de-protection reaction in the resist suns to different degrees of completion due to varying exposure doses. In this study we investigate the number of defects in various developers, and determine the size distribution of the defects. Based on analysis of the behavior of defects from their size distribution in develop we conclude that: (1) the size of defects increases when the exposure dose is reduced by appropriate Eops, (2) defects originate in the boundary area between unexposed and exposed areas, and (3) a portion of CA resist polymer that is insufficiently deprotected is dispersed in the developer, coalesces and is deposited in a form that is not very soluble, and is manifested as relatively large particle defects.

  9. EUV actinic brightfield mask microscopy for predicting printed defect images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Kenneth; Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Verduijn, Erik; Wood, Obert R.; Mangat, Pawitter

    2015-10-01

    Improving our collective understanding of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photomask defects and the imaging properties of available defect imaging tools is essential for improving EUV mask defectivity, defect repair and mitigation, and for high-level strategic decision-making. In this work, we perform a qualitative comparison of twenty-five defects imaged with mask scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EUV actinic mask imaging, and wafer SEM imaging. All but two of the defect locations were first identified by non-actinic mask blank inspection, prior to patterning. The others were identified as repeating defects on the wafer. We find that actinic defect imaging is predictive of the wafer prints, with small-scale features clearly replicated. While some mask defect SEM images match the wafer prints, others print with a larger outline indicating the presence of sub-surface disruptions hidden from the SEM's view. Fourteen other defects were subjected to an aerial image phase measurement method called Fourier Ptychography (FP). Although phase shifts were observed in the larger defects, the smaller defects in the dataset showed no significant phase shifting. We attribute this discrepancy to non-actinic mask blank inspection's limited ability to detect small phase defects under normal operating conditions.

  10. Extreme ultraviolet multilayer defect analysis and geometry reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongbo; Evanschitzky, Peter; Erdmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for the characterization of multilayer defects from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection images at different focus positions. The transport-of-intensity equation is applied to retrieve the phase distribution of the reflected light in the vicinity of the defect. The defect-induced intensity and phase modifications and their dependency from defect geometry parameters are analyzed by several selected optical properties of multilayer defect. To reconstruct the defect geometry parameters from the intensity and phase of a defect, a principal component analysis (PCA) is employed to parameterize the intensity and phase distributions into principal component coefficients. In order to construct the base functions of the PCA, a combination of a reference multilayer defect and appropriate pupil filters is introduced to obtain the designed sets of intensity and phase distributions. Finally, an artificial neural network is applied to correlate the principal component coefficients of the intensity and the phase of the defect with the defect geometry parameters and to reconstruct the unknown defect geometry parameters. The performance of the proposed approach is evaluated both for mask blank defects and for defects in the vicinity of an absorber pattern.

  11. Computational mask defect review for contamination and haze inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Corcoran, Noel; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram; Wolf, Yulian; Shah, Pinkesh

    2013-09-01

    As optical lithography continues to extend into sub-0.35 k1 regime, mask defect inspection and subsequent review has become tremendously challenging, and indeed the largest component to mask manufacturing cost. The routine use of various resolution enhancement techniques (RET) have resulted in complex mask patterns, which together with the need to detect even smaller defects due to higher MEEFs, now requires an inspection engineer to use combination of inspection modes. This is achieved in 193nm AeraTM mask inspection systems wherein masks are not only inspected at their scanner equivalent aerial exposure conditions, but also at higher Numerical Aperture resolution, and special reflected-light, and single-die contamination modes, providing better coverage over all available patterns, and defect types. Once the required defects are detected by the inspection system, comprehensively reviewing and dispositioning each defect then becomes the Achilles heel of the overall mask inspection process. Traditionally, defects have been reviewed manually by an operator, which makes the process error-prone especially given the low-contrast in the convoluted aerial images. Such manual review also limits the quality and quantity of classifications in terms of the different types of characterization and number of defects that can practically be reviewed by a person. In some ways, such manual classification limits the capability of the inspection tool itself from being setup to detect smaller defects since it often results in many more defects that need to be then manually reviewed. Paper 8681-109 at SPIE Advanced Lithography 2013 discussed an innovative approach to actinic mask defect review using computational technology, and focused on Die-to-Die transmitted aerial and high-resolution inspections. In this approach, every defect is characterized in two different ways, viz., quantitatively in terms of its print impact on wafer, and qualitatively in terms of its nature and origin in

  12. Analysis of submicron defects using an SEM-Auger defect review tool

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Kenton D.; Watson, David G.; Paul, Dennis F.; Clough, Stephen P.

