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Sample records for frequency domain method

  1. Frequency-Domain Methods for Characterization of Pulsed Power Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    White, A D; Anderson, R A; Ferriera, T J; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    This paper discusses methods of frequency-domain characterization of pulsed power sensors using vector network analyzer and spectrum analyzer techniques that offer significant simplification over time-domain methods, while mitigating or minimizing the effect of the difficulties present in time domain characterization. These methods are applicable to characterization of a wide variety of sensors.

  2. Robust time and frequency domain estimation methods in adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamaire, Richard Orville

    1987-01-01

    A robust identification method was developed for use in an adaptive control system. The type of estimator is called the robust estimator, since it is robust to the effects of both unmodeled dynamics and an unmeasurable disturbance. The development of the robust estimator was motivated by a need to provide guarantees in the identification part of an adaptive controller. To enable the design of a robust control system, a nominal model as well as a frequency-domain bounding function on the modeling uncertainty associated with this nominal model must be provided. Two estimation methods are presented for finding parameter estimates, and, hence, a nominal model. One of these methods is based on the well developed field of time-domain parameter estimation. In a second method of finding parameter estimates, a type of weighted least-squares fitting to a frequency-domain estimated model is used. The frequency-domain estimator is shown to perform better, in general, than the time-domain parameter estimator. In addition, a methodology for finding a frequency-domain bounding function on the disturbance is used to compute a frequency-domain bounding function on the additive modeling error due to the effects of the disturbance and the use of finite-length data. The performance of the robust estimator in both open-loop and closed-loop situations is examined through the use of simulations.

  3. A simple method for converting frequency domain aerodynamics to the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, direct procedure was developed for converting frequency domain aerodynamics into indicial aerodynamics. The data required for aerodynamic forces in the frequency domain may be obtained from any available (linear) theory. The method retains flexibility for the analyst and is based upon the particular character of the frequency domain results. An evaluation of the method was made for incompressible, subsonic, and transonic two dimensional flows.

  4. Frequency-domain multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics simulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Lingyi; Yin, Zhenyu; Yam, ChiYung E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk; Koo, SiuKong; Chen, GuanHua E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk; Chen, Quan; Wong, Ngai

    2013-12-28

    A frequency-domain quantum mechanics and electromagnetics (QM/EM) method is developed. Compared with the time-domain QM/EM method [Meng et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 1190–1199 (2012)], the newly developed frequency-domain QM/EM method could effectively capture the dynamic properties of electronic devices over a broader range of operating frequencies. The system is divided into QM and EM regions and solved in a self-consistent manner via updating the boundary conditions at the QM and EM interface. The calculated potential distributions and current densities at the interface are taken as the boundary conditions for the QM and EM calculations, respectively, which facilitate the information exchange between the QM and EM calculations and ensure that the potential, charge, and current distributions are continuous across the QM/EM interface. Via Fourier transformation, the dynamic admittance calculated from the time-domain and frequency-domain QM/EM methods is compared for a carbon nanotube based molecular device.

  5. Frequency domain optical tomography using a Monte Carlo perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Sakamoto, Hiroki

    2016-04-01

    A frequency domain Monte Carlo method is applied to near-infrared optical tomography, where an intensity-modulated light source with a given modulation frequency is used to reconstruct optical properties. The frequency domain reconstruction technique allows for better separation between the scattering and absorption properties of inclusions, even for ill-posed inverse problems, due to cross-talk between the scattering and absorption reconstructions. The frequency domain Monte Carlo calculation for light transport in an absorbing and scattering medium has thus far been analyzed mostly for the reconstruction of optical properties in simple layered tissues. This study applies a Monte Carlo calculation algorithm, which can handle complex-valued particle weights for solving a frequency domain transport equation, to optical tomography in two-dimensional heterogeneous tissues. The Jacobian matrix that is needed to reconstruct the optical properties is obtained by a first-order "differential operator" technique, which involves less variance than the conventional "correlated sampling" technique. The numerical examples in this paper indicate that the newly proposed Monte Carlo method provides reconstructed results for the scattering and absorption coefficients that compare favorably with the results obtained from conventional deterministic or Monte Carlo methods.

  6. Damping identification in frequency domain using integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiwei; Sheng, Meiping; Ma, Jiangang; Zhang, Wulin

    2015-03-01

    A new method for damping identification of linear system in frequency domain is presented, by using frequency response function (FRF) with integral method. The FRF curve is firstly transformed to other type of frequency-related curve by changing the representations of horizontal and vertical axes. For the newly constructed frequency-related curve, integral is conducted and the area forming from the new curve is used to determine the damping. Three different methods based on integral are proposed in this paper, which are called FDI-1, FDI-2 and FDI-3 method, respectively. For a single degree of freedom (Sdof) system, the formulated relation of each method between integrated area and loss factor is derived theoretically. The numeral simulation and experiment results show that, the proposed integral methods have high precision, strong noise resistance and are very stable in repeated measurements. Among the three integral methods, FDI-3 method is the most recommended because of its higher accuracy and simpler algorithm. The new methods are limited to linear system in which modes are well separated, and for closely spaced mode system, mode decomposition process should be conducted firstly.

  7. A mixed finite element domain decomposition method for nearly elastic wave equations in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiaobing

    1996-12-31

    A non-overlapping domain decomposition iterative method is proposed and analyzed for mixed finite element methods for a sequence of noncoercive elliptic systems with radiation boundary conditions. These differential systems describe the motion of a nearly elastic solid in the frequency domain. The convergence of the iterative procedure is demonstrated and the rate of convergence is derived for the case when the domain is decomposed into subdomains in which each subdomain consists of an individual element associated with the mixed finite elements. The hybridization of mixed finite element methods plays a important role in the construction of the discrete procedure.

  8. Numerical methods for time-domain and frequency-domain analysis: applications in engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamas, R. D.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical methods are widely used for modeling different physical phenomena in engineering, especially when an analytic approach is not possible. Time-domain or frequency- domain type variations are generally investigated, depending on the nature of the process under consideration. Some methods originate from mechanics, although most of their applications belong to other fields, such as electromagnetism. Conversely, other methods were firstly developed for electromagnetism, but their field of application was extended to other fields. This paper presents some results that we have obtained by using a general purpose method for solving linear equations, i.e., the method of moments (MoM), and a time-domain method derived for electromagnetism, i.e., the Transmission Line Matrix method (TLM).

  9. Comparison of frequency-domain and time-domain rotorcraft vibration control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Active control of rotor-induced vibration in rotorcraft has received significant attention recently. Two classes of techniques have been proposed. The more developed approach works with harmonic analysis of measured time histories and is called the frequency-domain approach. The more recent approach computes the control input directly using the measured time history data and is called the time-domain approach. The report summarizes the results of a theoretical investigation to compare the two approaches. Five specific areas were addressed: (1) techniques to derive models needed for control design (system identification methods), (2) robustness with respect to errors, (3) transient response, (4) susceptibility to noise, and (5) implementation difficulties. The system identification methods are more difficult for the time-domain models. The time-domain approach is more robust (e.g., has higher gain and phase margins) than the frequency-domain approach. It might thus be possible to avoid doing real-time system identification in the time-domain approach by storing models at a number of flight conditions. The most significant error source is the variation in open-loop vibrations caused by pilot inputs, maneuvers or gusts. The implementation requirements are similar except that the time-domain approach can be much simpler to implement if real-time system identification were not necessary.

  10. A review of time-domain and frequency-domain component mode synthesis method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Hurty (1965) has conducted a dynamic analysis of structural systems using component modes. The component mode synthesis (CMS) procedure considered by him represents a form of substructure coupling analysis which is often utilized in structural dynamics. Time-domain CMS methods employing real modes are discussed, taking into account real component modes, normal modes, redundant constraint modes, rigid-body modes, attachment modes, inertia-relief modes, statically-complete interface mode sets, dynamic component mode supersets, component modal models, the coupling of components, and the classification of methods. Attention is also given to the experimental determination of component mode synthesis parameters, time-domain CMS methods for damped systems, and frequency-domain CMS methods for damped systems.

  11. Frequency-domain methods for modeling a nonlinear acoustic orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egolf, David P.; Murphy, William J.; Franks, John R.; Kirlin, R. Lynn

    2002-11-01

    This presentation describes frequency-domain methods for simulating transmission loss across a single orifice mounted in an acoustic waveguide. The work was a preamble to research involving earplugs containing one or more orifices. Simulation methods included direct Fourier transformation, linearization about an operating point, and Volterra series. They were applied to an electric-circuit analog of the acoustic system containing the orifice. The orifice itself was characterized by an empirical expression for nonlinear impedance obtained by fitting curves to experimental resistance and reactance data reported by other authors. Their data-collection procedures required the impedance expression presented herein to be properly labeled as a describing function, a quantity well known in the nonlinear control systems literature. Results of the computer simulations were compared to experimental transmission-loss data. For a single-tone input sound pressure, the computer code accurately predicted the output fundamental (i.e., without harmonics). For a broadband input, the simulated output was less accurate, but acceptable. Levels of the sound-pressure input ranged from 60 to 160 dB. [Work supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH, through a research associateship granted the first author by the National Research Council.] a)Currently on leave at National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH.

  12. On the Analysis Methods for the Time Domain and Frequency Domain Response of a Buried Objects*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poljak, Dragan; Šesnić, Silvestar; Cvetković, Mario

    2014-05-01

    There has been a continuous interest in the analysis of ground-penetrating radar systems and related applications in civil engineering [1]. Consequently, a deeper insight of scattering phenomena occurring in a lossy half-space, as well as the development of sophisticated numerical methods based on Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, Finite Element Method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Method of Moments (MoM) and various hybrid methods, is required, e.g. [2], [3]. The present paper deals with certain techniques for time and frequency domain analysis, respectively, of buried conducting and dielectric objects. Time domain analysis is related to the assessment of a transient response of a horizontal straight thin wire buried in a lossy half-space using a rigorous antenna theory (AT) approach. The AT approach is based on the space-time integral equation of the Pocklington type (time domain electric field integral equation for thin wires). The influence of the earth-air interface is taken into account via the simplified reflection coefficient arising from the Modified Image Theory (MIT). The obtained results for the transient current induced along the electrode due to the transmitted plane wave excitation are compared to the numerical results calculated via an approximate transmission line (TL) approach and the AT approach based on the space-frequency variant of the Pocklington integro-differential approach, respectively. It is worth noting that the space-frequency Pocklington equation is numerically solved via the Galerkin-Bubnov variant of the Indirect Boundary Element Method (GB-IBEM) and the corresponding transient response is obtained by the aid of inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT). The results calculated by means of different approaches agree satisfactorily. Frequency domain analysis is related to the assessment of frequency domain response of dielectric sphere using the full wave model based on the set of coupled electric field integral

  13. A frequency domain method for the generation of partially coherent normal stationary time domain signals

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, D.O.; Paez, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for generating vectors of time domain signals which are partially coherent in a prescribed manner is described. The procedure starts with the spectral density matrix, (G{sub xx}(f)), that relates pairs of elements of the vector random process (x(t), {minus}{infinity} < t < {infinity}). The spectral density matrix is decomposed into the form (G{sub xx}(f)) = (U(f)) (S(f)) (U(f)){prime} where (U(f)) is a matrix of complex frequency response functions, and (S(f)) is a diagonal matrix of real functions which can vary with frequency. The factors of the spectral density matrix, (U(f)) and (S(f)), are then used to generate a frame of random data in the frequency domain. The data is transformed into the time domain using an inverse FFT to generate a frame of data in the time domain. Successive frames of data are then windowed, overlapped, and added to form a vector of normal stationary sampled time histories, (x(t)), of arbitrary length. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Frequency-domain method for discrete frequency noise prediction of rotors in arbitrary steady motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaretti, M.; Testa, C.; Bernardini, G.

    2012-12-01

    A novel frequency-domain formulation for the prediction of the tonal noise emitted by rotors in arbitrary steady motion is presented. It is derived from Farassat's 'Formulation 1A', that is a time-domain boundary integral representation for the solution of the Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings equation, and represents noise as harmonic response to body kinematics and aerodynamic loads via frequency-response-function matrices. The proposed frequency-domain solver is applicable to rotor configurations for which sound pressure levels of discrete tones are much higher than those of broadband noise. The numerical investigation concerns the analysis of noise produced by an advancing helicopter rotor in blade-vortex interaction conditions, as well as the examination of pressure disturbances radiated by the interaction of a marine propeller with a non-uniform inflow.

  15. A method for efficient fractional sample delay generation for real-time frequency-domain beamformers

    SciTech Connect

    Breeding, J.E.; Karnowski, T.P.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents an efficient method for fractional delay filter generation for frequency-domain beamformers. A common misunderstanding regarding frequency-domain beamforming is that any fractional time shift can be achieved using the delay property of the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). Blind application of the DFT delay property introduces circular convolution errors that may adversely affect the beam`s time series. The method presented avoids these errors while enabling real-time processing.

  16. Frequency domain system identification methods - Matrix fraction description approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Luca G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the use of matrix fraction descriptions for least-squares curve fitting of the frequency spectra to compute two matrix polynomials. The matrix polynomials are intermediate step to obtain a linearized representation of the experimental transfer function. Two approaches are presented: first, the matrix polynomials are identified using an estimated transfer function; second, the matrix polynomials are identified directly from the cross/auto spectra of the input and output signals. A set of Markov parameters are computed from the polynomials and subsequently realization theory is used to recover a minimum order state space model. Unevenly spaced frequency response functions may be used. Results from a simple numerical example and an experiment are discussed to highlight some of the important aspect of the algorithm.

  17. Comparison of back projection methods of determining earthquake rupture process in time and frequency domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Wen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Back projection is a method to back project the seismic energy recorded in a seismic array back to the earthquake source region and determine the rupture process of a large earthquake. The method takes advantage of the coherence of seismic energy in a seismic array and is quick in determining some important properties of earthquake source. The method can be performed in both time and frequency domains. In time domain, the most conventional procedure is beam forming with some measures of suppressing the noise, such as the Nth root stacking, etc. In the frequency domain, the multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) estimates the direction of arrivals of multiple waves propagating through an array using the subspace method. The advantage of this method is the ability to study rupture properties at various frequencies and to resolve simultaneous arrivals making it suitable for detecting biliteral rupture of an earthquake source. We present a comparison of back projection results on some large earthquakes between the methods in time domain and frequency domain. The time-domain procedure produces an image that is smeared and exhibits some artifacts, although some enhancing stacking methods can at some extent alleviate the problem. On the other hand, the MUSIC method resolves clear multiple arrivals and provides higher resolution of rupture imaging.

  18. Determining XV-15 aeroelastic modes from flight data with frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1993-01-01

    The XV-15 tilt-rotor wing has six major aeroelastic modes that are close in frequency. To precisely excite individual modes during flight test, dual flaperon exciters with automatic frequency-sweep controls were installed. The resulting structural data were analyzed in the frequency domain (Fourier transformed). All spectral data were computed using chirp z-transforms. Modal frequencies and damping were determined by fitting curves to frequency-response magnitude and phase data. The results given in this report are for the XV-15 with its original metal rotor blades. Also, frequency and damping values are compared with theoretical predictions made using two different programs, CAMRAD and ASAP. The frequency-domain data-analysis method proved to be very reliable and adequate for tracking aeroelastic modes during flight-envelope expansion. This approach required less flight-test time and yielded mode estimations that were more repeatable, compared with the exponential-decay method previously used.

  19. Novel frequency domain techniques and advances in Finite Difference Time domain (FDTD) method for efficient solution of multiscale electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayappan, Kadappan

    With the advent of sub-micron technologies and increasing awareness of Electromagnetic Interference and Compatibility (EMI/EMC) issues, designers are often interested in full- wave solutions of complete systems, taking to account a variety of environments in which the system operates. However, attempts to do this substantially increase the complexities involved in computing full-wave solutions, especially when the problems involve multi- scale geometries with very fine features. For such problems, even the well-established numerical methods, such as the time domain technique FDTD and the frequency domain methods FEM and MoM, are often challenged to the limits of their capabilities. In an attempt to address such challenges, three novel techniques have been introduced in this work, namely Dipole Moment (DM) Approach, Recursive Update in Frequency Domain (RUFD) and New Finite Difference Time Domain ( vFDTD). Furthermore, the efficacy of the above techniques has been illustrated, via several examples, and the results obtained by proposed techniques have been compared with other existing numerical methods for the purpose of validation. The DM method is a new physics-based approach for formulating MoM problems, which is based on the use of dipole moments (DMs), as opposed to the conventional Green's functions. The absence of the Green's functions, as well as those of the vector and scalar potentials, helps to eliminate two of the key sources of difficulties in the conventional MoM formulation, namely the singularity and low-frequency problems. Specifically, we show that there are no singularities that we need to be concerned with in the DM formulation; hence, this obviates the need for special techniques for integrating these singularities. Yet another salutary feature of the DM approach is its ability to handle thin and lossy structures, or whether they are metallic, dielectric-type, or even combinations thereof. We have found that the DM formulation can handle these

  20. Comparison of Frequency-Domain Array Methods for Studying Earthquake Rupture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y.; Yin, J.; Yao, H.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic array methods, in both time- and frequency- domains, have been widely used to study the rupture process and energy radiation of earthquakes. With better spatial resolution, the high-resolution frequency-domain methods, such as Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) (Schimdt, 1986; Meng et al., 2011) and the recently developed Compressive Sensing (CS) technique (Yao et al., 2011, 2013), are revealing new features of earthquake rupture processes. We have performed various tests on the methods of MUSIC, CS, minimum-variance distortionless response (MVDR) Beamforming and conventional Beamforming in order to better understand the advantages and features of these methods for studying earthquake rupture processes. We use the ricker wavelet to synthesize seismograms and use these frequency-domain techniques to relocate the synthetic sources we set, for instance, two sources separated in space but, their waveforms completely overlapping in the time domain. We also test the effects of the sliding window scheme on the recovery of a series of input sources, in particular, some artifacts that are caused by the sliding window scheme. Based on our tests, we find that CS, which is developed from the theory of sparsity inversion, has relatively high spatial resolution than the other frequency-domain methods and has better performance at lower frequencies. In high-frequency bands, MUSIC, as well as MVDR Beamforming, is more stable, especially in the multi-source situation. Meanwhile, CS tends to produce more artifacts when data have poor signal-to-noise ratio. Although these techniques can distinctly improve the spatial resolution, they still produce some artifacts along with the sliding of the time window. Furthermore, we propose a new method, which combines both the time-domain and frequency-domain techniques, to suppress these artifacts and obtain more reliable earthquake rupture images. Finally, we apply this new technique to study the 2013 Okhotsk deep mega earthquake

  1. Maximum likelihood method for estimating airplane stability and control parameters from flight data in frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.

    1980-01-01

    A frequency domain maximum likelihood method is developed for the estimation of airplane stability and control parameters from measured data. The model of an airplane is represented by a discrete-type steady state Kalman filter with time variables replaced by their Fourier series expansions. The likelihood function of innovations is formulated, and by its maximization with respect to unknown parameters the estimation algorithm is obtained. This algorithm is then simplified to the output error estimation method with the data in the form of transformed time histories, frequency response curves, or spectral and cross-spectral densities. The development is followed by a discussion on the equivalence of the cost function in the time and frequency domains, and on advantages and disadvantages of the frequency domain approach. The algorithm developed is applied in four examples to the estimation of longitudinal parameters of a general aviation airplane using computer generated and measured data in turbulent and still air. The cost functions in the time and frequency domains are shown to be equivalent; therefore, both approaches are complementary and not contradictory. Despite some computational advantages of parameter estimation in the frequency domain, this approach is limited to linear equations of motion with constant coefficients.

  2. Using frequency-domain methods to identify XV-15 aeroelastic modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    The XV-15 Tilt-Rotor wing has six major aeroelastic modes that are close in frequency. To precisely excite individual modes during flight test, dual flaperon exciters with automatic frequency-sweep controls were installed. The resulting structural data were analyzed in the frequency domain (Fourier transformed) with cross spectral and transfer function methods. Modal frequencies and damping were determined by performing curve fits to transfer function magnitude and phase data and to cross spectral magnitude data. Results are given for the XV-15 with its original metal rotor blades. Frequency and damping values are also compared with earlier predictions.

  3. Identification of XV-15 aeroelastic modes using frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, Cecil W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1989-01-01

    The XV-15 Tilt-Rotor wing has six major aeroelastic modes that are close in frequency. To precisely excite individual modes during flight test, dual flaperon exciters with automatic frequency-sweep controls were installed. The resulting structural data were analyzed in the frequency domain (Fourier transformed) with cross spectral and transfer function methods. Modal frequencies and damping were determined by performing curve fits to transfer function magnitude and phase data and to cross spectral magnitude data. Results are given for the XV-15 with its original metal rotor blades. Frequency and damping values are also compared with earlier predictions.

  4. Frequency-space domain acoustic wave simulation with the BiCGstab (ℓ) iterative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zengli; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Wenge; Li, Chunhong

    2016-02-01

    The vast computational cost and memory requirements of LU decomposition are major obstacles to 3D seismic modelling in the frequency-space domain. BiCGstab (ℓ) is an effective bi-conjugate gradient method to solve the giant sparse linear equations, but the convergence rate is extremely low when the threshold value is set small enough. The BiCGstab (ℓ) iterative method was introduced into 3D numerical simulation to overcome these problems in this paper. Numerical examples have shown that the precision of the BiCGstab (ℓ) iterative method meets the demand of seismic modelling and the result is equivalent to that of LU decomposition. The computational cost and memory resource demands of the BiCGstab (ℓ) iterative method are superior to that of LU decomposition. It is an effective method of 3D seismic modelling in the frequency-space domain.

  5. Methods of EEG signal features extraction using linear analysis in frequency and time-frequency domains.

    PubMed

    Al-Fahoum, Amjed S; Al-Fraihat, Ausilah A

    2014-01-01

    Technically, a feature represents a distinguishing property, a recognizable measurement, and a functional component obtained from a section of a pattern. Extracted features are meant to minimize the loss of important information embedded in the signal. In addition, they also simplify the amount of resources needed to describe a huge set of data accurately. This is necessary to minimize the complexity of implementation, to reduce the cost of information processing, and to cancel the potential need to compress the information. More recently, a variety of methods have been widely used to extract the features from EEG signals, among these methods are time frequency distributions (TFD), fast fourier transform (FFT), eigenvector methods (EM), wavelet transform (WT), and auto regressive method (ARM), and so on. In general, the analysis of EEG signal has been the subject of several studies, because of its ability to yield an objective mode of recording brain stimulation which is widely used in brain-computer interface researches with application in medical diagnosis and rehabilitation engineering. The purposes of this paper, therefore, shall be discussing some conventional methods of EEG feature extraction methods, comparing their performances for specific task, and finally, recommending the most suitable method for feature extraction based on performance. PMID:24967316

  6. Methods of EEG Signal Features Extraction Using Linear Analysis in Frequency and Time-Frequency Domains

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fahoum, Amjed S.; Al-Fraihat, Ausilah A.

    2014-01-01

    Technically, a feature represents a distinguishing property, a recognizable measurement, and a functional component obtained from a section of a pattern. Extracted features are meant to minimize the loss of important information embedded in the signal. In addition, they also simplify the amount of resources needed to describe a huge set of data accurately. This is necessary to minimize the complexity of implementation, to reduce the cost of information processing, and to cancel the potential need to compress the information. More recently, a variety of methods have been widely used to extract the features from EEG signals, among these methods are time frequency distributions (TFD), fast fourier transform (FFT), eigenvector methods (EM), wavelet transform (WT), and auto regressive method (ARM), and so on. In general, the analysis of EEG signal has been the subject of several studies, because of its ability to yield an objective mode of recording brain stimulation which is widely used in brain-computer interface researches with application in medical diagnosis and rehabilitation engineering. The purposes of this paper, therefore, shall be discussing some conventional methods of EEG feature extraction methods, comparing their performances for specific task, and finally, recommending the most suitable method for feature extraction based on performance. PMID:24967316

  7. Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Vakoc, Benjamin; Yun, Seok Hyun

    In this chapter, we discuss a frequency-domain approach, optical frequency-domain imaging (OFDI), which is based on optical frequency-domain reflectometry and uses a wavelength-swept laser and standard single-element photodetectors. The chapter begins with an overview of the fundamental aspects of the technology, including the detected signal, sensitivity, depth range, and resolution, and then goes on to discuss specific component technologies including the light source, interferometer and acquisition electronics, and image processing. The final section of the chapter provides a brief glimpse at some of the biomedical applications that most directly take advantage of the improved speed and sensitivity of OFDI.

  8. Mixed frequency-/time-domain coherent multidimensional spectroscopy: research tool or potential analytical method?

    PubMed

    Pakoulev, Andrei V; Rickard, Mark A; Kornau, Kathryn M; Mathew, Nathan A; Yurs, Lena A; Block, Stephen B; Wright, John C

    2009-09-15

    Coherent multidimensional spectroscopy (CMDS) is now the optical analogue of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Just as NMR heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) methods rely on multiple quantum coherences, achieving widespread application requires that CMDS also excites multiple quantum coherences over a wide range of quantum state energies. This Account focuses on frequency-domain CMDS because these methods tune the excitation frequencies to resonance with the desired quantum states and can form multiple quantum coherences between states with very different energies. CMDS methods use multiple excitation pulses to excite multiple quantum states within their dephasing time, so their quantum mechanical phase is maintained. Coherences formed from pairs of the excited states emit coherent beams of light. The temporal ordering of the excitation pulses defines a sequence of coherences that can result in zero, single, double, or higher order coherences as required for multiple quantum coherence CMDS. Defining the temporal ordering and the excitation frequencies and spectrally resolving the output frequency also defines a particular temporal pathway for the coherences, just as an NMR pulse sequence defines an NMR method. Two dimensional contour plots through this multidimensional parameter space allow visualization of the state energies and dynamics. This Account uses nickel and rhodium chelates as models for understanding mixed frequency-/time-domain CMDS. Mixed frequency-/time-domain methods use excitation pulse widths that are comparable to the dephasing times, so multidimensional spectra are obtained by scanning the excitation frequencies, while the coherence and population dynamics are obtained by scanning the time delays. Changing the time delays changes the peaks in the 2D excitation spectra depending upon whether the pulse sequence excites zero, single, or double quantum coherences. In addition, peaks split as a result of the frequency-domain

  9. Frequency-domain Monte Carlo method for linear oscillatory gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladiges, Daniel R.; Sader, John E.

    2015-03-01

    Gas flows generated by resonating nanoscale devices inherently occur in the non-continuum, low Mach number regime. Numerical simulations of such flows using the standard direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method are hindered by high statistical noise, which has motivated the development of several alternate Monte Carlo methods for low Mach number flows. Here, we present a frequency-domain low Mach number Monte Carlo method based on the Boltzmann-BGK equation, for the simulation of oscillatory gas flows. This circumvents the need for temporal simulations, as is currently required, and provides direct access to both amplitude and phase information using a pseudo-steady algorithm. The proposed method is validated for oscillatory Couette flow and the flow generated by an oscillating sphere. Good agreement is found with an existing time-domain method and accurate numerical solutions of the Boltzmann-BGK equation. Analysis of these simulations using a rigorous statistical approach shows that the frequency-domain method provides a significant improvement in computational speed.

