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Sample records for frequency cyclotron

  1. Transparency of Magnetized Plasma at Cyclotron Frequency

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; J.S. Wurtele

    2002-03-14

    Electromagnetic radiation is strongly absorbed by a magnetized plasma if the radiation frequency equals the cyclotron frequency of plasma electrons. It is demonstrated that absorption can be completely canceled in the presence of a magnetostatic field of an undulator or a second radiation beam, resulting in plasma transparency at the cyclotron frequency. This effect is reminiscent of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of the three-level atomic systems, except that it occurs in a completely classical plasma. Unlike the atomic systems, where all the excited levels required for EIT exist in each atom, this classical EIT requires the excitation of the nonlocal plasma oscillation. The complexity of the plasma system results in an index of refraction at the cyclotron frequency that differs from unity. Lagrangian description was used to elucidate the physics and enable numerical simulation of the plasma transparency and control of group and phase velocity. This control naturally leads to applications for electromagnetic pulse compression in the plasma and electron/ion acceleration.

  2. Cyclotron Mode Frequency Shifts in Multi-Species Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    Plasmas exhibit a variety of cyclotron modes, which are used in a broad range of devices to manipulate and diagnose charged particles. Here we discuss cyclotron modes in trapped plasmas with a single sign of charge. Collective effects and electric fields shift these cyclotron mode frequencies away from the ``bare'' cyclotron frequencies Ωs ≡ qB /ms c for each species s. These electric fields may arise from applied trap potentials, from space charge including collective effects, and from image charge in the trap walls. We will describe a new laser-thermal cyclotron spectroscopy technique, applied to well-diagnosed pure ion plasmas. This technique enables detailed observations of cos (mθ) surface cyclotron modes with m = 0 , 1, and 2 in near rigid-rotor multi-species ion plasmas. For each species s, we observe cyclotron mode frequency shifts which are dependent on the plasma density through the E × B rotation frequency, and on the charge concentration of species s, in close agreement with recent theory. This includes the novel m = 0 radial ``breathing'' mode, which generates no external electric field except at the plasma ends. These cyclotron frequencies can be used to determine the plasma E × B rotation frequency and the species charge concentrations, in close agreement with our laser diagnostics. Here, this plasma characterization permits a determination of the ``bare'' cyclotron frequencies to an accuracy of 2 parts in 104. These new results give a physical basis for the ``space charge'' and ``amplitude'' calibration equations of cyclotron mass spectroscopy, widely used in molecular chemistry and biology. Also, at high temperatures there is preliminary evidence that radially-standing electrostatic Bernstein waves couple to the surface cyclotron modes, producing new resonant frequencies. Supported by NSF/DOE Partnership grants PHY-0903877 and DE-SC0002451.

  3. Ionospheric modification at twice the electron cyclotron frequency.

    PubMed

    Djuth, F T; Pedersen, T R; Gerken, E A; Bernhardt, P A; Selcher, C A; Bristow, W A; Kosch, M J

    2005-04-01

    In 2004, a new transmission band was added to the HAARP high-frequency ionospheric modification facility that encompasses the second electron cyclotron harmonic at altitudes between approximately 220 and 330 km. Initial observations indicate that greatly enhanced airglow occurs whenever the transmission frequency approximately matches the second electron cyclotron harmonic at the height of the upper hybrid resonance. This is the reverse of what happens at higher electron cyclotron harmonics. The measured optical emissions confirm the presence of accelerated electrons in the plasma. PMID:15903924

  4. Suppression of cyclotron instability in Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources by two-frequency heating

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-08-15

    Multiple frequency heating is one of the most effective techniques to improve the performance of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources. The method increases the beam current and average charge state of the extracted ions and enhances the temporal stability of the ion beams. It is demonstrated in this paper that the stabilizing effect of two-frequency heating is connected with the suppression of electron cyclotron instability. Experimental data show that the interaction between the secondary microwave radiation and the hot electron component of ECR ion source plasmas plays a crucial role in mitigation of the instabilities.

  5. Frequency-scanning marginal oscillator for ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Paul R.; Bowers, Michael T.

    1982-07-01

    A number of ion cyclotron resonance applications have arisen in the past few years which require a frequency-scanned detection system. Since the traditional marginal oscillator detector has always been a fixed-frequency detector, alternative detection techniques such as bridge circuit detectors have become widely used. In this paper we present an alternative to the bridge detector, namely, a frequency-scanning marginal oscillator. Requirements and modifications necessary to convert a marginal oscillator to frequency scanning operation are discussed in detail and the necessary circuit diagrams presented. Finally, a theoretical comparison is made between bridge circuit and marginal oscillator sensitivities.

  6. Heating by waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main aspects of heating with the fast wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are reviewed. First, the ion cyclotron resonance mechanism, fundamental and harmonics, is examined. Then the properties of fast wave dispersion are reviewed, and the principles of minority and higher cylcotron harmonic heating are discussed. An elementary coupling model is worked out in order to outline the computation of the electrical properties of ICRF antennas. Using the simple model, the antenna radiation pattern inside the plasma is computed and the effect of phasing on the k spectrum and on the antenna radiation properties is illustrated. The quasi linear-Fokker-Planck computation of the deformation of distribution functions due to Radio-Frequency (RF) and tail formation are briefly discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Frequency-swept detector for ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wronka, J.; Ridge, D. P.

    1982-04-01

    Design, construction, performance, and use of a frequency-swept bridge detector for ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry are described. Special features include characterization and simple automatic correction of phase shift to allow broadband detection. The result is a detection system that may be used either at constant field or constant frequency. Drift-mode operation is simplified in that it may be satisfactorily used without the various signal modulation schemes used in previous detectors. In the trapped mode the detector may be pulsed to control the timing of ion detection. This detector makes it possible to do frequency-swept double resonance experiments which provide spectra of all the product ions of a given reactant ion. Circuit schematics and typical frequency- and field-swept spectra are shown.

  8. Plane gyroklinotron at first and third harmonics of cyclotron frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurayev, A.A.; Lukashonok, D.V.; Sinitsyn, A.K. E-mail: timka86@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    The results of gyroklinotron's parameters optimization for efficiency at f = 100 GHz with interaction on first and third harmonics of the cyclotron frequency are presented. The predicted electron gyroklinotron's efficiency reaches 70% on first harmonic and 40% on third harmonic. This is more than in usual gyrotron. Besides in contrast to usual gyrotron the width electron beam on radius of guiding centers of electron orbits in gyroklinotron may considerable exceed working wave length {lambda}. This allows to use in it considerable more power of electron beams EB then in usual gyrotron. (author)

  9. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency: Stereo observations

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, L. K.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Klecker, B.; Omidi, N.; Isenberg, P. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Figueroa-Viñas, A.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2014-05-10

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named 'LFW storms'. Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  10. Ion cyclotron resonance bridge detector for frequency sweep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitsakis, Michael N.; Wobschall, Darold C.

    1983-11-01

    An electronic ion cyclotron resonance detection system was designed and constructed. The ions are excited by sweeping the frequency of the electric field (3-300 kHz) using a sweep frequency generator with a nonlinear sweep voltage in order to maintain an approximately constant mass resolution. Ion detection is accomplished by a bridge with a phase-sensitive detector as a demodulator. The required reference signal for the phase-sensitive detector is generated by a circuit with a transfer function which approximates that of the ICR signal in order to obtain an accurate phase match between the signal source and the detector. The device is capable of detecting a minimum concentration of 50 ions/cm3 over a mass range of 15 to 1500 amu.

  11. Transport induced by ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Debing Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-11-15

    The Vlasov equation, which includes the effect of the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves, can be written as the Fokker-Planck equation which describes the quasilinear transport in phase space by using the Lie-transform method. The radial transport fluxes of particle, energy and parallel momentum driven by ICRF waves in the slab geometry have been derived. The results show that the ICRF-induced radial redistributions of particle, energy and parallel momentum are driven by the inhomogeneity in energy of the equilibrium distribution function, and related to the correlation between the excursion in the real space and the excursion in energy. For the case with strong asymmetry of k{sub y} spectrum, the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the energy inhomogeneity dominates the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the spatial inhomogeneity.

  12. The technology of the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Barber, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is the least expensive means of accomplishing auxiliary heating in fusion experiments. RF systems comprise two major elements: the transmitter and the antenna. The state of the art for the transmitter is already at the megawatt level. The technology of the antenna is strongly coupled to the plasma character. Typically, these antennas are designed to operate at a high power density (1.2 kW/cm/sup 2/) with an efficiency of 96%. ICRF technology and options have improved over the past few years, owing to development and experiments; however, the optimal combination of options can be defined only when results from confinement experiments and test facilities are in hand. 19 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Low radio frequency biased electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samukawa, Seiji; Toyosato, Tomohiko; Wani, Etsuo

    1991-03-01

    A radio frequency (rf) biased electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etching technology has been developed to realize an efficient ion acceleration in high density and uniform ECR plasma for accurate Al-Si-Cu alloy film etching. In this technology, the substrate is located at the ECR position (875 G position) and the etching is carried out with a 400 kHz rf bias power. This Al-Si-Cu etching technology achieves a high etching rate (more than 5000 A/min), excellent etching uniformity (within ±5%), highly anisotropic etching, and Cu residue-free etching in only Cl2 gas plasma. These etching characteristics are accomplished by the combination of the dense and uniform ECR plasma generation at the ECR position with the efficient accelerated ion flux at the ECR position by using 400 kHz rf bias.

  14. Precision phase control for the radio frequency system of K500 superconducting cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Som, Sumit; Ghosh, Surajit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Roy, Suprakash

    2013-11-15

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) has commissioned K500 Superconducting cyclotron (SCC) based on MSU and Texas A and M university cyclotrons. The radio frequency (RF) system of SCC has been commissioned with the stringent requirement of various RF parameters. The three-phase RF system of Superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9–27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.1°, respectively. The phase control system has the option to change the relative phase difference between any two RF cavities and maintain the phase stability within ±0.1° during round-the-clock cyclotron operation. The said precision phase loop consists of both analogue In-phase/Quadrature modulator to achieve faster response and also Direct Digital Synthesis based phase shifter to achieve wide dynamic range as well. This paper discusses detail insights into the various issues of phase control for the K500 SCC at VECC, Kolkata.

  15. Precision phase control for the radio frequency system of K500 superconducting cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sumit; Ghosh, Surajit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Roy, Suprakash

    2013-11-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) has commissioned K500 Superconducting cyclotron (SCC) based on MSU and Texas A&M university cyclotrons. The radio frequency (RF) system of SCC has been commissioned with the stringent requirement of various RF parameters. The three-phase RF system of Superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.1°, respectively. The phase control system has the option to change the relative phase difference between any two RF cavities and maintain the phase stability within ±0.1° during round-the-clock cyclotron operation. The said precision phase loop consists of both analogue In-phase/Quadrature modulator to achieve faster response and also Direct Digital Synthesis based phase shifter to achieve wide dynamic range as well. This paper discusses detail insights into the various issues of phase control for the K500 SCC at VECC, Kolkata.

  16. Excitation of low frequency waves by streaming ions via anomalous cyclotron resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Dillenburg, D.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.; Ziebell, L. F.; Goedert, J.; Freund, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a small population of streaming ions on low-frequency waves with frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency is analyzed for three modes of interest: Alfven waves, magnetosonic waves, and ion-cyclotron waves. The instability mechanism is the anomalous cyclotron resonance of the waves with the streaming ions. Conditions for excitation of the three types of waves are derived and expressions for the growth rates are obtained. Excitation of Alfven waves is possible even if the ratio of the densities of the streaming ions to the thermal ions is very small. For magnetosonic waves, excitation can easily occur if waves are propagating parallel or nearly parallel to the ambient magnetic field. As for ion-cyclotron waves, it is found that for the ion-whistler branch the excitation is suppressed over a broader range of wave frequencies than for the fast magnetosonic branch.

  17. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed near the oxygen cyclotron frequency by ISEE 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Hu, Y. D.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The first results of observations of ion cyclotron waves by the elliptically orbiting ISEE 1 and 2 pair of spacecraft are reported. The most intense waves (8 nT) were observed in the outer plasmasphere where convection drift velocities were largest and the Alfven velocity was a minimum. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. Computations of the experimental wave spectra during the passage through the plasmapause show that the spectral slots relate to the local plasma parameters, possibly suggesting an ion cyclotron wave growth source near the spacecraft. A regular wave packet structure seen over the first 30 min of the event is attributed to the modulation of this energy source by the Pc 5 waves seen at the same time.

  18. Observation of upper drift modes in radio frequency produced magnetized plasmas with frequency above ion cyclotron frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Saha, S. K.; Chowdhury, S.; Janaki, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In a RF produced magnetized argon plasma expanding into a larger expansion chamber, electrostatic modes propagating azimuthally in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and frequency greater than the ion cyclotron frequency are observed. In the radial direction, the mode amplitude peaks at a location where the radial density gradient is maximum. The modes are detected at axial locations up to 16 cm away from the entrance aperture. For fixed values of the neutral pressure and magnetic field, the mode frequency is found to be independent of the location at which it is measured. The modes exhibit drift wave characteristics revealing a radial structure with the azimuthal mode number m = 1 at the lower radial locations (r ˜ 3.0 cm) while the m = 2 mode is located in the outer region. Theoretical modeling using a local dispersion relation based on the fluid equations predicts destabilization of the modes with frequency greater than the ion-cyclotron frequency by electron-neutral collisions and exhibiting other drift wave features.

  19. Observation of upper drift modes in radio frequency produced magnetized plasmas with frequency above ion cyclotron frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Saha, S. K.; Chowdhury, S.; Janaki, M. S.

    2015-12-15

    In a RF produced magnetized argon plasma expanding into a larger expansion chamber, electrostatic modes propagating azimuthally in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and frequency greater than the ion cyclotron frequency are observed. In the radial direction, the mode amplitude peaks at a location where the radial density gradient is maximum. The modes are detected at axial locations up to 16 cm away from the entrance aperture. For fixed values of the neutral pressure and magnetic field, the mode frequency is found to be independent of the location at which it is measured. The modes exhibit drift wave characteristics revealing a radial structure with the azimuthal mode number m = 1 at the lower radial locations (r ∼ 3.0 cm) while the m = 2 mode is located in the outer region. Theoretical modeling using a local dispersion relation based on the fluid equations predicts destabilization of the modes with frequency greater than the ion-cyclotron frequency by electron-neutral collisions and exhibiting other drift wave features.

  20. Absorption and emission of extraordinary-mode electromagnetic waves near cyclotron frequency in nonequilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Lin, C. S.; Wong, H. K.; Tsai, S. T.; Zhou, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation is presented of two cases: (1) weakly relativistic electrons with a loss-cone type distribution, and (2) electrons with a drift velocity parallel to the ambient magnetic field. Numerical computations are given for physical parameters close to those in the polar region of the earth magnetosphere and laboratory experiments, with attention to the fast extraordinary-mode radiation whose frequency is near that of the electron cyclotron frequency. The fast extraordinary mode can escape from a strong field region to the weaker field region and may therefore be measured outside the plasma. It is found that the X mode radiation can be amplified by means of a cyclotron maser effect when the electrons have a loss-cone distribution, and it is concluded that, when the electron energy is sufficiently high, the X mode cutoff frequency may be lower than the cyclotron frequency.

  1. Comments on finite Larmor radius models for ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Smithe, D.N.

    1994-06-01

    The accuracy of standard finite Larmor radius (FLR) models for wave propagation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is compared against full hot plasma models. For multiple ion species plasmas, the FLR model is shown to predict the presence of a spurious second harmonic ion-ion type resonance between the second harmonic cyclotron layers of two ion species. It is shown explicitly here that the spurious resonance is an artifact of the FLR models and that no absorption occurs in the plasma as a result of this ``resonance.``

  2. Comments on finite Larmor radius models for ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R. ); Smithe, D.N. )

    1994-12-01

    The accuracy of standard finite Larmor radius (FLR) models for wave propagation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is compared against full hot plasma models. For multiple ion species plasmas, the FLR model is shown to predict the presence of a spurious second harmonic ion--ion type resonance between the second harmonic cyclotron layers of two ion species. It is shown explicitly here that the spurious resonance is an artifact of the FLR models and that no absorption occurs in the plasma as a result of this resonance.''

  3. Cyclotron mode frequencies and resonant absorption in multi-species ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Affolter, M.; Anderegg, F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2015-05-15

    Cyclotron mode frequencies are studied on trapped rigid-rotor multi-species ion plasmas. Collective effects and radial electric fields shift the mode frequencies away from the “bare” cyclotron frequencies 2πF{sub c}{sup (s)}≡(q{sub s}B/M{sub s}c) for each species s. These frequency shifts are measured on the distinct cyclotron modes (m=0,1, and 2) with cos(mθ) azimuthal dependence. We find that for radially uniform plasmas the frequency shifts corroborate a simple theory expression, in which collective effects enter only through the E × B rotation frequency f{sub E} and the species fraction δ{sub s}. The m = 1 center-of-mass mode is in agreement with a simple “clump” model. Additionally, ultra-cold ion plasmas exhibit centrifugal separation by mass, and additional frequency shifts are observed, in agreement with a more general theory.

  4. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Lan; Alexander, Robert; Wicks, Robert; Stevens, Michael; Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Russell, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Strong narrow-band electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency have been found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They are nearly-circularly polarized and propagate close to the magnetic field. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency can be ion cyclotron waves or magnetosonic waves. They can play an important role in modulating the solar wind ion distribution, and contribute to the heating and acceleration of solar wind. Since the waves are left-hand or right-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, they are probably due to Doppler shift of a same type of waves, or there could be a mixture of waves with intrinsically different polarizations. Through the assistance of audification, we have studied the long-lasting low frequency wave events in 2005 using high-cadence magnetic field data from the Wind mission. The Solar Wind Experiment team of the Wind mission has provided the temperature anisotropies for core protons, beam protons, and alpha particles, as well as the beam drift for selected cases. We conduct wave dispersion analysis using these ion moments to examine if these waves can be explained by ion cyclotron anisotropy instability or ion beam instability related to the solar wind inhomogeneities.

  5. Electron cyclotron harmonic resonances in high-frequency heating of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2013-09-15

    Electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves under cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction is studied. Theory is formulated; the analytical solutions in the second and fourth harmonic cyclotron resonance cases are obtained, and in the third harmonic case, a first order differential equation governing the evolution of the electron energy is derived. The theory is applied for explaining the generation of artificial ionization layers observed in high-frequency (HF) ionospheric heating experiments. The upper hybrid waves are assumed to be excited parametrically by the O-mode HF heating wave. As the decay mode is the lower hybrid wave, the excited upper hybrid waves have wavelengths ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m, which are short enough to effectively incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect for the harmonic cyclotron resonance interactions as well as have a frequency bandwidth of about 20 kHz, which provides an altitude region of about 10 km for continuous harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction between electrons and descending waves in the slightly inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The numerical results on electron acceleration show that electron fluxes with energies larger than 14 eV are generated in the three harmonic cases. These energetic electrons cause impact ionizations, which are descending to form artificial ionization layers at the bottom of the ionospheric F region.

  6. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating of plasma with small impurity production

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1987-01-01

    Plasma including plasma ions is magnetically confined by a magnetic field. The plasma has a defined outer surface and is intersected by resonance surfaces of respective common ion cyclotron frequency of a predetermined species of plasma ions moving in the magnetic field. A radio frequency source provides radio frequency power at a radio frequency corresponding to the ion cyclotron frequency of the predetermined species of plasma ions moving in the field at a respective said resonance surface. RF launchers coupled to the radio frequency source radiate radio frequency energy at the resonance frequency onto the respective resonance surface within the plasma from a plurality of locations located outside the plasma at such respective distances from the intersections of the respective resonance surface and the defined outer surface and at such relative phases that the resulting interference pattern provides substantially null net radio frequency energy over regions near and including substantial portions of the intersections relative to the radio frequency energy provided thereby at other portions of the respective resonance surface within the plasma.

  7. Oscillating two stream instability of electromagnetic pump in the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Nafis; Tripathi, V. K.; Rafat, M.; Husain, Mudassir M.

    2009-06-15

    An analytical formalism of oscillating two stream instability of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a plasma is developed. The instability produces electrostatic ion cyclotron sidebands and a driven low frequency mode. The nonlinear coupling arises primarily due to the motion of ions and is strong when the pump frequency is close to ion cyclotron frequency and the oscillatory ion velocity is a significant fraction of acoustic speed. For propagation perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, the X-mode pump wave produces flute type perturbation with maximum growth rate at some specific wavelengths, which are three to four times larger than the ion Larmor radius. For propagation at oblique angles to ambient magnetic field, the ion cyclotron O-mode, the growth rate increases with the wave number of the low frequency mode.

  8. Use of the radio-frequency quadrupole structure as a cyclotron axial-buncher system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.W.; Swenson, D.A.; Wangler, T.P.

    1981-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is a new linear accelerating structure being developed as a low-velocity linac. In this structure rf electric fields are used to simultaneously focus, bunch, and accelerate ions. The slow introduction of the accelerating field results in the adiabatic bunching of a dc ion beam with a large capture efficiency. Realistic computer simulations have shown that this new structure could also be used as a buncher in the axial injection system of a cyclotron. A description of the RFQ geometry and its general properties is given. A preliminary design is presented for a variable frequency RFQ to be used as buncher in the axial injection system of a variable energy cyclotron. The operating parameters for this RFQ are discussed.

  9. Validation of the load-resilient ion cyclotron resonance frequency antenna concept on Tore Supra plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulliez, K.; Argouarch, A.; Bosia, G.; Berger-By, G.; Bremond, S.; Colas, L.; Lombard, G.; Mendes, A.; Millon, L.; Mollard, P.; Volpe, D.; Beaumont, B.; Bécoulet, A.; Clairet, F.; Ekedahl, A.; Elkhaldi, M.; Gunn, J.; Hoang, G. T.; Tore Supra Team

    2008-06-01

    In the framework of the ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating development at CEA Cadarache, a prototype antenna based on the load-resilient electrical layout foreseen for ITER has been built. This prototype was recently tested in Tore Supra. The ITER-like electrical scheme has been validated during fast perturbations at the edge plasma. Clear load resilience properties are reported. The main conclusions and consequences learned from the development of the ITER antenna are discussed.

  10. HIGH FREQUENCY POWER TRANSMISSION LINE FOR CYCLOTRONS AND THE LIKE

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, W.J.

    1954-04-20

    High-frequency power transmission systems, particularly a stacked capacitance alternating power current transmission line wherein maximum utilization of the effective conductios skin of the line conductors is achieved while enabling a low impedance to be obtained are reported. The transmission line consists of a number of flat metal strips with interleaved dielectric strips. The metal dielectric strips are coiled spirally with the axis of the spiral extending along the length of the strips, and the alternating metal strips at the output end have outwardly extending aligned lugs which are directly strapped together and connected to the respective terminals on the load. At the input end of the transmission line, similarly, the alternate metal strips are directly strapped together and connected to an altereating current source. With the arrangement described each metal strip conducts on both sides, so that the metal strips are designed to have a thickness corresponding to twice the depth of the "skin effect" conducting lamina of each conductor at the source frequency.

