Sample records for frequency harmonic imaging

  1. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5?MHz to 5?MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15?dB to 22?dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30?MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70??m compared to 150??m pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for the design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers. PMID:25856384

  2. A parallel adaptive finite element simplified spherical harmonics approximation solver for frequency domain fluorescence molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yujie; Zhu, Banghe; Shen, Haiou; Rasmussen, John C.; Wang, Ge; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2010-08-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging/tomography may play an important future role in preclinical research and clinical diagnostics. Time- and frequency-domain fluorescence imaging can acquire more measurement information than the continuous wave (CW) counterpart, improving the image quality of fluorescence molecular tomography. Although diffusion approximation (DA) theory has been extensively applied in optical molecular imaging, high-order photon migration models need to be further investigated to match quantitation provided by nuclear imaging. In this paper, a frequency-domain parallel adaptive finite element solver is developed with simplified spherical harmonics (SPN) approximations. To fully evaluate the performance of the SPN approximations, a fast time-resolved tetrahedron-based Monte Carlo fluorescence simulator suitable for complex heterogeneous geometries is developed using a convolution strategy to realize the simulation of the fluorescence excitation and emission. The validation results show that high-order SPN can effectively correct the modeling errors of the diffusion equation, especially when the tissues have high absorption characteristics or when high modulation frequency measurements are used. Furthermore, the parallel adaptive mesh evolution strategy improves the modeling precision and the simulation speed significantly on a realistic digital mouse phantom. This solver is a promising platform for fluorescence molecular tomography using high-order approximations to the radiative transfer equation.

  3. Multi-frequency harmonic arrays: initial experience with a novel transducer concept for nonlinear contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Flemming; Shi, William T; Jadidian, Bahram; Winder, Alan A

    2004-12-01

    Nonlinear contrast imaging modes such as second harmonic imaging (HI) and subharmonic imaging (SHI) are increasingly important for clinical applications. However, the performance of currently available transducers for HI and SHI is significantly constrained by their limited bandwidth. To bypass this constraint, a novel transducer concept termed multi-frequency harmonic transducer arrays (MFHA's) has been designed and a preliminary evaluation has been conducted. The MFHA may ultimately be used for broadband contrast enhanced HI and SHI with high dynamic range and consists of three multi-element piezo-composite sub-arrays (A-C) constructed so the center frequencies are 4f(A) = 2f(B) = f(C) (specifically 2.5/5.0/10.0 MHz and 1.75/3.5/7.0 MHz). In principle this enables SHI by transmitting on sub-array C receiving on B and, similarly, from B to A as well as HI by transmitting on A receiving on B and, likewise, from B to C. Initially transmit and receive pressure levels of the arrays were measured with the elements of each sub-array wired in parallel. Following contrast administration, preliminary in vitro HI and SHI signal-to-noise ratios of up to 40 dB were obtained. In conclusion, initial design and in vitro characterization of two MFHA's have been performed. They have an overall broad frequency bandwidth of at least two octaves. Due to the special design of the array assembly, the SNR for HI and SHI was comparable to that of regular B-mode and better than commercially available HI systems. However, further research on multi-element MFHA's is required before their potential for in vivo nonlinear contrast imaging can be assessed. PMID:15530981

  4. In vitro and in vivo tissue harmonic images obtained with parallel transmit beamforming by means of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Demi, Libertario; Ramalli, Alessandro; Giannini, Gabriele; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In classic pulse-echo ultrasound imaging, the data acquisition rate is limited by the speed of sound. To overcome this, parallel beamforming techniques in transmit (PBT) and in receive (PBR) mode have been proposed. In particular, PBT techniques, based on the transmission of focused beams, are more suitable for harmonic imaging because they are capable of generating stronger harmonics. Recently, orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) has been investigated as a means to obtain parallel beamformed tissue harmonic images. To date, only numerical studies and experiments in water have been performed, hence neglecting the effect of frequencydependent absorption. Here we present the first in vitro and in vivo tissue harmonic images obtained with PBT by means of OFDM, and we compare the results with classic B-mode tissue harmonic imaging. The resulting contrast-to-noise ratio, here used as a performance metric, is comparable. A reduction by 2 dB is observed for the case in which three parallel lines are reconstructed. In conclusion, the applicability of this technique to ultrasonography as a means to improve the data acquisition rate is confirmed. PMID:25585405

  5. Frequency domain second harmonic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianping; Tomov, I. V.; Jiang, Y.; Chen, Zhongping

    2006-02-01

    We report the development of a frequency domain second harmonic OCT system. The system uses a 170 fs pulses from Yb fiber laser and second harmonic spectrum is recorded by a 0.17 nm resolution spectrometer and thermoelectric cooled CCD detector. The system is applied to image biological tissue of the fish scales. Highly organized collagen fibrils can be visualized in the recorded images. The axial resolution of the frequency domain SH-OCT is 30 ?m.

  6. High frequency nonlinear imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jens K. Poulsen

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear imaging has already shown improved image resolution compared to fundamental imaging at lower frequencies (2-4 MHz). The required steps to obtain nonlinear images at high frequencies are presented here. The transmit frequency was from 20 to 60 MHz and on receive, pulse-inversion, the first, second, and the third harmonic were used for imaging. Experiments were conducted using a wire

  7. Fully parallel adaptive finite element simulation using the simplified spherical harmonics approximations for frequency-domain fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yujie; Zhu, Banghe; Shen, Haiou; Rasmussen, John C.; Wang, Ge; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging/tomography may play an important role in preclinical research and clinical diagnostics as a type of optical molecular. Time- and frequency-domain measurement can acquire more measurement information, reducing the ill-posedness and improving the reconstruction quality of fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography. Although the diffusion approximation (DA) theory has been extensively in optical imaging, high-order photon migration models must be further investigated for application to complex and small tissue volumes. In this paper, a frequency-domain fully parallel adaptive finite element solver is developed with the simplified spherical harmonics (SPN) approximations. To fully evaluate the performance of the SPN approximations, a fast tetrahedron-based Monte Carlo simulator suitable for complex heterogeneous geometries is developed using the convolution strategy to realize the simulation of the fluorescence excitation and emission. With simple and real digital mouse phantoms, the results show that the significant precision and speed improvements are obtained from the parallel adaptive mesh evolution strategy.

  8. High-resolution frequency domain second harmonic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianping; Tomov, I. V.; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Zhongping

    2007-02-01

    We used continuum generated in an 8.5 cm long fiber by a femtosecond Yb fiber laser to improve threefold the axial resolution of frequency domain SH-OCT to 12?m. The acquisition time was shortened by more than two orders of magnitude compared to time domain SH-OCT. The system was applied to image biological tissue of fish scales, pig leg tendon and rabbit eye sclera. Highly organized collagen fibrils can be visualized in the recorded images. Polarization dependence on second harmonic has been used to obtain polarization resolved images.

  9. Superharmonic imaging with chirp coded excitation: filtering spectrally overlapped harmonics.

    PubMed

    Harput, Sevan; McLaughlan, James; Cowell, David M J; Freear, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Superharmonic imaging improves the spatial resolution by using the higher order harmonics generated in tissue. The superharmonic component is formed by combining the third, fourth, and fifth harmonics, which have low energy content and therefore poor SNR. This study uses coded excitation to increase the excitation energy. The SNR improvement is achieved on the receiver side by performing pulse compression with harmonic matched filters. The use of coded signals also introduces new filtering capabilities that are not possible with pulsed excitation. This is especially important when using wideband signals. For narrowband signals, the spectral boundaries of the harmonics are clearly separated and thus easy to filter; however, the available imaging bandwidth is underused. Wideband excitation is preferable for harmonic imaging applications to preserve axial resolution, but it generates spectrally overlapping harmonics that are not possible to filter in time and frequency domains. After pulse compression, this overlap increases the range side lobes, which appear as imaging artifacts and reduce the Bmode image quality. In this study, the isolation of higher order harmonics was achieved in another domain by using the fan chirp transform (FChT). To show the effect of excitation bandwidth in superharmonic imaging, measurements were performed by using linear frequency modulated chirp excitation with varying bandwidths of 10% to 50%. Superharmonic imaging was performed on a wire phantom using a wideband chirp excitation. Results were presented with and without applying the FChT filtering technique by comparing the spatial resolution and side lobe levels. Wideband excitation signals achieved a better resolution as expected, however range side lobes as high as -23 dB were observed for the superharmonic component of chirp excitation with 50% fractional bandwidth. The proposed filtering technique achieved >50 dB range side lobe suppression and improved the image quality without affecting the axial resolution. PMID:25389159

  10. Use of harmonic imaging without echocardiographic contrast to improve two-dimensional image quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KirkT Spencer; James Bednarz; PatrickG Rafter; Claudia Korcarz; RobertoM Lang

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether harmonic imaging (HI) improves endocardial visualization during 2-dimensional echocardiography without echocardiographic contrast. HI differs from fundamental imaging (FI) by transmitting ultrasound at one frequency and receiving at twice the transmitted frequency. This technique has been used in conjunction with contrast echocardiography to enhance myocardial contrast visualization. HI and FI were sequentially

  11. Ultrasound harmonic imaging using nonlinear chirp for cardiac imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyun-jae Song; Jaehee Song; Jin Ho Chang; Tai-kyong Song

    2010-01-01

    Coded excitation techniques have been used to improve a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in tissue harmonic imaging. However, a poor separation between fundamental and target harmonic components causes the second harmonic signals to have a high level of range sidelobes after compression. In terms of the separation performance, pulse inversion (PI) is the best method and thus provides the lowest level

  12. Frequency-resolved optical grating using third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Krumbuegel, M.A.; Delong, K.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We demonstrate the first frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of an laser oscillator without the time ambiguity using third-harmonic generation. The experiment agrees well with the phase-retrieved spectrograms.

  13. Investigation of plasma diagnostics using a dual frequency harmonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Hwan [Department of Nanoscale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Do; Cho, Sung-Won; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-07

    Plasma diagnostic methods using harmonic currents analysis of electrostatic probes were experimentally investigated to understand the differences in their measurement of the plasma parameters. When dual frequency voltage (?{sub 1},?{sub 2}) was applied to a probe, various harmonic currents (?{sub 1},?2?{sub 1},?{sub 2},?2?{sub 2},?{sub 2}±?{sub 1},?{sub 2}±2?{sub 1}) were generated due to the non-linearity of the probe sheath. The electron temperature can be obtained from the ratio of the two harmonics of the probe currents. According to the combinations of the two harmonics, the sensitivities in the measurement of the electron temperature differed, and this results in a difference of the electron temperature. From experiments and simulation, it is shown that this difference is caused by the systematic and random noise.

  14. Contrast and harmonic imaging improves accuracy and efficiency of novice readers for dobutamine stress echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlassak, Irmien; Rubin, David N.; Odabashian, Jill A.; Garcia, Mario J.; King, Lisa M.; Lin, Steve S.; Drinko, Jeanne K.; Morehead, Annitta J.; Prior, David L.; Asher, Craig R.; Klein, Allan L.; Thomas, James D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Newer contrast agents as well as tissue harmonic imaging enhance left ventricular (LV) endocardial border delineation, and therefore, improve LV wall-motion analysis. Interpretation of dobutamine stress echocardiography is observer-dependent and requires experience. This study was performed to evaluate whether these new imaging modalities would improve endocardial visualization and enhance accuracy and efficiency of the inexperienced reader interpreting dobutamine stress echocardiography. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-nine consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography. Both fundamental (2.5 MHZ) and harmonic (1.7 and 3.5 MHZ) mode images were obtained in four standard views at rest and at peak stress during a standard dobutamine infusion stress protocol. Following the noncontrast images, Optison was administered intravenously in bolus (0.5-3.0 ml), and fundamental and harmonic images were obtained. The dobutamine echocardiography studies were reviewed by one experienced and one inexperienced echocardiographer. LV segments were graded for image quality and function. Time for interpretation also was recorded. Contrast with harmonic imaging improved the diagnostic concordance of the novice reader to the expert reader by 7.1%, 7.5%, and 12.6% (P < 0.001) as compared with harmonic imaging, fundamental imaging, and fundamental imaging with contrast, respectively. For the novice reader, reading time was reduced by 47%, 55%, and 58% (P < 0.005) as compared with the time needed for fundamental, fundamental contrast, and harmonic modes, respectively. With harmonic imaging, the image quality score was 4.6% higher (P < 0.001) than for fundamental imaging. Image quality scores were not significantly different for noncontrast and contrast images. CONCLUSION: Harmonic imaging with contrast significantly improves the accuracy and efficiency of the novice dobutamine stress echocardiography reader. The use of harmonic imaging reduces the frequency of nondiagnostic wall segments.

  15. Multimode Directional Coupler for Utilization of Harmonic Frequencies from TWTAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2013-01-01

    A novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC) intended for the measurement and potential utilization of the second and higher order harmonic frequencies from high-power traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs) has been successfully designed, fabricated, and tested. The design is based on the characteristic multiple propagation modes of the electrical and magnetic field components of electromagnetic waves in a rectangular waveguide. The purpose was to create a rugged, easily constructed, more efficient waveguide- based MDC for extraction and exploitation of the second harmonic signal from the RF output of high-power TWTs used for space communications. The application would be a satellitebased beacon source needed for Qband and V/W-band atmospheric propagation studies. The MDC could function as a CW narrow-band source or as a wideband source for study of atmospheric group delay effects on highdata- rate links. The MDC is fabricated from two sections of waveguide - a primary one for the fundamental frequency and a secondary waveguide for the second harmonic - that are joined together such that the second harmonic higher order modes are selectively coupled via precision- machined slots for propagation in the secondary waveguide. In the TWTA output waveguide port, both the fundamental and the second harmonic signals are present. These signals propagate in the output waveguide as the dominant and higher order modes, respectively. By including an appropriate mode selective waveguide directional coupler, such as the MDC presented here at the output of the TWTA, the power at the second harmonic can be sampled and amplified to the power level needed for atmospheric propagation studies. The important conclusions from the preliminary test results for the multimode directional coupler are: (1) the second harmonic (Ka-band) can be measured and effectively separated from the fundamental (Ku-band) with no coupling of the latter, (2) power losses in the fundamental frequency are negligible, and (3) the power level of the extracted second harmonic is sufficient for further amplification to power levels needed for practical applications. It was also demonstrated that third order and potentially higher order harmonics are measurable with this device. The design is frequency agnostic, and with the appropriate choice of waveguides, is easily scaled to higher frequency TWTs. The MDC has the same function but with a number of important advantages over the conventional diplexer.

  16. Combined Tissue Imaging Technique: Deconvolved Inverse Scattering Impedance Imaging with Account of the Second Harmonic Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, Nikolay; Driscoll, Diana; Tobocman, William

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging (THI) can greatly improve the diagnostic quality of images. While a large transducer bandwidth is necessary for this technique, the axial resolution is still limited in THI. Technological limitations for THI are also more pronounced at higher frequencies because of the small size of transducer. The depth of penetration is also less due to higher attenuation. Here we describe a new combined imaging technique: Born-approximation deconvolved inverse scattering (BADIS) imaging and tissue harmonic imaging (THI). BADIS technique deconvolves the incident pulse from the reflected pulse, and uses the resulting impulse response to produce an image of the acoustic impedance distribution. These images are free of speckle and have improved axial resolution. BADIS allows the use of lower frequencies than those would be required by the pulse-echo method to achieve the same axial resolution. To provide further improvement we took into account of the nonlinear properties of tissue and implemented the second harmonic signal generated due to this nonlinearity in BADIS technique. We obtained results of soft tissue imaging that demonstrated the improvement of the image quality in comparison with the common pulse-echo imaging technique.

  17. Excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fomichev, V. V.; Fainshtein, S. M.; Chernov, G. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    An alternative mechanism for the excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics as a result of the development of explosive instability in a weakly relativistic beam-plasma system in the solar atmosphere is proposed. The efficiency of the new mechanism as compared to the previously discussed ones is analyzed.

  18. Lens-less surface second harmonic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sly, Krystal L.; Nguyen, Trang T.; Conboy, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Lens-less surface second harmonic generation imaging (SSHGI) is used to image an SHG active molecule, (S)-( + )-1,1’-bi-2-naphthol (SBN), incorporated into a lipid bilayer patterned with the 1951 United States Air Force resolution test target. Data show the coherent plane-wave nature of SHG allows direct imaging without the aid of a lens system. Lens-less SSHGI readily resolves line-widths as small as 223 ?m at an object-image distance of 7.6 cm and line-widths of 397 ?m at distances as far as 30 cm. Lens-less SSHGI simplifies the detection method, raises photon collection efficiency, and expands the field-of-view. These advantages allow greater throughput and make lens-less SSHGI a potentially valuable detection method for biosensors and medical diagnostics. PMID:23037346

  19. Second harmonic generation imaging in muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Both, Martin; Vogel, Martin; Fink, Rainer H.; Uttenweiler, Dietmar

    2003-10-01

    We have used second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging to quantify a strong intrinsic SHG-signal from cellular and subcellular muscle fibre preparations. In isolated single muscle cells, the intrinsic SHG-signal periodically follows the striation pattern and strongly depends on the sarcomere length and the polarization of the illuminating laser beam. At the subcellular level, the SHG signal seems to be located mainly at the overlapping region of the (thin) actin and (thick) myosin filaments. Thus, SHG imaging resolves the arrangement of the contractile structures with high resolution non-invasively and without chromophores. It may also allow to study dynamic molecular interactions of the motor protein myosin with actin filaments during force production and muscle shortening.

  20. OPTIMIZATION OF SECOND HARMONIC INPUT IMPEDANCE FOR HIGH CONVERSION GAIN FREQUENCY DOUBLER

    E-print Network

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    -5]. A quarter-wave length microstrip line designed at the second harmonic frequency is commonly used the input impedance at the second harmonic frequency. A LC tank resonator, as a second harmonic impedance at fundamental frequency. In practice, a stepped impedance resonator was utilized for realizing the designed

  1. High-resolution frequency-domain second-harmonic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianping; Tomov, Ivan V.; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Zhongping

    2007-04-01

    We used continuum generated in an 8.5 cm long fiber by a femtosecond Yb fiber laser to improve threefold the axial resolution of frequency domain second-harmonic optical coherence tomography (SH-OCT) to 12 ?m. The acquisition time was shortened by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared to the time-domain SH-OCT. The system was applied to image biological tissue of fish scales, pig leg tendon, and rabbit eye sclera. Highly organized collagen fibrils can be visualized in the recorded images. Polarization dependence on the SH has been used to obtain polarization resolved images.

  2. Non-Harmonic Analysis Applied to Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xu; Uchida, Tetsuya; Hirobayashi, Shigeki; Chong, Changho; Morosawa, Atsushi; Totsuka, Koki; Suzuki, Takuya

    2012-02-01

    A new processing technique called non-harmonic analysis (NHA) is proposed for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Conventional Fourier-domain OCT employs the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), which depends on the window function and length. The axial resolution of the OCT image, calculated by using DFT, is inversely proportional to the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the wavelength range. The FWHM of wavelength range is limited by the sweeping range of the source in swept-source OCT and it is limited by the number of CCD pixels in spectral-domain OCT. However, the NHA process does not have such constraints; NHA can resolve high frequencies irrespective of the window function and the frame length of the sampled data. In this study, the NHA process is described and it is applied to OCT imaging. It is compared with OCT images based on the DFT. To demonstrate the benefits of using NHA for OCT, we perform OCT imaging with NHA of an onion skin. The results reveal that NHA can achieve an image resolution equivalent that of a 100-nm sweep range using a significantly reduced wavelength range. They also reveal the potential of using this technique to achieve high-resolution imaging without using a broadband source. However, the long calculation times required for NHA must be addressed if it is to be used in clinical applications.

  3. In-phased second harmonic wave array generation with intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling.

    PubMed

    Hirosawa, Kenichi; Shohda, Fumio; Yanagisawa, Takayuki; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot cavity is one promising method to synchronize the phase of a laser array. However, it does not achieve the lowest array mode with the same phase but the highest array mode with the anti-phase between every two adjacent lasers, which is called out-phase locking. Consequently, their far-field images exhibit 2-peak profiles. We propose intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling. By placing a nonlinear crystal in a Talbot cavity, the Talbot cavity generates an out-phased fundamental wave array, which is converted into an in-phase-locked second harmonic wave array at the nonlinear crystal. We demonstrate numerical calculations and experiments on intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling and obtain an in-phase-locked second harmonic wave array for a Nd:YVO4 array laser. PMID:25837108

  4. Qualitative and quantitative effects of harmonic echocardiographic imaging on endocardial edge definition and side-lobe artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Yazbek, N.; Garcia, M. J.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Harmonic imaging is a new ultrasonographic technique that is designed to improve image quality by exploiting the spontaneous generation of higher frequencies as ultrasound propagates through tissue. We studied 51 difficult-to-image patients with blinded side-by-side cineloop evaluation of endocardial border definition by harmonic versus fundamental imaging. In addition, quantitative intensities from cavity versus wall were compared for harmonic versus fundamental imaging. Harmonic imaging improved left ventricular endocardial border delineation over fundamental imaging (superior: harmonic = 71.1%, fundamental = 18.7%; similar: 10.2%; P <.001). Quantitative analysis of 100 wall/cavity combinations demonstrated brighter wall segments and more strikingly darker cavities during harmonic imaging (cavity intensity on a 0 to 255 scale: fundamental = 15.6 +/- 8.6; harmonic = 6.0 +/- 5.3; P <.0001), which led to enhanced contrast between the wall and cavity (1.89 versus 1.19, P <.0001). Harmonic imaging reduces side-lobe artifacts, resulting in a darker cavity and brighter walls, thereby improving image contrast and endocardial delineation.

  5. Optical coherence tomography imaging based on non-harmonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xu; Hirobayashi, Shigeki; Chong, Changho; Morosawa, Atsushi; Totsuka, Koki; Suzuki, Takuya

    2009-11-01

    A new processing technique called Non-Harmonic Analysis (NHA) is proposed for OCT imaging. Conventional Fourier-Domain OCT relies on the FFT calculation which depends on the window function and length. Axial resolution is counter proportional to the frame length of FFT that is limited by the swept range of the swept source in SS-OCT, or the pixel counts of CCD in SD-OCT degraded in FD-OCT. However, NHA process is intrinsically free from this trade-offs; NHA can resolve high frequency without being influenced by window function or frame length of sampled data. In this study, NHA process is explained and applied to OCT imaging and compared with OCT images based on FFT. In order to validate the benefit of NHA in OCT, we carried out OCT imaging based on NHA with the three different sample of onion-skin,human-skin and pig-eye. The results show that NHA process can realize practical image resolution that is equivalent to 100nm swept range only with less than half-reduced wavelength range.

  6. Balancing Vibrations at Harmonic Frequencies by Injecting Harmonic Balancing Signals into the Armature of a Linear Motor/Alternator Coupled to a Stirling Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations at harmonic frequencies are reduced by injecting harmonic balancing signals into the armature of a linear motor/alternator coupled to a Stirling machine. The vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A harmonic balancing signal is generated for selected harmonics of the operating frequency by processing the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each harmonic. Reference inputs for each harmonic are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms at the frequency of the selected harmonic. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the harmonics are summed with a principal control signal. The harmonic balancing signals modify the principal electrical drive voltage and drive the motor/alternator with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each harmonic.

  7. Harmonic Image Reconstruction Assisted by a Nonlinear Metmaterial Surface

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhiyu

    We experimentally demonstrate a microwave far-field image reconstruction modality with the transverse resolution exceeding the diffraction limit by using a single layer of highly nonlinear metamaterial. The harmonic fields ...

  8. Efficient broadband third harmonic frequency conversion via angular dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D.M.; Henesian, M.A.; Milam, D.; Eimerl, D.

    1995-07-18

    In this paper we present experimental measurements and theoretical modeling of third harmonic (3{omega}) conversion efficiency with optical bandwidth. Third harmonic conversion efficiency drops precipitously as the input bandwidth significantly exceeds the phase matching limitations of the conversion crystals. For Type I/Type II frequency tripling, conversion efficiency be-gins to decrease for bandwidths greater than {approximately}60 GHz. However, conversion efficiency corresponding to monochromatic phase-matched beams can be recovered provided that the instantaneous Propagation vectors are phase matched at all times. This is achieved by imposing angular spectral dispersion (ASD) on the input beam via a diffraction grating, with a dispersion such that the phase mismatch for each frequency is zero. Experiments were performed on the Optical Sciences Laser (OSL), a 1--100 J class laser at LLNL. These experiments used a 200 GHz bandwidth source produced by a multipassed electro-optic phase modulator. The spectrum produced was composed of discrete frequency components spaced at 3 GHz intervals. Angular dispersion was incorporated by the addition of a 1200 gr/mm diffraction grating oriented at the Littrow angle, and capable of rotation about the beam direction. Experiments were performed with a pulse length of 1-ns and a 1{omega} input intensity of {approximately} 4 GW/cm{sup 2} for near optimal dispersion for phase matching, 5.2 {mu}rad/GHz, with 0.1, 60, and 155 GHz bandwidth, as well as for partial dispersion compensation, 1.66 {mu}rad/GHz, with 155 GHz and 0.1 GHz bandwidth. The direction of dispersion was varied incrementally 360{degrees} about the beam diameter. The addition of the grating to the beamline reduced the narrowband conversion efficiency by approximately 10%.

  9. Statistical model of clutter suppression in tissue harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiang; Hamilton, Mark F

    2011-03-01

    A statistical model is developed for the suppression of clutter in tissue harmonic imaging (THI). Tissue heterogeneity is modeled as a random phase screen that is characterized by its correlation length and variance. With the autocorrelation function taken to be Gaussian and for small variance, statistical solutions are derived for the mean intensities at the fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies in the field of a focused sound beam that propagates through the phase screen. The statistical solutions are verified by comparison with ensemble averaging of direct numerical simulations. The model demonstrates that THI reduces the aberration clutter appearing in the focal region regardless of the depth of the aberrating layer, with suppression of the clutter most effective when the layer is close to the source. The model is also applied to the reverberation clutter that is transmitted forward along the axis of the beam. As with aberration clutter, suppression of such reverberation clutter by THI is most pronounced when the tissue heterogeneity is located close to the source. PMID:21428483

  10. Statistical model of clutter suppression in tissue harmonic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiang; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model is developed for the suppression of clutter in tissue harmonic imaging (THI). Tissue heterogeneity is modeled as a random phase screen that is characterized by its correlation length and variance. With the autocorrelation function taken to be Gaussian and for small variance, statistical solutions are derived for the mean intensities at the fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies in the field of a focused sound beam that propagates through the phase screen. The statistical solutions are verified by comparison with ensemble averaging of direct numerical simulations. The model demonstrates that THI reduces the aberration clutter appearing in the focal region regardless of the depth of the aberrating layer, with suppression of the clutter most effective when the layer is close to the source. The model is also applied to the reverberation clutter that is transmitted forward along the axis of the beam. As with aberration clutter, suppression of such reverberation clutter by THI is most pronounced when the tissue heterogeneity is located close to the source. PMID:21428483

  11. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  12. Harmonic Spatial Coherence Imaging: An Ultrasonic Imaging Method Based on Backscatter Coherence

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jeremy J; Jakovljevic, Marko; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2012-01-01

    HSCI and SLSC imaging less sensitive to clutter because it has low spatial coherence. The method is based on the coherence of the second harmonic backscatter. Because the same signals that are used to construct harmonic B-mode images are also used to construct HSCI images, the benefits obtained with harmonic imaging are also applicable to HSCI. Harmonic imaging has been the primary tool for suppressing clutter in diagnostic ultrasound imaging, however second harmonic echoes are not necessarily immune to the effects of clutter. HSCI and SLSC imaging are less sensitive to clutter because it has low spatial coherence. Harmonic Spatial Coherence Imaging shows favorable imaging characteristics such as improved contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), improved speckle signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and better delineation of borders and other structures compared to fundamental and harmonic B-mode imaging. CNRs of up to 1.9 were obtained from in vivo imaging of human cardiac tissue with HSCI, compared to 0.6, 0.9, and 1.5 in fundamental B-mode, harmonic B-mode, and SLSC imaging, respectively. In vivo experiments in human liver tissue demonstrated SNRs of up to 3.4 for HSCI compared to 1.9 for harmonic B-mode. Nonlinear simulations of a heart chamber model were consistent with the in vivo experiments. PMID:22547276

  13. Invariant quaternion radial harmonic Fourier moments for color image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-yang, Wang; Wei-yi, Li; Hong-ying, Yang; Pan-pan, Niu; Yong-wei, Li

    2015-03-01

    Moments and moment invariants have become a powerful tool in image processing owing to their image description capability and invariance property. But, conventional methods are mainly introduced to deal with the binary or gray-scale images, and the only approaches for color image always have poor color image description capability. Based on radial harmonic Fourier moments (RHFMs) and quaternion, we introduced the quaternion radial harmonic Fourier moments (QRHFMs) for representing color images in this paper, which can be seen as the generalization of RHFMs for gray-level images. It is shown that the QRHFMs can be obtained from the RHFMs of each color channel. We derived and analyzed the rotation, scaling, and translation (RST) invariant property of QRHFMs. We also discussed the problem of color image retrieval using invariant QRHFMs. Experimental results are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed color image representation.

  14. Frequency-tunable second-harmonic submillimeter-wave gyrotron oscillators

    E-print Network

    Sousa, Antonio C. Torrezan de (Antonio Carlos Torrezan de)

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports the design and experimental demonstration of frequency-tunable submillimeter-wave gyrotrons operating in continuous wave (CW) at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. An unprecedented ...

  15. Imaging leukocytes in vivo with third harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Kun; Chen, Chien-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Shing; Wu, Pei-Chun; Hsieh, Tsung-Yuan; Liu, Han-Wen; Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Lin, Win-Li; Chia, Jean-San; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Without a labeling, we demonstrated that lipid granules in leukocytes have distinctive third harmonic generation (THG) contrast. Excited by a 1230nm femtosecond laser, THG signals were generated at a significantly higher level in neutrophils than other mononuclear cells, whereas signals in agranular lymphocytes were one order smaller. These characteristic THG features can also be observed in vivo to trace the newly recruited leukocytes following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Furthermore, using video-rate THG microscopy, we also captured images of blood cells in human capillaries. Quite different from red-blood-cells, every now and then, round and granule rich blood cells with strong THG contrast appeared in circulation. The corresponding volume densities in blood, evaluated from their frequencies of appearance and the velocity of circulation, fall within the physiological range of human white blood cell counts. These results suggested that labeling-free THG imaging may provide timely tracing of leukocyte movement and hematology inspection without disturbing the normal cellular or physiological status.

  16. High Harmonic Frequency Combs for High Resolution Spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ozawa; J. Rauschenberger; Ch. Gohle; M. Herrmann; D. R. Walker; V. Pervak; A. Fernandez; R. Graf; A. Apolonski; R. Holzwarth; F. Krausz; T. W. Hänsch; Th. Udem

    2008-01-01

    We generated a series of harmonics in a xenon gas jet inside a cavity seeded by pulses from a Ti:sapphire mode-locked laser with a repetition rate of 10.8 MHz. Harmonics up to 19th order at 43 nm were observed with plateau harmonics at the muW power level. An elaborate dispersion compensation scheme and the use of a moderate repetition rate

  17. Time domain simulation of nonlinear acoustic beams generated by rectangular pistons with application to harmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinmai; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-01-01

    A time-domain numerical code (the so-called Texas code) that solves the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation has been extended from an axis-symmetric coordinate system to a three-dimensional (3D) Cartesian coordinate system. The code accounts for diffraction (in the parabolic approximation), nonlinearity and absorption and dispersion associated with thermoviscous and relaxation processes. The 3D time domain code was shown to be in agreement with benchmark solutions for circular and rectangular sources, focused and unfocused beams, and linear and nonlinear propagation. The 3D code was used to model the nonlinear propagation of diagnostic ultrasound pulses through tissue. The prediction of the second-harmonic field was sensitive to the choice of frequency-dependent absorption: a frequency squared f2 dependence produced a second-harmonic field which peaked closer to the transducer and had a lower amplitude than that computed for an f1.1 dependence. In comparing spatial maps of the harmonics we found that the second harmonic had dramatically reduced amplitude in the near field and also lower amplitude side lobes in the focal region than the fundamental. These findings were consistent for both uniform and apodized sources and could be contributing factors in the improved imaging reported with clinical scanners using tissue harmonic imaging. .

  18. Harmonic generation by yeast cells in response to low-frequency electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawarathna, D.; Claycomb, J. R.; Cardenas, G.; Gardner, J.; Warmflash, D.; Miller, J. H., Jr.; Widger, W. R.

    2006-05-01

    We report on harmonic generation by budding yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 108cells/ml ) in response to sinusoidal electric fields with amplitudes ranging from zero to 5V/cm in the frequency range 10-300Hz . The cell-generated harmonics are found to exhibit strong amplitude and frequency dependence. Sodium metavanadate, an inhibitor of the proton pump known as H+ -ATPase, and glucose, a substrate of H+ -ATPase, are found to increase harmonic production at low amplitudes while reducing it at large amplitudes. This P-type proton pump can be driven by an oscillatory transmembrane potential, and its nonlinear response is believed to be largely responsible for harmonic production at low frequencies in yeast cells. We find that the observed harmonics show dramatic changes with time and in their field and frequency dependence after perturbing the system by adding an inhibitor, substrate, or membrane depolarizer to the cell suspension.

  19. Separation of structural modes and harmonic frequencies in Operational Modal Analysis using random decrement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    Operational Modal Analysis (OMA) is used to extract modal parameters of a structure on the basis of their output response measured during operation. OMA, when applied to mechanical engineering structures is often faced with the problem of harmonics present in the output response. A complex structure may have many dominant frequency components in its response frequency spectrum. These may contain frequency components associated with resonant frequencies of the structure, which and the associated mode shapes and the damping factors represent the data of interest, but may also contain frequencies or harmonics associated with the excitation sources. Since in OMA the characteristics of the excitation sources are not known, one of the problems lies in separating the resonant frequencies from the harmonic excitation frequencies. Any error in this regard may lead to an error in modal identification with the consequence that a harmonic may be construed as a structural mode and vice versa. This issue is addressed in this paper and a method is presented for separating resonant frequencies from harmonic excitation frequencies using random decrement of the response. The principle of the method is presented using an analytical study on a single degree of freedom system. The effectiveness of the method is then demonstrated through numerical studies on a lumped parameter multi-degree of freedom system and a simulated plate structure. Detection of single and multiple harmonics in the response that are well separated as well as close to resonant frequencies are considered.

  20. Confocal imaging of biological tissues using second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Beop-Min; Stoller, Patrick C.; Reiser, Karen M.; Eichler, Juergen P.; Yan, Ming; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2000-06-01

    A confocal microscopy imaging system was devised to selectively detect second harmonic signals generated by biological tissues. Several types of biological tissues were examined using this imaging system, including human teeth, bovine blood vessels, and chicken skin. All these tissues generated strong second harmonic signals. There is considerable evidence that the source of these signals in tissue is collagen. Collagen, the predominant component of most tissues, is known to have second order nonlinear susceptibility. This technique may have diagnostic usefulness in pathophysiological conditions characterized by changes in collagen structure including malignant transformation of nevi, progression of diabetic complications, and abnormalities in wound healing.

  1. Confocal imaging of biological tissues using second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Beop-Min; Stoller, Patrick C.; Reiser, Karen M.; Eichler, Juergen P.; Yan, Ming; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2000-04-01

    A confocal microscopy imaging system was devised to selectively detect second harmonic signals generated by biological tissues. Several types of biological tissues were examined using this imaging system, including human teeth, bovine blood vessels, and chicken skin. All these tissues generated strong second harmonic signals. There is considerable evidence that the source of these signals in tissue is collagen. Collagen, the predominant component of most tissues, is known to have second order nonlinear susceptibility. This technique may have diagnostic usefulness in pathophysiological conditions characterized by changes in collagen structure including malignant transformation of nevi, progression of diabetic complications, and abnormalities in wound healing.

  2. Confocal Imaging of Biological Tissues Using Second Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B-M.; Stoller, P.; Reiser, K.; Eichler, J.; Yan, M.; Rubenchik, A.; Da Silva, L.

    2000-03-06

    A confocal microscopy imaging system was devised to selectively detect Second harmonic signals generated by biological tissues. Several types of biological tissues were examined using this imaging system, including human teeth, bovine blood vessels, and chicken skin. All these tissues generated strong second harmonic signals. There is considerable evidence that the source of these signals in tissue is collagen. Collagen, the predominant component of most tissues, is known to have second order nonlinear susceptibility. This technique may have diagnostic usefulness in pathophysiological conditions characterized by changes in collagen structure including malignant transformation of nevi, progression of diabetic complications, and abnormalities in wound healing.

  3. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  4. Single pulse frequency compounding protocol for superharmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilouchkine, M. G.; van Neer, P. L. M. J.; Verweij, M. D.; Matte, G. M.; Vletter, W. B.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; de Jong, N.

    2013-07-01

    Second harmonic imaging is currently accepted as the standard in commercial echographic systems. A new imaging technique, coined as superharmonic imaging (SHI), combines the third till the fifth harmonics, arising during nonlinear sound propagation. It could further enhance the resolution and quality of echographic images. To meet the bandwidth requirement for SHI a dedicated phased array has been developed: a low frequency subarray, intended for transmission, interleaved with a high frequency subarray, used in reception. As the bandwidth of the elements is limited, the spectral gaps in between the harmonics cause multiple (ghost) reflection artifacts. A dual-pulse frequency compounding method aims at suppressing those artifacts at a price of a reduced frame rate. In this study we explore a possibility of performing frequency compounding within a single transmission. The traditional frequency compounding method suppresses the ripples by consecutively emitting two short Gaussian bursts with a slightly different center frequency. In the newly proposed method, the transmit aperture is divided into two parts: the first half is used to send a pulse at the lower center frequency, while the other half simultaneously transmits at a slightly higher center frequency. The suitability of the protocol for medical imaging applications in terms of the steering capabilities was performed in a simulation study with INCS and the hydrophone measurements. Moreover, an experimental study was carried out to find the optimal parameters for the clinical imaging protocol. The latter was subsequently used to obtain the images of a tissue mimicking phantom containing strongly reflecting wires. Additionally, the images of a human heart in the parasternal projection were acquired. The scanning aperture with the developed protocol amounts to approximately 90°, which is sufficient to capture the cardiac structures in the standard anatomical projections. The theoretically estimated and experimentally measured grating lobe levels are equal to -28.3 dB and -35.9 dB, respectively. A considerable improvement in the axial resolution of the SHI component (0.73 mm) at -6 dB in comparison with the third harmonic (2.23 mm) was observed. A similar comparison in terms of the lateral resolution slightly favored the superharmonic component by 0.2 mm. Additionally, the images of the tissue mimicking phantom exhibited the absence of the multiple reflection artifacts. The in-vivo acquisition allows one to clearly observe the dynamic of the mitral valve leaflets. The new method is equally effective in eliminating the ripple artifacts associated with SHI as the dual-pulse technique, while the full frame rate is maintained.

  5. Coherent states and uncertainty relations for the damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Um, Chung-In; George, Thomas F.; Pandey, Lakshmi N.

    1993-01-01

    Starting with evaluations of propagator and wave function for the damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency, exact coherent states are constructed. These coherent states satisfy the properties which coherent states should generally have.

  6. Frequency-resolved optical grating using surface third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Krumbuegel, M.A.; Delong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    We demonstrate the frequency-resolved optical grating technique using third-harmonic generation on the surface of a cover glass with ultra-short optical pulses and compare that with the phase-retrieved spectrogram.

  7. Imaging Collagen Orientation Using Polarization-Modulated Second Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, P; Celliers, P M; Reiser, K M; Rubenchik, A M

    2002-01-10

    We use polarization-modulated second harmonic generation to image fiber orientation in collagen tissues, with an axial resolution of about 10 {micro}m and a transverse resolution of up to 1 {micro}m. A linearly polarized ultra-short pulse (200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser beam is modulated using an electro-optic modulator and quarter-wave plate combination and focused onto a translation stage mounted sample using a microscope objective. The generated second harmonic light is collected using a photomultiplier tube and demodulated using phase sensitive detection to obtain signal intensity and fiber orientation information. In order to obtain second harmonic generation images of different types of collagen organization, we analyze several different tissues, including rat-tail tendon, mouse aorta, mouse fibrotic liver, and porcine skin. We can use our technique to image fibrotic tissue in histological sections of damaged liver and to identify burned tissue in porcine skin to a depth of a few hundred microns. Polarization-modulated second harmonic generation potentially could be a useful clinical technique for diagnosing collagen related disease or damage, especially in the skin.

  8. Second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating in the single-cycle regime

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Baltuska; Maxim S. Pshenichnikov; Douwe A. Wiersma

    1999-01-01

    The problem of measuring broad-band femtosecond pulses by the technique of second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG FROG) is addressed. We derive the full equation for the FROG signal, which is valid even for single-optical-cycle pulses. The effect of the phase mismatch in the second-harmonic crystal, the implications of the beam geometry, and the frequency-dependent variation of the nonlinearity are

  9. [Harmonic imaging analysis for assessment of morphological changes in mini-pig alveolar bone by normal and increased functional load].

    PubMed

    Guseva, I E; Zhitkov, M Iu; Loginova, N K; Mokhov, A V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to reveal the mastication forces effect on the microstructure of mandible bone tissue of mini-pigs by Fouirier harmonic imaging analysis of bone sections images of back scattered electrons and assessment of calcium and phosphorous distribution maps obtained by roentgenofluorescence technique. The results showed that by higher functional loads not only the total content of mineral elements in the bone matrix increased but also the of the low-frequency harmonics in the image spectrum indicating structural heterogeneity decrease in bone mineralization. PMID:25588332

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography imaging based on Non-Harmonic Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xu Cao; Shigeki Hirobayashi; Changho Chong; Atsushi Morosawa; Koki Totsuka; Takuya Suzuki

    2009-01-01

    A new processing technique called Non-Harmonic Analysis (NHA) is proposed for OCT imaging. Conventional Fourier-Domain OCT relies on the FFT calculation which depends on the window function and length. Axial resolution is counter proportional to the frame length of FFT that is limited by the swept range of the swept source in SS-OCT, or the pixel counts of CCD in

  11. Coupling CARS with multiphoton fluorescence and high harmonic generation imaging modalities using a femtosecond laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongtao; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Zhu, Jiabin; Buhman, Kimberly K.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-02-01

    Multimodal nonlinear optical imaging has opened new opportunities and becomes a powerful tool for imaging complex tissue samples with inherent 3D spatial resolution.. We present a robust and easy-to-operate approach to add the coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging modality to a widely used multiphoton microscope. The laser source composed of a Mai Tai femtosecond laser and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) offers one-beam, two-beam and three-beam modalities. The Mai Tai output at 790 nm is split into two beams, with 80% of the power being used to pump the OPO. The idler output at 2036 nm from OPO is doubled using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. This frequency-doubled idler beam at 1018 nm is sent through a delay line and collinearly combined with the other Mai Tai beam for CARS imaging on a laser-scanning microscope. This Mai Tai beam is also used for multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. The signal output at 1290 nm from OPO is used for SHG and third-harmonic generation (THG) imaging. External detectors are installed for both forward and backward detection, whereas two internal lamda-scan detectors are employed for microspectroscopy analysis. This new system allows vibrationally resonant CARS imaging of lipid bodies, SHG imaging of collagen fibers, and multiphoton fluorescence analysis in fresh tissues. As a preliminary application, the effect of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) deficiency on liver lipid metabolism in mice was investigated.

  12. Automated cardiac sarcomere analysis from second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Canadilla, Patricia; Gonzalez-Tendero, Anna; Iruretagoyena, Igor; Crispi, Fatima; Torre, Iratxe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Bijnens, Bart H.; Gratacos, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    Automatic quantification of cardiac muscle properties in tissue sections might provide important information related to different types of diseases. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging provides a stain-free microscopy approach to image cardiac fibers that, combined with our methodology of the automated measurement of the ultrastructure of muscle fibers, computes a reliable set of quantitative image features (sarcomere length, A-band length, thick-thin interaction length, and fiber orientation). We evaluated the performance of our methodology in computer-generated muscle fibers modeling some artifacts that are present during the image acquisition. Then, we also evaluated it by comparing it to manual measurements in SHG images from cardiac tissue of fetal and adult rabbits. The results showed a good performance of our methodology at high signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. We conclude that our automated measurements enable reliable characterization of cardiac fiber tissues to systematically study cardiac tissue in a wide range of conditions.

  13. In vivo application of short-lag spatial coherence and harmonic spatial coherence imaging in fetal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kakkad, Vaibhav; Dahl, Jeremy; Ellestad, Sarah; Trahey, Gregg

    2015-04-01

    Fetal scanning is one of the most common applications of ultrasound imaging and serves as a source of vital information about maternal and fetal health. Visualization of clinically relevant structures, however, can be severely compromised in difficult-to-image patients due to poor resolution and the presence of high levels of acoustical noise or clutter. We have developed novel coherence-based beamforming methods called Short-Lag Spatial Coherence (SLSC) imaging and Harmonic Spatial Coherence imaging (HSCI), and applied them to suppress the effects of clutter in fetal imaging. This method is used to create images of the spatial coherence of the backscattered ultrasound as opposed to images of echo magnitude. We present the results of a patient study to assess the benefits of coherence-based beamforming in the context of first trimester fetal exams. Matched fundamental B-mode, SLSC, harmonic B-mode, and HSCI images were generated using raw radio frequency data collected on 11 volunteers in the first trimester of pregnancy. The images were compared for qualitative differences in image texture and target conspicuity as well as using quantitative imaging metrics such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and contrast. SLSC and HSCI showed statistically significant improvements across all imaging metrics compared with B-mode and harmonic B-mode, respectively. These improvements were greatest for poor quality B-mode images where contrast of anechoic targets was improved from 15 dB in fundamental B-mode to 27 dB in SLSC and 17 dB in harmonic B-mode to 30 dB in HSCI. CNR improved from 1.4 to 2.5 in the fundamental images and 1.4 to 3.1 in the harmonic case. These results exhibit the potential of coherence-based beamforming to improve image quality and target detectability, especially in high noise environments. PMID:25116292

  14. Dual-Frequency Piezoelectric Transducers for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K. Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F. Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  15. Imaging magnetic nanoparticles using the signal's frequency spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Trembly, B. Stuart; Sullivan, Charles R.