  10. Single channel speech separation in modulation frequency domain based on a novel pitch range estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodzadeh, Azar; Abutalebi, Hamid Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Sheikhzadeh, Hamid

    2012-12-01

    Computational Auditory Scene Analysis (CASA) has been the focus in recent literature for speech separation from monaural mixtures. The performance of current CASA systems on voiced speech separation strictly depends on the robustness of the algorithm used for pitch frequency estimation. We propose a new system that estimates pitch (frequency) range of a target utterance and separates voiced portions of target speech. The algorithm, first, estimates the pitch range of target speech in each frame of data in the modulation frequency domain, and then, uses the estimated pitch range for segregating the target speech. The method of pitch range estimation is based on an onset and offset algorithm. Speech separation is performed by filtering the mixture signal with a mask extracted from the modulation spectrogram. A systematic evaluation shows that the proposed system extracts the majority of target speech signal with minimal interference and outperforms previous systems in both pitch extraction and voiced speech separation.

  11. Parallel full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain by the Gauss-Newton method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain. We first test the inversion ability of three numerical optimization methods, i.e., the steepest-descent method, the Newton-CG method and the Gauss- Newton method, for a simple model. The results show that the Gauss-Newton method performs well and efficiently. Then numerical computations for a benchmark model named Marmousi model by the Gauss-Newton method are implemented. Parallel algorithm based on message passing interface (MPI) is applied as the inversion is a typical large-scale computational problem. Numerical computations show that the Gauss-Newton method has good ability to reconstruct the complex model.

  12. 3D micro profile measurement with the method of spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-10-01

    3D micro profiles are often needed for measurement in many fields, e.g., binary optics, electronic industry, mechanical manufacturing, aeronautic and space industry, etc. In the case where height difference between two neighboring points of a test profile is equal to or greater than λ / 4, microscopic interferometry based on laser source will no longer be applicable because of the uncertainty in phase unwrapping. As white light possesses the characteristic of interference length approximate to zero, applying it for micro profilometry can avoid the trouble and can yield accurate results. Using self-developed Mirau-type scanning interference microscope, a step-like sample was tested twice, with 128 scanning interferograms recorded for each test. To process each set of the interferograms, the method of spatial frequency domain analysis was adopted. That is, for each point, by use of Furrier transform, white-light interference intensities were decomposed in spatial frequency domain, thus obtaining phase values corresponding to different wavenumbers; by using least square fitting on phases and wave numbers, a group-velocity OPD was gained for the very point; and finally in terms of the relation between relative height and the group-velocity OPD, the profile of the test sample was obtained. Two tests yielded same profile result for the sample, and step heights obtained were 50.88 nm and 50.94 nm, respectively. Meantime, the sample was also measured with a Zygo Newview 7200 topography instrument, with same profile result obtained and step height differing by 0.9 nm. In addition, data processing results indicate that chromatic dispersion equal to and higher than 2nd order is negligible when applying spatial frequency domain analysis method.

  13. Tuning fractional PID controllers for a Steward platform based on frequency domain and artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copot, Cosmin; Zhong, Yu; Ionescu, Clara; Keyser, Robin

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, two methods to tune a fractional-order PI λ D μ controller for a mechatronic system are presented. The first method is based on a genetic algorithm to obtain the parameter values for the fractionalorder PI λ D μ controller by global optimization. The second method used to design the fractional-order PI λ D μ controller relies on an auto-tuning approach by meeting some specifications in the frequency domain. The real-time experiments are conducted using a Steward platform which consists of a table tilted by six servo-motors with a ball on the top of the table. The considered system is a 6 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) motion platform. The feedback on the position of the ball is obtained from images acquired by a visual sensor mounted above the platform. The fractional-order controllers were implemented and the performances of the steward platform are analyzed.

  14. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  15. Full waveform inversion in the frequency domain using direct iterative T-matrix methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Morten; Ursin, Bjørn

    2015-06-01

    We present two direct iterative solutions to the nonlinear seismic waveform inversion problem that are based on volume integral equation methods for seismic forward modelling in the acoustic approximation. The solutions are presented in the frequency domain, where accurate inversion results can often be obtained using a relatively low number of frequency components. Our inverse scattering approach effectively replaces an ill-posed nonlinear inverse problem with a series of linear ill-posed inverse problems, for which there already exist efficient (regularized) solution methods. Both these solutions update the wavefield within the scattering domain after each iteration. The main difference is that the background medium Green functions are kept fixed in the first solution, but updated after each iteration in the second solution. This means that our solutions are very similar to the Born iterative (BI) and the distorted Born iterative (DBI) methods that are commonly used in acoustic and electromagnetic inverse scattering. However, we have eliminated the need to perform a full forward simulation (or to invert a huge matrix) at each iteration via the use of an iterative T-matrix method for fixed background media for the BI method and a variational T-matrix method for dynamic background media for the DBI method. The T-matrix (variation) is linearly related with the seismic wavefield data (residuals), but related with the unknown scattering potential model parameter (updates) in a non-linear manner, which is independent of the source-receiver configuration. This mathematical structure, which allows one to peel off the effects of the source-receiver configuration, is very attractive when dealing with multiple (simultaneous) sources, and is also compatible with the (future) use of renormalization methods for dealing with local minima problems. To illustrate the performance and potential of the two direct iterative methods for FWI, we performed a series of numerical

  16. Substructure coupling in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Frequency domain analysis was found to be a suitable method for determining the transient response of systems subjected to a wide variety of loads. However, since a large number of calculations are performed within the discrete frequency loop, the method loses it computational efficiency if the loads must be represented by a large number of discrete frequencies. It was also discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain work particularly well for analyzing structural system with a small number of interface and loaded degrees of freedom. It was discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain can lead to an efficient method of obtaining natural frequencies of undamped structures. It was also found that the damped natural frequencies of a system may be determined using frequency domain techniques.

  17. Study of Skin Phantoms by Photothermal Radiometry in Frequency Domain and Multivariate Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Gutiérez-Juárez, G.; Landa-Hernandez, A.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Ivanov, R.; Huerta-Franco, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper the use of the photothermal radiometry technique in the frequency domain (PRTF) and the use of multivariate methods in the study of two types of skin phantoms: (a) one in which skin pigmentation was simulated dyeing the gel phantom and (b) the other consists of exposure of animal skin samples to different degrees of thermal damage. In experiment (a), gel phantoms were prepared with different concentrations of methylene blue (MB). The mean values of the radiometry signal (RS) show significant differences in only those cases in which changes in the concentration of MB were higher than 0.38 mM. This result was confirmed with a t test for independent samples of the data ( p < 0.05). The mean values of the amplitude and phase signal do not permit discrimination between phantoms with changes in pigmentation equal to or lower than this value. However, principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between phantoms with changes in molar concentration equal to 0.38 mM (for the phase signal). In the case of experiment (b), the following four groups of pork skin samples were analyzed: one consists of samples of fresh skin, while the other three consist of samples exposed to thermal damage at 45 °C (the exposure time was 4 s) and 80 °C (exposure times were 4 s and 8 s, respectively). The mean values of the RS for each group of samples did not show a clear visual discrimination. However, the t test for independent samples applied to the data demonstrated significant differences only between fresh skin and skin exposure to thermal damage at 80 °C (with exposure times of 4 s and 8 s). PCA was used to discriminate between the four different skin samples.

  18. A Fast Method of Transforming Relaxation Functions Into the Frequency Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mopsik, Frederick I.

    1999-01-01

    The limits to the error due to truncation of the numeric integration of the one-sided Laplace transform of a relaxation function in the time domain into its equivalent frequency domain are established. Separate results are given for large and small ω. These results show that, for a given ω, only a restricted range of time samples is needed to perform the computation to a given accuracy. These results are then combined with a known error estimate for integration by cubic splines to give a good estimate for the number of points needed to perform the computation to a given accuracy. For a given data window between t1 and t2, the computation time is shown to be proportional to ln(t1/t2).

  19. Frequency domain modelling of wind turbine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Soerensen, P.; Larsen, G.C.; Christensen, C.J.

    1995-09-01

    The present paper describes a frequency domain model of the structure of an operating horizontal axis wind turbine. The frequency domain model is implemented along with an analogous time domain modeling the Risoe PC code Design Basis 2, and a more detailed description of the model is offered in a Risoe report by Soerensen (1994). The structure of an operating wind turbine is affected by essential non-linearities between structural variables on blades and tower respectively. These non-linearities are caused by the rotation of the blades. The transformations between the blade coordinate systems and the tower coordinate system will depend on the instantaneous azimuth positions of the blades as they rotate. Frequency domain analysis are much faster than time simulations and in some respects they give more insight into the dynamics of the structure. However, the non-linear terms in the dynamic equations for a complex wind turbine structure are usually thought to preclude the use of frequency domain methods. Design Basis 2 is used to verify the frequency domain model comparing loads on the structure calculated with the frequency domain model both to loads calculated with the time domain model and to measured loads. Examples show that frequency and time domain calculations of typical PSD`s of loads are in very good agreement. Also the agreement between the calculated and measured PSD`s is good. Moreover, Design Basis 2 has shown that the frequency domain model results in an extremely fast calculation method.

  20. Frequency-domain elastic full-waveform multiscale inversion method based on dual-level parallelism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Zhen-Chun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-12-01

    The complexity of an elastic wavefield increases the nonlinearity of inversion. To some extent, multiscale inversion decreases the nonlinearity of inversion and prevents it from falling into local extremes. A multiscale strategy based on the simultaneous use of frequency groups and layer stripping method based on damped wave field improves the stability of inversion. A dual-level parallel algorithm is then used to decrease the computational cost and improve practicability. The seismic wave modeling of a single frequency and inversion in a frequency group are computed in parallel by multiple nodes based on multifrontal massively parallel sparse direct solver and MPI. Numerical tests using an overthrust model show that the proposed inversion algorithm can effectively improve the stability and accuracy of inversion by selecting the appropriate inversion frequency and damping factor in lowfrequency seismic data.

  1. Method for measuring settling phenomena by means of frequency domain instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Apuzzo, M.; D'Arco, M.; Liccardo, A.; Vadursi, M.

    2016-05-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of settling phenomena that characterize the step response of digital to analog converters, amplifiers, and several other devices. Settling is described by means of a minimal second order model that is suitable to account for the distortion terms recognized in the signal spectrum. An alternative method for dynamic performance assessment of systems characterized by poor settling performance is then proposed. Thanks to the use of high bandwidth spectrum analyzers, the proposed method overtakes the limits characterizing the measurement approaches based on the use of time-domain instruments in the presence of modern ultra-wideband systems.

  2. Method for measuring settling phenomena by means of frequency domain instrumentation.

    PubMed

    D'Apuzzo, M; D'Arco, M; Liccardo, A; Vadursi, M

    2016-05-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of settling phenomena that characterize the step response of digital to analog converters, amplifiers, and several other devices. Settling is described by means of a minimal second order model that is suitable to account for the distortion terms recognized in the signal spectrum. An alternative method for dynamic performance assessment of systems characterized by poor settling performance is then proposed. Thanks to the use of high bandwidth spectrum analyzers, the proposed method overtakes the limits characterizing the measurement approaches based on the use of time-domain instruments in the presence of modern ultra-wideband systems. PMID:27250466

  3. A frequency domain numerical method for airfoil broadband self-noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qidou; Joseph, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical approach, based in the frequency domain, for predicting the broadband self-noise radiation due to an airfoil situated in a smooth mean flow. Noise is generated by the interaction between the boundary layer turbulence on the airfoil surface and the airfoil trailing edge. Thin airfoil theory is used to deduce the unsteady blade loading. In this paper, the important difference with much of the previous work dealing with trailing edge noise is that the integration of the surface sources for computation of the radiated sound field is evaluated on the actual airfoil surface rather than in the mean-chord plane. The assumption of flat plate geometry in the calculation of radiation is therefore avoided. Moreover, the solution is valid in both near and far fields and reduces to the analytic solution due to Amiet when the airfoil collapses to a flat plate with large span, and the measurement point is taken to the far field. Predictions of the airfoil broadband self-noise radiation presented here are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the predictions obtained using the Brooks approach, which are based on a comprehensive database of experimental data. Also investigated in this paper is the effect on the broadband noise prediction of relaxing the 'frozen-gust' assumption, whereby the turbulence at each frequency comprises a continuous spectrum of streamwise wavenumber components. It is shown that making the frozen gust assumption yields an under-prediction of the noise spectrum by approximately 2dB compared with that obtained when this assumption is relaxed, with the largest occurring at high frequencies. This paper concludes with a comparison of the broadband noise directivity for a flat-plat, a NACA 0012 and a NACA 0024 airfoil at non-zero angle of attack. Differences of up to 20 dB are predicted, with the largest difference occurring at a radiation angle of zero degrees relative to the airfoil mean centre line.

  4. Method and apparatus for determining shaliness and oil saturations in earth formations using induced polarization in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1982-11-16

    An apparatus is disclosed for borehole measurements of the induced polarization of earth formations. The apparatus consists of an induced polarization logger capable of measuring both in-phase and quadrature conductivities in the frequency domain. A method is described which uses these measurements to determine cation exchange capacity per unit pore volume, Qv, brine conductivity, Cw, and oil and water saturations, So and Sw, in shaly sands.

  5. Equations for the angles of arrival and departure for multivariable root loci using frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagle, A. E.; Levy, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    Frequency domain methods are developed to obtain explicit equations for the angles of arrival and departure for multivariable root loci. The techniques involve an evaluation of polynomials formulated within the transfer function matrix. The equations defined require simpler computations than the state-space results of Shaked (1976). A class of higher order poles and zeros is formulated in terms of simpler equations than Shaked's, and the equations are shown to be generalizations of the single-input-single-output root locus equations.

  6. Frequency Domain Analysis of Beat-Less Control Method for Converter-Inverter Driving Systems Applied to AC Electric Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akira

    In inverter-converter driving systems for AC electric cars, the DC input voltage of an inverter contains a ripple component with a frequency that is twice as high as the line voltage frequency, because of a single-phase converter. The ripple component of the inverter input voltage causes pulsations on torques and currents of driving motors. To decrease the pulsations, a beat-less control method, which modifies a slip frequency depending on the ripple component, is applied to the inverter control. In the present paper, the beat-less control method was analyzed in the frequency domain. In the first step of the analysis, transfer functions, which revealed the relationship among the ripple component of the inverter input voltage, the slip frequency, the motor torque pulsation and the current pulsation, were derived with a synchronous rotating model of induction motors. An analysis model of the beat-less control method was then constructed using the transfer functions. The optimal setting of the control method was obtained according to the analysis model. The transfer functions and the analysis model were verified through simulations.

  7. Frequency-domain Hadamard spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupče, Ēriks; Freeman, Ray

    2003-05-01

    A new technique is proposed for multichannel excitation and detection of NMR signals in the frequency domain, an alternative to the widely used pulse-excited Fourier transform method. An extensive array of N radiofrequency irradiation channels covers the spectrum of interest. A selective radiofrequency pulse sequence is applied to each channel, generating a steady-state NMR response acquired one-point-at-a-time in the intervals between pulses. The excitation pattern is repeated N times, phase-encoded according to a Hadamard matrix, and the corresponding N composite responses are decoded by reference to the same matrix. This multiplex technique offers the same sensitivity advantage as conventional Fourier transform spectroscopy. The irradiation pattern may be tailored to concentrate on interesting spectral regions, to facilitate homonuclear double resonance, or to avoid exciting strong solvent peaks. As no free induction decay is involved, the new method avoids problems of pulse breakthrough or lineshape distortion by premature termination of the time-domain signal.

  8. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  9. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  10. Methods for rapid frequency-domain characterization of leakage currents in silicon nanowire-based field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Roinila, Tomi; Yu, Xiao; Verho, Jarmo; Li, Tie; Kallio, Pasi; Vilkko, Matti; Gao, Anran; Wang, Yuelin

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowire-based field-effect transistors (SiNW FETs) have demonstrated the ability of ultrasensitive detection of a wide range of biological and chemical targets. The detection is based on the variation of the conductance of a nanowire channel, which is caused by the target substance. This is seen in the voltage-current behavior between the drain and source. Some current, known as leakage current, flows between the gate and drain, and affects the current between the drain and source. Studies have shown that leakage current is frequency dependent. Measurements of such frequency characteristics can provide valuable tools in validating the functionality of the used transistor. The measurements can also be an advantage in developing new detection technologies utilizing SiNW FETs. The frequency-domain responses can be measured by using a commercial sine-sweep-based network analyzer. However, because the analyzer takes a long time, it effectively prevents the development of most practical applications. Another problem with the method is that in order to produce sinusoids the signal generator has to cope with a large number of signal levels. This may become challenging in developing low-cost applications. This paper presents fast, cost-effective frequency-domain methods with which to obtain the responses within seconds. The inverse-repeat binary sequence (IRS) is applied and the admittance spectroscopy between the drain and source is computed through Fourier methods. The methods is verified by experimental measurements from an n-type SiNW FET. PMID:25161832

  11. phiFLIM: a new method to avoid aliasing in frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Munster, E B; Gadella, T W J

    2004-01-01

    In conventional wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), excitation light is intensity-modulated at megahertz frequencies. Emitted fluorescence is recorded by a CCD camera through an image intensifier, which is modulated at the same frequency. From images recorded at various phase differences between excitation and intensifier gain modulation, the phase and modulation depth of the emitted light is obtained. The fluorescence lifetime is determined from the delay and the decrease in modulation depth of the emission relative to the excitation. A minimum of three images is required, but in this case measurements become susceptible to aliasing caused by the presence of higher harmonics. Taking more images to avoid this is not always possible owing to phototoxicity or movement. A method is introduced, phiFLIM, requiring only three recordings that is not susceptible to aliasing. The phase difference between the excitation and the intensifier is scanned over the entire 360 degrees range following a predefined phase profile, during which the image produced by the intensifier is integrated onto the CCD camera, yielding a single image. Three different images are produced following this procedure, each with a different phase profile. Measurements were performed with a conventional wide-field frequency-domain FLIM system based on an acousto-optic modulator for modulation of the excitation and a microchannel-plate image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera for the detection. By analysis of the harmonic content of measured signals it was found that the third harmonic was effectively the highest present. Using the conventional method with three recordings, phase errors due to aliasing of up to +/- 29 degrees and modulation depth errors of up to 30% were found. Errors in lifetimes of YFP-transfected HeLa cells were as high as 100%. With phiFLIM, using the same specimen and settings, systematic errors due to aliasing did not occur. PMID:14678510

  12. An adaptive subspace trust-region method for frequency-domain seismic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Li, Xiaofan; Song, Hanjie; Liu, Shaolin

    2015-05-01

    Full waveform inversion is currently considered as a promising seismic imaging method to obtain high-resolution and quantitative images of the subsurface. It is a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem, the main difficulty of which that prevents the full waveform inversion from widespread applying to real data is the sensitivity to incorrect initial models and noisy data. Local optimization theories including Newton's method and gradient method always lead the convergence to local minima, while global optimization algorithms such as simulated annealing are computationally costly. To confront this issue, in this paper we investigate the possibility of applying the trust-region method to the full waveform inversion problem. Different from line search methods, trust-region methods force the new trial step within a certain neighborhood of the current iterate point. Theoretically, the trust-region methods are reliable and robust, and they have very strong convergence properties. The capability of this inversion technique is tested with the synthetic Marmousi velocity model and the SEG/EAGE Salt model. Numerical examples demonstrate that the adaptive subspace trust-region method can provide solutions closer to the global minima compared to the conventional Approximate Hessian approach and the L-BFGS method with a higher convergence rate. In addition, the match between the inverted model and the true model is still excellent even when the initial model deviates far from the true model. Inversion results with noisy data also exhibit the remarkable capability of the adaptive subspace trust-region method for low signal-to-noise data inversions. Promising numerical results suggest this adaptive subspace trust-region method is suitable for full waveform inversion, as it has stronger convergence and higher convergence rate.

  13. A novel method for sensing metastatic cells in the CSF of pediatric population with medulloblastoma by frequency domain FLIM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahav, Gilad; Fixler, Dror; Gershanov, Sivan; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza

    2016-03-01

    Brain tumors are the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, after leukemia. Patients with cancer in the central nervous system have a very low recovery rate. Today known imaging and cytology techniques are not always sensitive enough for an early detection of both tumor and its metastatic spread, moreover the detection is generally limited, reviewer dependent and takes a relatively long time. Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. The aim of our talk is to present the frequency domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system as a possible method for an early detection of MB and its metastatic spread in the cerebrospinal fluids within the pediatric population.

  14. a Frequency Domain Based NUMERIC-ANALYTICAL Method for Non-Linear Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, S.; Sekar, P.

    1998-04-01

    In this paper a multiharmonic balancing technique is used to develop certain algorithms to determine periodic orbits of non-liner dynamical systems with external, parametric and self excitations. Essentially, in this method the non-linear differential equations are transformed into a set of non-linear algebraic equations in terms of the Fourier coefficients of the periodic solutions which are solved by using the Newton-Raphson technique. The method is developed such that both fast Fourier transform and discrete Fourier transform algorithms can be used. It is capable of treating all types of non-linearities and higher dimensional systems. The stability of periodic orbits is investigated by obtaining the monodromy matrix. A path following algorithm based on the predictor-corrector method is also presented to enable the bifurcation analysis. The prediction is done with a cubic extrapolation technique with an arc length incrementation while the correction is done with the use of the least square minimisation technique. The under determined system of equations is solved by singular value decomposition. The suitability of the method is demonstrated by obtaining the bifurcational behaviour of rolling contact vibrations modelled by Hertz contact law.

  15. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  16. Frequency-domain method for measuring spectral properties in multiple-scattering media: methemoglobin absorption spectrum in a tissuelike phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkin, Joshua B.; So, Peter T. C.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    1995-03-01

    We have measured the optical absorption and scattering coefficient spectra of a multiple-scattering medium (i.e., a biological tissue-simulating phantom comprising a lipid colloid) containing methemoglobin by using frequency-domain techniques. The methemoglobin absorption spectrum determined in the multiple-scattering medium is in excellent agreement with a corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum obtained from a steady-state spectrophotometer measurement of the optical density of a minimally scattering medium. The determination of the corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum takes into account the scattering from impurities in the methemoglobin solution containing no lipid colloid. Frequency-domain techniques allow for the separation of the absorbing from the scattering properties of multiple-scattering media, and these techniques thus provide an absolute

  17. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A; Berer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  18. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  19. Frequency domain FIR and IIR adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of the LMS adaptive filter relating to its convergence characteristics and the problems associated with disparate eigenvalues is presented. This is used to introduce the concept of proportional convergence. An approach is used to analyze the convergence characteristics of block frequency-domain adaptive filters. This leads to a development showing how the frequency-domain FIR adaptive filter is easily modified to provide proportional convergence. These ideas are extended to a block frequency-domain IIR adaptive filter and the idea of proportional convergence is applied. Experimental results illustrating proportional convergence in both FIR and IIR frequency-domain block adaptive filters is presented.

  20. Frequency domain state-space system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chung-Wen; Juang, Jer-Nan; Lee, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for identifying state-space models from frequency response data of linear systems is presented. A matrix-fraction description of the transfer function is employed to curve-fit the frequency response data, using the least-squares method. The parameters of the matrix-fraction representation are then used to construct the Markov parameters of the system. Finally, state-space models are obtained through the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm using Markov parameters. The main advantage of this approach is that the curve-fitting and the Markov parameter construction are linear problems which avoid the difficulties of nonlinear optimization of other approaches. Another advantage is that it avoids windowing distortions associated with other frequency domain methods.

  1. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Simon, F.; Murányi, F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  2. Apparatus and method for qualitative and quantitative measurements of optical properties of turbid media using frequency-domain photon migration

    DOEpatents

    Tromberg, Bruce J.; Tsay, Tsong T.; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lara O.; Haskell, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Optical measurements of turbid media, that is media characterized by multiple light scattering, is provided through an apparatus and method for exposing a sample to a modulated laser beam. The light beam is modulated at a fundamental frequency and at a plurality of integer harmonics thereof. Modulated light is returned from the sample and preferentially detected at cross frequencies at frequencies slightly higher than the fundamental frequency and at integer harmonics of the same. The received radiance at the beat or cross frequencies is compared against a reference signal to provide a measure of the phase lag of the radiance and modulation ratio relative to a reference beam. The phase and modulation amplitude are then provided as a frequency spectrum by an array processor to which a computer applies a complete curve fit in the case of highly scattering samples or a linear curve fit below a predetermined frequency in the case of highly absorptive samples. The curve fit in any case is determined by the absorption and scattering coefficients together with a concentration of the active substance in the sample. Therefore, the curve fitting to the frequency spectrum can be used both for qualitative and quantitative analysis of substances in the sample even though the sample is highly turbid.

  3. Apparatus and method for qualitative and quantitative measurements of optical properties of turbid media using frequency-domain photon migration

    DOEpatents

    Tromberg, B.J.; Tsay, T.T.; Berns, M.W.; Svaasand, L.O.; Haskell, R.C.

    1995-06-13

    Optical measurements of turbid media, that is media characterized by multiple light scattering, is provided through an apparatus and method for exposing a sample to a modulated laser beam. The light beam is modulated at a fundamental frequency and at a plurality of integer harmonics thereof. Modulated light is returned from the sample and preferentially detected at cross frequencies at frequencies slightly higher than the fundamental frequency and at integer harmonics of the same. The received radiance at the beat or cross frequencies is compared against a reference signal to provide a measure of the phase lag of the radiance and modulation ratio relative to a reference beam. The phase and modulation amplitude are then provided as a frequency spectrum by an array processor to which a computer applies a complete curve fit in the case of highly scattering samples or a linear curve fit below a predetermined frequency in the case of highly absorptive samples. The curve fit in any case is determined by the absorption and scattering coefficients together with a concentration of the active substance in the sample. Therefore, the curve fitting to the frequency spectrum can be used both for qualitative and quantitative analysis of substances in the sample even though the sample is highly turbid. 14 figs.

  4. Frequency Domain Sampling Using Biomedical Imaging Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Gun Ha; Chung, Minji; Kyung, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In magnetic resonance image analysis using physical and computational method, the process of transformation from frequency domain to image domain requires significant amount time because Inverse Fourier Transformation (IFT) takes every frequency points to determine the final output image. This paper shows the mechanisms and physics of image formation using the selectivity of proper k-space by removing different amounts of high or low frequencies to create the most optimal magnetic resonance image of a human tibial bone. Originally, square unit step function, N/2-N/10:N/2 + N/10 = 1, was used during the Fourier Transformations. And Gaussian filter, y = exp(-t2/40n) , where t = h-L/2, h = [0,M], L =2*7*N/40, the size of frequency matrix (M, N) = (365,557) was tested. Also circle equations as a filter, r = sqrt((x-M/2)2 + (y-N/2)2) , were tested in creating the images of the human tibial bone to find an efficient filter. The best efficiency occurred when the exponent n in the proposed Gaussian filter equation is in between 3 and 8, and therefore, a new algorithm is needed to find the exact number since the number is not only an integer.

  5. Frequency domain optoacoustic tomography using amplitude and phase

    PubMed Central

    Mohajerani, Pouyan; Kellnberger, Stephan; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    We introduce optoacoustic tomographic imaging using intensity modulated light sources and collecting amplitude and phase information in the frequency domain. Imaging is performed at multiple modulation frequencies. The forward modeling uses the Green's function solution to the pressure wave equation in frequency domain and the resulting inverse problem is solved using regularized least squares minimization. We study the effect of the number of frequencies and of the bandwidth employed on the image quality achieved. The possibility of employing an all-frequency domain optoacoustic imaging for experimental measurements is studied as a function of noise. We conclude that frequency domain optoacoustic tomography may evolve to a practical experimental method using light intensity modulated sources, with advantages over time-domain optoacoustics. PMID:25431755

  6. Time-Domain Frequency Correction Method for Averaging Low-Field NMR Signals Acquired in Urban Laboratory Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Long-Qing; Liu, Chao; Dong, Hui; Xu, Lu; Zhang, Yi; Hans-Joachim, Krause; Xie, Xiao-Ming; Andreas, Offenhäusser

    2012-10-01

    Using a second-order helium-cooled superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer as the detector, ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF-NMR) signals of protons are recorded in an urban environment without magnetic shielding. The homogeneity and stability of the measurement field are investigated. NMR signals of protons are studied at night and during working hours. The Larmor frequency variation caused by the fluctuation of the external magnetic field during daytime reaches around 5 Hz when performing multiple measurements for about 10 min, which seriously affects the results of averaging. In order to improve the performance of the averaged data, we suggest the use of a data processor, i.e. the so-called time-domain frequency correction (TFC). For a 50-times averaged signal spectrum, the signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced from 30 to 120 when applying TFC while preserving the NMR spectrum linewidth. The TFC is also applied successfully to the measurement data of the hetero-nuclear J-coupling in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol.