    1998-11-24

    The challenges associated with analyzing semiconductor defects become greater as the device design rule decreases. According to the SIA National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, the current metrology requirement for particle analysis is 90 nm with the need to analyze 75 nm particles by the year 2001. These dimensional requirements are beyond the typical capabilities of current SEM/EDX defect review tools. Auger Electron Spectroscopy is a powerful method for measuring the surface composition of localized regions, and has been identified in the SIA roadmap as a primary technique for particle analysis. The ability of a state-of-the-art Auger defect review tool (DRT) to provide secondary electron and high spatial resolution elemental images is particularly effective in characterizing the often complex structure of semiconductor defects. Examples of Auger analysis from defects found at various process steps, on both unpatterned and patterned whole wafers, are shown. These examples highlight the ability of Auger to analyze both thin and laterally small or complex defects.

  13. Porous nematic microfluidics for generation of umbilic defects and umbilic defect lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplinc, Jure; Morris, Stephen; Ravnik, Miha

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate that porous nematic microfluidics is a potential route for the generation of nematic umbilic defects and regular umbilic defect lattices. By using numerical modeling we show that the mutual (backflow) coupling between the flow velocity and the orientation director field of the nematic liquid crystal leads to the formation of positive umbilic defects at local peaks and to the formation of negative umbilic defects at the local saddles in the flow profile. The number of flow peaks and the index of the flow saddles (i.e., the number of the valleys) are shown to be directly related to the strength of the umbilic defect, effectively relating the two fields at the geometrical level. The regular arrangement of the barriers in the porous channels is demonstrated to lead to the formation of regular lattices of umbilic defects, including square, triangular, and even kagome lattices. Experimental realization of such systems is discussed, with particular focus on microfluidic-tunable birefringent photonic band structures and lattices.

  14. Defect characterisation based on heat diffusion using induction thermography testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) thermography (a.k.a. induction thermography) has been successfully applied to detect defects (corrosion, cracks, impact, and delamination) in metal alloy and carbon fiber reinforced plastic. During these applications, the defect detection mechanism is mainly investigated based on the eddy current interaction with defect. In this paper, defect characterisation for wall thinning defect and inner defect in steel is investigated based on heat diffusion. The paper presents the PEC thermography testing, which integrates the reflection mode and transmission mode by means of configuring two cameras on both sides of sample. The defect characterisation methods under transmission mode and reflection mode are investigated and compared through 1D analytical analysis, 3D numerical studies, and experimental studies. The suitable detection mode for wall thinning and inner defects quantification is concluded.

  15. Production of EUV mask blanks with low killer defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antohe, Alin O.; Kearney, Patrick; Godwin, Milton; He, Long; John Kadaksham, Arun; Goodwin, Frank; Weaver, Al; Hayes, Alan; Trigg, Steve

    2014-04-01

    For full commercialization, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology requires the availability of EUV mask blanks that are free of defects. This remains one of the main impediments to the implementation of EUV at the 22 nm node and beyond. Consensus is building that a few small defects can be mitigated during mask patterning, but defects over 100 nm (SiO2 equivalent) in size are considered potential "killer" defects or defects large enough that the mask blank would not be usable. The current defect performance of the ion beam sputter deposition (IBD) tool will be discussed and the progress achieved to date in the reduction of large size defects will be summarized, including a description of the main sources of defects and their composition.

  16. Detection of a Heart Defect in the Fetus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Defects • Home • About Congenital Heart Defects • The Impact of Congenital Heart ... About Heart Rate (Pulse) 4 What are the Symptoms of High Blood Pressure? 5 How to Eat Healthy 6 ...

  17. Zika Virus Causes Brain Defects in Babies: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158287.html Zika Virus Causes Brain Defects in Babies: CDC Agency says evidence confirms ... definite and direct cause of microcephaly and other brain-related birth defects, U.S. health officials announced Wednesday. " ...