    2008-03-01

    Current methods of magnetic particle imaging generate a signal by cyclically saturating nanoparticles creating measurable harmonics in the induced magnetization. The sensitivity promises to be competitive with SPECT so molecular imaging is possible. The signal was localized by saturating the nanoparticles outside a voxel using a strong static magnetic field and sweeping the voxel across the sample to form an image. However, in applications where enough nanoparticles are present, signal can be detected at several higher harmonic frequencies and we show that the distribution of signal between those frequencies contributes localizing information. We tested one-dimensional implementations but the methods can be generalized to three dimensions. Spatial encoding was accomplished by using multiple drive frequencies that varied spatially. Two drive coils tuned to different drive frequencies and mounted on the same axis were used to explore the method. The response was measured from a single sample of iron oxide nanoparticles at eight positions along that axis to estimate response function for the reconstruction. Then two identical samples were placed at pairs of locations to test the method. The sample positions were reconstructed from the measured spectrum of the signal generated. The number of independent parameters is limited but four independent parameters can be achieved with very good conditioning and eight independent parameters can be achieved with reasonable conditioning.

  16. Electron cyclotron harmonic resonances in high-frequency heating of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P. [Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)] [Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves under cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction is studied. Theory is formulated; the analytical solutions in the second and fourth harmonic cyclotron resonance cases are obtained, and in the third harmonic case, a first order differential equation governing the evolution of the electron energy is derived. The theory is applied for explaining the generation of artificial ionization layers observed in high-frequency (HF) ionospheric heating experiments. The upper hybrid waves are assumed to be excited parametrically by the O-mode HF heating wave. As the decay mode is the lower hybrid wave, the excited upper hybrid waves have wavelengths ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m, which are short enough to effectively incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect for the harmonic cyclotron resonance interactions as well as have a frequency bandwidth of about 20 kHz, which provides an altitude region of about 10 km for continuous harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction between electrons and descending waves in the slightly inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The numerical results on electron acceleration show that electron fluxes with energies larger than 14 eV are generated in the three harmonic cases. These energetic electrons cause impact ionizations, which are descending to form artificial ionization layers at the bottom of the ionospheric F region.

  17. Variable Frequency Motor Drives: Harmonics, Power Factor, and Energy Efficiency

    E-print Network

    Massey, G. W.

    Variable frequency motor drives (VFD's) have been on the market for many years. Early versions were unreliable and prone to failure. Relatively recent developments in Pulse-Width Modulated (PWM) waveform technology have improved VFD reliability...

  18. Ultrafast Nanoscale Imaging Using High Order Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutu, Willem; Gauthier, David; Ge, Xunyou; Wang, Fan; Gonzalez, Aura Ines; Barbrel, Benjamin; Borta, Ana; Ducousso, Mathieu; Carré, Bertrand; Merdji, Hamed

    Coherent diffractive imaging using soft and hard X-rays ultrashort pulses is a promising technique to study ultrafast dynamics in non crystalline objects. However, up to now, it was limited to large scale facilities such as free electron lasers. We developed an optimized table-top soft X-ray source, based on high order harmonic generation. It produces a high intensity femtosecond coherent beam, with up to 1 ×1011 photons per shot at the source at ? = 32 nm. We recently demonstrated nanoscale imaging in single laser shot mode, with femtosecond time resolution. This opens fascinating perspectives in imaging dynamical phenomena to be spread over a large scientific community. First preliminary results in the investigation of femtosecond spin-reversals of magnetic nano-domains and ultrasfast molecular rearrangements are presented.

  19. Discriminating harmonicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Gerald; Mason, Christine R.; Brughera, Andrew; Chiu, Chung-Yiu Peter

    2003-08-01

    Simultaneous tones that are harmonically related tend to be grouped perceptually to form a unitary auditory image. A partial that is mistuned stands out from the other tones, and harmonic complexes with different fundamental frequencies can readily be perceived as separate auditory objects. These phenomena are evidence for the strong role of harmonicity in perceptual grouping and segregation of sounds. This study measured the discriminability of harmonicity directly. In a two interval, two alternative forced-choice (2I2AFC) paradigm, the listener chose which of two sounds, signal or foil, was composed of tones that more closely matched an exact harmonic relationship. In one experiment, the signal was varied from perfectly harmonic to highly inharmonic by adding frequency perturbation to each component. The foil always had 100% perturbation. Group mean performance decreased from greater than 90% correct for 0% signal perturbation to near chance for 80% signal perturbation. In the second experiment, adding a masker presented simultaneously with the signals and foils disrupted harmonicity. Both monaural and dichotic conditions were tested. Signal level was varied relative to masker level to obtain psychometric functions from which slopes and midpoints were estimated. Dichotic presentation of these audible stimuli improved performance by 3-10 dB, due primarily to a release from ``informational masking'' by the perceptual segregation of the signal from the masker.

  20. Research of second harmonic generation images based on texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Li, Yan; Gong, Haiming; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan

    2014-09-01

    Texture analysis plays a crucial role in identifying objects or regions of interest in an image. It has been applied to a variety of medical image processing, ranging from the detection of disease and the segmentation of specific anatomical structures, to differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy as a potential noninvasive tool for imaging biological tissues has been widely used in medicine, with reduced phototoxicity and photobleaching. In this paper, we clarified the principles of texture analysis including statistical, transform, structural and model-based methods and gave examples of its applications, reviewing studies of the technique. Moreover, we tried to apply texture analysis to the SHG images for the differentiation of human skin scar tissues. Texture analysis method based on local binary pattern (LBP) and wavelet transform was used to extract texture features of SHG images from collagen in normal and abnormal scars, and then the scar SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal ones. Compared with other texture analysis methods with respect to the receiver operating characteristic analysis, LBP combined with wavelet transform was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy. It can provide a new way for clinical diagnosis of scar types. At last, future development of texture analysis in SHG images were discussed.

  1. Golay-encoded excitation for dual-frequency harmonic detection of ultrasonic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Shen, Che-Chou; Shi, Tai-Yu

    2011-02-01

    Golay-encoded excitation in combination with the third harmonic (3f?) transmit phasing is examined for both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) improvements in harmonic imaging of contrast microbubbles. To produce the cancellation pair of tissue harmonic signal in 3f? transmit phasing, the phase of the bit waveform is properly designed for both the fundamental and the 3f? transmit signals to provide the Golay encoding of the received harmonic responses. Results indicate that the proposed Golay excitation can effectively suppress the tissue harmonic amplitude to increase CTR. Meanwhile, the SNR of the contrast harmonic signal also improves because of the elongated waveform of Golay excitation. Nevertheless, the generation of marked range side-lobes of the bubble region would degrade the achievable SNR improvement and the image contrast, especially when the bit of Golay excitation increases. The range side-lobes could result from the nonlinear resonance of the microbubbles that interferes with the phase modulation of the Golay encoding. PMID:21342820

  2. In vivo localized harmonic motion imaging of VX2 tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of localized harmonic motion (LHM) imaging for tumor detection in vivo. LHM was induced using a single-element focused ultrasound (FUS) transducer (80 mm focal, 100 mm diameter, 1.54 MHz) and a separate transducer (5 kHz PRF, 5 MHz) was used to track motion by cross-correlating RF signals. A scan was performed with the transducers assembly and LHM was induced 5 times per location. Images were formed averaging the calculated LHM amplitudes. Ten New Zealand rabbits had VX2 tumors implanted on their thighs. Tumors were located using Magnetic resonance images and LHM images were obtained. Eight out of ten tumors were visualized on LHM images as a region with lower amplitude (5.7±1.3?m in tumors and 19.5±5.8?m in muscle). All tumors had an elongated shape running along the muscle fibers. It was possible to detect tumors larger than 4mm in width (short axis of the tumor). We performed a FUS ablation of one tumor and the ablated region was detected as well on LHM images as a reduced LHM amplitude region.

  3. Increased efficiency of ion acceleration by using femtosecond laser pulses at higher harmonic frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Psikal, J., E-mail: jan.psikal@fjfi.cvut.cz [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Klimo, O. [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Weber, S.; Margarone, D. [ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-15

    The influence of laser frequency on laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. When ultrashort intense laser pulse at higher harmonic frequency irradiates a thin solid foil, the target may become re lativistically transparent for significantly lower laser pulse intensity compared with irradiation at fundamental laser frequency. The relativistically induced transparency results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum energies of accelerated ions and their numbers. Our simulation results have shown the increase in maximum proton energy and increase in the number of high-energy protons by a factor of 2 after the interaction of an ultrashort laser pulse of maximum intensity 7?×?10{sup 21?}W/cm{sup 2} with a fully ionized plastic foil of realistic density and of optimal thickness between 100?nm and 200?nm when switching from the fundamental frequency to the third harmonics.

  4. Imaging articular cartilage using second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Jessica C.; Winlove, C. Peter; Knapp, Karen; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Sub cellular resolution images of equine articular cartilage have been obtained using both second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM). The SHGM images clearly map the distribution of the collagen II fibers within the extracellular matrix while the TPFM images show the distribution of endogenous two-photon fluorophores in both the cells and the extracellular matrix, highlighting especially the pericellular matrix and bright 2-3?m diameter features within the cells. To investigate the source of TPF in the extracellular matrix experiments have been carried out to see if it may originate from the proteoglycans. Pure solutions of the following proteoglycans hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate and aggrecan have been imaged, only the aggrecan produced any TPF and here the intensity was not great enough to account for the TPF in the extracellular matrix. Also cartilage samples were subjected to a process to remove proteoglycans and cellular components. After this process the TPF from the samples had decreased by a factor of two, with respect to the SHG intensity.

  5. Cochlear implant melody recognition as a function of melody frequency range, harmonicity, and number of electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sonya; Kong, Ying-Yee; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2009-01-01

    Objective The primary goal of the present study was to determine how cochlear implant melody recognition was affected by the frequency range of the melodies, the harmonicity of these melodies, and the number of activated electrodes. The secondary goal was to investigate whether melody recognition and speech recognition were differentially affected by the limitations imposed by cochlear implant processing. Design Four experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, eleven cochlear implant users used their clinical processors to recognize melodies of complex harmonic tones with their fundamental frequencies being in the low (104-262 Hz), middle (207-523 Hz), and high (414-1046 Hz) ranges. In the second experiment, melody recognition with pure tones was compared to melody recognition with complex harmonic tones in 4 subjects. In the third experiment, melody recognition was measured as a function of the number of electrodes in 5 subjects. In the fourth experiment, vowel and consonant recognition were measured as a function of the number of electrodes in the same 5 subjects who participated in the third experiment. Results Frequency range significantly affected cochlear implant melody recognition with higher frequency ranges producing better performance. Pure tones produced significantly better performance than complex harmonic tones. Increasing the number of activated electrodes did not affect performance with low- and middle-frequency melodies, but produced better performance with high-frequency melodies. Large individual variability was observed for melody recognition but its source seemed to be different from the source of the large variability observed in speech recognition. Conclusion Contemporary cochlear implants do not adequately encode either temporal pitch or place pitch cues. Melody recognition and speech recognition require different signal processing strategies in future cochlear implants. PMID:19194298

  6. 2.32 THz quantum cascade laser frequency-locked to the harmonic of a microwave synthesizer source.

    PubMed

    Danylov, Andriy A; Light, Alexander R; Waldman, Jerry; Erickson, Neal R; Qian, Xifeng; Goodhue, William D

    2012-12-01

    Frequency stabilization of a THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) to the harmonic of a microwave source has been accomplished using a Schottky diode waveguide mixer designed for harmonic mixing. The 2.32 THz, 1.0 milliwatt CW QCL is coupled into the signal port of the mixer and a 110 GHz signal, derived from a harmonic of a microwave synthesizer, is coupled into the IF port. The difference frequency between the 21st harmonic of 110 GHz and the QCL is used in a discriminator to adjust the QCL bias current to stabilize the frequency. The short-term frequency jitter is reduced from 550 kHz to 4.5 kHz (FWHM) and the long-term frequency drift is eliminated. This performance is compared to that of several other THz QCL frequency stabilization techniques. PMID:23262736

  7. Improved Shear Wave Motion Detection Using Pulse-Inversion Harmonic Imaging with a Phased Array Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Urban, Matthew W.; Manduca, Armando; Pislaru, Sorin V.; Kinnick, Randall R.; Pislaru, Cristina; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging is widely used to improve ultrasound B-mode imaging quality thanks to its effectiveness in suppressing imaging artifacts associated with ultrasound reverberation, phase aberration, and clutter noise. In ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE), because the shear wave motion signal is extracted from the ultrasound signal, these noise sources can significantly deteriorate the shear wave motion tracking process and consequently result in noisy and biased shear wave motion detection. This situation is exacerbated in in vivo SWE applications such as heart, liver, and kidney. This paper, therefore, investigated the possibility of implementing harmonic imaging, specifically pulse-inversion harmonic imaging, in shear wave tracking, with the hypothesis that harmonic imaging can improve shear wave motion detection based on the same principles that apply to general harmonic B-mode imaging. We first designed an experiment with a gelatin phantom covered by an excised piece of pork belly and show that harmonic imaging can significantly improve shear wave motion detection by producing less underestimated shear wave motion and more consistent shear wave speed measurements than fundamental imaging. Then, a transthoracic heart experiment on a freshly sacrificed pig showed that harmonic imaging could robustly track the shear wave motion and give consistent shear wave speed measurements while fundamental imaging could not. Finally, an in vivo transthoracic study of seven healthy volunteers showed that the proposed harmonic imaging tracking sequence could provide consistent estimates of the left ventricular myocardium stiffness in end-diastole with a general success rate of 80% and a success rate of 93.3% when excluding the subject with Body Mass Index (BMI) higher than 25. These promising results indicate that pulse-inversion harmonic imaging can significantly improve shear wave motion tracking and thus potentially facilitate more robust assessment of tissue elasticity by SWE. PMID:24021638

  8. Efficient second-harmonic conversion of CW single-frequency Nd:YAG laser light by frequency locking to a monolithic ring frequency doubler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstenberger, D. C.; Tye, G. E.; Wallace, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Efficient second-harmonic conversion of the 1064-nm output of a diode-pumped CW single-frequency Nd:YAG laser to 532 nm was obtained by frequency locking the laser to a monolithic ring resonator constructed of magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate. The conversion efficiency from the fundamental to the second harmonic was 65 percent. Two hundred milliwatts of CW single-frequency 532-nm light were produced from 310 mW of power of 1064-nm light. This represents a conversion efficiency of 20 percent from the 1-W diode laser used to pump the Nd:YAG laser to single-frequency 532-nm output. No signs of degradation were observed for over 500 h of operation.

  9. NOTE: Cone-beam image reconstruction using spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Zeng, Gengsheng L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2001-06-01

    Image reconstruction from cone-beam projections is required for both x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Grangeat's algorithm accurately performs cone-beam reconstruction provided that Tuy's data sufficiency condition is satisfied and projections are complete. The algorithm consists of three stages: (a) Forming weighted plane integrals by calculating the line integrals on the cone-beam detector, and obtaining the first derivative of the plane integrals (3D Radon transform) by taking the derivative of the weighted plane integrals. (b) Rebinning the data and calculating the second derivative with respect to the normal to the plane. (c) Reconstructing the image using the 3D Radon backprojection. A new method for implementing the first stage of Grangeat's algorithm was developed using spherical harmonics. The method assumes that the detector is large enough to image the whole object without truncation. Computer simulations show that if the trajectory of the cone vertex satisfies Tuy's data sufficiency condition, the proposed algorithm provides an exact reconstruction.

  10. Second harmonic generating (SHG) nanoprobes for in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Periklis; Maloney, James; Wu, David; Fraser, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has profoundly changed cell and molecular biology studies by permitting tagged gene products to be followed as they function and interact. The ability of a fluorescent dye to absorb and emit light of different wavelengths allows it to generate startling contrast that, in the best cases, can permit single molecule detection and tracking. However, in many experimental settings, fluorescent probes fall short of their potential due to dye bleaching, dye signal saturation, and tissue autofluorescence. Here, we demonstrate that second harmonic generating (SHG) nanoprobes can be used for in vivo imaging, circumventing many of the limitations of classical fluorescence probes. Under intense illumination, such as at the focus of a laser-scanning microscope, these SHG nanocrystals convert two photons into one photon of half the wavelength; thus, when imaged by conventional two-photon microscopy, SHG nanoprobes appear to generate a signal with an inverse Stokes shift like a fluorescent dye, but with a narrower emission. Unlike commonly used fluorescent probes, SHG nanoprobes neither bleach nor blink, and the signal they generate does not saturate with increasing illumination intensity. The resulting contrast and detectability of SHG nanoprobes provide unique advantages for molecular imaging of living cells and tissues. PMID:20668245

  11. Microwave frequency tuning and harmonic generation in ferroelectric thin film transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, James C.; Ono, R. H.; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Chang, Kao-Shuo

    2002-07-01

    We evaluate dielectric tuning on nanosecond time scales in ferroelectric Ba0.3Sr0.7TiO3 thin films by measuring nonlinear harmonic generation at a fundamental frequency of 3 GHz. We compare the form of the distributed nonlinear capacitance per unit length C(Vrf) extracted from a simple model of harmonic generation in coplanar waveguide transmission line structures with the nonlinear capacitance C(Vdc) measured using a dc bias voltage, and obtain excellent agreement for temperatures in the range 235-295 K. This demonstrated agreement implies that full dielectric tuning can be expected in these ferroelectric thin films on nanosecond time scales, and also demonstrates that detrimental high-frequency nonlinear effects in device structures can be accurately predicted based on dc biased measurements.

  12. Harmonic imaging with fresnel beamforming in the presence of phase aberration.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Man Minh; Shin, Junseob; Yen, Jesse

    2014-10-01

    Fresnel beamforming is a beamforming method with a delay profile similar in shape to a physical Fresnel lens. The advantage of Fresnel beamforming is the reduced channel count, which consists of four to eight transmit and two analog-to-digital receive channels. Fresnel beamforming was found to perform comparably to conventional delay-and-sum beamforming. However, the performance of Fresnel beamforming is highly dependent on focal errors. These focal errors result in high side-lobe levels and further reduce the performance of Fresnel beamforming in the presence of phase aberration. With the advantages of lower side-lobe levels and suppression of aberration effects, harmonic imaging offers an effective solution to the limitations of Fresnel beamforming. We describe the implementation of tissue harmonic imaging and pulse inversion harmonic imaging in Fresnel beamforming, followed by dual apodization with cross-correlation, to improve image quality. Compared with conventional delay-and-sum beamforming, experimental results indicated contrast-to-noise ratio improvements of 10%, 49% and 264% for Fresnel beamforming using tissue harmonic imaging in the cases of no aberrator, 5-mm pork aberrator and 12-mm pork aberrator, respectively. These improvements were 22%, 57% and 352% for Fresnel beamforming using pulse inversion harmonic imaging. Moreover, dual apodization with cross-correlation was found to further improve the contrast-to-noise ratios in all cases. Harmonic imaging was also found to narrow the lateral beamwidth and shorten the axial pulse length by at least 25% and 21%, respectively, for Fresnel beamforming at different aberration levels. These results suggest the effectiveness of harmonic imaging in improving image quality for Fresnel beamforming, especially in the presence of phase aberration. Even though this combination of Fresnel beamforming and harmonic imaging does not outperform delay-and-sum beamforming combined with harmonic imaging, it provides the benefits of reduced channel count and potentially reduced cost and size of ultrasound systems. PMID:25018027

  13. Distinction between harmonic and structural components in ambient excitation tests using the time-frequency domain decomposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thien-Phu; Argoul, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The time-frequency domain decomposition technique has been proposed for modal identification in ambient vibration testing. In the presence of harmonic excitations, the modal identification process can provide not only structural modes but also non-structural ones relative to harmonic components. It is thus important to distinguish between them. In this study, by using the time-frequency domain decomposition technique, it is demonstrated that the distinction between non-structural harmonic components and those of the structural responses can be possible, and it is merged into the general procedure of the time-frequency domain decomposition method. This proposition is then verified by numerical examples and by a laboratory test.

  14. Molecular Mie model for second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, Sarina; Schürer, Benedikt; Sauerbeck, Christian; Peukert, Wolfgang; Peschel, Ulf

    2011-12-01

    A theoretical model to simulate second harmonic and sum frequency generation from stratified spherical particles of arbitrary material is presented and compared with the widely used Rayleigh-Gans-Debye approximation and to experimental results from polystyrene particles with adsorbed malachite green molecules. In this model, the nonlinear polarization is caused by individual dipoles placed in the vicinity of the sphere and is simulated on a molecular basis. This offers greater flexibility to model more sophisticated systems.

  15. Frequency-resolved optical-gating measurements of ultrashort pulses using surface third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Krumbuegel, M.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R. [Combustion Research Facility, MS9057, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States)

    1996-09-01

    We demonstrate what is to our knowledge the first frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) technique to measure ultrashort pulses from an unamplified Ti:sapphire laser oscillator without direction-of-time ambiguity. This technique utilizes surface third-harmonic generation as the nonlinear-optical effect and, surprisingly, is the most sensitive third-order FROG geometry yet. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  16. The hp-local discontinuous Galerkin method for low-frequency time-harmonic Maxwell equations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ilaria Perugia; Dominik Schötzau

    2003-01-01

    The local discontinuous Galerkin method for the numerical ap- proximation of the time-harmonic Maxwell equations in a low-frequency regime is introduced and analyzed. Topologically nontrivial domains and heteroge- neous media are considered, containing both conducting and insulating mate- rials. The presented method involves discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of the curl-curl and grad-div operators, derived by introducing suitable auxiliary variables and so-called

  17. Enhancing the resolution of the forward second harmonic imaging using the two-photon laser scanning microscope

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Hussain Reshak

    2009-01-01

    The effect of increasing the numerical aperture and changing the immersion imaging medium of the objective in the forward second harmonic imaging of the grana and intergranal parts of chloroplasts in the leaves of shade moss Plagiomnium affine plant were demonstrated. Also the enhancement of the forward second harmonic generation images and simultaneously records the forward and backward second harmonic

  18. Automatic recognition of harmonic bird sounds using a frequency track extraction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Heller, Jason R; Pinezich, John D

    2008-09-01

    This paper demonstrates automatic recognition of vocalizations of four common bird species (herring gull [Larus argentatus], blue jay [Cyanocitta cristata], Canada goose [Branta canadensis], and American crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos]) using an algorithm that extracts frequency track sets using track properties of importance and harmonic correlation. The main result is that a complex harmonic vocalization is rendered into a set of related tracks that is easily applied to statistical models of the actual bird vocalizations. For each vocalization type, a statistical model of the vocalization was created by transforming the training set frequency tracks into feature vectors. The extraction algorithm extracts sets of frequency tracks from test recordings that closely approximate harmonic sounds in the file being processed. Each extracted set in its final form is then compared with the statistical models generated during the training phase using Mahalanobis distance functions. If it matches one of the models closely, the recognizer declares the set an occurrence of the corresponding vocalization. The method was evaluated against a test set containing vocalizations of both the 4 target species and 16 additional species as well as background noise containing planes, cars, and various natural sounds. PMID:19045673

  19. A mechanism for plasma waves at the harmonics of the plasma frequency foreshock boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A bump-on-tail unstable reduced velocity distribution, constructed from data obtained at the upstream boundary of the electron foreshock by the GSFC electron spectrometer experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite, is used as the initial plasma state for a numerical integration of the 1D-Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations. The integration is carried through the growth of the instability, beyond its saturation, and well into the stabilized plasma regime. A power spectrum computed for the electric field of the stabilized plasma is dominated by a narrow peak at the Bohm-Gross frequency of the unstable field mode but also contains significant power at the harmonics of the Bohm-Gross frequency. The harmonic power is in sharp peaks which are split into closely spaced doublets. The fundamental peak at the Bohm-Gross frequency is split into a closely spaced triplet. The mechanism for excitation of the second harmonic is shown to be second order wave-wave coupling.

  20. Observations of complex frequency comb structure in a harmonically-pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Richard A.; Balskus, Karolis; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T.

    2015-03-01

    Various schemes allow femtosecond optical parametric oscillators to produce pulses at harmonics of their pump laser repetition frequency, each apparently offering the possibility of generating widely-spaced, tunable frequency combs. Using a 100-MHz Ti:sapphire pump laser, we have compared two alternative optical parametric oscillator architectures, both leading to 300-MHz pulses but one configured in a cavity three times shorter than the pump laser and the other in a cavity one-third longer. Heterodyne measurements between the pump and each of these two systems show that they possess different carrier-envelope offset characteristics, with implications on the coherence and stabilization of the resulting combs.

  1. Superposed second-harmonic Talbot self-image from a PPLT crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dunzhao; Liu, Dongmei; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Min

    2014-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the superposed second-harmonic Talbot self-image in a z-cut periodically-poled LiTaO3 crystal. The generated second-harmonic (SH) waves in the positive and negative domains have the same intensity but different phases (a phase shift of ?) due to the opposite poling directions, i.e. a second-harmonic phase pattern is generated from the crystal. By introducing a reference SH wave, we can selectively study the self-imaging originating from the SH patterns with different phases. In the integer and fractional Talbot planes, the two patterns interfere with each other and form superposed self-imaging patterns.

  2. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Torrezan, Antonio C; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Griffin, Robert G; Barnes, Alexander B

    2010-06-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:23761938

  3. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Torrezan, Antonio C; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G

    2010-06-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE(11,2) and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE(11,2,q). The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:21243088

  4. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2012-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:23761938

  5. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:21243088

  6. Artificial optical emissions at HAARP for pump frequencies near the third and second electron gyro-harmonic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Pedersen; J. Hughes; R. Marshall; E. Gerken; A. Senior; D. Sentman; M. McCarrick

    2005-01-01

    High-power high-frequency radio waves beamed into the ionosphere cause plasma turbulence, which can accelerate electrons. These electrons collide with the F-layer neutral oxygen causing artificial optical emissions identical to natural aurora. Pumping at electron gyro-harmonic frequencies has special significance as many phenomena change their character. In particular, artificial optical emissions become strongly reduced for the third and higher gyro-harmonics. The

  7. A Preliminary Engineering Design of Intravascular Dual-Frequency Transducers for Contrast-Enhanced Acoustic Angiography and Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probes are not optimized for contrast detection because of their design for high-frequency fundamental-mode imaging. However, data from transcutaneous contrast imaging suggests the possibility of utilizing contrast ultrasound for molecular imaging or vasa vasorum assessment to further elucidate atherosclerotic plaque deposition. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a small-aperture (0.6 × 3 mm) IVUS probe optimized for high-frequency contrast imaging. The design utilizes a dual-frequency (6.5 MHz/30 MHz) transducer arrangement for exciting microbubbles at low frequencies (near their resonance) and detecting their broadband harmonics at high frequencies, minimizing detected tissue backscatter. The prototype probe is able to generate nonlinear microbubble response with more than 1.2 MPa of rarefractional pressure (mechanical index: 0.48) at 6.5 MHz, and is also able to detect microbubble response with a broadband receiving element (center frequency: 30 MHz, ?6-dB fractional bandwidth: 58.6%). Nonlinear super-harmonics from microbubbles flowing through a 200-?m-diameter micro-tube were clearly detected with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 12 dB. Preliminary phantom imaging at the fundamental frequency (30 MHz) and dual-frequency super-harmonic imaging results suggest the promise of small aperture, dual-frequency IVUS transducers for contrast-enhanced IVUS imaging. PMID:24801226

  8. Second harmonic generation imaging of endogenous structural proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Mohler, William H.; Plotnikov, Sergey; Millard, Andrew C.

    2003-07-01

    We find that several key endogenous structural proteins including collagen, acto-myosin, and tubulin give rise to intense second harmonic generation (SHG) and that these structures can be imaged in intact tissues on a laser-scanning microscope. Because SHG is a non-resonant process, this modality suffers little inherent photobleaching or toxicity. In this study we demonstrate the clarity of SHG optical sectioning within unfixed, unstained thick specimens, including fish scales, C. elegans, and mouse muscle, where penetration into tissue upwards of 600 microns was achieved. The simultaneous use of SHG and two-photon excited GFP fluorescence allows for the inference of the molecular isoform that gives rise to SHG from the myofilament lattice in C. elegans. The physical origin of SHG within these tissues is addressed and is attributed to the laser interaction with dipolar protein structures. SHG polarization anisotropy is also used to determine the extent of dipolar order and radial symmetry in the helical structures. Comparisons are drawn between SHG and other forms of microscopy including polarization and fluorescence microscopy, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages.

  9. Contrast harmonic imaging of the normal canine spleen.

    PubMed

    Ohlerth, Stefanie; Rüefli, Eva; Poirier, Valerie; Roos, Malgorzata; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the perfusion pattern and perfusion dynamics in the normal canine spleen using contrast harmonic imaging. Twenty-five dogs without clinical or ultrasonographic evidence of splenic disease were studied. Twenty-three dogs were scanned with only manual restraint; two dogs were sedated with buprenorphin. All dogs received an intravenous bolus of a microbubble contrast medium (SonoVue). The perfusion pattern during the blood pool phase represented a skewed bell-shaped curve. A tissue-specific late phase, similar to humans, was not observed. Time/intensity curves were generated for a selected region. Mean average-derived peak intensity (PI) was 6.6dB, mean time to peak intensity calculated from the initial rise (TTP) was 25.6 s and mean area under the curve (AUC) was 523.6 dBs. If dogs were divided into two body weight groups (< or =15 and >15 kg body weight), average derived peak intensity area, time to peak intensity, and area under the curve were lower for the smaller dogs than for the larger animals. However, differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.2, 0.05, and 0.08, respectively). No significant association was found between hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, red blood cell count, blood pressure, heart rate, age, gender, and the perfusion variables. In conclusion, these baseline data may prove useful in the evaluation of dogs with diffuse or focal splenic disease. PMID:17899981

  10. Vector carrier frequency by interfering the kth harmonic of two rulings rotated polarly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses-Fabian, Cruz; Kantun-Montiel, Rosaura; Lemus-Alonso, Gildardo-Pablo

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a method for introducing carrier fringes inclined at any angle into an interferogram. The setup is built on a 4f optical system consisting of two apertures in the input plane and a Ronchi ruling in the Fourier plane. Additionally, a Ronchi ruling rotated on polar direction is placed at each aperture and two passband filters are placed in the Fourier plane for filtering the kth harmonic of their spectra. We demonstrated that the magnitude and direction of the vector carrier frequency depend on the grating period at the input plane, the polar angles, and the kth harmonic, which gives this method the ability to modulate its magnitude only, or its direction only, or both in a wide range. The theoretical model and experimental results are shown in this paper.

  11. Probing nuclear motion by frequency modulation of molecular high-order harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xue-Bin; Bandrauk, André D

    2014-11-01

    Molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHOHG) in a non-Born-Oppenheimer treatment of H(2)(+), D(2)(+), is investigated by numerical simulations of the corresponding time-dependent Schro?dinger equations in full dimensions. As opposed to previous studies on amplitude modulation of intracycle dynamics in MHOHG, we demonstrate redshifts as frequency modulation (FM) of intercycle dynamics in MHOHG. The FM is induced by nuclear motion using intense laser pulses. Compared to fixed-nuclei approximations, the intensity of MHOHG is much higher due to the dependence of enhanced ionization on the internuclear distance. The width and symmetry of the spectrum of each harmonic in MHOHG encode rich information on the dissociation process of molecules at the rising and falling parts of the laser pulses, which can be used to retrieve the nuclear dynamics. Isotope effects are studied to confirm the FM mechanism. PMID:25415907

  12. Probing Nuclear Motion by Frequency Modulation of Molecular High-Order Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xue-Bin; Bandrauk, André D.

    2014-11-01

    Molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHOHG) in a non-Born-Oppenheimer treatment of H2 + , D2 + , is investigated by numerical simulations of the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equations in full dimensions. As opposed to previous studies on amplitude modulation of intracycle dynamics in MHOHG, we demonstrate redshifts as frequency modulation (FM) of intercycle dynamics in MHOHG. The FM is induced by nuclear motion using intense laser pulses. Compared to fixed-nuclei approximations, the intensity of MHOHG is much higher due to the dependence of enhanced ionization on the internuclear distance. The width and symmetry of the spectrum of each harmonic in MHOHG encode rich information on the dissociation process of molecules at the rising and falling parts of the laser pulses, which can be used to retrieve the nuclear dynamics. Isotope effects are studied to confirm the FM mechanism.

  13. Phase conjugation of the second harmonic of a focused ultrasound beam as a method for improving C-scan acoustical imaging in nonlinear inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyansky, Leonid M.; Brysev, Andrew P.; Klopotov, Roman V.; Pernod, Philippe J.; Preobrazhensky, Vladimir L.; Yan, Xiang; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2003-10-01

    Acoustical imaging in complex media (e.g., biological tissue) can be affected by phase aberrations introduced in a wave during propagation. Wave phase conjugation (WPC) of ultrasound is known for its ability to compensate for phase distortions due to inhomogeneity of the propagation medium, and it can be used for improvement of acoustical imaging under these conditions. In a nonlinear medium harmonics are generated during propagation of an intense beam of ultrasound, and this principle is used in tissue harmonic imaging. The parametric method of WPC permits phase conjugation of a selected frequency component of the probe beam. In this way the peculiarities of WPC can be combined with advantages of harmonic imaging. Automated WPC-focusing of the conjugated second-harmonic component of a focused nonlinear probe beam is studied experimentally and theoretically for the case of a homogeneous medium, and experimentally for a medium with pseudo-random inhomogeneities. The generated conjugate wave can also be sufficiently intense to generate higher-order harmonics, which display enhanced focusing. Improvement of a C-scan harmonic imaging system operating in an inhomogeneous medium is provided as an example.

  14. Extracting tidal frequencies using multivariate harmonic analysis of sea level height time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri-Simkooei, A. R.; Zaminpardaz, S.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    This contribution is seen as a first attempt to extract the tidal frequencies using a multivariate spectral analysis method applied to multiple time series of tide-gauge records. The existing methods are either physics-based in which the ephemeris of Moon, Sun and other planets are used, or are observation-based in which univariate analysis methods—Fourier and wavelet for instance—are applied to tidal observations. The existence of many long tide-gauge records around the world allows one to use tidal observations and extract the main tidal constituents for which efficient multivariate methods are to be developed. This contribution applies the multivariate least-squares harmonic estimation (LS-HE) to the tidal time series of the UK tide-gauge stations. The first 413 harmonics of the tidal constituents and their nonlinear components are provided using the multivariate LS-HE. A few observations of the research are highlighted: (1) the multivariate analysis takes information of multiple time series into account in an optimal least- squares sense, and thus the tidal frequencies have higher detection power compared to the univariate analysis. (2) Dominant tidal frequencies range from the long-term signals to the sixth-diurnal species interval. Higher frequencies have negligible effects. (3) The most important tidal constituents (the first 50 frequencies) ordered from their amplitudes range from 212 cm (M2) to 1 cm (OQ2) for the data set considered. There are signals in this list that are not available in the 145 main tidal frequencies of the literature. (4) Tide predictions using different lists of tidal frequencies on five different data sets around the world are compared. The prediction results using the first significant 50 constituents provided promising results on these locations of the world.

  15. Third and second harmonic generation imaging of human articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chen, Chih-Hwa; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2009-02-01

    Cartilage matrix is damaged in diseased states such as osteoarthritis, while adult articular cartilage does not have the capacity to repair structural damage. A least invasive mean to diagnose these diseased states of human articular cartilage with a high spatial resolution is thus highly desired. In this paper, we present our harmonic generation microscopic studies on the human articular cartilage samples. Without any staining, third and second harmonic generation can provide strong contrast in chondrocytes and collagen matrix, respectively. Our study indicates the high capability of harmonic generation microscopy for future articular cartilage disease diagnosis.

  16. Design and performance of the Beamlet laser third harmonic frequency converter

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, C.E.; Wonterghem, B.M. Van; Auerbach, J.M.; Foley, R.J.; Murray, J.R.; Campbell, J.H.; Caird, J.A.; Speck, D.R.; Woods, B.

    1995-09-12

    The Beamlet laser is a full-scale, single-aperture scientific prototype of the frequency-tripled Nd:glass laser for the proposed National Ignition Facility. At aperture sizes of 30 cm x 30 cm and 34 cm x 34 cm using potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals of 32 cm x 32 cm and 37 cm x 37 cm, respectively, the authors have obtained up to 8.3 kJ of third harmonic energy at 70%--80% whole beam conversion efficiency.

  17. A piezoelectric pulse generator for low frequency non-harmonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports a new piezoelectric prototype for pulse generation by energy harvesting from low frequency non-harmonic vibration. The pulse generator presented here consists of two parts: the electromechanical part and the load circuit. A metal rolling rod is used as the proof mass, moving along the substrate to achieve both actuating of the piezoelectric cantilever by magnetic coupling and self-synchronous switching of the circuit. By using this new approach, the energy from the piezoelectric transduction mechanism is regulated simultaneously when it is extracted. This allows a series of tuneable pulses to be generated, which can be applied to self-powered RF wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes.

  18. Second Harmonic Imaging improves Echocardiograph Quality on board the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Hamilton, Douglas; Martin, David; Ebert, Douglas; Melton, Shannon; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) capabilities have been part of the Human Research Facility (HRF) on board the International Space Station (ISS) since 2001. The US equipment on board the ISS includes a first-generation Tissue Harmonic Imaging (THI) option. Harmonic imaging (HI) is the second harmonic response of the tissue to the ultrasound beam and produces robust tissue detail and signal. Since this is a first-generation THI, there are inherent limitations in tissue penetration. As a breakthrough technology, HI extensively advanced the field of ultrasound. In cardiac applications, it drastically improves endocardial border detection and has become a common imaging modality. U.S. images were captured and stored as JPEG stills from the ISS video downlink. US images with and without harmonic imaging option were randomized and provided to volunteers without medical education or US skills for identification of endocardial border. The results were processed and analyzed using applicable statistical calculations. The measurements in US images using HI improved measurement consistency and reproducibility among observers when compared to fundamental imaging. HI has been embraced by the imaging community at large as it improves the quality and data validity of US studies, especially in difficult-to-image cases. Even with the limitations of the first generation THI, HI improved the quality and measurability of many of the downlinked images from the ISS and should be an option utilized with cardiac imaging on board the ISS in all future space missions.

  19. High-resolution harmonic motion imaging (HR-HMI) for tissue biomechanical property characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Qian, Xuejun; Chiu, Chi Tat; Yu, Mingyue; Jung, Hayong; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Elastography, capable of mapping the biomechanical properties of biological tissues, serves as a useful technique for clinicians to perform disease diagnosis and determine stages of many diseases. Many acoustic radiation force (ARF) based elastography, including acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and harmonic motion imaging (HMI), have been developed to remotely assess the elastic properties of tissues. However, due to the lower operating frequencies of these approaches, their spatial resolutions are insufficient for revealing stiffness distribution on small scale applications, such as cancerous tumor margin detection, atherosclerotic plaque composition analysis and ophthalmologic tissue characterization. Though recently developed ARF-based optical coherence elastography (OCE) methods open a new window for the high resolution elastography, shallow imaging depths significantly limit their usefulness in clinics. Methods The aim of this study is to develop a high-resolution HMI method to assess the tissue biomechanical properties with acceptable field of view (FOV) using a 4 MHz ring transducer for efficient excitation and a 40 MHz needle transducer for accurate detection. Under precise alignment of two confocal transducers, the high-resolution HMI system has a lateral resolution of 314 µm and an axial resolution of ?147 µm with an effective FOV of 2 mm in depth. Results The performance of this high resolution imaging system was validated on the agar-based tissue mimicking phantoms with different stiffness distributions. These data demonstrated the imaging system’s improved resolution and sensitivity on differentiating materials with varying stiffness. In addition, ex vivo imaging of a human atherosclerosis coronary artery demonstrated the capability of high resolution HMI in identifying layer-specific structures and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques based on their stiffness differences. Conclusions All together high resolution HMI appears to be a promising ultrasound-only technology for characterizing tissue biomechanical properties at the microstructural level to improve the image-based diseases diagnosis in multiple clinical applications. PMID:25694960

  20. 3D quantitative Fourier analysis of second harmonic generation microscopy images of collagen structure in cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romijn, Elisabeth I.; Lilledahl, Magnus B.

    2013-02-01

    One of the main advantages of nonlinear microscopy is that it provides 3D imaging capability. Second harmonic generation is widely used to image the 3D structure of collagen fibers, and several works have highlighted the modification of the collagen fiber fabric in important diseases. By using an ellipsoidal specific fitting technique on the Fourier transformed image, we show, using both synthetic images and SHG images from cartilage, that the 3D direction of the collagen fibers can be robustly determined.

  1. High-order harmonic generation by chirped and self-guided femtosecond laser pulses. II. Time-frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tosa, V. [Department of Physics, KAIST, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); National Institute for R and D of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Kim, H.T.; Kim, I.J.; Nam, C.H. [Department of Physics, KAIST, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701(Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    We present a time-dependent analysis of high-order harmonics generated by a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse propagating through a long gas jet. A three-dimensional model is used to calculate the harmonic fields generated by laser pulses, which only differ by the sign of their initial chirp. The time-frequency distributions of the single-atom dipole and harmonic field reveal the dynamics of harmonic generation in the cutoff. A time-dependent phase-matching calculation was performed, taking into account the self-phase modulation of the laser field. Good phase matching holds for only few optical cycles, being dependent on the electron trajectory. When the cutoff trajectory is phase matched, emitted harmonics are locked in phase and the emission intensity is maximized.

  2. Imaging the bone marrow stem cells morphogenesis in PGA scaffold by multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic (SHG) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Teng, Shu-Wen; Chen, Hsiao-Ching; Lo, Wen; Sun, Yen; Lin, Tze-Yu; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Jiang, Ching-Chuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The ability to image tissue engineering products without damaging histological procedures is important for the understanding of the dynamics of tissue reorganization and formation. In this work, we test the ability of multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy to image engineered tissues following chrondrogenic induction. The system we used is human bone marrow stem cells seeded in the scaffold polyglycolic acid (PGA). Our results show that autofluorescence can be used to image cells while second harmonic generation signal can be used to visualize the synthesis of extracellular matrix. This approach demonstrates the ability of multiphoton imaging in the study of tissue engineering products.

  3. A dual frequencies MMW holographic imaging system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenxin Caoa; Wenbin Doua; Hongyan Su

    2009-01-01

    A new MMW holographic system using dual frequencies for not only imaging hologram but also measuring distance automatically between a certain object and the system aperture is presented. Concretely, the scheme for the transmitter and receiver about it and the relative simulation are made, which show that for an object at an arbitrary distance to some extent the system presented

  4. MREIT conductivity imaging based on the local harmonic Bz algorithm: Animal experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Kiwan; Lee, Chang-Ock; Woo, Eung Je; Kim, Hyung Joong; Seo, Jin Keun

    2010-04-01

    From numerous numerical and phantom experiments, MREIT conductivity imaging based on harmonic Bz algorithm shows that it could be yet another useful medical imaging modality. However, in animal experiments, the conventional harmonic Bz algorithm gives poor results near boundaries of problematic regions such as bones, lungs, and gas-filled stomach, and the subject boundary where electrodes are not attached. Since the amount of injected current is low enough for the safety for in vivo animal, the measured Bz data is defected by severe noise. In order to handle such problems, we use the recently developed local harmonic Bz algorithm to obtain conductivity images in our ROI(region of interest) without concerning the defected regions. Furthermore we adopt a denoising algorithm that preserves the ramp structure of Bz data, which informs of the location and size of anomaly. Incorporating these efficient techniques, we provide the conductivity imaging of post-mortem and in vivo animal experiments with high spatial resolution.

  5. Mosquito (Aedes aegypti) flight tones: Frequency, harmonicity, spherical spreading, and phase relationships

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Benjamin J.; Emr, Kevin S.; Wyttenbach, Robert A.; Hoy, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito flight produces a tone as a side effect of wing movement; this tone is also a communication signal that is frequency-modulated during courtship. Recordings of tones produced by tethered flying male and female Aedes aegypti were undertaken using pairs of pressure-gradient microphones above and below, ahead and behind, and to the left and right over a range of distances. Fundamental frequencies were close to those previously reported, although amplitudes were lower. The male fundamental frequency was higher than that of the female and males modulated it over a wider range. Analysis of harmonics shows that the first six partials were nearly always within 1?Hz of integer multiples of the fundamental, even when the fundamental was being modulated. Along the front-back axis, amplitude attenuated as a function of distance raised to the power 2.3. Front and back recordings were out of phase, as were above and below, while left and right were in phase. Recordings from ahead and behind showed quadratic phase coupling, while others did not. Finally, two methods are presented for separating simultaneous flight tones in a single recording and enhancing their frequency resolution. Implications for mosquito behavior are discussed. PMID:25234901

  6. Quantified characterization of dermal collagen structure in human cutaneous scars from second harmonic generation imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoqin Zhu; Youting Chen; Shuangmu Zhuo; Biying Yu; Liqin Zheng; Kecheng Lu; Jianxin Chen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, high resolution images of collagens based on second harmonic generation (SHG) were obtained in the dermis of different scar tissues and surrounding considered uninjured skins, demonstrating differences in their microstructures. In order to quantitatively analyze their structural features, Fourier analysis was applied for the SHG images to compare the alteration in collagen orientation of different scars. Moreover,

  7. Conductivity and current density image reconstruction using harmonic Bz algorithm in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suk Hoon Oh; Byung Il Lee; Eung Je Woo; Soo Yeol Lee; Min Hyoung Cho; Ohin Kwon; Jin Keun Seo

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is to provide cross-sectional images of the conductivity distribution ? of a subject. While injecting current into the subject, we measure one component Bz of the induced magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) using an MRI scanner. Based on the relation between ?2Bz and ??, the harmonic Bz algorithm reconstructs an image

  8. Simultaneous acquisition of spatial harmonics (SMASH): Fast imaging with radiofrequency coil arrays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel K. Sodickson; Warren J. Manning

    1997-01-01

    This report presents a fast-imaging technique that al- lows some fraction of signal data points to be acquired in parallel, rather than sequentially in time. Previously, several fast imaging schemes have been proposed using simultaneous data acquisition in multiple RF coils (8- 13). The technique described here, dubbed simultaneous acquisition of spatial harmonics (SMASH), reduces im- age acquisition times by

  9. Measurement of sound velocity made easy using harmonic resonant frequencies with everyday mobile technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Michael; Kuhn, Jochen; Müller, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Recent articles about smartphone experiments have described their applications as experimental tools in different physical contexts.1-4 They have established that smartphones facilitate experimental setups, thanks to the small size and diverse functions of mobile devices, in comparison to setups with computer-based measurements. In the experiment described in this article, the experimental setup is reduced to a minimum. The objective of the experiment is to determine the speed of sound with a high degree of accuracy using everyday tools. An article published recently proposes a time-of-flight method where sound or acoustic pulses are reflected at the ends of an open tube.5 In contrast, the following experiment idea is based on the harmonic resonant frequencies of such a tube, simultaneously triggered by a noise signal.