  7. Frequency Domain Calculations Of Acoustic Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Two complex geometry problems are solved using the linearized Euler equations. The impedance mismatch method1 is used to impose the solid surfaces without the need to use a body-fitted grid. The problem is solved in the frequency domain to avoid long run times. Although the harmonic assumption eliminates all time dependence, a pseudo-time term is added to allow conventional iterative methods to be employed. A Jameson type, Runge-Kutta scheme is used to advance the solution in pseudo time. The spatial operator is based on a seven-point, sixth-order finite difference. Constant coefficient, sixth-derivative artificial dissipation is used throughout the domain. A buffer zone technique employing a complex frequency to damp all waves near the boundaries is used to minimize reflections. The results show that the method is capable of capturing the salient features of the scattering, but an excessive number of grid points are required to resolve the phenomena in the vicinity of the solid bodies because the wavelength of the acoustics is relatively short compared with the size of the bodies. Smoothly transitioning into the immersed boundary condition alleviates the difficulties, but a fine mesh is still required.

  8. Spatial frequency domain error budget

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschildt, H; Krulewich, D

    1998-08-27

    The aim of this paper is to describe a methodology for designing and characterizing machines used to manufacture or inspect parts with spatial-frequency-based specifications. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, one of our responsibilities is to design or select the appropriate machine tools to produce advanced optical and weapons systems. Recently, many of the component tolerances for these systems have been specified in terms of the spatial frequency content of residual errors on the surface. We typically use an error budget as a sensitivity analysis tool to ensure that the parts manufactured by a machine will meet the specified component tolerances. Error budgets provide the formalism whereby we account for all sources of uncertainty in a process, and sum them to arrive at a net prediction of how "precisely" a manufactured component can meet a target specification. Using the error budget, we are able to minimize risk during initial stages by ensuring that the machine will produce components that meet specifications before the machine is actually built or purchased. However, the current error budgeting procedure provides no formal mechanism for designing machines that can produce parts with spatial-frequency-based specifications. The output from the current error budgeting procedure is a single number estimating the net worst case or RMS error on the work piece. This procedure has limited ability to differentiate between low spatial frequency form errors versus high frequency surface finish errors. Therefore the current error budgeting procedure can lead us to reject a machine that is adequate or accept a machine that is inadequate. This paper will describe a new error budgeting methodology to aid in the design and characterization of machines used to manufacture or inspect parts with spatial-frequency-based specifications. The output from this new procedure is the continuous spatial frequency content of errors that result on a machined part. If the machine

  9. Comparison of delay compensation methods for real-time hybrid simulation using frequency-domain evaluation index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijie, Xu; Tong, Guo; Cheng, Chen

    2016-03-01

    The delay compensation method plays an essential role in maintaining the stability and achieving accurate real-time hybrid simulation results. The effectiveness of various compensation methods in different test scenarios, however, needs to be quantitatively evaluated. In this study, four compensation methods (i.e., the polynomial extrapolation, the linear acceleration extrapolation, the inverse compensation and the adaptive inverse compensation) are selected and compared experimentally using a frequency evaluation index (FEI) method. The effectiveness of the FEI method is first verified through comparison with the discrete transfer function approach for compensation methods assuming constant delay. Incomparable advantage is further demonstrated for the FEI method when applied to adaptive compensation methods, where the discrete transfer function approach is difficult to implement. Both numerical simulation and laboratory tests with predefined displacements are conducted using sinusoidal signals and random signals as inputs. Findings from numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FEI method is an efficient and effective approach to compare the performance of different compensation methods, especially for those requiring adaptation of compensation parameters.

  10. Turbulence excited frequency domain damping measurement and truncation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soovere, J.

    1976-01-01

    Existing frequency domain modal frequency and damping analysis methods are discussed. The effects of truncation in the Laplace and Fourier transform data analysis methods are described. Methods for eliminating truncation errors from measured damping are presented. Implications of truncation effects in fast Fourier transform analysis are discussed. Limited comparison with test data is presented.

  11. Autonomous Frequency-Domain Indentification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Yam, Yeung; Bayard, David S.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Test and data-processing system determines plant models and uncertainties. Integrated system of methods, digital signal-processing, and algorithms identifies parametric model of large, flexible structures. Experiments in development of system conducted on laboratory model intended to represent large space antenna or flexible spacecraft. Also applicable to many terrestrial systems, robust control of dynamic plants and processes, robust control of systems about which knowledge uncertain or incomplete, decentralized control, and knowledge-based control systems.

  12. Analysis of anomalous electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability effects using a frequency domain controlled-source electromagnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Kyubo; Oh, Seokmin; Seol, Soon Jee; Lee, Ki Ha; Byun, Joongmoo

    2016-03-01

    We present a series of processes for understanding and analysing controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) responses for a conductive and permeable earth. To realize the CSEM response, a new 3-D CSEM forward modelling algorithm based on an edge finite element method for both electrically conductive and magnetically permeable heterogeneities is developed. The algorithm shows highly accurate results in validation tests against a semi-analytic solution for stratified earth and an integral form of the scattered field. We describe the vector behaviour of an anomalous magnetic field originating from a conductive and permeable anomaly when the loop sources are deployed over a conductive half-space. The CSEM response of the conductive and permeable anomaly is classified into three effects originating from: conductivity perturbations, permeability perturbations and the coupling of these two effects. The separated individual results and the corresponding integral equation form of the anomalous field help to better understand the physical behaviour. We confirm the characteristic features of the CSEM response from the conductive and permeable anomaly, for example, (1) the general dominance of the induction effect in the out-of-phase response accompanied by a non-negligible magnetization effect from the magnetic anomaly in a conductive half-space and (2) the dominance of near frequency-independent magnetization effects in the in-phase response at relatively low frequencies and change in ruling part of the in-phase response into the induction effect as the frequency increases. We also demonstrate the effect of coupling mode and show that its maximum contribution is limited to a few per cent level of other two modes, induction and magnetization mode, even when the heterogeneity of our model is strong. In our synthetic survey, using examples of land-based profiling surveys of low induction number and intermediate regime, we find that the effect of magnetization can be used as an

  13. Frequency-Domain Approach To Determine Magnetic Address-Sensor Separation Distance Using the Harmonic Ratio Method.

    PubMed

    Young, Colin C; Blackley, Benjamin W; Porter, Marc D; Granger, Michael C

    2016-02-16

    In this work, we describe an approach to determine the distance separating a magnetic address from a scanning magnetoresistive sensor, a critical adjustable parameter for certain bioassay analyses where magnetic nanoparticles are used as labels. Our approach is leveraged from the harmonic ratio method (HRM), a method used in the hard drive industry to control the distance separating a magnetoresistive read head from its data platter with nanometer resolution. At the heart of the HRM is an amplitude comparison of a signal's fundamental frequency to that of its harmonics. When the signal is derived from the magnetic field pattern of a periodic array of magnetic addresses, the harmonic ratio contains the information necessary to determine the separation between the address array and the read head. The elegance of the HRM is that there is no need of additional components to the detection platform to determine a separation distance; the streaming "bit signal" contains all the information needed. In this work, we demonstrate that the tenets governing HRM used in the hard drive industry can be applied to the bioanalytical arena where submicrometer to 100 μm separations are required. PMID:26879366

  14. Detector nonlinearity in frequency-domain fluorometry.

    PubMed

    Wirth, M J; Burbage, J D; Zulli, S L

    1993-02-20

    Frequency-domain fluorometry relies on the measurement of the phase and amplitudes of the Fourier components of the time-dependent fluorescence signal. Experimental results that show that a conventional photomultiplier is subject to intensity-dependent phase shifts are presented. The measurements indicate that this is a problem well below the maximum linear current of the photomultiplier response. These results have important implications in frequency-domain fluorescence anisotropy experiments, in which the parallel and the perpendicular components of the emission intensity are inherently different from one another: a phase shift can be introduced by the photomultiplier. PMID:20802776

  15. Frequency domain optical tomography in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuqi; Wang, Yao; Pei, Yaling; Zhu, Wenwu; Hu, Jenhun; Barbour, Randall L.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, a reconstruction algorithm for frequency-domain optical tomography in human tissue is presented. A fast and efficient multigrid finite difference (MGFD) method is adopted as a forward solver to obtain the simulated detector responses and the required imaging operator. The solutions obtained form MGFD method for 3D problems with weakly discontinuous cocoefficients are compared with analyzed solutions to determine the accuracy of the numerical method. Simultaneous reconstruction of both absorption and scattering coefficients for tissue-like media is accomplished by solving a perturbation equation using the Born approximation. This solution is obtained by a conjugate gradient descent method with Tikhonov regularization. Two examples are given to show the quality of the reconstruction results. Both involve the examination of anatomically accurate optical models of tissue derived from segmented 3D magnetic resonance images to which have been assigned optical coefficients to the designated tissue types. One is a map of a female breast containing two small 'added pathologies', such as tumors. The other is a map of the brain containing a 'local bleeding' area, representing a hemorrhage. The reconstruction results show that the algorithm is computationally practical and can yield qualitatively correct geometry of the objects embedded in the simulated human tissue. Acceptable results are obtaiend even when 10% noise is present in the data.

  16. Method and Apparatus of Multiplexing and Acquiring Data from Multiple Optical Fibers Using a Single Data Channel of an Optical Frequency-Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jr., Allen R (Inventor); Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Piazza, Anthony (Nino) (Inventor); Richards, William Lance (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and system for multiplexing a network of parallel fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor-fibers to a single acquisition channel of a closed Michelson interferometer system via a fiber splitter by distinguishing each branch of fiber sensors in the spatial domain. On each branch of the splitter, the fibers have a specific pre-determined length, effectively separating each branch of fiber sensors spatially. In the spatial domain the fiber branches are seen as part of one acquisition channel on the interrogation system. However, the FBG-reference arm beat frequency information for each fiber is retained. Since the beat frequency is generated between the reference arm, the effective fiber length of each successive branch includes the entire length of the preceding branch. The multiple branches are seen as one fiber having three segments where the segments can be resolved. This greatly simplifies optical, electronic and computational complexity, and is especially suited for use in multiplexed or branched OFS networks for SHM of large and/or distributed structures which need a lot of measurement points.

  17. Frequency versus time domain immunity testing of Smart Grid components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronwald, F.

    2014-11-01

    Smart Grid components often are subject to considerable conducted current disturbances in the frequency range 2-150 kHz and, as a consequence, it is necessary to provide reliable immunity test methods. The relevant basic standard IEC 61000-4-19 that is currently under discussion focusses on frequency domain test methods. It is remarked in this contribution that in the context of frequency domain testing the chosen frequency spacing is related to the resonance response of the system under test which, in turn, is characterized in terms of resonance frequencies and quality factors. These notions apply well to physical system but it is pointed out by the example of an actual smart meter immunity test that smart grid components may exhibit susceptibilities that do not necessarily follow a resonance pattern and, additionally, can be narrowband. As a consequence it is suggested to supplement the present frequency domain test methods by time domain tests which utilize damped sinusoidal excitations with corresponding spectra that properly cover the frequency range 2-150 kHz, as exemplified by the military standard MIL-STD-461.

  18. Analyzing the properties of acceptor mode in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals based on a modified finite-difference frequency-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Ding, Guo-Wen; Lin, Yi-Bing; Chen, Yu-Qing

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the properties of acceptor mode in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (2D PPCs) composed of the homogeneous and isotropic dielectric cylinders inserted into nonmagnetized plasma background with square lattices under transverse-magnetic wave are theoretically investigated by a modified finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method with supercell technique, whose symmetry of every supercell is broken by removing a central rod. A new FDFD method is developed to calculate the band structures of such PPCs. The novel FDFD method adopts a general function to describe the distribution of dielectric in the present PPCs, which can easily transform the complicated nonlinear eigenvalue equation to the simple linear equation. The details of convergence and effectiveness of proposed FDFD method are analyzed using a numerical example. The simulated results demonstrate that the enough accuracy of the proposed FDFD method can be observed compared to the plane wave expansion method, and the good convergence can also be obtained if the number of meshed grids is large enough. As a comparison, two different configurations of photonic crystals (PCs) but with similar defect are theoretically investigated. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs, not only the acceptor mode has a higher frequency but also an additional photonic bandgap (PBG) can be found in the low frequency region. The calculated results also show that PBGs of proposed PPCs can be enlarged as the point defect is introduced. The influences of the parameters for present PPCs on the properties of acceptor mode are also discussed in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the acceptor mode in the present PPCs can be easily tuned by changing those parameters. Those results can hold promise for designing the tunable applications in the signal process or time delay devices based on the present PPCs.

  19. Scalable video coding in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civanlar, Mehmet R.; Puri, Atul

    1992-11-01

    Scalable video coding is important in a number of applications where video needs to be decoded and displayed at a variety of resolution scales. It is more efficient than simulcasting, in which all desired resolution scales are coded totally independent of one another within the constraint of a fixed available bandwidth. In this paper, we focus on scalability using the frequency domain approach. We employ the framework proposed for the ongoing second phase of Motion Picture Experts Group (MPEG-2) standard to study the performance of one such scheme and investigate improvements aimed at increasing its efficiency. Practical issues related to multiplexing of encoded data of various resolution scales to facilitate decoding are considered. Simulations are performed to investigate the potential of a chosen frequency domain scheme. Various prospects and limitations are also discussed.

  20. High frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy

    2013-12-01

    A new method for the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is developed based on the characteristic matrix method. This method is useful for studying planar samples or stack of planar samples. The terahertz radiation was generated by optical rectification in a ZnTe crystal and detected by another ZnTe crystal via electro-optic sampling method. In this new characteristic matrix based method, the spectra of the sample and reference waveforms will be modeled by using characteristic matrices. We applied this new method to measure the optical constants of air. The terahertz transmission through the layered systems air-Teflon-air-Quartz-air and Nitrogen gas-Teflon-Nitrogen gas-Quartz-Nitrogen gas was modeled by the characteristic matrix method. A transmission coefficient is derived from these models which was optimized to fit the experimental transmission coefficient to extract the optical constants of air. The optimization of an error function involving the experimental complex transmission coefficient and the theoretical transmission coefficient was performed using patternsearch algorithm of MATLAB. Since this method takes account of the echo waveforms due to reflections in the layered samples, this method allows analysis of longer time-domain waveforms giving rise to very high frequency resolution in the frequency-domain. We have presented the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of air and compared the results with the literature values. We have also fitted the complex susceptibility of air to the Lorentzian and Gaussian functions to extract the linewidths.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-10-15

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  2. Frequency Domain Modeling of SAW Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    New SAW sensors for integrated vehicle health monitoring of aerospace vehicles are being investigated. SAW technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, and extremely low power. However, the lack of design tools for MEMS devices in general, and for Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices specifically, has led to the development of tools that will enable integrated design, modeling, simulation, analysis and automatic layout generation of SAW devices. A frequency domain model has been created. The model is mainly first order, but it includes second order effects from triple transit echoes. This paper presents the model and results from the model for a SAW delay line device.

  3. AU-FREDI - AUTONOMOUS FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification program, AU-FREDI, is a system of methods, algorithms and software that was developed for the identification of structural dynamic parameters and system transfer function characterization for control of large space platforms and flexible spacecraft. It was validated in the CALTECH/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory. Due to the unique characteristics of this laboratory environment, and the environment-specific nature of many of the software's routines, AU-FREDI should be considered to be a collection of routines which can be modified and reassembled to suit system identification and control experiments on large flexible structures. The AU-FREDI software was originally designed to command plant excitation and handle subsequent input/output data transfer, and to conduct system identification based on the I/O data. Key features of the AU-FREDI methodology are as follows: 1. AU-FREDI has on-line digital filter design to support on-orbit optimal input design and data composition. 2. Data composition of experimental data in overlapping frequency bands overcomes finite actuator power constraints. 3. Recursive least squares sine-dwell estimation accurately handles digitized sinusoids and low frequency modes. 4. The system also includes automated estimation of model order using a product moment matrix. 5. A sample-data transfer function parametrization supports digital control design. 6. Minimum variance estimation is assured with a curve fitting algorithm with iterative reweighting. 7. Robust root solvers accurately factorize high order polynomials to determine frequency and damping estimates. 8. Output error characterization of model additive uncertainty supports robustness analysis. The research objectives associated with AU-FREDI were particularly useful in focusing the identification methodology for realistic on-orbit testing conditions. Rather than estimating the entire structure, as is

  4. Frequency domain analysis of knock images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yunliang; He, Xin; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-12-01

    High speed imaging-based knock analysis has mainly focused on time domain information, e.g. the spark triggered flame speed, the time when end gas auto-ignition occurs and the end gas flame speed after auto-ignition. This study presents a frequency domain analysis on the knock images recorded using a high speed camera with direct photography in a rapid compression machine (RCM). To clearly visualize the pressure wave oscillation in the combustion chamber, the images were high-pass-filtered to extract the luminosity oscillation. The luminosity spectrum was then obtained by applying fast Fourier transform (FFT) to three basic colour components (red, green and blue) of the high-pass-filtered images. Compared to the pressure spectrum, the luminosity spectra better identify the resonant modes of pressure wave oscillation. More importantly, the resonant mode shapes can be clearly visualized by reconstructing the images based on the amplitudes of luminosity spectra at the corresponding resonant frequencies, which agree well with the analytical solutions for mode shapes of gas vibration in a cylindrical cavity.

  5. Identification of characteristic components in frequency domain from signal singularities.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2010-03-01

    In rotating machinery condition monitoring, identification of characteristic components is fundamental in many engineering applications so as to obtain fault sensitive features for fault detection and diagnosis. This paper proposed a novel method for the identification of characteristic components in frequency domain based on singularity analysis. In this process, Lipschitz exponent function is constructed from the signal through wavelet-based singularity analysis. In order to highlight the periodic phenomena, autocorrelation transform is employed to extract the periodic exponents and Fourier transform is used to map the time-domain information into frequency domain. Case study with rolling element bearing vibration data shows that the proposed has very excellent capability for the identification of characteristic components compared with traditional methods. PMID:20370219

  6. High-speed optical frequency-domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.; Iftimia, N.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate high-speed, high-sensitivity, high-resolution optical imaging based on optical frequency-domain interferometry using a rapidly-tuned wavelength-swept laser. We derive and show experimentally that frequency-domain ranging provides a superior signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional time-domain ranging as used in optical coherence tomography. A high sensitivity of −110 dB was obtained with a 6 mW source at an axial resolution of 13.5 µm and an A-line rate of 15.7 kHz, representing more than an order-of-magnitude improvement compared with previous OCT and interferometric imaging methods. PMID:19471415

  7. Radiative Transport Based Frequency Domain Fluorescence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Amit; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Wareing, Todd A.; McGhee, John

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of radiative transport model based fluorescence optical tomography from frequency domain boundary measurements. The coupled radiative transport model for describing NIR fluorescence propagation in tissue is solved by a novel software based on the established Attila™ particle transport simulation platform. The proposed scheme enables the prediction of fluorescence measurements with non-contact sources and detectors at minimal computational cost. An adjoint transport solution based fluorescence tomography algorithm is implemented on dual grids to efficiently assemble the measurement sensitivity Jacobian matrix. Finally, we demonstrate fluorescence tomography on a realistic computational mouse model to locate nM to μM fluorophore concentration distributions in simulated mouse organs. PMID:18364555

  8. Evaluation of the accuracy of brain optical properties estimation at different ages using the frequency-domain multi-distance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Grant, P. Ellen; Sliva, Danielle D.; Roche-Labarbe, Nadège; Pienaar, Rudolph; Boas, David A.; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Selb, Juliette

    2011-03-01

    NIRS is safe, non-invasive and offers the possibility to record local hemodynamic parameters at the bedside, avoiding the transportation of neonates and critically ill patients. In this work, we evaluate the accuracy of the frequency-domain multi-distance (FD-MD) method to retrieve brain optical properties from neonate to adult. Realistic measurements are simulated using a 3D Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation. Height different ages were investigated: a term newborn of 38 weeks gestational age, two infants of 6 and 12 months of age, a toddler of 2 year (yr.) old, two children of 5 and 10 years of age, a teenager of 14 yr. old, and an adult. Measurements are generated at multiple distances on the right parietal area of head models and fitted to a homogeneous FD-MD model to estimate the brain optical properties. In the newborn, infants, toddler and 5 yr. old child models, the error was dominated by the head curvature, while the superficial layer in the 10 yr. old child, teenager and adult heads. The influence of the CSF is also evaluated. In this case, absorption coefficients suffer from an additional error. In all cases, measurements at 5 mm provided worse estimation because of the diffusion approximation.

  9. Optimal System Realization in Frequency Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Maghami, Peiman G.

    1999-01-01

    Several approaches are presented to identify an experimental system model directly from frequency response data. The formulation begins with a matrix-fraction description as the model structure. Frequency weighting such as exponential weighting is introduced to solve a weighted least-squares problem to obtain the coefficient matrices for the matrix-fraction description. A multi-variable state-space model can then be formed using the coefficient matrices of the matrix-fraction description. An approach is introduced to fine-tune the model using non-linear programming methods to minimize the desired cost function. The method deals with the model in the real Schur or modal form and reassigns a subset of system poles using a nonlinear optimizer. At every optimization step, the input and output influence matrices are refined through least-squares procedures. The proposed approaches are used to identify an analytical model for a NASA testbed from experimental data.

  10. Autonomous Frequency-Domain System-Identification Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Mettler, Edward; Bayard, David S.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification (AU-FREDI) computer program implements system of methods, algorithms, and software developed for identification of parameters of mathematical models of dynamics of flexible structures and characterization, by use of system transfer functions, of such models, dynamics, and structures regarded as systems. Software considered collection of routines modified and reassembled to suit system-identification and control experiments on large flexible structures.

  11. Time and frequency domain characteristics of detrending-operation-based scaling analysis: Exact DFA and DMA frequency responses.

    PubMed

    Kiyono, Ken; Tsujimoto, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    We develop a general framework to study the time and frequency domain characteristics of detrending-operation-based scaling analysis methods, such as detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and detrending moving average (DMA) analysis. In this framework, using either the time or frequency domain approach, the frequency responses of detrending operations are calculated analytically. Although the frequency domain approach based on conventional linear analysis techniques is only applicable to linear detrending operations, the time domain approach presented here is applicable to both linear and nonlinear detrending operations. Furthermore, using the relationship between the time and frequency domain representations of the frequency responses, the frequency domain characteristics of nonlinear detrending operations can be obtained. Based on the calculated frequency responses, it is possible to establish a direct connection between the root-mean-square deviation of the detrending-operation-based scaling analysis and the power spectrum for linear stochastic processes. Here, by applying our methods to DFA and DMA, including higher-order cases, exact frequency responses are calculated. In addition, we analytically investigate the cutoff frequencies of DFA and DMA detrending operations and show that these frequencies are not optimally adjusted to coincide with the corresponding time scale. PMID:27575081

  12. Time and frequency domain characteristics of detrending-operation-based scaling analysis: Exact DFA and DMA frequency responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Ken; Tsujimoto, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    We develop a general framework to study the time and frequency domain characteristics of detrending-operation-based scaling analysis methods, such as detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and detrending moving average (DMA) analysis. In this framework, using either the time or frequency domain approach, the frequency responses of detrending operations are calculated analytically. Although the frequency domain approach based on conventional linear analysis techniques is only applicable to linear detrending operations, the time domain approach presented here is applicable to both linear and nonlinear detrending operations. Furthermore, using the relationship between the time and frequency domain representations of the frequency responses, the frequency domain characteristics of nonlinear detrending operations can be obtained. Based on the calculated frequency responses, it is possible to establish a direct connection between the root-mean-square deviation of the detrending-operation-based scaling analysis and the power spectrum for linear stochastic processes. Here, by applying our methods to DFA and DMA, including higher-order cases, exact frequency responses are calculated. In addition, we analytically investigate the cutoff frequencies of DFA and DMA detrending operations and show that these frequencies are not optimally adjusted to coincide with the corresponding time scale.

  13. Resonant frequency analysis of a Lamé-mode resonator on a quartz plate by the finite-difference time-domain method using the staggered grid with the collocated grid points of velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takashi; Hasegawa, Koji; Hirayama, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method using a staggered grid with the collocated grid points of velocities (SGCV) was formulated for elastic waves propagating in anisotropic solids and for a rectangular SGCV. Resonant frequency analysis of Lamé-mode resonators on a quartz plate was carried out to confirm the accuracy and validity of the proposed method. The resonant frequencies for the fundamental and higher-order Lamé-modes calculated by the proposed method agreed very well with their theoretical values.

  14. Time domain and frequency domain design techniques for model reference adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1971-01-01

    Some problems associated with the design of model-reference adaptive control systems are considered and solutions to these problems are advanced. The stability of the adapted system is a primary consideration in the development of both the time-domain and the frequency-domain design techniques. Consequentially, the use of Liapunov's direct method forms an integral part of the derivation of the design procedures. The application of sensitivity coefficients to the design of model-reference adaptive control systems is considered. An application of the design techniques is also presented.

  15. Frequency-domain direct waveform inversion based on perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sangmin; Kim, Youngseo; Shin, Changsoo

    2014-05-01

    A direct waveform inversion based on perturbation theory is proposed to delineate a subsurface velocity structure from seismic data. This technique can directly compute the difference between the actual subsurface velocity and an initial guess of the velocity, while full waveform inversion updates the velocity model in the directions of reducing the data residual. Unlike full waveform inversion using the steepest descent method, the direct waveform inversion does not require a proper step length to iteratively update the velocity model. We present an algorithm for the waveform inversion method in the frequency domain and numerical examples demonstrating how the inversion method can reconstruct subsurface velocity structures using surface seismic data. The time-domain seismograms synthesized in the inversion procedure match the corresponding shot-gather seismograms of field data.

  16. Frequency Domain Beamforming for a Deep Space Network Downlink Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a frequency domain beamformer to array up to 8 antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network currently in development. The objective of this array is to replace and enhance the capability of the DSN 70m antennas with multiple 34m antennas for telemetry, navigation and radio science use. The array will coherently combine the entire 500 MHz of usable bandwidth available to DSN receivers. A frequency domain beamforming architecture was chosen over a time domain based architecture to handle the large signal bandwidth and efficiently perform delay and phase calibration. The antennas of the DSN are spaced far enough apart that random atmospheric and phase variations between antennas need to be calibrated out on an ongoing basis in real-time. The calibration is done using measurements obtained from a correlator. This DSN Downlink Array expands upon a proof of concept breadboard array built previously to develop the technology and will become an operational asset of the Deep Space Network. Design parameters for frequency channelization, array calibration and delay corrections will be presented as well a method to efficiently calibrate the array for both wide and narrow bandwidth telemetry.