  18. Defect annihilation at grain boundaries in alpha-Fe

    PubMed Central

    Di Chen; Wang, Jing; Chen, Tianyi; Shao, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Understanding radiation responses of Fe-based metals is essential to develop radiation tolerant steels for longer and safer life cycles in harsh reactor environments. Nanograined metals have been explored as self-healing materials due to point-defect recombination at grain boundaries. The fundamental defect-boundary interactions, however, are not yet well understood. We discover that the interactions are always mediated by formation and annealing of chain-like defects, which consist of alternately positioned interstitials and vacancies. These chain-like defects are closely correlated to the patterns of defect formation energy minima on the grain boundary, which depend on specific boundary configurations. Through chain-like defects, a point defect effectively translates large distances, to annihilate with its opposite, thus grain boundaries act as highly efficient defect sinks that cannot saturate under extreme radiation conditions. PMID:23519086

  19. Defect annihilation at grain boundaries in alpha-Fe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Wang, Jing; Chen, Tianyi; Shao, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Understanding radiation responses of Fe-based metals is essential to develop radiation tolerant steels for longer and safer life cycles in harsh reactor environments. Nanograined metals have been explored as self-healing materials due to point-defect recombination at grain boundaries. The fundamental defect-boundary interactions, however, are not yet well understood. We discover that the interactions are always mediated by formation and annealing of chain-like defects, which consist of alternately positioned interstitials and vacancies. These chain-like defects are closely correlated to the patterns of defect formation energy minima on the grain boundary, which depend on specific boundary configurations. Through chain-like defects, a point defect effectively translates large distances, to annihilate with its opposite, thus grain boundaries act as highly efficient defect sinks that cannot saturate under extreme radiation conditions. PMID:23519086

  20. Lower Dimension Vacuum Defects in Lattice Yang-Mills Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V.I.

    2005-04-01

    We overview lattice data on d = 0, 1, 2, 3 dimensional vacuum defects in lattice four-dimensional SU(2) (SU(3)) gluodynamics. In all the cases, defects have a total volume which scales in physical units (with zero fractal dimension). In the case of d = 1, 2, the defects are distinguished by ultraviolet divergent non-Abelian action as well. This sensitivity to the ultraviolet scale allows us to derive strong constraints from the continuum theory on the properties of the defects, which turn out to be satisfied by the lattice data. We discuss a classification scheme of the defects which allows us to (at least) visualize the defect properties in a simple and unified way. A not-yet-checked relation of the defects to the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking is suggested by the scheme. Finally, we present some arguments that the defects considered could become fundamental variables of a dual formulation of the theory.

  1. Are There Disorders or Conditions Associated with Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Are there disorders or conditions associated with neural tube defects? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Infants born with neural tube defects that are not immediately fatal may ...

  2. 7 CFR 52.3187 - Definitions and explanations of defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... flesh, or both, of the prune. (h) Insect injury. “Insect injury” means healed or unhealed surface...) Other means. “Other means” includes damage by any injury or defect or group of defects not...

  3. Study Explores Mechanism Between Zika Virus, Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158048.html Study Explores Mechanism Between Zika Virus, Birth Defects Protein on fetal stem cells provides ... Scientists say they've discovered how the Zika virus might cause severe brain and eye birth defects. ...

  4. Defect characterisation based on heat diffusion using induction thermography testing.

    PubMed

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) thermography (a.k.a. induction thermography) has been successfully applied to detect defects (corrosion, cracks, impact, and delamination) in metal alloy and carbon fiber reinforced plastic. During these applications, the defect detection mechanism is mainly investigated based on the eddy current interaction with defect. In this paper, defect characterisation for wall thinning defect and inner defect in steel is investigated based on heat diffusion. The paper presents the PEC thermography testing, which integrates the reflection mode and transmission mode by means of configuring two cameras on both sides of sample. The defect characterisation methods under transmission mode and reflection mode are investigated and compared through 1D analytical analysis, 3D numerical studies, and experimental studies. The suitable detection mode for wall thinning and inner defects quantification is concluded. PMID:23126785

  5. Vorticity, defects and correlations in active turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Thampi, Sumesh P.; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a numerical investigation of a continuum model of an active nematic, concentrating on the regime of active turbulence. Results are presented for the effect of three parameters, activity, elastic constant and rotational diffusion constant, on the order parameter and flow fields. Defects and distortions in the director field act as sources of vorticity, and thus vorticity is strongly correlated to the director field. In particular, the characteristic length of decay of vorticity and order parameter correlations is controlled by the defect density. By contrast, the decay of velocity correlations is determined by a balance between activity and dissipation. We highlight the role of microscopic flow generation mechanisms in determining the flow patterns and characteristic scales of active turbulence and contrast the behaviour of extensile and contractile active nematics. PMID:25332382

  6. Excess Oxygen Defects in Layered Cuprates

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lightfoot, P.; Pei, S. Y.; Jorgensen, J. D.; Manthiram, A.; Tang, X. X.; Goodenough, J. B.