  10. Frequency domain analysis of knock images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yunliang; He, Xin; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-12-01

    High speed imaging-based knock analysis has mainly focused on time domain information, e.g. the spark triggered flame speed, the time when end gas auto-ignition occurs and the end gas flame speed after auto-ignition. This study presents a frequency domain analysis on the knock images recorded using a high speed camera with direct photography in a rapid compression machine (RCM). To clearly visualize the pressure wave oscillation in the combustion chamber, the images were high-pass-filtered to extract the luminosity oscillation. The luminosity spectrum was then obtained by applying fast Fourier transform (FFT) to three basic colour components (red, green and blue) of the high-pass-filtered images. Compared to the pressure spectrum, the luminosity spectra better identify the resonant modes of pressure wave oscillation. More importantly, the resonant mode shapes can be clearly visualized by reconstructing the images based on the amplitudes of luminosity spectra at the corresponding resonant frequencies, which agree well with the analytical solutions for mode shapes of gas vibration in a cylindrical cavity.

  11. Stochastic multiresonance and correlation-time-controlled stability for a harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Romi; Laas, Katrin; Laas, Tõnu; Reiter, Eerik

    2008-09-01

    The long-time behavior of the first two moments and the correlation function for the output signal of a harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency subjected to an external periodic force and an additive thermal noise is considered analytically. The colored fluctuations of the oscillator frequency are modeled as a three-level Markovian noise. Using the Shapiro-Loginov formula, the exact expressions of several stochastic resonance (SR) characteristics such as the spectral amplification, the variance of the output signal, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the SR gain have been calculated. The nonmonotonic dependence of the SR characteristics versus the noise parameters as well as versus the input signal frequency and also the conditions for the appearance of energetic instability are analyzed. In particular, the multiresonancelike behavior of the variance and the signal-to-noise ratio as functions of the noise correlation time are observed and the connection between the occurrence of energetic instability and the phenomenon of stochastic multiresonance is established. Some unexpected effects such as the hypersensitive response of the spectral amplification to small variations of the noise amplitude encountered in the case of a large flatness of the colored noise are also discussed. PMID:18851006

  12. Ultrasonic imaging of static objects through an aberrating layer using harmonic phase conjugation approach.

    PubMed

    Mirzania, Raheleh; Shapoori, Kiyanoosh; Malyarenko, Eugene; Maev, Roman Gr

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this study is to develop a new image reconstruction approach for the ultrasonic detection of small objects (comparable to or smaller than the ultrasonic wavelength) behind an aberrating layer. Instead of conventional pulse-echo experimental setup we used through transmission, as the backscattered field after going twice through the layer becomes much weaker than the through-transmitted field. The proposed solution is based on the Harmonic Phase Conjugation (HPC) technique. The developed numerical model allows to calculate the amplitude and phase distributions of the through-transmitted acoustic field interacting with the objects and received by a linear transducer array either directly or after passing through an additional aberrating layer. Then, the digitized acoustic field received by the array is processed, phase-conjugated, and finally, numerically propagated back through the medium in order to reconstruct the image of the target objects. The reconstruction quality of the algorithm was systematically tested on a numerical model, which included a barrier, a medium behind it, and a group of three scatterers, by varying scatterer distances from the source transducer, their mutual arrangement, and the angle of the incident field. Subsequently, a set of laboratory experiments was conducted (at transmit frequency of 2MHz) to verify the accuracy of the developed simulation. The results demonstrate feasibility of imaging multiple scattering objects through a barrier using the HPC method with better than 1mm accuracy. The results of these tests are presented, and the feasibility of implementing this approach for various biomedical and NDT imaging applications is discussed. PMID:25553713

  13. Integration of the denoising, inpainting and local harmonic Bz algorithm for MREIT imaging of intact animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Kiwan; Kim, Hyung Joong; Lee, Chang-Ock; Seo, Jin Keun; Woo, Eung Je

    2010-12-01

    Conductivity imaging based on the current-injection MRI technique has been developed in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography. Current injected through a pair of surface electrodes induces a magnetic flux density distribution inside an imaging object, which results in additional magnetic field inhomogeneity. We can extract phase changes related to the current injection and obtain an image of the induced magnetic flux density. Without rotating the object inside the bore, we can measure only one component Bz of the magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz). Based on a relation between the internal conductivity distribution and Bz data subject to multiple current injections, one may reconstruct cross-sectional conductivity images. As the image reconstruction algorithm, we have been using the harmonic Bz algorithm in numerous experimental studies. Performing conductivity imaging of intact animal and human subjects, we found technical difficulties that originated from the MR signal void phenomena in the local regions of bones, lungs and gas-filled tubular organs. Measured Bz data inside such a problematic region contain an excessive amount of noise that deteriorates the conductivity image quality. In order to alleviate this technical problem, we applied hybrid methods incorporating ramp-preserving denoising, harmonic inpainting with isotropic diffusion and ROI imaging using the local harmonic Bz algorithm. These methods allow us to produce conductivity images of intact animals with best achievable quality. We suggest guidelines to choose a hybrid method depending on the overall noise level and existence of distinct problematic regions of MR signal void.

  14. Diffeomorphic Image Registration of Diffusion MRI Using Spherical Harmonics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiujuan Geng; Thomas J. Ross; Hong Gu; Wanyong Shin; Wang Zhan; Yi-Ping Chao; Ching-Po Lin; Norbert Schuff; Yihong Yang

    2011-01-01

    Nonrigid registration of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial for group analyses and building white matter and fiber tract atlases. Most current diffusion MRI regis- tration techniques are limited to the alignment of diffusion tensor imaging(DTI)data.Weproposeanoveldiffeomorphicregistration method for high angular resolution diffusion images by mapping their orientation distribution functions (ODFs). ODFs can be reconstructed using q-ball imaging (QBI) techniques

  15. Efficient procedure for the numerical calculation of harmonic vibrational frequencies based on internal coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-08-15

    We propose a general procedure for the numerical calculation of the harmonic vibrational frequencies that is based on internal coordinates and Wilson’s GF methodology via double differentiation of the energy. The internal coordinates are defined as the geometrical parameters of a Z-matrix structure, thus avoiding issues related to their redundancy. Linear arrangements of atoms are described with a dummy atom of infinite mass. The procedure has been automated in FORTRAN90 and its main advantage lies in the nontrivial reduction of the number of single point energy calculations needed for the construction of the Hessian matrix when compared to the corresponding number using double differentiation in Cartesian coordinates. For molecules of C1 symmetry the computational savings amount to 36! ? 30, where N is the number of atoms, with additional savings when symmetry is present. Typical applications for small and medium size molecules in their minimum and transition state geometries as well as hydrogen bonded clusters are presented. In all cases the frequencies based on internal coordinates differ on average by < 1 cm-1 from those obtained from Cartesian coordinates.

  16. Resonance Properties and Frequencies of AN Electro-Rheological Clutch at Harmonic Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oravský, Vladimír

    In this paper, a concentric electro-rheological clutch (ERC) is considered, embedded into a broader system: electro-hydro-aggregate (EHA) consisting of an induction motor as an electrodrive (ED) and a brake (B) as a loading machine. For ED, its dynamic moment characteristics and for B, a harmonic loading moment are taken into account. One starts from the corresponding nonlinear nondimensional dynamic model of EHA which is of the 5th order with 14 nondimensional parameters. The steady solution of the model can exhibit resonance which, due to complexity and extensiveness of the model, is very difficult to detect and analyze. Therefore, an analytical solution in the frame of the first approximation is sought, based on the method of small parameter. For this, a few simplifying assumptions are adopted (undamped system, small amplitude and frequency of load and narrow gap in ERC). Then, undamped resonance frequencies are derived and analyzed. Results are compared with resonance curves of the original and unsimplified system and further solution of the problem in question is proposed.

  17. Pulse-modulated second harmonic imaging microscope quantitatively demonstrates marked increase of collagen in tumor after chemotherapy

    E-print Network

    Raja, Anju M.

    Pulse-modulated second harmonic imaging microscopes (PM-SHIMs) exhibit improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over conventional SHIMs on sensitive imaging and quantification of weak collagen signals inside tissues. We quantify ...

  18. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  19. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound imaging: Basic principles, present situation and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, the development of stabilised microbubble contrast agents and improvements in available ultrasonic equipment, such as harmonic imaging, have enabled us to display microbubble enhancements on a greyscale with optimal contrast and spatial resolution. Recent technological advances made contrast harmonic technology available for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the first time in 2008. Thus, the evaluation of microcirculation is now feasible with EUS, prompting the evolution of contrast-enhanced EUS from vascular imaging to images of the perfused tissue. Although the relevant experience is still preliminary, several reports have highlighted contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) as a promising noninvasive method to visualise and characterise lesions and to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions. Even if histology remains the gold standard, the combination of CH-EUS and EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) can not only render EUS more accurate but may also assist physicians in making decisions when EUS-FNA is inconclusive, increasing the yield of EUS-FNA by guiding the puncture with simultaneous imaging of the vascularity. The development of CH-EUS has also opened up exciting possibilities in other research areas, including monitoring responses to anticancer chemotherapy or to ethanol-induced pancreatic tissue ablation, anticancer therapies based on ultrasound-triggered drug and gene delivery, and therapeutic adjuvants by contrast ultrasound-induced apoptosis. Contrast harmonic imaging is gaining popularity because of its efficacy, simplicity and non-invasive nature, and many expectations are currently resting on this technique. If its potential is confirmed in the near future, contrast harmonic imaging will become a standard practice in EUS. PMID:25400439

  20. Three-dimensional high-resolution second-harmonic generation imaging of endogenous structural proteins in biological tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Campagnola, Paul J; Millard, Andrew C; Terasaki, Mark; Hoppe, Pamela E; Malone, Christian J; Mohler, William A

    2002-01-01

    We find that several key endogenous protein structures give rise to intense second-harmonic generation (SHG)-nonabsorptive frequency doubling of an excitation laser line. Second-harmonic imaging microscopy (SHIM) on a laser-scanning system proves, therefore, to be a powerful and unique tool for high-resolution, high-contrast, three-dimensional studies of live cell and tissue architecture. Unlike fluorescence, SHG suffers no inherent photobleaching or toxicity and does not require exogenous labels. Unlike polarization microscopy, SHIM provides intrinsic confocality and deep sectioning in complex tissues. In this study, we demonstrate the clarity of SHIM optical sectioning within unfixed, unstained thick specimens. SHIM and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) were combined in a dual-mode nonlinear microscopy to elucidate the molecular sources of SHG in live cells and tissues. SHG arose not only from coiled-coil complexes within connective tissues and muscle thick filaments, but also from microtubule arrays within interphase and mitotic cells. Both polarization dependence and a local symmetry cancellation effect of SHG allowed the signal from species generating the second harmonic to be decoded, by ratiometric correlation with TPEF, to yield information on local structure below optical resolution. The physical origin of SHG within these tissues is addressed and is attributed to the laser interaction with dipolar protein structures that is enhanced by the intrinsic chirality of the protein helices. PMID:11751336

  1. Generation of higher-order harmonics upon the addition of high-frequency XUV radiation to IR radiation: Generalization of the three-step model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Avner

    2008-11-01

    The irradiation of atoms by a strong, quasicontinuous IR laser field of frequency ? results in the emission of odd harmonics of ? (“IR harmonics”), by high-harmonic generation. It has been recently shown [A. Fleischer and N. Moiseyev, Phys. Rev. A 77, 010102(R) (2008)] that the addition of a weak XUV field of harmonic frequency q? to the IR driver field leads to the appearance of a new set of higher-order harmonics (“XUV harmonics”) q±2K ( q,K integers) which were absent in the spectra in the presence of the IR field alone. Here we generalize these results by studying the generation of XUV harmonics upon the addition of an arbitrary high-frequency XUV field qtilde ? , with frequency not necessarily a harmonic of ? , and amplitude ? qtilde in , which might be large. We have found that as the intensity of the XUV field increases, higher sets of XUV harmonics qtilde ±2K,2 qtilde ±(2K-1),3 qtilde ±2K,… . gradually appear, where each XUV harmonics set n qtilde qtilde ±[2K-1+mod(n qtilde ,2)] (n qtilde =1,2,3,…) is ((? qtilde in)/( qtilde 2?2))2n qtilde times weaker than the set of IR harmonics. The mechanism responsible for the appearance of the XUV harmonics is analyzed analytically using a generalization of the semiclassical recollision (three-step) model of high-harmonic generation (HHG). It is shown that the emitted HHG radiation field can be written as a series of terms, with the zeroth-order term representing the three-step recollision mechanism in its most familiar context [P. B. Corkum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 1994 (1993)] and giving rise to IR harmonics in the spectra. The higher-order terms, which are responsible for the appearance of the new sets of XUV harmonics in the spectra, are shown to originate from the polarization (ac-Stark oscillations) which is induced by the XUV field on the returning electronic wave packet in the recollision process. The XUV harmonics are formed by the same electron trajectories which form the IR harmonics and have the same emission times as the IR harmonics. Due to the small quiver amplitude of the ac-Stark oscillation, they are, however, much weaker than the IR harmonics. Nevertheless, this mechanism allows an extension of the cutoff in the harmonic generation spectra without the necessity of increasing the IR field intensity, as is verified numerically by a quantum-mechanical simulation of a Xe atom irradiated by a combination of IR and XUV classical fields.

  2. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    The ultra-relativistic electrons, trapped in the inner radiation belts of Jupiter, generates a strong synchrotron radio emission (historically known as the jovian decimeter radiation (DIM)) which is beamed, polarized (~20% linear, ~1% circular) and broadband. It has been extensively observed by radio telescopes/ probes and imaged by radio interferometers over a wide frequency spectrum (from >300 MHz up to 22 GHz). This extended emission presents two main emission peaks constantly located on both sides of the planet close to the magnetic plane. High latitude emissions were also regularly observed at particular frequencies, times and in particular observational configurations. This region of the magnetosphere is "frozen" due to the strong magnetic field (~4.2 G as the equator) and therefore is forced to rotate at the planetary period (T?9h55m). Due to the tilt (~ 10o) between the spin axis of the planet and the magnetic axis (which can be seen as dipolar in first approximation), the belts and the associated radio emission wobble around the planet center. The analysis of the flux at different frequencies highlighted spatial, temporal and spectral variabilities which origins are now partly understood. The emission varies at different time scales (short-time variations of hours to long-term variation over decades) due to the combination of visibility effect (wobbling, beaming, position of the observer in the magnetic rotating reference frame) [1], [2] and intrinsic local variations (interaction between relativistic electrons and satellites/dust, delayed effect of the solar wind ram pressure, impacts events) [3], [4], [5]. A complete framework is necessary to fully understand the source, loss and transport processes of the electrons originating from outside the belt, migrating by inward diffusion and populating the inner region of the magnetosphere. Only a few and unresolved measurements were made below 300 MHz and the nonsystematic observation of this radio emission, at different epochs only provided, each time, glimpses of the spectral content in different observational configurations. As the synchrotron emission frequency peaks at Vmax / E2B (with max in MHz, E, the electron energy in MeV and B, the magnetic field in Gauss), the low frequency content of this emission is associated with low energy electron populations inside the inner belt and the energetic electrons located in regions of weaker magnetic field (at few jovian radii). Therefore, there is much interest in extending and completing the current knowledge of the synchrotron emission from the belts, with low frequency resolved observations. LOFAR, the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) [6], is a giant flexible and digital ground-based radio interferometer operating in the 30-250 MHz band. It brings very high time (~ ?s), frequency (~ kHz) and angular resolutions (~1") and huge sensitivity (mJy). In November 2011, a single 10-hour track enabled to cover an entire planetary rotation and led to the first resolved image of the radiation belts between 127- 172 MHz [7,8]. In Feb 2013, an 2×5h30 joint LOFAR/ WSRT observing campaign seized the state of the radiation belts from 45 MHz up to 5 GHz. We will present the current state of the study (imaging, reconstruction method and modeling) of the radiation belts dynamic with this current set of observations. LOFAR can contribute to the understanding of the physics taking place in the inner belt as well as possibly providing a fast and a systematic "diagnostic" of the state of the belts. The latter represents an opportunity to give context and ground-based support for the arrival of JUNO (NASA) scheduled in July 2016 and also for future missions, such as JUICE (ESA), at the vicinity of Jupiter by the exploration of its icy satellites.

  3. Long-term imaging of mouse embryos using adaptive harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Thayil, Anisha; Watanabe, Tomoko; Jesacher, Alexander; Wilson, Tony; Srinivas, Shankar; Booth, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed description of an adaptive harmonic generation (HG) microscope and culture techniques that permit long-term, three-dimensional imaging of mouse embryos. HG signal from both pre- and postimplantation stage (0.5–5.5 day-old) mouse embryos are fully characterized. The second HG images reveal central spindles during cytokinesis whereas third HG images show several features, such as lipid droplets, nucleoli, and plasma membranes. The embryos are found to develop normally during one-day-long discontinuous HG imaging, permitting the observation of several dynamic events, such as morula compaction and blastocyst formation. PMID:21529087

  4. Graphics processing unit-based quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Jonayat, A S M; Patel, Sanjay; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2014-09-01

    We adapt a graphics processing unit (GPU) to dynamic quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging. We demonstrate the temporal advantage of the GPU-based approach by computing the number of frames analyzed per second from SHG image videos showing varying fiber orientations. In comparison to our previously reported CPU-based approach, our GPU-based image analysis results in ?10× improvement in computational time. This work can be adapted to other quantitative, nonlinear imaging techniques and provides a significant step toward obtaining quantitative information from fast in vivo biological processes. PMID:25223706

  5. Second-harmonic generation and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy through a rodent mammary imaging window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Pamela A.; Nazir, Muhammad; Szulczewski, Michael J.; Keely, Patricia J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2012-03-01

    Tumor-Associated Collagen Signatures (TACS) have been identified that manifest in specific ways during breast tumor progression and that correspond to patient outcome. There are also compelling metabolic changes associated with carcinoma invasion and progression. We have characterized the difference in the autofluorescent properties of metabolic co-factors, NADH and FAD, between normal and carcinoma breast cell lines. Also, we have shown in vitro that increased collagen density alters metabolic genes which are associated with glycolysis and leads to a more invasive phenotype. Establishing the relationship between collagen density, cellular metabolism, and metastasis in physiologically relevant cancer models is crucial for developing cancer therapies. To study cellular metabolism with respect to collagen density in vivo, we use multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy (MPM) in conjunction with a rodent mammary imaging window implanted in defined mouse cancer models. These models are ideal for the study of collagen changes in vivo, allowing determination of corresponding metabolic changes in breast cancer invasion and progression. To measure cellular metabolism, we collect fluorescence lifetime (FLIM) signatures of NADH and FAD, which are known to change based on the microenvironment of the cells. Additionally, MPM systems are capable of collecting second harmonic generation (SHG) signals which are a nonlinear optical property of collagen. Therefore, MPM, SHG, and FLIM are powerful tools with great potential for characterizing key features of breast carcinoma in vivo. Below we present the current efforts of our collaborative group to develop intravital approaches based on these imaging techniques to look at defined mouse mammary models.

  6. Simultaneous Multi-Harmonic Imaging of Nanoparticles in Tissues for Increased Selectivity

    E-print Network

    Rogov, Andrii; Ramos-Gomes, Fernanda; Bode, Julia; Staedler, Davide; Passemard, Solène; Courvoisier, Sébastien; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Waharte, François; Ciepielewski, Daniel; Rideau, Philippe; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Alves, Frauke; Salamero, Jean; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the use of Bismuth Ferrite (BFO) nanoparticles for tumor tissue labelling in combination with infrared multi-photon excitation at 1250 nm. We report the efficient and simultaneous generation of second and third harmonic by the nanoparticles. On this basis, we set up a novel imaging protocol based on the co-localization of the two harmonic signals and demonstrate its benefits in terms of increased selectivity against endogenous background sources in tissue samples. Finally, we discuss the potential use of BFO nanoparticles as mapping reference structures for correlative light-electron microscopy.

  7. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads.

    PubMed

    Brigham, John C; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A; Diamessis, Peter J

    2011-01-15

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  8. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  9. Sum frequency and second harmonic generation from the surface of a liquid microjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolentsev, Nikolay; Chen, Yixing; Jena, Kailash C.; Brown, Matthew A.; Roke, Sylvie

    2014-11-01

    The use of a liquid microjet as a possible source of interest for Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) spectroscopy is examined. We measured non-resonant SHG scattering patterns from the air/water interface of a microjet of pure water and observe a strong enhancement of the SHG signal for certain scattering angles. These enhancements can be explained by the optical properties and the shape of the liquid microjet. SFG experiments at the surface of a liquid microjet of ethanol in air show that it is also possible to measure the coherent vibrational SFG spectrum of the ethanol/air interface in this way. Our findings are useful for future far-UV or X-ray based nonlinear optical surface experiments on liquid jets. In addition, combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and SHG/SFG measurements are feasible, which will be very useful in improving our understanding of the molecular foundations of electrostatic and chemical surface properties and phenomena.

  10. Sum frequency and second harmonic generation from the surface of a liquid microjet

    SciTech Connect

    Smolentsev, Nikolay; Chen, Yixing; Roke, Sylvie, E-mail: sylvie.roke@epfl.ch [Laboratory for Fundamental Biophotonics (LBP), Institute of Bioengineering (IBI), School of Engineering STI, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jena, Kailash C. [Laboratory for Fundamental Biophotonics (LBP), Institute of Bioengineering (IBI), School of Engineering STI, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar, 140001 (India); Brown, Matthew A. [Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-11-14

    The use of a liquid microjet as a possible source of interest for Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) spectroscopy is examined. We measured non-resonant SHG scattering patterns from the air/water interface of a microjet of pure water and observe a strong enhancement of the SHG signal for certain scattering angles. These enhancements can be explained by the optical properties and the shape of the liquid microjet. SFG experiments at the surface of a liquid microjet of ethanol in air show that it is also possible to measure the coherent vibrational SFG spectrum of the ethanol/air interface in this way. Our findings are useful for future far-UV or X-ray based nonlinear optical surface experiments on liquid jets. In addition, combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and SHG/SFG measurements are feasible, which will be very useful in improving our understanding of the molecular foundations of electrostatic and chemical surface properties and phenomena.

  11. Suppression of tissue harmonics for pulse-inversion contrast imaging using time reversal.

    PubMed

    Couture, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-François; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2008-10-01

    Pulse-inversion (PI) sequences are sensitive to the nonlinear echoes from microbubbles allowing an improvement in the blood-to-tissue contrast. However, at larger mechanical indices, this contrast is reduced by harmonics produced during nonlinear propagation. A method for tissue harmonics cancellation exploiting time reversal is experimentally implemented using a 128-channel 12-bit emitter receiver. The probe calibration is performed by acquiring the nonlinear echo of a wire in water. These distorted pulses are time-reversed, optimized and used for the PI imaging of a tissue phantom. Compared to normal (straight) pulses, the time-reversed distorted pulses reduced the tissue signal in PI by 11 dB. The second harmonic signals from microbubbles flowing in a wall-less vessel were unaffected by the correction. This technique can thus increase the blood-to-tissue contrast ratio while keeping the pressure and the number of pulses constant. PMID:18765888

  12. Image enhancement by non-linear extrapolation in frequency space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H. (Inventor); Greenspan, Hayit K. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An input image is enhanced to include spatial frequency components having frequencies higher than those in an input image. To this end, an edge map is generated from the input image using a high band pass filtering technique. An enhancing map is subsequently generated from the edge map, with the enhanced map having spatial frequencies exceeding an initial maximum spatial frequency of the input image. The enhanced map is generated by applying a non-linear operator to the edge map in a manner which preserves the phase transitions of the edges of the input image. The enhanced map is added to the input image to achieve a resulting image having spatial frequencies greater than those in the input image. Simplicity of computations and ease of implementation allow for image sharpening after enlargement and for real-time applications such as videophones, advanced definition television, zooming, and restoration of old motion pictures.

  13. Submillisecond second harmonic holographic imaging of biological specimens in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Smith, David R; Winters, David G; Bartels, Randy A

    2013-11-12

    Optical microscopy has played a critical role for discovery in biomedical sciences since Hooke's introduction of the compound microscope. Recent years have witnessed explosive growth in optical microscopy tools and techniques. Information in microscopy is garnered through contrast mechanisms, usually absorption, scattering, or phase shifts introduced by spatial structure in the sample. The emergence of nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms reveals new information from biological specimens. However, the intensity dependence of nonlinear interactions leads to weak signals, preventing the observation of high-speed dynamics in the 3D context of biological samples. Here, we show that for second harmonic generation imaging, we can increase the 3D volume imaging speed from sub-Hertz speeds to rates in excess of 1,500 volumes imaged per second. This transformational capability is possible by exploiting coherent scattering of second harmonic light from an entire specimen volume, enabling new observational capabilities in biological systems. PMID:24173034

  14. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  15. Simultaneous stimulated Raman scattering and higher harmonic generation imaging for liver disease diagnosis without labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (e.g., higher harmonic (second-/third- harmonic) generation (HHG), simulated Raman scattering (SRS)) has high diagnostic sensitivity and chemical specificity, making it a promising tool for label-free tissue and cell imaging. In this work, we report a development of a simultaneous SRS and HHG imaging technique for characterization of liver disease in a bile-duct-ligation rat-modal. HHG visualizes collagens formation and reveals the cell morphologic changes associated with liver fibrosis; whereas SRS identifies the distributions of hepatic fat cells formed in steatosis liver tissue. This work shows that the co-registration of SRS and HHG images can be an effective means for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver steatosis/fibrosis at the cellular and molecular levels.

  16. Harmonics and high-frequency emission by small end-user equipment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Lundmark; E. O. A. Larsson; M. H. J. Bollen; A. Harmonics

    This paper discusses different treatments of harmonics in three phase systems, especially passive and active power factor correction (PFC). The change from harmonics below 2 kHz to above 2 kHz is described. Measurements have been carried out with two types of computer load together with LCD and florescent light driven by electronic ballast: on a large number of devices during

  17. Image and feature reconstruction for the attenuated Radon transform via circular harmonic decomposition of the kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaud, G.; Lakhal, A.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is concerned with a method of image reconstruction and feature extraction for the attenuated Radon transform in two dimensions based on the decomposition in circular harmonics of the integral kernel in Novikov?s inversion formula for an arbitrary known attenuation. This analytical decomposition of the reconstruction kernel provides an alternative reconstruction algorithm. Besides, we propose to use our formula to directly extract features of the object with no need for process imaging techniques. Numerical results attest to the strengths and limitations of our reconstruction method in terms of accuracy and robustness for image and feature reconstruction.

  18. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei, E-mail: biehzw@nus.edu.sg [Optical Bioimaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  19. Application of abstract harmonic analysis to the high-speed recognition of images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usikov, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Methods are constructed for rapidly computing correlation functions using the theory of abstract harmonic analysis. The theory developed includes as a particular case the familiar Fourier transform method for a correlation function which makes it possible to find images which are independent of their translation in the plane. Two examples of the application of the general theory described are the search for images, independent of their rotation and scale, and the search for images which are independent of their translations and rotations in the plane.

  20. Modeling of the doubly-fed reluctance machines using harmonic balance technique and Manley-Rowe power frequency relationships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olorunfemi Ojo; Zhiqing Wu

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling and analysis of a doubly-fed reluctance machine using the concept of the q-d harmonic balance to determine voltage equations while the electromagnetic torque and the contributions of the control and power windings to the mechanical output power are determined using the Manley-Rowe power-frequency relationships. The resulting model, including saturation effects and core losses is

  1. A Multivariate, Multitaper Approach to Detecting and Estimating Harmonic Response in Cortical Optical Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Sornborger, A.T.; Yokoo, T.

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency and accuracy of cortical maps from optical imaging experiments have been improved using periodic stimulation protocols. The resulting data analysis requires the detection and estimation of periodic information in a multivariate dataset. To date, these analyses have relied on discrete Fourier transform (DFT) sinusoid estimates. Multitaper methods have become common statistical tools in the analysis of univariate time series that can give improved estimates. Here, we extend univariate multitaper harmonic analysis methods to the multivariate, imaging context. Given the hypothesis that a coherent oscillation across many pixels exists within a specified bandwidth, we investigate the problem of its detection and estimation in noisy data by constructing Hotelling’s generalized T2-test. We then extend the investigation of this problem in two contexts, that of standard Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA) and that of Generalized Indicator Function Analysis (GIFA) which is often more robust in extracting a signal in spatially correlated noise. We provide detailed information on the fidelities of the mean estimates found with our methods and comparison with DFT estimates. Our results indicate that GIFA provides particularly good estimates of harmonic signals in spatially correlated noise and is useful for detecting small amplitude harmonic signals in applications such as biological imaging measurements where spatially correlated noise is common. We demonstrate the power of our methods with an optical imaging dataset of the periodic response to a periodically rotating oriented drifting grating stimulus experiment in cat visual cortex. PMID:21970814

  2. Spectral imaging of breast fibroadenoma using second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA), typically composed of stroma and epithelial cells, is a very common benign breast disease. Women with FA are associated with an increased risk of future breast cancer. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential of multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) for characterizing the morphology of collagen in the human breast fibroadenomas. In the study, high-contrast SHG images of human normal breast tissues and fibroadenoma tissues were obtained for comparison. The morphology of collagen was different between normal breast tissue and fibroadenoma. This study shows that MPLSM has the ability to distinguish fibroadenoma tissues from the normal breast tissues based on the noninvasive SHG imaging. With the advent of the clinical portability of miniature MPLSM, we believe that the technique has great potential to be used in vivo studies and for monitoring the treatment responses of fibroadenomas in clinical.

  3. Harmonic Response of Cellular Membrane Pumps to Low Frequency Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawarathna, D.; Miller, J. H., Jr.; Claycomb, J. R.; Cardenas, G.; Warmflash, D.

    2005-10-01

    We report on harmonic generation by budding yeast cells in response to a sinusoidal electric field, which is seen to be minimal when the field amplitude is less than a threshold value. Surprisingly, sodium metavanadate, an inhibitor of P-type ATPases reportedly responsible for nonlinear response in yeast, reduces the threshold field amplitude, increasing harmonic generation at low amplitudes while reducing it at large amplitudes, whereas the addition of glucose dramatically increases the production of even harmonics. Finally, a simple model is proposed to interpret the observed behavior.

  4. Frequency-resolved optical gating with the use of second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R. (Combustion Research Facility, MS-9057, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States)); Hunter, J.; White, W.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

    1994-11-01

    We discuss the use of second-harmonic generation (SHG) as the nonlinearity in the technique of frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) for measuring the full intensity and phase evolution of an arbitrary ultrashort pulse. FROG that uses a third-order nonlinearity in the polarization-gate geometry has proved extremely successful, and the algorithm required for extraction of the intensity and the phase from the experimental data is quite robust. However, for pulse intensities less than [similar to] 1 MW, third-order nonlinearities generate insufficient signal strength, and therefore SHG FROG appears necessary. We discuss the theoretical, algorithmic, and experimental considerations of SHG FROG in detail. SHG FROG has an ambiguity in the direction of time, and its traces are somewhat unintuitive. Also, previously published algorithms are generally ineffective at extracting the intensity and the phase of an arbitrary laser pulse from the SHG FROG trace. We present an improved pulse-retrieval algorithm, based on the method of generalized projections, that is far superior to the previously published algorithms, although it is still not so robust as the polarization-gate algorithm. We discuss experimental sources of error such as pump depletion and group-velocity mismatch. We also present several experimental examples of pulses measured with SHG FROG and show that the derived intensities and phases are in agreement with more conventional diagnostic techniques, and we demonstrate the high-dynamic-range capability of SHG FROG. We conclude that, despite the above drawbacks, SHG FROG should be useful in measuring low-energy pulses.

  5. Harmonic engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles L

    2009-01-01

    A high efficiency harmonic engine based on a resonantly reciprocating piston expander that extracts work from heat and pressurizes working fluid in a reciprocating piston compressor. The engine preferably includes harmonic oscillator valves capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into and out of the expander, and also preferably includes a shunt line

  6. Differentially-Enhanced Sideband Imaging via Radio-frequency Encoding

    E-print Network

    Fard, A M; Jalali, B

    2015-01-01

    We present a microscope paradigm that performs differential interference imaging with high sensitivity via optical amplification and radio-frequency (RF) heterodyne detection. This method, termed differentially-enhanced sideband imaging via radio-frequency encoding (DESIRE), uniquely exploits frequency-to-space mapping technique to encode the image of an object onto the RF sidebands of an illumination beam. As a proof-of-concept, we show validation experiment by implementing radio frequency (f = 15 GHz) phase modulation in conjunction with spectrally-encoded laser scanning technique to acquire one-dimensional image of a barcode-like object using a commercial RF spectrum analyzer.

  7. A NEW HIGH FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND SKIN IMAGING SYSTEM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Vogt; Rüdiger Scharenberg; Georg Moussa; Michael Sand; Klaus Hoffmann; Peter Altmeyer; Helmut Ermert

    In this paper, a new high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) system for high resolution skin imaging is presented. For imaging, mechanical scans are performed with spherically focused single element transducers. Two separate applicators with different transducers are utilized to fulfill the different requirements for imaging the skin with 20 MHz ultrasound and for lower range high resolution imaging of the uppermost

  8. Harmonic frequency mixing in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+X intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. B.; Aruga, Y.; Tachiki, T.; Mizugaki, Y.; Chen, J.; Nakajima, K.; Yamashita, T.; Wu, P. H.

    1999-10-01

    In a c-axis junction stack (10 ?m×10 ?m in a-b plane) patterned on a Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+X single crystal, we performed harmonic mixings between a 100 GHz signal and up to the 98th harmonic of a local oscillator at about 1 GHz. The dependence of PIF on V, where PIF is the mixing output at the intermediate frequency and V is the dc voltage across the junction stack, was strongly affected by the local oscillator power levels. For low values of local oscillator power, the optimum operation point where PIF became maximum was around zero bias, and typical multi-branch structure of PIF vs V curves were observed. For high values of local oscillator power, the optimum operation point moved to the high-voltage region. In both cases, interesting oscillations occurred on the PIF vs V curves. Our experimental results led us to believe that intrinsic Josephson junctions can be good candidates for high frequency applications and the harmonic mixing may be a useful probe to investigate plasma phenomena in the layered superconductors.

  9. Improved sonographic imaging of hepatic hemangioma with contrast-enhanced coded harmonic angiography: comparison with MR imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jae Young Lee; Byung Ihn Choi; Joon Koo Han; Ah Young Kim; Shang Hun Shin; Sung Gyu Moon

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare peripheral nodular enhancement with centripetal progression on contrast-enhanced coded harmonic angio (CHA) with those as seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. A total of 20 patients with 24 hemangiomas confirmed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI were included in this study. All 20 patients were examined with CHA in conjunction with a galactose-based

  10. Chiral imaging of collagen by second-harmonic generation circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H.; Huttunen, M. J.; Hsu, K.-J.; Partanen, M.; Zhuo, G.-Y.; Kauranen, M.; Chu, S.-W.

    2013-01-01

    We provide evidence that the chirality of collagen can give rise to strong second-harmonic generation circular dichroism (SHG-CD) responses in nonlinear microscopy. Although chirality is an intrinsic structural property of collagen, most of the previous studies ignore that property. We demonstrate chiral imaging of individual collagen fibers by using a laser scanning microscope and type-I collagen from pig ligaments. 100% contrast level of SHG-CD is achieved with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. As a new contrast mechanism for imaging chiral structures in bio-tissues, this technique provides information about collagen morphology and three-dimensional orientation of collagen molecules. PMID:23761852

  11. Texture analysis applied to second harmonic generation image data for ovarian cancer classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bruce L.; Brewer, Molly A.; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Hocker, James; Singh, Vikas; Mackie, Thomas R.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2014-09-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantitate the remodeling, we implement a form of texture analysis to delineate the collagen fibrillar morphology observed in second harmonic generation microscopy images of human normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. In the learning stage, a dictionary of "textons"-frequently occurring texture features that are identified by measuring the image response to a filter bank of various shapes, sizes, and orientations-is created. By calculating a representative model based on the texton distribution for each tissue type using a training set of respective second harmonic generation images, we then perform classification between images of normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. By optimizing the number of textons and nearest neighbors, we achieved classification accuracy up to 97% based on the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (true positives versus false positives). The local analysis algorithm is a more general method to probe rapidly changing fibrillar morphologies than global analyses such as FFT. It is also more versatile than other texture approaches as the filter bank can be highly tailored to specific applications (e.g., different disease states) by creating customized libraries based on common image features.

  12. Sources of Image Degradation in Fundamental and Harmonic Ultrasound Imaging: A Nonlinear, Full-Wave, Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.

    2011-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain (FDTD). This numerical method is used to simulate propagation of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse through a measured representation of the human abdomen with heterogeneities in speed of sound, attenuation, density, and nonlinearity. Conventional delay-and-sum beamforming is used to generate point spread functions (PSF) that display the effects of these heterogeneities. For the particular imaging configuration that is modeled, these PSFs reveal that the primary source of degradation in fundamental imaging is due to reverberation from near-field structures. Compared to fundamental imaging, reverberation clutter in harmonic imaging is 27.1 dB lower. Simulated tissue with uniform velocity but unchanged impedance characteristics indicates that for fundamental imaging, the primary source of degradation is phase aberration. PMID:21507753

  13. Three-dimensional second-harmonic generation imaging with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Gauderon, R; Lukins, P B; Sheppard, C J

    1998-08-01

    A three-dimensional reflectance scanning optical microscope based on the nonlinear optical phenomenon of second-harmonic generation is presented. A mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser producing <90-fs pulses at approximately 790 nm was used, and the images were constructed by scanning of an object, which possessed local second-order nonlinearity, relative to a focused spot from the laser. The second-harmonic light at approximately 395 nm generated by the specimen was separated from the fundamental beam by use of dichroic and interference filters and was detected by a photodiode. The technique was then used to characterize the distribution of second-order nonlinearity and microstructure of the nonlinear material lithium triborate. PMID:18087476

  14. Imaging scattering orientation with spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Konecky, Soren D.; Rice, Tyler; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques based on multiple light scattering generally have poor sensitivity to the orientation and direction of microscopic light scattering structures. In order to address this limitation, we introduce a spatial frequency domain method for imaging contrast from oriented scattering structures by measuring the angular-dependence of structured light reflectance. The measurement is made by projecting sinusoidal patterns of light intensity on a sample, and measuring the degree to which the patterns are blurred as a function of the projection angle. We derive a spatial Fourier domain solution to an anisotropic diffusion model. This solution predicts the effects of bulk scattering orientation on the amplitude and phase of the projected patterns. We introduce a new contrast function based on a scattering orientation index (SOI) which is sensitive to the degree to which light scattering is directionally dependent. We validate the technique using tissue simulating phantoms, and ex vivo samples of muscle and brain. Our results show that SOI is independent of the overall amount of bulk light scattering and absorption, and that isotropic versus oriented scattering structures can be clearly distinguished. We determine the orientation of subsurface microscopic scattering structures located up to 600 ?m beneath highly scattering (??s = 1.5 mm?1) material. PMID:22191918

  15. High-resolution nonlinear optical imaging of live cells by second harmonic generation.

    PubMed Central

    Campagnola, P J; Wei, M D; Lewis, A; Loew, L M

    1999-01-01

    By adapting a laser scanning microscope with a titanium sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser and transmission optics, we are able to produce live cell images based on the nonlinear optical phenomenon of second harmonic generation (SHG). Second harmonic imaging (SHIM) is an ideal method for probing membranes of living cells because it offers the high resolution of nonlinear optical microscopy with the potential for near-total avoidance of photobleaching and phototoxicity. The technique has been implemented on three cell lines labeled with membrane-staining dyes that have large nonlinear optical coefficients. The images can be obtained within physiologically relevant time scales. Both achiral and chiral dyes were used to compare image formation for the case of single- and double-leaflet staining, and it was found that chirality plays a significant role in the mechanism of contrast generation. It is also shown that SHIM is highly sensitive to membrane potential, with a depolarization of 25 mV resulting in an approximately twofold loss of signal intensity. PMID:10585956

  16. High-resolution nonlinear optical imaging of live cells by second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Campagnola, P J; Wei, M D; Lewis, A; Loew, L M

    1999-12-01

    By adapting a laser scanning microscope with a titanium sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser and transmission optics, we are able to produce live cell images based on the nonlinear optical phenomenon of second harmonic generation (SHG). Second harmonic imaging (SHIM) is an ideal method for probing membranes of living cells because it offers the high resolution of nonlinear optical microscopy with the potential for near-total avoidance of photobleaching and phototoxicity. The technique has been implemented on three cell lines labeled with membrane-staining dyes that have large nonlinear optical coefficients. The images can be obtained within physiologically relevant time scales. Both achiral and chiral dyes were used to compare image formation for the case of single- and double-leaflet staining, and it was found that chirality plays a significant role in the mechanism of contrast generation. It is also shown that SHIM is highly sensitive to membrane potential, with a depolarization of 25 mV resulting in an approximately twofold loss of signal intensity. PMID:10585956

  17. Theory of electron cyclotron maser interaction in a cavity at the harmonic frequencies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. R. Chu

    1978-01-01

    A theory of the cyclotron maser interaction between an annular electron beam and the standing electromagnetic wave in a cavity structure is formulated on the basis of the relativistic Vlasov equation and the Maxwell equations. Detailed analytical expressions for the beam-wave coupling coefficient, beam energy gain, and threshold beam power have been derived for the fundamental and higher cyclotron harmonics.

  18. High-order harmonic cut-off frequency in atomic silver irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Anatoly V.; Ganeev, Rashid A.; Kuroda, Hiroto; Stremoukhov, Sergey Yu; Shoutova, Olga A.

    2013-01-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental study of high-order optical harmonic generation in the ensemble of silver atoms irradiated by intense femtosecond pulses of Ti:Sapphire laser are presented. It is shown that the photoemission spectra exhibit unusual behavior when the laser field strength approaches near-atomic values. In subatomic field strength the cut-off frequency increases linearly with laser pulse intensity. However, when the field strength approaches near-atomic region firstly cut-off frequency slows down and then saturates. To give new interpretation of such kind of photoemission spectrum behavior we have proposed the light-atom interaction theory based on the use of eigenfunctions of boundary value problem for "the atom in an external field" instead of the traditional basis of the "free atom" eigenfunctions. The results of computer simulations clearly demonstrate saturation of the cut-off frequency at near-atomic strength of a laser field. The problem of angular divergence of a harmonic emission is analyzed.

  19. Pulse frequency modulation based CMOS image sensor for subretinal stimulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David C. Ng; Tetsuo Furumiya; Koutaro Yasuoka; Akihiro Uehara; Keiichiro Kagawa; Takashi Tokuda; Masahiro Nunoshita; Jun Ohta

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a CMOS image sensor based on pulse frequency modulation for subretinal implantation. The sensor chip forms part of the proposed intraocular retinal prosthesis system where data and power transmission are provided wirelessly from an extraocular unit. Image sensing and electrical stimulus are integrated onto the same chip. Image of sufficient resolution has been demonstrated using 16times16 pixels.

  20. Second harmonic generation imaging of the collagen in myocardium for atrial fibrillation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chiou, Yu-We; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2009-02-01

    Myocardial fibrosis, a common sequela of cardiac hypertrophy, has been shown to be associated with arrhythmias in experimental models. Some research has indicated that myocardial fibrosis plays an important role in predisposing patients to atrial fibrillation. Second harmonic generation (SHG) is an optically nonlinear coherent process to image the collagen network. In this presentation, we observe the SHG images of the collagen matrix in atrial myocardium and we analyzed of collagen fibers arrangement by using Fourier-transform analysis. Moreover, comparing the SHG images of the collagen fibers in atrial myocardium between normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and atrial fibrillation (AF), our result indicated that it is possible to realize the relation between myocardial fibrosis and AF.

  1. Macromolecular structure of cellulose studied by second-harmonic generation imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. Malcom; Millard, Andrew C.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2003-11-01

    The macromolecular structure of purified cellulose samples is studied by second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy. We show that the SHG contrast in both Valonia and Acetobacter cellulose strongly resembles that of collagen from animal tissues, both in terms of morphology and polarization anisotropy. Polarization analysis shows that microfibrils in each lamella are highly aligned and ordered and change directions by 90° in adjacent lamellae. The angular dependence of the SHG intensity fits well to a cos2 ? distribution, which is characteristic of the electric dipole interaction. Enzymatic degradation of Valonia fibers by cellulase is followed in real time by SHG imaging and results in exponential decay kinetics, showing that SHG imaging microscopy is ideal for monitoring dynamics in biological systems.

  2. Interferometric Backward Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy for Axial Imaging with Accuracy Beyond the Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Nuno M.; McCulloch, Christopher; Barzda, Virginijus

    2014-01-01

    A new nonlinear microscopy technique based on interference of backward-reflected third harmonic generation (I-THG) from multiple interfaces is presented. The technique is used to measure height variations or changes of a layer thickness with an accuracy of up to 5 nm. Height variations of a patterned glass surface and thickness variations of fibroblasts are visualized with the interferometric epi-THG microscope with an accuracy at least two orders of magnitude better than diffraction limit. The microscopy technique can be broadly applied for measuring distance variations between membranes or multilayer structures inside biological tissue and for surface height variation imaging. PMID:24710103

  3. In vivo structural imaging of the cornea by polarization-resolved second harmonic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Latour, Gaël; Gusachenko, Ivan; Kowalczuk, Laura; Lamarre, Isabelle; Schanne-Klein, Marie?Claire

    2011-01-01

    The transparency and mechanical strength of the cornea are related to the highly organized three-dimensional distribution of collagen fibrils. It is of great interest to develop specific and contrasted in vivo imaging tools to probe these collagenous structures, which is not available yet. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy is a unique tool to reveal fibrillar collagen within unstained tissues, but backward SHG images of cornea fail to reveal any spatial features due to the nanometric diameter of stromal collagen fibrils. To overcome this limitation, we performed polarization-resolved SHG imaging, which is highly sensitive to the sub-micrometer distribution of anisotropic structures. Using advanced data processing, we successfully retrieved the orientation of the collagenous fibrils at each depth of human corneas, even in backward SHG homogenous images. Quantitative information was also obtained about the submicrometer heterogeneities of the fibrillar collagen distribution by measuring the SHG anisotropy. All these results were consistent with numerical simulation of the polarization-resolved SHG response of cornea. Finally, we performed in vivo SHG imaging of rat corneas and achieved structural imaging of corneal stroma without any labeling. Epi-detected polarization-resolved SHG imaging should extend to other organs and become a new diagnosis tool for collagen remodeling. PMID:22254163

  4. Constructive influence of noise flatness and friction on the resonant behavior of a harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency.