  17. Analysis of frequency domain frame detection and synchronization in OQAM-OFDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thein, Christoph; Schellmann, Malte; Peissig, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    For future communication systems, filter bank multicarrier schemes offer the flexibility to increase spectrum utilization in heterogeneous wireless environments by good separation of signals in the frequency domain. To fully exploit this property for frame detection and synchronization, the advantage of the filter bank should be taken at the receiver side. In this work, the concept of frequency domain processing for frame detection and synchronization is analyzed and a suitable preamble design as well as corresponding estimation algorithms is discussed. The theoretical performance of the detection and estimation schemes is derived and compared with simulation-based assessments. The results show that, even though the frequency domain algorithms are sensitive to carrier frequency offsets, satisfactory frame detection and synchronization can be achieved in the frequency domain. In comparison to time domain synchronization methods, the computational complexity increases; however, enhanced robustness in shared spectrum access scenarios is gained in case the described frequency domain approach is utilized.

  18. Visual saliency: a biologically plausible contourlet-like frequency domain approach

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Peng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose a fast frequency domain saliency detection method that is also biologically plausible, referred to as frequency domain divisive normalization (FDN). We show that the initial feature extraction stage, common to all spatial domain approaches, can be simplified to a Fourier transform with a contourlet-like grouping of coefficients, and saliency detection can be achieved in frequency domain. Specifically, we show that divisive normalization, a model of cortical surround inhibition, can be conducted in frequency domain. Since Fourier coefficients are global in space, we extend to this model by conducting piecewise FDN (PFDN) using overlapping local patches to provide better biological plausibility. Not only do FDN and PFDN outperform current state-of-the-art methods in eye fixation prediction, they are also faster. Speed and simplicity are advantages of our frequency domain approach, and its biological plausibility is the main contribution of our paper. PMID:21886671

  19. Frequency-domain measurement of luminescent lanthanide chelates.

    PubMed

    Hyppänen, Iko; Soukka, Tero; Kankare, Jouko

    2010-08-01

    The sinusoidal modulation of excitation intensity and phase-sensitive detection of emission is ideally suitable for the accurate determination of the lifetime and intensity of lanthanide luminescence. In this work we elaborate on the general mathematical and instrumental techniques of the frequency-domain (FD) measurements in the low-frequency domain below 100 kHz. A modular FD luminometer is constructed by using a UV-LED as the excitation source, proper light filters in the excitation and emission paths, a photomultiplier with a fast preamplifier, and a conventional dual-phase lock-in amplifier. Starting from the set of linear differential equations governing the excited-state processes of the lanthanide chelates, an equation linking the luminescence intensity to the general form of the excitation modulation was derived. Application to the sinusoidal modulation in the Euler's exponential form gives the expression for the in-phase and out-of-phase signals of a dual-phase lock-in amplifier. It is shown that by using a relatively large number of logarithmically equidistant modulation frequencies it is possible to use the Kramers-Kronig relation for checking the compatibility of the out-of-phase and in-phase signals. As an example, the emission from two different europium(III) chelates were measured by using 200 modulation frequencies between 10 Hz and 100 kHz. In addition to the conventional transition between (5)D(0) and (7)F(2) levels emitting at 615 nm, also the emission from the transition between (5)D(1) and (7)F(1) levels at ca. 540 nm was measured. The latter emission was also measured at different temperatures, yielding the energy difference between the (5)D(1) and (5)D(0) levels. The relatively large number of modulation frequencies allows also an accurate determination of lifetimes and corresponding amplitudes by using an appropriate nonlinear regression method. Comparison of the time-domain and frequency-domain methods shows that the weighting of data is

  20. Frequency and time domain modeling of high speed amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalska, Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the lumped model of high speed amplifier useful for frequency and time domain (also large signal) simulation. Model is constructed on the basis of two-domain device measurements, namely small signal frequency parameters and time response to the input step of varying amplitude. Rational approximation of frequency domain data leads to small signal model composed of RLC subcircuits and controlled sources. Next, the model is complimented with the nonlinearities identified from time-domain measurements, including those taken for large input signals. Final amplifier model implemented in SPICE simulator is shown to correctly render the behavior of the device over the wide variety of operating conditions.

  1. A statistical package for computing time and frequency domain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlow, J.

    1978-01-01

    The spectrum analysis (SPA) program is a general purpose digital computer program designed to aid in data analysis. The program does time and frequency domain statistical analyses as well as some preanalysis data preparation. The capabilities of the SPA program include linear trend removal and/or digital filtering of data, plotting and/or listing of both filtered and unfiltered data, time domain statistical characterization of data, and frequency domain statistical characterization of data.

  2. Frequency Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Techniques in Eye Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtkowski, M.; Kowalczyk, A.; Targowski, P.; Gorczyñska, I.

    2000-12-01

    This contribution presents an application of frequency-domain optical tomography to ophthalmology. Essential theoretical foundations of time-domain and frequency-domain optical tomography are presented. Images of sections through the anterior chamber, the corneo-scleral angle and fundus of the eye are reconstructed from the spectral fringes. The morphological information gained by tomograms is important for diagnosing and planning of a treatment of glaucoma.

  3. Frequency Dependent Microwave Impedance Microscopy of Ferroelectric Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Scott; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    ABO3 ferroelectrics are known to exhibit domain wall conductivity which is of great fundamental and technological interest. Microwave Impedance Microscopy is a near field measurement technique which allows local, non-contact measurement of AC conductivity and permittivity. In this work, Microwave Impedance Microscopy over a wide frequency range is used to probe the electrical properties of domain walls in ABO3 ferroelectrics. An unexpected, strong frequency dependence in the microwave dissipation near domain walls is observed.

  4. Frequency and Time Domain Modeling of Acoustic Liner Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program directed at the acoustics of advanced subsonic propulsion systems undertaken at NASA Langley, Duke University was funded to develop a boundary condition model for bulk-reacting nacelle liners. The overall objective of the Langley program was to understand and predict noise from advanced subsonic transport engines and to develop related noise control technology. The overall technical areas included: fan and propeller source noise, acoustics of ducts and duct liners, interior noise, subjective acoustics, and systems noise prediction. The Duke effort was directed toward duct liner acoustics for the development of analytical methods to characterize liner behavior in both frequency domain and time domain. A review of duct acoustics and liner technology can be found in Reference [1]. At that time, NASA Langley was investigating the propulsion concept of an advanced ducted fan, with a large diameter housed inside a relatively short duct. Fan diameters in excess of ten feet were proposed. The lengths of both the inlet and exhaust portions of the duct were to be short, probably less than half the fan diameter. The nacelle itself would be relatively thin-walled for reasons of aerodynamic efficiency. The blade-passage frequency was expected to be less than I kHz, and very likely in the 200 to 300 Hz range. Because of the design constraints of a short duct, a thin nacelle, and long acoustic wavelengths, the application of effective liner technology would be especially challenging. One of the needs of the NASA Langley program was the capability to accurately and efficiently predict the behavior of the acoustic liner. The traditional point impedance method was not an adequate model for proposed liner designs. The method was too restrictive to represent bulk reacting liners and to allow for the characterization of many possible innovative liner concepts. In the research effort at Duke, an alternative method, initially developed to handle bulk

  5. Two-photon experiments in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbodji, I.; Olislager, L.; Woodhead, E.; Galmes, B.; Cussey, J.; Furfaro, L.; Emplit, P.; Massar, S.; Phan Huy, K.; Merolla, J.-M.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the study of two-photon interference in the frequency domain. Bell and Hong-Ou-Mandel experiments are investigated. These experiments involve the manipulation of photons in the frequency domain, using off-the-shelf telecommunication components such as electro-optic phase modulators and narrow-band frequency filters. In the first experiment, photon pairs entangled in frequency are created and separated. Each photon is then directed through an independent electro-optic phase modulator. Variation of the radio-frequency parameters of the modulation gives rise to a well-controlled Bessel-shape two-photon interference pattern in the frequency domain. This is efficiently measured with narrow-band frequency filters and superconducting single photon detectors. Experimental measurements exhibit high visibilities (over 99 percent both for net and raw visibilities) and allow the (theoretically proven) optimal violation of a Bell inequality for our setup (by more than 18 standard deviations). The second experiment is a Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment in the frequency domain. We show that a grating (spatial domain) or a phase modulator (temporal domain) can be seen as a frequency beam splitter. A broadband spectrum of photon pairs is divided into two interleaved frequency combs, each one used as an independent input to this acting beam splitter. A theoretical calculation shows clear photon anti-bunching behavior.

  6. Real-Time Parameter Estimation in the Frequency Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1999-01-01

    A method for real-time estimation of parameters in a linear dynamic state space model was developed and studied. The application is aircraft dynamic model parameter estimation from measured data in flight for indirect adaptive or reconfigurable control. Equation error in the frequency domain was used with a recursive Fourier transform for the real-time data analysis. Linear and nonlinear simulation examples and flight test data from the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle HARV) were used to demonstrate that the technique produces accurate model parameter estimates with appropriate error bounds. Parameter estimates converged in less than 1 cycle of the dominant dynamic mode natural frequencies, using control surface inputs measured in flight during ordinary piloted maneuvers. The real-time parameter estimation method has low computational requirements, and could be implemented aboard an aircraft in real time.

  7. A frequency domain approach to handling qualities design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolovich, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    A method for designing linear multivariable feedback control systems based on desired closed loop transfer matrix information is introduced. The technique which was employed to achieve the final design was based on a theoretical result, known as the structure theorem. The structure theorem was a frequency domain relationship which simplified the expression for the transfer matrix (matrix of transfer functions) of a linear time-invariant multivariable system. The effect of linear state variable feedback on the closed loop transfer matrix of the system was also clarified.

  8. Frequency domain, waveform inversion of laboratory crosswell radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Mazzella, Aldo T.; Horton, Robert J.; McKenna, Jason R.

    2010-01-01

    A new waveform inversion for crosswell radar is formulated in the frequency-domain for a 2.5D model. The inversion simulates radar waves using the vector Helmholtz equation for electromagnetic waves. The objective function is minimized using a backpropagation method suitable for a 2.5D model. The inversion is tested by processing crosswell radar data collected in a laboratory tank. The estimated model is consistent with the known electromagnetic properties of the tank. The formulation for the 2.5D model can be extended to inversions of acoustic and elastic data.

  9. Iterative procedures for wave propagation in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seongjai; Symes, W.W.

    1996-12-31

    A parallelizable two-grid iterative algorithm incorporating a domain decomposition (DD) method is considered for solving the Helmholtz problem. Since a numerical method requires choosing at least 6 to 8 grid points per wavelength, the coarse-grid problem itself is not an easy task for high frequency applications. We solve the coarse-grid problem using a nonoverlapping DD method. To accelerate the convergence of the iteration, an artificial damping technique and relaxation parameters are introduced. Automatic strategies for finding efficient parameters are discussed. Numerical results are presented to show the effectiveness of the method. It is numerically verified that the rate of convergence of the algorithm depends on the wave number sub-linearly and does not deteriorate as the mesh size decreases.

  10. Frequency domain fluorimetry using a mercury vapor lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Matthew J.; Lundin, Michael A.; Marciniak, Michael A.

    2009-04-01

    Frequency Domain (FD) fluorimetry, capitalizes on the frequency response function of a fluorophore and offers independence from light scatter and excitation/emission intensity variations in order to extract the sample's fluorescent lifetime. Mercury vapor lamps, a common source of industrial facility lighting, emit radiation that overlaps the UV/blue absorption spectrum of many fluorophores and may be used as an efficient and portable excitation source. The AC power modulation of mercury vapor lamps modulates the lamp's intensity at 120 Hz (in the United States) and higher harmonics. The fluorescent lifetimes for 3 different materials (willemite, uranium doped glass and U3O8) are measured with conventional techniques and compared with the FD technique using the power harmonics from a mercury vapor lamp. The mercury lamp measurements agree to within 25% of the conventional methods.

  11. Remote Strain Sensing of CFRP Using Microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Project is investigating technologies that increase automated remote inspection of aircraft composite structures. Therefore, microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) is being investigated as a method of enabling rapid remote measurement of strain occurring at the first ply of a composite fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) structure using Radio Frequency (RF) Electro-Magnetic (EM) radiation. While microwave reflectometry has been used to detect disbonds in CFRP structures, its use in detecting strain has been limited. This work will present data demonstrating the measurement of the reactance changes due to loading conditions that are indicative of strain in a CFRP structure. In addition, the basic EM signature will be presented along with an analysis of temperature and humidity effects.

  12. Nonintrusive noncontacting frequency-domain photothermal radiometry of caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.; Abd-Elwahab, Bassam

    2010-04-01

    Among diffusion methods, photothermal radiometry (PTR) has the ability to penetrate and yield information about an opaque medium well beyond the range of conventional optical imaging. Owing to this ability, pulsed-laser PTR has been extensively used in turbid media such as biological tissues to study the sub-surface deposition of laser radiation, a task that may be difficult or impossible for many optical methods due to excessive scattering and absorption. In this paper considers the achievements of Pulsed Photothermal Radiometry using IR camera in the investigation of physical properties of biological materials and the diagnostics of the interaction of laser radiation with biological materials. A three-dimensional heat conduction formulation with the use of three-dimensional optical diffusion is developed to derive a turbid frequency-domain PTR model. The present photo-thermal model for frequency-domain PTR may prove useful for non-contact; non-invasive, in situ evaluate the depth profilometric imaging capabilities of FDPTR in monitoring carious and artificial subsurface lesions in human teeth.

  13. Frequency domain effects of low resolution digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Eugene L.

    Some effects of minimizing the transmitted bandwidth by quantizing to a small number of bits are discussed. Measured performance is presented for four different input signals and one-,three-, and eight-bit quantization. The signals are amplitude modulation, angle modulation, sum of sine waves, and frequency sweep. The analysis are performed using either fast Fourier transforms or a Kay DSP sonograph. The effective dynamic ranges of one- and three-bit quantization are shown to be a function of the input signal characteristics. One- and three-bit quantizations perform best for angle modulated signals and worst for amplitude modulated signals.

  14. Phasor plotting with frequency-domain flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Peria, William; Sands, Bryan; Naivar, Mark; Brent, Roger; Houston, Jessica P

    2016-06-27

    Interest in time resolved flow cytometry is growing. In this paper, we collect time-resolved flow cytometry data and use it to create polar plots showing distributions that are a function of measured fluorescence decay rates from individual fluorescently-labeled cells and fluorescent microspheres. Phasor, or polar, graphics are commonly used in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In FLIM measurements, the plotted points on a phasor graph represent the phase-shift and demodulation of the frequency-domain fluorescence signal collected by the imaging system for each image pixel. Here, we take a flow cytometry cell counting system, introduce into it frequency-domain optoelectronics, and process the data so that each point on a phasor plot represents the phase shift and demodulation of an individual cell or particle. In order to demonstrate the value of this technique, we show that phasor graphs can be used to discriminate among populations of (i) fluorescent microspheres, which are labeled with one fluorophore type; (ii) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells labeled with one and two different fluorophore types; and (iii) Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that express combinations of fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes. The resulting phasor plots reveal differences in the fluorescence lifetimes within each sample and provide a distribution from which we can infer the number of cells expressing unique single or dual fluorescence lifetimes. These methods should facilitate analysis time resolved flow cytometry data to reveal complex fluorescence decay kinetics. PMID:27410612

  15. Polarization influence on reflectance measurements in the spatial frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Wiest, J; Bodenschatz, N; Brandes, A; Liemert, A; Kienle, A

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we quantify the influence of crossed polarizers on reflectance measurements in the spatial frequency domain. The use of crossed polarizers is a very common approach for suppression of specular surface reflections. However, measurements are typically evaluated using a non-polarized scalar theory. The consequences of this discrepancy are the focus of our study, and we also quantify the related errors of the derived optical properties. We used polarized Monte Carlo simulations for forward calculation of the reflectance from different samples. The samples' scatterers are assumed to be spherical, allowing for the calculation of the scattering functions by Mie theory. From the forward calculations, the reduced scattering coefficient [Formula: see text] and the absorption coefficient μa were derived by means of a scalar theory, as commonly used. Here, we use the analytical solution of the scalar radiative transfer equation. With this evaluation approach, which does not consider polarization, we found large errors in [Formula: see text] and μa in the range of 25% and above. Furthermore, we investigated the applicability of the use of a reference measurement to reduce these errors as suggested in literature. We found that this method is not able to generally improve the accuracy of measurements in the spatial frequency domain. Our general recommendation is to apply a polarized theory when using crossed polarizers. PMID:26158399

  16. Real time frequency domain fibreoptic temperature sensor using ruby crystals.

    PubMed

    Alcala, J R; Liao, S C; Zheng, J

    1996-01-01

    The excited state phosphorescence lifetime of ruby crystals is used to monitor temperature in the physiological range from 15 degrees to 45 degrees C with precision and accuracy less than 1 degree C, in real time. Precision of 0.1 degree C is attained with 3 min integration times. A 500 micron cubic ruby crystal bounded to the distal end of an optical fibre of similar core dimensions is excited with pulsed Ne-He laser light of about 9 microW average power. The instrument uses a sampler for data acquisition, and frequency domain methods for data fitting. The instrument amplifies the a.c. components of the detector output and band limits the signal to 800 Hz. The fundamental frequency of the excitation is set to 24.41 Hz to obtain 32 or less harmonics. This band-limited signal is sampled and averaged between 20 and 100 cycles to obtain temperature measurements in real time. The frequency domain representation of the data is obtained by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio, of each sampled harmonic, is then computed. Five to 32 values of the phase and modulation are averaged before computing the sensor lifetime. The technique is capable of measuring precise and accurate excited state lifetimes from subpicowatt luminescent signals in plastic optical fibres. A least squares fit yields the lifetimes of single exponentials. A component of zero lifetime is introduced to account for the backscatter excitation seen by the photodetector leaking through optical interference filters. The phosphorescence lifetimes measured reproducibly to about six parts in 1000, with a 2 s integration time, are used to monitor physiological temperature. Temperatures are computed employing empirical polynomials. The system drift is 3% over 5 h of continuous operation. The instrumentation and methods allow 2.7 s update times and 50 s full response times. PMID:8771039

  17. Real-Time Parameter Estimation in the Frequency Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for real-time estimation of parameters in a linear dynamic state-space model was developed and studied. The application is aircraft dynamic model parameter estimation from measured data in flight. Equation error in the frequency domain was used with a recursive Fourier transform for the real-time data analysis. Linear and nonlinear simulation examples and flight test data from the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle were used to demonstrate that the technique produces accurate model parameter estimates with appropriate error bounds. Parameter estimates converged in less than one cycle of the dominant dynamic mode, using no a priori information, with control surface inputs measured in flight during ordinary piloted maneuvers. The real-time parameter estimation method has low computational requirements and could be implemented

  18. Ion mobility spectrometer using frequency-domain separation

    DOEpatents

    Martin, S.J.; Butler, M.A.; Frye, G.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1998-08-04

    An apparatus and method are provided for separating and analyzing chemical species in an ion mobility spectrometer using a frequency-domain technique wherein the ions generated from the chemical species are selectively transported through an ion flow channel having a moving electrical potential therein. The moving electrical potential allows the ions to be selected according to ion mobility, with certain of the ions being transported to an ion detector and other of the ions being effectively discriminated against. The apparatus and method have applications for sensitive chemical detection and analysis for monitoring of exhaust gases, hazardous waste sites, industrial processes, aerospace systems, non-proliferation, and treaty verification. The apparatus can be formed as a microelectromechanical device (i.e. a micromachine). 6 figs.

  19. Ion mobility spectrometer using frequency-domain separation

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Butler, Michael A.; Frye, Gregory C.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method is provided for separating and analyzing chemical species in an ion mobility spectrometer using a frequency-domain technique wherein the ions generated from the chemical species are selectively transported through an ion flow channel having a moving electrical potential therein. The moving electrical potential allows the ions to be selected according to ion mobility, with certain of the ions being transported to an ion detector and other of the ions being effectively discriminated against. The apparatus and method have applications for sensitive chemical detection and analysis for monitoring of exhaust gases, hazardous waste sites, industrial processes, aerospace systems, non-proliferation, and treaty verification. The apparatus can be formed as a microelectromechanical device (i.e. a micromachine).

  20. Frequency domain compensation of a DYNGEN turbofan engine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, R. M.; Gejji, R. R.; Hoppner, P. W.; Longenbaker, W. E.; Sain, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Following Rosenbrock's ideas regarding the advantages of dominance in linear multivariable control systems, a new graphical technique is used for the design of compensators that achieve dominance. The technique is illustrated with an application to the problem of designing compensators for a linear turbofan-engine model. The resulting design is put into perspective by examining it in the light of two other multivariable frequency-domain methods. One, MacFarlane's method of characteristic loci, is used to realize a final design for stability and low interaction. The other is a direct technique based upon the algebraic expansion of the determinant of the return difference in terms of it's elements. Results from simulations carried out on the NASA DYNGEN software are included.

  1. A comparison of discrimination capabilities of time- and frequency-domain electromagnetic induction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilaka, Sailaja V.; Faircloth, Daniel L.; Riggs, Lloyd S.; Baginski, Michael E.

    2005-06-01

    This paper discusses the ability of time and frequency domain electromagnetic induction systems to discriminate unexploded ordnance from clutter. Toward this end, time and frequency domain electromagnetic induction systems were built and the responses of a wide variety of targets including loops, spheres, cylinders and inert UXOs were measured. Also, time and frequency responses of test targets are numerically modeled using finite element methods to validate the experimental work. Target information is more distinct in the frequency domain than time domain. Moreover, discrimination performance of the frequency domain electromagnetic induction system was enhanced by almost a factor of two when the usual the low frequency spectrum (30 Hz to 24 kHz) was extended down to extremely low frequencies (1 Hz to 30 Hz). However, data acquisition at extremely low frequencies is a time consuming process especially if data averaging is required to achieve acceptable SNR. Therefore, in practice, it would be better to have two operating modes when using a frequency domain electromagnetic induction system; one with very few operating frequencies and the other operating in the entire band (1 Hz to 24 kHz). Once a target location is marked using the first mode, the system can be used as a "cued" sensor in the second mode, thus improving the discrimination.

  2. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible bymore » simply extending the data acquisition time.« less

  3. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time.

  4. AD Conversion Revisited in the Frequency Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikada, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The output of a quantizer is shown in the form of a sum of harmonics and inter-modulations, whose coefficient is also shown in an analytical form using Kummer confluent hypergeometric functions of the first kind. Methods to reduce quantization noise are also discussed.

  5. Segmentation and frequency domain ML pitch estimation of speech signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Salim A.

    The rate of oscillation of the vocal cords and its inverse value, the pitch period, are important speech features that are useful for speech analysis/synthesis, speech recognition, and speech coding. An automatic approach for the estimation of the pitch period in continuous speech is presented. The proposed approach considers the segmentation of the speech signal into homogeneous regions and the detection of segments that are generated by vocal cord oscillations prior to pitch estimation. The pitch period of voiced segments is estimated in the frequency domain using a maximum likelihood (ML) procedure. The estimated pitch period is chosen to maximize a likelihood function over the range of expected pitch periods. An efficient simplified realization of the generalized likelihood ratio segmentation method is also described.

  6. Frequency domain photothermal radiometry with spherical solids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chinhua; Liu, Yue; Mandelis, Andreas; Shen, Jun

    2007-04-15

    Motivated by increasing practical and industrial applications of photothermal techniques in the measurement of materials of various shapes with curvature, we extend the applications of photothermal diagnostics to solid spheres, in which both theoretical and experimental photothermal radiometry studies on spherical geometries and thermal diffusivity of the sample are discussed. Based on the Green function method, a full thermal-wave field distribution of a spherical solid is obtained. The characteristics of the thermal-wave field with respect to thermophysical properties of the material, the diameter of the solid, the size of the incident laser beam, and the measurement angle are discussed. Experimental results with steel spheres of different diameters exhibit good agreement between the theory and the experiments.

  7. Uncertainty Modeling Via Frequency Domain Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The majority of literature on robust control assumes that a design model is available and that the uncertainty model bounds the actual variations about the nominal model. However, methods for generating accurate design models have not received as much attention in the literature. The influence of the level of accuracy of the uncertainty model on closed loop performance has received even less attention. The research reported herein is an initial step in applying and extending the concept of model validation to the problem of obtaining practical uncertainty models for robust control analysis and design applications. An extension of model validation called 'sequential validation' is presented and applied to a simple spring-mass-damper system to establish the feasibility of the approach and demonstrate the benefits of the new developments.

  8. An analog filter approach to frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, Clifford P.; O'Neill, Mary D.; McKenna, Ian J.

    2015-10-01

    The rate equations found in frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy are the same as those found in electronics under analog filter theory. Laplace transform methods are a natural way to solve the equations, and the methods can provide solutions for arbitrary excitation functions. The fluorescence terms can be modeled as circuit components and cascaded with drive and detection electronics to produce a global transfer function. Electronics design tools such as Spicea can be used to model fluorescence problems. In applications, such as remote sensing, where detection electronics are operated at high gain and limited bandwidth, a global modeling of the entire system is important, since the filter terms of the drive and detection electronics affect the measured response of the fluorescence signals. Furthermore, the techniques described here can be used to separate signals from fast and slow fluorophores emitting into the same spectral band, and data collection can be greatly accelerated by means of a frequency comb driver waveform and appropriate signal processing of the response.

  9. An Analog Filter Approach to Frequency Domain Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trainham, R; O'Neill, M; McKenna, I J

    2015-11-01

    The rate equations found in frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy are the same as those found in electronics under analog filter theory. Laplace transform methods are a natural way to solve the equations, and the methods can provide solutions for arbitrary excitation functions. The fluorescence terms can be modelled as circuit components and cascaded with drive and detection electronics to produce a global transfer function. Electronics design tools such as SPICE can be used to model fluorescence problems. In applications, such as remote sensing, where detection electronics are operated at high gain and limited bandwidth, a global modelling of the entire system is important, since the filter terms of the drive and detection electronics affect the measured response of the fluorescence signals. The techniques described here can be used to separate signals from fast and slow fluorophores emitting into the same spectral band, and data collection can be greatly accelerated by means of a frequency comb driver waveform and appropriate signal processing of the response. The simplification of the analysis mathematics, and the ability to model the entire detection chain, make it possible to develop more compact instruments for remote sensing applications. PMID:26429345

  10. An analog filter approach to frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Trainham, Clifford P.; O'Neill, Mary D.; McKenna, Ian J.

    2015-10-01

    The rate equations found in frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy are the same as those found in electronics under analog filter theory. Laplace transform methods are a natural way to solve the equations, and the methods can provide solutions for arbitrary excitation functions. The fluorescence terms can be modeled as circuit components and cascaded with drive and detection electronics to produce a global transfer function. Electronics design tools such as Spicea can be used to model fluorescence problems. In applications, such as remote sensing, where detection electronics are operated at high gain and limited bandwidth, a global modeling of the entiremore » system is important, since the filter terms of the drive and detection electronics affect the measured response of the fluorescence signals. Furthermore, the techniques described here can be used to separate signals from fast and slow fluorophores emitting into the same spectral band, and data collection can be greatly accelerated by means of a frequency comb driver waveform and appropriate signal processing of the response.« less

  11. Real-time background suppression during frequency domain lifetime measurements.

    PubMed

    Herman, Petr; Maliwal, Badri P; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Maliwal, Baldri P

    2002-10-01

    We describe real time background suppression of autofluorescence from biological samples during frequency domain or phase modulation measurements of intensity decays. For these measurements the samples were excited with a train of light pulses with widths below 1 ps. The detector was gated off for a short time period of 10 to 40 ns during and shortly after the excitation pulse. The reference signal needed for the frequency domain measurement was provided by a long-lifetime reference fluorophore which continues to emit following the off-gating pulse. Both the sample and the reference were measured under identical optical and electronic conditions avoiding the need for correction of the photomultiplier tube signal for the gating sequence. We demonstrate frequency domain background suppression using a mixture of short- and long-lifetime probes and for a long-lifetime probe in human plasma with significant autofluorescence. PMID:12381357

  12. Vector optical fields broken in the spatial frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Li, Si-Min; Wang, Dan; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically and experimentally explore the redistribution of polarization states and orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the output plane, induced by the symmetry breaking in the spatial frequency domain. When the vector fields are obstructed by sector-shaped filters in the spatial frequency domain, the local polarization states in the output plane undergo an abrupt transition from linear to circular polarization. The results reveal the polarization-dependent splitting and the appearance of a series of opposite OAMs in the output plane. We also find the self-healing effect of the vector fields broken in the spatial frequency domain and further explore its potential application. If the vector optical fields are used for information transferring or for imaging, even if the optical field carrying the information or image is partially blocked, the complete information or image can still be obtained, implying that which may increase the robustness of the information transferring and the imaging.