  11. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  12. Kinetic Alfvén turbulence below and above ion cyclotron frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. S.; Voitenko, Y. M.; Wu, D. J.; Yu, M. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Alfvénic turbulent cascade perpendicular and parallel to the background magnetic field is studied accounting for anisotropic dispersive effects and turbulent intermittency. The perpendicular dispersion and intermittency make the perpendicular-wave-number magnetic spectra steeper and speed up production of high ion cyclotron frequencies by the turbulent cascade. On the contrary, the parallel dispersion makes the spectra flatter and decelerate the frequency cascade above the ion cyclotron frequency. Competition of these factors results in spectral indices distributed in the interval [-2, -3], where -2 is the index of high-frequency space-filling turbulence and -3 is the index of low-frequency intermittent turbulence formed by tube-like fluctuations. Spectra of fully intermittent turbulence fill a narrower range of spectral indices [-7/3, -3], which almost coincides with the range of indexes measured in the solar wind. This suggests that the kinetic-scale turbulent spectra are mainly shaped by the dispersion and intermittency. A small mismatch with measured indexes of about 0.1 can be associated with damping effects not studied here.

  13. Low-distortion detection system for frequency-swept ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, M. B.; Freiser, B. S.

    1986-07-01

    A high-performance frequency-swept capacitance bridge detector for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometry has been constructed in our laboratory. Although the basic design of the system is similar to that of previously reported bridge circuits, careful design, layout, construction, and component selection have resulted in excellent frequency-swept performance over a bandwidth of 15 kHz to 1 MHz. At a magnetic field strength of 1.0 T, this corresponds to a mass range of 15-1000 Daltons. Problems with base-line drift and frequency-dependent signal distortion common to many other designs have been significantly reduced. Circuit diagrams are included for all parts of the detector and frequency response curves have been included where appropriate. In addition, several simple circuit diagrams for support devices have also been included.

  14. ICRH of JET and LHD Majority Ions at Their Fundamental Cyclotron Frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kaschuck, Yu. A.; Amosov, V. N.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Mailloux, J.; Stamp, M.; Jachmich, S.; Leggate, H.; Walden, A.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Santala, M.; Kiptily, V.; Popovichev, S.; Vdovin, V.; Biewer, T.; Crombe, K.; Esposito, B.

    2007-09-28

    Results of the experimental studies of ICRH at the fundamental cyclotron frequency of the majority deuterons in JET plasmas with near-tangential deuteron neutral beam injection (NBI) are presented. 1D, 2D and 3D ICRH modeling indicated that several ITER relevant mechanisms of heating may occur simultaneously in this heating scheme: fundamental ion cyclotron resonance heating of majority and beam D ions, impurity ion heating and electron heating due to Landau damping and TTMP. These mechanisms were studied in JET experiments with a {approx}90% D, 5% H plasma including traces of Be and Ar. Up to 2MW of ICRH power was applied at 25 MHz to NBI heated plasmas. In most of the discharges the toroidal magnetic field strength was 3.3T, but in one it was equal to 3.6T. The E{sub +} component of the electric field governs the ion cyclotron heating of not too fast particles. The Doppler shifted RF absorption of the beam deuterons away from the cold resonance at which E{sub +} is small was exploited to enhance the RF power absorption efficiency. Fundamental ICRH experiments were also carried out in LHD hydrogen plasma with high energy hydrogen NBI. ICRH was performed at 38MHz with injected power <1 MW. The effect of fundamental ICRH was clearly demonstrated in both machines.

  15. Ion cyclotron range of frequency heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma via the second-harmonic tritium cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Bush, C.E.; Darrow, D.; Hosea, J.C.; Jaeger, E.F.; Majeski, R.; Murakami, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.E.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.

    1995-07-31

    Experiments have been performed on the TFTR to study rf wave heating of a D-T plasma by way of the second-harmonic tritium cyclotron resonance. The addition of tritium ions to a deuterium plasma allows for absorption of the rf waves at the tritium cyclotron harmonics and by electron damping of a mode converted ion Bernstein wave. Competing mechanisms include direct electron damping and damping at the fundamental cyclotron resonance of deuterium, {alpha} particles, and {sup 3}He ions. The contribution of each is estimated from a series of plasma discharges where various plasma parameters are varied. The majority of the rf power is found to damp on the tritium ions.

  16. Wave intensifications near the electron cyclotron frequency within the polar cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Wong, H. K.; Lin, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    As DE 1 flew through the polar cusp, enhanced narrowband electrostatic waves were sometimes observed just above the electron cyclotron frequency. Here, wave and particle measurements from three representative cusp transits are presented in order to characterize these signals and understand the conditions that favor their generation. It was found that the form of the local cusp electron velocity distribution had a direct influence on the wave spectral character. A preliminary study indicates that electron beams in the cusp can generate the enhanced signals, although generation by an anisotropic warm component cannot be ruled out.

  17. Electron cyclotron heating of a tokamak reactor at down-shifted frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Mazzucato, E.

    1985-01-01

    The absorption of electron cyclotron waves in a hot and dense tokamak plasma is investigated for the case of the extraordinary mode for outside launching. It is shown that, for electron temperatures T/sub e/ greater than or equal to 5 keV, strong absorption occurs for oblique propagation at frequencies significantly below the electron gyrofrequency at the plasma center. A new density dependence of the wave absorption is found which is more favorable for plasma heating than the familiar n/sub e//sup -1/ scaling.

  18. Numerical analysis of radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2012-01-15

    A new finite element numerical scheme for analyzing self-consistent radio-frequency (RF) sheath-plasma interaction problems in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is applied to various problems represented by simplified models for the tokamak scrape-off layer. The present code incorporates a modified boundary condition, which is called a sheath boundary condition, that couples the radio-frequency waves and sheaths at the material boundaries by treating the sheath as a thin vacuum layer. A series of numerical analyses in one- and two-dimensional domains show several important physical properties, such as the existence of multiple roots, hysteresis effects, presence and characteristics of the sheath-plasma waves, and the phase shift of a reflected slow wave, some of which are newly identified by introducing a spatially varying plasma density and background magnetic field.

  19. Properties Of Waves At The Proton Cyclotron Frequency Upstream From Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, N.; Bertucci, C.; Gomez, D. O.; Mazelle, C. X.

    2012-12-01

    We present a study on the properties of electromagnetic plasma waves in the region upstream of the Martian bow shock, detected by the magnetometer and electron reflectometer (MAG / ER) onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft during the period known as Science Phasing Orbits (SPO). The waves found display frequencies in the reference system of MGS (SC) which are close to the local proton cyclotron frequency. Minimum variance analysis (MVA) shows that these 'proton cyclotron frequency' waves (PCWs) are characterized - in the SC frame - by a left-hand, elliptical polarization and propagate almost parallel to the background magnetic field. They also have a small degree of compressibility and an amplitude that decreases with radial distance from the planet. The latter result supports the idea that the source of these waves is Mars. In order to determine the instability which could produce the observed waves, we studied the relation between their polarization and the direction of the mean magnetic field relative to the solar wind velocity direction. In addition, we find that these waves are not associated with the foreshock and that their spatial distribution does not depend on the orientation of the solar wind convective electric field. We also find a clear difference in the waves occurrence rate between SPO1 and SPO2 subphases and we discuss these results in the context of possible changes in the pick up conditions associated with seasonal variations.

  20. Wave intensifications near the electron cyclotron frequency within the polar cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Gurnett, D.A. ); Menietti, J.D.; Wong, H.K.; Lin, C.S.; Burch, J.L. )

    1990-05-01

    As DE 1 flew through the polar cusp, enhanced narrowband electrostatic waves were sometimes observed just above the electron cyclotron frequency, f{sub ce}. In this report, the authors present wave and particle measurements from three representative cusp transits in order to characterize these signals and understand the conditions that favor their generation. In these representative cases, narrowband emission intensifications occurred at frequencies between 1.1 to 1.3 f{sub ce}. The emission intensities ranged between 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}12} V{sup 2}/(m{sup 2} Hz), such waves being 50 to 1,000 times greater than the narrowbanded cyclotron-related signal levels detected in adjacent regions. Simultaneously occurring with the wave enhancements were energetic cusp electrons with energies extending up to about 500 eV. It was found that the form of the local cusp electron velocity distribution had a direct influence on the wave spectral character. A preliminary study indicates that electron beams in the cusp can generate the enhanced signals, although generation by an anisotropic warm component cannot be ruled out. Based on an examination of many cusp transits, the occurrence of these enhanced signals appeared to have some dependency on Kp index, indicating that increased particle flows seem to affect their generation. Although the exact wave/particle coupling mechanism resonsible for these enhancements is difficult to identify, it is evident that the generation is directly related to the energetic cusp electrons.

  1. Initial Results of Multi-Frequency Electron Cyclotron Heating in the Levitated Dipole Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.K.; Garnier, D.T.; Mauel, M.; Ortiz, E.E.; Mahar, S.; Boxer, A.C.; Ellsworth, J.L.; Karim, I.; Kesner, J.

    2005-09-26

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) has created high-beta, hot-electron plasmas that are confined by a strong dipole electromagnet via multiple-frequency electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). Multiple frequency ECRH is used to investigate how variation of the power deposition profile may be used to adjust the plasma density and pressure profiles. The initial experiments have been performed using up to 3 kW at 2.45 GHz and 3 kW at 6.4 GHz. Variations included switching on and off a single source while injecting constant power with the other source. We have also investigated the role of magnetic shaping, using external coils, on ECRH phenomena and plasma profile control. The preliminary results of these experiments will be presented.

  2. Ion heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in the Wisconsin Tokapole II

    SciTech Connect

    Biddle, A. P.

    1980-06-01

    Ion temperatures of 75 eV, a doubling of the ohmic heating temperature in a normal discharge, have been achieved using the fast magnetosonic wave heating at the second, third, and fourth harmonics of the cyclotron frequency in a single component hydrogen plasma. The wave launching structure is a single turn, shielded, insulated loop which constitutes the inductor of the rf source tank circuit. Power levels of 800 kW have been applied to the plasma for periods of up to 1.1 milliseconds. Good agreement has been found between theory and experiment for loading and wave propagation in the plasma for m = 0 and m = +1 modes. Eigenmodes have been observed by peaking of both the rf wave amplitude and the loading of the oscillator, as well as by oscillator frequency shifts imposed by their passage.

  3. Wave Heating in Ion Cyclotron Ranges of Frequencies in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Mushiake, T.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma device RT-1 has been developed for the studies on magnetosphere and advanced fusion plasmas. A levitated superconducting coil produces magnetic dipole fields that realize a high confinement state. The electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with 8.2 GHz and 50 kW produces the plasmas with hot electrons in a few ten keV range. We reported that the local electron beta exceeded 1 in RT-1 plasmas. In such situation, the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Heating ions is expected to access high ion beta state and to improve the plasma confinement theoretically. Therefore the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 2-4 MHz and 10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. Based on the results of the TASK-WF2 code, the ∩ shape loop antenna was designed for a slow wave excitation, and was implemented in the RT-1. In the ICRF heating experiments, a base plasma was sustained by ECRH. We observed the clear increase in diamagnetic signals and impurity ion temperature (CIII) in helium plasmas at the neutral gas pressure of 3 mPa, if the ICRF power of 10 kW is comparable to the ECRH one. This result is the first time in a magnetosphere plasma device. The results related to the ICRF heating will be presented in detail. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Nos 23224014 and 24360384.

  4. Observation of ion-cyclotron-frequency mode-conversion flow drive in tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Rice, J E; Wukitch, S J; Greenwald, M J; Hubbard, A E; Ince-Cushman, A; Lin, L; Porkolab, M; Reinke, M L; Tsujii, N

    2008-12-01

    Strong toroidal flow (Vphi) and poloidal flow (Vtheta) have been observed in D-3He plasmas with ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) mode-conversion (MC) heating on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The toroidal flow scales with the rf power Prf (up to 30 km/s per MW), and is significantly larger than that in ICRF minority heated plasmas at the same rf power or stored energy. The central Vphi responds to Prf faster than the outer regions, and the Vphi(r) profile is broadly peaked for r/a < or =0.5. Localized (0.3 < or = r/a < or =0.5) Vtheta appears when Prf > or =1.5 MW and increases with power (up to 0.7 km/s per MW). The experimental evidence together with numerical wave modeling suggests a local flow drive source due to the interaction between the MC ion cyclotron wave and 3He ions. PMID:19113561

  5. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-15

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and {+-}0.2{sup 0}, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ('Dee' voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  6. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.20, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  7. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.2(0), respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result. PMID:23464200

  8. High power heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in the Wisconsin Tokapole II

    SciTech Connect

    Biddle, A. P.; Sprott, J. C.

    1980-09-01

    Fast wave heating at the second, third, and fourth harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance, and slow wave heating at the fundamental in a single ion species hydrogen plasma, are found to be in good agreement with warm plasma theory at rf power levels less than or equal to 130 kW. Ion heating is negligible off an eigenmode. Ion body temperatures are more than doubled to 75 eV from the 35 eV ohmically heated case with tails comprising 8% of the plasma at 320 eV. No deleterious effects except a non-disruptive 10% shortening of the discharge length caused by impurity influx are noted. A passive mode tracking technique allows approx. = 40% increase in power deposition in a passing eigenmode over that of a fixed frequency rf source. Ion temperatures are limited by charge exchange due to the < 50 eV central temperature and the small 13 cm radius current channel.

  9. Theory of mode conversion and wave damping near the ion-cyclotron frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Colestock, P.L.; Kashuba, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    Using a variational technique, a set of coupled model equations for the mode-conversion process near the ion-cyclotron frequency is derived. The system is truncated to first order in Larmor radius but includes the effects of explicit gradients and a poloidal field. From the equations a conservation rule is extracted which ensures conservation of total energy and provides an explicit expression for the wave damping in differential form. The equations are integrated numerically for the standard cases of fast waves incident from either the low- or high-field sides of the mode-conversion layer. The scaling of the damping processes is discussed and implications for current rf-heating experiments on the Princeton Large Torus are drawn.

  10. Materials tests and analyses of Faraday shield tubes for ICRF (ion cyclotron resonant frequency) antennas

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Walls, J.C.; Taylor, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas for heating fusion plasmas require careful analysis of the materials selected for the design and the successful fabrication of high integrity braze bonds. Graphite tiles are brazed to Inconel 625 Faraday shield tubes to protect the antenna from the plasma. The bond between the graphite and Inconel tube is difficult to achieve due to the different coefficients of thermal expansion. A 2-D stress analysis showed the graphite could be bonded to Inconel with a Ag-Cu-Ti braze alloy without cracking the graphite. Brazing procedures and nondestructive examination methods have been developed for these joints. This paper presents the results of our joining development and proof testing. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Amplification of radiation near cyclotron frequency due to electron population inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Wu, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Amplification of electromagnetic waves via the cyclotron maser mechanism by a population of weakly relativistic electrons is studied. The effect of a tenuous population of low energy background plasma is included. It is found that both the ordinary and extraordinary modes can be excited by the weakly relativistic electrons with a loss-cone distribution. The growth rate for the extraordinary mode is much higher than that for the ordinary mode. Velocity spread in the energetic electron distribution function may reduce the growth rate by a factor of approximately 10 from that in the monoenergetic case. The maximum growth rate for the fast extraordinary mode (X mode) occurs near the upper hybrid cutoff frequency. Numerical results are obtained and discussed.

  12. Development of multichannel intermediate frequency system for electron cyclotron emission radiometer on KSTAR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kogi, Yuichiro; Sakoda, Takuya; Mase, Atsushi; Ito, Naoki; Yokota, Yuya; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Nagayama, Yoshio; Kawahata, Kazuo; Jeong, Seung H.; Kwon, Myeun

    2008-10-15

    Plasma experiments on KSTAR are scheduled to start up this year (2008). We have developed an electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer to measure the radial electron temperature profiles in KSTAR experiments. The radiometer system consists, briefly, of two downconversion stages, amplifiers, bandpass filter banks, and video detectors. These components are made commercially or developed in house. The system detects ECE power in the frequency range from 110 to 196 GHz, the detected signal being resolved by means of 48 frequency windows. Before installation of this system on KSTAR, we installed a part of this system on large helical device (LHD) to study the system under similar plasma conditions. In this experiment, the signal amplitude, considered to be proportional to the electron temperature, is measured. The time-dependent traces of the electron temperature measured by this radiometer are in good agreement with those provided by the LHD Michelson spectrometer. The system noise level which limits the minimum measurable temperature (converted to the electron temperature) is about 30 eV.

  13. Electron cyclotron heating at down-shifted frequencies in existing tokamak devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Krivenski, V.

    1985-06-01

    Plasma heating in existing tokamak devices by electron cyclotron waves with frequency (f) significantly smaller than the electron gyrofrequency (f/sub c/) is investigated for the case of Maxwellian plasmas. It is shown that for central electron temperatures larger than 3 keV, strong absorption of extraordinary waves can occur at values of toroidal field for which the condition f = f/sub c/ is not satisfied in the plasma region. The cases of f = 60 GHz and f = 100 GHz are discussed for the PLT and TFTR devices as representative of medium (approx. =30 kG) and high (approx. =50 kG) magnetic field tokamaks, respectively. Numerical calculations with a ray tracing code indicate that most of the rf energy is absorbed in a central plasma region. These results are of practical interest because they significantly simplify the main technical problem of ECH in a tokamak reactor, i.e., the development of high frequency and high power microwave sources.

  14. Development of multichannel intermediate frequency system for electron cyclotron emission radiometer on KSTAR Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Kogi, Yuichiro; Sakoda, Takuya; Mase, Atsushi; Ito, Naoki; Yokota, Yuya; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Nagayama, Yoshio; Jeong, Seung H; Kwon, Myeun; Kawahata, Kazuo

    2008-10-01

    Plasma experiments on KSTAR are scheduled to start up this year (2008). We have developed an electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer to measure the radial electron temperature profiles in KSTAR experiments. The radiometer system consists, briefly, of two downconversion stages, amplifiers, bandpass filter banks, and video detectors. These components are made commercially or developed in house. The system detects ECE power in the frequency range from 110 to 196 GHz, the detected signal being resolved by means of 48 frequency windows. Before installation of this system on KSTAR, we installed a part of this system on large helical device (LHD) to study the system under similar plasma conditions. In this experiment, the signal amplitude, considered to be proportional to the electron temperature, is measured. The time-dependent traces of the electron temperature measured by this radiometer are in good agreement with those provided by the LHD Michelson spectrometer. The system noise level which limits the minimum measurable temperature (converted to the electron temperature) is about 30 eV. PMID:19044599

  15. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating and current drive in deuterium-tritium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bretz, N.; Budny, R. V.; Darrow, D. S.; Grek, B.; Hammett, G.; Hosea, J. C.; Hsuan, H.; Ignat, D.; Majeski, R.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.; Rogers, J. H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J. E.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.; Bush, C. E.; Goldfinger, R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D.; Bettenhausen, M.; Lam, N. T.; Scharer, J.; Sund, R.; Sauter, O.

    1995-06-01

    The first experiments utilizing high-power radio waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas have been completed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [Fusion Technol. 21, 13 (1992)]. Results from the initial series of experiments have demonstrated efficient core second harmonic tritium (2ΩT) heating in parameter regimes approaching those anticipated for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [D. E. Post, Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Proceedings of the 13th International Conference, Washington, DC, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 239]. Observations are consistent with modeling predictions for these plasmas. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves has been observed in D-T, deuterium-deuterium (D-D), and deuterium-helium-4 (D-4He) plasmas with high concentrations of minority helium-3 (3He) (n3He/ne≳10%). Mode conversion current drive in D-T plasmas was simulated with experiments conducted in D-3He-4He plasmas. Results show a directed propagation of the mode converted ion Bernstein waves, in correlation with the antenna phasing.

  16. The 110-GHz Electron Cyclotron Range of Frequency System on JT-60U: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Moriyama, S.; Kajiwara, K.; Seki, M.; Tsuneoka, M.; Takahashi, K.; Anno, K.; Hamamatsu, K.; Hiranai, S.; Ikeda, Yu.; Imai, T.; Sakamoto, K.; Shimono, M.; Shinozaki, S.; Terakado, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Yokokura, K.; Fujii, T.

    2002-09-15

    The electron cyclotron range of frequency (ECRF) system was designed and operated on the JT-60U to locally heat and control plasmas. The frequency of 110 GHz was adopted to inject the fundamental O-mode from the low field side with an oblique injection angle. The system is composed of four 1 MW-level gyrotrons, four transmission lines, and two antennae. The gyrotron is featured by a collector potential depression (CPD) and a gaussian beam output through a diamond window. The CPD enables JAERI to drive the gyrotron under the condition of the main DC voltage of 60 kV without a thyristor regulation. The gaussian mode from the gyrotron is effectively transformed to HE{sub 11} mode in the 31.75 mm diameter corrugated waveguide. About 75% of the output power of the gyrotrons can be injected into plasmas through the waveguides about 60 m in length. There are two antennae to control the deposition position of the EC wave during a plasma discharge. One is connected with three RF lines to steer the EC beams in the poloidal direction. The other is to control the EC beam in the toroidal and poloidal directions by two steerable mirrors.On the operation in 2000, the power of 1.5 to 1.6 MW for 3 s was successfully injected into plasmas using three gyrotrons. Local profile control was demonstrated by using the antennae. This capability was devoted to improve the plasma performance such as high T{sub e} production more than 15 keV and suppression of the MHD activities. In 2001, the fourth gyrotron, whose structure was improved for long pulse operation, has been installed for a total injection power of {approx}3 MW.

  17. Excitation of electrostatic waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahata, A.; Igami, H.; Kawamori, E.; Kogi, Y.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.

    2014-10-15

    We report the observation of electromagnetic radiation at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency that was considered to be converted from electrostatic waves called electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas. The excitation of EBWs was attributed to the thermalization of electrons accelerated by the reconnection electric field around the X-point. The radiative process discussed here is an acceptable explanation for observed radio waves pulsation associated with major flares.

  18. Dependence of synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave and electron cyclotron wave on the frequency and parallel refractive index of electron cyclotron wave for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Chen, S. Y. Tang, C. J.

    2014-01-15

    The physical mechanism of the synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW) in tokamaks is investigated using theoretical analysis and simulation methods in the present paper. Research shows that the synergy relationship between the two waves in velocity space strongly depends on the frequency ω and parallel refractive index N{sub //} of ECW. For a given spectrum of LHW, the parameter range of ECW, in which the synergy current exists, can be predicted by theoretical analysis, and these results are consistent with the simulation results. It is shown that the synergy effect is mainly caused by the electrons accelerated by both ECW and LHW, and the acceleration of these electrons requires that there is overlap of the resonance regions of the two waves in velocity space.