    1990-09-01

    Neutron powder diffraction has been used to study the oxygen defect chemistry of two non-superconducting layered cuprates, La{sub 1. 25}Dy{sub 0.75}Cu{sub 3.75}F{sub 0.5}, having a T{sup {asterisk}}- related structure, and La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 1.15}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 6.25}, having a structure related to that of the newly discovered double-layer superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 6}. The role played by oxygen defects in determining the superconducting properties of layered cuprates is discussed.

  7. Birth defects: Risk factors and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Camila Ive Ferreira; Fett-Conte, Agnes Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Birth defects (BDs) or congenital anomalies include all structural and functional alterations in embryonic or fetal development resulting from genetic, environmental or unknown causes, which result in physical and/or mental impairment. BDs occur in about 3% of newborn babies and in most cases of pregnancy loss. BDs are a very complex and heterogeneous group of single or multiple changes that, in most cases, are of unknown etiology. Among the risk factors are advanced maternal and paternal ages, parental consanguinity, teratogenic agents such as infectious agents and drugs, and poor nutrition, in particular folic acid deficiency. One of the consequences of these defects is the high death rate within the first year of life. Information on BDs is becoming increasingly more important throughout the world so that preventive measures can be taken. Knowledge of BDs enables the development of therapeutic and preventive strategies besides adequate genetic counseling.

  8. Multichannel quantum defect theory for polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfimov, Sergei V.; Dorofeev, Dmitrii L.; Zon, Boris A.

    2014-02-01

    Our work is devoted to developing a general approach for nonpenetrating Rydberg states of polar molecules. We propose a method to estimate the accuracy of calculation of their wave functions and quantum defects. Basing on this method we estimate the accuracy of Born-Oppenheimer (BO) and inverse Born-Oppenheimer (IBO) approximations for these states. This estimation enables us to determine the space and energy regions where BO and IBO approximations are valid. It depends on the interplay between l coupling (due to dipole potential of the core) and l uncoupling (due to rotation the core). Next we consider the intermediate region where both BO and IBO are not valid. For this intermediate region we propose a modification of Fano's multichannel quantum defect theory to match BO and IBO wave functions and show that it gives more reliable results. They are demonstrated on the example of SO molecule.

  9. Defect and recognition in Sophocles' Oedipus Rex.

    PubMed

    Whitman-Raymond, Lee

    2005-12-01

    This paper explores the relationships between experienced defect and the subsequent shame and longing for recognition. A clinical vignette is presented in which a young woman sought treatment for her infidelity to her husband: a behavior she found totally mystifying and deeply troubling. Using Bollas' concept of "the unthought known," parallels are drawn between this patient, who was adopted at 2 weeks of age, and Oedipus' experience of knowing and not knowing his fate. A case is made for the idea that we both avoid and seek to know what is unbearable about ourselves, including our sense of defects. One motivation for this is the longing to be seen, recognized, known, and, finally, know one's self. PMID:16328074

  10. Nanoscale defect detection by heterodyne interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Haoshan; Li Yuhe; Wang Dongsheng; Tong Xiaolei; Liu Mei

    2009-03-10

    We construct an instrument that facilitates the measurement of nanoscale defects. It is based on heterodyne interferometry with phase measurement that utilizes a polarizing beam splitter to form a measuring signal and an oscillating cantilever tip that acts as a scanning probe to get the measurement values of sample topography. The dependence of the tip displacement on the variation of tip-sample distance and the comb scanning of the sample topography are investigated by experiments. The results prove that the tip displacement increases and is enough to be discriminated in various positions where the sample is approached. The system has been successfully utilized to measure the defect characterization by measuring the pitch of the standard sample. The results also show that the heterodyne system has good repeatability, a large measurement range, and high accuracy, with a measurement stability of 0.5 nm.