  13. Theoretical analysis of long offset time-lapse frequency domain controlled source electromagnetic signals using the method of moments: Application to the monitoring of a land oil reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamper, C.; Rejiba, F.; Tabbagh, A.; Spitz, S.

    2011-03-01

    We present a sensitivity study applied to water front monitoring of an onshore oil reservoir, using a remote controlled source electromagnetic method (CSEM) with electric dipoles and a borehole-to-surface configuration. We have developed an optimized and parallelized code based on the method of moments, in order to study the influence of several static or time-varying background uncertainties on the time-lapse CSEM signal (also called 4-D CSEM). Analysis of the relative and absolute variations in phase or quadrature of the time-lapse signal induced by the fluid substitution process, inside the reservoir, has shown that the vertical electric dipole allows the shape of the water front to be monitored, while remaining less sensitive (compared to a horizontal electric source dipole) to the total volume of substituted fluid. We have examined the influence of missed anomalies (1-D/3-D), with more or less conductive properties, near to the ground surface or the reservoir, and with or without time-varying properties. In most cases, the 4-D signal behaves like a reliable filter, canceling almost all response anomalies. However, it can also lead to strong, local perturbations of the time-lapse signal. We have also shown that in the presence of steel cased boreholes at the source location, or with outlying steel cased boreholes, the recording of exploitable data does not present insurmountable difficulties at low frequencies (˜1 Hz), and for a dense array of surface receivers. These positive results with CSEM monitoring suggest that minimal, coarse-time 3-D explorations should be used to ensure reliable interpretation of the monitored data.

  14. Autonomous frequency domain identification: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.; Scheid, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis, design, and on-orbit tuning of robust controllers require more information about the plant than simply a nominal estimate of the plant transfer function. Information is also required concerning the uncertainty in the nominal estimate, or more generally, the identification of a model set within which the true plant is known to lie. The identification methodology that was developed and experimentally demonstrated makes use of a simple but useful characterization of the model uncertainty based on the output error. This is a characterization of the additive uncertainty in the plant model, which has found considerable use in many robust control analysis and synthesis techniques. The identification process is initiated by a stochastic input u which is applied to the plant p giving rise to the output. Spectral estimation (h = P sub uy/P sub uu) is used as an estimate of p and the model order is estimated using the produce moment matrix (PMM) method. A parametric model unit direction vector p is then determined by curve fitting the spectral estimate to a rational transfer function. The additive uncertainty delta sub m = p - unit direction vector p is then estimated by the cross spectral estimate delta = P sub ue/P sub uu where e = y - unit direction vectory y is the output error, and unit direction vector y = unit direction vector pu is the computed output of the parametric model subjected to the actual input u. The experimental results demonstrate the curve fitting algorithm produces the reduced-order plant model which minimizes the additive uncertainty. The nominal transfer function estimate unit direction vector p and the estimate delta of the additive uncertainty delta sub m are subsequently available to be used for optimization of robust controller performance and stability.

  15. Imaging scattering orientation with spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Konecky, Soren D.; Rice, Tyler; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques based on multiple light scattering generally have poor sensitivity to the orientation and direction of microscopic light scattering structures. In order to address this limitation, we introduce a spatial frequency domain method for imaging contrast from oriented scattering structures by measuring the angular-dependence of structured light reflectance. The measurement is made by projecting sinusoidal patterns of light intensity on a sample, and measuring the degree to which the patterns are blurred as a function of the projection angle. We derive a spatial Fourier domain solution to an anisotropic diffusion model. This solution predicts the effects of bulk scattering orientation on the amplitude and phase of the projected patterns. We introduce a new contrast function based on a scattering orientation index (SOI) which is sensitive to the degree to which light scattering is directionally dependent. We validate the technique using tissue simulating phantoms, and ex vivo samples of muscle and brain. Our results show that SOI is independent of the overall amount of bulk light scattering and absorption, and that isotropic versus oriented scattering structures can be clearly distinguished. We determine the orientation of subsurface microscopic scattering structures located up to 600 μm beneath highly scattering (μ′s = 1.5 mm−1) material. PMID:22191918

  16. Frequency Domain Tomography Of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Peng; Reed, Stephen; Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady; Downer, Mike

    2009-01-22

    Frequency Domain Holography (FDH), a technique for visualizing quasistatic objects propagating near the speed of light, has produced 'snapshots' of laser wakefields, but they are averaged over structural variations that occur during propagation through the plasma medium. Here we explore via simulations a generalization of FDH--that we call Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT)--that can potentially record a time sequence of quasistatic snapshots, like the frames of a movie, of the wake structure as it propagates through the plasma. FDT utilizes a several probe-reference pulse pairs that propagate obliquely to the drive pulse and wakefield, along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans.

  17. Non-stationary frequency domain system identification using time-frequency representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanlin; Kareem, Ahsan

    2016-05-01

    System properties of buildings and bridges may vary with time due to temperature changes, aging or extreme loadings. To identify these time-varying system properties, this study proposes a new output-only non-stationary system identification (SI) framework based on instantaneous or marginal spectra derived from the time-frequency representation, e.g., short time Fourier or wavelet transform. Spectra derived from these time-frequency representations are very popular in tracking time-varying frequencies; however, they have seldom been used to identify the time-varying damping ratio because a short window needed to capture the time-varying information amplifies the bandwidth significantly, which may lead to considerably overestimating the damping ratio. To overcome this shortcoming, this study modifies the theoretical frequency response function (FRF) to explicitly account for the windowing effect, and therefore enables SI directly using instantaneous or marginal spectra derived from the wavelet or short time Fourier transform. The response spectrum estimated using the short time window and the modified FRF are both influenced by the same time window, thus the instantaneous or time-localized marginal spectrum of response can be fitted to the modified FRF to identify frequency and damping ratio at each time instant. This spectral-based SI framework can reliably identify damping in time-varying systems under non-stationary excitations. The efficacy of the proposed framework is demonstrated by both numerical and full-scale examples, and also compared to the time-domain SI method, stochastic subspace identification (SSI), since the time-domain SI approaches and their extensions are popular in identifying time-varying systems utilizing recursive algorithms or moving windows.

  18. Frequency-Domain Identification of XV-15 Tilt-Rotor Aircraft Dynamics in Hovering Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.; Leung, Joseph G. M.; Dugan, Daniel C.

    1985-01-01

    Frequency-domain methods are used to identify the open-loop dynamics of the XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft from flight tests. Piloting and data analysis techniques are presented to determine frequency response plots and equivalent transfer function models. The open-loop pitch and roll dynamics for the hover flight condition exhibit unstable low-frequency oscillations, whereas the dynamics in the remaining degrees of freedom are lightly damped and generally decoupled. Comparisons of XV-15 flight-test and simulator data are more favorable for high-frequency inputs (omega greater than 1.0 rad/sec) than low-frequency inputs. Time-domain comparisons of the extracted transfer functions with step response flight data are very favorable, even for large amplitude motions. The results presented in this paper demonstrate the utility of the frequency-domain techniques for dynamics identification and simulator fidelity studies.

  19. Adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filter for noise removal in wrapped phase patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guixiong; Chen, Dongxue; Peng, Yanhua; Zeng, Qilin

    2016-08-01

    In order to avoid the detrimental effects of excessive noise in the phase fringe patterns of a laser digital interferometer over the accuracy of phase unwrapping and the successful detection of mechanical fatigue defects, an effective method of adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filtering is introduced based on the characteristics of the energy spectrum of localized wrapped phase patterns. Not only can this method automatically set the cutoff frequency, but it can also effectively filter out noise while preserving the image edge information. Compared with the sine and cosine transform filtering and the multidirectional frequency domain filtering, the experimental results demonstrate that the image filtered by our method has the fewest number of residues and is the closest to the noise-free image, compared to the two aforementioned methods, demonstrating the effectiveness of this adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filter. PMID:27505376

  20. Fluorescence lifetime standards for time and frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Boens, Noël; Qin, Wenwu; Basarić, Nikola; Hofkens, Johan; Ameloot, Marcel; Pouget, Jacques; Lefèvre, Jean-Pierre; Valeur, Bernard; Gratton, Enrico; vandeVen, Martin; Silva, Norberto D; Engelborghs, Yves; Willaert, Katrien; Sillen, Alain; Rumbles, Garry; Phillips, David; Visser, Antonie J W G; van Hoek, Arie; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Malak, Henryk; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Szabo, Arthur G; Krajcarski, Don T; Tamai, Naoto; Miura, Atsushi

    2007-03-01

    A series of fluorophores with single-exponential fluorescence decays in liquid solution at 20 degrees C were measured independently by nine laboratories using single-photon timing and multifrequency phase and modulation fluorometry instruments with lasers as excitation source. The dyes that can serve as fluorescence lifetime standards for time-domain and frequency-domain measurements are all commercially available, are photostable under the conditions of the measurements, and are soluble in solvents of spectroscopic quality (methanol, cyclohexane, water). These lifetime standards are anthracene, 9-cyanoanthracene, 9,10-diphenylanthracene, N-methylcarbazole, coumarin 153, erythrosin B, N-acetyl-l-tryptophanamide, 1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl)benzene, 2,5-diphenyloxazole, rhodamine B, rubrene, N-(3-sulfopropyl)acridinium, and 1,4-diphenylbenzene. At 20 degrees C, the fluorescence lifetimes vary from 89 ps to 31.2 ns, depending on fluorescent dye and solvent, which is a useful range for modern pico- and nanosecond time-domain or mega- to gigahertz frequency-domain instrumentation. The decay times are independent of the excitation and emission wavelengths. Dependent on the structure of the dye and the solvent, the excitation wavelengths used range from 284 to 575 nm, the emission from 330 to 630 nm. These lifetime standards may be used to either calibrate or test the resolution of time- and frequency-domain instrumentation or as reference compounds to eliminate the color effect in photomultiplier tubes. Statistical analyses by means of two-sample charts indicate that there is no laboratory bias in the lifetime determinations. Moreover, statistical tests show that there is an excellent correlation between the lifetimes estimated by the time-domain and frequency-domain fluorometries. Comprehensive tables compiling the results for 20 (fluorescence lifetime standard/solvent) combinations are given. PMID:17269654

  1. Underground imaging by frequency-domain electromagnetic migration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, M.S.; Traynin, P.; Booker, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    A new method of the resistivity imaging based on frequency-domain electromagnetic migration is developed. Electromagnetic (EM) migration involves downward diffusion of observed EM fields whose time flow has been reversed. Unlike downward analytical continuation, migration is a stable procedure that accurately restores the phase of the upgoing field inside the Earth. This method is indented for the processing and interpretation of EM data collected for both TE and TM modes of plane-wave excitation. Until recently, the method could be applied only for determining the position of anomalous structures and for finding interfaces between layers of different conductivity. There were no well developed approaches to the resistivity imaging, which is the key problem in the inversion of EM data. The authors provide a novel approach to determining not only the position of anomalous structures but their resistivity as well. The main difficulty in the practical realization of this approach is determining the background resistivity distribution for migration. They discuss the method of the solution of this problem based on differential transformation of apparent resistivity curves. The final goal of migration is to provide a first order interpretation using a computational effort equivalent to a forward modeling calculation.

  2. Bubble Pulse Cancelation in the Time-Frequency Domain Using Warping Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hai-Qiang; Zhang, Ren-He; Li, Zheng-Lin; Guo, Yong-Gang; He, Li

    2013-08-01

    The received shock waves produced by explosive charges are often polluted by bubble pulses in underwater acoustic experiments. A method based on warping operators is proposed to cancel the bubble pulses in the time-frequency domain. This is applied to the explosive data collected during the Yellow Sea experiment in November 2000. The original received signal is first transformed into a warped signal by warping operators. Then, the warped signal is analyzed in the time-frequency domain. Due to the different features between the shock waves and the bubble pulses in the time-frequency domain for the warped signal, the bubble pulses can be easily filtered out. Furthermore, the shock waves in the original time domain can be retrieved by the inverse warping transformation. The autocorrelation functions and the time-frequency representation show that the bubble pulses can be canceled effectively.

  3. A Windowing Frequency Domain Adaptive Filter for Acoustic Echo Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheng; Qiu, Xiaojun

    This letter proposes a windowing frequency domain adaptive algorithm, which reuses the filtering error to apply window function in the filter updating symmetrically. By using a proper window function to reduce the negative influence of the spectral leakage, the proposed algorithm can significantly improve the performance of the acoustic echo cancellation for speech signals.

  4. Time domain measurement of frequency stability: A tutorial introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanier, J.; Tetu, M.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical basis behind the definition of frequency stability in the time domain is outlined. Various types of variances were examined. Their differences and interrelation are pointed out. Systems that are generally used in the measurement of these variances are described.

  5. SPA- STATISTICAL PACKAGE FOR TIME AND FREQUENCY DOMAIN ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlow, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The need for statistical analysis often arises when data is in the form of a time series. This type of data is usually a collection of numerical observations made at specified time intervals. Two kinds of analysis may be performed on the data. First, the time series may be treated as a set of independent observations using a time domain analysis to derive the usual statistical properties including the mean, variance, and distribution form. Secondly, the order and time intervals of the observations may be used in a frequency domain analysis to examine the time series for periodicities. In almost all practical applications, the collected data is actually a mixture of the desired signal and a noise signal which is collected over a finite time period with a finite precision. Therefore, any statistical calculations and analyses are actually estimates. The Spectrum Analysis (SPA) program was developed to perform a wide range of statistical estimation functions. SPA can provide the data analyst with a rigorous tool for performing time and frequency domain studies. In a time domain statistical analysis the SPA program will compute the mean variance, standard deviation, mean square, and root mean square. It also lists the data maximum, data minimum, and the number of observations included in the sample. In addition, a histogram of the time domain data is generated, a normal curve is fit to the histogram, and a goodness-of-fit test is performed. These time domain calculations may be performed on both raw and filtered data. For a frequency domain statistical analysis the SPA program computes the power spectrum, cross spectrum, coherence, phase angle, amplitude ratio, and transfer function. The estimates of the frequency domain parameters may be smoothed with the use of Hann-Tukey, Hamming, Barlett, or moving average windows. Various digital filters are available to isolate data frequency components. Frequency components with periods longer than the data collection interval

  6. In vivo spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nguyen, John Quan M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and local oxygen saturation can inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities can be estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis and epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. Therefore, a method is desired that decouples the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. A previously developed inverse method based on a neural network forward model was applied to simulated spatial frequency domain reflectance of skin for multiple wavelengths in the near infrared. It is demonstrated that the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis can be determined independently and with minimal coupling. Then, the same inverse method was applied to reflectance measurements from a tissue simulating phantom and in vivo human skin. Oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentrations were estimated from the volar forearms of weakly and strongly pigmented subjects using a standard homogeneous model and the present two layer model.

  7. Time-domain control of ultrahigh-frequency nanomechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Giesen, F; Belov, M; Losby, J; Moroz, J; Fraser, A E; McKinnon, G; Clement, T J; Sauer, V; Hiebert, W K; Freeman, M R

    2008-12-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems could have applications in fields as diverse as ultrasensitive mass detection and mechanical computation, and can also be used to explore fundamental phenomena such as quantized heat conductance and quantum-limited displacement. Most nanomechanical studies to date have been performed in the frequency domain. However, applications in computation and information storage will require transient excitation and high-speed time-domain operation of nanomechanical systems. Here we show a time-resolved optical approach to the transduction of ultrahigh-frequency nanoelectromechanical systems, and demonstrate that coherent control of nanomechanical oscillation is possible through appropriate pulse programming. A series of cantilevers with resonant frequencies ranging from less than 10 MHz to over 1 GHz are characterized using the same pulse parameters. PMID:19057589

  8. Frequency-Domain Interferometry of Electron Bunch Driven Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, M. C.; Yi, Austin; Shvets, Gennady; Fang, Yun; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Babzien, Marcus; Fedurin, Mikhail; Kusche, Karl

    2012-10-01

    Beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA), such as the ``plasma afterburner'' can potentially greatly increase the particle energies of conventional accelerators . Various schemes using single and multiple bunches of electrons, positrons and protons have been investigated. Appropriately delayed witness bunches have been the usual method to probe the fields of such wakes, and indirectly, the corresponding plasma wake structures. However, the wake structure has not been observed directly in the PWFA. We will report our progress in the development of direct, optical interferometric methods of measuring the plasma density modulation in electron beam driven wakefields. Frequency Domain Holography (FDH), employing two chirped laser pulses (probe and reference) co-propagating with the particle drive-beam and its plasma wake, permits single shot observation of an extended section of the wakefield behind a drive bunch. The chirped, temporally stretched, probe samples several periods of the wake, while the undisturbed reference pulse propagates ahead of the electron drive bunch. The technique is being developed in the Accelerator Test Facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory as a probe for two and multibunch driven plasmawakefield experiments

  9. Optical Frequency Domain Visualization of Electron Beam Driven Plasma Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, Michael C.; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl; Fedurin, Michhail; Babzien, Marcus

    2010-11-01

    Bunch driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA), such as the "plasma afterburner," are a promising emerging method for significantly increasing the energy output of conventional particle accelerators [1]. The study and optimization of this method would benefit from an experimental correlation of the drive bunch parameters and the accelerated particle parameters with the corresponding plasma wave structure. However, the plasma wave structure has not been observed directly so far. We will report ongoing development of a noninvasive optical Frequency Domain Interferometric (FDI) [2] and Holographic (FDH) [3] diagnostics of bunch driven plasma wakes. Both FDI and FDH have been previously demonstrated in the case of laser driven wakes. These techniques employ two laser pulses co-propagating with the drive particle bunch and the trailing plasma wave. One pulse propagates ahead of the drive bunch and serves as a reference, while the second is overlapped with the plasma wave and probes its structure. The multi-shot FDI and single-shot FDH diagnostics permit direct noninvasive observation of longitudinal and transverse structure of the plasma wakes. The experiment is being developed at the 70 MeV Linac in the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to visualize wakes generated by two [4] and multi-bunch [5] drive beams.

  10. Optical Frequency Domain Visualization of Electron Beam Driven Plasma Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, Michael C.; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl; Fedurin, Michhail; Babzien, Marcus

    2010-11-04

    Bunch driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA), such as the 'plasma afterburner', are a promising emerging method for significantly increasing the energy output of conventional particle accelerators. The study and optimization of this method would benefit from an experimental correlation of the drive bunch parameters and the accelerated particle parameters with the corresponding plasma wave structure. However, the plasma wave structure has not been observed directly so far. We will report ongoing development of a noninvasive optical Frequency Domain Interferometric (FDI) and Holographic (FDH) diagnostics of bunch driven plasma wakes. Both FDI and FDH have been previously demonstrated in the case of laser driven wakes. These techniques employ two laser pulses co-propagating with the drive particle bunch and the trailing plasma wave. One pulse propagates ahead of the drive bunch and serves as a reference, while the second is overlapped with the plasma wave and probes its structure. The multi-shot FDI and single-shot FDH diagnostics permit direct noninvasive observation of longitudinal and transverse structure of the plasma wakes. The experiment is being developed at the 70 MeV Linac in the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to visualize wakes generated by two and multi-bunch drive beams.

  11. Interconnect modeling using integrated time-domain and frequency-domain techniques

    SciTech Connect

    You, Hong; Yeh, Chune-Sin; Gadepally, B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an integrated time- and-frequency-domain technique for characterization and modeling of parasitic effects associated with interconnects. This technique enables direct measurements of critical transient as well as frequency responses of interconnects; accurate and efficient SPICE model extraction for coupled lines; and cross-domain verification of the measured data as well as the extracted models. To illustrate its application this technique is applied to characterize and extract the equivalent circuit model of the I/O bus on a real-world printed circuit board.

  12. Domain adaptive boosting method and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jie; Miao, Zhenjiang

    2015-03-01

    Differences of data distributions widely exist among datasets, i.e., domains. For many pattern recognition, nature language processing, and content-based analysis systems, a decrease in performance caused by the domain differences between the training and testing datasets is still a notable problem. We propose a domain adaptation method called domain adaptive boosting (DAB). It is based on the AdaBoost approach with extensions to cover the domain differences between the source and target domains. Two main stages are contained in this approach: source-domain clustering and source-domain sample selection. By iteratively adding the selected training samples from the source domain, the discrimination model is able to achieve better domain adaptation performance based on a small validation set. The DAB algorithm is suitable for the domains with large scale samples and easy to extend for multisource adaptation. We implement this method on three computer vision systems: the skin detection model in single images, the video concept detection model, and the object classification model. In the experiments, we compare the performances of several commonly used methods and the proposed DAB. Under most situations, the DAB is superior.

  13. Removing the depth-degeneracy in optical frequency domain imaging with frequency shifting

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel technique using an acousto-optic frequency shifter in optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is presented. The frequency shift eliminates the ambiguity between positive and negative differential delays, effectively doubling the interferometric ranging depth while avoiding image cross-talk. A signal processing algorithm is demonstrated to accommodate nonlinearity in the tuning slope of the wavelength-swept OFDI laser source. PMID:19484034

  14. Multiple Input Design for Real-Time Parameter Estimation in the Frequency Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    A method for designing multiple inputs for real-time dynamic system identification in the frequency domain was developed and demonstrated. The designed inputs are mutually orthogonal in both the time and frequency domains, with reduced peak factors to provide good information content for relatively small amplitude excursions. The inputs are designed for selected frequency ranges, and therefore do not require a priori models. The experiment design approach was applied to identify linear dynamic models for the F-15 ACTIVE aircraft, which has multiple control effectors.

  15. Frequency-Domain Streak Camera and Tomography for Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving and Channeled Plasma Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Reed, Stephen; Dong, Peng; Downer, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate a prototype Frequency Domain Streak Camera (FDSC) that can capture the picosecond time evolution of the plasma accelerator structure in a single shot. In our prototype Frequency-Domain Streak Camera, a probe pulse propagates obliquely to a sub-picosecond pump pulse that creates an evolving nonlinear index "bubble" in fused silica glass, supplementing a conventional Frequency Domain Holographic (FDH) probe-reference pair that co-propagates with the "bubble". Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT) generalizes Frequency-Domain Streak Camera by probing the "bubble" from multiple angles and reconstructing its morphology and evolution using algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans. Multiplexing methods (Temporal Multiplexing and Angular Multiplexing) improve data storage and processing capability, demonstrating a compact Frequency Domain Tomography system with a single spectrometer.

  16. Polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging system for endobronchial imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; de Lange, Joop; Daniels, Johannes M A; Grünberg, Katrien; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-01

    A polarization sensitive endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) system with a motorized distal scanning catheter is demonstrated. It employs a passive polarization delay unit to multiplex two orthogonal probing polarization states in depth, and a polarization diverse detection unit to detect interference signal in two orthogonal polarization channels. Per depth location four electro-magnetic field components are measured that can be represented in a complex 2x2 field matrix. A Jones matrix of the sample is derived and the sample birefringence is extracted by eigenvalue decomposition. The condition of balanced detection and the polarization mode dispersion are quantified. A complex field averaging method based on the alignment of randomly pointing field phasors is developed to reduce speckle noise. The variation of the polarization states incident on the tissue due to the circular scanning and catheter sheath birefringence is investigated. With this system we demonstrated imaging of ex vivo chicken muscle, in vivo pig lung and ex vivo human lung specimens. PMID:25836196

  17. Frequency-wavenumber domain analysis of guided wavefields.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Thomas E; Michaels, Jennifer E; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    Full wavefield measurements obtained with either an air-coupled transducer mounted on a scanning stage or a scanning laser vibrometer can be combined with effective signal and imaging processing algorithms to support characterization of guided waves as well as detection, localization and quantification of structural damage. These wavefield images contain a wealth of information that clearly shows details of guided waves as they propagate outward from the source, reflect from specimen boundaries, and scatter from discontinuities within the structure. The analysis of weaker scattered waves is facilitated by the removal of source waves and the separation of wave modes, which is effectively achieved via frequency-wavenumber domain filtering in conjunction with the subsequent analysis of the resulting residual signals. Incident wave removal highlights the presence and the location of weak scatterers, while the separation of individual guided wave modes allows the characterization of their separate contribution to the scattered field and the evaluation of mode conversion phenomena. The effectiveness of these methods is demonstrated through their application to detection of a delamination in a composite plate and detection of a crack emanating from a hole. PMID:21190706

  18. High-speed frequency-domain terahertz coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yahng, Ji Sang; Park, Choon-Su; Lee, Hwi Don; Kim, Chang-Seok; Yee, Dae-Su

    2016-01-25

    High-speed frequency-domain terahertz (THz) coherence tomography is demonstrated using frequency sweeping of continuous-wave THz radiation and beam steering. For axial scanning, THz frequency sweeping with a kHz sweep rate and a THz sweep range is executed using THz photomixing with an optical beat source consisting of a wavelength-swept laser and a distributed feedback laser diode. During the frequency sweep, frequency-domain THz interferograms are measured using coherent homodyne detection employing signal averaging for noise reduction and used as axial-scan data via fast Fourier transform. Axial-scan data are acquired while scanning a transverse range of 100 × 100 mm(2) by use of a THz beam scanner with moving neither sample nor THz transmitter/receiver unit. It takes 100 s to acquire axial-scan data for 100 × 100 points with 5 averaged traces at a sweep rate of 1 kHz. THz tomographic images of a glass fiber reinforced polymer sample with artificial internal defects are presented, acquired using the tomography system. PMID:26832489

  19. Single SQUID frequency-domain multiplexer for large bolometer arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M.J.; Skidmore, J.T.; Richards, P.L.; Spieler, H.G.

    2001-08-20

    We describe the development of a frequency-domain superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer which monitors a row of low-temperature sensors simultaneously with a single SQUID. Each sensor is ac biased with a unique frequency and all the sensor currents are added in a superconducting summing loop. A single SQUID measures the current in the summing loop, and the individual signals are lock-in detected after the room temperature SQUID electronics. The current in the summing loop is nulled by feedback to eliminate direct crosstalk. We have built an eight-channel prototype and demonstrated channel separation and signal recovery.

  20. Joint time-frequency domain identification of nonlinearly controlled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Gang; Sain, Michael K.; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.; Pham, Khanh D.

    2006-05-01

    This paper introduces a 3-step approach for the identification of a linear structure that is controlled by nonlinear damping devices. First, the structure with the integrated nonlinear damper is subjected to random vibration test and the frequency response function (FRF) of the structure is calculated from the input-output data of the physical system. Based on the frequency domain data, a state space model is then estimated using a recently developed FRF curve-fitting technique that is designed especially for lightly damped structures with control inputs. Finally an iterative process is used to optimize the model performance in the time domain and an integrated model of the nonlinearly controlled structure is derived by interconnecting the structure model with that of the nonlinear damper. The complete approach is illustrated by the modeling of a base-isolated structure controlled by a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper.