  19. Investigation of electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in L-4 and ACT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1993-05-01

    Electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) were studied in the Princeton L-4 and ACT-1 devices for approximately ten years, from 1975 to 1985. The investigation began in the L-4 linear device, looking for the parametric excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-ion-species plasmas. In addition, this investigation verified multi-ion-species effects on the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave dispersion religion including the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Finite-Larmor-radius modification of the wave dispersion relation was also observed, even for ion temperatures of T[sub i] [approx] 1/40 eV. Taking advantage of the relatively high field and long device length of L-4, the existence of the cold electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (CES ICW) was verified. With the arrival of the ACT-1 toroidal device, finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) waves were studied in a relatively collisionless warm-ion hydrogen plasma. Detailed investigations of ion Bernstein waves (IBW) included the verification of mode-transformation in their launching, their wave propagation characteristics, their absorption, and the resulting ion heating. This basic physics activity played a crucial role in developing a new reactor heating concept termed ion Bernstein wave heating. Experimental research in the lower hybrid frequency range confirmed the existence of FLR effects near the lower hybrid resonance, predicted by Stix in 1965. In a neon plasma with a carefully placed phased wave exciter, the neutralized ion Bernstein wave was observed for the first time. Using a fastwave ICRF antenna, two parasitic excitation processes for IBW -- parametric instability and density-gradient-driven excitation -- were also discovered. In the concluding section of this paper, a possible application of externally launched electrostatic waves is suggested for helium ash removal from fusion reactor plasmas.

  20. Investigation of electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in L-4 and ACT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki

    1993-05-01

    Electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) were studied in the Princeton L-4 and ACT-1 devices for approximately ten years, from 1975 to 1985. The investigation began in the L-4 linear device, looking for the parametric excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-ion-species plasmas. In addition, this investigation verified multi-ion-species effects on the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave dispersion religion including the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Finite-Larmor-radius modification of the wave dispersion relation was also observed, even for ion temperatures of T{sub i} {approx} 1/40 eV. Taking advantage of the relatively high field and long device length of L-4, the existence of the cold electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (CES ICW) was verified. With the arrival of the ACT-1 toroidal device, finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) waves were studied in a relatively collisionless warm-ion hydrogen plasma. Detailed investigations of ion Bernstein waves (IBW) included the verification of mode-transformation in their launching, their wave propagation characteristics, their absorption, and the resulting ion heating. This basic physics activity played a crucial role in developing a new reactor heating concept termed ion Bernstein wave heating. Experimental research in the lower hybrid frequency range confirmed the existence of FLR effects near the lower hybrid resonance, predicted by Stix in 1965. In a neon plasma with a carefully placed phased wave exciter, the neutralized ion Bernstein wave was observed for the first time. Using a fastwave ICRF antenna, two parasitic excitation processes for IBW -- parametric instability and density-gradient-driven excitation -- were also discovered. In the concluding section of this paper, a possible application of externally launched electrostatic waves is suggested for helium ash removal from fusion reactor plasmas.

  1. On the role of electron energy distribution function in double frequency heating of electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, L. Dobrescu, S.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2014-02-15

    Double frequency heating (DFH) is a tool to improve the output of highly charged ions particularly from modern electron cyclotron resonance ion source installations with very high RF-frequencies. In order to gain information on the DFH-mechanism and on the role of the lower injected frequency we have carried out a series of dedicated experiments where we have put emphasis on the creation of a discrete resonance surface also for this lower frequency. Our well-established method of inserting an emissive MD (metal-dielectric) liner into the plasma chamber of the source is used in these experiments as a tool of investigation. In this way, the electron temperature and density for both ECR zones is increased in a controlled manner, allowing conclusions on the role of the change of the electron-energy-distribution function with and without DFH.

  2. Ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like walla)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, P.; Bobkov, V.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Lerche, E.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Van-Eester, D.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Campergue, A.-L.; Devaux, S.; Drewelow, P.; Graham, M.; Klepper, C. C.; Meigs, A.; Milanesio, D.; Mlynar, J.; Pütterich, T.; Sirinelli, A.

    2014-06-01

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall materials on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation is assessed and some important properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF are highlighted. A ˜ 20% reduction of the antenna coupling resistance is observed with the ILW as compared with the JET carbon (JET-C) wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas, quantified using Infra-Red thermography (maximum 4.5 MW/m2 in current drive phasing), are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. The location of the tungsten ICRF specific source could not be identified but some experimental observations indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: for example, the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions, and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong reduction of the impurity level. In L-mode plasmas, the ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 15%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating performance; the power is typically deposited at the plasma centre while the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma bulk. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas has started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core has been observed.

  3. Ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P. Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Meigs, A.; Sirinelli, A.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Lerche, E.; Van-Eester, D.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Brezinsek, S.; Campergue, A.-L.; Klepper, C. C.; Milanesio, D.; and others

    2014-06-15

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall materials on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation is assessed and some important properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF are highlighted. A ∼ 20% reduction of the antenna coupling resistance is observed with the ILW as compared with the JET carbon (JET-C) wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas, quantified using Infra-Red thermography (maximum 4.5 MW/m{sup 2} in current drive phasing), are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. The location of the tungsten ICRF specific source could not be identified but some experimental observations indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: for example, the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions, and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong reduction of the impurity level. In L-mode plasmas, the ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 15%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating performance; the power is typically deposited at the plasma centre while the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma bulk. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas has started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core has been observed.

  4. Variation in crossover frequency of EMIC waves in plasmasphere estimated from ion cyclotron whistler waves observed by Van Allen Probe A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Shoya; Kasahara, Yoshiya; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    We report variations in the propagation of the H+ band ion cyclotron whistlers observed by Van Allen Probe A. Ion cyclotron whistlers are one of the EMIC (electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves generated by mode conversion from lightning whistlers. Crossover frequency is an important frequency for the ion cyclotron whistlers, which is a function of the variations in the local heavy-ion composition. We surveyed waveform data obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument and Integrated Science instrument and found that 3461 H+ band ion cyclotron whistlers were observed from 572 km to 5992 km in altitude. The main finding is that the crossover frequencies of the observed events decreased with increasing altitude. These results support the hypothesis that the total heavy-ion density decreases with increasing altitude. Furthermore, in 96% of all observed events, the crossover frequencies exceeded 0.5fH+, which suggests that the EMIC dispersion relation contains a frequency gap of around 0.5fH+.

  5. Calculation of proton rotation frequency in static equilibrium orbits at the isochronous cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhanov, I. V.; Karamysheva, G. A.; Kiyan, I. N.; Sulikowski, J.

    2015-05-01

    The work presents equations of motion and numerical results of estimating the quality of the isochronous magnetic field calculated for the main operating mode of the AIC-144 multipurpose isochronous cyclotron located at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, and intended for proton-beam therapy to treat eye melanoma. The correctness of the calculations is confirmed by the successful treatment of patients.

  6. Ion cyclotron radio frequency systems and performance on the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade (TMX-U)

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.L.; Molvik, A.W.; Cummins, W.F.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Henderson, A.L.; Karsner, P.G.; Scofield, D.W.; Brooksby, C.A.

    1983-12-01

    High power ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) systems are now gaining greater attention than before as prime driver ion heating systems. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has installed a 200 kW high frequency (HF) transmitter system on its Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). This paper describes the system, antenna, controls, and monitoring apparatus. The transmitter operates into a high Q antenna installed in the central cell region of the experiment. It incorporates a dual-port feedback system to automatically adjust the transmitter's output power and allow the maximum consistent with the plasma loading of the antenna. Special techniques have been used to measure, in real-time, the dynamically changing loading values presented by the plasma. From the measurements, the antenna impedance can be optimized for specified plasma density.

  7. Measurements of energetic helium-3 minority distributions during ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating in the Princeton Large Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Hammett, G.W.; Kaita, R.; Wilson, J.R.

    1988-03-01

    Ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating experiments were performed with a /sup 3/He minority ion species in a /sup 4/He majority plasma in the Princeton Large Torus. The energetic /sup 3/He ion ''tail'' was measured directly with a charge exchange neutral analyzer for the first time. Comparisons with bounce-averaged quasi-linear calculations suggest a modestly peaked radi-frequency power deposition profile. The double charge exchange process /sup 3/He/sup + +/ )plus) /sup 4/He/sup 0/ )plus) /sup 3/He/sup 0/ )plus) /sup 4/He/sup + +/ demonstrated in these measurements may be useful as part of an alpha particle diagnostic in a fusion reactor experiment. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Plasma and cyclotron frequency effects on output power of the plasma wave-pumped free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolghadr, S. H.; Jafari, S.; Raghavi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Significant progress has been made employing plasmas in the free-electron lasers (FELs) interaction region. In this regard, we study the output power and saturation length of the plasma whistler wave-pumped FEL in a magnetized plasma channel. The small wavelength of the whistler wave (in sub-μm range) in plasma allows obtaining higher radiation frequency than conventional wiggler FELs. This configuration has a higher tunability by adjusting the plasma density relative to the conventional ones. A set of coupled nonlinear differential equations is employed which governs on the self-consistent evolution of an electromagnetic wave. The electron bunching process of the whistler-pumped FEL has been investigated numerically. The result reveals that for a long wiggler length, the bunching factor can appreciably change as the electron beam propagates through the wiggler. The effects of plasma frequency (or plasma density) and cyclotron frequency on the output power and saturation length have been studied. Simulation results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency, the power increases and the saturation length decreases. In addition, when density of background plasma is higher than the electron beam density (i.e., for a dense plasma channel), the plasma effects are more pronounced and the FEL-power is significantly high. It is also found that with increasing the strength of the external magnetic field frequency, the power decreases and the saturation length increases, noticeably.

  9. Excitation of the surface flute waves in electron cyclotron frequency range by internal rotating electron beam in a coaxial waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blednov, O.; Girka, I.; Girka, V.; Pavlenko, I.; Sydora, R.

    2014-12-01

    The initial stage of interaction between a gyrating beam of electrons, which move along Larmor orbits in a narrow gap between a cylindrical plasma layer and an internal screen of a metal coaxial waveguide and electromagnetic eigen waves, is studied theoretically. These waves are extraordinary polarized ones; they propagate along the azimuthal angle across an axial external steady magnetic field in the electron cyclotron frequency range. The numerical analysis shows that the excitation process is stable enough in respect to changing plasma waveguide parameters. The wider the plasma layer, the broader the range of plasma waveguide parameters within which effective wave excitation takes place. The main influence on the excitation of these modes is performed by the applied axial magnetic field, namely: its increase leads to an increase of growth rate and a broadening of the range of the waveguide parameters within which wave excitation is effective.

  10. Loading and Asymmetry Measurements and Modeling for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies System

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, D.W.; Carter, M.D.; Wilson, J.R.; Ryan, P.M.; Wilgen, J.B.; Hosea, J.; Rosenberg, A.

    2003-06-15

    The ion cyclotron heating and current drive system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has delivered over 3 MW reliably for pulse lengths over 100 ms with various phasings of the antennas. A circuit model of the system that includes the 12 coupled antennas and six radio-frequency sources has been developed that gives good agreement with vacuum measurements. When it is used to experimentally determine the S-matrix of the system under different plasma conditions, pronounced asymmetries in the off-diagonal values of the S-matrix are seen. The S-matrix in the presence of plasma has been calculated with the RANT3D code using measured edge density profiles in front of the antenna; these agree remarkably well with the measurements. The asymmetry is caused primarily by the large pitch angle of the magnetic field in front of the antenna, coupled with the gradients in the plasma edge.

  11. Loading and Asymmetry Measurements and Modeling for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies System

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, David W; Carter, Mark Dwain; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Wilgen, John B; Hosea, J.; Rosenberg, A.

    2003-01-01

    The ion cyclotron heating and current drive system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has delivered over 3 MW reliably for pulse lengths over 100 ms with various phasings of the antennas. A circuit model of the system that includes the 12 coupled antennas and six radio-frequency sources has been developed that gives good agreement with vacuum measurements. When it is used to experimentally determine the S-matrix of the system under different plasma conditions, pronounced asymmetries in the off-diagonal values of the S-matrix are seen. The S-matrix in the presence of plasma has been calculated with the RANT3D code using measured edge density profiles in front of the antenna; these agree remarkably well with the measurements. The asymmetry is caused primarily by the large pitch angle of the magnetic field in front of the antenna, coupled with the gradients in the plasma edge.

  12. Synergy in Two-Frequency Fast Wave Cyclotron Harmonic Absorption in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y.; Porkolab, M.; Baity, F. W.; Hosea, J. C.

    2009-11-26

    Fast waves (FWs) at 60 MHz and at 90 MHz are coupled to DIII-D discharges for central heating and current drive at net FW power up to 3.5 MW. The primary absorption mechanism is intended to be direct electron damping in the plasma core. In discharges at B = 2 T with fast deuteron populations from neutral beam injection, 4th and 6th deuterium cyclotron harmonic absorption on the fast ions competes with direct electron damping. Previous experiments have shown that the 6{omega}{sub D} absorption of the 90 MHz FWs is weaker than the 4{omega}{sub D} absorption of 60 MHz FWs, in agreement with a model that includes unspecified edge losses. Recent experiments have shown that if the fast deuterons are accelerated by absorption of 60 MHz (4{omega}{sub D}) FWs, adding 90 MHz power (6{omega}{sub D}) can increase the fusion neutron rate by a larger increment than is obtained with 90 MHz power alone. Details of this synergy between 4{omega}{sub D} and 6{omega}{sub D} absorption are presented.

  13. Enhancing the performances of traditional electron cyclotron resonance ion sources with multiple-discrete-frequency microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; Meyer, F.W.; Liu, Y.; Beene, J.R.; Tucker, D.

    1998-06-01

    The performances of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, in terms of high-charge-state yields and intensities within a particular charge state, can be enhanced by increasing the physical sizes of the ECR zones in relation to the sizes of their plasma volumes. The creation of a large ECR plasma {open_quotes}volume{close_quotes} permits coupling of more power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge-state distributions and higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present forms of the ECR source. The ECR plasma {open_quotes}volumes{close_quotes} of traditional B-minimum ECR sources can be increased by injecting broadband microwave radiation (multiple-discrete-frequency, variable frequency, or broad-band-width frequency microwave radiation) derived from standard klystron, gyrotron, or traveling-wave-tube (TWT) technologies (frequency domain). To demonstrate that the frequency domain technique can be used to enhance the performance of a traditional B-minimum ECR ion source, comparative studies were made to assess the relative performances of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Caprice ECR ion source, in terms of multiply charged ion-beam generation capabilities, when excited with high-power, single-frequency, or multiple-discrete-frequency microwave radiation, derived from standard klystron and/or TWT technologies. These studies demonstrate that the charge-state populations for Arthinsp{sup q+} and Xe{sup q+} move toward higher values when excited with two and three discrete-frequency, microwave power compared to those observed when single-frequency microwave power is used. For example, the most probable charge state for Xe is increased by one charge-state unit while the beam intensities for charge states higher than the most probable are increased by factors of {approximately}3 compared to those observed for single-frequency

  14. A detailed comparison of antenna impedance measurements on ASDEX Upgrade with the ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna code TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Coster, D.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Siegl, G.; Bilato, R.; Brambilla, M.; Verdoolaege, G.; Braun, F.; Fünfgelder, H.; D'Inca, R.; Suttrop, W.; Kallenbach, A.; Schweinzer, J.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; Mlynek, A.; Nikolaeva, V.; Guimarais, L.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-09-01

    New antenna diagnostics on the ASDEX Upgrade, in the form of voltage and current probe pairs on the feeding lines of each ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna, close to the input ports, have made it possible to study in detail the behavior of the ASDEX Upgrade two-strap antenna under changing loading conditions, and compare these measurements with the results of simulations using the TOPICA code. The present work extends previous studies by using the input impedance (more precisely, the complex voltage reflection coefficient Γ ) on each antenna port for comparison, instead of the more commonly used loading resistance or coupled power. The electron density profiles used for the simulation were reconstructed from the deuterium-carbon-nitrogen interferometer and lithium beam emission spectroscopy measurements, edge-localized mode-synchronized and averaged over time intervals from 10 to 200 ms depending on the case; 112 cases were compared from seven ASDEX Upgrade discharges with widely different plasma parameters and two operating frequencies (30 and 36.5 MHz). Very good agreement in \\vert Γ\\vert was found with the measurements on antenna 3 (<3% averaged over a shot), and good agreement was found with antennas 1 and 2 (<10%) the code reproduced the correct trend in loading resistance {{R}\\text{L}} in a significant majority of cases, although the discrepancies in the absolute values were rather high (up to  ˜50%) due to high reflection. Sources of discrepancy are discussed.

  15. An algorithm for the calculation of 3-D ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) fields in tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, D.N.; Colestock, P.L.; Kashuba, R.J.; Kammash, T.

    1987-04-01

    A computational scheme is developed which permits tractable calculation of three-dimensional full-wave solutions to the Maxwell-Vlasov equations under typical Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) experimental conditions. The method is unique in that power deposition to the plasma is determined via the anti-Hermitian part of a truncated warm-plasma dielectric operator, rather than as the result of an assumed phenomenological collision frequency. The resulting computer code allows arbitrary variation of density, temperature, magnetic field, and minority concentration in the poloidal plane by performing a convolution of poloidal modes to produce a coupled system of differential equations in the radial variable. By assuming no inhomogeneity along the toroidal axis, an inverse transform over k/sub parallel/ is performed to yield the full three-dimensional field solutions. The application of the code to TFTR-like plasmas shows a mild resonance structure in antenna loading related to the changing number of wavelengths between antenna and the resonance layer. 48 figs.

  16. Frequency sweep rates of rising tone electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: Comparison between nonlinear theory and Cluster observation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhaoguo; Zong, Qiugang Wang, Yongfu; Liu, Siqing; Lin, Ruilin; Shi, Liqin

    2014-12-15

    Resonant pitch angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been suggested to account for the rapid loss of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons. For the rising tone EMIC wave (classified as triggered EMIC emission), its frequency sweep rate strongly affects the efficiency of pitch-angle scattering. Based on the Cluster observations, we analyze three typical cases of rising tone EMIC waves. Two cases locate at the nightside (22.3 and 22.6 magnetic local time (MLT)) equatorial region and one case locates at the duskside (18MLT) higher magnetic latitude (λ = –9.3°) region. For the three cases, the time-dependent wave amplitude, cold electron density, and cold ion density ratio are derived from satellite data; while the ambient magnetic field, thermal proton perpendicular temperature, and the wave spectral can be directly provided by observation. These parameters are input into the nonlinear wave growth model to simulate the time-frequency evolutions of the rising tones. The simulated results show good agreements with the observations of the rising tones, providing further support for the previous finding that the rising tone EMIC wave is excited through the nonlinear wave growth process.

  17. Measurements of ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) loading with a ridged waveguide coupler on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Colestock, P.L.; Fortgang, C.M.; Hosea, J.C.; Hwang, D.Q.; Nagy, A.

    1987-11-01

    An ICRF ridged waveguide coupler has been installed on PLT for measurements of plasma loading. The coupler was partially filled with TiO/sub 2/ dielectric in order to sufficiently lower the cutoff frequency and utilized a tapered ridge for improved matching. Vacuum field measurements indicated a single propagating mode in the coupler and emphasized the importance of considering the fringing fields at the mouth of the waveguide. Low power experiments were carried out at 72.6 and 95.0 MHz without any external impedance matching network. Plasma loading increased rapidly as the face of the coupler approached the plasma, and, at fixed position, increased with line-averaged plasma density. At the lower frequency, the reflection coefficient exhibited a minimum (<8%) at a particular coupler position. At both frequencies, measurements indicated efficient power coupling to the plasma. Magnetic probe signals showed evidence of dense eigenmodes suggesting excitation of the fast wave. 24 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Design of radio frequency system for the riken separated sector cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; Chiba, Y.; Kohara, S.; Kumata, Y.; Ogiwara, K.; Oikawa, Y.; Takeshita, I.; Yokoyama, I.

    1985-10-01

    The radio-frequency (RF) system of the RIKEN SSC (K=540) is required to work in a frequency range of 20 to 45 MHz and to generate the maximum acceleration voltage 250 kV. A new movable box type variable frequency resonator is designed for that purpose. This resonator is a compact half wave length coaxial type ((2.1 m(H) x 3.5 m(W) x 1.6 m(D)). The delta shaped dee whose radial length is 2.7 m is supported in median plane by vertical stems from the both sides. The resonant frequency is varied by moving the boxes surrounding the stems. The performance of this resonator is studied on a one-fourth scale model. The maximum power loss is estimated to be 250 kW for the required dee voltages and the radially increasing voltage distributions are obtained. The RF power is fed into the resonator through a 50 ..cap omega.. coaxial feeder line ( about 1.8 m length) which is coupled with the resonator in good impedance matching by means of a variable capacitive coupler. The final amplifier is of grounded grid configuration; load resistance matching is made by a variable capacitor inserted in series at its output port. The final amplifier and its components are studied on full sized models. The result shows the movable box type resonator and power amplifier satisfy the design aim.

  19. Comment on "Mode Conversion of Waves In The Ion-Cyclotron Frequency Range in Magnetospheric Plasmas"

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun; Johnson, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    Recently, Kazakov and Fulop [1] studied mode conversion (MC) at the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance in planetary magnetospheric plasmas by simplifying the dispersion relation of the fast wave (FW) modes to describe a cutoff-resonance (CR) pair near the IIH resonance, which can be reduced to a Budden problem. They suggested that when the IIH resonance frequency (ωS) approaches the crossover frequency (ωcr), and the parallel wavenumber (k∥) is close to the critical wavenumber k* ∥(ωS = ωcr), MC can be efficient for arbitrary heavy ion density ratios. In this Comment, we argue that (a) the FW dispersion relation cannot be simplified to the CR pair especially near ωcr because in many parameter regimes there is a cutoff-resonance-cutoff (CRC) triplet that completely changes the wave absorption; and (b) the maximum MC efficiency does not always occur near k∥ ≈ k*∥∥.

  20. Experimental observation of left polarized wave absorption near electron cyclotron resonance frequency in helicon antenna produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C.

    2013-01-15

    Asymmetry in density peaks on either side of an m = +1 half helical antenna is observed both in terms of peak position and its magnitude with respect to magnetic field variation in a linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. The plasma is produced by powering the m = +1 half helical antenna with a 2.5 kW, 13.56 MHz radio frequency source. During low magnetic field (B < 100 G) operation, plasma density peaks are observed at critical magnetic fields on either side of the antenna. However, the density peaks occurred at different critical magnetic fields on both sides of antenna. Depending upon the direction of the magnetic field, in the m = +1 propagation side, the main density peak has been observed around 30 G of magnetic field. On this side, the density peak around 5 G corresponding to electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) is not very pronounced, whereas in the m = -1 propagation side, very pronounced ECR peak has been observed around 5 G. Another prominent density peak around 12 G has also been observed in m = -1 side. However, no peak has been observed around 30 G on this m = -1 side. This asymmetry in the results on both sides is explained on the basis of polarization reversal of left hand polarized waves to right hand polarized waves and vice versa in a bounded plasma system. The density peaking phenomena are likely to be caused by obliquely propagating helicon waves at the resonance cone boundary.