    PubMed

    Laas, Katrin; Mankin, Romi; Rekker, Astrid

    2009-05-01

    The influences of noise flatness and friction coefficient on the long-time behavior of the first two moments and the correlation function for the output signal of a harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency subjected to an external periodic force are considered. The colored fluctuations of the oscillator frequency are modeled as a trichotomous noise. The study is a follow up of the previous investigation of a stochastic oscillator [Phys. Rev. E 78, 031120 (2008)], where the connection between the occurrence of energetic instability and stochastic multiresonance is established. Here we report some unexpected results not considered in the previous work. Notably, we have found a nonmonotonic dependence of several stochastic resonance characteristics such as spectral amplification, variance of the output signal, and signal-to-noise ratio on the friction coefficient and on the noise flatness. In particular, in certain parameter regions spectral amplification exhibits a resonancelike enhancement at intermediate values of the friction coefficient. PMID:19518437

  5. The Harmonic Content of High-Frequency QPOs from the Relativistic Orbiting-Spot vs. Oscillating-Torus Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, Vladimir; Bakala, Pavel; Torok, Gabriel; Wildner, Martin; Goluchova, Katerina

    2014-08-01

    Different theoretical schemes have been proposed to explain the origin of high-frequency (kilohertz) quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) from accreting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries and stellar-mass accreting black-holes. In the case of twin-peak sources, Fourier power-spectral density exhibits two dominant oscillation modes, often in the approximate ratio of small integers (3:2). Despite the rich phenomenology, base frequencies alone do not allow us to distinguish in a unique way among the most popular models. We discuss the harmonic content predicted by two competing scenarios, namely, the orbiting spot model and the oscillating torus model. By employing a ray-tracing code, we study the relativistic regime where the emerging radiation signal is influenced by effects of strong gravity (energy shifts and light bending). We consider spots moving on slightly non-circular trajectories in an accretion disk, and tori oscillating with fundamental modes. The harmonic content of the observed signal can allow us to reveal the ellipticity of the orbits and discriminate between the scheme of orbiting spots and the case of an oscillating torus. On a practical side, we estimate the required signal-to-noise ratio of the model light curve and we discuss what improvement would be needed in comparison with RXTE, depending on the source brightness.

  6. Biomechanical assessment and monitoring of thermal ablation using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Gary Yi

    Cancer remains, one of the major public health problems in the United States as well as many other countries worldwide. According to According to the World Health Organization, cancer is currently the leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 7.6 million deaths annually, and 25% of the annual death was due to Cancer during the year of 2011. In the long history of the cancer treatment field, many treatment options have been established up to date. Traditional procedures include surgical procedures as well as systemic therapies such as biologic therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and radiation therapy. Nevertheless, side-effects are often associated with such procedures due to the systemic delivery across the entire body. Recently technologies have been focused on localized therapy under minimally or noninvasive procedure with imaging-guidance, such as cryoablation, laser ablation, radio-frequency (RF) ablation, and High Intensity F-ocused Ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU is a non-invasive procedure aims to coagulate tissue thermally at a localized focal zone created with noninvasively emitting a set of focused ultrasound beams while the surrounding healthy tissues remain relatively untreated. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a dynamic, radiation-force-based imaging technique, which utilizes a single HIFU transducer by emitting an Amplitude-modulated (AM) beam to both thermally ablate the tumor while inducing a stable oscillatory tissue displacement at its focal zone. The oscillatory response is then estimated by a cross-correlation based motion tracking technique on the signal collected by a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. HMIFU addresses the most critical aspect and one of the major unmet needs of HIFU treatment, which is the ability to perform real-time monitoring and mapping of tissue property change during the HIFU treatment. In this dissertation, both the assessment and monitoring aspects of HMIFU have been investigated fundamentally and experimentally through development of both a 1-D and 2-D based system. The performance assessment of HMIFU technique in depicting the lesion size increase as well as the lesion-to-background displacement contrast was first demonstrated using a 3D, FE-based interdisciplinary simulation framework. Through the development of 1-D HMIFU system, a multi-parametric monitoring approach was presented where presented where the focal HMI displacement, phase shift (Delta?), and correlation coefficients were monitored along with thermocouple and PCD under the HIFU treatment sequence with boiling and slow denaturation. For HIFU treatments with slow denaturation, consistent displacement increase-then-decrease trend was observed, indicating tissue softening-then-stiffening and phase shift increased with treatment time in agreement with mechanical testing outcomes. The correlation coefficient remained high throughout the entire treatment time under a minimized broadband energy and boiling mechanism. Contrarily, both displacement and phase shift changes lacked consistency under HIFU treatment sequences with boiling due to the presence of strong boiling mechanism confirmed by both PCD and thermocouple monitoring. In order to facilitate its clinical translation, a fully-integrated, clinically 2D real-time HMIFU system was also developed, which is capable of providing 2D real-time streaming during HIFU treatment up to 15 Hz without interruption. Reproducibility studies of the system showed consistent displacement estimation on tissue-mimicking phantoms as well as monitoring of tissue-softening-then-stiffening phase change across 16 out of 19 liver specimens (Increasing rate in phase shift (Delta?): 0.73+/-0.69 %/s, Decreasing rate in phase shift (Delta?): 0.60+/-0.19 %/s) along with thermocouple monitoring (Increasing: 0.84+/-1.15 %/ °C, Decreasing: 2.03+/- 0.93%/ °C) and validation of tissue stiffening using mechanical testing. In addition, the 2-D HMIFU system feasibility on preclinical pancreatic tumor mice model was also demonstrated in vivo, where HMI displa

  7. Inter- and Intra-Observer Variability in Prostate Definition With Tissue Harmonic and Brightness Mode Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, Gurpreet Kaur, E-mail: Gurpreet.Sandhu2@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Dunscombe, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Meyer, Tyler [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Pavamani, Simon [Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India); Khan, Rao [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare the relative utility of tissue harmonic (H) and brightness (B) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate by studying interobserver and intraobserver variation in prostate delineation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage disease were randomly selected. TRUS images of prostates were acquired using B and H modes. The prostates on all images were contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and five equally trained observers. The observers were blinded to information regarding patient and imaging mode. The volumes of prostate glands and areas of midgland slices were calculated. Volumes contoured were compared among the observers and between observer group and RO. Contours on one patient were repeated five times by four observers to evaluate the intraobserver variability. Results: A one-sample Student t-test showed the volumes outlined by five observers are in agreement (p > 0.05) with the RO. Paired Student t-test showed prostate volumes (p = 0.008) and midgland areas (p = 0.006) with H mode were significantly smaller than that with B mode. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant interobserver variability (p < 0.001) in prostate volumes and areas. Inter- and intraobserver consistency was quantified as the standard deviation of mean volumes and areas, and concordance indices. It was found that for small glands ({<=}35 cc) H mode provided greater interobserver consistency; however, for large glands ({>=}35 cc), B mode provided more consistent estimates. Conclusions: H mode provided superior inter- and intraobserver agreement in prostate volume definition for small to medium prostates. In large glands, H mode does not exhibit any additional advantage. Although harmonic imaging has not proven advantageous for all cases, its utilization seems to be judicious for small prostates.

  8. Computational segmentation of collagen fibers from second-harmonic generation images of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S.; Liu, Yuming; Pehlke, Carolyn A.; Conklin, Matthew W.; Szulczewski, Joseph M.; Inman, David R.; Keely, Patricia J.; Nowak, Robert D.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging can help reveal interactions between collagen fibers and cancer cells. Quantitative analysis of SHG images of collagen fibers is challenged by the heterogeneity of collagen structures and low signal-to-noise ratio often found while imaging collagen in tissue. The role of collagen in breast cancer progression can be assessed post acquisition via enhanced computation. To facilitate this, we have implemented and evaluated four algorithms for extracting fiber information, such as number, length, and curvature, from a variety of SHG images of collagen in breast tissue. The image-processing algorithms included a Gaussian filter, SPIRAL-TV filter, Tubeness filter, and curvelet-denoising filter. Fibers are then extracted using an automated tracking algorithm called fiber extraction (FIRE). We evaluated the algorithm performance by comparing length, angle and position of the automatically extracted fibers with those of manually extracted fibers in twenty-five SHG images of breast cancer. We found that the curvelet-denoising filter followed by FIRE, a process we call CT-FIRE, outperforms the other algorithms under investigation. CT-FIRE was then successfully applied to track collagen fiber shape changes over time in an in vivo mouse model for breast cancer.

  9. Computational segmentation of collagen fibers from second-harmonic generation images of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S.; Liu, Yuming; Pehlke, Carolyn A.; Conklin, Matthew W.; Szulczewski, Joseph M.; Inman, David R.; Keely, Patricia J.; Nowak, Robert D.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging can help reveal interactions between collagen fibers and cancer cells. Quantitative analysis of SHG images of collagen fibers is challenged by the heterogeneity of collagen structures and low signal-to-noise ratio often found while imaging collagen in tissue. The role of collagen in breast cancer progression can be assessed post acquisition via enhanced computation. To facilitate this, we have implemented and evaluated four algorithms for extracting fiber information, such as number, length, and curvature, from a variety of SHG images of collagen in breast tissue. The image-processing algorithms included a Gaussian filter, SPIRAL-TV filter, Tubeness filter, and curvelet-denoising filter. Fibers are then extracted using an automated tracking algorithm called fiber extraction (FIRE). We evaluated the algorithm performance by comparing length, angle and position of the automatically extracted fibers with those of manually extracted fibers in twenty-five SHG images of breast cancer. We found that the curvelet-denoising filter followed by FIRE, a process we call CT-FIRE, outperforms the other algorithms under investigation. CT-FIRE was then successfully applied to track collagen fiber shape changes over time in an in vivo mouse model for breast cancer. PMID:24407500

  10. Quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging to detect osteogenesis imperfecta in human skin samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, J.; Ferreira, A. E.; D'Souza-Li, L.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that leads to bone fractures due to mutations in the Col1A1 or Col1A2 genes that affect the primary structure of the collagen I chain with the ultimate outcome in collagen I fibrils that are either reduced in quantity or abnormally organized in the whole body. A quick test screening of the patients would largely reduce the sample number to be studied by the time consuming molecular genetics techniques. For this reason an assessment of the human skin collagen structure by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) can be used as a screening technique to speed up the correlation of genetics/phenotype/OI types understanding. In the present work we have used quantitative second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to investigate the collagen matrix organization of the OI human skin samples comparing with normal control patients. By comparing fibril collagen distribution and spatial organization, we calculated the anisotropy and texture patterns of this structural protein. The analysis of the anisotropy was performed by means of the two-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform and image pattern analysis with Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). From these results, we show that statistically different results are obtained for the normal and disease states of OI.

  11. Second harmonic imaging: a new ultrasound technique to assess human brain tumour perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrer, J; Mayfrank, L; Mull, M; Klotzsch, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: Second harmonic imaging is a new ultrasound technique that allows evaluation of brain tissue perfusion after application of an ultrasound contrast agent. Objective: To evaluate the potential of this technique for the assessment of abnormal echo contrast characteristics of different brain tumours. Methods: 27 patients with brain tumours were studied. These were divided into four groups: gliomas, WHO grade III–IV (n = 6); meningiomas (n = 9); metastases (n = 5); and others (n = 7). Patients were examined by second harmonic imaging in a transverse axial insonation plane using the transtemporal approach. Following intravenous administration of 4 g (400 mg/ml) of a galactose based echo contrast agent, 62 time triggered images (one image per 2.5 seconds) were recorded and analysed off-line. Time–intensity curves of two regions of interest (tumour tissue and healthy brain tissue), including peak intensity (PI) (dB), time to peak intensity (TP) (s), and positive gradient (PG) (dB/s), as well as ratios of the peak intensities of the two regions of interest, were derived from the data and compared intraindividually and interindividually. Results: After administration of the contrast agent a marked enhancement of echo contrast was visible in the tumour tissue in all patients. Mean PI and PG were significantly higher in tumour tissue than in healthy brain parenchyma (11.8 v 5.1 dB and 0.69 v 0.16 dB/s; p < 0.001). TP did not differ significantly (37.1 v 50.2 s; p = 0.14). A tendency towards higher PI and PG as well as shorter TP was apparent in malignant gliomas. When comparing different tumour types, however, none of these variables reached significance, nor were there significant differences between malignant and benign tumours in general. Conclusions: Second harmonic imaging not only allows identification of brain tumours, but may also help in distinguishing between different tumour types. It gives additional and alternative information about tumour perfusion. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical potential of this technique in investigating brain tumours—for example in follow up investigations of patients undergoing radiation or chemotherapy—especially in comparison with neuroradiological and neuropathological findings. PMID:12588918

  12. Holographic Radar Imaging Privacy Techniques Utilizing Dual-Frequency Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.; Sheen, David M.

    2008-04-18

    Over the last 15 years, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has performed significant research and development activities to enhance the state of the art of holographic radar imaging systems to be used at security checkpoints for screening people for concealed threats hidden under their garments. These enhancement activities included improvements to privacy techniques to remove human features and providing automatic detection of body-worn concealed threats. The enhanced privacy and detection methods used both physical and software imaging techniques. The physical imaging techniques included polarization-diversity illumination and reception, dual-frequency implementation, and high-frequency imaging at 60 GHz. Software imaging techniques to enhance the privacy of the person under surveillance included extracting concealed threat artifacts from the imagery to automatically detect the threat. This paper will focus on physical privacy techniques using dual-frequency implementation.

  13. Low-Power Analog Processing for Sensing Applications: Low-Frequency Harmonic Signal Classification

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel J.; William, Peter E.; Hoffman, Michael W.; Balkir, Sina

    2013-01-01

    A low-power analog sensor front-end is described that reduces the energy required to extract environmental sensing spectral features without using Fast Fouriér Transform (FFT) or wavelet transforms. An Analog Harmonic Transform (AHT) allows selection of only the features needed by the back-end, in contrast to the FFT, where all coefficients must be calculated simultaneously. We also show that the FFT coefficients can be easily calculated from the AHT results by a simple back-substitution. The scheme is tailored for low-power, parallel analog implementation in an integrated circuit (IC). Two different applications are tested with an ideal front-end model and compared to existing studies with the same data sets. Results from the military vehicle classification and identification of machine-bearing fault applications shows that the front-end suits a wide range of harmonic signal sources. Analog-related errors are modeled to evaluate the feasibility of and to set design parameters for an IC implementation to maintain good system-level performance. Design of a preliminary transistor-level integrator circuit in a 0.13 ?m complementary metal-oxide-silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit process showed the ability to use online self-calibration to reduce fabrication errors to a sufficiently low level. Estimated power dissipation is about three orders of magnitude less than similar vehicle classification systems that use commercially available FFT spectral extraction. PMID:23892765

  14. Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies:  An Evaluation of Hartree?Fock, Møller?Plesset, Quadratic Configuration Interaction, Density Functional Theory, and Semiempirical Scale Factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony P. Scott; Leo Radom

    1996-01-01

    Scaling factors for obtaining fundamental vibrational frequencies, low-frequency vibrations, zero-point vibrational energies (ZPVE), and thermal contributions to enthalpy and entropy from harmonic frequencies determined at 19 levels of theory have been derived through a least-squares approach. Semiempirical methods (AM1 and PM3), conventional uncorrelated and correlated ab initio molecular orbital procedures (Hartree- Fock (HF), Møller-Plesset (MP2), and quadratic configuration interaction including

  15. Ex vivo imaging and quantification of liver fibrosis using second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tzu-Lin; Liu, Yuan; Sung, Ming-Chin; Chen, Hsiao-Ching; Yang, Chun-Hui; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chen, Wei-Liang; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Kim, Ki-Hean; So, Peter T. C.; Chen, Yang-Fang; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-05-01

    Conventionally, liver fibrosis is diagnosed using histopathological techniques. The traditional method is time-consuming in that the specimen preparation procedure requires sample fixation, slicing, and labeling. Our goal is to apply multiphoton microscopy to efficiently image and quantitatively analyze liver fibrosis specimens bypassing steps required in histological preparation. In this work, the combined imaging modality of multiphoton autofluorescence (MAF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) was used for the qualitative imaging of liver fibrosis of different METAVIR grades under label-free, ex vivo conditions. We found that while MAF is effective in identifying cellular architecture in the liver specimens, it is the spectrally distinct SHG signal that allows the characterization of the extent of fibrosis. We found that qualitative SHG imaging can be used for the effective identification of the associated features of liver fibrosis specimens graded METAVIR 0 to 4. In addition, we attempted to associate quantitative SHG signal to the different METAVIR grades and found that an objective determination of the extent of disease progression can be made. Our approach demonstrates the potential of using multiphoton imaging in rapid classification of ex vivo liver fibrosis in the clinical setting and investigation of liver fibrosis-associated physiopathology in animal models in vivo.

  16. Analytical Bistatic k Space Images Compared to Experimental Swept Frequency EAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeffer, John; Cooper, Brett; Hom, Kam

    2004-01-01

    A case study of flat plate scattering images obtained by the analytical bistatic k space and experimental swept frequency ISAR methods is presented. The key advantage of the bistatic k space image is that a single excitation is required, i.e., one frequency I one angle. This means that prediction approaches such as MOM only need to compute one solution at a single frequency. Bistatic image Fourier transform data are obtained by computing the scattered field at various bistatic positions about the body in k space. Experimental image Fourier transform data are obtained from the measured response to a bandwidth of frequencies over a target rotation range.

  17. Image based adaptive optics through optimisation of low spatial frequencies

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Image based adaptive optics through optimisation of low spatial frequencies Delphine D adaptive optics scheme for an incoherent imaging system. Aberration correction is performed through of America OCIS codes: (010.1080) Adaptive Optics; (010.7350) Wave-front sensing; (110.4850) Optical transfer

  18. Image enhancement by adjusting the contrast of spatial frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ching-Chung

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate a brand-new method for image enhancement by adjusting the contrast of different spatial frequencies. Fine characteristics of an image are well enhanced with negligible side effects. This method is easy to implement owing to its simple optical basis.

  19. Wavelet packet image coding using space-frequency quantization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zixiang Xiong; Kannan Ramchandran; Michael T. Orchard

    1998-01-01

    We extend our previous work on space-frequency quantization (SFQ) [1] for image codingfrom wavelet transforms to the more general wavelet packet transforms [2]. The resulting waveletpacket coder offers an universal transform coding framework within the constraints of filter bankstructures by allowing joint transform and quantizer design without assuming a priori statisticsof the input image. In other words, the new coder

  20. Far-field imaging with a multi-frequency metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Jouvaud, C., E-mail: camille.jouvaud@centraliens-lille.org; Ourir, A.; Rosny, J. de [ESPCI ParisTech, PSL Research University, Institut Langevin, 1 rue Jussieu, F-75005 Paris, France and CNRS, Institut Langevin, 1 rue Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2014-06-16

    A metalens, i.e., a dense array of identical resonators, allows to image an object pattern at subwavelength scale from far field radiation field. Here, we show that the efficiency can be improved when the resonant frequencies of the cell are distributed over a given frequency range. Because in such systems each eigen mode is localized, the subwavelength image is built from a spectral analysis of the radiated field. A simple model based on coupled resonant dipoles is used to find the best frequency distribution. This multifrequency metalens approach is validated using a flat array of split ring resonators. We experimentally demonstrate the subwavelength resolution of such a device at microwave range.

  1. Extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B.; Kirshbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (<20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts.

  2. A Proposal of Co-occurrence Frequency Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaashi, Kazuhiko; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Koshimizu, Hiroyasu

    Image processing is generally constructed based on the gray information such as statistical gray histogram, gradient, texture, etc. However, a concrete technique that used this co-occurrence procession had been chiefly limited to the texture identification. Since the gray histogram is the most influential for extracting the global image properties, it has been always expected to be improved or extended. From this view point, it was notable that Dr. Kashiwagi proposed a new paradigm of feature extraction called Frequency Image (FI). As well as histogram, co-occurrence histogram or co-occurrence matrix is also such influential basic image feature especially for the texture feature analysis. In this paper, we introduce a new paradigm of texture feature image called “Co-occurrence Frequency Image (CFI)” as a complete extension of FI.

  3. Effects of frequency- and direction-dependent elastic materials on linearly elastic MRE image reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreard, I. M.; Pattison, A. J.; Doyley, M.; McGarry, M. D. J.; Barani, Z.; Van Houten, E. E.; Weaver, J. B.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2010-11-01

    The mechanical model commonly used in magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is linear elasticity. However, soft tissue may exhibit frequency- and direction-dependent (FDD) shear moduli in response to an induced excitation causing a purely linear elastic model to provide an inaccurate image reconstruction of its mechanical properties. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of reconstructing FDD data using a linear elastic inversion (LEI) algorithm. Linear and FDD phantoms were manufactured and LEI images were obtained from time-harmonic MRE acquisitions with variations in frequency and driving signal amplitude. LEI responses to artificially imposed uniform phase shifts in the displacement data from both purely linear elastic and FDD phantoms were also evaluated. Of the variety of FDD phantoms considered, LEI appeared to tolerate viscoelastic data-model mismatch better than deviations caused by poroelastic and anisotropic mechanical properties in terms of visual image contrast. However, the estimated shear modulus values were substantially incorrect relative to independent mechanical measurements even in the successful viscoelastic cases and the variations in mean values with changes in experimental conditions associated with uniform phase shifts, driving signal frequency and amplitude were unpredictable. Overall, use of LEI to reconstruct data acquired in phantoms with FDD material properties provided biased results under the best conditions and significant artifacts in the worst cases. These findings suggest that the success with which LEI is applied to MRE data in tissue will depend on the underlying mechanical characteristics of the tissues and/or organs systems of clinical interest.

  4. Beat-Frequency/Microsphere Medical Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Pretlow, Robert A., III

    1995-01-01

    Medical ultrasonic imaging system designed to provide quantitative data on various flows of blood in chambers, blood vessels, muscles, and tissues of heart. Sensitive enough to yield readings on flows of blood in heart even when microspheres used as ultrasonic contrast agents injected far from heart and diluted by circulation of blood elsewhere in body.

  5. Magnetic particle imaging with a planar frequency mixing magnetic detection scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hyobong; Lim, Jaeho; Choi, Chel-Jong; Shin, Sung-Woong; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We present the first experimental results of our planar-Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection (p-FMMD) technique to obtain Magnetic Particles Imaging (MPI). The p-FMMD scanner consists of two magnetic measurement heads with intermediate space for the analysis of the sample. The magnetic signal originates from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of superparamagnetic particles as in case of the usual MPI scanner. However, the detection principle is different. Standard MPI records the higher order harmonic response of particles at a field-free point or line. By contrast, FMMD records a sum-frequency component generated from both a high and a low frequency magnetic field incident on the magnetically nonlinear particles. As compared to conventional MPI scanner, there is no limit on the lateral dimensions of the sample; just the sample height is limited to 2 mm. In addition, the technique does not require a strong magnetic field or gradient because of the mixing of the two different frequencies. In this study, we acquired an 18 mm × 18 mm image of a string sample decorated with 100 nm diameter magnetic particles, using the p-FMMD technique. The results showed that it is feasible to use this novel MPI scanner for biological analysis and medical diagnostic purposes.

  6. Image Deconvolution by Means of Frequency Blur Invariant Concept

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Different blur invariant descriptors have been proposed so far, which are either in the spatial domain or based on the properties available in the moment domain. In this paper, a frequency framework is proposed to develop blur invariant features that are used to deconvolve a degraded image caused by a Gaussian blur. These descriptors are obtained by establishing an equivalent relationship between the normalized Fourier transforms of the blurred and original images, both normalized by their respective fixed frequencies set to one. Advantage of using the proposed invariant descriptors is that it is possible to estimate both the point spread function (PSF) and the original image. The performance of frequency invariants will be demonstrated through experiments. An image deconvolution is done as an additional application to verify the proposed blur invariant features. PMID:25202743

  7. Frequency Synthesizers and Oscillator Architectures Based on Multi-Order Harmonic Generation

    E-print Network

    Abdul-Latif, Mohammed

    2012-02-14

    Frequency synthesizers are essential components for modern wireless and wireline communication systems as they provide the local oscillator signal required to transmit and receive data at very high rates. They are also vital for computing devices...

  8. Amplitude-frequency analysis of the Earth orientation parameters and the variation of the second zonal harmonic of the geopotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, V. V.; Filippova, A. S.; Markov, Yu. G.; Perepelkin, V.

    2014-12-01

    An amplitude-frequency analysis of the rotary-oscillatory Earth motion under the action of gravitational-tidal perturbing torques from the Sun and the Moon is carried out using the classical mechanics' methods. The simulation results of the oscillatory process in the motion of the Earth pole and the variations of the second zonal harmonic ¥delta c_20 of the geopotential are studied. Based on the dynamic Euler-Liouville equations expressions for amplitude and phase of the Earth pole oscillations are obtained. A comparison of the spectral power densities of the time series between the Earth pole coordinates and the delta c_20 variations of the geopotential is carried out. A functional dependence of the aforementioned component of the geopotential from the amplitude and phase of the Earth's pole oscillatory process is shown.

  9. Ultra high frequency imaging acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-05-23

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  10. Relationship between center-peaked plasma density profiles and harmonic electromagnetic waves in very high frequency capacitively coupled plasma reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Ikuo; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Lane, Barton; Ohshita, Tatsuro; Upadhyay, Rochan R.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of the factors that control radial plasma uniformity in very high frequency (VHF) capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) sources is important for many plasma processes in semiconductor device manufacturing. Here, we report experimental measurements and high-resolution self-consistent numerical simulations that illustrate the plasma density profile and the higher harmonic wave content in two types of VHF-CCP test-bench reactors. A distinct sharp center peak superimposed on a broad center peak in argon plasma was observed for driving frequencies of 60 and 106 MHz. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations of the electric field power spectrum reveal the presence of UHF waves when the electron density is over 5 × 1016 (#/m3). The presence of UHF waves closely correlates with the occurrence of a distinct and sharp-center-peaked electron density. The numerical simulations show that specific frequency bands in the UHF spectrum are amplified in the plasma and lead to the evolution of the sharp-center-peaked electron density.

  11. Density imaging using a multiple-frequency DBIM approach.

    PubMed

    Lavarello, Roberto; Oelze, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Current inverse scattering methods for quantitative density imaging have limitations that keep them from practical experimental implementations. In this work, an improved approach, termed the multiple-frequency distorted Born iterative method (MF-DBIM) algorithm, was developed for imaging density variations. The MF-DBIM approach consists of inverting the wave equation by solving for a single function that depends on both sound speed and density variations at multiple frequencies. Density information was isolated by using a linear combination of the reconstructed single-frequency profiles. Reconstructions of targets using MF-DBIM from simulated data were compared with reconstructions using methods currently available in the literature, i.e., the dual-frequency DBIM (DF-DBIM) and T-matrix approaches. Useful density reconstructions, i.e., root mean square errors (RMSEs) less than 30%, were obtained with MF-DBIM even with 2% Gaussian noise in the simulated data and using frequency ranges spanning less than an order of magnitude. Therefore, the MFDBIM approach outperformed both the DF-DBIM method (which has problems converging with noise even an order of magnitude smaller) and the T-matrix method (which requires a ka factor close to unity to achieve convergence). However, the convergence of all the density imaging algorithms was compromised when imaging targets with object functions exhibiting high spatial frequency content. PMID:21041134

  12. Three-dimensional echocardiography with tissue harmonic imaging shows excellent reproducibility in assessment of left ventricular volumes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Yong Kim; Peter Søgaard; Henrik Egeblad; Niels Trolle Andersen; Bent Ø Kristensen

    2001-01-01

    We studied the reproducibility of repeated measurements of left ventricular (LV) volumes by 2-dimensional (biplane method of disks) and 3-dimensional echocardiography (coaxial scanning) with tissue harmonic imaging. Ten healthy subjects underwent estimation of LV volumes by transthoracic echocardiography twice within 1 week by 2 different operators to investigate interexamination and operator variance. In addition, the analysis of LV volume was

  13. Quantitative evaluation of skeletal muscle defects in second harmonic generation images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhua; Raben, Nina; Ralston, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Skeletal muscle pathologies cause irregularities in the normally periodic organization of the myofibrils. Objective grading of muscle morphology is necessary to assess muscle health, compare biopsies, and evaluate treatments and the evolution of disease. To facilitate such quantitation, we have developed a fast, sensitive, automatic imaging analysis software. It detects major and minor morphological changes by combining texture features and Fourier transform (FT) techniques. We apply this tool to second harmonic generation (SHG) images of muscle fibers which visualize the repeating myosin bands. Texture features are then calculated by using a Haralick gray-level cooccurrence matrix in MATLAB. Two scores are retrieved from the texture correlation plot by using FT and curve-fitting methods. The sensitivity of the technique was tested on SHG images of human adult and infant muscle biopsies and of mouse muscle samples. The scores are strongly correlated to muscle fiber condition. We named the software MARS (muscle assessment and rating scores). It is executed automatically and is highly sensitive even to subtle defects. We propose MARS as a powerful and unbiased tool to assess muscle health. PMID:23377006

  14. Quantitative evaluation of skeletal muscle defects in second harmonic generation images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenhua; Raben, Nina; Ralston, Evelyn

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle pathologies cause irregularities in the normally periodic organization of the myofibrils. Objective grading of muscle morphology is necessary to assess muscle health, compare biopsies, and evaluate treatments and the evolution of disease. To facilitate such quantitation, we have developed a fast, sensitive, automatic imaging analysis software. It detects major and minor morphological changes by combining texture features and Fourier transform (FT) techniques. We apply this tool to second harmonic generation (SHG) images of muscle fibers which visualize the repeating myosin bands. Texture features are then calculated by using a Haralick gray-level cooccurrence matrix in MATLAB. Two scores are retrieved from the texture correlation plot by using FT and curve-fitting methods. The sensitivity of the technique was tested on SHG images of human adult and infant muscle biopsies and of mouse muscle samples. The scores are strongly correlated to muscle fiber condition. We named the software MARS (muscle assessment and rating scores). It is executed automatically and is highly sensitive even to subtle defects. We propose MARS as a powerful and unbiased tool to assess muscle health. PMID:23377006

  15. Quantitative evaluation of skeletal muscle defects in second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenhua; Raben, Nina; Ralston, Evelyn

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle pathologies cause irregularities in the normally periodic organization of the myofibrils. Objective grading of muscle morphology is necessary to assess muscle health, compare biopsies, and evaluate treatments and the evolution of disease. To facilitate such quantitation, we have developed a fast, sensitive, automatic imaging analysis software. It detects major and minor morphological changes by combining texture features and Fourier transform (FT) techniques. We apply this tool to second harmonic generation (SHG) images of muscle fibers which visualize the repeating myosin bands. Texture features are then calculated by using a Haralick gray-level cooccurrence matrix in MATLAB. Two scores are retrieved from the texture correlation plot by using FT and curve-fitting methods. The sensitivity of the technique was tested on SHG images of human adult and infant muscle biopsies and of mouse muscle samples. The scores are strongly correlated to muscle fiber condition. We named the software MARS (muscle assessment and rating scores). It is executed automatically and is highly sensitive even to subtle defects. We propose MARS as a powerful and unbiased tool to assess muscle health.

  16. Amplified, frequency swept lasers for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT imaging: design and scaling principles.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Wojtkowski, M; Taira, K; Fujimoto, J; Hsu, K

    2005-05-01

    We demonstrate a high-speed, frequency swept, 1300 nm laser source for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT with Fourier domain/swept-source detection. The laser uses a fiber coupled, semiconductor amplifier and a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter. We present scaling principles which predict the maximum frequency sweep speed and trade offs in output power, noise and instantaneous linewidth performance. The use of an amplification stage for increasing output power and for spectral shaping is discussed in detail. The laser generates ~45 mW instantaneous peak power at 20 kHz sweep rates with a tuning range of ~120 nm full width. In frequency domain reflectometry and OCT applications the frequency swept laser achieves 108 dB sensitivity and ~10 mum axial resolution in tissue. We also present a fast algorithm for real time calibration of the fringe signal to equally spaced sampling in frequency for high speed OCT image preview. PMID:19495256

  17. Harmonic Tracking of Acoustic Radiation Force Induced Displacements

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Dahl, Jeremy J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods rely upon accurate estimates of tissue deformation to characterize the mechanical properties of soft tissues. These methods are corrupted by clutter, which can bias and/or increase variance in displacement estimates. Harmonic imaging methods are routinely used for clutter suppression and improved image quality in conventional B-mode ultrasound, but have not been utilized in ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods. We introduce a novel, fully-sampled pulse inversion harmonic method for tracking tissue displacements that corrects the loss in temporal sampling frequency associated with conventional pulse inversion techniques. The method is implemented with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging to monitor the displacements induced by an impulsive acoustic radiation force excitation. Custom pulse sequences were implemented on a diagnostic ultrasound scanner to collect spatially-matched fundamental and harmonic information within a single acquisition. B-mode and ARFI images created from fundamental data collected at 4 MHz and 8 MHz are compared with 8 MHz harmonic images created using a bandpass filter approach and the fully sampled pulse inversion method. In homogeneous, tissue-mimicking phantoms, where no visible clutter was observed, there was little difference in the axial displacements, estimated jitter, and normalized cross-correlation among the fundamental and harmonic tracking methods. The similarity of the lower and higher frequency methods suggests that any improvement due to the increased frequency of the harmonic components is negligible. The harmonic tracking methods demonstrated a marked improvement in B-mode and ARFI image quality of in vivo carotid arteries. Improved feature detection and decreased variance in estimated displacements were observed in the arterial walls of harmonic ARFI images, especially in the pulse inversion harmonic ARFI images. Within the lumen, the harmonic tracking methods improved the discrimination of the blood–vessel interface, making it easier to visualize plaque boundaries. Improvements in harmonic ARFI images in vivo were consistent with suppressed clutter supported by improved contrast and CNR in the matched harmonic B-mode images compared to the fundamental B-mode images. These results suggest that harmonic tracking methods can improve the clinical utility and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods. PMID:24158290

  18. Harmonic nanoparticles for regenerative research.

    PubMed

    Ronzoni, Flavio; Magouroux, Thibaud; Vernet, Remi; Extermann, Jérôme; Crotty, Darragh; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Ciepielewski, Daniel; Volkov, Yuri; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Jaconi, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    In this visualized experiment, protocol details are provided for in vitro labeling of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) with second harmonic generation nanoparticles (HNPs). The latter are a new family of probes recently introduced for labeling biological samples for multi-photon imaging. HNPs are capable of doubling the frequency of excitation light by the nonlinear optical process of second harmonic generation with no restriction on the excitation wavelength. Multi-photon based methodologies for hESC differentiation into cardiac clusters (maintained as long term air-liquid cultures) are presented in detail. In particular, evidence on how to maximize the intense second harmonic (SH) emission of isolated HNPs during 3D monitoring of beating cardiac tissue in 3D is shown. The analysis of the resulting images to retrieve 3D displacement patterns is also detailed. PMID:24836220

  19. Standing Waves and Harmonics In this laboratory exercise you will explore how the frequency of a wave and the stretching force applied to a

    E-print Network

    Yu, Jaehoon

    Standing Waves and Harmonics Purpose In this laboratory exercise you will explore how the frequency. Theory Standing waves are created when two traveling waves, both having the same speed, amplitude to a point. This wave is then reflected back in the opposite direction. Standing waves occurs at a fundament

  20. Improvement of scale factors for harmonic vibrational frequency calculations using new polarization functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierraalta, Anibal; Martorell, Guillermo; Ehrmann, Elena; Añez, Rafael

    Density functional calculations were carried to improve the calculated CO vibrational frequencies for transition metal carbonyls. Two types of density functionals were studied, hybrid and generalized-gradient methods. Using the simplex optimization method, new polarization functions for C and O atoms were obtained. With these new optimized functions, new scaling factors were obtained. The results reveal that, with the new polarization functions, the agreement between the calculated and the experimental values improves considerably. In general, the new scaling factors are very close to unit, with standard uncertainties close to ±0.006 cm-1. The use of the new polarization functions allows more precise calculations of the transition metal carbonyl CO vibrational frequencies.0

  1. First and second harmonic ECRH experience at gyrotron frequencies at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.

    1987-11-01

    Plasma heating of electrons in both mirror machines and tokamaks, using mm wave gyrotron sources, have been carried out in many experiments in recent years. The technology for both sources and mode-preserving waveguide transmission systems is well developed at power levels of 200 kW. At LLNL electron heating at 28 GHz in the TMX-U tandem mirror has been used to create hot electrons required for a thermal barrier (potential well). TMX-U, and other devices operating at lower frequency and power (10 GHz, few kW), routinely generates electron populations with mean energies of 100 to 500 keV and densities in the low to mid 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ range. Radial pressure profiles vary from peaked-on-axis to hollow and are dependent on the mod-B resonance surfaces. Experiments on the axisymmetric mirror SM-1 have shown improved heating efficiency using multiple frequencies with narrow frequency separation. The importance of rf diffusion in determining electron confinement has been shown in CONSTANCE B. Fokker-Planck and particle orbit models have been useful for understanding the importance of cavity heating for creating runaway electrons, the sensitivity of hot electron production to cold plasma, the reduction of electron lifetime by rf diffusion, and the effect of multiple frequencies on heating stochasticity. Potential wells generated in plasmas with large fractions of mirror-trapped electrons have been measured in TMX-U. These offer prospects for enhanced confinement of highly stripped ions. 11 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. A cost-efficient frequency-domain photoacoustic imaging system

    PubMed Central

    LeBoulluec, Peter; Liu, Hanli; Yuan, Baohong

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging techniques have recently attracted much attention and can be used for noninvasive imaging of biological tissues. Most PA imaging systems in research laboratories use the time domain method with expensive nanosecond pulsed lasers that are not affordable for most educational laboratories. Using an intensity modulated light source to excite PA signals is an alternative technique, known as the frequency domain method, with a much lower cost. In this paper, we describe a simple frequency domain PA system and demonstrate its imaging capability. The system provides opportunities not only to observe PA signals in tissue phantoms, but also to acquire hands-on skills in PA signal detection. It also provides opportunities to explore the underlying mechanisms of the PA effect. PMID:24659823

  3. Swept-frequency feedback interferometry using terahertz frequency QCLs: a method for imaging and materials analysis.

    PubMed

    Raki?, Aleksandar D; Taimre, Thomas; Bertling, Karl; Lim, Yah Leng; Dean, Paul; Indjin, Dragan; Ikoni?, Zoran; Harrison, Paul; Valavanis, Alexander; Khanna, Suraj P; Lachab, Mohammad; Wilson, Stephen J; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles

    2013-09-23

    The terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade laser (QCL) is a compact source of high-power radiation with a narrow intrinsic linewidth. As such, THz QCLs are extremely promising sources for applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, heterodyne detection, and coherent imaging. We exploit the remarkable phase-stability of THz QCLs to create a coherent swept-frequency delayed self-homodyning method for both imaging and materials analysis, using laser feedback interferometry. Using our scheme we obtain amplitude-like and phase-like images with minimal signal processing. We determine the physical relationship between the operating parameters of the laser under feedback and the complex refractive index of the target and demonstrate that this coherent detection method enables extraction of complex refractive indices with high accuracy. This establishes an ultimately compact and easy-to-implement THz imaging and materials analysis system, in which the local oscillator, mixer, and detector are all combined into a single laser. PMID:24104111

  4. High-frequency ultrasonic imaging of thickly sliced specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Chiaki; Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Chandraratna, Premindra A. N.

    2003-07-01

    It has been reported that a mechanical scanning reflection acoustic microscope (hereinafter called simply "SAM"), using high frequency ultrasonic tone-burst waves, can form a horizontal cross-sectional image (i.e., c-scan image) showing a highly resolved cellular structure of biological tissue. However, the tissue prepared for the SAM has been mostly a thinly sectioned specimen. In this study, the SAM images of specimens thickly sectioned from the tissue were analyzed. Optical and scanning acoustic microscopies were used to evaluate tissues of human small intestine and esophagus. For preparing thin specimens, the tissue was embedded in paraffin, and substantially sectioned at 5-10?m by the microtome. For optical microscopy, the tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and affixed onto glass substrates. For scanning acoustic microscopy, two types of specimens were prepared: thinly sectioned specimens affixed on the glass substrate, wherein the specimens were deparaffinized in xylene, but not stained, and thickely sectioned specimens. Images of the thick specimens obtained with frequency at 200 MHz revealed cellular structures. The morphology was very similar to that seen in the thinly sectioned specimens with optical and scanning acoustic microscopy. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was used to compare the images of biological tissue. An acoustic lens with frequency at 200 MHz permitted the imaging of surface and/or subsurface of microstructures in the thick sections of small intestine and esophagus.

  5. Blurriness measurement in frequency domain for image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Qadri Muhammad; Noman, Mehmood S.; Tahir, Aisha

    2011-10-01

    DCT based digital image and video compression leads to visible distortions like blockiness and blurriness, however this paper mainly focuses blurriness artifact. Subjective quality assessments are reliable but they are very costly and can't be computerized. This paper proposes three different objective quality assessment methods for blurriness estimation using full reference, reduced reference and no reference approaches. The distortion is measured in frequency domain by comparing the high frequency coefficients of the coded image. Before blurriness estimation in frequency domain, the property of Human Visual System is implemented by applying the spatial masking in spatial domain. Since the distortion is not likely to be in same amount in every part of the coded image therefore the coded image is divided into blocks and the distortion is calculated locally for each block and accumulated in the end for a single quality metric. The results show that the full and reduced reference meters are more reliable due to the availability of some reference information at receiver end. The work is tested on different set of blurred images from LIVE image database and the Pearson's correlation coefficient of 94.43% is obtained for full reference mode while it is 94.20% and 82.03% for reduced reference and no reference respectively.

  6. Generating high-frequency, rotating magnetic fields with low harmonic content

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Litvinenko, V.; Meng, W.; Pikin, A.; Skaritka, J.

    2011-09-13

    The future electron-ion collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory demands a high-current, polarized, bunched electron beam [http://www.bnl.gov/cad/eRhic]. One of the challenges here is to combine the bunched beams generated by multiple cathodes so to address the issue of designing and prototyping a combiner with high-frequency (700 kHz) rotational magnetic fields. This article presents its design, and simulation, and details some of the test results from this unprecedented device.

  7. A New High Frequency Ultrasound Skin Imaging System: Imaging Properties and Clinical in Vivo Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M.; Scharenberg, R.; Moussa, G.; Sand, M.; Hoffmann, K.; Altmeyer, P.; Ermert, H.

    In this paper, a new high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) system for high-resolution skin imaging is presented. For imaging, mechanical scans are performed with spherically focused single element transducers. Two separate applicators with different transducers are utilized to fulfill the different requirements for imaging the skin with 20MHz ultrasound and for lower range high resolution imaging of the uppermost skin layers with HFUS in the 100MHz range. Clinical images were acquired in the imaging lab of the Dermatological University Hospital. Imaging results of wound healing process and skin lesion nevus investigations are presented

  8. Statistical Validation of Brain Tumor Shape Approximation via Spherical Harmonics for Image-Guided Neurosurgery1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Talos, Ion-Florin; Bhagwat, Jui G.; Haker, Steven J.; Black, Peter M.; Zou, Kelly H.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Surgical planning now routinely uses both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) models that integrate data from multiple imaging modalities, each highlighting one or more aspects of morphology or function. We performed a preliminary evaluation of the use of spherical harmonics (SH) in approximating the 3D shape and estimating the volume of brain tumors of varying characteristics. Materials and Methods Magnetic resonance (MR) images from five patients with brain tumors were selected randomly from our MR-guided neurosurgical practice. Standardized mean square reconstruction errors (SMSRE) by tumor volume were measured. Validation metrics for comparing performances of the SH method against segmented contours (SC) were the dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and standardized Euclidean distance (SED) measure. Results Tumor volume range was 22413–85189 mm3, and range of number of vertices in triangulated models was 3674–6544. At SH approximations with degree of at least 30, SMSRE were within 1.66 × 10?5 mm?1. Summary measures yielded a DSC range of 0.89–0.99 (pooled median, 0.97 and significantly >0.7; P < .001) and an SED range of 0.0002–0.0028 (pooled median, 0.0005). Conclusion 3D shapes of tumors may be approximated by using SH for neurosurgical applications. PMID:15831419

  9. In vivo wound healing diagnosis with second harmonic and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-06-01

    Skin wounds heal when a series of cell lineages are triggered, followed by collagen deposition, to reconstruct damaged tissues. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic rate in vivo during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy respectively. The metabolic rate of cells is reflected through the lifetime of the autofluorescence from the co-enzyme protein, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, due to its change in the relative concentration of bound and free forms. A higher than normal cellular metabolic rate is observed during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually after eight days of wound formation. SHG signal intensity change indicates the net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase, and net regeneration begins on day five. Eventually, the quantity of collagen increases gradually to form a scar tissue as the final product. Importantly, this work demonstrates the feasibility of an in vivo imaging approach for a normal wound on rat skin, which has the potential to supplement the noninvasive clinical diagnosis of wounds.

  10. Depth-sensitive subsurface imaging of polymer nanocomposites using second harmonic Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Uribe, Octavio Alejandro; Reifenberger, Ronald; Raman, Arvind; Avila, Alba

    2015-03-24

    We study the depth sensitivity and spatial resolution of subsurface imaging of polymer nanocomposites using second harmonic mapping in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM). This method allows the visualization of the clustering and percolation of buried Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) via capacitance gradient (?C/?z) maps. We develop a multilayered sample where thin layers of neat Polyimide (PI) (?80 nm per layer) are sequentially spin-coated on well-dispersed SWCNT/Polyimide (PI) nanocomposite films. The multilayer nanocomposite system allows the acquisition of ?C/?z images of three-dimensional percolating networks of SWCNTs at different depths in the same region of the sample. We detect CNTs at a depth of ?430 nm, and notice that the spatial resolution progressively deteriorates with increasing depth of the buried CNTs. Computational trends of ?C/?z vs CNT depth correlate the sensitivity and depth resolution with field penetration and spreading, and enable a possible approach to three-dimensional subsurface structure reconstruction. The results open the door to nondestructive, three-dimensional tomography and nanometrology techniques for nanocomposite applications. PMID:25591106

  11. Image Decimation and Interpolation Techniques Based on Frequency Domain Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. C. CPEN; RUI J. P. DE FIGUEIREDO

    1984-01-01

    A scheme for a spatial domain image data preprocessing decimation and postprocessing interpolation is presented. The scheme is implemented by appropriate FIR digital filters. Frequency and patial domain specifications are discussed in the design of the corresponding digital filters. Fast approximation techniques in the spatial domain are presented.