  1. Multifunction tests of a frequency domain based flutter suppression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Adams, William M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the process of analysis, design, digital implementation and subsonic testing of an active controls flutter suppression system for a full span, free-to-roll wind-tunnel model of an advanced fighter concept. The design technique employed a frequency domain representation of the plant and used optimization techniques to generate a robust multi-input/multi-output controller. During testing in a fixed-in-roll configuration, simultaneous suppression of both symmetric and antisymmetric flutter was successfully demonstrated. For a free-to-roll configuration, symmetric flutter was suppressed to the limit of the tunnel test envelope. During aggressive rolling maneuvers above the open-loop flutter boundary, simultaneous flutter suppression and maneuver load control were demonstrated. Finally, the flutter suppression controller was reoptimized overnight during the test using combined experimental and analytical frequency domain data, resulting in improved stability robustness.

  2. Multifunction tests of a frequency domain based flutter suppression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Adams, William M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The process is described of analysis, design, digital implementation, and subsonic testing of an active control flutter suppression system for a full span, free-to-roll wind tunnel model of an advanced fighter concept. The design technique uses a frequency domain representation of the plant and used optimization techniques to generate a robust multi input/multi output controller. During testing in a fixed-in-roll configuration, simultaneous suppression of both symmetric and antisymmetric flutter was successfully shown. For a free-to-roll configuration, symmetric flutter was suppressed to the limit of the tunnel test envelope. During aggressive rolling maneuvers above the open-loop flutter boundary, simultaneous flutter suppression and maneuver load control were demonstrated. Finally, the flutter damping controller was reoptimized overnight during the test using combined experimental and analytical frequency domain data, resulting in improved stability robustness.

  3. Spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2011-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and oxygen saturation using biomedical optics techniques has the potential to inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities are typically estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in superficial tissue such as the skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis. Furthermore, epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. This study describes a technique for decoupling the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. An artificial neural network was used to map input optical properties to spatial frequency domain diffuse reflectance of two layer media. Then, iterative fitting was used to determine the optical properties from simulated spatial frequency domain diffuse reflectance. Additionally, an artificial neural network was trained to directly map spatial frequency domain reflectance to sets of optical properties of a two layer medium, thus bypassing the need for iteration. In both cases, the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis were determined independently. The accuracy and efficiency of the iterative fitting approach was compared with the direct neural network inversion.

  4. Recovering Complex Conductivity from Frequency and Time Domain Geophysical Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KANG, S.; Marchant, D.; Oldenburg, D.

    2013-12-01

    The electrical conductivity of earth materials can be frequency dependent. The bulk conductivity decreases with decreasing frequency because of the build-up of electric charges that occur under the application of an electric field. Effectively, the rock is electrically polarized. Finding the polarization response (often referred to as IP, Induced Polarization) can lead to economic benefits, as in the case of discovering sulphide minerals, but there is applicability in environmental problems, groundwater flow, and site characterization. We have the ability to model Maxwell's equations in 3D for complex conductivity in either the time or frequency domain. The challenge therefore is to invert the EM (electromagnetic) data to recover a four-dimensional conductivity (σ (ω, x, y, z)) using limited EM data generally acquired on, or above, the surface of the earth. At late times (or low frequencies) the static Maxwell's equation are valid and, if a background conductivity is known, then chargeability can be extracted. Unfortunately the static assumption is often violated and EM induction processes contaminate the sought signal. For example, signals in the time domain have three parts: a static on-time, an early-time inductive portion, and a late-time IP signal. Information about conductivity using the appropriate Maxwell's equations is available from each of these segments. The potential contamination of the IP from EM induction (often referred to as EM coupling) and the potential contamination of the EM signal from the IP data (IP coupling) can cause deleterious effects and must be addressed. The goal of this talk is to address such issues and outline a practical procedure for extracting IP information from existing time and frequency domain surveys.

  5. Frequency-Domain Identification With Composite Curve Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Improved method of parameter identification based on decomposing single wide-band model into two or more component systems in parallel. Each component model predominates in specific frequency range. Wide-band mathematical model of system identified as two narrow-band models: one containing most of information on high-frequency components of dynamics, and one containing most of information on low-frequency components. Applicable to diverse systems, including vibrating structures, electronic circuits, and control systems.

  6. Frequency domain stress intensity calibration of damped cracked panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses two schemes for doing finite element K calibration in the frequency domain. The baseline scheme uses the definition of K as a limit toward the crack tip. The limiting process requires using a very fine mesh around the crack tip making the scheme computationally very expensive. It is shown that the behavior of K as a function of frequency is very similar to a modal response. Taking advantage of this, a more efficient scheme involves a modal analysis of the cracked sheet and scaling the response to that of the static stress intensity. In this way, only a static K calibration need be performed. All the examples shown are for a frequency range spanning multiple resonances and with two levels of damping.

  7. Electromagnetic coupling in frequency domain induced polarisation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Partha Sarathi

    2000-11-01

    Frequency domain induced polarization (IP) surveys are commonly carried out to provide information about the chargeability structure of the earth. The goals might be as diverse as trying to delineate a mineralized and/or alteration zone for mineral exploration, or to find a region of contaminants for an environmental problem. Unfortunately, the measured responses can have contributions from inductive and galvanic effects of the ground. The inductive components are called EM coupling effects. They are considered to be ``noise'' and much of this thesis is devoted towards either removing these effects, or reformulating the inverse problem so that inductive effects are part of the ``signal''. If the forward modeling is based on galvanic responses only, then the inductive responses must first be removed from the data. The motivation for attacking the problem in this manner is that it is easier to solve D.C. resistivity equation than the full Maxwell's equation. The separation of the inductive response from the total response is derived by expressing the total electric field as a product of an IP response function, and an electric field which depends on EM coupling response. This enables me to generate formulae to obtain IP amplitude (PFE) and phase response from the raw data. The data can then be inverted, using a galvanic forward modeling. I illustrate this with 1D and 3D synthetic examples. To handle field data sets, I have developed an approximate method for estimating the EM coupling effects based upon the assumption that the earth is locally 1D. The 1D conductivity is obtained from a 2D inversion of the low frequency DC resistivity data. Application of this method to a field data set has shown encouraging results. I also examine the EM coupling problem in terms of complex conductivity. I show that if the forward modeling is carried out with full Maxwell's equation, then there is no need to remove EM coupling. I illustrate this with 1D synthetic example. In summary

  8. Multi-frequency periodic vibration suppressing in active magnetic bearing-rotor systems via response matching in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kejian; Zhu, Changsheng

    2011-05-01

    A method for multi-frequency periodic vibration suppressing in active magnetic bearing (AMB)-rotor systems is proposed, which is based on an adaptive finite-duration impulse response (FIR) filter in time domain. Firstly, the theoretic feasibility of the method is proved. However, two problems would be unavoidable, if the conventional adaptive FIR filter is adopted in practical application. One is that the convergence rate of the different frequency components may be highly disparate in multi-frequency vibration control. The other is that the computational complexity is significantly increased because the long memory FIR filter is required to match the transient response time of the AMB-rotor system. To overcome the problems above, the Fast Block Least Mean Square (FBLMS) algorithm is adopted to efficiently implement the computation in frequency domain at a computational cost far less than that of the conventional FIR filter. By the FBLMS algorithm, regardless of the number of the considered frequency components in vibration disturbance, the computational complexity would be invariable. Moreover, filter's weights in the FBLMS algorithm have the intuitional relation with signal's frequency. As a result, the convergence rate of each frequency component can be adjusted by assigning the individual step size parameter for each weight. Experiments with the reciprocating simulating disturbance test and the rotating harmonic vibration test were carried out on an AMB-rigid rotor test rig with a vertical shaft. The experiment results indicate that the proposed method with the FBLMS algorithm can achieve the good effectiveness for suppressing the multi-frequency vibration. The convergence property of each frequency component can be adjusted conveniently. Each harmonic component of the vibration can be addressed, respectively, by reconfiguring the frequency components of the reference input signal.

  9. Frequency Domain Magnetic Measurements from Kilohertz to Gigahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, John F.

    "......we applied much prolonged labor on investigating the magnetical forces; so wonderful indeed are they, compared with the forces in all other minerals, surpassing even the virtues of all bodies around us. Nor have we found this labor idle or unfruitful; since daily in our experimenting new unexpected properties came to light."William Gilbert, De Magnete, 1600Abstract. This review deals with practical aspects of making frequency-domain measurements of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic losses from 200 kHz up to 10 GHz. It sets out the types of measurement concerned, distinguishing resonant from nonresonant phenomena. The techniques available are categorized according to suitability for the different frequency regimes and types of investigation. Practical recipes are provided for undertaking such experiments across the entire frequency range. Marginal oscillator spectrometry is discussed which is applicable across the whole frequency range. Different instruments are presented, and particular emphasis is placed on designs which function on the Robinson principle. Analysis of oscillation condition and signal-to-noise performance is dealt with, also sample considerations such as filling factor. Practical circuits are presented and their merits and demerits evaluated. Layout and radio-frequency design considerations are dealt with. Ultrahigh/microwave frequency marginal oscillator spectrometry is given special treatment and several practical designs are given. The essentials of good microwave design are emphasized. A general discussion of resonant structures is included which treats multiple layer coil design, slow wave line structures, stripline and cavities. Unusual cavity designs such as the rhumbatron are treated. Use of striplines with microwave marginal spectrometry is described and compared with conventional network-analysis techniques. The use of parameter matrices for high-frequency analysis is alluded to. Some details of good construction practice are

  10. Analysis of wave packet motion in frequency and time domain: oxazine 1.

    PubMed

    Braun, Markus; Sobotta, Constanze; Dürr, Regina; Pulvermacher, Horst; Malkmus, Stephan

    2006-08-17

    Wave packet motion in the laser dye oxazine 1 in methanol is investigated by spectrally resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The spectral range of 600-690 nm was accessible by amplified broadband probe pulses covering the overlap region of ground-state bleach and stimulated emission signal. The influence of vibrational wave packets on the optical signal is analyzed in the frequency domain and the time domain. For the analysis in the frequency domain an algorithm is presented that accounts for interference effects of neighbored vibrational modes. By this method amplitude, phase and decay time of vibrational modes are retrieved as a function of probe wavelength and distortions due to neighbored modes are reduced. The analysis of the data in the time domain yields complementary information on the intensity, central wavelength, and spectral width of the optical bleach spectrum due to wave packet motion. PMID:16898679

  11. A Frequency-Domain Substructure System Identification Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blades, Eric L.; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A new frequency-domain system identification algorithm is presented for system identification of substructures, such as payloads to be flown aboard the Space Shuttle. In the vibration test, all interface degrees of freedom where the substructure is connected to the carrier structure are either subjected to active excitation or are supported by a test stand with the reaction forces measured. The measured frequency-response data is used to obtain a linear, viscous-damped model with all interface-degree of freedom entries included. This model can then be used to validate analytical substructure models. This procedure makes it possible to obtain not only the fixed-interface modal data associated with a Craig-Bampton substructure model, but also the data associated with constraint modes. With this proposed algorithm, multiple-boundary-condition tests are not required, and test-stand dynamics is accounted for without requiring a separate modal test or finite element modeling of the test stand. Numerical simulations are used in examining the algorithm's ability to estimate valid reduced-order structural models. The algorithm's performance when frequency-response data covering narrow and broad frequency bandwidths is used as input is explored. Its performance when noise is added to the frequency-response data and the use of different least squares solution techniques are also examined. The identified reduced-order models are also compared for accuracy with other test-analysis models and a formulation for a Craig-Bampton test-analysis model is also presented.

  12. Frequency Domain Modelling of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Felix; Lünenschloss, Peter; Mai, Juliane; Wagner, Norman; Töpfer, Hannes; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The amount of water in porous media such as soils and rocks is a key parameter when water resources are under investigation. Especially the quantitative spatial distribution and temporal evolution of water contents in soil formations are needed. In high frequency electromagnetic applications soil water content is quantitatively derived from the propagation behavior of electromagnetic waves along waveguides embedded in soil formations. The spatial distribution of the dielectric material properties along the waveguide can be estimated by numerical solving of the inverse problem based on the full wave forward model in time or frequency domain. However, current approaches mostly neglect or approximate the frequency dependence of the electromagnetic material properties of transfer function of the waveguide. As a first prove of concept a full two port broadband frequency domain forward model for propagation of transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waves in coaxial waveguide has been implemented. It is based on the propagation matrix approach for layered transmission line sections. Depending on the complexity of the material different models for the frequency dependent complex permittivity were applied. For the validation of the model a broadband frequency domain measurement with network analyzer technique was used. The measurement is based on a 20 cm long 50 Ohm 20/46 coaxial transmission line cell considering inhomogeneous material distributions. This approach allows (i) an increase of the waveguide calibration accuracy in comparison to conventional TDR based technique and (ii) the consideration of the broadband permittivity spectrum of the porous material. In order to systematic analyze the model, theoretical results were compared with measurements as well as 3D broadband finite element modeling of homogeneous and layered media in the coaxial transmission line cell. Defined standards (Teflon, dry glass beads, de-ionized water) were placed inside the line as the dielectric

  13. Frequency Domain Modelling of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Felix; Wagner, Norman; Lünenschloß, Peter; Toepfer, Hannes; Dietrich, Peter; Kaliorias, Andreas; Bumberger, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The amount of water in porous media such as soils and rocks is a key parameter when water resources are under investigation. Especially the quantitative spatial distribution and temporal evolution of water contents in soil formations are needed. In high frequency electromagnetic applications soil water content is quantitatively derived from the propagation behavior of electromagnetic waves along waveguides embedded in soil formations. The spatial distribution of the dielectric material properties along the waveguide can be estimated by numerical solving of the inverse problem based on the full wave forward model in time or frequency domain. However, current approaches mostly neglect or approximate the frequency dependence of the electromagnetic material properties of transfer function of the waveguide. As a first prove of concept a full two port broadband frequency domain forward model for propagation of transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waves in coaxial waveguide has been implemented. It is based on the propagation matrix approach for layered transmission line sections Depending on the complexity of the material different models for the frequency dependent complex permittivity were applied. For the validation of the model a broadband frequency domain measurement with network analyzer technique was used. The measurement is based on a 20 cm long 50 Ohm 20/46 coaxial transmission line cell considering inhomogeneous material distributions. This approach allows (i) an increase of the waveguide calibration accuracy in comparison to conventional TDR based technique and (ii) the consideration of the broadband permittivity spectrum of the porous material. In order to systematic analyze the model, theoretical results were compared with measurements as well as 3D broadband finite element modeling of homogeneous and layered media in the coaxial transmission line cell. Defined standards (Teflon, dry glass beads, de-ionized water) were placed inside the line as the dielectric

  14. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  15. Four-channel magnetic resonance imaging receiver using frequency domain multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wang; Qin, Xu; Jiejing, Ren; Gengying, Li

    2007-01-01

    An alternative technique that uses frequency domain multiplexing to acquire phased array magnetic resonance images is discussed in detail. The proposed method has advantages over traditional independent receiver chains in that it utilizes an analog-to-digital converter and a single-chip multicarrier receiver with high performance to reduce the size and cost of the phased array receiver system. A practical four-channel digital receiver using frequency domain multiplexing was implemented and verified on a home-built 0.3T magnetic resonance imaging system. The experimental results confirmed that the cross talk between each channel was below -60dB, the phase fluctuations were about 1°, and there was no obvious signal-to-noise ratio degradation. It is demonstrated that the frequency domain multiplexing is a valuable and economical technique, particularly for array coil systems where the multichannel receiver is indispensable and dynamic range is not a critical problem.

  16. Identification and verification of frequency-domain models for XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. B.; Leung, J. G. M.; Dugan, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    Frequency-domain methods are used to extract the open-loop dynamics of the XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft from flight test data for the cruise condition (V = 170 knots). The frequency responses are numerically fitted with transfer-function forms to identify equivalent model characteristics. The associated handling quality parameters meet or exceed Level 2, Category A, requirements for fixed-wing military aircraft. Step response matching is used to verify the time-domain fidelity of the transfer-function models for the cruise and hover flight conditions. The transient responses of the model and aircraft are in close agreement in all cases, except for the normal acceleration response to elevator deflection in cruise. This discrepancy is probably due to the unmodeled rotor rpm dynamics. The utility of the frequency-domain approach for dynamics identification and analysis is clearly demonstrated.

  17. Demultiplexing based on frequency-domain joint decision MMA for MDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caili, Gong; Li, Li; Guijun, Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a demultiplexing method based on frequency-domain joint decision multi-modulus algorithm (FD-JDMMA) for mode division multiplexing (MDM) system. The performance of FD-JDMMA is compared with frequency-domain multi-modulus algorithm (FD-MMA) and frequency-domain least mean square (FD-LMS) algorithm. The simulation results show that FD-JDMMA outperforms FD-MMA in terms of BER and convergence speed in the cases of mQAM (m=4, 16 and 64) formats. And it is also demonstrated that FD-JDMMA achieves better BER performance and converges faster than FD-LMS in the cases of 16QAM and 64QAM. Furthermore, FD-JDMMA maintains similar computational complexity as the both equalization algorithms.

  18. Robust spike classification based on frequency domain neural waveform features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenhui; Yuan, Yuan; Si, Jennie

    2013-12-01

    Objective. We introduce a new spike classification algorithm based on frequency domain features of the spike snippets. The goal for the algorithm is to provide high classification accuracy, low false misclassification, ease of implementation, robustness to signal degradation, and objectivity in classification outcomes. Approach. In this paper, we propose a spike classification algorithm based on frequency domain features (CFDF). It makes use of frequency domain contents of the recorded neural waveforms for spike classification. The self-organizing map (SOM) is used as a tool to determine the cluster number intuitively and directly by viewing the SOM output map. After that, spike classification can be easily performed using clustering algorithms such as the k-Means. Main results. In conjunction with our previously developed multiscale correlation of wavelet coefficient (MCWC) spike detection algorithm, we show that the MCWC and CFDF detection and classification system is robust when tested on several sets of artificial and real neural waveforms. The CFDF is comparable to or outperforms some popular automatic spike classification algorithms with artificial and real neural data. Significance. The detection and classification of neural action potentials or neural spikes is an important step in single-unit-based neuroscientific studies and applications. After the detection of neural snippets potentially containing neural spikes, a robust classification algorithm is applied for the analysis of the snippets to (1) extract similar waveforms into one class for them to be considered coming from one unit, and to (2) remove noise snippets if they do not contain any features of an action potential. Usually, a snippet is a small 2 or 3 ms segment of the recorded waveform, and differences in neural action potentials can be subtle from one unit to another. Therefore, a robust, high performance classification system like the CFDF is necessary. In addition, the proposed algorithm

  19. Baseband feedback for SAFARI-SPICA using Frequency Domain Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounab, A.; de Korte, P.; Cros, A.; van der Kuur, J.; van Leeuwen, B. J.; Monna, B.; Mossel, R.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.; Ravera, L.

    We report on the performance of the digital baseband feedback circuit developed to readout and process signals from arrays of transition edge sensors for SPICA-SAFARI in frequency domain multiplexing (FDM). The standard procedure to readout the SQUID current amplifiers is to use a feedback loop (flux-locked loop: FLL). However the achievable FFL bandwidth is limited by the cable transport delay t_d, which makes standard feedback inconvenient. A much better approach is to use baseband feedback. We have developed a model of the electronic readout chain for SPICA-SAFARI instrument by using an Anlog-digital co-simulation based on Simulink-System Generator environment.

  20. A frequency-domain derivation of shot-noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A formula for shot-noise is derived in the frequency-domain. The derivation is complete and reasonably rigorous while being appropriate for undergraduate students; it models a sequence of random pulses using Fourier sine and cosine series, and requires some basic statistical concepts. The text here may serve as a pedagogic introduction to the spectral analysis of random processes and may prove useful to introduce students to the logic behind stochastic problems. The concepts of noise power spectral density and equivalent noise bandwidth are introduced.

  1. Frequency-Domain Green's Functions for Radar Waves in Heterogeneous 2.5D Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green’s functions for radar waves propagating in heterogeneous media may be calculated in the frequency domain using a hybrid of two numerical methods. The model is defined in the Cartesian coordinate system, and its electromagnetic properties may vary in the x and z directions, ...

  2. Detecting structural information of scatterers using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Krauter, Philipp; Nothelfer, Steffen; Foschum, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate optical phantom experiments on the phase function parameter γ using spatial frequency domain imaging. The incorporation of two different types of scattering particles allows for control of the optical phantoms’ microscopic scattering properties. By laterally structuring areas with either TiO2 or Al2O3 scattering particles, we were able to obtain almost pure subdiffusive scattering contrast in a single optical phantom. Optical parameter mapping was then achieved using an analytical radiative transfer model revealing the microscopic structural contrast on a macroscopic field of view. As part of our study, we explain several correction and referencing techniques for high spatial frequency analysis and experimentally study the sampling depth of the subdiffusive parameter γ. PMID:26590206

  3. Frequency domain identification for robust large space structure control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Scheid, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is demonstrated for frequency domain identification of large space structures which systematically transforms experimental raw data into a form required for synthesizing H(infinity) controllers using modern robust control design software (e.g., Matlab Toolboxes). A unique feature of this approach is that the additive uncertainty is characterized to a specified statistic confidence rather than with hard bounds. In this study, the difference in robust performance is minimal between the two levels of confidence. In general cases, the present methodology provides a tool for performance/confidence level tradeoff studies. For simplicity, the additive uncertainty on a frequency grid is considered and the interpolation error in between grid points is neglected.

  4. Domain reduction method for atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Medyanik, Sergey N. . E-mail: medyanik@northwestern.edu; Karpov, Eduard G. . E-mail: edkarpov@gmail.com; Liu, Wing Kam . E-mail: w-liu@northwestern.edu

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, a quasi-static formulation of the method of multi-scale boundary conditions (MSBCs) is derived and applied to atomistic simulations of carbon nano-structures, namely single graphene sheets and multi-layered graphite. This domain reduction method allows for the simulation of deformable boundaries in periodic atomic lattice structures, reduces the effective size of the computational domain, and consequently decreases the cost of computations. The size of the reduced domain is determined by the value of the domain reduction parameter. This parameter is related to the distance between the boundary of the reduced domain, where MSBCs are applied, and the boundary of the full domain, where the standard displacement boundary conditions are prescribed. Two types of multi-scale boundary conditions are derived: one for simulating in-layer multi-scale boundaries in a single graphene sheet and the other for simulating inter-layer multi-scale boundaries in multi-layered graphite. The method is tested on benchmark nano-indentation problems and the results are consistent with the full domain solutions.

  5. Time domain characterization of oscillating sensors: Application of frequency counting to resonance frequency determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Kefeng; Ong, Keat G.; Mungle, Casey; Grimes, Craig A.

    2002-12-01

    A frequency counting technique is described for determining the resonance frequency of a transiently excited sensor; the technique is applicable to any sensor platform where the characteristic resonance frequency is the parameter of interest. The sensor is interrogated by a pulse-like excitation signal, and the resonance frequency of the sensor subsequently determined by counting the number of oscillations per time during sensor ring-down. A repetitive time domain interrogation technique is implemented to overcome the effects of sensor damping, such as that associated with mass loading, which reduces the duration of the sensor ring-down and hence the measurement resolution. The microcontroller based, transient frequency counting technique is detailed with application to the monitoring of magnetoelastic sensors [C. A. Grimes, D. Kouzoudis, and C. Mungle, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 3822 (2000)], with a measurement resolution of 0.001% achieved in approximately 40 ms.

  6. Dynamics of spintronic materials: Exploration in the time and frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Zabel, Hartmut

    2014-12-14

    X-ray and neutron reflectivity are mature experimental techniques for the exploration of film thicknesses and interface roughnesses on the nanoscale. Combining with photon and neutron polarization, these methods can be carried forward to the analysis of magnetic thin films and magnetic domain structures. New opportunities open up when these methods are used either in the time or in the frequency domain. Then dynamical processes can be studied such as domain oscillations, domain propagation, precession of spins, and damping effects. Two methods are discussed which have been developed recently: polarized neutron reflectivity from magnetic films in an alternating magnetic field and time resolved resonant magnetic x-ray reflectivity of the free precessional dynamics in films and multilayers.

  7. Ultrasound breast imaging using frequency domain reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, O.; Zuberi, M. A. H.; Pratt, R. G.; Duric, N.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ultrasonography reconstruction techniques, such as B-mode, are based on a simple wave propagation model derived from a high frequency approximation. Therefore, to minimize model mismatch, the central frequency of the input pulse is typically chosen between 3 and 15 megahertz. Despite the increase in theoretical resolution, operating at higher frequencies comes at the cost of lower signal-to-noise ratio. This ultimately degrades the image contrast and overall quality at higher imaging depths. To address this issue, we investigate a reflection imaging technique, known as reverse time migration, which uses a more accurate propagation model for reconstruction. We present preliminary simulation results as well as physical phantom image reconstructions obtained using data acquired with a breast imaging ultrasound tomography prototype. The original reconstructions are filtered to remove low-wavenumber artifacts that arise due to the inclusion of the direct arrivals. We demonstrate the advantage of using an accurate sound speed model in the reverse time migration process. We also explain how the increase in computational complexity can be mitigated using a frequency domain approach and a parallel computing platform.

  8. Radiative transport in fluorescence-enhanced frequency domain photon migration.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, John C; Joshi, Amit; Pan, Tianshu; Wareing, Todd; McGhee, John; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2006-12-01

    Small animal optical tomography has significant, but potential application for streamlining drug discovery and pre-clinical investigation of drug candidates. However, accurate modeling of photon propagation in small animal volumes is critical to quantitatively obtain accurate tomographic images. Herein we present solutions from a robust fluorescence-enhanced, frequency domain radiative transport equation (RTE) solver with unique attributes that facilitate its deployment within tomographic algorithms. Specifically, the coupled equations describing time-dependent excitation and emission light transport are solved using discrete ordinates (SN) angular differencing along with linear discontinuous finite-element spatial differencing on unstructured tetrahedral grids. Source iteration in conjunction with diffusion synthetic acceleration is used to iteratively solve the resulting system of equations. This RTE solver can accurately and efficiently predict ballistic as well as diffusion limited transport regimes which could simultaneously exist in small animals. Furthermore, the solver provides accurate solutions on unstructured, tetrahedral grids with relatively large element sizes as compared to commonly employed solvers that use step differencing. The predictions of the solver are validated by a series of frequency-domain, phantom measurements with optical properties ranging from diffusion limited to transport limited propagation. Our results demonstrate that the RTE solution consistently matches measurements made under both diffusion and transport-limited conditions. This work demonstrates the use of an appropriate RTE solver for deployment in small animal optical tomography. PMID:17278821

  9. Allan deviation computations of a linear frequency synthesizer system using frequency domain techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Andy

    1995-01-01

    Allan Deviation computations of linear frequency synthesizer systems have been reported previously using real-time simulations. Even though it takes less time compared with the actual measurement, it is still very time consuming to compute the Allan Deviation for long sample times with the desired confidence level. Also noises, such as flicker phase noise and flicker frequency noise, can not be simulated precisely. The use of frequency domain techniques can overcome these drawbacks. In this paper the system error model of a fictitious linear frequency synthesizer is developed and its performance using a Cesium (Cs) atomic frequency standard (AFS) as a reference is evaluated using frequency domain techniques. For a linear timing system, the power spectral density at the system output can be computed with known system transfer functions and known power spectral densities from the input noise sources. The resulting power spectral density can then be used to compute the Allan Variance at the system output. Sensitivities of the Allan Variance at the system output to each of its independent input noises are obtained, and they are valuable for design trade-off and trouble-shooting.