  1. Study of toroidal flow generation by ion cyclotron range of frequency minority heating in the Alcator C-Mod plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, S.; Itoh, K.; Zheng, L. J.; Van Dam, J. W.; Bonoli, P.; Rice, J. E.; Fiore, C. L.; Gao, C.; Fukuyama, A.

    2016-01-01

    The averaged toroidal flow of energetic minority ions during ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating is investigated in the Alcator C-Mod plasma by applying the GNET code, which can solve the drift kinetic equation with complicated orbits of accelerated energetic particles. It is found that a co-directional toroidal flow of the minority ions is generated in the region outside of the resonance location, and that the toroidal velocity reaches more than 40% of the central ion thermal velocity (Vtor ˜ 300 km/s with PICRF ˜ 2 MW). When we shift the resonance location to the outside of |r /a |˜0.5 , the toroidal flow immediately inside of the resonance location is reduced to 0 or changes to the opposite direction, and the toroidal velocity shear is enhanced at r/a ˜ 0.5. A radial diffusion equation for toroidal flow is solved by assuming a torque profile for the minority ion mean flow, and good agreements with experimental radial toroidal flow profiles are obtained. This suggests that the ICRF driven minority ion flow is related to the experimentally observed toroidal rotation during ICRF heating in the Alcator C-Mod plasma.

  2. Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in a plasma with an ion beam and counterstreaming bulk electrons - Waves in the zero-frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-12-01

    A common feature of the auroral plasma in the region above field-aligned (parallel) potential drops are electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) waves. The present paper has the objective to show that wave excitation in the zero-frequency band can occur when the ion beams and the current-carrying bulk electrons counterstream. The instability mechanism involves the Landau interaction of the slow (negative energy) ion-beam-cyclotron waves with the drifting electrons and also with the target (background) ions. Only the latter resonant interaction between the beam and the target ions was considered by Okuda and Nishikawa (1984). In this study, it is shown that an electron drift makes an additional unstable contribution to the waves in the zero-frequency band, including those discussed by Okuda and Nishikawa.

  3. Effect of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating conditions on the low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M. Malakhov, D. V.; Petelin, M. I.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2015-08-15

    Low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator was studied at different modes of plasma confinement. The plasma was heated at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. The effect of reflection of gyrotron radiation from the region of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating, as well as of backscattering of gyrotron radiation from fluctuations of the plasma density, on the modulation of the gyrotron power was investigated.

  4. Effect of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating conditions on the low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Malakhov, D. V.; Petelin, M. I.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2015-08-01

    Low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator was studied at different modes of plasma confinement. The plasma was heated at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. The effect of reflection of gyrotron radiation from the region of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating, as well as of backscattering of gyrotron radiation from fluctuations of the plasma density, on the modulation of the gyrotron power was investigated.

  5. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating and flow generation in deuterium{endash}tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J.C.; LeBlanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Nazikian, R.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Schilling, G.; von Goeler, S.; Bush, C.E.; Hanson, G.R.

    1998-05-01

    Recent radio-frequency heating experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Hawryluk {ital et al.}, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion {bold 33}, 1509 (1991)] have focused on developing tools for both pressure and current profile control in deuterium{endash}tritium (DT) plasmas. A new antenna was added to investigate pressure profile control utilizing direct ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating. This was the first time direct IBW heating was explored on TFTR. Plasma heating and driven poloidal flows are observed. Previously heating and current drive via mode-converted IBW waves had been demonstrated in non-DT plasmas but efforts in DT plasmas had been unsuccessful. This lack of success had been ascribed to the presence of a small {sup 7}Li minority ion population. In the most recent experiments {sup 6}Li was used exclusively for machine conditioning and mode-conversion heating consistent with theory is now observed in DT plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Spectral analysis of ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) wave field measurements in the Tara Central Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Golovato, S.N.; Horne, S.F.

    1987-12-01

    A simple spectral analysis technique has been developed to analyse the digital signals from an array of magnetic probes for ICRF field measurements in the Tara Tandem Mirror central cell. The wave dispersion relations of both the applied ICRF and the Alfven Ion Cyclotron Instability have been studied and the waves have been identified as slow in cyclotron waves. The radial profiles of field amplitude and wave vectors were also generated. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Durodié, F. Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Huygen, S.; Louche, F.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Winkler, K.

    2014-06-15

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517–520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the

  8. Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durodié, F.; Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Bamber, R.; Hancock, D.; Huygen, S.; Lockley, D.; Louche, F.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Nightingale, M. P. S.; Shannon, M.; Tigwell, P.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Wilson, D.; Winkler, K.

    2014-06-01

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517-520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the RF

  9. Ion-cyclotron range of frequencies in the scrape-off-layer: fine structure radial electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cziegler, I.; Terry, J. L.; Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Gas-puff-imaging techniques are utilized to detect radial electric field structures in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak via the observation of poloidal motion of advected fluctuations. When the diagnostic's field of view is magnetically connected to the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) active antennas, large (up to 8 km s-1) poloidal velocities are observed in a radial region encompassing both field lines terminating on and those passing in front of the antennas. The radial electric field switches sign indicating a peak in the potential profile corresponding to the transition from piercing to passing field lines. The electric field extends a few centimeters into the SOL and its local magnitude is of order Er ≈ 20-30 kV m-1. The corresponding plasma potentials scale as the square root of RF power; the poloidal structure is peaked when the field lines are connected to the top and bottom of the antenna. This structure is consistent with the presence of potential structures arising as a consequence of sheath rectification of the RF waves. The most striking result, however, is that the radial penetration λ⊥ of the potential structures is an order of magnitude larger than the basic theoretical expectation (λ⊥ ≈ 10δe, where δe is the skin depth). This substantial broadening is expected to have a strong impact on RF impurity physics. A (weak) power dependence observed in the width of the poloidal velocity features is explained as a competition between the RF induced and the background potential gradients.

  10. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  11. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering in the electron cyclotron frequency range of the X-Mode and O-Mode driver with the ITER plasma leads to the ``tail heating'' via the generation of suprathermal electrons and energetic ions. The scattering off Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for the gyrotron frequency of 170GHz; X-Mode and O-Mode power of 24 MW CW; on-axis B-field of 10T. The synergy between the two-plasmon decay and Raman scattering is analyzed in reference to the bulk plasma heating. Supported in part by Nikola TESLA Labs, La Jolla, CA

  12. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%-30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed

  13. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Collaboration: Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-15

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%–30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed

  14. Peculiarities of Optimizing the Subsystems of a Continuous-Wave Gyrotron with a Generation Frequency of 0.26 THz at the Fundamental Cyclotron Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Denisov, G. G.; Zapevalov, V. E.; Kuftin, A. N.; Manuilov, V. N.; Soluyanova, E. A.; Sedov, A. S.; Kholoptsev, V. V.; Chirkov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of developing the main units of a gyrotron operated in the continuous-wave regime with a generation frequency of 0 .26 THz. To improve selection of the operating mode in a oversized electrodynamic system, the gyrotron works at the fundamental cyclotron harmonic, which anticipates the use of a cryomagnet with a maximum magnetic field of 10 T, which does not require filling with liquid helium. The results of optimizing the electron-optical system, the cavity, and the quasi-optical converter of the output radiation are presented, and the control system, which is developed for the gyrotron setup, is described.

  15. Brazing of ceramic and graphite to metal in the fabrication of ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) antenna and feedthrough components

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, D.E.; Sluss, F.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Fabrication of some of the more critical components of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna and feedthrough assemblies has involved the brazing of alumina ceramic and graphite to various metals. Copper end pieces have been successfully brazed to alumina cylinders for use in feedthroughs for TEXTOR and in feedthroughs and capacitors for a Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) antenna. Copper-plated Inconel rods and tubes have been armored with graphite for construction of Faraday shields on antennas for Doublet III-D and TFTR. Details of brazing procedures and test results, including rf performance, mechanical strength, and thermal capabilities, are presented. 14 figs.

  16. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-08-15

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-{sup 3}He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-{sup 3}He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of {approx}50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  17. Use of multiple-discrete-frequency microwave radiation to enhance the performances of traditional B-minimum electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; Meyer, F.W.; Liu, Y.; Beene, J.R.; Tucker, D.

    1998-02-01

    The performances of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, in terms of high-charge-state yields and intensities within a particular charge-state, can be enhanced by increasing the physical sizes of the ECR zones in relation to the sizes of their plasma volumes. The ECR plasma {open_quotes}volumes{close_quotes} of traditional B-minimum ECR sources can be increased by injecting broadband microwave radiation (multiple-discrete frequency, variable frequency, or broad-bandwidth frequency microwave radiation) derived from standard klystron, gyrotron, or traveling-wave-tube (TWT) technologies (frequency domain). In this work, comparisons were made of the charge-state distributions of Ar{sup q+} and Xe{sup q+} extracted from the ORNL Caprice ECR ion source, when excited with single frequency and multiple-discrete-frequency microwave radiation, derived from standard klystron and/or TWT technologies. The charge-state populations for Ar{sup q+} and Xe{sup q+} move toward higher values when excited with modest power from two and three discrete frequency, microwave radiation compared to those generated with power from single-frequency radiation. For three-frequency plasma excitation, the most probable charge state for Xe is increased by one charge-state unit while the beam intensities for charge-states higher than the most probable are increased by factors of {approximately}3 over those for the single frequency plasma case. The results of these measurements along with details on the modifications to the injection system required to couple the microwave radiation into the plasma volume of the Caprice source will be presented in this article. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Sporadic Geomagnetic Pulsations at Frequencies of up to 15 HZ in the Magnetic Storm of November 7-14, 2004: Features of the Amplitude and Polarization Spectra and their Connection with Ion-Cyclotron Waves in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, E. N.; Yahnin, A. G.; Yahnina, T. A.; Demekhov, A. G.; Kotik, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the geomagnetic-pulsation spectra at unusually high frequencies (including the frequencies exceeding the Schumann resonance frequency 8 Hz), which were detected for the first time at the Novaya Zhizn' midlatitude station (the McIlwain parameter L = 2.6) at the time of a strong magnetic storm on November 07-14, 2004. To interpret the observed pulsation frequencies, we used the data from the NOAA low-orbit satellites which recorded localized precipitations of energetic protons (with energies of 30 to 80 keV) and calculations of the singlepass cyclotron amplification of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves. Amplitude and polarization characteristics of the radiation spectra at frequencies of up to 15 Hz at the Novaya Zhizn' and Lovozero stations (L = 5.2) are compared. It is shown that the magnetic field oscillations in the frequency range 7-15 Hz correlate with proton precipitations and proton auroras at geomagnetic latitudes 50°-57° (L = 2.42-3.37). It is also shown that for a high anisotropy of the pitch-angle distribution of the ring-current protons at such low geomagnetic latitudes, the frequency spectrum of observed high-frequency radiation agrees well with the calculated location of the maximum of the single-pass cyclotron amplification of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves. Analysis of the data and calculation results has led to the conclusion that inherently the recorded signals are a high-frequency counterpart of the Pc1 pulsations and are due to the generation of ion-cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere at unusually low latitudes, which are probably stipulated by the shift of the plasma pause to these latitudes during a strong magnetic storm.

  19. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  20. An algorithm for the analysis of inductive antennas of arbitrary cross-section for heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, I.S.; Colestock, P.L.

    1986-10-01

    The application of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating to near ignited plasmas will require launching structures that will be capable of withstanding the harsh plasma environment. The recessed antenna configuration is expected to provide sufficient protection for the structure, but to date no analysis has been done to determine if adequate coupling can be achieved in such a configuration. In this work we present a method for determining the current distribution for the antenna in the direction transverse to current flow and predict antenna loading in the presence of plasma. Antennas of arbitrary cross section are analyzed above ground planes of arbitrary shape. Results from ANDES, the ANtenna DESign code, are presented and compared to experimental results.

  1. Parametric study of two-dimensional potential structures induced by radio-frequency sheaths coupled with transverse currents in front of the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2006-04-15

    For the first time, a two-dimensional (2D) fluid model and an analytical expression for the rectified potential with respect to the transverse polarization current are established and verified by a 2D PIC (particle in cell) code over the validity domain of our model. Then the model is extended to the overall ion cyclotron frequency range used in different heating and current drive scenarios. First, the models demonstrate that these transverse polarization currents add some inertia in the temporal dynamic. Due to the nonlinear behavior of the I-V sheath characteristic, the time average amplitude (dc potential) of the rectified potential structure is increased compared to the time average rf potential. Second, they induce only a slight widening of the potential structure. Such modifications are quantified using a 'test map' initially characterized by a Gaussian shape. The map is assumed to remain Gaussian near its summit. The time behavior of the peak can be estimated analytically in the presence of polarization current as a function of its width r{sub 0} and amplitude {phi}{sub 0} (normalized to local temperature and to a characteristic length for transverse transport). A potential peaking criterion has been built to determine the peaking zone of the dc potential structure induced by the rf field. Computations made for typical parameters of the edge plasma in front of the antenna of the Tokamak Tore Supra show that the dc rectified potential is up to 50% higher than the previous computations neglecting polarization current effects. The weak diffused and high dc potential structures computed can explain the hot spot formation induced by convective cells associated to high energetic ion fluxes on the corners of the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating ant0010en.

  2. Observation of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode conversion plasma flow drive on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Wukitch, S. J.; Greenwald, M. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Lin, L.; Marmar, E. S.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Tsujii, N.; Wright, J. C.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2009-05-01

    At modest H3e levels (n3He/ne˜8%-12%), in relatively low density D(H3e) plasmas, n¯e≤1.3×1020 m-3, heated with 50 MHz rf power at Bt0˜5.1 T, strong (up to 90 km/s) toroidal rotation (Vϕ) in the cocurrent direction has been observed by high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod. The change in central Vϕ scales with the applied rf power (≤30 km s-1 MW-1), and is generally at least a factor of 2 higher than the empirically determined intrinsic plasma rotation scaling. The rotation in the inner plasma (r /a≤0.3) responds to the rf power more quickly than that of the outer region (r /a≥0.7), and the rotation profile is broadly peaked for r /a≤0.5. Localized poloidal rotation (0.3≤r/a≤0.6) in the ion diamagnetic drift direction (˜2 km/s at 3 MW) is also observed, and similarly increases with rf power. Changing the toroidal phase of the antenna does not affect the rotation direction, and it only weakly affects the rotation magnitude. The mode converted ion cyclotron wave (MC ICW) has been detected by a phase contrast imaging system and the MC process is confirmed by two-dimensional full wave TORIC simulations. The simulations also show that the MC ICW is strongly damped on H3e ions in the vicinity of the MC layer, approximately on the same flux surfaces where the rf driven flow is observed. The flow shear in our experiment is marginally sufficient for plasma confinement enhancement based on the comparison of the E ×B shearing rate and gyrokinetic linear stability analysis.

  3. Validation of full-wave simulations for mode conversion of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-08-15

    Mode conversion of fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is known to result in current drive and flow drive under optimised conditions, which may be utilized to control plasma profiles and improve fusion plasma performance. To describe these processes accurately in a realistic toroidal geometry, numerical simulations are essential. Quantitative comparison of these simulations and the actual experimental measurements is important to validate their predictions and to evaluate their limitations. The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been used to directly detect the ICRF waves in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The measurements have been compared with full-wave simulations through a synthetic diagnostic technique. Recently, the frequency response of the PCI detector array on Alcator C-Mod was recalibrated, which greatly improved the comparison between the measurements and the simulations. In this study, mode converted waves for D-{sup 3}He and D-H plasmas with various ion species compositions were re-analyzed with the new calibration. For the minority heating cases, self-consistent electric fields and a minority ion distribution function were simulated by iterating a full-wave code and a Fokker-Planck code. The simulated mode converted wave intensity was in quite reasonable agreement with the measurements close to the antenna, but discrepancies remain for comparison at larger distances.

  4. Validation of full-wave simulations for mode conversion of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-08-01

    Mode conversion of fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is known to result in current drive and flow drive under optimised conditions, which may be utilized to control plasma profiles and improve fusion plasma performance. To describe these processes accurately in a realistic toroidal geometry, numerical simulations are essential. Quantitative comparison of these simulations and the actual experimental measurements is important to validate their predictions and to evaluate their limitations. The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been used to directly detect the ICRF waves in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The measurements have been compared with full-wave simulations through a synthetic diagnostic technique. Recently, the frequency response of the PCI detector array on Alcator C-Mod was recalibrated, which greatly improved the comparison between the measurements and the simulations. In this study, mode converted waves for D-3He and D-H plasmas with various ion species compositions were re-analyzed with the new calibration. For the minority heating cases, self-consistent electric fields and a minority ion distribution function were simulated by iterating a full-wave code and a Fokker-Planck code. The simulated mode converted wave intensity was in quite reasonable agreement with the measurements close to the antenna, but discrepancies remain for comparison at larger distances.

  5. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N. Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-15

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with H{sub IPB98}(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  6. Breakdown of cyclotron resonance in semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, T.; Bhat, R.; Koza, M.; Hwang, D. M.; DeRosa, F.; Grabbe, P.; Allen, S. J.

    1988-03-01

    We have observed breakdown of cyclotron resonance in large magnetic fields oriented perpendicular to the growth direction in semiconductor superlattices. At small magnetic fields conventional cyclotron resonance is observed with the mass related to the miniband mass. At large magnetic fields, when the cyclotron diameter approaches the superlattice period, the resonance frequency appears to saturate and is determined by orbits impaled on the barrier. A model calculation gives good account of the magnetic field dependence of the resonance position and line width.

  7. Gyrotron development for high-power, long-pulse electron cyclotron heating and current drive at two frequencies in JT-60SA and its extension toward operation at three frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Yokokura, S. Moriyama K.; Sawahata, M.; Terakado, M.; Hiranai, S.; Wada, K.; Sato, Y.; Hinata, J.; Hoshino, K.; Isamaya, A.; Oda, Y.; Ikeda, R.; Takahashi, K.; Sakamoto, K.

    2015-06-01

    A gyrotron enabling high-power, long-pulse oscillations at both 110 and 138 GHz has been developed for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (CD) in JT-60SA. Oscillations of 1 MW for 100 s have been demonstrated at both frequencies, for the first time in the world as a gyrotron operating at two frequencies. The optimization of the anode voltage, or the electron pitch factor, using a triode gun was a key to obtain high power and high efficiency at two frequencies. It was also confirmed that the internal losses in the gyrotron were sufficiently low for expected long pulse operation at the higher power level of ∼1.5 MW. Another important result is that an oscillation at 82 GHz, which enables use of fundamental harmonic waves in JT-60SA while the other two frequencies are used as second harmonics waves, was demonstrated up to 0.4 MW for 2 s. These results of the gyrotron development significantly contribute to enhancing the operation regime of the ECH/CD system in JT-60SA.

  8. FEL on slow cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Silivra, A.

    1995-12-31

    A physical mechanism of interaction of fast electromagnetic wave with slow cyclotron wave of relativistic electron beam in a FEL with helical wiggler field is described. It is shown that: (1) interaction is possible for both group of steady state electron trajectories (2) positive gain is achieved within certain interval of guide field strength (3) operation wavelength for group 1 trajectories ({Omega}{sub 0}/{gamma} < k{omega}{upsilon}{parallel}) is shorter than for the conventional FEL synchronism. A nonlinear analysis shows that efficiency of slow cyclotron FEL is restricted mainly by a breakdown of a single electron synchronism due to dependence of (modified) electron cyclotron frequency on an energy of electron. Nevertheless, as numerical simulation shows, typical efficiency of 15 % order is achieved in millimeter wavelength band for the midrelativistic ({gamma}= 3 {divided_by} 4) slow cyclotron wave FEL. Tapering of magnetic field results in a substantial increase of efficiency.

  9. Physics and technology in the ion-cyclotron range of frequency on Tore Supra and TITAN test facility: implication for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaudon, X.; Bernard, J. M.; Colas, L.; Dumont, R.; Argouarch, A.; Bottollier-Curtet, H.; Brémond, S.; Champeaux, S.; Corre, Y.; Dumortier, P.; Firdaouss, M.; Guilhem, D.; Gunn, J. P.; Gouard, Ph.; Hoang, G. T.; Jacquot, J.; Klepper, C. C.; Kubič, M.; Kyrytsya, V.; Lombard, G.; Milanesio, D.; Messiaen, A.; Mollard, P.; Meyer, O.; Zarzoso, D.

    2013-08-01

    To support the design of an ITER ion-cyclotron range of frequency heating (ICRH) system and to mitigate risks of operation in ITER, CEA has initiated an ambitious Research & Development program accompanied by experiments on Tore Supra or test-bed facility together with a significant modelling effort. The paper summarizes the recent results in the following areas: Comprehensive characterization (experiments and modelling) of a new Faraday screen concept tested on the Tore Supra antenna. A new model is developed for calculating the ICRH sheath rectification at the antenna vicinity. The model is applied to calculate the local heat flux on Tore Supra and ITER ICRH antennas. Full-wave modelling of ITER ICRH heating and current drive scenarios with the EVE code. With 20 MW of power, a current of ±400 kA could be driven on axis in the DT scenario. Comparison between DT and DT(3He) scenario is given for heating and current drive efficiencies. First operation of CW test-bed facility, TITAN, designed for ITER ICRH components testing and could host up to a quarter of an ITER antenna. R&D of high permittivity materials to improve load of test facilities to better simulate ITER plasma antenna loading conditions.

  10. Physics and technology in the ion-cyclotron range of frequency on Tore Supra and TITAN test facility: implication for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Litaudon, X; Bernard, J. M.; Colas, L.; Dumont, R. J.; Argouarch, A.; Bottollier-Curtet, H.; Bremond, S.; Champeaux, S.; Corre, Y.; Dumortier, P.; Firdaouss, M.; Guilhem, D.; Gunn, J. P.; Gouard, Ph.; Hoang, G T; Jacquot, Jonathan; Klepper, C Christopher; Kubic, M.; Kyrytsya, V.; Lombard, G.; Milanesio, D.; Messiaen, A.; Mollard, P.; Meyer, O.; Zarzoso, D.