  12. High frequency ultrasound imaging in pupillary block glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Aslanides, I M; Libre, P E; Silverman, R H; Reinstein, D Z; Lazzaro, D R; Rondeau, M J; Harmon, G K; Coleman, D J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The diagnosis of pupillary block glaucoma requires sufficient clarity of the ocular media. This is particularly important for assessment of both the presence and patency of an iridotomy, and the determination of central anterior chamber depth. METHODS--High frequency ultrasonography was used in three patients with suspected pupillary block to determine iris configuration, posterior chamber volume, and ciliary body conformation. RESULTS--All patients demonstrated high frequency ultrasonographic findings consistent with pupillary block: iris bombé, a formed posterior chamber, and a lack of anterior rotation of the ciliary processes. CONCLUSION--High frequency ultrasound imaging appears to be a valuable adjunct in making or corroborating the diagnosis of pupillary block glaucoma. Images PMID:8534666

  13. A New High Frequency Ultrasound Skin Imaging System: Imaging Properties and Clinical in Vivo Results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Vogt; R. Scharenberg; G. Moussa; M. Sand; K. Hoffmann; P. Altmeyer; H. Ermert

    In this paper, a new high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) system for high-resolution skin imaging is presented. For imaging, mechanical\\u000a scans are performed with spherically focused single element transducers. Two separate applicators with different transducers\\u000a are utilized to fulfill the different requirements for imaging the skin with 20MHz ultrasound and for lower range high resolution\\u000a imaging of the uppermost skin layers

  14. Are Normative Values for LV Geometry and Mass Based on Fundamental Imaging Valid With Use of Harmonic Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    de las Fuentes, Lisa; Spence, Karen E.; Dávila-Román, Victor G.; Waggoner, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple studies have reported echocardiographically determined normal reference values for left ventricular mass (LVM) derived using fundamental imaging (FI). Modern ultrasound systems now use harmonic imaging (HI) due to the improved LV endomyocardial definition. However, the 2005 American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) Recommendations noted that the applicability of the reference values to HI-derived measurements has not been established. Methods LV end-diastolic volume, diameter, wall thickness, and mass were determined using HI in healthy subjects (n=251) including a normal weight (NW, body mass index [BMI] < 25 kg/m2, n=149, 68% women) and an otherwise-healthy overweight (OW, BMI ?25 and <30 kg/m2, n=102, 41% women) groups. Measurements were compared to ASE-endorsed reference values. The agreement between FI and HI was determined in a prospective cohort of 51 subjects. Results 2D-derived LV volumes were similar between NW and OW subjects; although M-mode (MM)-derived LV diameters were slightly greater in OW. 2D- and MM-derived LVM was greater in OW compared to NW subjects, including after adjustment by height or height2.7; however, indexing to body surface area eliminated these differences. The partition values for abnormal 2D- and MM-derived LVM were generally greater in NW and OW subjects of both sexes compared with the ASE endorsed values (except MM-derived in NW men). However, there were no significant differences in LVM determined by HI compared to FI in a prospectively studied cohort. Conclusions Reference values for LVM derived from NW and OW cohorts are generally higher than the ASE-endorsed referenced values. The difference between NW and ASE-endorsed values is unlikely to result from the use of HI rather than FI since there is excellent agreement between these two imaging modalities. This study emphasizes the need to update normal reference values to reflect modern imaging methods. PMID:20863657

  15. Digital image frequency spectrum method for analyzing speckle displacement in frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui; He, Yuming; Shen, Lei; Liu, Dabiao; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Song

    2015-03-15

    A technique called the digital image frequency spectrum (DIFS) method, used for analyzing digital speckle patterns with deformations in the frequency domain, is proposed. Two subimages in the same position as two digital speckle patterns before and after deformation are used to form a Young's fringe. The parallel Young's fringe pattern is automatically analyzed in the frequency domain. One finds that the displacement between the two subimages can be directly obtained, and a matching procedure used in digital image correlation (DIC) is unnecessary when DIFS is applied. Experimental results show that the relative error of this method is less than 3%, and it takes less time in computing integer-pixel displacement procedure. PMID:25768152

  16. Third harmonic frequency generation by type-I critically phase-matched LiB3O5 crystal by means of optically active quartz crystal.

    PubMed

    Gapontsev, Valentin P; Tyrtyshnyy, Valentin A; Vershinin, Oleg I; Davydov, Boris L; Oulianov, Dmitri A

    2013-02-11

    We present a method of third harmonic generation at 355 nm by frequency mixing of fundamental and second harmonic radiation of an ytterbium nanosecond pulsed all-fiber laser in a type-I phase-matched LiB(3)O(5) (LBO) crystal where originally orthogonal polarization planes of the fundamental and second harmonic beams are aligned by an optically active quartz crystal. 8 W of ultraviolet light at 355 nm were achieved with 40% conversion efficiency from 1064 nm radiation. The conversion efficiency obtained in a type-I phase-matched LBO THG crystal was 1.6 times higher than the one achieved in a type-II LBO crystal at similar experimental conditions. In comparison to half-wave plates traditionally used for polarization alignment the optically active quartz crystal has much lower temperature dependence and requires simpler optical alignment. PMID:23481827

  17. Coherent states and geometric phases of a generalized damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent mass and frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, I. A.; de Lima, D. A. P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we study the generalized harmonic oscillator with arbitrary time-dependent mass and frequency subjected to a linear velocity-dependent frictional force from classical and quantum points of view. We obtain the solution of the classical equation of motion of this system for some particular cases and derive an equation of motion that describes three different systems. Furthermore, with the help of the quantum invariant method and using quadratic invariants we solve analytically and exactly the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for this system. Afterwards, we construct coherent states for the quantized system and employ them to investigate some of the system's quantum properties such as quantum fluctuations of the coordinate and the momentum as well as the corresponding uncertainty product. In addition, we derive the geometric, dynamical and Berry phases for this nonstationary system. Finally, we evaluate the dynamical and Berry phases for three special cases and surprisingly find identical expressions for the dynamical phase and the same formulae for the Berry's phase.

  18. Molecular Imaging Using High-Order Harmonic Generation and Above-Threshold Ionization Elmar V. van der Zwan1,2

    E-print Network

    Lein, Manfred

    relies on comparing harmonic emission from a laser-irradiated molecule and an adequate reference system, 42.65.Ky When atoms or molecules are irradiated by a strong laser field, high-order harmonic imaging. For reasons outlined in the following, however, no concrete method has been proposed up to now

  19. Towards more accurate numerical modeling of impedance based high frequency harmonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yee Yan; Kiong Soh, Chee

    2014-03-01

    The application of smart materials in various fields of engineering has recently become increasingly popular. For instance, the high frequency based electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique employing smart piezoelectric materials is found to be versatile in structural health monitoring (SHM). Thus far, considerable efforts have been made to study and improve the technique. Various theoretical models of the EMI technique have been proposed in an attempt to better understand its behavior. So far, the three-dimensional (3D) coupled field finite element (FE) model has proved to be the most accurate. However, large discrepancies between the results of the FE model and experimental tests, especially in terms of the slope and magnitude of the admittance signatures, continue to exist and are yet to be resolved. This paper presents a series of parametric studies using the 3D coupled field finite element method (FEM) on all properties of materials involved in the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) structure interaction of the EMI technique, to investigate their effect on the admittance signatures acquired. FE model updating is then performed by adjusting the parameters to match the experimental results. One of the main reasons for the lower accuracy, especially in terms of magnitude and slope, of previous FE models is the difficulty in determining the damping related coefficients and the stiffness of the bonding layer. In this study, using the hysteretic damping model in place of Rayleigh damping, which is used by most researchers in this field, and updated bonding stiffness, an improved and more accurate FE model is achieved. The results of this paper are expected to be useful for future study of the subject area in terms of research and application, such as modeling, design and optimization.

  20. Robust nonrigid multimodal image registration using local frequency maps.

    PubMed

    Jian, Bing; Vemuri, Baba C; Marroquin, José L

    2005-01-01

    Automatic multi-modal image registration is central to numerous tasks in medical imaging today and has a vast range of applications e.g., image guidance, atlas construction, etc. In this paper, we present a novel multi-modal 3D non-rigid registration algorithm where in 3D images to be registered are represented by their corresponding local frequency maps efficiently computed using the Riesz transform as opposed to the popularly used Gabor filters. The non-rigid registration between these local frequency maps is formulated in a statistically robust framework involving the minimization of the integral squared error a.k.a. L2E (L2 error). This error is expressed as the squared difference between the true density of the residual (which is the squared difference between the non-rigidly transformed reference and the target local frequency representations) and a Gaussian or mixture of Gaussians density approximation of the same. The non-rigid transformation is expressed in a B-spline basis to achieve the desired smoothness in the transformation as well as computational efficiency. The key contributions of this work are (i) the use of Riesz transform to achieve better efficiency in computing the local frequency representation in comparison to Gabor filter-based approaches, (ii) new mathematical model for local-frequency based non-rigid registration, (iii) analytic computation of the gradient of the robust non-rigid registration cost function to achieve efficient and accurate registration. The proposed non-rigid L2E-based registration is a significant extension of research reported in literature to date. We present experimental results for registering several real data sets with synthetic and real non-rigid misalignments. PMID:17354721

  1. Three frequency false-color image of Prince Albert, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-frequency, false color image of Prince Albert, Canada, centered at 53.91 north latitude and 104.69 west longitude. It was produced using data from the X-band, C-band and L-band radars that comprise the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). SIR-C/X-SAR acquired this image on the 20th orbit of the Shuttle Endeavour. The area is located 40 km north and 30 km east of the town of Prince Albert in the Saskatchewan province of Canada. The image covers the area east of the Candle Lake, between gravel surface highways 120 and 106 and west of 106. The area in the middle of the image covers the entire Nipawin (Narrow Hills) provincial park. Most of the dark blue areas in the image are the ice covered lakes. The dark area on the top right corner of the image is the White Gull Lake north of the intersection of highway 120 and 913. The right middle part of the image shows Lake Ispuchaw and Lower Fishing Lake. The deforested areas are shown by light

  2. Bipolar-power-transistor-based limiter for high frequency ultrasound imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hojong; Yang, Hao-Chung; Shung, K Kirk

    2014-03-01

    High performance limiters are described in this paper for applications in high frequency ultrasound imaging systems. Limiters protect the ultrasound receiver from the high voltage (HV) spikes produced by the transmitter. We present a new bipolar power transistor (BPT) configuration and compare its design and performance to a diode limiter used in traditional ultrasound research and one commercially available limiter. Limiter performance depends greatly on the insertion loss (IL), total harmonic distortion (THD) and response time (RT), each of which will be evaluated in all the limiters. The results indicated that, compared with commercial limiter, BPT-based limiter had less IL (-7.7 dB), THD (-74.6 dB) and lower RT (43 ns) at 100 MHz. To evaluate the capability of these limiters, they were connected to a 100 MHz single element transducer and a two-way pulse-echo test was performed. It was found that the -6 dB bandwidth and sensitivity of the transducer using BPT-based limiter were better than those of the commercial limiter by 22% and 140%, respectively. Compared to the commercial limiter, BPT-based limiter is shown to be capable of minimizing signal attenuation, RT and THD at high frequencies and is thus suited for high frequency ultrasound applications. PMID:24199954

  3. Bipolar-power-transistor-based limiter for high frequency ultrasound imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hojong; Yang, Hao-Chung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2013-01-01

    High performance limiters are described in this paper for applications in high frequency ultrasound imaging systems. Limiters protect the ultrasound receiver from the high voltage (HV) spikes produced by the transmitter. We present a new bipolar power transistor (BPT) configuration and compare its design and performance to a diode limiter used in traditional ultrasound research and one commercially available limiter. Limiter performance depends greatly on the insertion loss (IL), total harmonic distortion (THD) and response time (RT), each of which will be evaluated in all the limiters. The results indicated that, compared with commercial limiter, BPT-based limiter had less IL (–7.7 dB), THD (–74.6 dB) and lower RT (43 ns) at 100MHz. To evaluate the capability of these limiters, they were connected to a 100 MHz single element transducer and a two-way pulse-echo test was performed. It was found that the -6 dB bandwidth and sensitivity of the transducer using BPT-based limiter were better than those of the commercial limiter by 22 % and 140 %, respectively. Compared to the commercial limiter, BPT-based limiter is shown to be capable of minimizing signal attenuation, RT and THD at high frequencies and is thus suited for high frequency ultrasound applications. PMID:24199954

  4. Frequency, bandwidth, and information transfer in B-mode imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbey, Craig K.; Nguyen, Nghia Q.; Insana, Michael F.

    2012-03-01

    Center frequency and bandwidth are two generic parameters used to characterize transmitted pulse profiles in B-mode ultrasonic imaging. Increasing either is generally thought to improve spatial resolution in the final image, but at a potential cost of lower signal-to-noise ratio, with no general understanding of where they are optimal. In this work we investigate their role in converting the acquired radio-frequency signal from a linear array into an envelope image. Statistics of the backscattered signal, based on Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory, are used in an ideal observer calculation that quantifies the task-relevant information contained in the radio-frequency (RF) signal. We then compare two approaches to computing an envelope image. The first is a standard B-mode envelope from the complex analytic signal. The second approach processes RF through a Wiener filter before forming an analytic signal. Effects of envelope detection are measured by computing the ideal observer in the envelope domain using Smith-Wagner approximations. Over frequencies ranging from 3-15MHz and fractional bandwidths ranging from 20% to 80%, we find that information transfer in the envelope varies widely with task. There is a substantial loss of information in all conditions in the formation of a standard envelope. Efficiency relative to the RF ranges from 60% to less than 5%. The Weinerfiltered envelope images substantially improve efficiency in two of the three tasks investigated. In the third task, the results are mixed, but we argue that the Weiner filter may be improved substantially by retuning it to the interior of a lesion.

  5. Tenth-order rational-harmonic frequency multiplication and detuning of optical pulse injection-locked erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Wu, Jung-Rung

    2005-04-01

    The jitter and frequency-detuning dynamics of a 10-GHz rational-harmonic frequency-multiplied pulse train generated from an erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) is studied. The EDFL is self-feedback seeded and optically injection locked by a gain-switched laser diode (GSLD) with a pulse width and an average power of 17.6 ps and 0.2 mW, respectively, at a repetition frequency of 1 GHz. The repetition frequency of the optical pulse train can be tenth-order multiplied by a slight detuning of the repetition frequency of the GSLD to match the rational-harmonic injection-locked condition of the EDFL. As the repetition frequency is multiplied from 1 to 10 GHz, the peak power, the pulse width, and the frequency-detuning bandwidth of the injection-locked EDFL pulses decrease from 1.2 to 0.3 W, from 40 to 21 ps, and from 40 to 9 kHz, respectively. The timing jitter of the injection-locked EDFL repeated at 1 GHz remains unchanged (<0.5 ps) within the detuning bandwidth, which inevitably increases to 1.2 ps after tenth-order multiplication.

  6. Detecting subtle plasma membrane perturbation in living cells using second harmonic generation imaging.

    PubMed

    Moen, Erick K; Ibey, Bennett L; Beier, Hope T

    2014-05-20

    The requirement of center asymmetry for the creation of second harmonic generation (SHG) signals makes it an attractive technique for visualizing changes in interfacial layers such as the plasma membrane of biological cells. In this article, we explore the use of lipophilic SHG probes to detect minute perturbations in the plasma membrane. Three candidate probes, Di-4-ANEPPDHQ (Di-4), FM4-64, and all-trans-retinol, were evaluated for SHG effectiveness in Jurkat cells. Di-4 proved superior with both strong SHG signal and limited bleaching artifacts. To test whether rapid changes in membrane symmetry could be detected using SHG, we exposed cells to nanosecond-pulsed electric fields, which are believed to cause formation of nanopores in the plasma membrane. Upon nanosecond-pulsed electric fields exposure, we observed an instantaneous drop of ~50% in SHG signal from the anodic pole of the cell. When compared to the simultaneously acquired fluorescence signals, it appears that the signal change was not due to the probe diffusing out of the membrane or changes in membrane potential or fluidity. We hypothesize that this loss in SHG signal is due to disruption in the interfacial nature of the membrane. The results show that SHG imaging has great potential as a tool for measuring rapid and subtle plasma membrane disturbance in living cells. PMID:24853757

  7. Second-harmonic and two-photon imaging and polarimetry of articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Jessica; Winlove, C. Peter; Moger, Julian; Knapp, Karen; Matcher, Steve

    2007-02-01

    Articular cartilage possesses an extensive extracellular matrix consisting of a highly organised network of collagen fibres embedded in a much finer mesh of proteoglycans and other glycoproteins. Many fundamental issues of cartilage biomechanics, its ageing and the development of osteoarthritis concern the detailed organisation of this matrix. Here we investigate the application of multi-photon microscopy to characterise the structure of the extracellular matrix. In reflection mode both second harmonic Generation (SHG) and two photon fluorescence (TPF) imaging modalities reveal differences in the pericellular and inter-territorial matrix in normal tissue and additional changes in degenerative lesions. The SHG signal from the surface zone is dependent on the direction of polarization of the laser excitation beam but the TPF signal is not. The former can be quantified to determine fibre orientation although the pattern is less well resolved than in tendon, reflecting the less regular orientation of the finer fibres. Nevertheless, previously unreported subtle variations in fibre orientation over the surface of the cartilage can be observed. In order to characterise variations with depth we carried out polarization sensitivity experiments at depths up to 180 microns into the tissue. At greater depths the polarization sensitivity is affected by the birefringence and dichroism of the overlying tissue and we have quantified these effects to allow correction of the data.

  8. Evidence for Harmonic Content and Frequency Evolution of Oscillations During the Rising Phase of X-ray Bursts From 4U 1636-536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bgattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, E.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a study of the evolution of burst oscillation properties during the rising phase of X-ray bursts from 4U 1636-536 observed with the proportional counter array (PCA) on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) . We present evidence for significant harmonic structure of burst oscillation pulses during the early rising phases of bursts. This is the first such detection in burst rise oscillations, and is very important for constraining neutron star structure parameters and the equation of state models of matter at the core of a neutron star. The detection of harmonic content only during the initial portions of the burst rise is consistent with the theoretical expectation that with time the thermonuclear burning region becomes larger, and hence the fundamental and harmonic amplitudes both diminish. We also find, for the first time from this source, strong evidence of oscillation frequency increase during the burst rise. The timing behavior of harmonic content, amplitude, and frequency of burst rise oscillations may be important in understanding the spreading of thermonuclear flames under the extreme physical conditions on neutron star surfaces.

  9. Time-resolved gigahertz acoustic wave imaging at arbitrary frequencies.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Osamu; Kaneko, Shogo; Wright, Oliver; Tomoda, Motonobu

    2015-03-01

    We describe a way to generate and detect arbitrary frequency components in time-resolved surface acoustic wave imaging based on optical pumping and probing with a periodic light source. The detailed theory of the technique, based on beam modulation and Fourier analysis, for a variety of possible experimental configurations is presented, followed by experimental data for a glass substrate covered with a thin gold film. We show how the acoustic dispersion relation can be obtained to arbitrary frequency resolution, not limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. PMID:25768824

  10. Better Visualization of Vermiform Appendix With Tissue Harmonic Imaging Compared to Conventional Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Inal, Mikail; Unal, Birsen; Bilgili, Yasemin Karadeniz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Surgery of appendicitis carries 7-11% negative appendectomy rates. Sonographically visualized normal appendix precludes unnecessary computed tomography (CT) examination and may reduce negative appendectomy rates. Tissue harmonic imaging (THI) has been reported to improve the overall image quality. Objective: We aimed to assess whether THI is more successful than conventional ultrasonography (US) in detecting normal and pathologic appendices. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on 185 patients who applied for routine US examinations in whom clinical findings of appendicitis were detected in 25. We searched for the appendix; applying both THI and conventional US to each patient, one before and the other after the routine US examinations. Patients were divided into two groups; one was evaluated first with conventional US and the other first with THI. When the appendix was found, localization, diameter and time spent for visualization were recorded. Twelve patients were operated; all of whom had appendicitis pathologically. Two methods were compared for: 1. Success rates in all patients; female, male and child groups separately; 2. Visualization of pathologic and normal appendices; 3. Time for visualization of appendix; 4. Comparison of success rates in the adult and child population. The relationship between the rate of visualization and body mass index was evaluated. Results: The appendix was visualized better by THI in all patients, and in the female and male groups (P < 0.001). In children, both methods were more successful compared to adults (P < 0.001, compared to male group, P < 0.001, compared to female group), with no difference between the methods (P = 0.22). When only the normal appendices were concerned, there was significant difference between both methods (P < 0.000). Both methods detected pathologic appendices better than normal ones, with a higher ratio for THI (P = 0.022 for the THI group, and ?2 = 7.22, P = 0.07 for the conventional US group). THI visualized the appendix faster. Both methods were more successful in lean patients (P = 0.004 for THI, P = 0.001 for conventional US imaging). Conclusions: THI visualizes appendix better than conventional US. It is a simple and time saving method that may eliminate further diagnostic imaging, and it may decrease negative appendectomy rates and related complications.

  11. Effect of bandwidth on beam smoothing and frequency conversion at the third harmonic of the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D.M.; Henesian, M.A.; Dixit, S.N.; Powell, H.T.; Thompson, C.E.; Weiland, T.L.

    1993-05-01

    We present the results of experiments performed on the Nova laser system to determine the effect of bandwidth on third harmonic (3{omega}) frequency conversion and beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Our experiments utilized a wide bandwidth fiber optic cross-phase modulated (XPM) source and a narrower bandwidth microwave modulated (FM) source, each centered at 1053 nm (1{omega}). The FM source produced {approximately}2 cm{sup {minus}1} of bandwidth, modulated at 3 GHz; the XPM bandwidth was varied from 5 to 15 cm{sup {minus}1}, modulated by the temporally noisy output of a multimode Nd:glass laser ({le} 500 GHz). The FM beam showed no evidence of self-phase modulation in the laser chain produced by intensity fluctuations, and 1{omega} bandwidth was tripled upon conversion to 3{omega} (2--6 cm{sup {minus}1}). The 1{omega} XPM bandwidth increased by {ge} 25% due to self-phase modulation in the laser chain (16--22 cm{sup {minus}1}) due to it`s relative noisy temporal structure. Over 50% of the 1{omega} XPM bandwidth was transferred to the 3{omega} beam (22--36 cm{sup {minus}1}), yielding 0.13% bandwidth at 3{omega}. The maximum intrinsic narrowband 3{omega} frequency conversion obtained using a type-II/type-II KDP crystal array was 62%. The intrinsic efficiency obtained at the Nova 10-beam chamber is typically > 65%. We have developed broadband frequency conversion codes and broadband pulse simulations to model our results, and have obtained good agreement with experiment. Using a random phase plate without bandwidth, we obtained a smoothing level, {sigma}/I {approximately} 0.79, defined by the rms variance normalized with respect to the average intensity. This is less than the theoretically expected value of 1 for an ideal speckle pattern, and could be evidence of polarization smoothing as a result of focus lens birefringence. With spectral dispersion and RPP we demonstrated an excellent level of smoothing with the XPM source.

  12. Fundamental and low frequency harmonic components of leakage current as a diagnostic tool to study aging of RTV and HTV silicone rubber in salt-fog

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ayman H. El-Hag; Shesha H. Jayaram; Edward A. Cherney

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the results of using the fundamental and the low frequency harmonic components of leakage current to study aging of silicone rubber in salt-fog. Experiments have been conducted on RTV and HTV coated rods at different fields (0.25-0.6 kV\\/cm) and conductivities (1000 to 2500 ?S\\/cm). The onset of dry-band arcing on samples could be determined by measuring the

  13. Emission spectroscopy, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and improved ground state structures of jet-cooled monochloro- and monobromosilylene (HSiCl and HSiBr)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Hostutler; Nicholas Ndiege; Dennis J. Clouthier; Steven W. Pauls

    2001-01-01

    The ground state harmonic frequencies of gas phase H\\/DSi35Cl and H\\/DSi79Br have been determined by exciting single vibronic bands of the A~ 1A''-X~ 1A' electronic transition and recording the dispersed fluorescence. The jet-cooled radicals were produced in a pulsed discharge jet using H\\/DSiX3 (X=Cl or Br) precursors. The emission data were fitted to an anharmonic model and a normal coordinate

  14. Experimental investigation of the ionospheric hysteresis effect on the threshold excitation level of the Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samimi, A.; Scales, W.; Cruz, M.; Isham, B.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent experimental observations of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) spectrum during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic show structures ordered by ion gyro-frequency. The proposed generation mechanism considers parametric decay of a pump upper hybrid/electron Bernstein (UH/EB) wave into another UH/EB and a group of neutralized ion Bernstein waves. The presumption of the proposed mechanism is that the pump electromagnetic wave is converted into the UH/EB wave. This conversion process generates field aligned irregularity which exhibits hysteresis effect. The predicted ionospheric hysteresis effect is studied during the PARS 2012 at HAARP. The preliminary results are presented for the first time. Also, experimental study of the effects of 1) the transmitter beam angle and 2) the transmitter frequency offset relative to the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency on the ion gyro-harmonic structures in the SEE spectrum are provided. The aforementioned observations are compared to the predictions of the analytical model. Possible connection of the SEE spectral features and artificially generated ionospheric descending layer is also discussed

  15. Harmonic operation of STW filters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Baer; C. A. FLory

    1988-01-01

    The physical mechanism causing the propagation loss of surface transverse wave (STW) devices during harmonic operation is modeled and analyzed. It is found that as the mode frequency is pushed beyond the fundamental, the dominant Bloch component of the STW solution passes through the higher spatial harmonics. In these frequency regions, the lower harmonic components which contribute (perhaps weakly) to

  16. Coherent Raman spectro-imaging with laser frequency combs

    E-print Network

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqué, Nathalie; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2013-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging of microscopic samples have opened up a wide range of applications throughout the physical, chemical, and biological sciences. High chemical specificity may be achieved by directly interrogating the fundamental or low-lying vibrational energy levels of the compound molecules. Amongst the available prevailing label-free techniques, coherent Raman scattering has the distinguishing features of high spatial resolution down to 200 nm and three-dimensional sectioning. However, combining fast imaging speed and identification of multiple - and possibly unexpected- compounds remains challenging: existing high spectral resolution schemes require long measurement times to achieve broad spectral spans. Here we overcome this difficulty and introduce a novel concept of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectro-imaging with two laser frequency combs. We illustrate the power of our technique with high resolution (4 cm-1) Raman spectra spanning more than 1200 cm-1 recorded within le...

  17. Frequency shift feedback imaging in liquid for biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Okajima, Takaharu; Arakawa, Hideo; Maeda, Sumihiro; Takashima, Akihiko; Ikai, Atsushi

    2003-03-01

    A commercially available atomic force microscope (AFM) equipped with a hand made simple self-oscillation circuit was used in imaging biomolecular samples in liquid environments, i.e. under physiological conditions. Assembled tau proteins, which are the major component of the neurofibrillary deposits in Alzheimer's disease, was taken as a trial sample. In order to image its native structure, the protein was physically absorbed on a cleaved mica surface without fixation. Using the frequency feedback imaging with a self-oscillation technique, the structure of protein fibers was clearly imaged even in a wide scanning range (3.75 ?m) with a contact force less than 100 pN. Furthermore, no damage of the proteins was observed in successive imagings. This indicates that the deformation of proteins was negligible in our method. In contrast, the proteins were destroyed when the vertical applied force of above 300 pN was applied using the amplitude feedback imaging with the self-oscillation technique.

  18. Design of variable frequency endoscope ultrasonic digital imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-nan; Bai, Bao-ping; Chen, Xiao-dong; Zhao, Qiang; Deng, Hao-ran; Wang, Yi; Yu, Dao-yin

    2013-12-01

    This paper presented a real-time endoscope ultrasonic digital imaging system, which was based on FPGA and applied for gastrointestinal examination. Four modules, scan-line data processing module, coordinate transformation and interpolation algorithm module, cache reading and writing control module and transmitting and receiving control module were included in this FPGA based system. Through adopting different frequency ultrasound probes in a single insertion of endoscope, the system showed a high speed data processing mechanism capable of achieving images with various display effects. A high-precision modified coordinate calibration CORDIC (HMCC-CORDIC) algorithm was employed to realize coordinate transformation and interpolation simultaneously, while the precision and reliability of the algorithm could be greatly improved through utilizing the pipeline structure based on temporal logic. Also, system real-time control by computer could be achieved through operating under the condition of USB2.0 interface. The corresponding experimental validations proved the feasibility and the correctness of the proper data processing mechanism, the HMCC-CORDIC algorithm and the USB real-time control. Finally, the specific experimental sample, a tissue mimicking phantom, was imaged in real-time (25 frames per second) by an endoscope ultrasonic imaging system with image size 1024×1024. The requirements for clinical examination could be well satisfied with the imaging parameters discussed above.

  19. Three frequency false color image of Flevoland, the Netherlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-frequency false color image of Flevoland, the Netherlands, centered at 52.4 degrees north latitude, 5.4 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Shuttle Endeavour. The area shown covers an area approximately 25 kilometers by 28 kilometers. Flevoland, which fills the lower two-thirds of the image, is a very flat area that is made up of reclaimed land that is used for agriculture and forestry. At the top of the image, across the canal from Flevoland, is an older forest shown in red; the city of Harderwijk is shown in white on the shore of the canal. At this time of the year, the agricultural fields are bare soil, and they show up in this image in blue. The dark blue areas are water and the small dots in the canal are boats. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43941.

  20. Exchange and polarization effect in high-order harmonic imaging of molecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sukiasyan, Suren; Ivanov, Misha Yu. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, SW7 2AZ London (United Kingdom); Patchkovskii, Serguei [National Research Council, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Smirnova, Olga [Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Brabec, Thomas [Physics Department and Center for Research in Photonics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    We analyze the importance of exchange, polarization, and electron-electron correlation in high-order harmonic generation in molecules interacting with intense laser fields. We find that electron exchange can become particularly important for harmonic emission associated with intermediate excitations in the molecular ion. In particular, for orbitals associated with two-hole one-particle excitations, exchange effects can eliminate structure-related minima and maxima in the harmonic spectra. Laser-induced polarization of the neutral molecule may also have major effects on orbital structure-related minima and maxima in the harmonic spectra. Finally, we show how exchange terms in recombination can be viewed as a shakedownlike process induced by sudden electronic excitation in the ion.

  1. Frequency identification of vibration signals using video camera image data.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Yih-Nen; Wu, Chia-Hung

    2012-01-01

    This study showed that an image data acquisition system connecting a high-speed camera or webcam to a notebook or personal computer (PC) can precisely capture most dominant modes of vibration signal, but may involve the non-physical modes induced by the insufficient frame rates. Using a simple model, frequencies of these modes are properly predicted and excluded. Two experimental designs, which involve using an LED light source and a vibration exciter, are proposed to demonstrate the performance. First, the original gray-level resolution of a video camera from, for instance, 0 to 256 levels, was enhanced by summing gray-level data of all pixels in a small region around the point of interest. The image signal was further enhanced by attaching a white paper sheet marked with a black line on the surface of the vibration system in operation to increase the gray-level resolution. Experimental results showed that the Prosilica CV640C CMOS high-speed camera has the critical frequency of inducing the false mode at 60 Hz, whereas that of the webcam is 7.8 Hz. Several factors were proven to have the effect of partially suppressing the non-physical modes, but they cannot eliminate them completely. Two examples, the prominent vibration modes of which are less than the associated critical frequencies, are examined to demonstrate the performances of the proposed systems. In general, the experimental data show that the non-contact type image data acquisition systems are potential tools for collecting the low-frequency vibration signal of a system. PMID:23202026

  2. Frequency Identification of Vibration Signals Using Video Camera Image Data

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Yih-Nen; Wu, Chia-Hung

    2012-01-01

    This study showed that an image data acquisition system connecting a high-speed camera or webcam to a notebook or personal computer (PC) can precisely capture most dominant modes of vibration signal, but may involve the non-physical modes induced by the insufficient frame rates. Using a simple model, frequencies of these modes are properly predicted and excluded. Two experimental designs, which involve using an LED light source and a vibration exciter, are proposed to demonstrate the performance. First, the original gray-level resolution of a video camera from, for instance, 0 to 256 levels, was enhanced by summing gray-level data of all pixels in a small region around the point of interest. The image signal was further enhanced by attaching a white paper sheet marked with a black line on the surface of the vibration system in operation to increase the gray-level resolution. Experimental results showed that the Prosilica CV640C CMOS high-speed camera has the critical frequency of inducing the false mode at 60 Hz, whereas that of the webcam is 7.8 Hz. Several factors were proven to have the effect of partially suppressing the non-physical modes, but they cannot eliminate them completely. Two examples, the prominent vibration modes of which are less than the associated critical frequencies, are examined to demonstrate the performances of the proposed systems. In general, the experimental data show that the non-contact type image data acquisition systems are potential tools for collecting the low-frequency vibration signal of a system. PMID:23202026

  3. Continuous-wave operation of a frequency-tunable 460-GHz second-harmonic gyrotron for enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance

    E-print Network

    Torrezan de Sousa, Antonio Carlos

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic ...

  4. Multiscale nonlinear frequency response analysis of single-layered graphene sheet under impulse and harmonic excitation using the atomistic finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Sachin O.; Singh, S. P.

    2015-04-01

    The atomistic finite element method (AFEM) is a multiscale technique where a sequential mode is used to transfer information between two length scales to model and simulate nanostructures at the continuum level. This method is used in this paper to investigate the nonlinear frequency response of a single-layered graphene sheet (SLGS) for impulse and harmonic excitation. The multi-body interatomic Tersoff–Brenner (TB) potential is used to represent the energy between two adjacent carbon atoms. Based on the TB potential, the equivalent geometric and elastic properties of carbon–carbon bonds are derived which are consistent with the material constitutive relations. These properties are used further to derive the nonlinear material model (stress–strain curve) of carbon–carbon bonds based on the force–deflection curve using the multi-body interatomic Tersoff–Brenner potential. A square SLGS is considered and its nonlinear vibration characteristics under an impulse and harmonic excitation for bridged, cantilever and clamped boundary conditions are investigated using the derived nonlinear material model (NMM). Before using the proposed nonlinear material model, the derived equivalent geometric and elastic properties of carbon–carbon bond are validated using molecular dynamics simulation results. The geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities are included in the nonlinear frequency response analysis. The investigated results of the nonlinear frequency response analysis are compared with those of the linear frequency response analysis, and the effect of the nonlinear behavior of carbon–carbon bonds on the frequency response of SLGS is studied.

  5. Sub-harmonic periodic pulse train recovery from aperiodic optical pulse sequences through dispersion-induced temporal self-imaging.

    PubMed

    Maram, Reza; Cortés, Luis Romero; Azaña, José

    2015-02-01

    Temporal self-imaging effects (TSIs) are observed when a periodic pulse train propagates through a first-order dispersive medium. Under specific dispersion conditions, either an exact, rate multiplied or rate divided image of the input signal is reproduced at the output. TSI possesses an interesting self-restoration capability even when acting over an aperiodic train of pulses. In this work, we investigate and demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, the capability of TSI to produce periodic sub-harmonic (rate-divided) pulse trains from aperiodic sequences. We use this inherent property of the TSI to implement a novel, simple and reconfigurable sub-harmonic optical clock recovery technique from RZ-OOK data signals. The proposed technique features a very simple realization, involving only temporal phase modulation and first-order dispersion and it allows one to set the repetition rate of the reconstructed clock signal in integer fractions (sub-harmonics) of the input bit rate. Proof-of-concept experiments are reported to validate the proposed technique and guidelines for optimization of the clock-recovery process are also outlined. PMID:25836212

  6. Higher Resolution VLBI Imaging with Fast Frequency Switching

    E-print Network

    E. Middelberg; A. L. Roy; R. C. Walker; H. Falcke; T. P. Krichbaum

    2002-07-03

    Millimetre-VLBI is an important tool in AGN astrophysics, but it is limited by short atmospheric coherence times and poor receiver and antenna performance. We demonstrate a new kind of phase referencing for the VLBA, enabling us to increase the sensitivity in mm-VLBI by an order of magnitude. If a source is observed in short cycles between the target frequency, nu_t, and a reference frequency, nu_ref, the nu_t data can be calibrated using scaled-up phase solutions from self-calibration at nu_ref. We have demonstrated the phase transfer on 3C 279, where we were able to make an 86 GHz image with 90 % coherence compared to self-calibration at nu_t. We have detected M81, our science target in this project, at 86 GHz using the same technique. We describe scheduling strategy and data reduction. The main impacts of fast frequency switching are the ability to image some of the nearest, but relatively weak AGN cores with unprecedented high angular resolution and to phase-reference the nu_t data to the nu_ref core position, enabling the detection of possible core shifts in jets due to optical depth effects. This ability will yield important constraints on jet properties and might be able to discriminate between the two competing emission models of Blandford-Konigl jets and spherical advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs) in low-luminosity AGNs.

  7. Frequency-radial duality based photoacoustic image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Akramus Salehin, S M; Abhayapala, Thushara D

    2012-07-01

    Photoacoustic image reconstruction algorithms are usually slow due to the large sizes of data that are processed. This paper proposes a method for exact photoacoustic reconstruction for the spherical geometry in the limiting case of a continuous aperture and infinite measurement bandwidth that is faster than existing methods namely (1) backprojection method and (2) the Norton-Linzer method [S. J. Norton and M. Linzer, "Ultrasonic reflectivity imaging in three dimensions: Exact inverse scattering solution for plane, cylindrical and spherical apertures," Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Trans. BME 28, 202-220 (1981)]. The initial pressure distribution is expanded using a spherical Fourier Bessel series. The proposed method estimates the Fourier Bessel coefficients and subsequently recovers the pressure distribution. A concept of frequency-radial duality is introduced that separates the information from the different radial basis functions by using frequencies corresponding to the Bessel zeros. This approach provides a means to analyze the information obtained given a measurement bandwidth. Using order analysis and numerical experiments, the proposed method is shown to be faster than both the backprojection and the Norton-Linzer methods. Further, the reconstructed images using the proposed methodology were of similar quality to the Norton-Linzer method and were better than the approximate backprojection method. PMID:22779464

  8. Drive frequency dependent phase imaging in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bo Huifeng; Kan Yi; Lu Xiaomei; Liu Yunfei; Peng Song; Wang Xiaofei; Cai Wei; Xue Ruoshi; Zhu Jinsong [Department of Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-08-15

    The drive frequency dependent piezoresponse (PR) phase signal in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals is studied by piezoresponse force microscopy. It is clearly shown that the local and nonlocal electrostatic forces have a great contribution to the PR phase signal. The significant PR phase difference of the antiparallel domains are observed at the contact resonances, which is related to the electrostatic dominated electromechanical interactions of the cantilever and tip-sample system. Moreover, the modulation voltage induced frequency shift at higher eigenmodes could be attributed to the change of indention force depending on the modulation amplitude with a piezoelectric origin. The PR phase of the silicon wafer is also measured for comparison. It is certificated that the electrostatic interactions are universal in voltage modulated scanning probe microscopy and could be extended to other phase imaging techniques.

  9. Focused high frequency needle transducer for ultrasonic imaging and trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Zhou, Qifa; Kirk Shung, K.

    2012-07-01

    A miniature focused needle transducer (<1 mm) was fabricated using the press-focusing technique. The measured pulse-echo waveform showed the transducer had center frequency of 57.5 MHz with 54% bandwidth and 14 dB insertion loss. To evaluate the performance of this type of transducer, invitro ultrasonic biomicroscopy imaging on the rabbit eye was obtained. Moreover, a single beam acoustic trapping experiment was performed using this transducer. Trapping of targeted particle size smaller than the ultrasonic wavelength was observed. Potential applications of these devices include minimally invasive measurements of retinal blood flow and single beam acoustic trapping of microparticles.

  10. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU): A 3D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gary Y.; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on Amplitude-modulated (AM) - Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module, and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework in order to 1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and 2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6, and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69, 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19, 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28, and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s, and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was also found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm2) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm2). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo. PMID:22036637

  11. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki H. (Lafayette, CA); Xie, Gan Q. (Berkeley, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The traveltimes corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter .alpha. for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography.

  12. Monitoring electrical and thermal burns with Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2011-10-01

    Thermal and electrical injuries are devastating and hard-to-treat clinical lesions. The pathophysiology of these injuries is not fully understood to this day. Further elucidating the natural history of this form of tissue injury could be helpful in offering stage-appropriate therapy. Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) is a novel non-invasive technique that can be used to determine optical properties of biological media. We have developed an experimental apparatus based on SFDI aimed at monitoring parameters of clinical interest such as tissue oxygen saturation, methemoglobin volume fraction, and hemoglobin volume fraction. Co- registered Laser Doppler images of the lesions are also acquired to assess tissue perfusion. Results of experiments conducted on a rat model and discussions on the systemic changes in tissue optical properties before and after injury will be presented.

  13. Finite-Frequency Imaging of Transition Zone Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Lateral variations in the 410-km and 660-km discontinuity depths are important for understanding thermal structure in the transition zone. Teleseismic P-wave coda have been widely used in imaging seismic discontinuities as the relative timing between the direct P wave and P-to-S converted waves provides important constraints on discontinuity depths. P-wave coda can be contaminated by strong scattering and stacking are often used in back-projection methods to reduce structural noise. In this study, we explore an alternative approach in imaging mantle discontinuity using long-period P-wave coda. We calculate the sensitivity of P-wave coda to transition zone discontinuity depth variations in the framework of surface-wave mode summation. We show that the sensitivities do not show a simple doughnut structure due to multiples of shallow discontinuities as well as other seismic phases such as pP and PcP waves. Furthermore, a discontinuity depth deflection farther away from a receiver or an opposite deflection of the same discontinuity closer to the receiver may produce same time shift in receiver functions, therefore, back-projection CCP stacking images can be strongly biased. The finite-frequency sensitivities are calculated based on a single-scattering approximation. We will discuss the validity of the approximation in discontinuity imaging using P-wave coda recorded at USArray TA stations.

  14. Harmonic engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-10-20

    A high efficiency harmonic engine based on a resonantly reciprocating piston expander that extracts work from heat and pressurizes working fluid in a reciprocating piston compressor. The engine preferably includes harmonic oscillator valves capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into and out of the expander, and also preferably includes a shunt line connecting an expansion chamber of the expander to a buffer chamber of the expander for minimizing pressure variations in the fluidic circuit of the engine. The engine is especially designed to operate with very high temperature input to the expander and very low temperature input to the compressor, to produce very high thermal conversion efficiency.

  15. Characterization of unifocal liver lesions with pulse inversion harmonic imaging after Levovist injection: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Bertolotto, M; Dalla Palma, L; Quaia, E; Locatelli, M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate capabilities of pulse inversion harmonic imaging (PIHI) in characterization of unifocal liver lesions. We evaluated with PIHI (HDI5000, ATL, Bothell, Wash.) and spiral CT 46 consecutive patients with a single liver lesion identified by fundamental US [7 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), 2 cholangiocarcinomas, 7 focal nodular hyperplasias (FNH), 17 hemangiomas and 13 metastases]. The PIHI was performed before and 30 s, 2 and 4 min after bolus administration of Levovist (2.5 g, 300 mg/ml). Scans were digitally stored and reviewed using a dedicated software. Hepatocellular carcinoma was hyperechoic on 30-s scan, and hypoechoic (n = 5) or isoechoic (n = 2) on 2-min scan. Cholangiocarcinoma had inhomogeneous persistent enhancement. Focal nodular hyperplasia was hyperechoic (n = 5) or isoechoic (n = 2) on 30-s scan, hyperechoic (n = 4), isoechoic (n = 2) or slightly hypoechoic (n = 1) on 2-min scan. Large hemangioma revealed peripheral enhancement on 30-s scan which extended centripetally on 2-min scan. Small hemangioma appeared isoechoic on 2-min scan in all but two cases in which they were hypoechoic on 2-min scans and hyperechoic on 4-min scan. Metastasis was hypoechoic on all scans, 70% with rim enhancement. Similar changes in enhancement pattern have been observed at spiral CT. The 30-s and the 2-min scans revealed a conclusive importance in characterization of HCC, cholangiocarcinoma, and large hemangioma. The 2-min scan often furnished enough information for characterization of small hemangioma and metastasis. The 4-min scan allowed characterization of two hemangiomas which appeared hypoechoic on 2-min scans. In the other cases it did not provide further information. Diagnosis of FNH is usually reached with Colour Doppler US; PIHI should be used when colour Doppler is biased by artefacts or when colour Doppler findings are not characteristic. Our results seem to show that PIHI could be a valuable alternative diagnostic approach to spiral CT for unifocal liver lesion characterization. This hypothesis needs to be confirmed with an increased number of lesions. PMID:10997422

  16. ACCURATE SHORT-TERM ANALYSIS OF THE FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY AND THE HARMONICS-TO-NOISE RATIO OF A SAMPLED SOUND

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Boersma

    1993-01-01

    We present a straightforward and robust algorithm for periodicity detection, working in the lag (autocorrelation) domain. When it is tested for periodic signals and for signals with additive noise or jitter, it proves to be several orders of magnitude more accurate than the methods commonly used for speech analysis. This makes our method capable of measuring harmonics-to-noise ratios in the

  17. Broadband Frequency Mixing and Second-Harmonic Generation in 2-METHYL-4-NITROANILINE Thin Crystal from 250 FS Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Messaoud, T.; Desforges, J.; Gauvin, S.

    In this paper, we present the experimental proof that even for highly nonlinear (NL), such as 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA), wave mixing has negligible effect on the second-harmonic generation (SHG) using 250 fs fundamental pulses. We explain our experimental results with a simple formalism based on monochromatic plane wave (MPW).