  10. Orthogonal Multi-Carrier DS-CDMA with Frequency-Domain Equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ken; Tomeba, Hiromichi; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    Orthogonal multi-carrier direct sequence code division multiple access (orthogonal MC DS-CDMA) is a combination of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and time-domain spreading, while multi-carrier code division multiple access (MC-CDMA) is a combination of OFDM and frequency-domain spreading. In MC-CDMA, a good bit error rate (BER) performance can be achieved by using frequency-domain equalization (FDE), since the frequency diversity gain is obtained. On the other hand, the conventional orthogonal MC DS-CDMA fails to achieve any frequency diversity gain. In this paper, we propose a new orthogonal MC DS-CDMA that can obtain the frequency diversity gain by applying FDE. The conditional BER analysis is presented. The theoretical average BER performance in a frequency-selective Rayleigh fading channel is evaluated by the Monte-Carlo numerical computation method using the derived conditional BER and is confirmed by computer simulation of the orthogonal MC DS-CDMA signal transmission.

  11. Cerebral autoregulation in the preterm newborn using near-infrared spectroscopy: a comparison of time-domain and frequency-domain analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Vibeke R.; Hahn, Gitte H.; Greisen, Gorm

    2015-03-01

    The aim was to compare two conventional methods used to describe cerebral autoregulation (CA): frequency-domain analysis and time-domain analysis. We measured cerebral oxygenation (as a surrogate for cerebral blood flow) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) in 60 preterm infants. In the frequency domain, outcome variables were coherence and gain, whereas the cerebral oximetry index (COx) and the regression coefficient were the outcome variables in the time domain. Correlation between coherence and COx was poor. The disagreement between the two methods was due to the MAP and cerebral oxygenation signals being in counterphase in three cases. High gain and high coherence may arise spuriously when cerebral oxygenation decreases as MAP increases; hence, time-domain analysis appears to be a more robust-and simpler-method to describe CA.

  12. Plane-wave solutions to frequency-domain and time-domain scattering from magnetodielectric slabs.

    PubMed

    Yaghjian, Arthur D; Hansen, Thorkild B

    2006-04-01

    Plane-wave representations are used to formulate the exact solutions to frequency-domain and time-domain sources illuminating a magnetodielectric slab with complex permittivity epsilon(omega) and permeability mu(omega). In the special case of a line source at z = 0 a distance d < L in front of an L-wide lossless double-negative (DNG) slab with kappa(omega 0) = epsilon(omega 0) / epsilon 0 = mu(omega 0) / mu 0 = (-1), the single-frequency (omega 0) solution exhibits not only "perfectly focused" fields for z > 2L but also divergent infinite fields in the region 2d < z < 2L. In contrast, the solution to the same lossless kappa(omega 0) = (-1) DNG slab illuminated by a sinusoidal wave that begins at some initial time t = 0 (and thus has a nonzero bandwidth, unlike the single-frequency excitation that begins at t = (-infinity) is proven to have imperfectly focused fields and convergent finite fields everywhere for all finite time t. The proof hinges on the variation of kappa(omega) about omega = omega 0 having a lower bound imposed by causality and energy conservation. The minimum time found to produce a given resolution is proportional to the estimate obtained by G. Gómez-Santos, [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 077401 (2003)]. Only as t --> infinity do the fields become perfectly focused in the region z > 2L and divergent in the region 2d < z < 2L. These theoretical results, which are confirmed by numerical examples, imply that divergent fields of the single-frequency solution are not caused by an inherent inconsistency in assuming an ideal lossless kappa(omega 0) = (-1) DNG material, but are the result of the continuous single-frequency wave (which contains infinite energy) building up infinite reactive fields during the infinite duration of time from t = (-infinity) to the present time t that the single-frequency excitation has been applied. An analogous situation occurs at the resonant frequencies of a lossless cavity. A single-frequency (zero-bandwidth) source inside the

  13. Development of a frequency-domain electromagnetic scattering measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kenneth K.

    1993-12-01

    This thesis describes the development of a system for measuring frequency-domain scattered fields in the Transient Electromagnetic Scattering Range at the Naval Postgraduate School. The new system employs a stepped-frequency CW waveform and utilizes an HP-8510B network analyzer as an RF front-end and a coherent receiver. A pair of AEL H1498 antennas was installed to cover a frequency range of 2 GHz to 18 GHz. An HP-82300C BASIC Language Processor was installed on a COMPAQ Deskpro-386 PC, and an HP-BASIC program was developed for remote control of the HP-8510B with data acquisition over the HPIB bus. A post-processing algorithm was created using MatLab for background subtraction, calibration, and deconvolution. A set of RCS measurements was made using various size spheres, and the postprocessing outputs were compared to computed values. Good agreement between these measurements and computed data indicates excellent accuracy of the measurement system and valid operations of the postprocessing algorithm.

  14. Patellofemoral pain syndrome: electromyography in a frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelli, D. S.; Kuriki, H. U.; Polito, L. F.; Azevedo, F. M.; Negrão Filho, R. F.; Alves, N.

    2011-09-01

    The Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), has a multifactorial etiology and affects approximately 7 to 15% of the population, mostly women, youth, adults and active persons. PFPS causes anterior or retropatelar pain that is exacerbated during functional motor gestures, such as up and down stairs or spending long periods of time sitting, squatting or kneeling. As the diagnostic evaluation of this syndrome is still indirect, different mechanisms and methodologies try to make a classification that distinguishes patients with PFPS in relation to asymptomatic. Thereby, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of the electromyographic (EMG) signal in the frequency domain of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) in patients with PFPS, during the ascent of stairs. 33 young women (22 control group and 11 PFPS group), were evaluated by EMG during ascent of stairs. The VMO mean power frequency (MPF) and the VL frequency 95% (F95) were lower in symptomatic individuals. This may be related to the difference in muscle recruitment strategy exerted by each muscle in the PFPS group compared to the control group.

  15. Simultaneous storage of medical images in the spatial and frequency domain: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Jagadish; Bhat, P Subbanna; Acharya U, Rajendra; UC, Niranjan

    2004-01-01

    Background Digital watermarking is a technique of hiding specific identification data for copyright authentication. This technique is adapted here for interleaving patient information with medical images, to reduce storage and transmission overheads. Methods The patient information is encrypted before interleaving with images to ensure greater security. The bio-signals are compressed and subsequently interleaved with the image. This interleaving is carried out in the spatial domain and Frequency domain. The performance of interleaving in the spatial, Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) coefficients is studied. Differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) is employed for data compression as well as encryption and results are tabulated for a specific example. Results It can be seen from results, the process does not affect the picture quality. This is attributed to the fact that the change in LSB of a pixel changes its brightness by 1 part in 256. Spatial and DFT domain interleaving gave very less %NRMSE as compared to DCT and DWT domain. Conclusion The Results show that spatial domain the interleaving, the %NRMSE was less than 0.25% for 8-bit encoded pixel intensity. Among the frequency domain interleaving methods, DFT was found to be very efficient. PMID:15180899

  16. Elastic wave attenuation and velocity of Berea sandstone measured in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankland, T. J.; Johnson, P. A.; Hopson, T. M.

    1993-03-01

    Using measurements in the frequency domain we have measured quality factor Q and travel times of direct and side-reflected elastic waves in a 1.8 m long sample of Berea sandstone. The frequency domain travel time (FDTT) method produces the continuous-wave (CW) response of a propagating wave by stepwise sweeping frequency of a driving source and detecting amplitude and phase of the received signal in reference to the source. Each separate travel path yields a characteristic repetition cycle in frequency space as its wave vector-distance product is stepped; an inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) reveals the corresponding travel time at the group velocity. Because arrival times of direct and reflected elastic waves appear as spikes along the time axis, travel times can be obtained precisely, and different arrivals can be clearly separated. Q can be determined from the amplitude vs frequency response of each peak as obtained from a moving window IFFT of the frequency-domain signal. In this sample at ambient conditions compressional velocity Vp is 2380 m/s and Qp is 55.

  17. Motion estimation in the frequency domain using fuzzy c-planes clustering.

    PubMed

    Erdem, C E; Karabulut, G Z; Yanmaz, E; Anarim, E

    2001-01-01

    A recent work explicitly models the discontinuous motion estimation problem in the frequency domain where the motion parameters are estimated using a harmonic retrieval approach. The vertical and horizontal components of the motion are independently estimated from the locations of the peaks of respective periodogram analyses and they are paired to obtain the motion vectors using a procedure proposed. In this paper, we present a more efficient method that replaces the motion component pairing task and hence eliminates the problems of the pairing method described. The method described in this paper uses the fuzzy c-planes (FCP) clustering approach to fit planes to three-dimensional (3-D) frequency domain data obtained from the peaks of the periodograms. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:18255527

  18. Noise characteristics of heterodyne/homodyne frequency-domain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dongyel; Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically develop and experimentally validate the noise characteristics of heterodyne and/or homodyne measurements that are widely used in frequency-domain diffusive imaging. The mean and covariance of the modulated heterodyne output are derived by adapting the random amplification of a temporal point process. A multinomial selection rule is applied to the result of the temporal noise analysis to additionally model the spatial distribution of intensified photons measured by a charge-coupled device (CCD), which shows that the photon detection efficiency of CCD pixels plays an important role in the noise property of detected photons. The approach of using a multinomial probability law is validated from experimental results. Also, experimentally measured characteristics of means and variances of homodyne outputs are in agreement with the developed theory. The developed noise model can be applied to all photon amplification processes.

  19. Monitoring electrical and thermal burns with Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2011-10-01

    Thermal and electrical injuries are devastating and hard-to-treat clinical lesions. The pathophysiology of these injuries is not fully understood to this day. Further elucidating the natural history of this form of tissue injury could be helpful in offering stage-appropriate therapy. Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) is a novel non-invasive technique that can be used to determine optical properties of biological media. We have developed an experimental apparatus based on SFDI aimed at monitoring parameters of clinical interest such as tissue oxygen saturation, methemoglobin volume fraction, and hemoglobin volume fraction. Co- registered Laser Doppler images of the lesions are also acquired to assess tissue perfusion. Results of experiments conducted on a rat model and discussions on the systemic changes in tissue optical properties before and after injury will be presented.

  20. Spectrally balanced detection for optical frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yueli; de Bruin, Daniel M; Kerbage, Charles; de Boer, Johannes F

    2007-12-10

    In optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) or swept-source optical coherence tomography, balanced detection is required to suppress relative intensity noise (RIN). A regular implementation of balanced detection by combining reference and sample arm signal in a 50/50 coupler and detecting the differential output with a balanced receiver is however, not perfect. Since the splitting ratio of the 50/50 coupler is wavelength dependent, RIN is not optimally canceled at the edges of the wavelength sweep. The splitting ratio has a nearly linear shift of 0.4% per nanometer. This brings as much as +/-12% deviation at the margins of wavelength-swept range centered at 1060nm. We demonstrate a RIN suppression of 33dB by spectrally corrected balanced detection, 11dB more that regular balanced detection. PMID:19550929

  1. Frequency-domain ultrasound waveform tomography breast attenuation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Gursharan Yash Singh; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; West, Erik; Montgomery, Katelyn; Boone, Michael; Duric, Neb

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound waveform tomography techniques have shown promising results for the visualization and characterization of breast disease. By using frequency-domain waveform tomography techniques and a gradient descent algorithm, we have previously reconstructed the sound speed distributions of breasts of varying densities with different types of breast disease including benign and malignant lesions. By allowing the sound speed to have an imaginary component, we can model the intrinsic attenuation of a medium. We can similarly recover the imaginary component of the velocity and thus the attenuation. In this paper, we will briefly review ultrasound waveform tomography techniques, discuss attenuation and its relations to the imaginary component of the sound speed, and provide both numerical and ex vivo examples of waveform tomography attenuation reconstructions.

  2. Optical Frequency Domain Visualization of Electron Beam Driven Plasma Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, M. C.; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Babzien, Marcus; Kusche, Karl; Fedurin, Mikhail

    2010-11-01

    Beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA), such as the ``plasma afterburner,'' are a promising approach for significantly increasing the particle energies of conventional accelerators. The study and optimization of PWFA would benefit from an experimental correlation between the parameters of the drive bunch, the accelerated bunch and the corresponding, accelerating plasma wave structure. However, the plasma wave structure has not yet been observed directly in PWFA. We will report our current work on noninvasive optical Frequency Domain Interferometric (FDI) and Holographic (FDH) visualization of beam-driven plasma waves. Both techniques employ two laser pulses (probe and reference) co-propagating with the particle drive-beam and its plasma wake. The reference pulse precedes the drive bunch, while the probe overlaps the plasma wave and maps its longitudinal and transverse structure. The experiment is being developed at the BNL/ATF Linac to visualize wakes generated by two and multi-bunch drive beams.

  3. Frequency domain identification experiment on a large flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Yam, Y.; Scheid, R. E.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experiences in the field of flexible structure control in space have indicated a need for on-orbit system identification to support robust control redesign to avoid in-flight instabilities and maintain high spacecraft performance. The authors highlight an automated frequency domain system identification methodology recently developed to fill this need. The methodology supports (1) the estimation of system quantities useful for robust control analysis and design, (2) experiment design tailored to performing system identification in a typically constrained on-orbit environment, and (3) the automation of operations to reduce human-in-the-loop requirements. A basic overview of the methodology is presented first, followed by an experimental verification of the approach performed on the JPL/AFAL testbed facility.

  4. Face identification with frequency domain matched filtering in mobile environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Su; Woo, Yong-Hyun; Yeom, Seokwon; Kim, Shin-Hwan

    2012-06-01

    Face identification at a distance is very challenging since captured images are often degraded by blur and noise. Furthermore, the computational resources and memory are often limited in the mobile environments. Thus, it is very challenging to develop a real-time face identification system on the mobile device. This paper discusses face identification based on frequency domain matched filtering in the mobile environments. Face identification is performed by the linear or phase-only matched filter and sequential verification stages. The candidate window regions are decided by the major peaks of the linear or phase-only matched filtering outputs. The sequential stages comprise a skin-color test and an edge mask filtering test, which verify color and shape information of the candidate regions in order to remove false alarms. All algorithms are built on the mobile device using Android platform. The preliminary results show that face identification of East Asian people can be performed successfully in the mobile environments.

  5. Radiative transport-based frequency-domain fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Amit; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Wareing, Todd A.; McGhee, John

    2008-04-01

    We report the development of radiative transport model-based fluorescence optical tomography from frequency-domain boundary measurements. The coupled radiative transport model for describing NIR fluorescence propagation in tissue is solved by a novel software based on the established Attila™ particle transport simulation platform. The proposed scheme enables the prediction of fluorescence measurements with non-contact sources and detectors at a minimal computational cost. An adjoint transport solution-based fluorescence tomography algorithm is implemented on dual grids to efficiently assemble the measurement sensitivity Jacobian matrix. Finally, we demonstrate fluorescence tomography on a realistic computational mouse model to locate nM to µM fluorophore concentration distributions in simulated mouse organs.

  6. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  7. Efficient integration method for fictitious domain approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duczek, Sascha; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    In the current article, we present an efficient and accurate numerical method for the integration of the system matrices in fictitious domain approaches such as the finite cell method (FCM). In the framework of the FCM, the physical domain is embedded in a geometrically larger domain of simple shape which is discretized using a regular Cartesian grid of cells. Therefore, a spacetree-based adaptive quadrature technique is normally deployed to resolve the geometry of the structure. Depending on the complexity of the structure under investigation this method accounts for most of the computational effort. To reduce the computational costs for computing the system matrices an efficient quadrature scheme based on the divergence theorem (Gauß-Ostrogradsky theorem) is proposed. Using this theorem the dimension of the integral is reduced by one, i.e. instead of solving the integral for the whole domain only its contour needs to be considered. In the current paper, we present the general principles of the integration method and its implementation. The results to several two-dimensional benchmark problems highlight its properties. The efficiency of the proposed method is compared to conventional spacetree-based integration techniques.

  8. Fast damage imaging using the time-reversal technique in the frequency-wavenumber domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Huang, G. L.; Yuan, F. G.

    2013-07-01

    The time-reversal technique has been successfully used in structural health monitoring (SHM) for quantitative imaging of damage. However, the technique is very time-consuming when it is implemented in the time domain. In this paper, we study the technique in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain for fast real-time imaging of multiple damage sites in plates using scattered flexural plate waves. Based on Mindlin plate theory, the time reversibility of dispersive flexural waves in an isotropic plate is theoretically investigated in the f-k domain. A fast damage imaging technique is developed by using the cross-correlation between the back-propagated scattered wavefield and the incident wavefield in the frequency domain. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed technique cannot only localize multiple damage sites but also potentially identify their sizes. Moreover, the time-reversal technique in the f-k domain is about two orders of magnitude faster than the method in the time domain. Finally, experimental testing of an on-line SHM system with a sparse piezoelectric sensor array is conducted for fast multiple damage identification using the proposed technique.

  9. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for Aircraft Acoustic Nacelle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in aircraft engine nacelles. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  10. Frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error for step response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang-Long; Xu, Ke-Jun

    2012-11-01

    To obtain accurate results in dynamic measurements it is required that the sensors should have good dynamic performance. In practice, sensors have non-ideal dynamic characteristics due to their small damp ratios and low natural frequencies. In this case some dynamic error correction methods can be adopted for dealing with the sensor responses to eliminate the effect of their dynamic characteristics. The frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error is a common method. Using the existing calculation method, however, the correct frequency-domain correction function (FCF) cannot be obtained according to the step response calibration experimental data. This is because of the leakage error and invalid FCF value caused by the cycle extension of the finite length step input-output intercepting data. In order to solve these problems the data splicing preprocessing and FCF interpolation are put forward, and the FCF calculation steps as well as sensor dynamic error correction procedure by the calculated FCF are presented in this paper. The proposed solution is applied to the dynamic error correction of the bar-shaped wind tunnel strain gauge balance so as to verify its effectiveness. The dynamic error correction results show that the adjust time of the balance step response is shortened to 10 ms (shorter than 1/30 before correction) after frequency-domain correction, and the overshoot is fallen within 5% (less than 1/10 before correction) as well. The dynamic measurement accuracy of the balance is improved significantly. PMID:23206091

  11. Frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error for step response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang-Long; Xu, Ke-Jun

    2012-11-01

    To obtain accurate results in dynamic measurements it is required that the sensors should have good dynamic performance. In practice, sensors have non-ideal dynamic characteristics due to their small damp ratios and low natural frequencies. In this case some dynamic error correction methods can be adopted for dealing with the sensor responses to eliminate the effect of their dynamic characteristics. The frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error is a common method. Using the existing calculation method, however, the correct frequency-domain correction function (FCF) cannot be obtained according to the step response calibration experimental data. This is because of the leakage error and invalid FCF value caused by the cycle extension of the finite length step input-output intercepting data. In order to solve these problems the data splicing preprocessing and FCF interpolation are put forward, and the FCF calculation steps as well as sensor dynamic error correction procedure by the calculated FCF are presented in this paper. The proposed solution is applied to the dynamic error correction of the bar-shaped wind tunnel strain gauge balance so as to verify its effectiveness. The dynamic error correction results show that the adjust time of the balance step response is shortened to 10 ms (shorter than 1/30 before correction) after frequency-domain correction, and the overshoot is fallen within 5% (less than 1/10 before correction) as well. The dynamic measurement accuracy of the balance is improved significantly.

  12. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for the Convective Wave Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Kreider, K. L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in ducts. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  13. Frequency domain stability analysis of nonlinear active disturbance rejection control system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Qi, Xiaohui; Xia, Yuanqing; Pu, Fan; Chang, Kai

    2015-05-01

    This paper applies three methods (i.e., root locus analysis, describing function method and extended circle criterion) to approach the frequency domain stability analysis of the fast tool servo system using nonlinear active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) algorithm. Root locus qualitative analysis shows that limit cycle is generated because the gain of the nonlinear function used in ADRC varies with its input. The parameters in the nonlinear function are adjustable to suppress limit cycle. In the process of root locus analysis, the nonlinear function is transformed based on the concept of equivalent gain. Then, frequency domain description of the nonlinear function via describing function is presented and limit cycle quantitative analysis including estimating prediction error is presented, which virtually and theoretically demonstrates that the describing function method cannot guarantee enough precision in this case. Furthermore, absolute stability analysis based on extended circle criterion is investigated as a complement. PMID:25532936

  14. Time-domain representation of frequency-dependent foundation impedance functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2006-01-01

    Foundation impedance functions provide a simple means to account for soil-structure interaction (SSI) when studying seismic response of structures. Impedance functions represent the dynamic stiffness of the soil media surrounding the foundation. The fact that impedance functions are frequency dependent makes it difficult to incorporate SSI in standard time-history analysis software. This paper introduces a simple method to convert frequency-dependent impedance functions into time-domain filters. The method is based on the least-squares approximation of impedance functions by ratios of two complex polynomials. Such ratios are equivalent, in the time-domain, to discrete-time recursive filters, which are simple finite-difference equations giving the relationship between foundation forces and displacements. These filters can easily be incorporated into standard time-history analysis programs. Three examples are presented to show the applications of the method.

  15. 3D frequency-domain finite-difference modeling of acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a 3D frequency-domain finite-difference method for acoustic wave propagation modeling. This method is developed as a tool to perform 3D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-angle seismic data. For wide-angle data, frequency-domain full-waveform inversion can be applied only to few discrete frequencies to develop reliable velocity model. Frequency-domain finite-difference (FD) modeling of wave propagation requires resolution of a huge sparse system of linear equations. If this system can be solved with a direct method, solutions for multiple sources can be computed efficiently once the underlying matrix has been factorized. The drawback of the direct method is the memory requirement resulting from the fill-in of the matrix during factorization. We assess in this study whether representative problems can be addressed in 3D geometry with such approach. We start from the velocity-stress formulation of the 3D acoustic wave equation. The spatial derivatives are discretized with second-order accurate staggered-grid stencil on different coordinate systems such that the axis span over as many directions as possible. Once the discrete equations were developed on each coordinate system, the particle velocity fields are eliminated from the first-order hyperbolic system (following the so-called parsimonious staggered-grid method) leading to second-order elliptic wave equations in pressure. The second-order wave equations discretized on each coordinate system are combined linearly to mitigate the numerical anisotropy. Secondly, grid dispersion is minimized by replacing the mass term at the collocation point by its weighted averaging over all the grid points of the stencil. Use of second-order accurate staggered- grid stencil allows to reduce the bandwidth of the matrix to be factorized. The final stencil incorporates 27 points. Absorbing conditions are PML. The system is solved using the parallel direct solver MUMPS developed for distributed

  16. Thermal characterization of light-emitting diodes in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitta, P.; Žukauskas, A.

    2008-09-01

    We report on a method for the measurement of thermal relaxation time constants within light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in the frequency domain. The method is based on the phase shift of the forward voltage waveform with respect to that of the harmonically modulated forward current due to the sensitivity of the forward voltage to junction temperature. The phase shift was shown to exhibit dips at angular frequencies equal to inverse thermal time constants. Extraction of thermal time constants was demonstrated for common low-power and high-power LEDs. The measured thermal time constants (˜0.1-100 ms) were linked to heat flows between the LED components.

  17. Frequency-dependent FDTD methods using Z transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Dennis M.

    1992-01-01

    While the frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain, or (FD)2TD, method can correctly calculate EM propagation through media whose dielectric properties are frequency-dependent, more elaborate applications lead to greater (FD)2TD complexity. Z-transform theory is presently used to develop the mathematical bases of the (FD)2TD method, simultaneously obtaining a clearer formulation and allowing researchers to draw on the existing literature of systems analysis and signal-processing.

  18. Prediction of Cancer Proteins by Integrating Protein Interaction, Domain Frequency, and Domain Interaction Data Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to be associated with cancer diseases. It is quite often that their precise functional role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. A strategy to gain a better understanding of the function of these proteins is to make use of a combination of different aspects of proteomics data types. In this study, we extended Aragues's method by employing the protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, domain-domain interaction (DDI) data, weighted domain frequency score (DFS), and cancer linker degree (CLD) data to predict cancer proteins. Performances were benchmarked based on three kinds of experiments as follows: (I) using individual algorithm, (II) combining algorithms, and (III) combining the same classification types of algorithms. When compared with Aragues's method, our proposed methods, that is, machine learning algorithm and voting with the majority, are significantly superior in all seven performance measures. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed method on two independent datasets. The best algorithm can achieve a hit ratio of 89.4% and 72.8% for lung cancer dataset and lung cancer microarray study, respectively. It is anticipated that the current research could help understand disease mechanisms and diagnosis. PMID:25866773

  19. Nonlinear (time domain) and linearized (time and frequency domain) solutions to the compressible Euler equations in conservation law form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreenivas, Kidambi; Whitfield, David L.

    1995-01-01

    Two linearized solvers (time and frequency domain) based on a high resolution numerical scheme are presented. The basic approach is to linearize the flux vector by expressing it as a sum of a mean and a perturbation. This allows the governing equations to be maintained in conservation law form. A key difference between the time and frequency domain computations is that the frequency domain computations require only one grid block irrespective of the interblade phase angle for which the flow is being computed. As a result of this and due to the fact that the governing equations for this case are steady, frequency domain computations are substantially faster than the corresponding time domain computations. The linearized equations are used to compute flows in turbomachinery blade rows (cascades) arising due to blade vibrations. Numerical solutions are compared to linear theory (where available) and to numerical solutions of the nonlinear Euler equations.

  20. Motion artifacts in optical coherence tomography with frequency-domain ranging

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    We describe results of theoretical and experimental investigations of artifacts that can arise in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) as a result of sample or probe beam motion. While SD-OCT and OFDI are based on similar spectral interferometric principles, the specifics of motion effects are quite different because of distinct signal acquisition methods. These results provide an understanding of motion artifacts such as signal fading, spatial distortion and blurring, and emphasize the need for fast image acquisition in biomedical applications. PMID:19483816

  1. Frequency-domain seismic-wave modeling, migration, and full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun

    In the dissertation, I have proposed and developed new approaches for seismic modeling, migration, and full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain. For 3D scalar-wave simulations in the frequency-space domain, we develop a fourth-order compact finite-difference (FD) form with a high-order spatial accuracy (4-5 grid points per shortest wavelength), and optimal one-way wave-equation (OWWE) absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs) with only one outer layer; these strategies greatly reduce the total number of the model grid points, and thus the overall computational cost. For reverse-time migration (RTM) using the cross-correlation imaging condition in the time domain, extra disk storage or wavefield simulations are required to make the forward propagated source and backward-propagated receiver wavefields available at the same time. We propose a new method to implement RTM in the frequency domain. Using virtual sources for the backward propagation of the receiver wavefield, we can straightforwardly implement the excitation-time and cross-correlation imaging conditions at each frequency without any disk storage or I/O and with complete spatial coverage of the migrated images. As both time and frequency domains have their own advantages for the inversion, we implement a hybrid scheme to combine both advantages in elastic full-waveform inversion (FWI). We simulate the wavefields using a time-domain high-precision finite-element (FE) modeling parallelized over shots with the message passing interface (MPI), and implement the inversion in the frequency domain via Fourier transform. Thus, we can easily apply both frequency-selection and time-windowing techniques to reduce the nonlinearity in inversion. To decouple different parameters in elastic FWI, we propose a new multi-steplength gradient approach to assign individual weights separately for each parameter gradient, and search for an optimal steplength along the composite gradient direction. As variations in the results

  2. Frequency and time domain three-dimensional inversion of electromagnetic data for a grounded-wire source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Choi, Jihyang; Son, Jeong-Sul

    2015-01-01

    We present frequency- and time-domain three-dimensional (3-D) inversion approaches that can be applied to transient electromagnetic (TEM) data from a grounded-wire source using a PC. In the direct time-domain approach, the forward solution and sensitivity were obtained in the frequency domain using a finite-difference technique, and the frequency response was then Fourier-transformed using a digital filter technique. In the frequency-domain approach, TEM data were Fourier-transformed using a smooth-spectrum inversion method, and the recovered frequency response was then inverted. The synthetic examples show that for the time derivative of magnetic field, frequency-domain inversion of TEM data performs almost as well as time-domain inversion, with a significant reduction in computational time. In our synthetic studies, we also compared the resolution capabilities of the ground and airborne TEM and controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data resulting from a common grounded wire. An airborne TEM survey at 200-m elevation achieved a resolution for buried conductors almost comparable to that of the ground TEM method. It is also shown that the inversion of CSAMT data was able to detect a 3-D resistivity structure better than the TEM inversion, suggesting an advantage of electric-field measurements over magnetic-field-only measurements.