    2013-01-01

    To support the design of an ITER ion-cyclotron range of frequency heating (ICRH) system and to mitigate risks of operation in ITER, CEA has initiated an ambitious Research & Development program accompanied by experiments on Tore Supra or test-bed facility together with a significant modelling effort. The paper summarizes the recent results in the following areas: Comprehensive characterization (experiments and modelling) of a new Faraday screen concept tested on the Tore Supra antenna. A new model is developed for calculating the ICRH sheath rectification at the antenna vicinity. The model is applied to calculate the local heat flux on Tore Supra and ITER ICRH antennas. Full-wave modelling of ITER ICRH heating and current drive scenarios with the EVE code. With 20 MW of power, a current of 400 kA could be driven on axis in the DT scenario. Comparison between DT and DT(3He) scenario is given for heating and current drive efficiencies. First operation of CW test-bed facility, TITAN, designed for ITER ICRH components testing and could host up to a quarter of an ITER antenna. R&D of high permittivity materials to improve load of test facilities to better simulate ITER plasma antenna loading conditions.

  11. Electron cyclotron wave generation by relativistic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    We show that an energetic electron distribution which has a temperature anisotropy (T perpendicular to b is greater than T parallel to b), or which is gyrating about a DC magnetic field, can generate electron cyclotron waves with frequencies below the electron cyclotron frequency. Relativistic effects are included in solving the dispersion equation and are shown to be quantitatively important. The basic idea of the mechanism is the coupling of the beam mode to slow waves. The unstable electron cyclotron waves are predominantly electromagnetic and right-hand polarized. For a low-density plasma in which the electron plasma frequency is less than the electron cyclotron frequency, the excited waves can have frequencies above or below the electron plasma frequency, depending upon the parameters of the energetic electron distribution. This instability may account for observed Z mode waves in the polar magnetosphere of the Earth and other planets.

  12. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-11-01

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k//) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (ktor). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k// as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the ktor trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k//, as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas' operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to address this issue.

  13. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Ochoukov, R; Bobkov, V; Faugel, H; Fünfgelder, H; Noterdaeme, J-M

    2015-11-01

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k(//)) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (k(tor)). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k(//) as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the k(tor) trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k(//), as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas' operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to address this issue. PMID

  14. Cyclotron radiation in hot magnetoplasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trulsen, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of thermal motions on the cyclotron radiation from test particles gyrating in a homogeneous magnetoplasma are studied. These effects take care of all singularities that exist in the theory of cyclotron radiation in cold magnetoplasma - e.g., the divergence in energy loss for small particle energies. Around the hybrid frequencies thermal corrections become of dominant importance. At these frequencies cold-plasma theory breaks down. Thermal effects arise in two ways: by modifying the wave modes known from cold plasma theory, and by the introduction of a new longitudinal wave mode, known as the Bernstein mode. All wave modes are damped (in stable plasmas).

  15. CLOVERLEAF CYCLOTRON

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, E.M.; Judd, D.L.

    1959-02-01

    A cyclotron is presented embodying a unique magnetic field configuration, which configuration increases in intensity with radius and therefore compensates for the reltivistic mass effect, the field having further convolutions productive of axial stability in the particle beam. By reconciling the seemingly opposed requirements of mass increase compensation on one hand and anial stability on the other, the production of extremely high current particle beams in the relativistie energy range is made feasible. Certain further advantages inhere in the invention, notably an increase in the usable magnet gap, simplified and more efficient extraction of the beam from the accelerator, and ready adaptation to the use of multiply phased excitation as contrasted with the single phased systems herstofore utilized. General

  16. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-11-15

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k{sub //}) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (k{sub tor}). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k{sub //} as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the k{sub tor} trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k{sub //}, as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas’ operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to

  17. A new sawtooth control mechanism relying on toroidally propagating ion cyclotron resonance frequency waves: Theory and Joint European Torus tokamak experimental evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, J. P.; Coda, S.; Chapman, I. T.; Lennholm, M.

    2010-05-15

    The sawtooth control mechanism in plasmas employing toroidally propagating ion cyclotron resonance waves is extended. The asymmetrically distributed energetic passing ions are shown to modify the ideal internal kink mode when the position of the minority ion cyclotron resonance resides within a narrow region close to the q=1 surface. An analytical treatment of the internal kink mode in the presence of model distribution function with parallel velocity asymmetry is developed. The fast ion mechanism explains the strong sensitivity of sawteeth to resonance position, and moreover is consistent with dedicated Joint European Torus [F. Romanelli, Nucl. Fusion 49, 104006 (2009)] experiments which controlled sawteeth despite negligible current drive.

  18. Theory of relativistic cyclotron masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Latham, P. E.; Dumbrajs, O.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper we have made an attempt to review the present status of the theory of cyclotron masers with relativistic electron beams. After discussing the basic features of electron-cyclotron radiation under conditions of normal and anomalous Doppler frequency shifts, we consider particle deceleration by a constant amplitude electromagnetic wave in a constant magnetic field using the formalism developed earlier for cyclotron autoresonance acceleration of electrons. An optimal cyclotron resonance mismatch was found that corresponds to the possibility of complete deceleration of relativistic electrons. Then, interaction of relativistic electrons with resonator fields is considered and the efficiency increase due to electron prebunching is demonstrated in a simple model. Since an efficient interaction of relativistic electrons with the large amplitude electromagnetic field of a resonator occurs at a short distance, where electrons make a small number of electron orbits, the issue of the simultaneous interaction of electrons with the field at several cyclotron harmonics is discussed. Finally, we consider deceleration of a prebunched electron beam by a traveling electromagnetic wave in a tapered magnetic field. This simple modeling is illustrated with a number of simulations of relativistic gyroklystrons and gyrotwistrons (gyrodevices in which the bunching cavity of the gyroklystron is combined with the output waveguide of the gyro-traveling-wave-tube).

  19. Spectra of low-frequency modulation of gyrotron radiation during electron-cyclotron resonance heating of plasma in the L-2M stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batanov, G. M.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Malakhov, D. V.; Novozhilova, Yu. V.; Petelin, M. I.; Petrov, A. E.; Pshenichnikov, A. A.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2011-05-01

    Results from experimental studies of the modulation of the gyrotron power during electron cyclotron resonance heating of plasma L-2M stellarator are presented. It is shown that the modulation spectrum consists of separate spectral bands, among which a 20-kHz peak with a spectral density exceeding by one order of magnitude the spectral density of the other peaks is observed. This can be explained by the gyrotron operation being affected by the wave reflected from long-wavelength plasma fluctuations.

  20. Spectra of low-frequency modulation of gyrotron radiation during electron-cyclotron resonance heating of plasma in the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Malakhov, D. V.; Novozhilova, Yu. V.; Petelin, M. I.; Petrov, A. E.; Pshenichnikov, A. A.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2011-05-15

    Results from experimental studies of the modulation of the gyrotron power during electron cyclotron resonance heating of plasma L-2M stellarator are presented. It is shown that the modulation spectrum consists of separate spectral bands, among which a 20-kHz peak with a spectral density exceeding by one order of magnitude the spectral density of the other peaks is observed. This can be explained by the gyrotron operation being affected by the wave reflected from long-wavelength plasma fluctuations.

  1. Cyclotrons as mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.

    1984-04-01

    The principles and design choices for cyclotrons as mass spectrometers are described. They are illustrated by examples of cyclotrons developed by various groups for this purpose. The use of present high energy cyclotrons for mass spectrometry is also described. 28 references, 12 figures.

  2. Cyclotron axial ion-beam-buncher system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.W.; Swenson, D.A.; Wangler, T.P.

    1982-02-11

    Adiabatic ion bunching is achieved in a cyclotron axial ion injection system through the incorporation of a radio frequency quadrupole system, which receives ions from an external ion source via an accelerate-decelerate system and a focusing einzel lens system, and which adiabatically bunches and then injects the ions into the median plane of a cyclotron via an electrostatic quadrupole system and an inflection mirror.

  3. Synchrotrons in cyclotron territory

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.; Gough, R.A.

    1986-10-01

    Synchrotrons and cyclotrons have an overlap in their particle and energy ranges. In proton radiotherapy, synchrotrons are proposed at 250 MeV, an energy usually served by cyclotrons. Heavy ion therapy has been synchrotron territory, but cyclotrons may be competitive. In nuclear science, heavy ion synchrotrons can be used in the cyclotron energy range of 10-200 MeV/u. Storage rings are planned to increase the flexibility of several cyclotrons. For atomic physics research, several storage rings are under construction for the energy range of 10 MeV/u and below.

  4. Cyclotrons: From Science to Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron, whose 80th anniversary we have just celebrated, not only revolutionized nuclear physics, but proved the starting point for a whole variety of recirculating accelerators, from the smallest microtron to the largest synchrotron, that have had an enormous impact in almost every branch of science and in several areas of medicine and industry. Cyclotrons themselves have proved remarkably adaptable, incorporating a variety of new ideas and technologies over the years: frequency modulation, edge focusing, AG focusing, separate magnet sectors, axial and azimuthal injection, ring geometries, stripping extraction, superconducting magnets and rf...... Even FFAGs, those most complex members of the cyclotron (fixed-magnetic-field) family, are making a comeback. Currently there are more than 50 medium or large cyclotrons around the world devoted to research. These provide intense primary beams of protons or stable ions, and correspondingly intense secondary beams of neutrons, pions, muons and radioactive ions, for experiments in nuclear, particle and condensed-matter physics, and in the materials and life sciences. Far outnumbering these, however, are the 800 or so small and medium cyclotrons used to produce radioisotopes for medical and other purposes. In addition, a rapidly growing number of 230-MeV proton cyclotrons are being built for cancer therapy -12 brought into operation since 1998 and as many more in the works. Altogether, cyclotrons are flourishing!

  5. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A.; Scott, Jill R.; McJunkin, Timothy R.

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  6. A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A. Bogomolov, S.; Lebedev, A.; Loginov, V.; Yazvitsky, N.

    2014-02-15

    The project of the DC-110 cyclotron facility to provide applied research in the nanotechnologies (track pore membranes, surface modification of materials, etc.) has been designed by the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). The facility includes the isochronous cyclotron DC-110 for accelerating the intensive Ar, Kr, Xe ion beams with 2.5 MeV/nucleon fixed energy. The cyclotron is equipped with system of axial injection and ECR ion source DECRIS-5, operating at the frequency of 18 GHz. This article reviews the design and construction of DECRIS-5 ion source along with some initial commissioning results.

  7. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I(FC) by the mobile plate tuner. The I(FC) is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I(FC) and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I(FC) when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner. PMID:22380157

  8. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I{sub FC} by the mobile plate tuner. The I{sub FC} is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I{sub FC} and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I{sub FC} when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner.

  9. Simulations of ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the terrestrial magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Winske, Dan

    1993-01-01

    Enhanced transverse magnetic fluctuations observed below the proton cyclotron frequency in the terrestrial magnetosheath have been identified as due to the proton cyclotron and helium cyclotron instabilities driven by the T-perpendicular greater than T-parallel condition of the sheath ions. One-dimensional hybrid computer simulations are used here to examine the nonlinear properties of these two growing modes at relatively weak fluctuation energies and for wave vectors parallel to the background magnetic field. Second-order theory predicts fluctuating magnetic field energies at saturation of the proton cyclotron anisotropy instability in semiquantitative agreement with the simulation results. Introduction of the helium component enhances the wave-particle exchange rate for proton anisotropy reduction by that instability, thereby reducing the saturation energy of that mode. The simulations demonstrate that wave-particle interactions by the proton cyclotron and helium cyclotron instabilities lead to the anticorrelation observed by Anderson and Fuselier (1993).

  10. Cyclotron maser emission: Stars, planets, and laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Vorgul, I.; Cairns, R. A.; Kellett, B. J.; Bingham, R.; Ronald, K.; Speirs, D. C.; McConville, S. L.; Gillespie, K. M.; Phelps, A. D. R.

    2011-05-15

    This paper is a review of results by the group over the past decade on auroral kilometric radiation and similar cyclotron emissions from stars and planets. These emissions are often attributed to a horseshoe or crescent shaped momentum distribution of energetic electrons moving into the convergent magnetic field which exists around polar regions of dipole-type stars and planets. We have established a laboratory-based facility that has verified many of the details of our original theoretical description and agrees well with numerical simulations. The experiment has demonstrated that the horseshoe distribution does indeed produce cyclotron emission at a frequency just below the local cyclotron frequency, with polarization close to X-mode and propagating nearly perpendicularly to the beam motion. We discuss recent developments in the theory and simulation of the instability including addressing a radiation escape problem and the effect of competing instabilities, relating these to the laboratory, space, and astrophysical observations.

  11. Fundamental mode of ultra-low frequency electrostatic dust-cyclotron surface waves in a magnetized complex plasma with drifting ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lee, Myoung-Jae

    2012-10-01

    The electrostatic dust-cyclotron (EDC) waves in a magnetized dusty plasma was reported that they could be excited by gravity in a collisional plasma [1]. Rosenberg suggested that EDC waves could be excited by ions drifting along the magnetic field in a collisional plasma containing dust grains with large thermal speeds [2]. The existing investigations, however, focus on EDC volume waves in which the boundary effects are not considered. In this work, we attempt to obtain some physical results concerning the fundamental mode of EDC surface wave and the stability of wave by utilizing a kinetic method. The EDC surface wave is assumed to propagate along an external magnetic field at the interface between the plasma and the vacuum. The plasma is comprised of drifting ions flowing along an external magnetic field. To derive the growth rate of surface waves, we employ the specular reflection boundary conditions. The EDC surface wave is found to be unstable when the ion drift velocity is larger than the phase velocity of the wave. In addition, the wave becomes to be more unstable if dust particles carry more negative charges.[4pt] [1] N. D'Angelo, Phys. Lett. A 323, 445 (2004).[0pt] [2] M. Rosenberg, Phys. Scr. 82, 035505 (2010).

  12. Multimegawatt cyclotron autoresonance accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.; LaPointe, M.A.; Ganguly, A.K.; Yoder, R.B.; Wang, C.

    1996-05-01

    Means are discussed for generation of high-quality multimegawatt gyrating electron beams using rf gyroresonant acceleration. TE{sub 111}-mode cylindrical cavities in a uniform axial magnetic field have been employed for beam acceleration since 1968; such beams have more recently been employed for generation of radiation at harmonics of the gyration frequency. Use of a TE{sub 11}-mode waveguide for acceleration, rather than a cavity, is discussed. It is shown that the applied magnetic field and group velocity axial tapers allow resonance to be maintained along a waveguide, but that this is impractical in a cavity. In consequence, a waveguide cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA) can operate with near-100{percent} efficiency in power transfer from rf source to beam, while cavity accelerators will, in practice, have efficiency values limited to about 40{percent}. CARA experiments are described in which an injected beam of up to 25 A, 95 kV has had up to 7.2 MW of rf power added, with efficiencies of up to 96{percent}. Such levels of efficiency are higher than observed previously in any fast-wave interaction, and are competitive with efficiency values in industrial linear accelerators. Scaling arguments suggest that good quality gyrating megavolt beams with peak and average powers of 100 MW and 100 kW can be produced using an advanced CARA, with applications in the generation of high-power microwaves and for possible remediation of flue gas pollutants. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Ion-cyclotron instability in magnetic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, L.D.

    1987-02-02

    This report reviews the role of ion-cyclotron frequency instability in magnetic mirrors. The modes discussed here are loss-cone or anisotropy driven. The discussion includes quasilinear theory, explosive instabilities of 3-wave interaction and non-linear Landau damping, and saturation due to non-linear orbits. (JDH)

  14. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    PubMed

    Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A G; Rácz, R; Yano, K; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W

    2014-02-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode. PMID:24593510

  15. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biri, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Drentje, A. G.; Rácz, R.; Yano, K.; Kato, Y.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.

    2014-02-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode.

  16. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Biri, S.; Rácz, R.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.

    2014-02-15

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1–18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1–18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode.

  17. Cyclotron resonance cooling by strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Tagcuhi, Toshihiro; Mima, Kunioka

    1995-12-31

    Reduction of energy spread of electron beam is very important to increase a total output radiation power in free electron lasers. Although several cooling systems of particle beams such as a stochastic cooling are successfully operated in the accelerator physics, these cooling mechanisms are very slow and they are only applicable to high energy charged particle beams of ring accelerators. We propose here a new concept of laser cooling system by means of cyclotron resonance. Electrons being in cyclotron motion under a strong magnetic field can resonate with circular polarized electromagnetic field, and the resonance take place selectively depending on the velocity of the electrons. If cyclotron frequency of electrons is equal to the frequency of the electromagnetic field, they absorb the electromagnetic field energy strongly, but the other electrons remain unchanged. The absorbed energy will be converted to transverse kinetic energy, and the energy will be dumped into the radiation energy through bremastrahlung. To build a cooling system, we must use two laser beams, where one of them is counter-propagating and the other is co-propagating with electron beam. When the frequency of the counter-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of fast electrons and the co-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of slow electrons, the energy of two groups will approach and the cooling will be achieved. We solve relativistic motions of electrons with relativistic radiation dumping force, and estimate the cooling rate of this mechanism. We will report optimum parameters for the electron beam cooling system for free electron lasers.

  18. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  19. Xe/+/ -induced ion-cyclotron harmonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.

    Xenon ion sources on an ejectable package separated from the main payload during the flights of Porcupine rockets F3 and F4 which were launched from Kiruna, Sweden on March 19 and 31, 1979, respectively. The effects of the xenon ion beam, detected by the LF (f less than 16 kHz) wideband electric field experiment and analyzed by using a sonograph, are discussed. Particular attention is given to the stimulation of the ion-cyclotron harmonic waves which are usually linked to the local proton gyro-frequency, but are sometimes related to half that frequency. It was found that in a plasma dominated by O(+) ions, a small amount (1-10%) of protons could cause an effect such that the O(+) cyclotron harmonic waves are set up by the hydrogen ions, the net result being the observation of harmonic emissions separated by the hydrogen ion gyro frequency.

  20. Spatial cyclotron damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, C. L.

    1970-01-01

    To examine spatial electron cyclotron damping in a uniform Vlasov plasma, it is noted that the plasma response to a steady-state transverse excitation consists of several terms (dielectric-pole, free-streaming, and branch-cut), but that the cyclotron-damped pole term is the dominant term for z l = c/w sub ce provided (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1. If the latter inequality does not hold, then the free-streaming and branch-cut terms persist well past z = c/w sub ce as w sub 1 approaches w sub ce, making experimental measurement of cyclotron damping essentially impossible. Considering only (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1, it is shown how collisional effects should be estimated and how a finite-width excitation usually has little effect on the cyclotron-damped part of the response. Criteria is established concerning collisional damping, measurable damping length sizes, and allowed uncertainty in the magnetic field Beta. Results of numerical calculations, showing the regions in the appropriate parameter spaces that meet these criteria, are presented. From these results, one can determine the feasibility of, or propose parameter values for, an experiment designed to measure spatial cyclotron damping. It is concluded that the electron temperature T sub e should be at least 1 ev., and preferably 10 ev. or higher, for a successful experiment.

  1. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Bilato, R.; Dumont, R.; Lerche, E.; Mantsinen, M.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-08-01

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of 3He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra 3He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  2. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.; Dumont, R.; Mantsinen, M.

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  3. K-130 Cyclotron vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhole, R. B.; Roy, Anindya; Pal, Sarbajit; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    The vacuum system for K-130 cyclotron has been operational since 1977. It consists of two sub-systems, main vacuum system and beam line vacuum system. The main vacuum system is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum of about 1 × 10-6 mbar inside the 23 m3 volume of acceleration chamber comprising the Resonator tank and the Dee tank. The beam line vacuum system is required for transporting the extracted beam with minimum loss. These vacuum systems consist of diffusion pumps backed by mechanical pumps like roots and rotary pumps. The large vacuum pumps and valves of the cyclotron vacuum system were operational for more than twenty five years. In recent times, problems of frequent failures and maintenance were occurring due to aging and lack of appropriate spares. Hence, modernisation of the vacuum systems was taken up in order to ensure a stable high voltage for radio frequency system and the extraction system. This is required for efficient acceleration and transportation of high intensity ion beam. The vacuum systems have been upgraded by replacing several pumps, valves, gauges and freon units. The relay based control system for main vacuum system has also been replaced by PLC based state of the art control system. The upgraded control system enables inclusion of additional operational logics and safety interlocks into the system. The paper presents the details of the vacuum system and describes the modifications carried out for improving the performance and reliability of the vacuum system.

  4. Fundamental processes of fuel removal by cyclotron frequency range plasmas and integral scenario for fusion application studied with carbon co-deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, S.; Wauters, T.; Kreter, A.; Petersson, P.; Carrasco, A. G.

    2015-08-01

    Plasma impact removal using radio frequency heated plasmas is a candidate method to control the co-deposit related tritium inventory in fusion devices. Plasma parameters evolve according to the balance of input power to losses (transport, radiation, collisions). Material is sputtered by the ion fluxes with impact energies defined by the plasma sheath. H2, D2 and 18O2 plasmas are produced in the carbon limiter tokamak TEXTOR. Pre-characterised a-C:D layers are exposed to study local removal rates. The D2 plasma exhibits the highest surface release rate of 5.7 ± 0.9 ∗ 1019 D/m2s. Compared to this the rate of the O2 plasma is 3-fold smaller due to its 11-fold lower ion flux density. Re-deposition of removed carbon is observed, indicating that pumping and ionisation are limiting the removal in TEXTOR. Presented models can explain the observations and allow tailoring removal discharges. An integral application scenario using ICWC and thermo-chemical removal is presented, allowing to remove 700 g T from a-C:DT co-deposits in 20 h with fusion compatible wall conditions using technical specifications similar to ITER.

  5. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G. Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Becker, R.; Baskaran, R.

    2014-02-15

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged {sup 238}U{sup 40+} (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  6. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G; Becker, R; Hamm, R W; Baskaran, R; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged (238)U(40+) (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam. PMID:24593474

  7. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, G.; Becker, R.; Hamm, R. W.; Baskaran, R.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged 238U40+ (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  8. Numerical investigation of auroral cyclotron maser processes

    SciTech Connect

    Speirs, D. C.; Ronald, K.; McConville, S. L.; Gillespie, K. M.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Cross, A. W.; Robertson, C. W.; Whyte, C. G.; He, W.; Bingham, R.; Vorgul, I.; Cairns, R. A.; Kellett, B. J.

    2010-05-15

    When a mainly rectilinear electron beam is subject to significant magnetic compression, conservation of magnetic moment results in the formation of a horseshoe shaped velocity distribution. It has been shown that such a distribution is unstable to cyclotron emission and may be responsible for the generation of auroral kilometric radiation--an intense rf emission sourced at high altitudes in the terrestrial auroral magnetosphere. Particle-in-cell code simulations have been undertaken to investigate the dynamics of the cyclotron emission process in the absence of cavity boundaries with particular consideration of the spatial growth rate, spectral output and rf conversion efficiency. Computations reveal that a well-defined cyclotron emission process occurs albeit with a low spatial growth rate compared with waveguide bounded simulations. The rf output is near perpendicular to the electron beam with a slight backward-wave character reflected in the spectral output with a well defined peak at 2.68 GHz, just below the relativistic electron cyclotron frequency. The corresponding rf conversion efficiency of 1.1% is comparable to waveguide bounded simulations and consistent with the predictions of kinetic theory that suggest efficient, spectrally well defined emission can be obtained from an electron horseshoe distribution in the absence of radiation boundaries.