  18. Linewidth of the harmonics in a microwave frequency comb generated by focusing a mode-locked ultrafast laser on a tunneling junction

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, Mark J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Stenger, Frank S. [School of Computing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Yarotski, Dmitry A. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-12-14

    Previous analyses suggest that microwave frequency combs (MFCs) with harmonics having extremely narrow linewidths could be produced by photodetection with a mode-locked ultrafast laser. In the MFC generated by focusing a passively mode-locked ultrafast laser on a tunneling junction, 200 harmonics from 74.254?MHz to 14.85?GHz have reproducible measured linewidths approximating the 1?Hz resolution bandwidth (RBW) of the spectrum analyzer. However, in new measurements at a RBW of 0.1?Hz, the linewidths are distributed from 0.12 to 1.17?Hz. Measurements and analysis suggest that, because the laser is not stabilized, the stochastic drift in the pulse repetition rate is the cause for the distribution in measured linewidths. It appears that there are three cases in which the RBW is (1) greater than, (2) less than, or (3) comparable with the intrinsic linewidth. The measured spectra in the third class are stochastic and may show two or more peaks at a single harmonic.

  19. Linewidth of the harmonics in a microwave frequency comb generated by focusing a mode-locked ultrafast laser on a tunneling junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, Mark J.; Stenger, Frank S.; Yarotski, Dmitry A.

    2013-12-01

    Previous analyses suggest that microwave frequency combs (MFCs) with harmonics having extremely narrow linewidths could be produced by photodetection with a mode-locked ultrafast laser. In the MFC generated by focusing a passively mode-locked ultrafast laser on a tunneling junction, 200 harmonics from 74.254 MHz to 14.85 GHz have reproducible measured linewidths approximating the 1 Hz resolution bandwidth (RBW) of the spectrum analyzer. However, in new measurements at a RBW of 0.1 Hz, the linewidths are distributed from 0.12 to 1.17 Hz. Measurements and analysis suggest that, because the laser is not stabilized, the stochastic drift in the pulse repetition rate is the cause for the distribution in measured linewidths. It appears that there are three cases in which the RBW is (1) greater than, (2) less than, or (3) comparable with the intrinsic linewidth. The measured spectra in the third class are stochastic and may show two or more peaks at a single harmonic.

  20. Quantification of collagen fiber organization in biological tissues at cellular and molecular scales using second-harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambekar Ramachandra Rao, Raghu

    Collagen is the most abundant structural protein found in the human body, and is responsible for providing structure and function to tissues. Collagen molecules organize naturally into structures called fibers on the scale of the wavelength of light and lack inversion symmetry, thus allowing for the process of second harmonic generation (SHG) when exposed to intense incident light. We have developed two quantitative techniques: Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation (FT-SHG) imaging and generalized chi2 second-harmonic generation (chi2-SHG) imaging. In order to show that FT-SHG imaging can be used as a valuable diagnostic tool for real-world biological problems, we first investigate collagenase-induced injury in horse tendons. Clear differences in collagen fiber organization between normal and injured tendon are quantified. In particular, we observe that the regularly oriented organization of collagen fibers in normal tendons is disrupted in injured tendons leading to a more random organization. We also observe that FT-SHG microscopy is more sensitive in assessing tendon injury compared to the conventional polarized light microscopy. The second study includes quantifying collagen fibers in cortical bone using FT-SHG imaging and comparing it with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further, as an example study, we show how FT-SHG imaging could be used to quantify changes in bone structure as a function of age. Some initial work and future directions for extending FT-SHG to 3D are also discussed. The second technique, chi2-SHG imaging, takes advantage of the coherent nature of SHG and utilizes polarization to extract the second-order susceptibility (d elements) which provides information on molecular organization, i.e., it provides access to sub-diffractional changes "optically". We use chi2-SHG in combination with FT-SHG imaging to investigate a couple of biological problems. First, we quantify differences in collagen fiber organization between cornea and sclera of the eye in order to investigate their properties of transparency and opacity, respectively. We find from chi2-SHG imaging that there is no statistical difference in the values of d elements between cornea and sclera, indicating that the underlying collagen structure generating SHG from the two is similar at the level of detection of SHG microscopy. However, the difference lies in the spatial organization of these collagen fibers as observed from FT-SHG imaging. We find that cornea contains lamellae with patches of ordered and uniform diameter collagen fibers with axial order, which could be the reason for its transparent behavior. Conversely, there are no lamellae in sclera (i.e., no axial order), and fibers are thicker, denser, have inconsistent diameters, and possess relatively inhomogeneous orientations, leading to its opaque nature. We also utilized the two techniques to assess differences in stromal collagen fibers for several human breast tissue conditions: normal, hyperplasia, dysplasia, and malignant. Using FT-SHG imaging, we note differences between malignant and other pathological conditions through the metric A.I. ratio. Using generalized chi2-SHG imaging, we observe structural changes in collagen at the molecular scale, and a particular d element showed a more sensitive differentiation between breast tissue conditions, except between hyperplasia and normal/dysplasia. We also find that the trigonal symmetry (3m) is a more appropriate model to describe collagen fibers in malignant tissues as opposed to the conventionally used hexagonal symmetry (C6). Furthermore, the percentage of abnormal collagen fibers could potentially be used as a metric for differentiating breast tissue conditions. We also introduce a technique for extending chi2-SHG to fibers with curvature which is useful for generating chi2-image maps (in terms of d elements) instead of the conventional SHG intensity images. The spatial variations in d elements will provide additional information. For example, in breast cancer tissues, it may help in observing how fibers chang

  1. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Corrado; J.E. Bondaryk; V. Godino

    1998-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and Ieaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containment in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify a technique(s) for inspection of inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary. Acoustic imaging has been identified as one of these potential techniques. A numerical feasibility study investigated the use of high-frequency bistatic acoustic imaging techniques for inspection of inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary of nuclear power plant containment. The range-dependent version of the OASES Code developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was utilized to perform a series of numerical simulations. OASES is a well developed and extensively tested code for evaluation of the acoustic field in a system of stratified fluid and/or elastic layers. Using the code, an arbitrary number of fluid or solid elastic layers are interleaved, with the outer layers modeled as halfspaces. High frequency vibrational sources were modeled to simulate elastic waves in the steel. The received field due to an arbitrary source array can be calculated at arbitrary depth and range positions. In this numerical study, waves that reflect and scatter from surface roughness caused by modeled degradations (e.g., corrosion) are detected and used to identify and map the steel degradation. Variables in the numerical study included frequency, flaw size, interrogation distance, and sensor incident angle.Based on these analytical simulations, it is considered unlikely that acoustic imaging technology can be used to investigate embedded steel liners of reinforced concrete containment. The thin steel liner and high signal losses to the concrete make this application difficult. Results for portions of steel containment embedded in concrete are more encouraging in that they indicate that the intrinsic backscatter from degradations representing thickness reductions from 10 to 80% the shell thickness are sufficient to permit detection. It is recommended that a controlled experimental program be conducted in which sensor levels are calibrated against degradations to determine if current sensor technology can input sufficient power into the system to provide return levels within the dynamic range of the receivers.

  2. Four-frequency polarizing microscope for recording plasma images in the wavelength range 0.4-1.1 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, B. L.; Mal'kova, S. V.; Osipov, M. V.; Puzyrev, V. N.; Saakyan, A. T.; Starodub, A. N.; Fedotov, S. I.; Fronya, A. A.; Shutyak, V. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    The optical scheme and design of a four-frequency polarizing microscope intended for simultaneous recording of plasma images in the wavelength range 0.4-1.1 {mu}m with the spatial resolution 12 {mu}m in the entire spectral range are described. The effectiveness of such a microscope in studies of plasmas produced on interaction of laser radiation with a target is demonstrated. The plasma images are obtained at the frequencies {omega}{sub 0}, (3/2){omega}{sub 0}, 2{omega}{sub 0}, and (5/2){omega}{sub 0}, where {omega}{sub 0} corresponds to the frequency of heating radiation. The transformation coefficient that characterizes the efficiency of conversion of heating radiation into the 2{omega}{sub 0}, (3/2){omega}{sub 0}, and (5/2){omega}{sub 0} harmonics generated in the plasma is determined.

  3. Single-Shot Diffractive Imaging with a Table-Top Femtosecond Soft X-Ray Laser-Harmonics Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ravasio, A.; Gauthier, D.; Billon, M.; Caumes, J-P.; Garzella, D.; Geleoc, M.; Gobert, O.; Hergott, J-F.; Pena, A-M.; Perez, H.; Carre, B. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, Batiment 522, Centre d'Etude de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Maia, F. R. N. C. [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Husargatan 3 (Box 596), SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Bourhis, E.; Gierak, J.; Madouri, A.; Mailly, D.; Schiedt, B. [Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures, CNRS-UPR20, Route de Nozay, F-91460 Marcoussis (France); Fajardo, M. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenue Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Gautier, J.; Zeitoun, P. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Technique Avancees, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR7639, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2009-07-10

    Coherent x-ray diffractive imaging is a powerful method for studies on nonperiodic structures on the nanoscale. Access to femtosecond dynamics in major physical, chemical, and biological processes requires single-shot diffraction data. Up to now, this has been limited to intense coherent pulses from a free electron laser. Here we show that laser-driven ultrashort x-ray sources offer a comparatively inexpensive alternative. We present measurements of single-shot diffraction patterns from isolated nano-objects with a single 20 fs pulse from a table-top high-harmonic x-ray laser. Images were reconstructed with a resolution of 119 nm from the single shot and 62 nm from multiple shots.

  4. Monitoring the effect of low-level laser therapy in healing process of skin with second harmonic generation imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoman; Yu, Biying; Weng, Cuncheng; Li, Hui

    2014-11-01

    The 632nm wavelength low intensity He-Ne laser was used to irradiated on 15 mice which had skin wound. The dynamic changes and wound healing processes were observed with nonlinear spectral imaging technology. We observed that:(1)The wound healing process was accelerated by the low-level laser therapy(LLLT);(2)The new tissues produced second harmonic generation (SHG) signals. Collagen content and microstructure differed dramatically at different time pointed along the wound healing. Our observation shows that the low intensity He-Ne laser irradiation can accelerate the healing process of skin wound in mice, and SHG imaging technique can be used to observe wound healing process, which is useful for quantitative characterization of wound status during wound healing process.

  5. Spatial coherence of the nonlinearly generated second harmonic portion of backscatter for a clinical imaging system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russell J. Fedewa; Kirk D. Wallace; Mark R. Holland; James R. Jago; Gary C. Ng; Matthew R. Rielly; Brent S. Robinson; James G. Miller

    2003-01-01

    Correlation-based approaches to phase aberration correction rely on the spatial coherence of backscattered signals. The spatial coherence of backscatter from speckle-producing targets is predicted by the auto correlation of the transmit apodization (Van Cittert-Zernike theorem). Work by others indicates that the second harmonic beam has a wider mainlobe with lower sidelobes than a beam transmitted at 2f. The purpose of

  6. Radio-frequency energy quantification in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Leeor

    Mapping of radio frequency (RF) energy deposition has been challenging for 50+ years, especially, when scanning patients in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. As result, electromagnetic simulation software is often used for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR), the rate of RF energy deposition in tissue. The thesis work presents challenges associated with aligning information provided by electromagnetic simulation and MRI experiments. As result of the limitations of simulations, experimental methods for the quantification of SAR were established. A system for quantification of the total RF energy deposition was developed for parallel transmit MRI (a system that uses multiple antennas to excite and image the body). The system is capable of monitoring and predicting channel-by-channel RF energy deposition, whole body SAR and capable of tracking potential hardware failures that occur in the transmit chain and may cause the deposition of excessive energy into patients. Similarly, we demonstrated that local RF power deposition can be mapped and predicted for parallel transmit systems based on a series of MRI temperature mapping acquisitions. Resulting from the work, we developed tools for optimal reconstruction temperature maps from MRI acquisitions. The tools developed for temperature mapping paved the way for utilizing MRI as a diagnostic tool for evaluation of RF/microwave emitting device safety. Quantification of the RF energy was demonstrated for both MRI compatible and non-MRI-compatible devices (such as cell phones), while having the advantage of being noninvasive, of providing millimeter resolution and high accuracy.

  7. A new image cipher in time and frequency domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu; Amin, Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Recently, various encryption techniques based on chaos have been proposed. However, most existing chaotic encryption schemes still suffer from fundamental problems such as small key space, weak security function and slow performance speed. This paper introduces an efficient encryption scheme for still visual data that overcome these disadvantages. The proposed scheme is based on hybrid Linear Feedback Shift Register (LFSR) and chaotic systems in hybrid domains. The core idea is to scramble the pixel positions based on 2D chaotic systems in frequency domain. Then, the diffusion is done on the scrambled image based on cryptographic primitive operations and the incorporation of LFSR and chaotic systems as round keys. The hybrid compound of LFSR, chaotic system and cryptographic primitive operations strengthen the encryption performance and enlarge the key space required to resist the brute force attacks. Results of statistical and differential analysis show that the proposed algorithm has high security for secure digital images. Furthermore, it has key sensitivity together with a large key space and is very fast compared to other competitive algorithms.

  8. Molecular structure, Normal Coordinate Analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies, Natural Bond Orbital, TD-DFT calculations and biological activity analysis of antioxidant drug 7-hydroxycoumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, S.; Sylvestre, S.; Jayarajan, D.; Amalanathan, M.; Oudayakumar, K.; Gnanapoongothai, T.; Jayavarthanan, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report harmonic vibrational frequencies, molecular structure, NBO and HOMO, LUMO analysis of Umbelliferone also known as 7-hydroxycoumarin (7HC). The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by computation (monomer and dimmer) shows good agreement with experimental XRD data. Harmonic frequencies of 7HC were determined and analyzed by DFT utilizing 6-311+G(d,p) as basis set. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) following the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field Methodology (SQMFF). The change in electron density (ED) in the ?* and ?* antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyperconjugation of hydrogen-bonded interaction. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) complements with the experimental findings. The simulated spectra satisfactorily coincides with the experimental spectra. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi and Enterococcus faecalis.

  9. Label-free and real-time imaging of dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes in cellular nucleus using second harmonic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes have been probed for the first time with the use of second harmonic microscopy. Unlike conventional approaches, second harmonic microscopy provides a label-free and real-time approach to detect DNA conformational changes. Upon dehydration, cellular DNA undergoes a transition from B- to A-form, whereas cellular nuclei change from invisible to visible under second harmonic microscopy. These results showed that DNA is a second order nonlinear optical material. We further confirmed this by characterizing the nonlinear optical properties of extracted DNA from human cells. Our findings open a new path for SHG imaging. DNA can change its conformations under many circumstances. For example: normal cells turning into cancerous cells and drug molecules binding with DNA. Therefore, the detection of DNA conformational changes with second harmonic microscopy will be a useful tool in cancer therapy and new drug discovery.

  10. Label-free and real-time imaging of dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes in cellular nucleus using second harmonic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes have been probed for the first time with the use of second harmonic microscopy. Unlike conventional approaches, second harmonic microscopy provides a label-free and real-time approach to detect DNA conformational changes. Upon dehydration, cellular DNA undergoes a transition from B- to A-form, whereas cellular nuclei change from invisible to visible under second harmonic microscopy. These results showed that DNA is a second order nonlinear optical material. We further confirmed this by characterizing the nonlinear optical properties of extracted DNA from human cells. Our findings open a new path for SHG imaging. DNA can change its conformations under many circumstances. For example: normal cells turning into cancerous cells and drug molecules binding with DNA. Therefore, the detection of DNA conformational changes with second harmonic microscopy will be a useful tool in cancer therapy and new drug discovery. PMID:25491759

  11. Imaging Interplanetary CMEs at Radio Frequency From Solar Polar Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Chi; Wang, C. B.; Wang, S.

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are violent discharges of plasma and magnetic fields from the Sun's corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, the detection of CMEs is important for un-derstanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. The Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) is a proposed mission to observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from solar polar orbit. The main payload (radio telescope) on board SPORT will be an in-terferometric imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band, which will follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from a distance of a few solar radii to near 1 AU from solar polar orbit. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind plasma experiment, a solar wind ion composition instrument, an energetic particle detector, a wave detector, a mag-netometer and an interplanetary radio burst tracker. In this paper, we first describe the current shortage of interplanetary CME observations. Next, the scientific motivation and objectives of SPORT are introduced. We discuss the basic specifications of the main radio telescope of SPORT with reference to the radio emission mechanisms and the radio frequency band to be observed. Finally, we discuss the key technologies of the SPORT mission, including the con-ceptual design of the main telescope, the image retrieval algorithm and the solar polar orbit injection. Other payloads and their respective observation objectives are also briefly discussed. Key words: Interplanetary CMEs; Interferometric imaging; Solar polar orbit; Radiometer.

  12. High-frequency ultrasound annular array imaging. Part II: digital beamformer design and imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chang-Hong; Snook, Kevin A; Cao, Pei-Jie; Shung, K Kirk

    2006-02-01

    This is the second part of a two-paper series reporting a recent effort in the development of a high-frequency annular array ultrasound imaging system. In this paper an imaging system composed of a six-element, 43 MHz annular array transducer, a six-channel analog front-end, a field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based beamformer, and a digital signal processor (DSP) microprocessor-based scan converter will be described. A computer is used as the interface for image display. The beamformer that applies delays to the echoes for each channel is implemented with the strategy of combining the coarse and fine delays. The coarse delays that are integer multiples of the clock periods are achieved by using a first-in-first-out (FIFO) structure, and the fine delays are obtained with a fractional delay (FD) filter. Using this principle, dynamic receiving focusing is achieved. The image from a wire phantom obtained with the imaging system was compared to that from a prototype ultrasonic backscatter microscope with a 45 MHz single-element transducer. The improved lateral resolution and depth of field from the wire phantom image were observed. Images from an excised rabbit eye sample also were obtained, and fine anatomical structures were discerned. PMID:16529105

  13. In vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access: towards image guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. We aim to develop optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging guidance for RFA. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using OCT catheter to image endocardia wall in active beating hearts through percutaneous access. This is a critical step toward image guided RFA in a clinic setting. METHODS A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into active beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardia wall. The images were then acquired at 10 frames per second at an axial resolution and lateral resolution of 15 ?m. RESULTS We report the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in active beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. CONCLUSIONS It is feasible to acquire OCT images in beating hearts through percutaneous access. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  14. Second-harmonic generation imaging of semiconductor nanowires with focused vector beams.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Godofredo; Mäkitalo, Jouni; Chen, Ya; Dhaka, Veer; Grasso, Marco; Karvonen, Lasse; Jiang, Hua; Huttunen, Mikko J; Huhtio, Teppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Kauranen, Martti

    2015-03-11

    We use second-harmonic generation (SHG) with focused vector beams to investigate individual vertically aligned GaAs nanowires. Our results provide direct evidence that SHG from oriented nanowires is mainly driven by the longitudinal field along the nanowire growth axis. Consequently, focused radial polarization provides a superior tool to characterize such nanowires compared to linear polarization, also allowing this possibility in the native growth environment. We model our experiments by describing the SHG process for zinc-blende structure and dipolar bulk nonlinearity. PMID:25651302

  15. The Classical Harmonic Vibrations of the Atomic Centers of Mass with Micro Amplitudes and Low Frequencies Monitored by the Entanglement between the Two Two-level Atoms in a Single mode Cavity

    E-print Network

    Yong-Yi Huang

    2013-12-08

    We study the entanglement dynamics of the two two-level atoms coupling with a single-mode polarized cavity field after incorporating the atomic centers of mass classical harmonic vibrations with micro amplitudes and low frequencies. We propose a quantitative vibrant factor to modify the concurrence of the two atoms states. When the vibrant frequencies are very low, we obtain that: (i) the factor depends on the relative vibrant displacements and the initial phases rather than the absolute amplitudes, and reduces the concurrence to three orders of magnitude; (ii) the concurrence increases with the increase of the initial phases; (iii) the frequency of the harmonic vibration can be obtained by measuring the maximal value of the concurrence during a small time. These results indicate that even the extremely weak classical harmonic vibrations can be monitored by the entanglement of quantum states.

  16. Even harmonic lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    Operation of a free-electron laser at harmonics of the fundamental frequency is explored with the numerical simulation code HELEX. This code includes coupling to the harmonics caused by misalignment of the electrons with the optical beam and coupling due to transverse gradients. Albeit weak, the transverse gradients produce the dominant coupling of the electrons to the even-harmonic light. Even-harmonic lasing occurs in a TEM{sub 0,2m+1}-like mode where the field on axis is zero. As bunching of the electron beam progresses, radiation at the higher odd harmonics is suppressed owing to the absence of higher-order odd-harmonic Fourier components in the bunch. Growth of the even-harmonic power from small signal requires suppression of competing harmonics (including the fundamental) that have higher gain. Lasing at an even harmonic has yet to be experimentally demonstrated in an open resonator (i.e. optical cavity). Strategies to make such an experiment possible are discussed. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Microscopic imaging of glyceraldehyde-induced tissue glycation with intrinsic second harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yu Jer; Granelli, Joseph; Tirumalasetty, Manasa; Lyubovitsky, Julia

    2013-02-01

    The bioinspired approaches to tissue strengthening and preservation rely on non-toxic cross-linking agents one of which is glyceraldehyde. In this study we used multiphoton microscopy that employs second harmonic generation (SHG) contrast to evaluate collagen microstructures and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) contrast to monitor progression of cross-linking upon treatment of tissues with glyceraldehyde. We examined collagen hydrogels assembled at 37 °C and 27 °C, bovine scleral and corneal tissues, skin as well as rat tail tendons. The results show a different effect of glyceraldehyde on collagen microstructures within the above tissues. This effect depends on the original microstructural assembly of collagen within a specific tissue. Our data suggests that epidermis (in skin and cornea) will protect collagen from cross-linking with glyceraldehyde. The work highlights benefits of monitoring progression of collagen cross-linking and effects of cross-linking on fiber microstructures as imaged with SHG and TPF signals.

  18. Time domain simulation of harmonic ultrasound images and beam patterns in 3D using the k-space pseudospectral method.

    PubMed

    Treeby, Bradley E; Tumen, Mustafa; Cox, B T

    2011-01-01

    A k-space pseudospectral model is developed for the fast full-wave simulation of nonlinear ultrasound propagation through heterogeneous media. The model uses a novel equation of state to account for nonlinearity in addition to power law absorption. The spectral calculation of the spatial gradients enables a significant reduction in the number of required grid nodes compared to finite difference methods. The model is parallelized using a graphical processing unit (GPU) which allows the simulation of individual ultrasound scan lines using a 256 x 256 x 128 voxel grid in less than five minutes. Several numerical examples are given, including the simulation of harmonic ultrasound images and beam patterns using a linear phased array transducer. PMID:22003638

  19. Investigation of Photonic Devices using Second-Harmonic-Generation Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (SHG-FROG)

    E-print Network

    Washburn, Brian

    Gating (SHG-FROG) Brian R. Washburn The heart of an experiment in ultrafast optics is the pulsed laser be used to determine the pulse duration. Frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) is a technique autocorrelation. Plus, due to the overdetermination of the pulse in the time- frequency domain, FROG has built

  20. Spatial and frequency-based super-resolution of ultrasound images

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mon-Ju; Karls, Joseph; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Vanderby, Ray; Sethares, William

    2014-01-01

    Modern ultrasound systems can output video images containing more spatial and temporal information than still images. Super-resolution techniques can exploit additional information but face two challenges: image registration and complex motion. In addition, information from multiple available frequencies is unexploited. Herein, we utilised these information sources to create better ultrasound images and videos, extending existing technologies for image capture. Spatial and frequency-based super-resolution processing using multiple motion estimation and frequency combination was applied to ultrasound videos of deforming models. Processed images are larger, have greater clarity and detail, and less variability in intensity between frames. Significantly, strain measurements are more accurate and precise than those from raw videos, and have a higher contrast ratio between ‘tumour’ and ‘surrounding tissue’ in a phantom model. We attribute improvements to reduced noise and increased resolution in processed images. Our methods can significantly improve quantitative and qualitative assessments of ultrasound images when compared assessments of standard images. PMID:25191631

  1. Cassini/RPWS: A low frequency radio imager at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Lamy, L.; Zarka, P.

    2014-04-01

    The High Frequency Receiver (HFR) of the Radio and Plasma Waves Science experiment (RPWS) onboard Cassini is a sensitive, and versatile radio instrument. Although the radio antenna connected to this instrument have no intrinsic directivity, the HFR measurements can provide instantaneous direction of arrival, flux density and polarization degree of the observed radio waves. Hence, the HFR can be described as an full-sky radio imager. As the instrument provides direction of arrival, radio sources can be located with some assumption on the propagation between the source and the observer. Hence, it is possible to produce radio source maps and correlate them with observations at other wavelengths, such as UV or IR observations of the auroral regions of Saturn. The flux and polarization measurements together with the timefrequency shape of the radio emissions can also be used to identify the radio emission processes. We present a review of the results of the Cassini/RPWS/HFR observations since its arrival at Saturn in 2004: interpretation of the radio arc shapes and equatorial shadow zones; in-situ observations in the radio source region; comparison with other wavelengths and particle measurements; confirmation of the Cyclotron Maser Instability (CMI) as the main emission mechanism for auroral radio emissions; monitoring of the radio emission variability in time and location, etc.

  2. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  3. Diagnostic potential of multimodal imaging of ovarian tissue using optical coherence tomography and second-harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Welge, Weston A.; DeMarco, Andrew T.; Watson, Jennifer M.; Rice, Photini S.; Barton, Jennifer K.; Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is particularly deadly because it is usually diagnosed after it has metastasized. We have previously identified features of ovarian cancer using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy (targeting collagen). OCT provides an image of the ovarian microstructure while SHG provides a high-resolution map of collagen fiber bundle arrangement. Here we investigated the diagnostic potential of dual-modality OCT and SHG imaging. We conducted a fully crossed, multi-reader, multi-case study using seven human observers. Each observer classified 44 ex vivo mouse ovaries (16 normal and 28 abnormal) as normal or abnormal from OCT, SHG, and simultaneously viewed, co-registered OCT and SHG images and provided a confidence rating on a six-point scale. We determined the average receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, area under the ROC curves (AUC), and other quantitative figures of merit. The results show that OCT has diagnostic potential with an average AUC of 0.91 ± 0.06. The average AUC for SHG was less promising at 0.71 ± 0.13. The average AUC for simultaneous OCT and SHG was not significantly different from OCT alone, possibly due to the limited SHG field of view. The high performance of OCT and co-registered OCT and SHG warrants further investigation.

  4. Three-dimensional simulations of harmonic radiation and harmonic lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, M.J.; McVey, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    Characteristics of the harmonic emission from free-electron lasers (FELs) are examined in the spontaneous, coherent-spontaneous and stimulated emission regimes. The radiation at both odd and even harmonic frequencies is treated for electron beams with finite emittance and energy spread. In the spontaneous emission regime, the transverse radiation patterns including the transverse frequency dependences, are given. How this expression is modified to include energy spread and emittance is described. In the coherent-spontaneous emission and stimulated emission regimes, the interaction of the radiation fields with the electrons must be treated self-consistently. Here, a single-frequency distributed transverse source function for each electron is used in the harmonic version of the 3-D code FELEX to model the harmonic radiation. The code has recently been modified to simultaneously model the fundamental and harmonic interactions for multiple-pass oscillator simulations. These modifications facilitate the examination of FELs under various operating conditions. When the FEL is lasing at the fundamental, the evolution of the harmonic fields can be examined. This evolution is unique in the sense that the electron beam radiates at the harmonic frequencies in the presence of the harmonic radiation circulating in the cavity. As a result, enhancements of the harmonic emission can be observed. Finally, harmonic lasing can occur in cases where there is sufficient gain to overcome cavity losses and lasing at the fundamental can be suppressed. The characteristics and efficiency of these interactions are explored. 11 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation imaging for liver fibrosis assessment without labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Pan, Shiying; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-10-01

    We apply the polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation (PR-SHG) microscopy to investigate the changes of collagen typings (type I vs type III) and collagen fibril orientations of liver tissue in bile-duct-ligation (BDL) rat models. The PR-SHG results show that the second-order susceptibility tensor ratios (?31/?15 and ?33/?15) of collagen fibers increase with liver fibrotic progression after BDL surgery, reflecting an increase of the type III collagen component with the severity of liver fibrosis; and the square root of the collagen type III to type I ratio linearly correlates (R2 = 0.98) with histopathological scores. Furthermore, the collagen fibril orientations become more random with liver fibrosis transformation as compared to normal liver tissue. This work demonstrates that PR-SHG microscopy has the potential for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver fibrosis based on quantitative analysis of collagen typings and fibril orientations.

  6. Harmonic engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.; Sewall, Noel; Boroa, Carl

    2014-08-19

    An engine based on a reciprocating piston engine that extracts work from pressurized working fluid. The engine includes a harmonic oscillator inlet valve capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into of the engine. In particular, the inlet valve includes an inlet valve head and a spring arranged together as a harmonic oscillator so that the inlet valve head is moveable from an unbiased equilibrium position to a biased closed position occluding an inlet. Upon releasing the inlet valve the inlet valve head undergoes a single oscillation past the equilibrium positio to a maximum open position and returns to a biased return position close to the closed position to choke the flow and produce a pressure drop across the inlet valve causing the inlet valve to close. Protrusions carried either by the inlet valve head or piston head are used to bump open the inlet valve from the closed position and initiate the single oscillation of the inlet valve head, and protrusions carried either by the outlet valve head or piston head are used to close the outlet valve ahead of the bump opening of the inlet valve.

  7. Theoretical probation of FClCOCl2 molecular complex : Post Hartree-Fock studies on molecular structures, stabilities and vibrational harmonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowek, Andrzej; Reddy, Shirisha; LeszczySki, Jerzy

    1994-12-01

    Potential energy surfaces of the weak FClCO⋯Cl 2 complex were studied using ab initio post Hartree-Fock theory at the MP2 and MP4 levels with 6-311G(d) and 6-311G(2d) basis sets. Two minimum energy conformations, first-order transition state and two second-order transition structures were found. The minimum energy forms (C and T) are separated by a small (less than 0.5 kcal/mol) barrier. At the MP2/6-311G(d) level their relative stabilities amount to -0.63 and -0.60 kcal/mol for C and T conformers, respectively, where at the MP2/6-311G(2d) approximation stabilities of both forms rise to -1.09 and -1.21 kcal/mol. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and compared with available experimental data.

  8. Multipath effects in semi-anechoic chambers at low frequencies: a simplified prediction model based on image theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Orlandi

    1996-01-01

    The multipath effects due to radiating sources inside a shielded room can not be neglected when the frequency of the harmonic components of the electromagnetic field are below the frequency threshold of the absorber lined walls. This paper deals with the prediction of the total radiated field by an electric dipole source inside a shielded room, taking into account the

  9. Shear Wave Imaging Using Phase Modulation Component of Harmonic Distortion in Continuous Shear Wave Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajuli, Raj Kumar; Tei, Reisen; Nakai, Daisuke; Yamakoshi, Yoshiki

    2013-07-01

    An elasticity imaging method using continuous shear wave excitation (CSWE) is expected to be a safe and quantitative technique. A velocity map could be produced by propagating wave number spectrum analysis of a two-dimensional (2D) displacement map of shear wave propagation. However; the problems of accuracy and resolution have limited the reliability of this technique in medical diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a shear wave imaging system for reconstructing the spatial phase modulation component of shear wave propagation in order to obtain high-resolution images of continuous shear wave excitation. Shear wave local velocity, which is derived from the spatial differentation of the phase of complex displacement, is adopted as an imaging parameter. A fine texture-like pattern of the phase modulation component appears in the local velocity map, which gives precise information of small-amplitude phase modulation.

  10. Combined nonlinear laser imaging (two-photon excitation fluorescence, second and third-harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopies) in ovarian tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, J.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Bottcher-Luiz, F.; Andrade, L. A. L. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    We applied Two-photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF), Second/Third Harmonic Generation (SHG and THG) and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) Non Linear Optics (NLO) Laser-Scanning Microscopy within the same imaging platform to evaluate their use as a diagnostic tool in ovarian tumors. We assess of applicability of this multimodal approach to perform a pathological evaluation of serous and mucinous tumors in human samples. The combination of TPEF-SHG-THG imaging provided complementary information about the interface epithelium/stromal, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillar tissue architecture (SHG). The fact that H&E staining is the standard method used in clinical pathology and that the stored samples are usually fixed makes it important a re-evaluation of these samples with NLO microscopy to compare new results with a library of already existing samples. FLIM, however, depends on the chemical environment around the fluorophors that was completely changed after fixation; therefore it only makes sense in unstained samples. Our FLIM results in unstained samples demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate healthy epithelia from serous or mucinous epithelia. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the different imaging modalities used showed that multimodal nonlinear microscopy has the potential to differentiate between cancerous and healthy ovarian tissue.

  11. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Darne, Chinmay D.; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Smith, Anne M.; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2012-01-01

    The work presented herein describes system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens microPET/CT commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be ±0.7% and ±0.3°, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 ?M IRDye800CW and 68Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. 3-D mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP3) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate FDPM approach. Finally, PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The results obtained validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging. PMID:23171509

  12. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darne, Chinmay D.; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I.-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Smith, Anne M.; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-12-01

    The work presented herein describes the system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens micro positron emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be ±0.7% and ±0.3°, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 µM IRDye800CW and 68Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. Three-dimensional mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP3) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate the FDPM approach. Finally, the PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The obtained results validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging.

  13. Assessment of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions with Spherical Harmonics: Comparison of MR Imaging and Pathologic Findings1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Shalmon, Bruria; Zou, Kelly H.; Azhari, Haim; Nass, Dvora; Achiron, Anat

    2005-01-01

    Spherical harmonics (SH) were used to approximate the volume and three-dimensional geometry of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in deceased patients. The institutional ethical committee does not require its approval for studies involving pathologic specimens. Pathologic findings were used as the reference standard. In addition, lesion volume was measured with cylindrical approximation (CA). Volumetric comparisons of biases were based on summary statistics, Spearman correlation, Wilcoxon test, and two-way analysis of variance. Shape comparison metrics included mean distance and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Eight of 11 lesions had smaller biases with SH method (P < .001). Median biases with SH and CA did not differ significantly, as compared with pathologic findings (r = 1.00 vs 0.99, respectively). Variances of the biases were significantly smaller for SH (P =.04). Ranges of normalized distance and DSC were 0.1%–2.5% and 75%–96%, respectively. Mean DSC was significantly higher than 70% (P < .001). SH method provided unbiased lesion volume and added geometric information that may enable a better understanding of the pathogenesis and lesion evolution over time. PMID:15833980

  14. The Effect of Through-Plane Motion on Left Ventricular Rotation: A Study Using Slice Following Harmonic Phase Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Brotman, David; Zhang, Ziheng; Sampath, Smita

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive quantification of regional left ventricular (LV) rotation may improve understanding of cardiac function. Current methods employed to quantify rotation typically acquire data on a set of prescribed short-axis slices, neglecting effects due to through-plane myocardial motion. We combine principles of slice-following tagged imaging with harmonic phase analysis methods to account for through-plane motion in regional rotation measurements. We compare rotation and torsion measurements obtained using our method to those obtained from imaging datasets acquired without slice-following. Our results in normal volunteers demonstrate differences in the general trends of average and regional rotation-time plots in mid-basal slices, and of the rotation versus circumferential strain loops. We observe substantial errors in measured peak average rotation of the order of 58% for basal slices (due to change in the pattern of the curve), ?6.6% for mid-ventricular slices, and ?8.5% for apical slices; and an average error in base-to-apex torsion of 19% when through-plane motion is not considered. This study concludes that due to an inherent base-to-apex gradient in rotation that exists in the LV, accounting for through-plane motion is critical to the accuracy of LV rotation quantification. PMID:22700308

  15. High fidelity magnetic resonance imaging by frequency sweep encoding and Fourier Jun Shen *, Yun Xiang

    E-print Network

    Shen, Jun

    High fidelity magnetic resonance imaging by frequency sweep encoding and Fourier decoding Jun Shen February 2010 Available online 20 February 2010 Keywords: Magnetic resonance imaging Encoding Decoding The dominating schemes for magnetic resonance imaging have been based on the Fourier transform relationship

  16. Region Segmentation in the Frequency Domain Applied to Upper Airway Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Bresch; Shrikanth Narayanan

    2009-01-01

    We describe a method for unsupervised region seg- mentation of an image using its spatial frequency domain repre- sentation. The algorithm was designed to process large sequences of real-time magnetic resonance (MR) images containing the 2-D midsagittal view of a human vocal tract airway. The segmentation algorithm uses an anatomically informed object model, whose fit to the observed image data

  17. Transient Anomaly Imaging in Visco-Elastic Media Obeying a Frequency Power-Law

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Transient Anomaly Imaging in Visco-Elastic Media Obeying a Frequency Power-Law Elie Bretin Lili Imaging and Back propagation, for an ideal medium to detect an anomaly in a visco-elastic medium from wave 4 we present anomaly imaging procedures and reconstruction methods in visco-elastic media. Numerical

  18. Experimental images of heterogeneous turbid media by frequency-domain diffusing-photon tomography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. O'Leary; D. A. Boas; B. Chance; A. G. Yodh

    We present images of heterogeneous turbid media derived from measurements of diffuse photon-density waves traveling through highly scattering tissue phantoms. To our knowledge, the images are the first experimental reconstruction based on data collected in the frequency domain. We demonstrate images of both absorbing and scattering heterogeneities and show that this method is sensitive to the optical properties of the

  19. A novel dual-frequency imaging method for intravascular ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Chen, Yan; Wong, Chi-Man; Liu, Baoqiang; Dai, Jiyan; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which is able to delineate internal structures of vessel wall with fine spatial resolution, has greatly enriched the knowledge of coronary atherosclerosis. A novel dual-frequency imaging method is proposed in this paper for intravascular imaging applications. A probe combined two ultrasonic transducer elements with different center frequencies (36 MHz and 78 MHz) is designed and fabricated with PMN-PT single crystal material. It has the ability to balance both imaging depth and resolution, which are important imaging parameters for clinical test. A dual-channel imaging platform is also proposed for real-time imaging, and this platform has been proven to support programmable processing algorithms, flexible imaging control, and raw RF data acquisition for IVUS applications. Testing results show that the -6 dB axial and lateral imaging resolutions of low-frequency ultrasound are 78 and 132 ?m, respectively. In terms of high-frequency ultrasound, axial and lateral resolutions are determined to be as high as 34 and 106 ?m. In vitro intravascular imaging on healthy swine aorta is conducted to demonstrate the performance of the dual-frequency imaging method for IVUS applications. PMID:25454093

  20. Amplified, frequency swept lasers for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT imaging: design and scaling principles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Huber; M. Wojtkowski; K. Taira; J. G. Fujimoto; K. Hsu

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-speed, frequency swept, 1300 nm laser source for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT with Fourier domain\\/swept-source detection. The laser uses a fiber coupled, semiconductor amplifier and a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter. We present scaling principles which predict the maximum frequency sweep speed and trade offs in output power, noise and instantaneous linewidth performance. The use of an

  1. Motion compensated frequency modulated continuous wave 3D coherent imaging ladar with scannerless architecture.

    PubMed

    Krause, Brian W; Tiemann, Bruce G; Gatt, Philip

    2012-12-20

    A principal difficulty of long dwell coherent imaging ladar is its extreme sensitivity to target or platform motion. This paper describes a motion compensated frequency modulated continuous wave 3D coherent imaging ladar method that overcomes this motion sensitivity, making it possible to work with nonstatic targets such as human faces, as well as imaging of targets through refractive turbulence. Key features of this method include scannerless imaging and high range resolution. The reduced motion sensitivity is shown with mathematical analysis and demonstration 3D images. Images of static and dynamic targets are provided demonstrating up to 600×800 pixel imaging with millimeter range resolution. PMID:23262614

  2. A novel model of interaction between high frequency electromagnetic non-ionizing fields and microtubules viewed as coupled two-degrees of freedom harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Luigi Maxmilian

    2015-01-01

    The question regarding the potential biological and adverse health effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields on living organisms is of primary importance in biophysics and medicine. Despite the several experimental evidences showing such occurrence in a wide frequency range from extremely low frequency to microwaves, a definitive theoretical model able to explain a possible mechanism of interaction between electromagnetic fields and living matter, especially in the case of weak and very weak intensities, is still missing. In this paper it has been suggested a possible mechanism of interaction involving the resonant absorption of electromagnetic radiation by microtubules. To this aim these have been modeled as non-dissipative forced harmonic oscillators characterized by two coupled "macroscopic" degrees of freedom, respectively describing longitudinal and transversal vibrations induced by the electromagnetic field. We have shown that the proposed model, although at a preliminary stage, is able to explain the ability of even weak electromagnetic radiating electromagnetic fields to transfer high quantities of energy to living systems by means of a resonant mechanism, so capable to easily damage microtubules structure. PMID:25714384

  3. Non-contact, ultrasound-based indentation method for measuring elastic properties of biological tissues using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by harmonic motion imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking radiofrequency signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the measured Young's modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r(2) > 0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r(2) = 0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI = 2.62? ± ?0.41?kPa, compared to EMechTesting = 4.2? ± ?2.58?kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens. PMID:25776065

  4. Non-contact, ultrasound-based indentation method for measuring elastic properties of biological tissues using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by harmonic motion imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking radiofrequency signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the measured Young’s modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r2 > 0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r2 = 0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI = 2.62? ± ?0.41?kPa, compared to EMechTesting = 4.2? ± ?2.58?kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens.

  5. In vivo time-lapse imaging of skin burn wound healing using second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Wound healing is a process to repair the damaged tissue caused by thermal burn, incised wound, or stab wound. Although the wound healing has many aspects, it is common for dynamics of collagen fiber, such as decomposition, production, or growth, to be closely related with wound healing. If such the healing process can be visualized as a timelapse image of the collagen fiber in the same subject, one may obtain new findings regarding biological repairing mechanisms in the healing process. In this article, to investigate the temporal modoification of dermal collagen fiber in the burn wound healing, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, minimal invasiveness, deep penetration, the absence of interference from background light, and in vivo measurement without additional staining. Since SHG light arises from a non-centrosymmetric triple helix of three polypeptide chains in the collagen molecule, SHG intensity sensitively reflects the structure maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates. A series of time-lapse SHG images during the wound healing process of 2 weeks clearly indicated that condensation and melting of dermal collagen fibers by the deep dermal burn, decomposition of the damaged collagen fibers in the inflammation phase, production of new collagen fibers in the proliferation phase, and the growth of the new collagen fibers in the remodeling phase. These results show a high potential of SHG microscopy for optical assessment of the wound healing process in vivo.

  6. Model-based frequency response characterization of a digital-image analysis system for epifluorescence microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazra, Rajeeb; Viles, Charles L.; Park, Stephen K.; Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Sieracki, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a model-based method for estimating the spatial frequency response of a digital-imaging system (e.g., a CCD camera) that is modeled as a linear, shift-invariant image acquisition subsystem that is cascaded with a linear, shift-variant sampling subsystem. The method characterizes the 2D frequency response of the image acquisition subsystem to beyond the Nyquist frequency by accounting explicitly for insufficient sampling and the sample-scene phase. Results for simulated systems and a real CCD-based epifluorescence microscopy system are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method.

  7. Spatial pattern separation of chemicals and frequency-independent components by terahertz spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuuki; Kawase, Kodo; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Youichi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2003-10-01

    We separated the component spatial patterns of frequency-dependent absorption in chemicals and frequency-independent components such as plastic, paper, and measurement noise in terahertz (THz) spectroscopic images, using known spectral curves. Our measurement system, which uses a widely tunable coherent THz-wave parametric oscillator source, can image at a specific frequency in the range 1-2 THz. The component patterns of chemicals can easily be extracted by use of the frequency-independent components. This method could be successfully used for nondestructive inspection for the detection of illegal drugs and devices of bioterrorism concealed, e.g., inside mail and packages.

  8. Second-order fractional Talbot effect induced frequency-doubling optical pulse injection for 40 GHz rational-harmonic mode-locking of an SOA fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Jui; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-09-01

    A second-order fractional Talbot effect induced frequency-doubling of a 10 GHz optical pulse-train is demonstrated to backward injection mode-lock a semiconductor optical amplifier fiber laser (SOAFL) for 40 GHz rational-harmonic mode-locking (RHML). That is, a real all-optical gain-modulation of the SOAFL can be created by injecting such a time-multiplexed but pseudo-frequency-doubled pulse-train into the cavity. The time-multiplexing pulse-train can thus be transformed into a frequency-multiplied pulse-train via cross-gain modulation (XGM). The optical pulse-train at 10 GHz is generated by nonlinearly driving an electro-absorption modulator (EAM), which experiences the second-order fractional Talbot effect after propagating through a 4 km long dispersion compensation fiber (DCF). The DCF not only plays the role of frequency-doubler but also compensates the frequency chirp of the 10 GHz optical pulse-train. The pulsewidth broadening from 22 to 60 ps for initiating the time-domain Talbot effect is simulated by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. With careful detuning of the RF modulation power of the EAM at 5 dBm, the generated 20 GHz optical pulse-train exhibits a positive frequency chirp with minimum peak-to-peak value of 2 GHz, and the peak-amplitude fluctuation between adjacent pulses is below 1.4%. In comparison with the SOAFL pulse-train repeated at 40 GHz generated by the fourth-order purely RHML process, the optimized second-order fractional Talbot effect in combination with the second-order RHML mechanism significantly enhances the modulation-depth of RHML, thus improving the on/off extinction ratio of the 40 GHz SOAFL pulse-train from 1.8 to 5.6 dB. Such a new scheme also provides a more stable 40 GHz RHML pulse-train from the SOAFL with its timing jitter reducing from 0.51 to 0.23 ps.