  3. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid. PMID:27375465

  4. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid. PMID:27375465

  5. A comparison of frequency domain design and l1-optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayasuriya, Suhada; Sobhani, Massoud; Zentgraf, Peter

    1991-01-01

    A frequency-domain design methodology is applied to a DC motor-speed control system and the results are compared to those obtained using l1-optimal control theory (Pearson and Bamieh, 1990). Both methods synthesize controllers that maximize the allowable size of an unknown-but-bounded disturbance while satisfying prespecified constraints on the control, the control rate, and the outputs. The frequency-domain design technique in general results in much lower-order compensators than those required by the l1-optimal method for a given size of disturbance. Also, the design trade-offs regarding the bandwidth of the system, the size of the disturbance input, and the structural complexity of the controller transfer function become quite transparent.

  6. Dynamic analysis of offshore structures with non-zero initial conditions in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushun; Lu, Hongchao; Li, Huajun

    2016-03-01

    The state of non-zero conditions is typically treated as fact when considering the dynamic analysis of offshore structures. This article extends a newly proposed method [1] to manage the non-zero initial conditions of offshore structures in the frequency domain, including new studies on original environmental loads reconstruction, response comparisons with the commercial software ANSYS, and a demonstration using an experimental cantilever beam. The original environmental loads, such as waves, currents, and winds, that act on a structure are decomposed into multiple complex exponential components are represented by a series of poles and corresponding residues. Counter to the traditional frequency-domain method, the non-zero initial conditions of offshore structures could be solved in the frequency domain. Compared with reference [1], an improvement reported in this article is that practical issues, including the choice of model order and central-processing-unit (CPU) time consumption, are further studied when applying this new method to offshore structures. To investigate the feasibility of the representation of initial environmental loads by their poles and corresponding residues, a measured random wave force collected from a column experiment at the Lab of Ocean University of China is used, decomposed, reconstructed and then compared with the original wave force; then, a numerical offshore platform is used to study the performance of the proposed method in detail. The numerical results of this study indicate that (1) a short duration of environmental loads are required to obtain their constitutive poles and residues, which implies good computational efficiency; and (2) the proposed method has a similar computational efficiency to traditional methods due to the use of the inverse Fourier transform technique. To better understand the performance, of time consumption and accuracy of the proposed method, the commercial software ANSYS is used to determine responses

  7. Three-dimensional inversion of frequency domain airborne electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Leif Harrington

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys provide vast amounts of data over remote areas that may not be ground accessible. Typical surveys may contain hundreds of thousands of data points sampled every few meters. Quantitative interpretation of this large amount of data is computationally very time consuming and challenging. This dissertation presents two methods, based on the integral equation (IE), to invert AEM data in three dimensions. One inversion method is based on the localized quasi-linear (LQL) approximate inversion, which I have modified so the inverse and forward operators only include a small area of the inversion domain. This is possible for airborne data interpretation because the footprint, or region that affects the response of each measurement, is relatively small relative to the typical survey area. This modification to the approximate LQL inversion enables interpretation of full airborne surveys using tens of thousands of data points and hundreds of thousands of cells. The method is tested on both synthetic and field data, each showing accurate results. The second interpretation method is a rigorous inversion, which uses the full accuracy of the IE method. It is based on the iterative solution of the domain and field equations, while keeping the inverse operator linear to speed the inversion process. The domain equation is solved using a preconditioned form of the complex generalized minimum residual solver to guarantee convergence. This inversion includes the footprint method developed for the LQL inversion. It has also been tested on both synthetic and field data, demonstrating excellent results with respect to both the speed and accuracy of the method. With present computing power, the rigorous method is intended to interpret subsets of AEM surveys. The LQL inversion can be applied to entire survey areas, but the accuracy is limited by the approximate nature of the inversion. These two methods pair nicely, with the LQL method used to identify

  8. Frequency domain response of a parametrically excited riser under random wave forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Song; Zhang, Wen-Shou; Lin, Jia-Hao; Yue, Qian-Jin; Kennedy, D.; Williams, F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Floating Production, Drilling, Storage and Offloading units represent a new technology with a promising future in the offshore oil industry. An important role is played by risers, which are installed between the subsea wellhead and the Tension Leg Deck located in the middle of the moon-pool in the hull. The inevitable heave motion of the floating hull causes a time-varying axial tension in the riser. This time dependent tension may have an undesirable influence on the lateral deflection response of the riser, with random wave forces in the frequency domain. To investigate this effect, a riser is modeled as a Bernoulli-Euler beam. The axial tension is expressed as a static part, along with a harmonic dynamic part. By linearizing the wave drag force, the riser's lateral deflection is obtained through a partial differential equation containing a time-dependent coefficient. Applying the Galerkin method, the equation is reduced to an ordinary differential equation that can be solved using the pseudo-excitation method in the frequency domain. Moreover, the Floquet-Liapunov theorem is used to estimate the stability of the vibration system in the space of parametric excitation. Finally, stability charts are obtained for some numerical examples, the correctness of the proposed method is verified by comparing with Monte-Carlo simulation and the influence of the parametric excitation on the frequency domain responses of the riser is discussed.

  9. Enhancement of Frequency Domain Indices of Heart Rate Variability by Cholinergic Stimulation with Pyridostigmine Bromide

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ali Asghar; Foroutan, Seyyed Abbas; Foroutan, Seyyed Mohsen; Erfanian Omidvar, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of orally administration of single dose sustained-released tablet of pyridostigmine bromide (PBSR) on the frequency domain indices of heart rate variability (HRV). Thirty-two healthy young men were participated in this study. They were divided into 2 groups; the pyridostigmine group (n = 22) and the placebo group (n = 10). Electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded at 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300 and 420 min after PBSR administration. At each time, simultaneously, a blood sample was prepared and PB plasma concentration was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Statistical analysis showed that in different indices of HRV, there is a significant increase in low frequency (LF) band at 300 min, but no difference in high frequency band (HF). It also showed significant decreases in normalized high frequency band (Hfnu), normalized low frequency band (Lfnu) and LF/HF ratio at 120, 240 and 300 min after PBSR administration. Maximum plasma concentration of PB was 150 min after the administration. In conclusion, administration of a single dose PBSR can enhance the frequency domains indices of HRV and improvesympathovagal balance. PMID:24250427

  10. Enhancement of frequency domain indices of heart rate variability by cholinergic stimulation with pyridostigmine bromide.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ali Asghar; Foroutan, Seyyed Abbas; Foroutan, Seyyed Mohsen; Erfanian Omidvar, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of orally administration of single dose sustained-released tablet of pyridostigmine bromide (PBSR) on the frequency domain indices of heart rate variability (HRV). Thirty-two healthy young men were participated in this study. They were divided into 2 groups; the pyridostigmine group (n = 22) and the placebo group (n = 10). Electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded at 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300 and 420 min after PBSR administration. At each time, simultaneously, a blood sample was prepared and PB plasma concentration was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Statistical analysis showed that in different indices of HRV, there is a significant increase in low frequency (LF) band at 300 min, but no difference in high frequency band (HF). It also showed significant decreases in normalized high frequency band (Hfnu), normalized low frequency band (Lfnu) and LF/HF ratio at 120, 240 and 300 min after PBSR administration. Maximum plasma concentration of PB was 150 min after the administration. In conclusion, administration of a single dose PBSR can enhance the frequency domains indices of HRV and improvesympathovagal balance. PMID:24250427

  11. Spectral evolution of two-dimensional kinetic plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Comişel, H.; Verscharen, D.; Narita, Y.; Motschmann, U.

    2013-09-15

    We present a method for studying the evolution of plasma turbulence by tracking dispersion relations in the energy spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency domain. We apply hybrid plasma simulations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry to demonstrate our method and its applicability to plasma turbulence in the ion kinetic regime. We identify four dispersion relations: ion-Bernstein waves, oblique whistler waves, oblique Alfvén/ion-cyclotron waves, and a zero-frequency mode. The energy partition and frequency broadening are evaluated for these modes. The method allows us to determine the evolution of decaying plasma turbulence in our restricted geometry and shows that it cascades along the dispersion relations during the early phase with an increasing broadening around the dispersion relations.

  12. Implementation of an LED-based clinical spatial frequency domain imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhar, Amaan; Sharif, Seyed A.; Saggese, Steve; Choi, Bernard; Cuccia, David J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2012-03-01

    Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) is a non-contact imaging method that uses multiple frequency spatial illumination to generate two dimensional maps of tissue optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering) and chromophore concentrations. We present phantom validation and pilot clinical data of a deployed light-emitting diode (LED) based system. The system employs four LED wavelengths (658 nm, 730 nm, 850 nm, 970 nm) to quantitatively assess tissue health by measurement of common tissue constituents. Phantom validation results and maps of oxyhemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, water content, reduced scattering, and surface topography will be presented for pilot studies assessing burn severity and efficacy of port wine stain treatment.

  13. Statistical significance of task related deep brain EEG dynamic changes in the time-frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Chládek, J; Brázdil, M; Halámek, J; Plešinger, F; Jurák, P

    2013-01-01

    We present an off-line analysis procedure for exploring brain activity recorded from intra-cerebral electroencephalographic data (SEEG). The objective is to determine the statistical differences between different types of stimulations in the time-frequency domain. The procedure is based on computing relative signal power change and subsequent statistical analysis. An example of characteristic statistically significant event-related de/synchronization (ERD/ERS) detected across different frequency bands following different oddball stimuli is presented. The method is used for off-line functional classification of different brain areas. PMID:24109865

  14. Visible spatial frequency domain imaging with a digital light microprojector

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Alexander J.; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Konecky, Soren D.; Cui, Haotian; Rice, Tyler B.; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. There is a need for cost effective, quantitative tissue spectroscopy and imaging systems in clinical diagnostics and pre-clinical biomedical research. A platform that utilizes a commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) based projector, cameras, and scaled Monte Carlo model for calculating tissue optical properties is presented. These components are put together to perform spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI), a model-based reflectance technique that measures and maps absorption coefficients (μa) and reduced scattering coefficients (μs′) in thick tissue such as skin or brain. We validate the performance of the flexible LED and modulation element (FLaME) system at 460, 530, and 632 nm across a range of physiologically relevant μa values (0.07 to 1.5  mm−1) in tissue-simulating intralipid phantoms, showing an overall accuracy within 11% of spectrophotometer values for μa and 3% for μs′. Comparison of oxy- and total hemoglobin fits between the FLaME system and a spectrophotometer (450 to 1000 nm) is differed by 3%. Finally, we acquire optical property maps of a mouse brain in vivo with and without an overlying saline well. These results demonstrate the potential of FLaME to perform tissue optical property mapping in visible spectral regions and highlight how the optical clearing effect of saline is correlated to a decrease in μs′ of the skull. PMID:24005154

  15. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  16. Optimal Frequency-Domain System Realization with Weighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Maghami, Peiman G.

    1999-01-01

    Several approaches are presented to identify an experimental system model directly from frequency response data. The formulation uses a matrix-fraction description as the model structure. Frequency weighting such as exponential weighting is introduced to solve a weighted least-squares problem to obtain the coefficient matrices for the matrix-fraction description. A multi-variable state-space model can then be formed using the coefficient matrices of the matrix-fraction description. Three different approaches are introduced to fine-tune the model using nonlinear programming methods to minimize the desired cost function. The first method uses an eigenvalue assignment technique to reassign a subset of system poles to improve the identified model. The second method deals with the model in the real Schur or modal form, reassigns a subset of system poles, and adjusts the columns (rows) of the input (output) influence matrix using a nonlinear optimizer. The third method also optimizes a subset of poles, but the input and output influence matrices are refined at every optimization step through least-squares procedures.

  17. Quantitative broadband absorption and scattering spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady state methodologies

    DOEpatents

    Tromberg, Bruce J.; Berger, Andrew J.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Bevilacqua, Frederic; Jakubowski, Dorota

    2008-09-23

    A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses a combination of frequency-domain and steady-state reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light steady-state measurement, whereas the frequency-domain data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption and reduced scattering derived from the frequency-domain data are used to calibrate the intensity of the steady-state measurements and to determine the reduced scattering coefficient at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. The absorption coefficient spectrum is determined by comparing the steady-state reflectance values with the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. Absorption spectra of a turbid phantom and of human breast tissue in vivo, derived with the combined frequency-domain and steady-state technique, agree well with expected reference values.

  18. Determination of medium electrical properties through full-wave modelling of frequency domain reflectrometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Frédéric; Lambot, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Accurate knowledge of the shallow soil properties is of prime importance in agricultural, hydrological and environmental engineering. During the last decade, numerous geophysical techniques, either invasive or resorting to proximal or remote sensing, have been developed and applied for quantitative characterization of soil properties. Amongst them, time domain reflectrometry (TDR) and frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) are recognized as standard techniques for the determination of soil dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity, based on the reflected electromagnetic waves from a probe inserted into the soil. TDR data were first commonly analyzed in the time domain using methods considering only a part of the waveform information. Later, advancements have led to the possibility of analyzing the TDR signal through full-wave inverse modeling either in the time or the frequency domains. A major advantage of FDR compared to TDR is the possibility to increase the bandwidth, thereby increasing the information content of the data and providing more detailed characterization of the medium. Amongst the recent works in this field, Minet et al. (2010) developed a modeling procedure for processing FDR data based on an exact solution of Maxwell's equations for wave propagation in one-dimensional multilayered media. In this approach, the probe head is decoupled from the medium and is fully described by characteristic transfer functions. The authors successfully validated the method for homogeneous sand subject to a range of water contents. In the present study, we further validated the modelling approach using reference liquids with well-characterized frequency-dependent electrical properties. In addition, the FDR model was coupled with a dielectric mixing model to investigate the ability of retrieving water content, pore water electrical conductivity and sand porosity from inversion of FDR data acquired in sand subject to different water content levels. Finally, the

  19. Water content evaluation in unsaturated soil using GPR signal analysis in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The evaluation of the water content of unsaturated soil is important for many applications, such as environmental engineering, agriculture and soil science. This study is applied to pavement engineering, but the proposed approach can be utilized in other applications as well. There are various techniques currently available which measure the soil moisture content and some of these techniques are non-intrusive. Herein, a new methodology is proposed that avoids several disadvantages of existing techniques. In this study, ground-coupled Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques are used to non-destructively monitor the volumetric water content. The signal is processed in the frequency domain; this method is based on Rayleigh scattering according to the Fresnel theory. The scattering produces a non-linear frequency modulation of the electromagnetic signal, where the modulation is a function of the water content. To test the proposed method, five different types of soil were wetted in laboratory under controlled conditions and the samples were analyzed using GPR. The GPR data were processed in the frequency domain, demonstrating a correlation between the shift of the frequency spectrum of the radar signal and the moisture content. The techniques also demonstrate the potential for detecting clay content in soils. This frequency domain approach gives an innovative method that can be applied for an accurate and non-invasive estimation of the water content of soils - particularly, in sub-asphalt aggregate layers - and assessing the bearing capacity and efficacy of the pavement drainage layers. The main benefit of this method is that no preventive calibration is needed.

  20. Research efforts in support of resonance extraction studies. Volume 1: Improvement and validation of TWFD (Thin-Wire Frequency-Domain): A thin-wire frequency-domain scattering code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auton, J. R.; Larry, T. L.; Vanblaricum, M. L.

    1984-11-01

    The development of a thin-wire frequency-domain (TWFD) method of moments code was discussed in a previous report 1. Since that time this code has undergone further development and numerical testing. The purpose of the code is to provide a theoretical and numerical basis to aid in understanding the resonance region electromagnetic scattering from thin-wire stick models. This frequency domain code augments a time-domain code (TWTD) which calculates the scattered transient response for an impulsive incident field. The outputs from both of these codes have provided numerical predictions which have been indispensible in assessing our ability to extract resonance information from actual scattering range data.

  1. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, John L.; Morrison, William H.; Christophersen, Jon P.

    2012-04-03

    Real-time battery impedance spectrum is acquired using a one-time record. Fast Summation Transformation (FST) is a parallel method of acquiring a real-time battery impedance spectrum using a one-time record that enables battery diagnostics. An excitation current to a battery is a sum of equal amplitude sine waves of frequencies that are octave harmonics spread over a range of interest. A sample frequency is also octave and harmonically related to all frequencies in the sum. The time profile of this signal has a duration that is a few periods of the lowest frequency. The voltage response of the battery, average deleted, is the impedance of the battery in the time domain. Since the excitation frequencies are known and octave and harmonically related, a simple algorithm, FST, processes the time record by rectifying relative to the sine and cosine of each frequency. Another algorithm yields real and imaginary components for each frequency.

  2. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, John L. (Inventor); Morrison, William H. (Inventor); Christophersen, Jon P. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Real-time battery impedance spectrum is acquired using a one-time record. Fast Summation Transformation (FST) is a parallel method of acquiring a real-time battery impedance spectrum using a one-time record that enables battery diagnostics. An excitation current to a battery is a sum of equal amplitude sine waves of frequencies that are octave harmonics spread over a range of interest. A sample frequency is also octave and harmonically related to all frequencies in the sum. The time profile of this signal has a duration that is a few periods of the lowest frequency. The voltage response of the battery, average deleted, is the impedance of the battery in the time domain. Since the excitation frequencies are known and octave and harmonically related, a simple algorithm, FST, processes the time record by rectifying relative to the sine and cosine of each frequency. Another algorithm yields real and imaginary components for each frequency.

  3. Frequency domain transfer function identification using the computer program SYSFIT

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    Because the primary application of SYSFIT for BPA involves studying power system dynamics, this investigation was geared toward simulating the effects that might be encountered in studying electromechanical oscillations in power systems. Although the intended focus of this work is power system oscillations, the studies are sufficiently genetic that the results can be applied to many types of oscillatory systems with closely-spaced modes. In general, there are two possible ways of solving the optimization problem. One is to use a least-squares optimization function and to write the system in such a form that the problem becomes one of linear least-squares. The solution can then be obtained using a standard least-squares technique. The other method involves using a search method to obtain the optimal model. This method allows considerably more freedom in forming the optimization function and model, but it requires an initial guess of the system parameters. SYSFIT employs this second approach. Detailed investigations were conducted into three main areas: (1) fitting to exact frequency response data of a linear system; (2) fitting to the discrete Fourier transformation of noisy data; and (3) fitting to multi-path systems. The first area consisted of investigating the effects of alternative optimization cost function options; using different optimization search methods; incorrect model order, missing response data; closely-spaced poles; and closely-spaced pole-zero pairs. Within the second area, different noise colorations and levels were studied. In the third area, methods were investigated for improving fitting results by incorporating more than one system path. The following is a list of guidelines and properties developed from the study for fitting a transfer function to the frequency response of a system using optimization search methods.

  4. New parallel SOR method by domain partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, D.; Adams, L.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper the authors propose and analyze a new parallel SOR method, the PSOR method, formulated by using domain partitioning and interprocessor data communication techniques. They prove that the PSOR method has the same asymptotic rate of convergence as the Red/Black (R/B) SOR method for the five-point stencil on both strip and block partitions, and as the four-color (R/B/G/O) SOR method for the nine-point stencil on strip partitions. They also demonstrate the parallel performance of the PSOR method on four different MIMD multiprocessors (a KSR1, an Intel Delta, a Paragon, and an IBM SP2). Finally, they compare the parallel performance of PSOR, R/B SOR, and R/B/G/O SOR. Numerical results on the Paragon indicate that PSOR is more efficient than R/B SOR and R/B/G/O SOR in both computation and interprocessor data communication.

  5. Mixed frequency/time domain optical analogues of heteronuclear multidimensional NMR.

    PubMed

    Pakoulev, Andrei V; Rickard, Mark A; Meyer, Kent A; Kornau, Kathryn; Mathew, Nathan A; Thompson, David E; Wright, John C

    2006-03-16

    Ultrafast spectroscopy is dominated by time domain methods such as pump-probe and, more recently, 2D-IR spectroscopies. In this paper, we demonstrate that a mixed frequency/time domain ultrafast four wave mixing (FWM) approach not only provides similar capabilities, but it also provides optical analogues of multiple- and zero-quantum heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The method requires phase coherence between the excitation pulses only over the dephasing time of the coherences. It uses twelve coherence pathways that include four with populations, four with zero-quantum coherences, and four with double-quantum coherences. Each pathway provides different capabilities. The population pathways correspond to those of two-dimensional (2D) time domain spectroscopies, while the double- and zero-quantum coherence pathways access the coherent dynamics of coupled quantum states. The three spectral and two temporal dimensions enable the isolation and characterization of the spectral correlations between different vibrational and/or electronic states, coherence and population relaxation rates, and coupling strengths. Quantum-level interference between the direct and free-induction decay components gives a spectral resolution that exceeds that of the excitation pulses. Appropriate parameter choices allow isolation of individual coherence pathways. The mixed frequency/time domain approach allows one to access any set of quantum states with coherent multidimensional spectroscopy. PMID:16526612

  6. Suspension parameter estimation in the frequency domain using a matrix inversion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thite, A. N.; Banvidi, S.; Ibicek, T.; Bennett, L.

    2011-12-01

    The dynamic lumped parameter models used to optimise the ride and handling of a vehicle require base values of the suspension parameters. These parameters are generally experimentally identified. The accuracy of identified parameters can depend on the measurement noise and the validity of the model used. The existing publications on suspension parameter identification are generally based on the time domain and use a limited degree of freedom. Further, the data used are either from a simulated 'experiment' or from a laboratory test on an idealised quarter or a half-car model. In this paper, a method is developed in the frequency domain which effectively accounts for the measurement noise. Additional dynamic constraining equations are incorporated and the proposed formulation results in a matrix inversion approach. The nonlinearities in damping are estimated, however, using a time-domain approach. Full-scale 4-post rig test data of a vehicle are used. The variations in the results are discussed using the modal resonant behaviour. Further, a method is implemented to show how the results can be improved when the matrix inverted is ill-conditioned. The case study shows a good agreement between the estimates based on the proposed frequency-domain approach and measurable physical parameters.

  7. A frequency domain analysis of spatial organization of epicardial maps.

    PubMed

    Sih, H J; Sahakian, A V; Arentzen, C E; Swiryn, S

    1995-07-01

    Mapping of organized rhythms like sinus rhythm uses activation times from individual electrograms, and often assumes that the map for a single activation is similar to maps for subsequent activations. However, during fibrillation, activation times and electrograms are not easy to define, and maps change from activation to activation. Volume and complexity of data make analysis of more than a few seconds of fibrillation difficult. Magnitude Squared Coherence (MSC), a frequency domain measure of the phase consistency between two signals, can be used to help interpret longer data segments without defining activation times or electrograms. Sinus rhythm, flutter, and fibrillation in humans and swine were mapped with an array of unipolar electrodes (2.5 mm apart) at 240 sites on the atrial or ventricular epicardium. Four-second data segments were analyzed. One site near the center of the array was chosen ad hoc as a reference. MSC maps were made by measuring mean MSC from 0-50 Hz between every point in the array relative to the reference. Isocoherence contours were drawn. The effects of bias in the coherence estimate due to misalignment were investigated. Average MSC versus distance from the reference was measured for all rhythms. Results indicate that in a 4-s segment of fibrillation, there can exist some phase consistency between one site and the reference and little or none between a second site and the reference even when both sites are equidistant from the reference. In fibrillation, isocoherence contours are elongated and irregularly shaped, reflecting long-term, but nonuniform, spatial organization. That is, activation during fibrillation cannot be considered as random over a 4-s interval. Bias in the coherence estimate due to misalignment is significant for sinus rhythm and flutter, but can be corrected by manual realignment. Average MSC drops with distance for all rhythms, being most pronounced for fibrillation, MSC maps may provide insights into long

  8. Frequency-domain optical probing of coherent spins in nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Frey, J A; Berezovsky, J

    2012-08-27

    Spin-photon interactions such as the Faraday effect provide techniques for measuring coherent spin dynamics in semiconductors. In contrast to typical ultrafast pulsed laser techniques, which measure spin dynamics in the time domain with an intense, spectrally broad probe pulse, we demonstrate a frequency-domain spin-photon resonance effect using modulated continuous-wave lasers which enables measurement of GHz-scale coherent spin dynamics in semiconductors with minimal spectral linewidth. This technique permits high-resolution spectroscopic measurements not possible with ultrafast methods. We have employed this effect to observe coherent spin dynamics in CdSe nanocrystals using standard diode lasers. By fitting the results to the expected model, we extract electron g-factors, and spin coherence and dephasing times in agreement with time-domain measurements. PMID:23037054

  9. 2D Seismic Imaging of Elastic Parameters by Frequency Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.; Operto, S.

    2008-12-01

    Thanks to recent advances in parallel computing, full waveform inversion is today a tractable seismic imaging method to reconstruct physical parameters of the earth interior at different scales ranging from the near- surface to the deep crust. We present a massively parallel 2D frequency-domain full-waveform algorithm for imaging visco-elastic media from multi-component seismic data. The forward problem (i.e. the resolution of the frequency-domain 2D PSV elastodynamics equations) is based on low-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method (P0 and/or P1 interpolations). Thanks to triangular unstructured meshes, the DG method allows accurate modeling of both body waves and surface waves in case of complex topography for a discretization of 10 to 15 cells per shear wavelength. The frequency-domain DG system is solved efficiently for multiple sources with the parallel direct solver MUMPS. The local inversion procedure (i.e. minimization of residuals between observed and computed data) is based on the adjoint-state method which allows to efficiently compute the gradient of the objective function. Applying the inversion hierarchically from the low frequencies to the higher ones defines a multiresolution imaging strategy which helps convergence towards the global minimum. In place of expensive Newton algorithm, the combined use of the diagonal terms of the approximate Hessian matrix and optimization algorithms based on quasi-Newton methods (Conjugate Gradient, LBFGS, ...) allows to improve the convergence of the iterative inversion. The distribution of forward problem solutions over processors driven by a mesh partitioning performed by METIS allows to apply most of the inversion in parallel. We shall present the main features of the parallel modeling/inversion algorithm, assess its scalability and illustrate its performances with realistic synthetic case studies.

  10. Frequency domain analysis of the random loading of cracked panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    The primary effort concerned the development of analytical methods for the accurate prediction of the effect of random loading on a panel with a crack. Of particular concern was the influence of frequency on the stress intensity factor behavior. Many modern structures, such as those found in advanced aircraft, are lightweight and susceptible to critical vibrations, and consequently dynamic response plays a very important role in their analysis. The presence of flaws and cracks can have catastrophic consequences. The stress intensity factor, K, emerges as a very significant parameter that characterizes the crack behavior. In analyzing the dynamic response of panels that contain cracks, the finite element method is used, but because this type of problem is inherently computationally intensive, a number of ways of calculating K more efficiently are explored.