  9. Cyclotron-resonance maser in a magnetic mirror.

    PubMed

    Caspi, R; Jerby, E

    1999-08-01

    A cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) experiment is performed in a high-gradient magnetic field using a low-energy electron beam ( approximately 10 keV/1 A). The magnetic field exceeds 1.63 T, which corresponds to a 45-GHz cyclotron frequency. The CRM radiation output is observed in much lower frequencies, between 6.6 and 20 GHz only. This discrepancy is explained by the finite penetration depth of the electrons into the growing magnetic field, as in a magnetic mirror. The electrons emit radiation at the local cyclotron frequency in their reflection point from that magnetic mirror; hence, the radiation frequency depends mostly on the initial electron energy. A conceptual reflex gyrotron scheme is proposed in this paper, as a CRM analogue for the known reflex klystron. PMID:11970042

  10. Backward mode of the ion-cyclotron wave in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2012-08-15

    The backward modes of the surface ion-cyclotron wave are investigated in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma. The dispersion relation of the backward mode of the surface ion-cyclotron wave is obtained using the specular reflection boundary condition with the plasma dielectric function. The result shows that the nonthermal effect suppresses the wave frequency as well as the group velocity of the surface ion-cyclotron wave. It is also found that the nonthermal effect on the surface ion-cyclotron wave increases with an increase of the wave number. In addition, it is found that the propagation domain of the surface ion-cyclotron wave increases with an increase of the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the electron gyrofrequency. It is also found that the nonthermal effect increases the propagation domain of the surface ion-cyclotron wave in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma.

  11. Electron-cyclotron-heating experiments in tokamaks and stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    England, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of high-frequency microwave radiation to plasma heating near the electron-cyclotron frequency in tokamaks and stellarators. Successful plasma heating by microwave power has been demonstrated in numerous experiments. Predicted future technological developments and current theoretical understanding suggest that a vigorous program in plasma heating will continue to yield promising results.

  12. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  13. Flat-top system of the DC-280 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbekyan, G. G.; Buzmakov, V. A.; Zarubin, V. B.; Ivanenko, I. A.; Kazarinov, N. Yu.; Karamysheva, G. A.; Franko, I.

    2013-07-01

    The flat-top cavity of the radio-frequency accelerating system designed at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, for the DC-280 cyclotron is described. The cyclotron is intended for increasing the capabilities and efficiency of experiments on the synthesis of super-heavy elements and an investigation of their nuclear physical and chemical properties. The DC-280 isochronous heavy-ion cyclotron will produce accelerated beam of ions in the range from neon to uranium. The parameters, design, and results of the experimental and 3D computer modeling of the flat-top cavity of the RF accelerating system of the DC-280 cyclotron are reported.

  14. Design Study Of Cyclotron Magnet With Permanent Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Chai, Jong Seo

    2011-06-01

    Low energy cyclotrons for Positron emission tomography (PET) have been wanted for the production of radio-isotopes after 2002. In the low energy cyclotron magnet design, increase of magnetic field between the poles is needed to make a smaller size of magnet and decrease power consumption. The Permanent magnet can support this work without additional electric power consumption in the cyclotron. In this paper the study of cyclotron magnet design using permanent magnet is shown and also the comparison between normal magnet and the magnet which is designed with permanent magnet is shown. Maximum energy of proton is 8 MeV and RF frequency is 79.3 MHz. 3D CAD design was done by CATIA P3 V5 R18 and the All field calculations had been performed by OPERA-3D TOSCA. The self-made beam dynamics program OPTICY is used for making isochronous field and other calculations.

  15. Generation of Electromagnetic Bursts in the Plasma Cyclotron Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, M. E.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2013-06-01

    We study experimentally the frequency and energy characteristics of electromagnetic waves in the plasma cyclotron maser, where the active medium is the two-component nonequilibrium plasma of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge, which is produced by a high-power gyrotron radiation in a mirror trap. At the plasma decay stage, high-power (up to 200 W) pulses of electromagnetic radiation are detected synchronously with the precipitation of energetic electrons from the trap. This radiation propagates across the magnetic trap, and the radiation frequency fits in the interval between the electron gyrofrequency at the center of the mirror and the frequency of the electron cyclotron resonance heating. Synchronicity of the generated radiation with the electron precipitation out of the trap, as well as the dependence of the radiation frequency on the magnetic field of the trap, confirm the cyclotron mechanism of the arising instability. It is shown that electron precipitation, which is due to the cyclotron instability of the low-density plasma, ensures fast relaxation (as compared with the loss due to the Coulomb collisions) of the energy stored in the hot component of the plasma.

  16. A laboratory study of collisional electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Cartier, S. L.; Merlino, R. L.; Dangelo, N.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of neutral-particle collisions on electrostatic ion cyclotron instability are analyzed. Experiments were conducted in the Q machine of Motley (1975) with a cesium plasma in which the neutral gas pressure in the main chamber varied from about 5 microtorr-10 mtorr. The relation between electrostatic ion cyclotron wave amplitude and frequency and neutral argon pressure is examined. It is observed that over the full range of neutral pressure the frequency changes by less than 10 percent and the ion cyclotron waves continue to be excited and reach amplitudes of at least several percent at values of the neutral pressure where the ion-neutral collision frequency/ion gyrofrequency is about 0.3.

  17. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating System on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei

    2009-08-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system which will provide at least than 10 MW heating power, with a frequency range from 25 MHz to 100 MHz, is being built up for the EAST. The system includes high-power and wide-frequency radio amplifier, transmission line as well as resonant double loop (RDL) antenna. As a part of this system a sub-ICRH system unit with a ultimate output power of 2.5 MW was set up and employed for heating experiment. The maximum of the launched power reached 200 kW in 2008.

  18. Laboratory study of auroral cyclotron emission processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronald, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    Electrons encounter an increasing magnetic field and increase in pitch angle as they descend towards the auroral ionosphere, according to the conservation of the magnetic moment. This process results in a horseshoe shaped distribution function in electron velocity space which has been observed by satellites [1]. Research has shown this distribution to be unstable to a cyclotron maser instability [2] and the emitted Auroral Kilometric Radiation is observed to be polarised in the extraordinary mode. Experimental results are presented based on an electron beam of energy 75keV having a cyclotron frequency of 4.45GHz, compressed using magnet coils to mimic the naturally occurring phenomenon. The emitted radiation spectrum was observed to be close to the cyclotron frequency. Electron transport measurements confirmed that the horseshoe distribution function was obtained. Measurements of the antenna pattern radiated from the output window demonstrated the radiation to be polarised and propagating perpendicular to the static magnetic field. The radiation generation efficiency was estimated to be 2% in close agreement to the numerical predictions of the 2D PiC code KARAT. The efficiency was also comparable with estimates of the astrophysical phenomenon. [1] R. J. Strangeway et al, Geophys. Rev. Lett., 25, 1998, pp. 2065-2068 [2] I Vorgul et al, Physics of Plasmas, 12, 2005, pp. 1-8

  19. The mirror and ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The linear dispersion equation for fully electromagnetic waves and instabilities at arbitrary directions of propagation relative to a background magnetic field B(0) in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma is solved numerically for bi-Maxwellian particle distributions. For isotropic plasmas the dispersion and damping of the three modes below the proton cyclotron frequency are studied as functions of Beta(i) and T(e)/T(i). The transport ratios of helicity, cross-helicity, Alfven ratio, compressibility, and parallel compressibility are defined. Under the condition that the proton temperature perpendicular to B(0) is greater than the parallel temperature, the growth rates and transport ratios of the mirror instability and the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability are examined and compared. Both the proton parallel compressibility and the proton Alfven ratio are significantly different for the two growing modes.

  20. Ion cyclotron waves observed near the plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Pc2 electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves at 0.1 Hz, near the oxygen cyclotron frequency, have been observed by ISEE-1 and -2 between L = 7.6 - 5.8 on an inbound near equatorial pass in the dusk sector. The waves occurred in a thick plasmapause of width about 1 earth radius and penetrated about 1 earth radius into the plasmasphere. Wave onset was accompanied by significant increases in the thermal (0-100 eV) He(+) and the warm (0.1-16 keV/e) O(+) and He(+) heavy ion populations. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by multicomponent cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. The results are considered as an example of wave-particle interactions occurring during the outer plasmasphere refilling process at the time of the substorm recovery phase.

  1. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  2. Evolution of the axial electron cyclotron maser instability, with applications to solar microwave spikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Sprangle, Phillip

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of cyclotron radiation from streaming and gyrating electrons in an external magnetic field is analyzed. The nonlinear dynamics of both the fields and the particles are treated fully relativistically and self-consistently. The model includes a background plasma and electrostatic effects. The analytical and numerical results show that a substantial portion of the beam particle energy can be converted to electromagnetic wave energy at frequencies far above the electron cyclotron frequency. In general, the excited radiation can propagate parallel to the magnetic field and, hence, escape gyrothermal absorption at higher cyclotron harmonics. The high-frequency Doppler-shifted cyclotron instability can have saturation efficiencies far higher than those associated with well-known instabilities of the electron cyclotron maser type. Although the analysis is general, the possibility of using this model to explain the intense radio emission observed from the sun is explored in detail.

  3. Nonlinear theory of drift-cyclotron kinetics and the possible breakdown of gyro-kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Deng Zhao

    2013-01-15

    A nonlinear theory of drift-cyclotron kinetics (termed cyclo-kinetics here) is formulated to test the breakdown of the gyro-kinetic approximations. Six dimensional cyclo-kinetics can be regarded as an extension of five dimensional gyro-kinetics to include high-frequency cyclotron waves, which can interrupt the low-frequency gyro-averaging in the (sixth velocity grid) gyro-phase angle. Nonlinear cyclo-kinetics has no limit on the amplitude of the perturbations. Formally, there is no gyro-averaging when all cyclotron (gyro-phase angle) harmonics of the perturbed distribution function (delta-f) are retained. Retaining only the (low frequency) zeroth cyclotron harmonic in cyclo-kinetics recovers both linear and nonlinear gyro-kinetics. Simple recipes are given for converting continuum nonlinear delta-f gyro-kinetic transport simulation codes to cyclo-kinetics codes by retaining (at least some) higher cyclotron harmonics.

  4. Emission of ion and electron cyclotron harmonic radiation from mode conversion layers

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, D.G.; Cho, S. )

    1989-07-01

    The asymmetry of cyclotron radiation from a mode conversion layer is presented for harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency and the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency for weakly relativistic electrons. The same form of Kirchhoff's law is found for all cases, relating the emission along each branch to the absorption of an incident wave along the corresponding branch. Results show that the fast wave radiation is more strongly asymmetric at the third harmonic than at the second harmonic of the ion cyclotron frequency, while the slow wave radiation ratio is about same. At the second cyclotron harmonic of weakly relativistic electrons, the asymmetry of radiation is found to be small at high temperature. The effect of equilibrium Bernstein wave radiation is also discussed.

  5. Emission of ion and electron cyclotron harmonic radiation from mode conversion layers

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.; Swanson, D.G. )

    1990-02-01

    The asymmetry of cyclotron radiation from a mode conversion layer is presented for harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency and the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency for weakly relativistic electrons. The same form of Kirchhoff's law is found for all cases, relating the emission along each branch to the absorption of an incident wave along the corresponding branch. Results show that the fast wave radiation is more strongly asymmetric at the third harmonic than at the second harmonic of the ion cyclotron frequency, while the slow wave radiation ratio is about same. At the second cyclotron harmonic of weakly relativistic electrons, the asymmetry of radiation is found to be small at high temperature. The effect of equilibrium Bernstein wave radiation is also discussed.

  6. Single-Electron Detection and Spectroscopy via Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation.

    PubMed

    Asner, D M; Bradley, R F; de Viveiros, L; Doe, P J; Fernandes, J L; Fertl, M; Finn, E C; Formaggio, J A; Furse, D; Jones, A M; Kofron, J N; LaRoque, B H; Leber, M; McBride, E L; Miller, M L; Mohanmurthy, P; Monreal, B; Oblath, N S; Robertson, R G H; Rosenberg, L J; Rybka, G; Rysewyk, D; Sternberg, M G; Tedeschi, J R; Thümmler, T; VanDevender, B A; Woods, N L

    2015-04-24

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Although first derived in 1904, cyclotron radiation from a single electron orbiting in a magnetic field has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radio-frequency spectrometer. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay end point, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments. PMID:25955048

  7. Quantum non demolition measurement of cyclotron excitations in a Penning trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzoli, Irene; Tombesi, Paolo

    1993-01-01

    The quantum non-demolition measurement of the cyclotron excitations of an electron confined in a Penning trap could be obtained by measuring the resonance frequency of the axial motion, which is coupled to the cyclotron motion through the relativistic shift of the electron mass.

  8. Relativistic Cyclotron Resonance Shape in Magnetic Bottle Geonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehmelt, Hans; Mittleman, Richard; Liu, Yuan

    1988-10-01

    The thermally excited axial oscillation of the electron through the weak magnetic bottle needed for the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect modulates the cyclotron frequency and produces a characteristic ≈ 12-kHz-wide vertical rise-exponential decline line shape of the cyclotron resonance. At the same time the relativistic mass shift decreases the frequency by ≈ 200 Hz per cyclotron motion quantum level n. Nevertheless, our analysis of the complex line shape shows that it should be possible to produce an abrupt rise in the cyclotron quantum number n from 0 to ≈ 20 over a small fraction of 200 Hz, when the 160-GHz microwave drive approaches the n = 0 → 1 transition, and a jump of 14 levels over a frequency increment of 200 Hz has already been observed in preliminary work. This realizes an earlier proposal to generate a very sharp cyclotron resonance feature by quasithermal excitation with a square noise band and should provide a way to detect spin flips when a weak bottle is used to reduce the broadening of the g - 2 resonance by a factor of 20.

  9. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  10. Ion cyclotron bands in VLF saucers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, Kaichi; Fung, Shing F.; Calvert, Wynne

    1990-01-01

    In the wideband VLF data obtained by the polar orbiting DE-1 satellite over the polar night ion trough region of the upper ionosphere, conspicuous frequency-band structures are found to occur both in absorption and emission, particularly associating with VLF saucers. The attenuation bands indicate that the ions of atomic hydrogen from the polar ionosphere are accelerated by the ac electric fields of VLF waves oscillating normal to the static magnetic field, analogous to a cyclotron accelerator. The observed frequencies of the cyclotron harmonics suggest that the acceleration is taking place in the layer below the satellite at a geocentric distance of less than about 1.5 earth radii. This example indicates the existence of upward propagating hiss at those altitudes inside the auroral zone. On the other hand, the frequency shifts of the emission bands are attributed to a combination of two different types of Doppler shift, one due to the orbital motion of the satellite and the other due to the upward motion of the medium at the emission source. This indicates the existence of an upward plasma flow at the source, with a velocity of the order of 20 km/s inside the saucer. The amount of this frequency shift decreases with increasing harmonic order, indicating a higher phase velocity for the electrostatic waves of higher harmonic order.

  11. Cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopička, K.; Fišer, M.; Hradilek, P.; Hanč, P.; Lebeda, O.

    2003-01-01

    Some of the cyclotron-produced radionuclides may serve as important materials for the production of radiopharmaceuticals. This lecture deals with basic information relating to various aspects of these compounds. In comparison with radionuclides/compounds used for non-medical purposes, radiopharmaceuticals are subject to a broader scale of regulations, both from the safety and efficacy point of view; besides that, there are both radioactive and medical aspects that must be taken into account for any radiopharmaceutical. According to the regulations and in compliance with general rules of work with radioactivity, radiopharmaceuticals should only be prepared/manufactured under special conditions, using special areas and special equipment and applying special procedures (e.g. sterilisation, disinfection, aseptic work). Also, there are special procedures for cleaning and maintenance. Sometimes the requirements for the product safety clash with those for the safety of the personnel; several examples of solutions pertaining to these cases are given in the lecture. Also, the specific role of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals is discussed.

  12. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  13. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  14. JSW's baby cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Toda, Y.; Kaneda, Y.; Satoh, Y.; Suzukawa, I.; Yamada, T.

    1983-04-01

    Designed by The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., specially for installation in a hospital's medical department and nuclear research laboratory, '' JSW BABY CYCLOTRON '' has been developed to produce short-lived radioisotopes such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F. JSW's Baby Cyclotron has some design features. 1) Fixed energy and four sector azimuthally varying field. 2) Compact figure desired for hospital's nuclear medical department 3) A bitter type magnet yoke shielding activity 4) Simple control and operation 5) Easy maintenance without skilled personnel. Type BC105 (P:10MeV, d:5MeV), BC107 (P:10MeV, d:7MeV), BC168 (P:16MeV, d:8MeV) and BC1710 (P:17MeV, d:10MeV) are available according to required amount of radioisotopes. In our radioisotope production test, yield and purity of 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F are usable to clinical diagnosis.

  15. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Kwon, M.; Kogi, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Mase, A.

    2010-10-15

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  16. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Kogi, Y; Kawahata, K; Nagayama, Y; Mase, A; Kwon, M

    2010-10-01

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration. PMID:21033954

  17. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C. M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Ng, J. S.T.; Grote, D. P.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L. F.

    2009-04-29

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where lb<< 2pi c/omega c (with lb = bunch length, omega c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ~;;3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined vertical density"stripes" found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The existence of the resonances has been confirmed in experiments at PEP-II. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations and experimental observations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics are discussed here.

  18. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C M; Furman, M A; Vay, J L; Grote, D P; Ng, J T; Pivi, M F; Wang, L F

    2009-05-05

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where l{sub b} << 2{pi}{omega}{sub c}, (l{sub b} = bunch duration, {omega}{sub c} = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor {approx} 3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined density 'stripes' of multipactoring found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics will be discussed.

  19. A Tuning Method for Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Traps

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for tuning electrically compensated ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) traps by tracking the observed cyclotron frequency of an ion cloud at different oscillation mode amplitudes. Although we have used this method to tune the compensation voltages of a custom-built electrically compensated trap, the approach is applicable to other designs that incorporate electrical compensation. To evaluate the effectiveness of tuning, we examined the frequency shift as a function of cyclotron orbit size at different z-mode oscillation amplitudes. The cyclotron frequencies varied by ~ 12 ppm for ions with low z-mode oscillation amplitudes compared to those with high z-mode amplitudes. This frequency difference decreased to ~1 ppm by one iteration of trap tuning. PMID:20060743

  20. Electrostatic electron cyclotron instabilities near the upper hybrid layer due to electron ring distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Speirs, D. C.; Daldorff, L. K. S.

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the electrostatic electron cyclotron instability involving Bernstein modes in a magnetized plasma. The presence of a tenuous thermal ring distribution in a Maxwellian plasma decreases the frequency of the upper hybrid branch of the electron Bernstein mode until it merges with the nearest lower branch with a resulting instability. The instability occurs when the upper hybrid frequency is somewhat above the third, fourth, and higher electron cyclotron harmonics, and gives rise to a narrow spectrum of waves around the electron cyclotron harmonic nearest to the upper hybrid frequency. For a tenuous cold ring distribution together with a Maxwellian distribution an instability can take place also near the second electron cyclotron harmonic. Noise-free Vlasov simulations are used to assess the theoretical linear growth-rates and frequency spectra, and to study the nonlinear evolution of the instability. The relevance of the results to laboratory and ionospheric heating experiments is discussed.

  1. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  2. Intelligent low-level RF system by non-destructive beam monitoring device for cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi Asadi Malafeh, M. S.; Ghergherehchi, M.; Afarideh, H.; Chai, J. S.; Yoon, Sang Kim

    2016-04-01

    The project of a 10 MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of the cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work an Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF, suitable for most AVF cyclotron accelerators, is designed using a beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, the RF phase detection does not need signal processing by a microcontroller.

  3. RF cavity design for KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, In Su; Hong, Bong Hwan; Kang, Joonsun; Kim, Hyun Wook; Kim, Chang Hyeuk; Kwon, Key Ho

    2015-03-01

    The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) has developed a superconducting cyclotron for the carbon therapy, which is called KIRAMS-430. The cyclotron is designed to accelerate only 12C6+ ions up to the energy of 430 MeV/u. It uses two normal conducting RF cavities. The RF frequency is about 70.76 MHz. The nominal dee voltage is 70 kV at the center and 160 kV at the extraction. The RF cavity was designed with 4 stems by using CST microwave studio (MWS). In this paper, we represent the simulation results and the optimized design of the RF cavity for the KIRAMS-430.

  4. N-bursty emission from Uranus: A cyclotron maser source?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, D. B.; Menietti, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ray tracing studies of RX-mode emission from the north polar regions of Uranus indicate that the n-bursty radio emission may have a source along field lines with footprints near the northern magnetic pole (perhaps in the cusp), but not necessarily associated with regions of strong UV emission. This is in contrast with similar studies for the Uranus nightside smooth radio emission, which are believed to be due to the cyclotron maser instability. Source regions can be found for both hollow and filled emission cones and for frequencies well above the local gyrofreuquency implying that mechanisms other than the cyclotron maser mechanism may be operating.

  5. Electron cyclotron heating experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Austin, M.E.; Bernabei, S.

    1998-01-01

    Initial experiments on heating and current drive using second harmonic electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak using the new 110 GHz ECH system. Modulation of the ECH power in the frequency range 50 to 300 Hz and detection of the temperature perturbation by ECE diagnostics is used to validate the location of the heating. This technique also determines an upper bound on the width of the deposition profile. Analysis of electron cyclotron current drive indicates that up to 0.17 MA of central current is driven, resulting in a negative loop voltage near the axis.

  6. EC-5 fifth international workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Lohr, J.

    1985-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: electron cyclotron emission measurements; electron cyclotron emission theory; electron cyclotron heating; gyrotron development; and ECH systems and waveguide development. These paper have been indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP).

  7. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Gelbart, W. Z.; Johnson, Richard R.

    2013-04-01

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 μA to 1000 μA, depending on the cyclotron energy and application [1].

  8. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Johnson, Richard R.; Gelbart, W. Z.

    2013-04-19

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 {mu}A to 1000 {mu}A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application.

  9. Cyclotron Production of Medical Radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; Zarate-Morales, A.; Flores-Moreno, A.

    2010-08-04

    The cyclotron production of radioisotopes for medical applications is gaining increased significance in diagnostic molecular imaging techniques such as PET and SPECT. In this regard, radioisotope production has never been easier or more convenient until de introduction of compact medical cyclotrons in the last few decades, which allowed the use of short-lived radioisotopes in in vivo nuclear medicine studies on a routine basis. This review outlines some general considerations about the production of radioisotopes using charged particle accelerators.