  11. Defect structure of EFG silicon ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strunk, H.; Cunningham, B.; Ast, D.

    1980-12-01

    The defect structure of EFG ribbons was studied using EBIC, TEM and HVEM. By imaging the same areas in EBIC and HVEM, a direct correlation between the crystallographic nature of defects and their electrical properties was obtained. (1) Partial dislocations at coherent twin boundaries may or may not be electrically active. Since no microprecipitates were observed at these dislocations it is likely that the different electrical activity is a consequence of the different dislocation core structures. (2) 2nd order twin joins were observed which followed the same direction as the coherent first order twins normally associated with EFG ribbons. These 2nd order twin joins are in all cases strongly electrically active. EFG ribbons contain high concentrations of carbon. Since no evidence of precipitation was found with TEM it is suggested that the carbon may be incorporated into the higher order twin boundaries now known to exist in EFG ribbons.

  12. Nonlinear ultrasonic scanning to detect material defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method and system are provided to detect defects in a material. Waves of known frequency(ies) are mixed at an interaction zone in the material. As a result, at least one of a difference wave and a sum wave are generated in the interaction zone. The difference wave occurs at a difference frequency and the sum wave occurs at a sum frequency. The amplitude of at least one nonlinear signal based on the sum and/or difference waves is then measured. The nonlinear signal is defined as the amplitude of one of the difference wave and sum wave relative to the product of the amplitude of the surface waves. The amplitude of the nonlinear signal is an indication of defects (e.g., dislocation dipole density) in the interaction zone.

  13. Transport on a lattice with dynamical defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turci, Francesco; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Pitard, Estelle; Romano, M. Carmen; Ciandrini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Many transport processes in nature take place on substrates, often considered as unidimensional lanes. These unidimensional substrates are typically nonstatic: Affected by a fluctuating environment, they can undergo conformational changes. This is particularly true in biological cells, where the state of the substrate is often coupled to the active motion of macromolecular complexes, such as motor proteins on microtubules or ribosomes on mRNAs, causing new interesting phenomena. Inspired by biological processes such as protein synthesis by ribosomes and motor protein transport, we introduce the concept of localized dynamical sites coupled to a driven lattice gas dynamics. We investigate the phenomenology of transport in the presence of dynamical defects and find a regime characterized by an intermittent current and subject to severe finite-size effects. Our results demonstrate the impact of the regulatory role of the dynamical defects in transport not only in biology but also in more general contexts.

  14. Defect structure of EFG silicon ribbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strunk, H.; Cunningham, B.; Ast, D.

    1980-01-01

    The defect structure of EFG ribbons was studied using EBIC, TEM and HVEM. By imaging the same areas in EBIC and HVEM, a direct correlation between the crystallographic nature of defects and their electrical properties was obtained. (1) Partial dislocations at coherent twin boundaries may or may not be electrically active. Since no microprecipitates were observed at these dislocations it is likely that the different electrical activity is a consequence of the different dislocation core structures. (2) 2nd order twin joins were observed which followed the same direction as the coherent first order twins normally associated with EFG ribbons. These 2nd order twin joins are in all cases strongly electrically active. EFG ribbons contain high concentrations of carbon. Since no evidence of precipitation was found with TEM it is suggested that the carbon may be incorporated into the higher order twin boundaries now known to exist in EFG ribbons.

  15. Biomimetic biphasic scaffolds for osteochondral defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuezhou; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Jincheng; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The osteochondral defects caused by vigorous trauma or physical disease are difficult to be managed. Tissue engineering provides a possible option to regenerate the damaged osteochondral tissues. For osteochondral reconstruction, one intact scaffold should be considered to support the regeneration of both cartilage and subchondral bone. Therefore, the biphasic scaffolds with the mimic structures of osteochondral tissues have been developed to close this chasm. A variety of biomimetic bilayer scaffolds fabricated from natural or synthetic polymers, or the ones loading with growth factors, cells, or both of them make great progresses in osteochondral defect repair. In this review, the preparation and in vitro and/or in vivo verification of bioinspired biphasic scaffolds are summarized and discussed, as well as the prospect is predicted. PMID:26816644