  9. Can recent innovations in harmonic analysis 'explain' key findings in natural image statistics?

    PubMed

    Donoho, D L; Flesia, A G

    2001-08-01

    Recently, applied mathematicians have been pursuing the goal of sparse coding of certain mathematical models of images with edges. They have found by mathematical analysis that, instead of wavelets and Fourier methods, sparse coding leads towards new systems: ridgelets and curvelets. These new systems have elements distributed across a range of scales and locations, but also orientations. In fact they have highly direction-specific elements and exhibit increasing numbers of distinct directions as we go to successively finer scales. Meanwhile, researchers in natural scene statistics (NSS) have been attempting to find sparse codes for natural images. The new systems they have found by computational optimization have elements distributed across a range of scales and locations, but also orientations. The new systems are certainly unlike wavelet and Gabor systems, on the one hand because of the multi-orientation and on the other hand because of the multi-scale nature. There is a certain degree of visual resemblance between the findings in the two fields, which suggests the hypothesis that certain important findings in the NSS literature might possibly be explained by the slogan: edges are the dominant features in images, and curvelets are the right tool for representing edges. We consider here certain empirical consequences of this hypothesis, looking at key findings of the NSS literature and conducting studies of curvelet and ridgelet transforms on synthetic and real images, to see if the results are consistent with predictions from this slogan. Our first experiment measures the nonGaussianity of Fourier, wavelet, ridgelet and curvelet coefficients over a database of synthetic and photographic images. Empirically the curvelet coefficients exhibit noticeably higher kurtosis than wavelet, ridgelet, or Fourier coefficients. This is consistent with the hypothesis. Our second experiment studies the inter-scale correlation of wavelet coefficient energies at the same location. We describe a simple experiment showing that presence of edges explains these correlations. We also develop a crude nonlinear 'partial correlation' by considering the correlation between wavelet parents and children after a few curvelet coefficients are removed. When we kill the few biggest coefficients of the curvelet transform, much of the correlation between wavelet subbands disappears--consistent with the hypothesis. We suggest implications for future discussions about NSS. PMID:11563535

  10. The response of phospholipid-encapsulated microbubbles to chirp-coded excitation: Implications for high-frequency nonlinear imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2013-01-01

    The current excitation strategy for harmonic and subharmonic imaging (HI and SHI) uses short sine-bursts. However, alternate pulsing strategies may be useful for enhancing nonlinear emissions from ultrasound contrast agents. The goal of this study was to corroborate the hypothesis that chirp-coded excitation can improve the performance of high-frequency HI and SHI. A secondary goal was to understand the mechanisms that govern the response of ultrasound contrast agents to chirp-coded and sine-burst excitation schemes. Numerical simulations and acoustic measurements were conducted to evaluate the response of a commercial contrast agent (Targestar-P®) to chirp-coded and sine-burst excitation (10?MHz frequency, peak pressures 290 kPa). The results of the acoustic measurements revealed an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio by 4 to 14?dB, and a two- to threefold reduction in the subharmonic threshold with chirp-coded excitation. Simulations conducted with the Marmottant model suggest that an increase in expansion-dominated radial excursion of microbubbles was the mechanism responsible for the stronger nonlinear response. Additionally, chirp-coded excitation detected the nonlinear response for a wider range of agent concentrations than sine-bursts. Therefore, chirp-coded excitation could be a viable approach for enhancing the performance of HI and SHI. PMID:23654417

  11. Effects of density functionals and dispersion interactions on geometries, bond energies and harmonic frequencies of EUX3 (E=N, P, CH; X=H, F, Cl).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Krishna Kumar; Patidar, Pankaj; Patidar, Sunil Kumar; Vishwakarma, Ravi

    2014-12-10

    Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed to evaluate the geometries, bonding nature and harmonic frequencies of the compounds [EUX3] at DFT, DFT-D3, DFT-D3(BJ) and DFT-dDSc levels using different density functionals BP86, BLYP, PBE, revPBE, PW91, TPSS and M06-L. The stretching frequency of UN bond in [NUF3] calculated with DFT/BLYP closely resembles with the experimental value. The performance of different density functionals for accurate UN vibrational frequencies follows the order BLYP>revPBE>BP86>PW91>TPSS>PBE>M06-L. The BLYP functional gives accurate value of the UE bond distances. The uranium atom in the studied compounds [EUX3] is positively charged. Upon going from [EUF3] to [EUCl3], the partial Hirshfeld charge on uranium atom decreases because of the lower electronegativity of chlorine compared to flourine. The Gopinathan-Jug bond order for UE bonds ranges from 2.90 to 3.29. The UE bond dissociation energies vary with different density functionals as M06-L

  12. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    SciTech Connect

    Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

    1985-01-01

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  13. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: Imaging and Source Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boboltz, David A.; Fey, Alan L.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Edward B.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Zhang, Li-Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-braid) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  14. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lilehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscope methodology has been developed that employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever fundamental resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of embedded nanoscale features.

  15. A real-time algorithm for the harmonic estimation and frequency tracking of dominant components in fusion plasma magnetic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, D.; Coelho, R. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)] [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-08-15

    The real-time tracking of instantaneous quantities such as frequency, amplitude, and phase of components immerse in noisy signals has been a common problem in many scientific and engineering fields such as power systems and delivery, telecommunications, and acoustics for the past decades. In magnetically confined fusion research, extracting this sort of information from magnetic signals can be of valuable assistance in, for instance, feedback control of detrimental magnetohydrodynamic modes and disruption avoidance mechanisms by monitoring instability growth or anticipating mode-locking events. This work is focused on nonlinear Kalman filter based methods for tackling this problem. Similar methods have already proven their merits and have been successfully employed in this scientific domain in applications such as amplitude demodulation for the motional Stark effect diagnostic. In the course of this work, three approaches are described, compared, and discussed using magnetic signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak plasma discharges for benchmarking purposes.

  16. Simultaneous sum-frequency and vibro-acoustography imaging for nondestructive evaluation and testing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.; Silva, G. T.; Greenleaf, J. F.; Fatemi, M. [Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Ultrasound Research Laboratory, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Instituto Nacional de Matematica Pura e Aplicada-IMPA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22460-320 (Brazil); Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Ultrasound Research Laboratory, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution ultrasound imaging systems for inspection of defects and flaws in materials are of great demand in many industries. Among these systems, Vibro-acoustography (VA) has shown excellent capabilities as a noncontact method for nondestructive high-resolution imaging applications. This method consists of mixing two confocal ultrasound beams, slightly shifted in frequency, to produce a dynamic (oscillatory) radiation force in the region of their intersection. This force vibrates the object placed at the focus of the confocal transducer. As a result of the applied force, an acoustic emission field at the difference frequency of the primary incident ultrasound beams is produced. In addition to the difference frequency acoustic emission signal, there exists another signal at the sum frequency, formed in the intersection region of the two primary beams. The goal of this study is to investigate the formation of high-resolution images using the sum frequency of ultrasound waves in VA while concurrently forming the conventional difference-frequency VA image, thereby increasing the amount of information acquired during a single scan. A theoretical model describing the sum-frequency wave propagation, including beam forming and image formation in the confocal configuration, is developed and verified experimentally. Moreover, sample experiments are performed on a flawed fiber-reinforced ceramic composite plate. Images at both the difference and sum frequencies are compared and discussed. Results show that the sum-frequency image produces a high-resolution C scan of the plate by which the flaws and structural details of the plate can be detected.

  17. Final Scientific\\/Technical Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063; Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry Kapteyn

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop experimental techniques for using coherent extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation generated using the high-order harmonic generation technique, as an illumination source for studies of high-density plasmas relevant to the stockpile stewardship mission. In this project, we made considerable progress, including the first demonstration of imaging of dynamic processes using this coherent ultrashort pulse light.

  18. High frequency active auroral research program (HAARP) imager

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cyril Lance; Robert Eather

    1993-01-01

    A low-light-level monochromatic imaging system was designed and fabricated which was optimized to detect and record optical emissions associated with high-power RF heating of the ionosphere. The instrument is capable of detecting very low intensities, of the order of 1 Rayleigh, from typical ionospheric atomic and molecular emissions. This is achieved through co-adding of ON images during heater pulses and

  19. Electrical tissue property imaging at low frequency using MREIT.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jin Keun; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-05-01

    The tomographic imaging of tissue's electrical properties (e.g., conductivity and permittivity) has been greatly improved by recent developments in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, which include MR electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) and electrical property tomography. When the biological material is subjected to an external electric field, local changes in its electrical properties become sources of magnetic field perturbations, which are detectable by the MR signals. Controlling the external excitation and measuring the responses using an MRI scanner, we can formulate the imaging problem as an inverse problem in which unknown tissue properties are recovered from the acquired MR signals. This inverse problem is nonlinear; it involves the incorporation of Maxwell's equations and Bloch equations during data acquisition. Each method for visualizing internal conductivity and permittivity distributions has its own methodological limitations, and is restricted to imaging only a part of the ensemble or mean tissue structures or states. Therefore, imaging methods can be improved by developing complementary methods that can employ the beneficial aspects of various existing techniques. This paper focuses on recent progress in MREIT and discusses its distinct features in comparison with other imaging methods. PMID:24759274

  20. High frequency ultrasonic imaging of skin: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Dines, K A; Sheets, P W; Brink, J A; Hanke, C W; Condra, K A; Clendenon, J L; Goss, S A; Smith, D J; Franklin, T D

    1984-10-01

    Experimental results are presented demonstrating the application of pulse echo ultrasound to imaging the skin. A laboratory prototype B-mode mechanical scanner was employed to obtain images of human skin, both in vitro and in vivo, using broadband pulsed ultrasound at 25 MHz. Images were formed by processing digitized A-mode waveforms and displaying the resulting two-dimensional cross sections using a digital imaging system. Images obtained by rectifying the A-modes are compared to those derived using a software-based cross-correlation technique. Scans of test targets demonstrate that an axial resolution of 100 m can be achieved at 25 MHz when the digital correlation method is employed. Lateral resolution is limited by the 0.25 mm half-power focal beamwidth of the transducer. Seventeen in vitro ultrasonic scans of human skin were compared to frozen section histology. Average skin depth was well correlated between the two techniques ( = 0.99, p less than 0.001). Application of cross-correlated processing to 25 MHz in vivo images produced good delineation of epidermis, papillary, and reticular dermis. Conversion to a 50 MHz transducer did not delineate skin layers as well as the 25 MHz transducer due to inherent difficulties with transducer reverberations. PMID:6399171

  1. Multiple image storage and frequency conversion in a cold atomic ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Wu, Jing-Hui; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-05-01

    The strong demand for quantum memory, a key building block of quantum network, has inspired new methodologies and led to experimental progress for quantum storage. The use of quantum memory for spatial multimode or image storage could dramatically increase the channel bit rate. Furthermore, quantum memory that can store multiple optical modes would lead to higher efficiencies in quantum communication and computation. Here, by using resonant tripod electromagnetically induced transparency in a cold atomic ensemble, we experimentally demonstrate the storage of two probes with different frequencies and images in the frequency domain. In addition, by using different read light, we realize the frequency conversion of retrieved images with high efficiency. Besides, our method may be used to create a superposition of the images by realizing the function of a beam splitter. All advantages make our method useful in many fields, including quantum information, detection, imaging, sensing, and so on.

  2. Multi-frequency static imaging in electrical impedance tomography: Part 1 instrumentation requirements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. Riu; J. Rosell; A. Lozano; R. Pallà-Areny

    1995-01-01

    Static images of the human body using electrical impedance tomography techniques can be obtained by measuring at two or more\\u000a different frequencies. The frequencies used depend on the application, and their selection depends on the frequency behaviour\\u000a of the impedance for the target tissue. An analysis using available data and theoretical models for tissue impedance yields\\u000a the expected impedance and

  3. High frequency piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers for imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q. F.; Shung, K. K.; Zhang, Q.; Djuth, F. T.

    2006-05-01

    Methods for fabricating high frequency ultrasound transducer and array based on piezoelectric films and MEMS technology are presented in this paper. Piezoelectric PZT films up to 30 ?m-thick deposited on silicon substrate have been prepared by a modified sol-gel process. The raw materials included lead acetate trihydrate and zirconium n-propoxide and titanate isoproxide. The sol-gel PZT solutions were prepared using above materials and 2-methoxyethanol as the solvent. Spin-coated films were annealed at 750 °C by a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process. Thicker PZT films were fabricated by repeating this process and using a modified PZT composite solution. The high frequency single element transducers actuated by the PZT films were fabricated and pulse-echo measurement results show the transducers had a broad bandwidth and high central frequencies. The beam profile of one 103 MHz transducer was measured using a 8 ?m diameter wire and a lateral resolution of 33 ?m was observed. A micromachined process to fabricate high frequency linear array will be also presented.

  4. Combined photoacoustic and high-frequency power Doppler ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Harrison, Tyler; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka; Zemp, Roger J.

    2010-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising technique for visualizing optically absorbing structures with ultrasonic spatial resolution. Since it relies on optical absorption of tissues, photoacoustic imaging is particularly sensitive to vascular structures even at the micro-scale. Power Doppler ultrasound can be used to detect moving blood irrespective of Doppler angles. However, the sensitivity may be inadequate to detect very small vessels with slow flow velocities. In this work, we merge these two synergistic modalities and compare power Doppler ultrasound images with high-contrast photoacoustic images. We would like to understand the advantages and disadvantages of each technique for assessing microvascular density, an important indicator of disease status. A combined photoacoustic and highfrequency ultrasound system has been developed. The system uses a swept-scan 25 MHz ultrasound transducer with confocal dark-field laser illumination optics. A pulse-sequencer enables ultrasonic and laser pulses to be interlaced so that photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound images are co-registered. Experiments have been performed on flow phantoms to test the capability of our system and signal processing methods. Work in progress includes in vivo color flow mapping. This combined system will be used to perform blood oxygen saturation and flow estimations, which will provide us with the parameters to estimate the local rate of metabolic oxygen consumption, an important indicator for many diseases.

  5. Image blurring and deblurring using two biased photorefractive crystals in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Ma, Chong; Sun, Zhixu; Xu, Tao; Li, Jianwei; Xu, Nan; Wang, Jinjin; Song, Feng; Sheng, Chuanxiang; Sun, Ming; Li, Li

    2014-11-01

    In an imaging system based on a coherent source of moderate power density, images can be blurred when a biased photorefractive crystal is applied at the focal point of the imaging lens. In the frequency domain of the original images, the intensity patterns are diffracted through the photorefractive crystal with varied bias voltage. The high intensity region, which is usually the center or low frequency region of the intensity patterns, is more readily focused or defocused, resulting in blurred images in perception. Such blurred images could not be simply recovered by defocusing methods, which can only indistinguishably focus or defocus the whole intensity patterns. However, the blurred images may be deblurred to certain extent for recovery if a second photorefractive crystal with bias voltage is employed at the focal point of a tandem imaging system. The mechanism of deblurring is similar to that of blurring: the blurred images are transferred through the frequency domain again using an imaging lens, where the second biased photorefractive crystal diffracts the intensity patterns to revert the sensitive region where previously gets focused or defocused. In this work, theoretical analyses are presented in detail to explain the blurring-deblurring mechanism using two biased photorefractive crystals and compatible experimental results are obtained and illustrated. Considering the blurring and deblurring function subgroups of the experiment setup can be potentially developed into encryption and decryption units compatible with far field propagation, the technology presented herein may be promising to find applications in secure laser-based free-space communication systems.

  6. New instantaneous frequency estimation method based on the use of image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borda, Monica; Nafornita, Ioan; Isar, Alexandru

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new method for the estimation of the instantaneous frequency of a frequency modulated signal, corrupted by additive noise. This method represents an example of fusion of two theories: the time-frequency representations and the mathematical morphology. Any time-frequency representation of a useful signal is concentrated around its instantaneous frequency law and realizes the diffusion of the noise that perturbs the useful signal in the time - frequency plane. In this paper a new time-frequency representation, useful for the estimation of the instantaneous frequency, is proposed. This time-frequency representation is the product of two others time-frequency representations: the Wigner - Ville time-frequency representation and a new one obtained by filtering with a hard thresholding filter the Gabor representation of the signal to be processed. Using the image of this new time-frequency representation the instantaneous frequency of the useful signal can be extracted with the aid of some mathematical morphology operators: the conversion in binary form, the dilation and the skeleton. The simulations of the proposed method have proved its qualities. It is better than other estimation methods, like those based on the use of adaptive notch filters.

  7. High-Frequency EM Characterization of Through-Wall Building Imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul C. Chang; Robert J. Burkholder; John L. Volakis; Ronald J. Marhefka; Yakup Bayram

    2009-01-01

    A high-frequency asymptotic technique based on the Uniform Geometric Theory of Diffraction (UTD) is employed for building interior imaging. The analysis is implemented using a ray-tracing technique to account for multiple scattering interactions in a building, along with a set of heuristic diffraction coefficients for dielectric wedges and corners. Imaging of the synthetic aperture radar data is carried out by

  8. Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Neocortical Spatiotemporal Dynamics to Afferent Activation Frequency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diego Contreras; Rodolfo Llinas

    2001-01-01

    The spatial and temporal patterns of neocortex activation are determined not only by the dynamic character of the input but also by the intrinsic dynamics of the cortical circuitry. To study the role of afferent input frequency on cortical activation dy- namics, the electrical activity of in vitro neocortex slices was imaged during white-matter electrical stimulation. High-speed optical imaging was

  9. SEGMENTATION OF ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC IMAGES BASED ON STATISTICAL MODELLING OF THE RADIO-FREQUENCY SIGNAL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Bernard; Denis Friboulet; INSA Blaise Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This work presents an algorithm for segmentation of ultrasound images based on the statistics of the ra dio- frequency (RF) signal. We first show that the Gener alized Gaussian distribution can reliably model both fully (blood pool) and partially (tissue area) developed speckle in echocardiographic RF images. We then show that this probability density function (pdf) may be used in

  10. Effect of radar frequency on waterline mapping from airborne SAR image in the intertidal zone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Duk-jin Kim; Sang-Eun Park; Wooil M. Moon; Hyo-Sung Lee

    2005-01-01

    Discrepancy of waterline extracted from L- and P-band airborne SAR images was investigated in the intertidal zone through the field measurements and theory of SAR imaging mechanism. In the intertidal zone which has low slope, the Bragg waves resonant with each radar frequency can reside in different depth of surf zone, resulting in the boundary between water and land can

  11. Transmit beamforming for optimal second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Hoilund-Kaupang, Halvard; Masoy, Svein-Erik

    2011-08-01

    A simulation study of transmit ultrasound beams from several transducer configurations is conducted to compare second-harmonic imaging at 3.5 MHz and 11 MHz. Second- harmonic generation and the ability to suppress near field echoes are compared. Each transducer configuration is defined by a chosen f-number and focal depth, and the transmit pressure is estimated to not exceed a mechanical index of 1.2. The medium resembles homogeneous muscle tissue with nonlinear elasticity and power-law attenuation. To improve computational efficiency, the KZK equation is utilized, and all transducers are circular-symmetric. Previous literature shows that second-harmonic generation is proportional to the square of the transmit pressure, and that transducer configurations with different transmit frequencies, but equal aperture and focal depth in terms of wavelengths, generate identical second-harmonic fields in terms of shape. Results verify this for a medium with attenuation f1. For attenuation f1.1, deviations are found, and the high frequency subsequently performs worse than the low frequency. The results suggest that high frequencies are less able to suppress near-field echoes in the presence of a heterogeneous body wall than low frequencies. PMID:21859575

  12. Contrast Imaging in Mouse Embryos Using High-frequency Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Denbeigh, Janet M; Nixon, Brian A; Puri, Mira C; Foster, F Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast-enhanced imaging can convey essential quantitative information regarding tissue vascularity and perfusion and, in targeted applications, facilitate the detection and measure of vascular biomarkers at the molecular level. Within the mouse embryo, this noninvasive technique may be used to uncover basic mechanisms underlying vascular development in the early mouse circulatory system and in genetic models of cardiovascular disease. The mouse embryo also presents as an excellent model for studying the adhesion of microbubbles to angiogenic targets (including vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) or ?v?3) and for assessing the quantitative nature of molecular ultrasound. We therefore developed a method to introduce ultrasound contrast agents into the vasculature of living, isolated embryos. This allows freedom in terms of injection control and positioning, reproducibility of the imaging plane without obstruction and motion, and simplified image analysis and quantification. Late gestational stage (embryonic day (E)16.6 and E17.5) murine embryos were isolated from the uterus, gently exteriorized from the yolk sac and microbubble contrast agents were injected into veins accessible on the chorionic surface of the placental disc. Nonlinear contrast ultrasound imaging was then employed to collect a number of basic perfusion parameters (peak enhancement, wash-in rate and time to peak) and quantify targeted microbubble binding in an endoglin mouse model. We show the successful circulation of microbubbles within living embryos and the utility of this approach in characterizing embryonic vasculature and microbubble behavior. PMID:25867243

  13. High Frequency VLBA\\/VLBI Imaging of M87

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Ly; R. C. Walker; W. Junor

    2004-01-01

    New 43 GHz VLBI observations of M87 along with previous observations at 43 GHz and one observation at 22 GHz are presented. These data allow us to image the base of the jet where many questions regarding the formation of radio jets are left unanswered. These observations occurred in 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2004. The counter-jet for M87 has

  14. Erratum: Multi-frequency intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Yu, Mingyue; Li, Jiawen; Munding, Chelsea; Chen, Zeyu; Fei, Chunlong; Shung, K; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-03-01

    When this paper was submitted for publication (T. Ma, et al) "Multifrequency intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging," IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control, vol. 62, no. 1, pp. 97-107, Jan. 2015), c-authors Jiawen Li and Chelsea E. Munding were erroneously omitted. PMID:25768827

  15. Space-frequency quantization for wavelet image coding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zixiang Xiong; Kannan Ramchandran; Michael T. Orchard

    1997-01-01

    Recently, a new class of image coding algorithms coupling standard scalar quantization offrequency coefficients with tree-structured quantization (related to spatial structures) has attractedwide attention because its good performance appears to confirm the promised efficienciesof hierarchical representation [1, 2]. This paper addresses the problem of how spatial quantizationmodes and standard scalar quantization can be applied in a jointly optimal fashion inan

  16. High Frequency Methods for Simulation of High Resolution Imaging in Terahertz Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuo; Cui, Tie Jun

    2010-03-01

    High resolution imaging in the terahertz (THz) frequency range is investigated theoretically in this paper through the use of the high frequency methods in computational electromagnetics (CEM). Physical optics (PO), shooting and bouncing ray (SBR) and truncated-wedge incremental length diffraction coefficients (TW-ILDCs) methods are combined together to compute the scattered fields, which are then used to construct the inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) images through two dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D-FFT). The corresponding ISAR images clearly show that high range and bearing resolution can be easily realized for THz carrier waves with broad bandwidth.

  17. High Frequency Electromechanical Imaging of Ferroelectrics in a Liquid Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Chu, Ying-Hao [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena is a ubiquitous feature of many information and energy storage materials and devices. In addition to involvement in performance and degradation mechanisms, electromechanical effects underpin a broad spectrum of nanoscale imaging and spectroscopies including piezoresponse force and electrochemical strain microscopies. Traditionally, these studies are conducted under ambient conditions. However, applications related to imaging energy storage and electrophysiological phenomena require operation in a liquid phase and therefore the development of electromechanical probing techniques suitable to liquid environments. Due to the relative high conductivity of most liquids and liquid decomposition at low voltages, the transfer of characterization techniques from ambient to liquid is not straightforward. Here we present a detailed study of ferroelectric domain imaging and manipulation in thin film BiFeO{sub 3} using piezoresponse force microscopy in liquid environments as model systems for electromechanical phenomena in general. We explore the use of contact resonance enhancement and the application of multifrequency excitation and detection principles to overcome the experimental problems introduced by a liquid environment. Understanding electromechanical sample characterization in liquid is a key aspect not only for ferroelectric oxides but also for biological and electrochemical sample systems.

  18. Optimal geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the global minima of water clusters (H2O)n, n=2-6, and several hexamer local minima at the CCSD(T) level of theory

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Apra, Edoardo; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-09-21

    We report the first optimum geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies for the ring pentamer and several water hexamer (prism, cage, cyclic and two book) at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. All five hexamer isomer minima previously reported by MP2 are also minima on the CCSD(T) potential energy surface (PES). In addition, all CCSD(T) minimum energy structures for the n=2-6 cluster isomers are quite close to the ones previously obtained by MP2 on the respective PESs, as confirmed by a modified Procrustes analysis that quantifies the difference between any two cluster geometries. The CCSD(T) results confirm the cooperative effect of the homodromic ring networks (systematic contraction of the nearest-neighbor (nn) intermolecular separations with cluster size) previously reported by MP2, albeit with O-O distances shorter by ~0.02 Å, indicating that MP2 overcorrects this effect. The harmonic frequencies at the minimum geometries were obtained by the double differentiation of the CCSD(T) energy using an efficient scheme based on internal coordinates that reduces the number of required single point energy evaluations by ~15% when compared to the corresponding double differentiation using Cartesian coordinates. Negligible differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) are found for the librational modes, while uniform increases of ~15 and ~25 cm-1 are observed for the bending and “free” OH harmonic frequencies. The largest differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) are observed for the harmonic hydrogen bonded frequencies. The CCSD(T) red shifts from the monomer frequencies (??) are smaller than the MP2 ones, due to the fact that the former produces shorter elongations (?R) of the respective hydrogen bonded OH lengths from the monomer value with respect to the latter. Both the MP2 and CCSD(T) results for the hydrogen bonded frequencies were found to closely follow the relation - ?? = s ? ?R, with a rate of s = 20.3 cm-1 / 0.001 Å. The CCSD(T) harmonic frequencies, when corrected using the MP2 anharmonicities obtained from second order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2), produce anharmonicCCSD(T) estimates that are within < 60 cm-1 from the measured infrared (IR) active bands of the n=2-6 clusters and furthermore trace the observed red shifts with respect to the monomer (??) quite accurately. The energetic order between the various hexamer isomers on the PES (prism has the lowest energy) previously reported at MP2 was found to be preserved at the CCSD(T) level, whereas the inclusion of anharmonic corrections further stabilizes the cage among the hexamer isomers.

  19. Distribution mapping of ciliary beat frequencies of respiratory epithelium cells using image processing.

    PubMed

    Yi, W J; Park, K S; Min, Y G; Sung, M W

    1997-11-01

    Through their rapid periodic actions, the cilia of the human respiratory tract play an important role in clearing inhaled noxious particles. An automated method is developed, based on an image-processing technique, to measure and analyse objectively and quantitatively, ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Microscopic ciliary images are transformed into digitised grey images through an image grabber inside a PC, and signals are extracted from these, based on an image-subtraction algorithm, and are processed through power spectrum analysis using a fast Fourier transform (FFT). By means of the FFT power spectrum, maximum peak frequencies are detected as CBFs in each partitioned block for the entire digitised field. Using these CBFs, distribution maps are composed in various resolutions, showing visually the spatial distribution of CBFs through cells and in a single cell. To measure CBF variations quantitatively, phenylephrine hydrochloride is used, and the changes in CBF influenced by its concentration and duration are observed. PMID:9538534

  20. High precision spectroscopy and imaging in THz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, Vladimir L.

    2014-03-01

    Application of microwave methods for development of the THz frequency range has resulted in elaboration of high precision THz spectrometers based on nonstationary effects. The spectrometers characteristics (spectral resolution and sensitivity) meet the requirements for high precision analysis. The gas analyzers, based on the high precision spectrometers, have been successfully applied for analytical investigations of gas impurities in high pure substances. These investigations can be carried out both in absorption cell and in reactor. The devices can be used for ecological monitoring, detecting the components of chemical weapons and explosive in the atmosphere. The great field of THz investigations is the medicine application. Using the THz spectrometers developed one can detect markers for some diseases in exhaled air.

  1. Laser ultrasonic propagation imaging method in the frequency domain based on wavelet transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Ciang Chia, Chen; Jin Shin, Hye; Park, Chan-Yik; Jin Yoon, Dong

    2011-01-01

    A wavelet-transformed ultrasonic propagation imaging method capable of ultrasonic propagation imaging in the frequency domain was developed and applied as a new structural damage or flaw visualization algorithm. Since the wavelet-transformed ultrasonic propagation imaging method has strong frequency selectivity, it can visualize the propagation of ultrasonic waves of a specific frequency (for example, to isolate ultrasonic mode of interest and a damage-related ultrasonic wave). The strong frequency selectivity of the wavelet-transformed ultrasonic propagation imaging method was demonstrated, isolating only the zeroth-order asymmetrical mode of the fundamental Lamb wave modes in an anisotropic carbon fiber-reinforced plastic plate with a thickness of 5 mm. The wavelet-transformed ultrasonic propagation imaging method can also convert a complex time domain multiple wavefield into a simple frequency domain single wavefield. This feature enables easy interpretation of the results, and facilitates the precise evaluation of the location and size of structural damage or flaws. We demonstrated this capability by detecting a disbond in a sandwich structure made of Al-alloy skins and a foam core. A disbond with a diameter of 20 mm, which is representative of a common manufacturing flaw, was successfully detected, localized, and evaluated. Since a method to determine the allowable maximum pulse repetition frequency depending on target materials and structures was found by investigating the residual wave caused from the previous laser impinging, our laser ultrasonic system can scan rapidly the target with an optimal pulse repetition rate. In addition, the proposed wavelet-transformed ultrasonic propagation imaging method can visualize damage or flaw without the need for reference data from the intact state of the structure. Hence, we propose the wavelet-transformed ultrasonic propagation imaging approach for automatic inspection of in-service engineering structures, or in-process quality inspection in manufacturing.

  2. High Frequency VLBA/VLBI Imaging of M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, C.; Walker, R. C.; Junor, W.

    2004-12-01

    New 43 GHz VLBI observations of M87 along with previous observations at 43 GHz and one observation at 22 GHz are presented. These data allow us to image the base of the jet where many questions regarding the formation of radio jets are left unanswered. These observations occurred in 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2004. The counter-jet for M87 has been detected from a 22 GHz observation and three epochs at 43 GHz. Moreover, at 43 GHz the edge-brightened structure is present at each epoch and a wide opening angle at the base is confirmed from an averaged image of all the epochs. Proper motion measurements at 43 GHz reveal that lower limits on the pattern speed of the jet are 0.25 to 0.40c and 0.17c for the counter-jet. Therefore, yearly-sampled epochs cannot provide accurate proper motion measurements. These results lead us to pursue more observations to make a proper movie of the jet base of M87 at 43 GHz with the VLBA. This project was conducted through the NRAO Summer Student program with partial support from the National Science Foundation.

  3. Optimal modulation frequencies for small-tissue imaging based on the equation of radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Keol; Netz, Uwe J.; Beuthan, j.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2009-02-01

    The frequency-domain experimental data is typically corrupted by noise and the measurement accuracy is compromised. Assuming the widely used shot-noise model, it is well-known that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the amplitude signal decreases with increasing frequency, whereas the SNR of phase measurement reaches a peak value in the range between 400 MHz and 800 MHz in tissue volumes typical for small animal imaging studies. As a consequence, it can be assumed that there exists an optimal frequency for which the reconstruction accuracy would be best. To determine optimal frequencies for FDOT, we investigate here the frequency dependence of optical tomographic reconstruction results using the frequency-domain equation of radiative transfer. We present numerical and experimental studies with a focus on small tissue geometries as encountered in small animal imaging and imaging of human finger joints affected by arthritis. Best results were achieved in the 400-800 MHz frequency range, depending on the particular optical properties.

  4. Generating an image of dispersive energy by frequency decomposition and slant stacking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for calculating an image of dispersive energy in the frequency-velocity (f-v) domain. The frequency decomposition is first applied to a shot gather in the offset-time domain to stretch impulsive data into pseudo-vibroseis data or frequency-swept data. Because there is a deterministic relationship between frequency and time in a sweep used in the frequency decomposition, the first step theoretically completes the transform from time to frequency. The slant stacking is then performed on the frequency-swept data to complete the transform from offset to velocity. This simple two-step algorithm generates an image of dispersive energy in the f-v domain. The straightforward transform only uses offset information of data so that this algorithm can be applied to data acquired with arbitrary geophone-acquisition geometry. Examples of synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that this algorithm generates accurate images of dispersive energy of the fundamental as well as higher modes. ?? Birkha??user Verlag, Basel, 2007.

  5. Discovery of deep and shallow trap states from step structures of rutile TiO{sub 2} vicinal surfaces by second harmonic and sum frequency generation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2011-04-21

    In this report, local electronic structures of steps and terraces on rutile TiO{sub 2} single crystal faces were studied by second harmonic and sum frequency generation (SHG/SFG) spectroscopy. We attained selective measurement of the local electronic states of the step bunches formed on the vicinal (17 18 1) and (15 13 0) surfaces using a recently developed step-selective probing technique. The electronic structures of the flat (110)-(1x1) (the terrace face of the vicinal surfaces) and (011)-(2x1) surfaces were also discussed. The SHG/SFG spectra showed that step structures are mainly responsible for the formation of trap states, since significant resonances from the trap states were observed only from the vicinal surfaces. We detected deep hole trap (DHT) states and shallow electron trap (SET) states selectively from the step bunches on the vicinal surfaces. Detailed analysis of the SHG/SFG spectra showed that the DHT and SET states are more likely to be induced at the top edges of the step bunches than on their hillsides. Unlike the SET states, the DHT states were observed only at the step bunches parallel to [1 1 1][equivalent to the step bunches formed on the (17 18 1) surface]. Photocatalytic activity for each TiO{sub 2} sample was also measured through methylene blue photodegradation reactions and was found to follow the sequence: (110) < (17 18 1) < (15 13 0) < (011), indicating that steps along [0 0 1] are more reactive than steps along [1 1 1]. This result implies that the presence of the DHT states observed from the step bunches parallel to [1 1 1] did not effectively contribute to the methylene blue photodegradation reactions.

  6. Metamaterial fibres for subdiffraction imaging and focusing at terahertz frequencies over optically long distances

    PubMed Central

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J.; Fischer, Bernd M.; Walther, Markus; Fleming, Simon C.; Argyros, Alexander; Kuhlmey, Boris T.

    2013-01-01

    Using conventional materials, the resolution of focusing and imaging devices is limited by diffraction to about half the wavelength of light, as high spatial frequencies do not propagate in isotropic materials. Wire array metamaterials, because of their extreme anisotropy, can beat this limit; however, focusing with these has only been demonstrated up to microwave frequencies and using propagation over a few wavelengths only. Here we show that the principle can be scaled to frequencies orders of magnitudes higher and to considerably longer propagation lengths. We demonstrate imaging through straight and tapered wire arrays operating in the terahertz spectrum, with unprecedented propagation of near field information over hundreds of wavelengths and focusing down to 1/28 of the wavelength with a net increase in power density. Applications could include in vivo terahertz-endoscopes with resolution compatible with imaging individual cells. PMID:24162458

  7. Metamaterial fibres for subdiffraction imaging and focusing at terahertz frequencies over optically long distances.

    PubMed

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J; Fischer, Bernd M; Walther, Markus; Fleming, Simon C; Argyros, Alexander; Kuhlmey, Boris T

    2013-01-01

    Using conventional materials, the resolution of focusing and imaging devices is limited by diffraction to about half the wavelength of light, as high spatial frequencies do not propagate in isotropic materials. Wire array metamaterials, because of their extreme anisotropy, can beat this limit; however, focusing with these has only been demonstrated up to microwave frequencies and using propagation over a few wavelengths only. Here we show that the principle can be scaled to frequencies orders of magnitudes higher and to considerably longer propagation lengths. We demonstrate imaging through straight and tapered wire arrays operating in the terahertz spectrum, with unprecedented propagation of near field information over hundreds of wavelengths and focusing down to 1/28 of the wavelength with a net increase in power density. Applications could include in vivo terahertz-endoscopes with resolution compatible with imaging individual cells. PMID:24162458

  8. An image reconstruction method from Fourier data with uncertainties on the spatial frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelio, Anastasia; Bonettini, Silvia; Prato, Marco

    2013-10-01

    In this paper the reconstruction of a two-dimensional image from a nonuniform sampling of its Fourier transform is considered, in the presence of uncertainties on the frequencies corresponding to the measured data. The problem therefore becomes a blind deconvolution, in which the unknowns are both the image to be reconstructed and the exact frequencies. The availability of information on the image and the frequencies allows to reformulate the problem as a constrained minimization of the least squares functional. A regularized solution of this optimization problem is achieved by early stopping an alternating minimization scheme. In particular, a gradient projection method is employed at each step to compute an inexact solution of the minimization subproblems. The resulting algorithm is applied on some numerical examples arising in a real-world astronomical application.

  9. Metamaterial fibres for subdiffraction imaging and focusing at terahertz frequencies over optically long distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J.; Fischer, Bernd M.; Walther, Markus; Fleming, Simon C.; Argyros, Alexander; Kuhlmey, Boris T.

    2013-10-01

    Using conventional materials, the resolution of focusing and imaging devices is limited by diffraction to about half the wavelength of light, as high spatial frequencies do not propagate in isotropic materials. Wire array metamaterials, because of their extreme anisotropy, can beat this limit; however, focusing with these has only been demonstrated up to microwave frequencies and using propagation over a few wavelengths only. Here we show that the principle can be scaled to frequencies orders of magnitudes higher and to considerably longer propagation lengths. We demonstrate imaging through straight and tapered wire arrays operating in the terahertz spectrum, with unprecedented propagation of near field information over hundreds of wavelengths and focusing down to 1/28 of the wavelength with a net increase in power density. Applications could include in vivo terahertz-endoscopes with resolution compatible with imaging individual cells.

  10. A frequency domain radar interferometric imaging (FII) technique based on high-resolution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.; Helal, D.; Crochet, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work, we propose a frequency-domain interferometric imaging (FII) technique for a better knowledge of the vertical distribution of the atmospheric scatterers detected by MST radars. This is an extension of the dual frequency-domain interferometry (FDI) technique to multiple frequencies. Its objective is to reduce the ambiguity (resulting from the use of only two adjacent frequencies), inherent with the FDI technique. Different methods, commonly used in antenna array processing, are first described within the context of application to the FII technique. These methods are the Fourier-based imaging, the Capon's and the singular value decomposition method used with the MUSIC algorithm. Some preliminary simulations and tests performed on data collected with the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar (Shigaraki, Japan) are also presented. This work is a first step in the developments of the FII technique which seems to be very promising.

  11. Two-dimensional sparse synthetic aperture radar imaging method with stepped-frequency waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Fufei; Zhang, Qun; Lou, Hao; Li, Zhi'an; Luo, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Stepped-frequency waveforms (SFWs) can use the digital signal processing method to obtain high-range resolution with relatively narrow instantaneous bandwidth, which has been used in synthetic aperture radar (SAR). However, SFWs have the disadvantages of poor antijamming capability and a long period of transmission. Also, in the coherent integration time, some echo data are frequently lost. A two-dimensional sparse imaging method in the space and frequency domains for SAR is proposed based on compressed sensing (CS) theory. A sparse SFW for SAR imaging is formed and analyzed first, which has the advantages of better antijamming capability and a shorter time period of transmission. The range compression is completed by using CS theory. As to the sparse echo data in the space domain, the imaging operator and the CS-based imaging scheme are constructed to simultaneously implement the range cell migration correction and azimuth compression. Compared with the conventional SAR imaging method of SFWs, a much smaller number of frequencies and a smaller amount of imaging data are required for SAR imaging by using the proposed method. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is proven by simulation and experimental results.

  12. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-01

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets' surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  13. High frame-rate intravascular optical frequency-domain imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han Saem; Jang, Sun-Joo; Kim, Kyunghun; Dan-Chin-Yu, Alexey V.; Shishkov, Milen; Bouma, Brett E.; Oh, Wang-Yuhl

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular optical frequency-domain imaging (OFDI), a second-generation optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology, enables imaging of the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the vessel wall following a short and nonocclusive clear liquid flush. Although 3D vascular visualization provides a greater appreciation of the vessel wall and intraluminal structures, a longitudinal imaging pitch that is several times bigger than the optical imaging resolution of the system has limited true high-resolution 3D imaging, mainly due to the slow scanning speed of previous imaging catheters. Here, we demonstrate high frame-rate intravascular OFDI in vivo, acquiring images at a rate of 350 frames per second. A custom-built, high-speed, and high-precision fiber-optic rotary junction provided uniform and high-speed beam scanning through a custom-made imaging catheter with an outer diameter of 0.87 mm. A 47-mm-long rabbit aorta was imaged in 3.7 seconds after a short contrast agent flush. The longitudinal imaging pitch was 34 ?m, comparable to the transverse imaging resolution of the system. Three-dimensional volume-rendering showed greatly enhanced visualization of tissue microstructure and stent struts relative to what is provided by conventional intravascular imaging speeds. PMID:24466489

  14. Effects of frequency and bandwidth on diagnostic information transfer in ultrasonic B-mode imaging.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Craig K; Nguyen, Nghia Q; Insana, Michael F

    2012-06-01

    Transmitted pressure pulses in ultrasonic B-mode imaging systems are commonly characterized by their center frequency and bandwidth. Both parameters are associated with tradeoffs in spatial resolution and signal-to-noise in ultrasonic system design, with no general understanding of where they are optimal when applied to specific clinical exams. We use the ideal observer and simple psychophysical studies with human observers to evaluate the efficiency of information transfer in B-mode imaging as a function of the transmitted pulse center frequency and fractional bandwidth. Our approach uses a statistical model of backscatter relevant to breast imaging, and a 2-D model of pulse propagation based on Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory. The statistics of the backscattered signal are combined in an ideal observer calculation that quantifies the task-relevant information contained in the radio-frequency (RF) signal after delay-and-sum beamforming. This is followed by a psychophysical evaluation of observer performance on B-mode envelope-detected images in three simple tasks. This experimental design allows us to track the flow of diagnostic information through RF acquisition and subsequent reading of the envelope image. In a low-contrast detection task and a high-contrast boundary discrimination task, optimal efficiency for human observers is observed at the highest center frequencies tested (15 MHz) and at moderate bandwidth (40%). For detection of scattering material in a high-contrast hypoechoic lesion, optimal efficiency was observed at lower center frequencies (5 MHz) and higher bandwidth (80%). The ideal observer analysis shows that this task dependence does not arise in the acquisition stage, where efficiency is maximized at 15 MHz with bandwidths of 60% or greater, but rather in the subsequent processing and reading of the envelope image. In addition, at higher frequencies more information is lost in the processing and reading than in the acquisition of reflected signals. PMID:22711407

  15. Three-Dimensional (3D) High-Frequency Ultrasound Images of Skin and an Eye

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kumi Kamada; Osamu Oshiro; Kunihiro Chihara; Wojciech Secomski; Andrzej Nowicki

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the three-dimensional (3D) visualization of skin and an eye using high-frequency ultrasound. A high-frequency ultrasound image has high resolution of the order of 10 mum and demonstrates the detailed internal structure of an organ. Therefore it is suitable for visualizing the structure of organs such as skin and the eye. The method of 3D visualization of skin

  16. Impulsive Environment Sound Detection by Neural Classification of Spectrogram and Mel-Frequency Coefficient Images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peerapol Khunarsa; Chidchanok Lursinsap; Thanapant Raicharoen

    \\u000a The problem of automatic detecting impulsive sounds such as human sound (screams, shout), gun shots, machine gun, thunder,\\u000a fire alarm, and car horn are useful for hearing impairment person. In this paper, instead of filtering the frequency of each\\u000a sound for identifying types of sound, the frequency of sound is transformed into a recognizable image. The transformation\\u000a is based on

  17. Dual-frequency continuous-wave terahertz transmission imaging of nonmelanoma skin cancers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cecil S. Joseph; Anna N. Yaroslavsky; Julie L. Lagraves; Thomas M. Goyette; Robert H. Giles

    2010-01-01

    Continuous wave terahertz imaging has the potential for diagnosing and delineating skin cancers. While contrast has been observed between cancerous and normal tissue at terahertz frequencies, the source mechanism behind this contrast is not clearly understood.1Transmission measurements of 240mum thick sections of nonmelanoma skin cancer were taken at two frequencies of 1.39 THz and 1.63 THz that lie within and

  18. A High-Frequency High Frame Rate Duplex Ultrasound Linear Array Imaging System for Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lequan; Xu, Xiaochen; Hu, Changhong; Sun, Lei; Yen, Jesse T.; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) ultrasound imaging has been shown to be useful for non-invasively imaging anatomical structures of the eye and small animals in biological and pharmaceutical research, achieving superior spatial resolution. Cardiovascular research utilizing mice requires not only real-time B-scan imaging, but also ultrasound Doppler to evaluate both anatomy and blood flow of the mouse heart. This paper reports the development of a high frequency ultrasound duplex imaging system capable of both B-mode imaging and Doppler flow measurements, using a 64-element linear array. The system included a HF pulsed-wave Doppler module, a 32-channel HF B-mode imaging module, a PC with a 200 MS/s 14-bit A/D card, and real-time LabView software. A 50dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and a depth of penetration of larger than 12 mm were achieved using a 35 MHz linear array with 50 ?m pitch. The two-way beam widths were determined to be 165 ?m to 260 ?m and the clutter energy to total energy ratio (CTR) were 9.1 dB to 12 dB, when the array was electronically focused at different focal points at depths from 4.8 mm to 9.6 mm. The system is capable of acquiring real-time B-mode images at a rate greater than 400 frames per second (fps) for a 4.8 × 13 mm field of view, using a 30 MHz 64-element linear array with 100 ?m pitch. Sample in vivo cardiac high frame rate images and duplex images of mouse hearts are shown to assess its current imaging capability and performance for small animals. PMID:20639149

  19. Implementation of an LED-based clinical spatial frequency domain imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhar, Amaan; Sharif, Seyed A.; Saggese, Steve; Choi, Bernard; Cuccia, David J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2012-03-01

    Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) is a non-contact imaging method that uses multiple frequency spatial illumination to generate two dimensional maps of tissue optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering) and chromophore concentrations. We present phantom validation and pilot clinical data of a deployed light-emitting diode (LED) based system. The system employs four LED wavelengths (658 nm, 730 nm, 850 nm, 970 nm) to quantitatively assess tissue health by measurement of common tissue constituents. Phantom validation results and maps of oxyhemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, water content, reduced scattering, and surface topography will be presented for pilot studies assessing burn severity and efficacy of port wine stain treatment.

  20. Multi-frequency time-reversal-based imaging for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation using full matrix capture.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chengguang; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu; Drinkwater, Bruce

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, two multi-frequency time-reversal (TR)-based imaging algorithms are explored for application to the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging of defects in solids: time reversal with multiple signal classification (TRMUSIC) and a related phase-coherent form (PC-MUSIC). These algorithms are tested with simulated and experimental ultrasonic array data acquired using the full matrix capture (FMC) process. The performance of these algorithms is quantified in terms of their spatial resolution and robustness to noise. The effect of frequency bandwidth is investigated and the results are compared with the single-frequency versions of these algorithms. It is shown that both TR-MUSIC and PCMUSIC are capable of resolving lateral targets spaced closer than the Rayleigh limit, achieving super-resolution imaging. TR-MUSIC can locate the positions of scatterers correctly, whereas the results from PC-MUSIC are less clear because of the presence of multiple peaks in the vicinity of target. However, an advantage of PC-MUSIC is that it can overcome the elongated point spread function that appears in TR-MUSIC images, and hence provide enhanced axial resolution. For high noise levels, TR-MUSIC and PC-MUSIC are shown to provide stable images and suppress the presence of artifacts seen in their single-frequency equivalents. PMID:25474781

  1. Three-dimensional ground penetrating radar imaging using multi-frequency diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J.E.; Johansson, E.M.