  10. Design study of the KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Kang, Joonsun; Hong, Bong Hwan; Jung, In Su

    2016-07-01

    Design study of superconducting cyclotron magnet for the carbon therapy was performed at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The name of this project is The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project and a fixed frequency cyclotron with four spiral sector magnet was one of the candidate for the accelerator type. Basic parameters of the cyclotron magnet and its characteristics were studied. The isochronous magnetic field which can guide the 12C6+ ions up to 430 MeV/u was designed and used for the single particle tracking simulation. The isochronous condition of magnetic field was achieved by optimization of sector gap and width along the radius. Operating range of superconducting coil current was calculated and changing of the magnetic field caused by mechanical deformations of yokes was considered. From the result of magnetic field design, structure of the magnet yoke was planned.

  11. Dynamic effects on cyclotron scattering in pulsar accretion columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.; Meszaros, P.

    1991-01-01

    A resonant scattering model for photon reprocessing in a pulsar accretion column is presented. The accretion column is optically thin to Thomson scattering and optically thick to resonant scattering at the cyclotron frequency. Radiation from the neutron star surface propagates freely through the column until the photon energy equals the local cyclotron frequency, at which point the radiation is scattered, much of it back toward the star. The radiation pressure in this regime is insufficient to stop the infall. Some of the scattered radiation heats the stellar surface around the base of the column, which adds a softer component to the spectrum. The partial blocking by the accretion column of X-rays from the surface produces a fan beam emission pattern. X-rays above the surface cyclotron frequency freely escape and are characterized by a pencil beam. Gravitational light bending produces a pencil beam pattern of column-scattered radiation in the antipodal direction, resulting in a strongly angle-dependent cyclotron feature.

  12. Fundamental and harmonic electron cyclotron maser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1985-10-01

    The plasma conditions and features of the energetic electron distribution in electron cyclotron maser emission for which growth in a particular mode is favored when the ratio of the plasma frequency omega(p) to the electron cyclotron frequency Omega(e) is greater than about 0.3 are determined. It is shown that growth at the fundamental is suppressed as omega(p)/Omega(e) increases and emission at harmonics of Omega(e) dominates. Growth at harmonics of Omega(e) is not restricted to the O and X modes, but can also occur for the Z mode. Whether or not growth in a particular mode dominates depends both on omega(p)/Omega(e) and on the form of the distribution. If the density of the energetic electrons is sufficiently large, the dispersion relations of the O and X modes are modified so that the group velocities of the growing O and X mode waves can be comparable to that of the growing Z mode waves.

  13. Loss cone-driven cyclotron maser instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Yi, Sibaek; Lim, Dayeh; Kim, Hee-Eun; Seough, Jungjoon; Yoon, Peter H.

    2013-11-01

    The weakly (or mildly) relativistic cyclotron maser instability has been successfully applied to explain the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation and other radio sources in nature and laboratory. Among the most important physical parameters that determine the instability criteria is the ratio of plasma-to-electron cyclotron frequencies, ωp/Ω. It is therefore instructive to consider how the normalized maximum growth rate, γmax/Ω, varies as a function of ωp/Ω. Although many authors have already discussed this problem, in order to complete the analysis, one must also understand how the radiation emission angle corresponding to the maximum growth, θmax, scales with ωp/Ω, since the propagation angle determines the radiation beaming pattern. Also, the behavior of the frequency corresponding to the maximum growth rate at each harmonic, (ωmax-sΩ)/Ω, where s=1,2,3,ċ , as a function of ωp/Ωis of importance for a complete understanding of the maser excitation. The present paper computes these additional quantities for the first time, making use of a model loss cone electron distribution function.

  14. Multi-Species Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating at High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andre, M.; Chang, T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Crew, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of ion distributions and plasma waves obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the high-altitude, nightside auroral zone are used to study ion energization for three ion species. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to account for the transverse heating of these ion populations. One of these, the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) mechanism, explains ion conic formation through ion cyclotron resonance with broadband electromagnetic wave turbulence in the vicinity of the characteristic ion cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron resonant heating of the ions by low- frequency electromagnetic waves is an important energy source for the transport of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. In this paper we test the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to three simultaneously heated and accelerated ion species by modelling the ion conic formation in terms of a resonant wave-particle interaction in which the ions extract energy from the portion of the broadband electromagnetic wave spectrum which includes the ion cyclotron frequency. Using a Monte Carlo technique we evaluate the ion heating produced by the electromagnetic turbulence at low frequencies and find that the wave amplitudes near the ion cyclotron frequencies are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies.

  15. Multi-Species Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating at High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andre, M.; Chang, T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Crew, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of ion distributions and plasma waves obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the high-altitude, nightside auroral zone are used to study ion energization for three ion species. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to account for the transverse heating of these ion populations. One of these, the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) mechanism, explains ion conic formation through ion cyclotron resonance with broadband electromagnetic wave turbulence in the vicinity of the characteristic ion cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron resonant heating of the ions by low-frequency electromagnetic waves is an important energy source for the transport of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. In this paper we test the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to three simultaneously heated and accelerated ion species by modelling the ion conic formation in terms of a resonant wave-particle interaction in which the ions extract energy from the portion of the broadband electromagnetic wave spectrum which includes the ion cyclotron frequency. Using a Monte Carlo technique we evaluate the ion heating produced by the electromagnetic turbulence at low frequencies and find that the wave amplitudes near the ion cyclotron frequencies are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies.

  16. Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Omidi, N.

    2016-02-01

    The ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) refer to electromagnetic transverse waves with nearly field-aligned propagation, circular polarization, and frequencies near the proton gyro-frequency. This chapter presents the ICW studies observed in the solar wind over a wide range of heliocentric distances, at all solar longitudes, and at locations far from planets or comets. To better understand the wave source region, case studies have been performed on a special group of ICW storm events, in which the left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) waves were observed simultaneously in the spacecraft frame. The study in the chapter assumes the waves are generated through one possible mechanism (i.e., the temperature anisotropy instability). The variations of the wave properties with heliocentric distances may also provide information on the possible wave generation sources and the effects of the wave to the solar wind plasma.

  17. Folded waveguide coupler for ion cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, T.L.; Chen, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    A new type of waveguide coupler for plasma heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is described. The coupler consists of a series of interleaved metallic vanes within a rectangular enclosure analogous to a wide rectangular waveguide that has been ''folded'' several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a plate is attached which contains coupling apertures in each fold or every other fold of the waveguide, depending upon the wavenumber spectrum desired. This plate serves primarily as a wave field polarizer that converts coupler fields to the polarization of the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma. Theoretical estimates indicate that the folded waveguide is capable of high-efficiency, multimegawatt operation into a plasma. Bench tests have verified the predicted field structure within the waveguide in preparation for high-power tests on the Radio Frequency Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  18. Cyclotron side band emissions from magnetospheric electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.

    1975-01-01

    Very low frequency emissions with subharmonic cyclotron frequency from magnetospheric electrons were detected by the S(3)-A satellite (Explorer 45) whose orbit is close to the magnetic equatorial plane where the wave-particle interaction is most efficient. These emissions were observed during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm in the nightside of the magnetosphere outside of the plasmasphere. During the event of these side-band emissions, the pitch angle distributions of high energy electrons (greater than 50 keV) and of energetic protons (greater than 100 keV) showed remarkable changes with time, whereas those of low energy electrons and protons remained approximately isotropic. In this type of event, emissions consist essentially of two bands, the one below the equatorial electron gyrofrequency, and the other above. The emissions below are whistler mode, and the emissions above are electrostatic mode.

  19. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-06-25

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code"POSINST" was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ~;;(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed.

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source DECRIS-4 for the U400 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leporis, M.; Bekhterev, V.; Bogomolov, S.; Efremov, A.; Gulbekian, G.; Kostyukhov, Yu.; Lebedev, A.; Loginov, V.; Yazvitsky, N.

    2006-03-15

    The electron cyclotron resonance ion source DECRIS-4 has been designed and constructed at the FLNR to be used as a second injector of heavy multiply charged ions for the U-400 cyclotron. After the modification of the injection side this source can be also used as a 'charge breeder' (the ''1{sup +}{yields}n{sup +}'' method) for the second phase of the Dubna radioactive ion beams project. The main feature of the ion source design is the creation of the extended resonance zone in a comparatively compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source. For this purpose the axial magnetic field is formed with a flat minimum. In this case the superposition of the axial magnetic field and the radial field of the permanent-magnet hexapole, made from NdFeB, allows one to create a larger resonance volume. For the plasma heating a microwave frequency of 14 GHz is used. In this paper we will present the basic design features of the ion source, including the results of the magnetic-field measurements. Some preliminary results of ion source tests are also reported.

  1. Fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Lyneis, Claude M; Leitner, D; Todd, D S; Sabbi, G; Prestemon, S; Caspi, S; Ferracin, P

    2008-02-01

    The concepts and technical challenges related to developing a fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a rf frequency greater than 40 GHz and magnetic confinement fields greater than twice B(ECR) will be explored in this article. Based on the semiempirical frequency scaling of ECR plasma density with the square of operating frequency, there should be significant gains in performance over current third generation ECR ion sources, which operate at rf frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz. While the third generation ECR ion sources use NbTi superconducting solenoid and sextupole coils, the new sources will need to use different superconducting materials, such as Nb(3)Sn, to reach the required magnetic confinement, which scales linearly with rf frequency. Additional technical challenges include increased bremsstrahlung production, which may increase faster than the plasma density, bremsstrahlung heating of the cold mass, and the availability of high power continuous wave microwave sources at these frequencies. With each generation of ECR ion sources, there are new challenges to be mastered, but the potential for higher performance and reduced cost of the associated accelerator continues to make this a promising avenue for development. PMID:18315111

  2. Evidence for proton cyclotron waves near Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-02-01

    We have computed frequency spectra of power density and polarization parameters of magnetohydrodynamic waves from observations on board the ICE spacecraft as it flew past Comet Giacobini-Zinner on September 11, 1985. Since the spectral parameters are frequency dependent, we find that the analysis is best carried out in a 'wave' reference frame where one of the major axes is along the wave normal direction for each frequency component. The power density along the wave normal direction shows a systematic peak structure which we identify as belonging to cyclotron wave harmonics of pickup ions near the comet. The fundamental harmonics of the cyclotron waves are also consistent with the gyrofrequencies calculated from the magnetic field data.

  3. Evidence for proton cyclotron waves near Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    We have computed frequency spectra of power density and polarization parameters of magnetohydrodynamic waves from observations on board the ICE spacecraft as it flew past Comet Giacobini-Zinner on September 11, 1985. Since the spectral parameters are frequency dependent, we find that the analysis is best carried out in a 'wave' reference frame where one of the major axes is along the wave normal direction for each frequency component. The power density along the wave normal direction shows a systematic peak structure which we identify as belonging to cyclotron wave harmonics of pickup ions near the comet. The fundamental harmonics of the cyclotron waves are also consistent with the gyrofrequencies calculated from the magnetic field data.

  4. Cyclotron resonance in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Erik Alfred

    We present a study of cyclotron resonance in graphene. Graphene is a novel two-dimensional system consisting of a single sheet of atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, and exhibits a unique, linear low-energy dispersion. Bilayer graphene, two sheets stacked together, is an equally interesting system displaying a second unique, but hyperbolic, dispersion. In this work, we study the quantized Landau levels of these systems in strong magnetic fields, via Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We have fabricated large area single layer and bilayer graphene devices on infrared-transparent Si/SiO2 substrates, using standard electron beam lithography and thin-film liftoff techniques. At cryogenic temperatures and high magnetic fields, we measure the infrared transmission through these devices as a function of the back gate voltage, which changes the Fermi level and hence the carrier density. We analyze the normalized transmission traces, assigning the observed minima to the cyclotron resonance wherein carriers are excited between Landau levels. In single layer graphene, we study Landau level transitions near the charge neutral Dirac point, and find a set of particle-hole symmetric transitions, both within the conduction and valence band, and between the bands. These experiments confirm the unusual B- and n -dependencies of the LL energies, where B is the magnetic field and n the LL index. The CR selection rule is determined to be Delta n = |nfinal| -- |n initial| = +/-1. The ratio of the observed interband and intraband transitions exceeds the expected value by 5%, and this excess is interpreted as an additional contribution to the transition energy from many-particle effects. We explore several higher LL transitions for both electron and hole doping of single layer graphene. The data are consistent with a renormalization of the carrier band velocity near the Dirac point, and suggest that impurity scattering strengthens at low energies. We also study the CR at the

  5. Nonlinear sub-cyclotron resonance as a formation mechanism for gaps in banded chorus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fu, Xiangrong; Guo, Zehua; Dong, Chuanfei; Gary, S. Peter

    2015-05-14

    An interesting characteristic of magnetospheric chorus is the presence of a frequency gap at ω ≃ 0.5Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron angular frequency. Recent chorus observations sometimes show additional gaps near 0.3Ωe and 0.6Ωe. Here we present a novel nonlinear mechanism for the formation of these gaps using Hamiltonian theory and test particle simulations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless plasma. We find that an oblique whistler wave with frequency at a fraction of the electron cyclotron frequency can resonate with electrons, leading to effective energy exchange between the wave and particles.

  6. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  7. Use of cyclotrons in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaim, S. M.

    2004-10-01

    Cyclotrons are versatile ion-accelerating machines which find many applications in medicine. In this short review their use in hadron therapy is briefly discussed. Proton therapy is gaining significance because of its capability to treat deep-lying tumours. A strong area of application of cyclotrons involves the production of short-lived neutron deficient radiotracers for use in emission tomography, especially positron emission tomography. This fast and quantitative in vivo diagnostic technique is being increasingly used in neurology, cardiology and oncology. Besides routine patient care, considerable interdisciplinary work on development of new positron emitters is under way. A short account of those efforts is given. The use of cyclotrons in the production of radionuclides for internal radiotherapy is also briefly described.

  8. Cyclotron and linac production of Ac-225.

    PubMed

    Melville, Graeme; Allen, Barry J

    2009-04-01

    Radium needles that were once implanted into tumours as a cancer treatment are now obsolete and constitute a radioactive waste problem, as their half-life is 1600 years. The reduction of radium by photonuclear transmutation by bombarding Ra-226 with high-energy photons from a medical linear accelerator (linac) has been investigated. A linac dose of 2800 Gy produced about 2.4 MBq (64 microCi) of Ra-225, which decays to Ac-225 and can then be used for 'Targeted Alpha Therapy' (TAT) of cancer. This result, while consistent with theoretical calculations, is far too low to be of practical use unless much larger quantities of radium are irradiated. The increasing application of Ac-225 for cancer therapy indicates the potential need for its increased production and availability. This paper investigates the possibility of producing of Ac-225 in commercial quantities, which could potentially reduce obsolete radioactive material and displace the need for expensive importation of Ac-225 from the USA and Russia in the years ahead. Scaled up production of Ac-225 could theoretically be achieved by the use of a high current cyclotron or linac. Production specifications are determined for a linac in terms of current, pulse length and frequency, as well as an examination of other factors such as radiation issues and radionuclei separation. Yields are compared with those calculated for the Australian National Cyclotron in Sydney. PMID:19135381

  9. Design Features Of K = 100 Cyclotron Magnet For ISOL RIB Production

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Ah; Gad, Kh. M. M.; Chai, Jong-Seo

    2011-06-01

    K = 100 Separated Sector Cyclotron was designed in conceptual for the ISOL driver. It has 4 separated sector magnets. Two SF cyclotrons will be used as the injectors for separated sector cyclotron. RF frequency is 70 MHz, 4th harmonics. We have designed sector magnet without trim and harmonic coils. Minimum radius of the magnet is 55 cm and maximum radius is 1.8 m. Designed magnets were calculated and simulated by OPERA 3D (TOSCA) code. Ion beam dynamics calculations have been done using particle studio code to prove the focusing properties of the designed magnets.

  10. Experiments on ion cyclotron damping at the deuterium fourth harmonic in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Baity, F.W.; Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Mau, T.K.; Porkolab, M.

    1999-05-01

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the energetic ions of an injected beam is evaluated in the DIII-D tokamak. Ion cyclotron resonance absorption at the fourth harmonic of the deuteron cyclotron frequency is observed with deuterium neutral beam injection (f = 60 MHz, B{sub T} = 1.9 T). Enhanced D-D neutron rates are evidence of absorption at the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Characteristics of global energy confinement provide further proof of substantial beam acceleration by the rf. In many cases, the accelerated deuterons cause temporary stabilization of the sawtooth (monster sawteeth), at relatively low rf power levels of {approximately}1 MW.

  11. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, A. Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.

    2015-12-10

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  12. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rana Pratap; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper.

  13. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rana Pratap; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S V

    2016-01-01

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper. PMID:26827337

  14. A new ion and electron detector for ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Simms, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    A new detector using an extremelly driven tuned circuit has been developed for use in ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy experiments. Based on the Q-meter circuit, this detector will operate at frequencies greater than 1 MHz at rf levels less than 1 mV. Operation in the frequency range 1-15 MHz allows the use of higher magnetic fields for more efficient storage of low mass ions in the trapping mode of operation. In the frequency range 2-6 MHz electrons can be detected in the ion cyclotron resonance cell by their resonant motion in the trapping plane.

  15. Dynamic regimes of cyclotron instability in the afterglow mode of minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, D.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the dynamic regimes of cyclotron instabilities in non-equilibrium plasma of a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source operated in pulsed mode. The instability appears in decaying ion source plasma shortly (1-10 ms) after switching off the microwave radiation of the klystron, and manifests itself in the form of powerful pulses of electromagnetic emission associated with precipitation of high-energy electrons along the magnetic field lines. Recently it was shown that this plasma instability causes perturbations of the extracted ion current, which limits the performance of the ion source and generates strong bursts of bremsstrahlung emission. In this article we present time-resolved diagnostics of electromagnetic emission bursts related to cyclotron instability in the decaying plasma. The temporal resolution is sufficient to study the fine structure of the dynamic spectra of the electromagnetic emission at different operating regimes of the ion source. It was found that at different values of magnetic field and heating power the dynamic spectra demonstrate common features: Decreasing frequency from burst to burst and an always falling tone during a single burst of instability. The analysis has shown that the instability is driven by the resonant interaction of hot electrons, distributed between the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) zone and the trap center, with slow extraordinary wave propagation quasi-parallel with respect to the external magnetic field.

  16. Two-stream cyclotron radiative instabilities due to the marginally mirror-trapped fraction for fustion alphas in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-07-01

    It is shown here that the marginally mirror-trapped fraction of the newly-born fusion alpha particles in the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction dominated tokamak plasmas can induce a two-stream cyclotron radiative instability for the fast Alfven waves propagating near the harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c{alpha}}. This can explain both the experimentally observed time behavior and the spatially localized origin of the fusion product ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in TFTR at frequencies {omega} {approx} m{omega}{sub c{alpha}}.

  17. Cyclotron Production of Technetium-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Katherine M.

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) has emerged as the most widely used radionuclide in medicine and is currently obtained from a 99Mo/ 99mTc generator system. At present, there are only a handful of ageing reactors worldwide capable of producing large quantities of the parent isotope, 99Mo, and owing to the ever growing shutdown periods for maintenance and repair of these ageing reactors, the reliable supply 99mTc has been compromised in recent years. With an interest in alternative strategies for producing this key medical isotope, this thesis focuses on several technical challenges related to the direct cyclotron production of 99mTc via the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction. In addition to evaluating the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,x)99Mo reactions, this work presented the first experimental evaluation of the 100Mo(p,2n) 99gTc excitation function in the range of 8-18 MeV. Thick target calculations suggested that large quantities of cyclotron-produced 99mTc may be possible. For example, a 6 hr irradiation at 500 μA with an energy window of 18→10 MeV is expected to yield 1.15 TBq of 99mTc. The level of coproduced 99gTc contaminant was found to be on par with the current 99Mo/99mTc generator standard eluted with a 24 hr frequency. Highly enriched 100Mo was required as the target material for 99mTc production and a process for recycling of this expensive material is presented. An 87% recovery yield is reported, including metallic target preparation, irradiation, 99mTc extraction, molybdate isolation, and finally hydrogen reduction to the metal. Further improvements are expected with additional optimization experiments. A method for forming structurally stable metallic molybdenum targets has also been developed. These targets are capable of withstanding more than a kilowatt of beam power and the reliable production and extraction of Curie quantities of 99mTc has been demonstrated. With the end-goal of using the cyclotron-produced 99mTc clinically, the quality of the cyclotron

  18. Shear-flow-driven ion cyclotron and ion sound-drift instabilities of cylindrical inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. S.; Chibisov, D. V.

    2007-08-15

    The effects of the shear flow along the magnetic field on the development of the ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities in the radially inhomogeneous cylindrical plasma are studied on the ground of a kinetic approach. It is shown that flow shear not only modifies the frequencies and growth rates of known current driven electrostatic ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities, but is the source of the development of specific shear-flow-driven ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities. These instabilities are excited at the levels of current along the ambient magnetic field which is below the critical value for the development of the modified by flow shear current driven ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities.

  19. Cyclotron Resonance in Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    Cyclotron Resonance Absorption/Scattering features provide direct measurement of magnetic field strength in the line forming region. This has enabled the estimation of magnetic field strengths of nearly two dozen neutron stars in accreting high mass binary systems. With improved spectroscopic sensitivity, new X-ray observatories such as NuSTAR, Astrosat and Hitomi are opening the doors to studying detailed features such as the line shape and phase dependence with high significance. Such studies will help understand the nature of matter accumulation in, and outflow from, the magnetically confined accretion column on the neutron star. This talk will describe the results of MHD simulations of the matter flow in such systems, the diagnostics of such flows using cyclotron lines, and comparison with recent observations from NuSTAR and Astrosat.

  20. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90`s

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. The authors also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA.

  1. Electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum associated with the drift Alfven-cyclotron instability

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Kicheol; Ryu, Chang-Mo; Yoon, Peter H.

    2012-07-15

    The present paper investigates the electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum associated with the drift Alfven-cyclotron instability by means of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, which may be plausibly associated with a current disruption event. The current disruption event shows localized high-amplitude electromagnetic fluctuations. In recent theories, these fluctuation characteristics are shown to correspond to the drift Alfven-cyclotron instability. A simulation is carried out to clarify this instability. The simulation shows that the drift Alfven-cyclotron instabilities are excited in two frequency regimes, a relatively low frequency mode propagating in a quasi-perpendicular direction while the second high-frequency branch propagating in a predominantly parallel propagation direction, consistent with observations as well as with a recent theory.

  2. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002 - 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis

  3. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is very well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis of modern

  4. Cyclotron line resonant transfer through neutron star atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John C. L.; Wasserman, Ira M.; Salpeter, Edwin E.

    1988-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are used to study in detail the resonant radiative transfer of cyclotron line photons with recoil through a purely scattering neutron star atmosphere for both the polarized and unpolarized cases. For each case, the number of scatters, the path length traveled, the escape frequency shift, the escape direction cosine, the emergent frequency spectra, and the angular distribution of escaping photons are investigated. In the polarized case, transfer is calculated using both the cold plasma e- and o-modes and the magnetic vacuum perpendicular and parallel modes.