  16. Defective Reduction in Automotive Headlining Manufacturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittichai, Saranya; Chutima, Parames

    2016-05-01

    In an automobile parts manufacturing company, currently the headlining process has a lot of wastes resulting in a high cost of quality per year. In this paper, the Six Sigma method is used to reduce the defects in the headlining process. Cause-and-effect matrix and failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) were adopted to screen the factors that affect the quality of headlining. The 2k-1 fractional factorials design was also use to determine the potential preliminary root causes. The full factorial experiments was conducted to identify appropriate settings of the significant factors. The result showed that the process can reduce the defects of headlining from 12.21% to 6.95%

  17. Parallel transport and defects on nematic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, Riccardo; Virga, Epifanio G.; Kralj, Samo

    2012-11-01

    Nematic shells are thin films of nematic liquid crystal deposited on the boundary of colloidal particles, where liquid crystal molecules may freely glide, while remaining tangent to the surface substrate. The surface nematic order is described here by an appropriate tensor field Q, which vanishes wherever a defect occurs in the molecular order. We show how the classical concept of parallel transport on a manifold introduced by Levi-Civita can be adapted to this setting to define the topological charge m of a defect. We arrive at a simple formula to compute m from a generic representation of Q. In a number of separate appendices, we revisit in a unified language several, apparently disparate applications of Levi-Civita's parallel transport.

  18. CBED and LACBED characterization of crystal defects.

    PubMed

    Morniroli, J P

    2006-09-01

    Convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) obtained with a focused incident beam is well known for the identification of the point and space groups but it can also be used for the analysis of stacking faults and antiphase boundaries. Large-angle convergent-beam electron diffraction (LACBED) is performed with a large defocused incident beam and is well adapted to the characterization of most types of crystal defects: point defects, perfect and partial dislocations, stacking faults, antiphase boundaries and grain boundaries. Among the advantages of these methods with respect to the conventional transmission electron microscopy methods, are that one or few patterns are required for a full analysis and the interpretations are easy and unambiguous. The LACBED technique is particularly useful for the analysis of dislocations present in anisotropic and beam-sensitive materials. PMID:17059540

  19. Topological Point Defects in Relaxor Ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Y.; Prokhorenko, S.; Kornev, I.; Bellaiche, L.

    2016-03-01

    First-principles-based effective Hamiltonian simulations are used to reveal the hidden connection between topological defects (hedgehogs and antihedgehogs) and relaxor behavior. Such defects are discovered to predominantly lie at the border of polar nanoregions in both Ba (Zr0.5 Ti0.5 )O3 (BZT) and Pb (Sc0.5 Nb0.5 )O3 (PSN) systems, and the temperature dependency of their density allows us to distinguish between noncanonical (PSN) and canonical (BZT) relaxor behaviors (via the presence or absence of a crossing of a percolation threshold). This density also possesses an inflection point at precisely the temperature for which the dielectric response peaks. Moreover, hedgehogs and antihedgehogs are found to be mobile excitations, and the dynamical nature of their annihilation is demonstrated (using simple hydrodynamical arguments) to follows laws, such as those of Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius, that are characteristic of dipolar relaxation kinetics of relaxor ferroelectrics.

  20. Topological Point Defects in Relaxor Ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Y; Prokhorenko, S; Kornev, I; Bellaiche, L

    2016-03-25

    First-principles-based effective Hamiltonian simulations are used to reveal the hidden connection between topological defects (hedgehogs and antihedgehogs) and relaxor behavior. Such defects are discovered to predominantly lie at the border of polar nanoregions in both Ba(Zr_{0.5}Ti_{0.5})O_{3} (BZT) and Pb(Sc_{0.5}Nb_{0.5})O_{3} (PSN) systems, and the temperature dependency of their density allows us to distinguish between noncanonical (PSN) and canonical (BZT) relaxor behaviors (via the presence or absence of a crossing of a percolation threshold). This density also possesses an inflection point at precisely the temperature for which the dielectric response peaks. Moreover, hedgehogs and antihedgehogs are found to be mobile excitations, and the dynamical nature of their annihilation is demonstrated (using simple hydrodynamical arguments) to follows laws, such as those of Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius, that are characteristic of dipolar relaxation kinetics of relaxor ferroelectrics. PMID:27058101