  5. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in a nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartier, S. L.; Dangelo, N.; Merlino, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves excited in a single-ended cesium Q machine with a nonuniform magnetic field are described. The electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves are generated in the usual manner by drawing an electron current to a small exciter disk immersed in the plasma column. The parallel and perpendicular (to B) wavelengths and phase velocities are determined by mapping out two-dimensional wave phase contours. The wave frequency f depends on the location of the exciter disk in the nonuniform magnetic field, and propagating waves are only observed in the region where f is approximately greater than fci, where fci is the local ion-cyclotron frequency. The parallel phase velocity is in the direction of the electron drift. From measurements of the plasma properties along the axis, it is inferred that the electron drift velocity is not uniform along the entire current channel. The evidence suggests that the waves begin being excited at that axial position where the critical drift velocity is first exceeded, consistent with a current-driven excitation mechanism.

  6. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-10

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ∼10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ∼50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  7. LH wave absorption by mode conversion near ion cyclotron harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.; Bers, A.; Fuchs, V.

    1981-02-01

    Numerical studies of the dispersion relation near the lower-hybrid frequency in an inhomogeneous plasma (..delta.. n, ..delta.. T, ..delta.. B) show that portions of an incident lower-hybrid wave spectrum undergo successive but partial mode conversions to warm-plasma waves in the presence of ion cyclotron harmonics. Wave absorption beyond the first mode conversion occurs near an ion cyclotron harmonic where ion Landau damping is enhanced. A second-order dispersion relation numerically in good agreement with the full dispersion relation in the mode conversion region is derived using the condition par. delta D/par. delta k = 0. The mode conversion efficiency at each confluence is evaluated by solving the corresponding differential equation.

  8. Ion Behavior in an Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Trap

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We recently described a new electrically compensated trap in FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and developed a means of tuning traps of this general design. Here, we describe a continuation of that research by comparing the ion transient lifetimes and the resulting mass resolving powers and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios that are achievable in the compensated vs. uncompensated modes of this trap. Transient lifetimes are ten times longer under the same conditions of pressure, providing improved mass resolving power and S/N ratios. The mass resolving power as a function of m/z is linear (log-log plot) and nearly equal to the theoretical maximum. Importantly, the ion cyclotron frequency as a function of ion number decreases linearly in accord with theory, unlike its behavior in the uncompensated mode. This linearity should lead to better control in mass calibration and increased mass accuracy than achievable in the uncompensated mode. PMID:21499521

  9. Cyclotron resonance in topological insulators: non-relativistic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabert, C. J.; Carbotte, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    The low-energy Hamiltonian used to describe the dynamics of the helical Dirac fermions on the surface of a topological insulator contains a subdominant non-relativistic (Schrödinger) contribution. This term can have an important effect on some properties while having no effect on others. The Hall plateaus retain the same relativistic quantization as the pure Dirac case. The height of the universal interband background conductivity is unaltered, but its onset is changed. However, the non-relativistic term leads directly to particle-hole asymmetry. It also splits the interband magneto-optical lines into doublets. Here, we find that, while the shape of the semiclassical cyclotron resonance line is unaltered, the cyclotron frequency and its optical spectral weight are changed. There are significant differences in both of these quantities for a fixed value of chemical potential or fixed doping away from charge neutrality depending on whether the Fermi energy lies in the valence or conduction band.

  10. RF Heating in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, D.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2011-12-01

    ECRIS—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources are able to feed accelerators with intense currents of highly charged ions. In ECRIS a high density—high temperature plasma is generated by means of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating inside a B-min, MHD stable trap. The state of the art about the principal heating mechanisms will be given. The paper will specially discuss the most critical and still open issues concerning the influence of the magnetic field and of the RF frequency on the plasma heating, as well as the impact of possible non-linear pumping wave—to—plasma interactions. The contribution of INFN-LNS will be specifically underlined. A short review on the future perspectives for the design of new generation ion sources will be given in conclusion.

  11. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the plasma depletion layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Richard E.; Hudson, Mary K.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Anderson, Brian J.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a study of the theoretical properties of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves which occur in the plasma depletion layer are presented. The analysis assumes a homogeneous plasma with the characteristics which were measured by the AMPTE/CCE satellite at 1450-1501 UT on October 5, 1984. Waves were observed in the Pc 1 frequency range below the hydrogen gyrofrequency, and these waves are identified as EMIC waves. The higher-frequency instability is driven by the temperature anisotropy of the H(+) ions, while the lower-frequency instability is driven by the temperature anisotropy of the He(2+) ions. It is argued that the higher-frequency waves will have k roughly parallel to B(0) and will be left-hand polarized, while the lower frequency wave band will have k oblique to B(0) and will be linearly polarized, in agreement with observations.

  12. Microwave emission related to cyclotron instabilities in a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, I.; Tarvainen, O.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2015-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) have been essential in the research and applications of nuclear physics over the past 40 years. They are extensively used in a wide range of large-scale accelerator facilities for the production of highly charged heavy ion beams of stable and radioactive elements. ECRISs are susceptible to kinetic instabilities due to resonance heating mechanism leading to anisotropic electron velocity distribution function. Instabilities of cyclotron type are a proven cause of frequently observed periodic bursts of ‘hot’ electrons and bremsstrahlung, accompanied with emission of microwave radiation and followed by considerable drop of multiply charged ions current. Detailed studies of the microwave radiation associated with the instabilities have been performed with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen and argon plasmas. It is demonstrated that during the development of cyclotron instability ‘hot’ electrons emit microwaves in sub-microsecond scale bursts at temporally descending frequencies in the 8-15 GHz range with two dominant frequencies of 11.09 and 12.59 GHz regardless of ECRIS settings i.e. magnetic field strength, neutral gas pressure or species and microwave power. The experimental data suggest that the most probable excited plasma wave is a slow extraordinary Z-mode propagating quasi-longitudinally with respect to the external magnetic field.

  13. Compressibility and cyclotron damping in the oblique Alfven wave

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.K. )

    1989-11-01

    Compressibility, magnetic compressibility, and damping rate are calculated for the obliquely propagating Alfven shear wave in high- and low-beta Vlasov plasmas. There is an overall increase in compressibility as beta is reduced from {beta} = 1 to {beta}{much lt}1. For high obliquity {theta} and low frequency ({omega} {much lt} {Omega}{sub p}) the compressibility C follows a k{sup 2} wave number dependence; for high {theta} and low {beta} the approximation C(k) {approx} k{sub n}{sup 2} {identical to} (kV{sub A}/{Omega}{sub p}){sup 2} holds for wave numbers up to the proton cyclotron resonance, where {Omega}{sub p} is the proton cyclotron frequency and V{sub A} is the Alfven velocity. Strong proton cyclotron damping sets in at k{sub n} of the order of unity; the precise k{sub n} position of the damping cutoff increases with decreasing {beta} and increasing {theta}. Hence compressibility can exceed unity near the damping cutoff for high-{theta} waves in a low-{beta} plasma. The magnetic compressibility of the oblique Alfven wave also has a k{sup 2} dependence and can reach a maximum value of the order of 10% at high wave number. It is shown that Alfven compressibility could be the dominant contributor to the near-Sun solar wind density fluctuation spectrum for k>10{sup {minus}2} km{sup {minus}1} and hence might cause some of the flattening at high wave number seen in radio scintillation measurements. This would also be consistent with the notion that the observed density spectrum inner scale is a signature of cyclotron damping.

  14. Relativistic effects on cyclotron wave absorption by an energetic electron tail in the PLT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Efthimion, P.; Fidone, I.

    1984-07-01

    Electron cyclotron wave absorption by mildly relativistic electrons in the low density regime of the PLT tokamak is investigated. Appreciable wave damping is found for vertical propagation at frequencies of 50, 60, and 70 GHz when the spatially constant cyclotron frequency is 89 GHz. The perpendicular temperature T/sub perpendicular/(v/sub parallel/) of the fast tail is also measured from emission of radiation in the same direction. The results obtained are in satisfactory agreement with the theory of wave emission and absorption.

  15. Calculation of the spontaneous cyclotron emissivity using the complete relativistic resonance condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Wu, C. S.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for the spectral emissivity of spontaneous synchrotron radiation for a plasma which consists of both thermal and suprathermal electron components is derived using the complete relativistic cyclotron resonance condition. The expression is valid over all angles of propagation. The result is applied to the study of the emission of radiation from an energetic population of electrons with a loss-cone distribution in a relatively low-density plasma (i.e., the electron plasma frequency is less than the cyclotron frequency).

  16. Fuzzy-logic-based LLRF control for the RFT-30 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Young-Bae; Lee, Eun-Je; Hur, Min-Goo; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yong-Dae; Yang, Seung-Dae; Jung, In-Su; Park, Yeun-Soo

    2015-10-01

    A RFT-30 cyclotron can be used for various applications such as radioisotope production and fundamental research. A low level radio frequency (LLRF) system adjusts the parameters for stable operation of the radio frequency (RF) system. It is important for the LLRF system to maintain a stable resonance condition during its operation. In this paper, we propose a fuzzy-based LLRF control for the RFT-30 cyclotron. The proposed approach stabilizes the resonance condition by moving the fine tuner based on a fuzzy logic controller (FLC). Performance results show that the FLC approach maintains a stable resonance condition for the RF system.

  17. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, S.; Katagiri, K.; Nakao, M.; Sugiura, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Noda, A.; Okada, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Honma, T.; Noda, K.

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C4+ ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C4+, for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  18. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source. PMID:24593538

  19. Ion cyclotron waves at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    During the interaction of Titan's thick atmosphere with the ambient plasma, it was expected that ion cyclotron waves would be generated by the free energy of the highly anisotropic velocity distribution of the freshly ionized atmospheric particles created in the interaction. However, ion cyclotron waves are rarely observed near Titan, due to the long growth times of waves associated with the major ion species from Titan's ionosphere, such as CH4+ and N2+. In the over 100 Titan flybys obtained by Cassini to date, there are only two wave events, for just a few minutes during T63 flyby and for tens of minutes during T98 flyby. These waves occur near the gyrofrequencies of proton and singly ionized molecular hydrogen. They are left-handed, elliptically polarized, and propagate nearly parallel to the field lines. Hybrid simulations are performed to understand the wave growth under various conditions in the Titan environment. The simulations using the plasma and field conditions during T63 show that pickup protons with densities ranging from 0.01 cm-3 to 0.02 cm-3 and singly ionized molecular hydrogens with densities ranging from 0.015 cm-3 to 0.25 cm-3 can drive ion cyclotron waves with amplitudes of ~0.02 nT and of ~0.04 nT within appropriate growth times at Titan, respectively. Since the T98 waves were seen farther upstream than the T63 waves, it is possible that the instability was stronger and grew faster on T98 than T63.

  20. Cyclotron Line Measurements with INTEGRAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottschmidt, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Caballero, I.; Fritz, S.; Schoenherr, G.; Kretschmar, P.; Wilms, J.; McBride, V. A.; Suchy, S.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its broadband energy coverage, INTEGRAL has made important contributions to observing and interpreting cyclotron lines, which are present in the 10-100 keV range of a sample of accreting pulsars. In these systems photons with energies fulfilling the resonance condition inelastically Compton scatter off electrons quantized in the accretion column above the neutron star's magnetic pole(s). This process gives rise to the broad, absorption-like lines or 'cyclotron resonant scattering features' (CRSF). The observed lines allow to directly measure the B-fields of these sources, resulting in values of a few times 1E12G. In this overview I will present recent highlights regarding CRSF observations as well as discuss current ideas and models for the physical conditions in the accretion column. Among the former are the stability of the spectrum of Vela X-1 during giant flares in 2003, the observation of three cyclotron lines during the 2004 outburst of V0332+53, the confirmation of the fundamental line at approximately 45 keV during a 2005 normal outburst of A0535-26, and the simultaneous detection of the two lines in the dipping source 4U 1907+09 (for which also a torque reversal was detected for the first time). Through these and other observations it has become increasingly apparent that two types of observations can potentially be used to constrain the accretion column geometry: the determination of energy ratios for multiple harmonic lines (only two sources with greater than 2 lines are known), was well as the evolution of the fundamental line centroid, which, for different sources, may or may not be correlated with flux. Furthermore, first steps have been taken away from the usual phenomenological description of the lines, towards a physical approach based on self-consistent CRSF modeling. Initial applications are presented.

  1. Lawrence's Legacy : Seaborg's Cyclotron - The 88-Inch Cyclotron turns 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Margaret; Clark, David

    2003-04-01

    In 1958, Sputnik had recently been launched by the Russians, leading to worry in Congress and increased funding for science and technology. Ernest Lawrence was director of the "Rad Lab" at Berkeley. Another Nobel Prize winner, Glenn Seaborg, was Associate Laboratory Director and Director of the Nuclear Chemistry Division. In this atmosphere, Lawrence was phoned by commissioners of the Atomic Energy Commission and asked what they could do for Seaborg, "because he did such a fine job of setting up the chemistry for extracting plutonium from spent reactor fuel" [1]. In this informal way, the 90-Inch (eventually 88-Inch) Cyclotron became a line item in the federal budget at a cost of 3M (later increased to 5M). The 88-Inch Cyclotron achieved first internal beam on Dec. 12, 1961 and first external beam in May 1962. Forty years later it is still going strong. Pieced together from interviews with the retirees who built it, Rad Lab reports and archives from the Seaborg and Lawrence collections, the story of its design and construction - on-time and under-budget - provides a glimpse into the early days of big science. [1] remarks made by Elmer Kelly, "Physicist-in-charge' of the project on the occasion of the 40th anniversary celebration.

  2. Large-Amplitude Electromagnetic Proton Cyclotron Waves throughout the Earth's Magnetosheath: Cassini and Wind Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanu, R.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Reddy, V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Falkowski, B. J.; Echer, E.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    A rare and unique observation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves has been studied for the Cassini and WIND satellites during the Cassini Earth flyby on 18th August, 1999, across the Earth's magnetosheath. Magnetic field data from Cassini and WIND for the time interval 0152-0226 UT are analyzed to characterize the wave modes when the satellites were present in the subsolar and dusk side magnetosheath, respectively. A new technique/program called Rosetta Automatic Wave Analysis (RAWA) has been developed based on the method initiated by Tsurutani et. al., 2013 to study the wave cycles. Various wave mode characteristics like frequency, ellipticity, propagation angle, and wave polarization are determined and are characterized statistically. Cassini and WIND wave cycle analysis suggest that almost all the waves (> 80%) were left hand circularly polarized waves with frequencies lying at or below the proton cyclotron frequency. This indicates abundance of ion (proton) cyclotron mode propagation in the Earth's magnetosheath for the aforementioned interval. No obvious mirror mode indications were found as there were no linearly polarized waves detected. The waves which were either right hand polarized or had frequencies greater than the proton cyclotron frequency were consistent with their being left hand waves with frequencies less than proton cyclotron frequency in the plasma frame. We thus conclude that the waves detected at both Cassini and WIND are electromagnetic left hand polarized proton cyclotron waves. There is no evidence of mode conversion to (plasma frame) right hand waves, even though the wave amplitudes are exceptionally large (10 nT). Majority of the waves were found to propagate parallel (<30o) to the ambient magnetic field and were circularly polarized. However it is also found that for waves propagating at oblique angles to B0, the polarization is still circular. This is not understood at this time. Proton cyclotron waves detected at Cassini and WIND

  3. FREQUENCY CONTROL OF RF HEATING OF GASEOUS PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Herold, E.W.

    1962-09-01

    This invention relates to the heating of gaseous plasma by radiofrequency ion-cyclotron resonance heating. The cyclotron resonance frequencies are varied and this invention provides means for automatically controlling the frequency of the radiofrequency to maximize the rate of heating. To this end, a servo-loop is provided to sense the direction of plasma heating with frequency and a control signal is derived to set the center frequency of the radiofrequency energy employed to heat the plasma. (AEC)

  4. Cyclotrons for the production of radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics and design choices for modern cyclotrons. Cyclotrons can be used in 3 areas in the radioactive beam field: the production of high energy heavy ion beams for use in fragmentation, the spallation of targets with high energy protons, and the acceleration of radioactive beams from low energy to the MeV/u range. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Design study of a 17.3 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at Louvain-la-Neuve

    SciTech Connect

    Standaert, L. Davin, F.; Loiselet, M.

    2014-02-15

    The Cyclotron Resources Center of the Louvain-la-Neuve University is developing a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source to increase the energy of the accelerated beam by injection of higher charge state ions into the cyclotron. The design of the source is based on a 17.3 GHz frequency and classical coils to produce the axial field. The field reaches 2 T at the injection side and 1.2 T at extraction. The total power consumption for the coils is limited to 80 kW. The design features of the source are presented.

  6. Low-frequency electrostatic waves in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeraj, T.; Singh, Satyavir; Singh Lakhina, Gurbax

    2016-07-01

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves are one of the ubiquitous features in space and laboratory plasmas. Here we present a linear study of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in the solar wind. We model the solar wind by three-component magnetised plasma consisting of hot electrons with kappa distribution and fluid cold protons and doubly charged Helium ions. A numerical analysis of the linear electrostatic dispersion relation has been carried out for slow solar wind parameters and for -oblique wave propagation. The system supports four different modes i.e., fast and slow acoustic modes, and proton and Helium cyclotron modes. It has to be emphasised that for parallel propagation, physically acceptable solution to the dispersion relation are those of fast and slow acoustic modes. For oblique propagation, the coupling between various modes can be seen. Moreover, when the angle of propagation is increased the separation between acoustic modes and cyclotron modes increases and at perpendicular propagation, only proton and Helium-cyclotron modes can exist. The effect of various parameters like number density and temperature of Helium ions and kappa index on the dispersive properties has also been investigated. As the number density of helium ions increases, frequency of proton cyclotron mode decreases and frequency of Helium cyclotron mode increases at a fixed wave number. When the value of kappa increases, the frequency of the proton cyclotron mode increases but it does not have significant effect on the frequency of the Helium cyclotron mode. Likewise, when the temperature of Helium ions increases, the frequency of Helium cyclotron mode increases, however, the frequency of proton cyclotron mode remains more or less unchanged.

  7. The cyclotron development activities at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianjue; Li, Zhenguo; An, Shizhong; Yin, Zhiguo; Yang, Jianjun; Yang, Fang

    2011-12-01

    The cyclotron has an obvious advantage in offering high average current and beam power. Cyclotron development for various applications, e.g. radioactive ion-beam (RIB) generation, clean nuclear energy systems, medical diagnostics and isotope production, were performed at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for over 50 years. At the moment two cyclotrons are being built at CIAE, the 100 MeV, CYCIAE-100, and a 14 MeV, the CYCIAE-14. Meanwhile, we are designing and proposing to build a number of cyclotrons with different energies, among them are the CYCIAE-70, the CYCIAE-800, and the upgrading of CYCIAE-CRM, which is going to increase its beam current to mA level. The contribution will present an overall introduction to the cyclotron development activities conducted at CIAE, with different emphasis to each project in order to demonstrate the design and construction highlights.

  8. Design of a compact permanent magnet Cyclotron Mass Spectrometer for the detection and measurement of trace isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.T.; Bertsche, K.J.; Clark, D.J.; Halbach, K.; Kunkel, W.B.; Leung, K.N.; Li, C.Y.

    1992-07-01

    A technique for the detection of trace amounts of rare isotopes, Cyclotron mass Spectrometry (CMS), is described. This technique uses the relationships between particle mass, charge, magnetic field strength and cyclotron orbital frequency to provide high mass resolution. The instrument also has high sensitivity and is capable of measuring isotopes with abundances of < 10{sub {minus} 12}. Improvements now being implemented will lead to further increases in the sensitivity and enhance operating parameters such as cost, portability, and sample throughput.

  9. RF physics of ICWC discharge at high cyclotron harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyssoivan, A.; van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Bobkov, V.; Vervier, M.; Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Kreter, A.; Moiseenko, V.; Möller, S.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Philipps, V.; Rohde, V.; Schneider, P.; Sergienko, G.; van Schoor, M.; Textor Team, ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    Recent experiments on Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) performed in tokamaks TEXTOR and ASDEX Upgrade with standard ICRF antennas operated at fixed frequencies but variable toroidal magnetic field demonstrated rather contrasting parameters of ICWC discharge in scenarios with on-axis fundamental ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) for protons,ω=ωH+, and with its high cyclotron harmonics (HCH), ω=10ωcH+ṡ HCH scenario: very high antenna coupling to low density RF plasmas (Ppl≈0.9PRF-G) and low energy Maxwellian distribution of CX hydrogen atoms with temperature TH≈350 eV. Fundamental ICR: lower antenna-plasma coupling efficiency (by factor of about 1.5 times) and generation of high energy non-Maxwellian CX hydrogen atoms (with local energy E⊥H ≥1.0 keV). In the present paper, we analyze the obtained experimental results numerically using (i) newly developed 0-D transport code describing the process of plasma production with electron and ion collisional ionization in helium-hydrogen gas mixture and (ii) earlier developed 1-D Dispersion Relation Solver accounting for finite temperature effects and collision absorption mechanisms for all plasma species in addition to conventionally examined Landau/TTPM damping for electrons and cyclotron absorption for ions. The numerical study of plasma production in helium with minor hydrogen content in low and high toroidal magnetic fields is presented. The investigation of the excitation, conversion and absorption of plasma waves as function of BT-field suggests that only fast waves (FW) may give a crucial impact on antenna coupling and characteristics of the ICWC discharge using standard poloidally polarized ICRF antennas designed to couple RF power mainly to FW. The collisional (non-resonant) absorption by electrons and ions and IC absorption by resonant ions of minor concentration in low Te plasmas is studied at fundamental ICR and its high harmonics.

  10. Linear and nonlinear physics of the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability of fusion-born ions in relation to ion cyclotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajal, L.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.; Cook, J. W. S.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI) probably underlies observations of ion cyclotron emission (ICE) from energetic ion populations in tokamak plasmas, including fusion-born alpha-particles in JET and TFTR [Dendy et al., Nucl. Fusion 35, 1733 (1995)]. ICE is a potential diagnostic for lost alpha-particles in ITER; furthermore, the MCI is representative of a class of collective instabilities, which may result in the partial channelling of the free energy of energetic ions into radiation, and away from collisional heating of the plasma. Deep understanding of the MCI is thus of substantial practical interest for fusion, and the hybrid approximation for the plasma, where ions are treated as particles and electrons as a neutralising massless fluid, offers an attractive way forward. The hybrid simulations presented here access MCI physics that arises on timescales longer than can be addressed by fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations and by analytical linear theory, which the present simulations largely corroborate. Our results go further than previous studies by entering into the nonlinear stage of the MCI, which shows novel features. These include stronger drive at low cyclotron harmonics, the re-energisation of the alpha-particle population, self-modulation of the phase shift between the electrostatic and electromagnetic components, and coupling between low and high frequency modes of the excited electromagnetic field.