    1994-07-01

    In this paper we present results from a three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithm for impulse radar operating in monostatic pulse-echo mode. The application of interest to us is the nondestructive evaluation of civil structures such as bridge decks. We use a multi-frequency diffraction tomography imaging technique in which coherent backward propagations of the received reflected wavefield form a spatial image of the scattering interfaces within the region of interest. This imaging technique provides high-resolution range and azimuthal visualization of the subsurface region. We incorporate the ability to image in planarly layered conductive media and apply the algorithm to experimental data from an offset radar system in which the radar antenna is not directly coupled to the surface of the region. We present a rendering in three-dimensions of the resulting image data which provides high-detail visualization.

  2. Effect of spectral shaping on defect detection in frequency modulated thermal wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dua, Geetika; Mulaveesala, Ravibabu; Siddique, Juned A.

    2015-02-01

    This manuscript highlights a novel data processing approach for active infrared non-destructive testing and evaluation of carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP). This is accomplished by performing spectral reshaping on a captured pre-processed linear frequency modulated thermal profile over the specimen. Results obtained from the Gaussian windowed frequency modulated thermal wave imaging (GWFMTWI) clearly shows better detection capabilities with improved test resolution and sensitivity. Further multi-transform techniques have been introduced both in time and frequency in order to test subsurface defect capabilities of the proposed approach.

  3. Moving-target imaging based on space-time-frequency signal processing for SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yao; Huang, Shijun

    2013-03-01

    A method for moving-target imaging in dual-channel SAR system based on space-time-frequency signal processing is studied. In space-time domain, adaptive sliding-window processing method is applied to get high output signal to noise ratio by dual-channel clutter suppression. In time-frequency domain, modified discrete Chirp-Fourier transformation is applied to get Doppler modulation frequency parameters. Range migration is solved by Keystone transformation. Azimuth velocity accuracy is improved by phase compensation. Parameter decoupling is solved by channel phase deviation. A lot of simulation experiments verify the validity of the proposed method.

  4. Final Scientific/Technical Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063 Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henry Kapteyn

    2006-06-06

    The objective of this project was to develop experimental techniques for using coherent extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation generated using the high-order harmonic generation technique, as an illumination source for studies of high-density plasmas relevant to the stockpile stewardship mission. In this project, we made considerable progress, including the first demonstration of imaging of dynamic processes using this coherent ultrashort pulse light. This work also stimulated considerable progress in the development of the required ultrashort EUV pulses, and in the development of new laser technologies that have been commercialized. We also demonstrated the first EUV sources that exhibit full intrinsic optical coherence. This work resulted in 12 publications.

  5. DeStripe: frequency-based algorithm for removing stripe noises from AFM images

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a relatively recently developed technique that shows a promising impact in the field of structural biology and biophysics. It has been used to image the molecular surface of membrane proteins at a lateral resolution of one nanometer or less. An immediate obstacle of characterizing surface features in AFM images is stripe noise. To better interpret structures at a sub-domain level, pre-processing of AFM images for removing stripe noises is necessary. Noise removal can be performed in either spatial or frequency domain. However, denoising processing in the frequency domain is a better solution for preserving edge sharpness. Results We have developed a denoising protocol, called DeStripe, for AFM bio-molecular images that are contaminated with heavy and fine stripes. This program adopts a divide-and-conquer approach by dividing the Fourier spectrum of the image into central and off-center regions for noisy pixels detection and intensity restoration; it is also applicable to other images interfered with high-density stripes such as those acquired by the scanning electron microscope. The denoising effect brought by DeStripe provides better visualization for image objects without introducing additional artifacts into the restored image. Conclusions The DeStripe denoising effect on AFM images is illustrated in the present work. It allows extracting extended information from the topographic measurements and implicitly enhances the molecular features in the image. All the presented images were processed by DeStripe with the raw image as the only input without any requirement for other prior information. A web service, http://biodev.cea.fr/destripe, is available for running DeStripe. PMID:21281524

  6. Electrical tissue property imaging using MRI at dc and Larmor frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Joonsung; In Kwon, Oh; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Woo, Eung Je

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of conductivity and permittivity distributions inside the human body has been actively investigated in impedance imaging areas such as electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and magnetic induction tomography (MIT). Since the conductivity and permittivity values exhibit frequency-dependent changes, it is worthwhile to perform spectroscopic imaging from almost dc to hundreds of MHz. To probe the human body, we may inject current using surface electrodes or induce current using external coils. In EIT and MIT, measured data are only available on the boundary or exterior of the body unless we invasively place sensors inside the body. Their image reconstruction problems are nonlinear and ill-posed to result in images with a relatively low spatial resolution. Noting that an MRI scanner can noninvasively measure magnetic fields inside the human body, electrical tissue property imaging methods using MRI have lately been proposed. Magnetic resonance EIT (MREIT) performs conductivity imaging at dc or below 1 kHz by externally injecting current into the human body and measuring induced internal magnetic flux density data using an MRI scanner. Magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT) produces both conductivity and permittivity images at the Larmor frequency of an MRI scanner based on B1-mapping techniques. Since internal data are only available in MREIT and MREPT, we may formulate well-posed inverse problems for image reconstructions. To develop related imaging techniques, we should clearly understand the basic principles of MREIT and MREPT, which are based on coupled physics of bioelectromagnetism and MRI as well as associated mathematical methods. In this paper, we describe the physical principles of MREIT and MREPT in a unified way and associate measurable quantities with the conductivity and permittivity. Clarifying the key relations among them, we examine existing image reconstruction algorithms to reveal their capabilities and limitations. We discuss technical issues in MREIT and MREPT and suggest future research directions to improve the quality of cross-sectional images of the electrical tissue properties.

  7. Polarized light spatial frequency domain imaging for non-destructive quantification of soft tissue fibrous structures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Sharma, Manu; Hill, Michael; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of soft tissue fiber orientation is fundamental to pathophysiology and biomechanical function in a multitude of biomedical applications. However, many existing techniques for quantifying fiber structure rely on transmitted light, limiting general applicability and often requiring tissue processing. Herein, we present a novel wide-field reflectance-based imaging modality, which combines polarized light imaging (PLI) and spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) to rapidly quantify preferred fiber orientation on soft collagenous tissues. PLI utilizes the polarization dependent scattering property of fibers to determine preferred fiber orientation; SFDI imaging at high spatial frequency is introduced to reject the highly diffuse photons and to control imaging depth. As a result, photons scattered from the superficial layer of a multi-layered sample are highlighted. Thus, fiber orientation quantification can be achieved for the superficial layer with optical sectioning. We demonstrated on aortic heart valve leaflet that, at spatial frequency of f = 1mm?1, the diffuse background can be effectively rejected and the imaging depth can be limited, thus improving quantification accuracy.

  8. Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy operation by imaging at the frequency shift minimum: The dip-df mode

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Rahe, Philipp, E-mail: rahe@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    In frequency modulated non-contact atomic force microscopy, the change of the cantilever frequency (?f) is used as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Around the ?f(z) minimum, however, stable feedback operation is challenging using a standard proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback design due to the change of sign in the slope. When operated under liquid conditions, it is furthermore difficult to address the attractive interaction regime due to its often moderate peakedness. Additionally, the ?f signal level changes severely with time in this environment due to drift of the cantilever frequency f{sub 0} and, thus, requires constant adjustment. Here, we present an approach overcoming these obstacles by using the derivative of ?f with respect to z as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Rather than regulating the absolute value to a preset setpoint, the slope of the ?f with respect to z is regulated to zero. This new measurement mode not only makes the minimum of the ?f(z) curve directly accessible, but it also benefits from greatly increased operation stability due to its immunity against f{sub 0} drift. We present isosurfaces of the ?f minimum acquired on the calcite CaCO{sub 3}(101{sup ¯}4) surface in liquid environment, demonstrating the capability of our method to image in the attractive tip-sample interaction regime.

  9. Room temperature terahertz wave imaging at 60 fps by frequency up-conversion in DAST crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuzhen; Qi, Feng; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Takida, Yuma; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-02-01

    Terahertz imaging has attracted a lot of interests for more than 10 years. But real time, high sensitive, low cost THz imaging in room temperature, which is widely needed by fields such as biology, biomedicine and homeland security, has not been fully developed yet. A lot of approaches have been reported on electro-optic (E-O) imaging and THz focal plane arrays with photoconductive antenna or micro-bolometer integrated. In this paper, we report high sensitive realtime THz image at 60 frames per second (fps) employing a commercial infrared camera, using nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion technology. In this system, a flash-lamp pumped nanosecond pulse green laser is used to pump two optical parametric oscillator systems with potassium titanyl phosphate crystals (KTP-OPO). One system with dual KTP crystals is used to generate infrared laser for the pumping of THz difference frequency generation (DFG) in a 4- Dimethylamino-N-Methyl-4-Stilbazolium Tosylate (DAST) crystal. The other one is for generation of pumping laser for THz frequency up-conversion in a second DAST crystal. The THz frequency can be tuned continuously from a few THz to less than 30 THz by controlling the angle of KTP crystals. The frequency up-converted image in infrared region is recorded by a commercial infrared camera working at 60 Hz. Images and videos are presented to show the feasibility of this technique and the real-time ability. Comparison with a general micro-bolometer THz camera shows the high sensitivity of this technique.

  10. Accumulated source imaging of brain activity with both low and high-frequency neuromagnetic signals

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jing; Luo, Qian; Kotecha, Rupesh; Korman, Abraham; Zhang, Fawen; Luo, Huan; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; Rose, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of high-frequency brain signals (>70 Hz). One challenge of high-frequency signal analysis is that the size of time-frequency representation of high-frequency brain signals could be larger than 1 terabytes (TB), which is beyond the upper limits of a typical computer workstation's memory (<196 GB). The aim of the present study is to develop a new method to provide greater sensitivity in detecting high-frequency magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a single automated and versatile interface, rather than the more traditional, time-intensive visual inspection methods, which may take up to several days. To address the aim, we developed a new method, accumulated source imaging, defined as the volumetric summation of source activity over a period of time. This method analyzes signals in both low- (1~70 Hz) and high-frequency (70~200 Hz) ranges at source levels. To extract meaningful information from MEG signals at sensor space, the signals were decomposed to channel-cross-channel matrix (CxC) representing the spatiotemporal patterns of every possible sensor-pair. A new algorithm was developed and tested by calculating the optimal CxC and source location-orientation weights for volumetric source imaging, thereby minimizing multi-source interference and reducing computational cost. The new method was implemented in C/C++ and tested with MEG data recorded from clinical epilepsy patients. The results of experimental data demonstrated that accumulated source imaging could effectively summarize and visualize MEG recordings within 12.7 h by using approximately 10 GB of computer memory. In contrast to the conventional method of visually identifying multi-frequency epileptic activities that traditionally took 2–3 days and used 1–2 TB storage, the new approach can quantify epileptic abnormalities in both low- and high-frequency ranges at source levels, using much less time and computer memory. PMID:24904402

  11. Aircraft Detection from VHR Images Based on Circle-Frequency Filter and Multilevel Features

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Li, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft automatic detection from very high-resolution (VHR) images plays an important role in a wide variety of applications. This paper proposes a novel detector for aircraft detection from very high-resolution (VHR) remote sensing images. To accurately distinguish aircrafts from background, a circle-frequency filter (CF-filter) is used to extract the candidate locations of aircrafts from a large size image. A multi-level feature model is then employed to represent both local appearance and spatial layout of aircrafts by means of Robust Hue Descriptor and Histogram of Oriented Gradients. The experimental results demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method. PMID:24163637

  12. Optimal geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the global minima of water clusters (H2O)n, n = 2-6, and several hexamer local minima at the CCSD(T) level of theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Aprà, Edoardo; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-09-01

    We report the first optimum geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies for the ring pentamer and several water hexamer (prism, cage, cyclic and two book) at the coupled-cluster including single, double, and full perturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. All five examined hexamer isomer minima previously reported by Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) are also minima on the CCSD(T) potential energy surface (PES). In addition, all CCSD(T) minimum energy structures for the n = 2-6 cluster isomers are quite close to the ones previously obtained by MP2 on the respective PESs, as confirmed by a modified Procrustes analysis that quantifies the difference between any two cluster geometries. The CCSD(T) results confirm the cooperative effect of the homodromic ring networks (systematic contraction of the nearest-neighbor (nn) intermolecular separations with cluster size) previously reported by MP2, albeit with O-O distances shorter by ˜0.02 Å, indicating that MP2 overcorrects this effect. The harmonic frequencies at the minimum geometries were obtained by the double differentiation of the CCSD(T) energy using an efficient scheme based on internal coordinates that reduces the number of required single point energy evaluations by ˜15% when compared to the corresponding double differentiation using Cartesian coordinates. Negligible differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) frequencies are found for the librational modes, while uniform increases of ˜15 and ˜25 cm-1 are observed for the bending and "free" OH harmonic frequencies. The largest differences between CCSD(T) and MP2 are observed for the harmonic hydrogen bonded frequencies, for which the former produces larger absolute values than the latter. Their CCSD(T) redshifts from the monomer values (??) are smaller than the MP2 ones, due to the fact that CCSD(T) produces shorter elongations (?R) of the respective hydrogen bonded OH lengths from the monomer value with respect to MP2. Both the MP2 and CCSD(T) results for the hydrogen bonded frequencies were found to closely follow the relation -?? = s . ?R, with a rate of s = 20.2 cm-1/0.001 Å for hydrogen bonded frequencies with IR intensities >400 km/mol. The CCSD(T) harmonic frequencies, when corrected using the MP2 anharmonicities obtained from second order vibrational perturbation theory, produce anharmonic CCSD(T) estimates that are within <60 cm-1 from the measured infrared (IR) active bands of the n = 2-6 clusters. Furthermore, the CCSD(T) harmonic redshifts (with respect to the monomer) trace the measured ones quite accurately. The energetic order between the various hexamer isomers on the PES (prism has the lowest energy) previously reported at MP2 was found to be preserved at the CCSD(T) level, whereas the inclusion of anharmonic corrections further stabilizes the cage among the hexamer isomers.

  13. Imaging Defects in Thin DLC Coatings Using High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong Fei; Douglas A. Rebinsky; Pavel Zinin; Bernd Koehler

    2004-01-01

    In this work high frequency scanning acoustic microscopy was employed to nondestructively characterize subsurface defects in chromium containing DLC (Cr-DLC) coatings. Subsurface defects as small as one micron were successfully detected in a flat Cr-DLC coated steel coupon. Depth of the imaged subsurface defects was estimated using a simple geometrical acoustics model. The nature of the subsurface defects was investigated

  14. A Double-Delta Compensating Technique for Pulse-Frequency Modulation CMOS Image Sensor

    E-print Network

    Hornsey, Richard

    A Double-Delta Compensating Technique for Pulse-Frequency Modulation CMOS Image Sensor Tsung, Ontario, Canada elliott@cse.yorku.ca, hornsey@cse.yorku.ca Abstract--We design a double-delta compensating a double-delta compensating (DDC) technique in an effort to reduce the FPN and extend DR for the comparator

  15. Imaging a soil fragipans using a high-frequency MASW method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to noninvasively image a fragipan layer, a naturally occurring dense soil layer, using a high-frequency (HF) multi-channel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method. The HF-MASW is developed to measure the soil profile in terms of the shear (S) wave velocity at depths up...

  16. Frequency, Prognosis and Surgical Treatment of Structural Abnormalities Seen with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Childhood Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Anne T.; Mathern, Gary W.; Bronen, Richard A.; Fulbright, Robert K.; DiMario, Francis; Testa, Francine M.; Levy, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    The epidemiology of lesions identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with the use of pre-surgical evaluations and surgery in childhood-onset epilepsy patients has not previously been described. In a prospectively identified community-based cohort of children enrolled from 1993 to 1997, we examined (i) the frequency of lesions…

  17. High-frequency acoustic imaging with focused transducer for rapid micro echography of interfaces

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    High-frequency acoustic imaging with focused transducer for rapid micro echography of interfaces an important ultrasonic propagation velocity). As demonstrator, we use an assemblage of power modules an ultrasonic generator consisted of a piezoelectric transducer. It converts the electrical signal

  18. Imaging source process of earthquakes from back-projection of high frequency seismograms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Pulido

    2007-01-01

    Standard methodologies for calculation of the earthquakes source process, are based on inversion procedures which require the calculation of complete source-stations Greens functions. On the other hand alternative procedures have been developed in order to directly retrieve an image of the rupture process from high frequency seismograms (Spudich et. al. 1984, Kao and Shan 2004, Ishii et. al. 2005). In

  19. Optimization of real-time high-frequency ultrasound for blood flow imaging in the microcirculation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dustin E. Kruse; Jerome S. Mai; Ronald H. Silverman; Michael F. Insana; D. J. Coleman; Katherine W. Ferrara

    2001-01-01

    The first high frequency ultrasound system able to image blood flow in the microcirculation in real-time has been developed. 2D color flow frames are rapidly acquired using a recently reported method to achieve frame rates approaching 10 fps. A new flow phantom was constructed in order to tune the wall filter order, cutoff and attenuation for a 25 MHz, f\\/2

  20. Use of low frequencies for sub-basalt imaging Anton Ziolkowski,1

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    are covered by Cenozoic flood basalts. These basalts are highly heterogeneous, and have many differentUse of low frequencies for sub-basalt imaging Anton Ziolkowski,1 * Peter Hanssen,2 Robert Gatliff,2 margins are covered by large areas of basalts. These basalts are often extremely heterogeneous and scatter

  1. Imaging of rock fractures with low-frequency ultrasonic reflection/diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, S.D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Hand, M.K. [Radian International LLC, Denver, CO (United States)

    1998-12-01

    This paper documents the development of a method for imaging millimeter-scale fractures in rock with low-frequency ultrasound and seismic algorithms developed originally for kilometer-scale geologic structures. Low-frequency ultrasonic reflection/diffraction imaging provides detailed images of an impedance contrast in terms of two-way travel time from the surface to the fracture, which produces a geometrically distorted representation. Several seismic methods were used to sharpen the images, including migration, which greatly enhances horizontal resolution and inverts the image from the travel time domain back into the depth domain. The resulting images allow quantitative analysis of the geometry and location of the fracture. Computer-based parametric modeling indicates that velocity changes as small as 5% of the rock matrix velocity can be resolved, and fracture length and thickness less than 1 mm can be resolved. Laboratory-scale tests were run on a cast rock-like block with a known flaw (150-mm disk sandwich of oil-separated polyethylene, total thickness 1.5 mm). The processed data allowed quantification of the known flaw as well as revealing a sub-millimeter-thick crack that was created during construction of the block. As a final test, the method successfully imaged the failure crack in a rock beam under static loading.

  2. Stepped-frequency continuous-wave microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Hao, E-mail: haonan@stanford.edu; Arbabian, Amin [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-06-02

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic (TA) imaging combines the dielectric contrast of microwave imaging with the resolution of ultrasound imaging. Prior studies have only focused on time-domain techniques with short but powerful microwave pulses that require a peak output power in excess of several kilowatts to achieve sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This poses safety concerns as well as to render the imager expensive and bulky with requiring a large vacuum radio frequency source. Here, we propose and demonstrate a coherent stepped-frequency continuous-wave (SFCW) technique for TA imaging which enables substantial improvements in SNR and consequently a reduction in peak power requirements for the imager. Constructive and destructive interferences between TA signals are observed and explained. Full coherency across microwave and acoustic domains, in the thermo-elastic response, is experimentally verified and this enables demonstration of coherent SFCW microwave-induced TA imaging. Compared to the pulsed technique, an improvement of 17?dB in SNR is demonstrated.

  3. Simultaneous dual-wavelength photoacoustic radar imaging using waveform engineering with mismatched frequency modulated excitation.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Bahman; Sean Choi, Sung Soo; Khosroshahi, Mohammad E; Dovlo, Edem; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The spectroscopic imaging capability of photoacoustics (PA) without the depth limitations of optical methods offers a major advantage in preclinical and clinical applications. Consecutive PA measurements with properly chosen wavelengths allow composition related information about blood or tissue. In this work, we propose and experimentally introduce modulation waveform engineering through the use of mismatched (uncorrelated or weakly correlated) linear frequency modulated signals for PA characterization and imaging. The feasibility of the method was tested on oxygen saturated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin in vitro in a blood circulating rig. The method was also employed for in vivo imaging of a neck carcinoma tumor grown in a mouse thigh. The proposed method can increase the accuracy and speed of functional imaging by simultaneous PA probing with two wavelengths using portable laser-diode based PA imaging systems. PMID:25831278

  4. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging of Nanocomposites via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lillehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope methodology, called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), has been developed. The method employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope engages the sample top surface. The cantilever is driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave at the sample surface generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create amplitude and phase-generated images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features. RDF-AFUM phase images of LaRC-CP2 polyimide polymer containing embedded nanostructures are presented. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of a 12.7 micrometer thick film of LaRC-CP2 containing a monolayer of gold nanoparticles embedded 7 micrometers below the specimen surface reveals the occurrence of contiguous amorphous and crystalline phases within the bulk of the polymer and a preferential growth of the crystalline phase in the vicinity of the gold nanoparticles. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of LaRC-CP2 film containing randomly dispersed carbon nanotubes reveals the growth of an interphase region at certain nanotube-polymer interfaces.

  5. Imaging weak zones in the foundation using frequency domain attenuation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, V. R.; Jha, P. C.; Chandrasekhar, E.; Babu, B. Butchi; Sivaram, Y. V.; Sandeep, N.

    2013-10-01

    Cross-hole imaging method using Time Domain (TD) and Frequency Domain (FD) parts of cross-hole radar tomography data acquired using Step Frequency Ground Penetrating Radar (SFGPR) was implemented. This method was adopted for imaging foundation of a dam to check if the foundation was free of geological weak zones. The dam site is characterised by massive and jointed-phyllites associated with major and minor shears. The cross-hole radar tomography data was acquired in the frequency bandwidth of 250 MHz, from the deepest level gallery up to a depth of 40 m in the foundation. In TD, first arrival time and amplitudes of radio waves were inverted using Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT) resulting in velocity and attenuation tomograms. The tomograms showed nearly uniform velocity or attenuation structure in the respective tomographic plane. Subsequently, cross-hole radar tomography data was analysed in FD for a variation of spectrum-amplitude at different frequencies. Amplitudes picked at each single frequency were then inverted using SIRT for obtaining frequency domain attenuation tomogram (FDAT). The FDAT clearly showed presence of anomalous high attenuation zones in the depth range of 23-33 m of the tomographic plane. The anomalous zones in the attenuation tomogram are weak zones in the foundation. To validate the above observations, cross-hole seismic tomography was also done in the same boreholes. Cross-hole seismic tomography results showed low velocity (p-wave) zones around the same location corresponding to the high attenuation zone in FDAT, bringing the dormant weak zone to light. This enabled fine-tuning of the reinforcement design and strengthening the weak zone. This paper discusses the cross-hole radar tomography imaging method, the results of its application in imaging weak zones in the foundation and the comparison of cross-hole radar tomography results (in TD and FD) with the cross-hole seismic tomography results.

  6. High speed 3D endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging probe for lung cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-06-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 ?m and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm. We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  7. Comparison of ultrasound temperature imaging with infrared thermometry during radio frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaonan; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Li, Qiang; Wu, Shuicai; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Liu, Hao-Li; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2014-04-01

    Radio frequency ablation (RFA) is a widely used alternative modality in the treatment of tumors. During RFA, temperature monitoring is essential to ensure accurate and appropriate thermal dosage. Ultrasound temperature imaging based on the detection of echo time-shift has been demonstrated to have good ability to monitor the temperature distribution. However, no study has proven that the region of ultrasound temperature imaging can correspond well to the practical temperature distribution in the tissue. In this study, we aim to combine ultrasound and infrared systems to clarify the correlation between ultrasound temperature imaging and the practical temperature distribution in a tissue. Five porcine livers (n = 5) were ablated using an RFA system and monitored with an ultrasound system to acquire raw backscattered data for temperature imaging. Meanwhile, an infrared imaging system was used to obtain the practical temperature map of the tissue. The results showed that the temperature distribution detected by ultrasound echo time-shift agreed with those obtained from the infrared image. When the tissue temperature was higher than 45 °C, ultrasound temperature imaging is difficult to describe the behavior of the heat transfer in a homogeneous medium. In this study, we used the experimental setup based on combining ultrasound and infrared systems to confirm the reliability and limitations of ultrasound temperature imaging in RFA monitoring. Such an experimental design may be considered as an indispensable platform for the development and optimization of ultrasound temperature imaging techniques in RFA monitoring.

  8. On the validation of seismic imaging methods: Finite frequency or ray theory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, Monica; Larmat, Carene; Porritt, Robert W.; Higdon, David M.; Rowe, Charlotte A.; Allen, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the merits of the more recently developed finite-frequency approach to tomography against the more traditional and approximate ray theoretical approach for state of the art seismic models developed for western North America. To this end, we employ the spectral element method to assess the agreement between observations on real data and measurements made on synthetic seismograms predicted by the models under consideration. We check for phase delay agreement as well as waveform cross-correlation values. Based on statistical analyses on S wave phase delay measurements, finite frequency shows an improvement over ray theory. Random sampling using cross-correlation values identifies regions where synthetic seismograms computed with ray theory and finite-frequency models differ the most. Our study suggests that finite-frequency approaches to seismic imaging exhibit measurable improvement for pronounced low-velocity anomalies such as mantle plumes.

  9. Modifying the size distribution of microbubble contrast agents for high-frequency subharmonic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Rychak, Joshua J.; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Subharmonic imaging is of interest for high frequency (>10 MHz) nonlinear imaging, because it can specifically detect the response of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). However, conventional UCA produce a weak subharmonic response at high frequencies, which limits the sensitivity of subharmonic imaging. We hypothesized that modifying the size distribution of the agent can enhance its high-frequency subharmonic response. The overall goal of this study was to investigate size-manipulated populations of the agent to determine the range of sizes that produce the strongest subharmonic response at high frequencies (in this case, 20 MHz). A secondary goal was to assess whether the number or the volume-weighted size distribution better represents the efficacy of the agent for high-frequency subharmonic imaging. Methods: The authors created six distinct agent size distributions from the native distribution of a commercially available UCA (Targestar-P®). The median (number-weighted) diameter of the native agent was 1.63 ?m, while the median diameters of the size-manipulated populations ranged from 1.35 to 2.99 ?m. The authors conducted acoustic measurements with native and size-manipulated agent populations to assess their subharmonic response to 20 MHz excitation (pulse duration 1.5 ?s, pressure amplitudes 100–398 kPa). Results: The results showed a considerable difference between the subharmonic response of the agent populations that were investigated. The subharmonic response peaked for the agent population with a median diameter of 2.15 ?m, which demonstrated a subharmonic signal that was 8 dB higher than the native agent. Comparing the subharmonic response of different UCA populations indicated that microbubbles with diameters between 1.3 and 3 ?m are the dominant contributors to the subharmonic response at 20 MHz. Additionally, a better correlation was observed between the subharmonic response of the agent and the number-weighted size-distribution (R2 = 0.98) than with the volume-weighted size distribution (R2 = 0.53). Conclusions: Modifying the size distribution of the agent appears to be a viable strategy to improve the sensitivity of high-frequency subharmonic imaging. In addition, when the size distribution of the UCA has not been suitably modified, the number-weighted size distribution is a useful parameter to accurately describe the efficacy of the agent for high-frequency subharmonic imaging. PMID:23927358

  10. Multi-parametric monitoring and assessment of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) boiling by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): an ex vivo feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-03-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and change in relative phase shift during high energy HIFU treatment with tissue boiling. Forty three (n = 43) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 28). Two-dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10 s, 20 s and 30 s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11 W, which were selected and verified as treatment parameters capable of inducing boiling using both thermocouple and passive cavitation detection (PCD) measurements. Although a steady decrease in the displacement, compressive strain, and relative change in the focal phase shift (??) were obtained in numerous cases, indicating an overall increase in relative stiffness, the study outcomes also showed that during boiling, a reverse lesion-to-background displacement contrast was detected, indicating potential change in tissue absorption, geometrical change and/or, mechanical gelatification or pulverization. Following treatment, corresponding 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions also mapped consistent discrepancy in the lesion-to-background displacement contrast. Despite the expectedly chaotic changes in acoustic properties with boiling, the relative change in phase shift showed a consistent decrease, indicating its robustness to monitor biomechanical properties independent of the acoustic property changes throughout the HIFU treatment. In addition, the 2D HMI displacement images confirmed and indicated the increase in the thermal lesion size with treatment duration, which was validated against pathology. In conclusion, multi-parametric HMIFU was shown capable of monitoring and mapping tissue viscoelastic response changes during and after HIFU boiling, some of which were independent of the acoustic parameter changes. PMID:24556974

  11. Multi-parametric monitoring and assessment of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) boiling by Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU): An ex vivo feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and change in relative phase-shift during high energy HIFU treatment with tissue boiling. Forty three (n=43) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n=28). Two dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10-s, 20-s and 30-s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11W, which were selected and verified as treatment parameters capable of inducing boiling using both thermocouple and Passive Cavitation Detection (PCD) measurements. Although a steady decrease in the displacement, compressive strain, and relative change in the focal phase shift (??) were obtained in numerous cases, indicating an overall increase in relative stiffness, the study outcomes also showed that during boiling, a reverse lesion-to-background displacement contrast was detected, indicating potential change in tissue absorption, geometrical change and/or, mechanical gelatification or pulverization. Following treatment, corresponding 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions also mapped consistent discrepancy in the lesion-to-background displacement contrast. Despite unpredictable changes in acoustic properties with boiling, the relative change in phase shift showed a consistent decrease, indicating its robustness to monitor biomechanical properties independent of the acoustic property change throughout the HIFU treatment. In addition, the 2D HMI displacement images confirmed and indicated the increase in the thermal lesion size with treatment duration, which was validated against pathology. In conclusion, multi-parametric HMIFU was shown capable of monitoring and mapping tissue viscoelastic response changes during and after HIFU boiling, some of which were independent of the acoustic parameter changes. PMID:24556974

  12. Harmonic generation at high intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.; Kulander, K.C.

    1993-06-01

    Atomic electrons subject to intense laser fields can absorb many photons, leading either to multiphoton ionization or the emission of a single, energetic photon which can be a high multiple of the laser frequency. The latter process, high-order harmonic generation, has been observed experimentally using a range of laser wavelengths and intensities over the past several years. Harmonic generation spectra have a generic form: a steep decline for the low order harmonics, followed by a plateau extending to high harmonic order, and finally an abrupt cutoff beyond which no harmonics are discernible. During the plateau the harmonic production is a very weak function of the process order. Harmonic generation is a promising source of coherent, tunable radiation in the XUV to soft X-ray range which could have a variety of scientific and possibly technological applications. Its conversion from an interesting multiphoton phenomenon to a useful laboratory radiation source requires a complete understanding of both its microscopic and macroscopic aspects. We present some recent results on the response of single atoms at intensities relevant to the short pulse experiments. The calculations employ time-dependent methods, which we briefly review in the next section. Following that we discuss the behavior of the harmonics as a function of laser intensity. Two features are notable: the slow scaling of the harmonic intensities with laser intensity, and the rapid variation in the phase of the individual harmonics with respect to harmonic order. We then give a simple empirical formula that predicts the extent of the plateau for a given ionization potential, wavelength and intensity.

  13. High-speed camera with real time processing for frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Victor; Watt, David; Faris, Gregory W.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a high-speed camera system for frequency domain imaging suitable for applications such as in vivo diffuse optical imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging. 14-bit images are acquired at 2 gigapixels per second and analyzed with real-time pipeline processing using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). Performance of the camera system has been tested both for RF-modulated laser imaging in combination with a gain-modulated image intensifier and a simpler system based upon an LED light source. System amplitude and phase noise are measured and compared against theoretical expressions in the shot noise limit presented for different frequency domain configurations. We show the camera itself is capable of shot noise limited performance for amplitude and phase in as little as 3 ms, and when used in combination with the intensifier the noise levels are nearly shot noise limited. The best phase noise in a single pixel is 0.04 degrees for a 1 s integration time. PMID:21750770

  14. Tree Image Growth Analysis Using the Instantaneous Phase and Frequency Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, Janakiramanan [ORNL; Pattichis, Marios S. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Scuderi, Louis A. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Baba, Justin S [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    We propose the use of Amplitude-Modulation Frequency-Modulation (AM-FM) methods for tree growth analysis. Tree growth is modeled using phase modulation. For adapting AM-FM methods to different images, we introduce the use of fast filterbank filter coefficient computation based on piecewise linear polynomials and radial frequency magnitude estimation using integer-based Savitzky-Golay filters for derivative estimation. For a wide range of images, a simple filterbank design with only 4 channel filters is used. Filterbank specification is based on two different methods. For each input image, the FM image is estimated using dominant component analysis. A tree growthmodel is developed to characterize and depict quarterly and half-seasonal growth of trees using instantaneous phase. Qualitative evaluation of inter- and intraring reconstruction is performed on 20 aspen images and a mixture of 12 tree images of various types. Qualitative scores indicate that the results were mostly of good to excellent quality (4.4/5.0 and 4.0/5.0 for the two databases, resp.).

  15. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process.

  16. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process. PMID:25611867

  17. Second harmonic generation and sum frequency mixing of Nd:YAlO3 laser in flux grown 7.5 mol% Nb KTP crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Y. Zhang; H. Y. Shen; G. Zhang; W. Z. Chen; W. Liu; R. R. Zeng; C. H. Huang; W. X. Lin; J. K. Liang

    2001-01-01

    KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystals doped with Nb (Nb:KTP) can not only largely blue-shift the cut-off wavelength for the type II second harmonic generation (SHG) phase matching of KTP crystals, but can also change the optimum phase matching angle of Nd:YAG 1.0642 ?m laser which has a noncritical phase matching direction

  18. Limitations on squeezing and formation of the superposition of two macroscopically distinguishable states at fundamental frequency in the process of second harmonic generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitin, S. P.; Masalov, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    The results of numerical simulations of quantum state evolution in the process of second harmonic generation (SHG) are discussed. It is shown that at a particular moment of time in the fundamental mode initially coherent state turns into a superposition of two macroscopically distinguished states. The question of whether this superposition exhibits quantum interference is analyzed.

  19. Fast frequency sweeping in resonance-tracking SPM for high-resolution AFAM and PFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enriquez-Flores, C. I.; Gervacio-Arciniega, J. J.; Cruz-Valeriano, E.; de Urquijo-Ventura, P.; Gutierrez-Salazar, B. J.; Espinoza-Beltran, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    A new resonance-tracking (RT) method using fast frequency sweeping excitation was developed for quantitative scanning probe microscopy (SPM) imaging. This method allows quantitative imaging of elastic properties and ferroelectrical domains with nanoscale resolution at high data acquisition rates. It consists of a commercial AFM system combined with a high-frequency lock-in amplifier, a programmed function generator and a fast data acquisition card. The resonance-tracking method was applied to the atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) and to the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) modes. Plots of amplitude versus time and phase versus time for resonant spectra working with different sweeping frequencies were obtained to evaluate the response speed of the lock-in amplifier. It was proved that this resonance-tracking method allows suitable spectral acquisition at a rate of about 5 ms/pixel, which is useful for SPM imaging in a practical scanning time. In order to demonstrate the system performance, images of RT-AFAM for TiN films and RT-PFM for GeTe are shown.

  20. Dynamic fluorescence anisotropy imaging microscopy in the frequency domain (rFLIM).

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Andrew H A; Hanley, Quentin S; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J; Subramaniam, Vinod; Jovin, Thomas M

    2002-01-01

    We describe a novel variant of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), denoted anisotropy-FLIM or rFLIM, which enables the wide-field measurement of the anisotropy decay of fluorophores on a pixel-by-pixel basis. We adapted existing frequency-domain FLIM technology for rFLIM by introducing linear polarizers in the excitation and emission paths. The phase delay and intensity ratios (AC and DC) between the polarized components of the fluorescence signal are recorded, leading to estimations of rotational correlation times and limiting anisotropies. Theory is developed that allows all the parameters of the hindered rotator model to be extracted from measurements carried out at a single modulation frequency. Two-dimensional image detection with a sensitive CCD camera provides wide-field imaging of dynamic depolarization with parallel interrogation of different compartments of a complex biological structure such as a cell. The concepts and technique of rFLIM are illustrated with a fluorophore-solvent (fluorescein-glycerol) system as a model for isotropic rotational dynamics and with bacteria expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) exhibiting depolarization due to homotransfer of electronic excitation energy (emFRET). The frequency-domain formalism was extended to cover the phenomenon of emFRET and yielded data consistent with a concentration depolarization mechanism resulting from the high intracellular concentration of EGFP. These investigations establish rFLIM as a powerful tool for cellular imaging based on rotational dynamics and molecular proximity. PMID:12202387

  1. Tendinopathy discrimination by use of spatial frequency parameters in ultrasound B-mode images.

    PubMed

    Bashford, G R; Tomsen, N; Arya, S; Burnfield, J M; Kulig, K

    2008-05-01

    The structural characteristics of a healthy tendon are related to the anisotropic speckle patterns observed in ultrasonic images. This speckle orientation is disrupted upon damage to the tendon structure as observed in patients with tendinopathy. Quantification of the structural appearance of tendon shows promise in creating a tool for diagnosing, prognosing, or measuring changes in tendon organization over time. The current work describes a first step taken towards this goal-classification of Achilles tendon images into tendinopathy and control categories. Eight spatial frequency parameters were extracted from regions of interest on tendon images, filtered and classified using linear discriminant analysis. Resulting algorithms had better than 80% accuracy in categorizing tendon image kernels as tendinopathy or control. Tendon images categorized wrongly provided for an interesting clinical association between incorrect classification of tendinopathy kernels as control and the symptom and clinical time history based inclusion criteria. To assess intersession reliability of image acquisition, the first 10 subjects were imaged twice during separate sessions. Test-retest of repeated measures was excellent (tau = 0.996, ICC = (2, 1) = 0.73 with one outlier) indicating a general consistency in imaging techniques. PMID:18450534

  2. Point-source localization in blurred images by a frequency-domain eigenvector-based method.

    PubMed

    Gunsay, M; Jeffs, B D

    1995-01-01

    We address the problem of resolving and localizing blurred point sources in intensity images. Telescopic star-field images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or optical aberrations are typical examples of this class of images, a new approach to image restoration is introduced, which is a generalization of 2-D sensor array processing techniques originating from the field of direction of arrival estimation (DOA). It is shown that in the frequency domain, blurred point source images can be modeled with a structure analogous to the response of linear sensor arrays to coherent signal sources. Thus, the problem may be cast into the form of DOA estimation, and eigenvector based subspace decomposition algorithms, such as MUSIC, may be adapted to search for these point sources. For deterministic point images the signal subspace is degenerate, with rank one, so rank enhancement techniques are required before MUSIC or related algorithms may be used. The presence of blur prohibits the use of existing rank enhancement methods. A generalized array smoothing method is introduced for rank enhancement in the presence of blur, and to regularize the ill posed nature of the image restoration. The new algorithm achieves inter-pixel super-resolution and is computationally efficient. Examples of star image deblurring using the algorithm are presented. PMID:18291992

  3. Compensation of motion artifacts in catheter-based optical frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ha, J. Y.; Shishkov, M.; Colice, M.; Oh, W. Y.; Yoo, H.; Liu, L.; Tearney, G. J.; Bouma, B. E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel heterodyne Doppler interferometer method for compensating motion artifacts caused by cardiac motion in intracoronary optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is demonstrated. To track the relative motion of a catheter with regard to the vessel, a motion tracking system is incorporated with a standard OFDI system by using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) techniques. Without affecting the imaging beam, dual WDM monochromatic beams are utilized for tracking the relative radial and longitudinal velocities of a catheter-based fiber probe. Our results demonstrate that tracking instantaneous velocity can be used to compensate for distortion in the images due to motion artifacts, thus leading to accurate reconstruction and volumetric measurements with catheter-based imaging. PMID:20589002

  4. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  5. Spectral discrimination of breast pathologies in situ using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nationally, 25% to 50% of patients undergoing lumpectomy for local management of breast cancer require a secondary excision because of the persistence of residual tumor. Intraoperative assessment of specimen margins by frozen-section analysis is not widely adopted in breast-conserving surgery. Here, a new approach to wide-field optical imaging of breast pathology in situ was tested to determine whether the system could accurately discriminate cancer from benign tissues before routine pathological processing. Methods Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) was used to quantify near-infrared (NIR) optical parameters at the surface of 47 lumpectomy tissue specimens. Spatial frequency and wavelength-dependent reflectance spectra were parameterized with matched simulations of light transport. Spectral images were co-registered to histopathology in adjacent, stained sections of the tissue, cut in the geometry imaged in situ. A supervised classifier and feature-selection algorithm were implemented to automate discrimination of breast pathologies and to rank the contribution of each parameter to a diagnosis. Results Spectral parameters distinguished all pathology subtypes with 82% accuracy and benign (fibrocystic disease, fibroadenoma) from malignant (DCIS, invasive cancer, and partially treated invasive cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy) pathologies with 88% accuracy, high specificity (93%), and reasonable sensitivity (79%). Although spectral absorption and scattering features were essential components of the discriminant classifier, scattering exhibited lower variance and contributed most to tissue-type separation. The scattering slope was sensitive to stromal and epithelial distributions measured with quantitative immunohistochemistry. Conclusions SFDI is a new quantitative imaging technique that renders a specific tissue-type diagnosis. Its combination of planar sampling and frequency-dependent depth sensing is clinically pragmatic and appropriate for breast surgical-margin assessment. This study is the first to apply SFDI to pathology discrimination in surgical breast tissues. It represents an important step toward imaging surgical specimens immediately ex vivo to reduce the high rate of secondary excisions associated with breast lumpectomy procedures. PMID:23915805

  6. Brain connectivity study of joint attention using frequency-domain optical imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic populations. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is being used to study brain connectivity for the first time in response to joint attention experience in normal adults. The prefrontal region of the brain was non-invasively imaged using a frequency-domain based optical imager. The imaging studies were performed on 11 normal right-handed adults and optical measurements were acquired in response to joint-attention based video clips. While the intensity-based optical data provides information about the hemodynamic response of the underlying neural process, the time-dependent phase-based optical data has the potential to explicate the directional information on the activation of the brain. Thus brain connectivity studies are performed by computing covariance/correlations between spatial units using this frequency-domain based optical measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the extent of synchrony and directional variation in the pattern of activation varies in the left and right frontal cortex. The results have significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using diffuse optical imaging tools in the future.

  7. Discrete frequency infrared microspectroscopy and imaging with a tunable quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Kole, Matthew R; Reddy, Rohith K; Schulmerich, Matthew V; Gelber, Matthew K; Bhargava, Rohit

    2012-12-01

    Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging is a well-established modality but requires the acquisition of a spectrum over a large bandwidth, even in cases where only a few spectral features may be of interest. Discrete frequency infrared (DF-IR) methods are now emerging in which a small number of measurements may provide all the analytical information needed. The DF-IR approach is enabled by the development of new sources integrating frequency selection, in particular of tunable, narrow-bandwidth sources with enough power at each wavelength to successfully make absorption measurements. Here, we describe a DF-IR imaging microscope that uses an external cavity quantum cascade laser (QCL) as a source. We present two configurations, one with an uncooled bolometer as a detector and another with a liquid nitrogen cooled mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detector and compare their performance to a commercial FT-IR imaging instrument. We examine the consequences of the coherent properties of the beam with respect to imaging and compare these observations to simulations. Additionally, we demonstrate that the use of a tunable laser source represents a distinct advantage over broadband sources when using a small aperture (narrower than the wavelength of light) to perform high-quality point mapping. The two advances highlight the potential application areas for these emerging sources in IR microscopy and imaging. PMID:23113653

  8. Three-dimensional phantoms for curvature correction in spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu T A; Le, Hanh N D; Vo, Minh; Wang, Zhaoyang; Luu, Long; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C

    2012-06-01

    The sensitivity to surface profile of non-contact optical imaging, such as spatial frequency domain imaging, may lead to incorrect measurements of optical properties and consequently erroneous extrapolation of physiological parameters of interest. Previous correction methods have focused on calibration-based, model-based, and computation-based approached. We propose an experimental method to correct the effect of surface profile on spectral images. Three-dimensional (3D) phantoms were built with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic using an accurate 3D imaging and an emergent 3D printing technique. In this study, our method was utilized for the correction of optical properties (absorption coefficient ?(a) and reduced scattering coefficient ?(s)') of objects obtained with a spatial frequency domain imaging system. The correction method was verified on three objects with simple to complex shapes. Incorrect optical properties due to surface with minimum 4 mm variation in height and 80 degree in slope were detected and improved, particularly for the absorption coefficients. The 3D phantom-based correction method is applicable for a wide range of purposes. The advantages and drawbacks of the 3D phantom-based correction methods are discussed in details. PMID:22741068

  9. Frequency-domain sensitivity analysis for small imaging domains using the equation of radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xuejun; Ren, Kui; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2007-04-01

    Optical tomography of small imaging domains holds great promise as the signal-to-noise ratio is usually high, and the achievable spatial resolution is much better than in large imaging domains. Emerging applications range from the imaging of joint diseases in human fingers to monitoring tumor growth or brain activity in small animals. In these cases, the diameter of the tissue under investigation is typically smaller than 3 cm, and the optical path length is only a few scattering mean-free paths. It is well known that under these conditions the widely applied diffusion approximation to the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) is of limited applicability. To accurately model light propagation in these small domains, the ERT has to be solved directly. We use the frequency-domain ERT to perform a sensitivity study for small imaging domains. We found optimal source-modulation frequencies for which variations in optical properties, size, and location of a tissue inhomogeneity lead to maximal changes in the amplitude and phase of the measured signal. These results will be useful in the design of experiments and optical tomographic imaging systems that probe small tissue volumes.

  10. Clinical combination of multiphoton tomography and high frequency ultrasound imaging for evaluation of skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, K.; Speicher, M.; Koehler, M. J.; Scharenberg, R.; Elsner, P.; Kaatz, M.

    2010-02-01

    For the first time, high frequency ultrasound imaging, multiphoton tomography, and dermoscopy were combined in a clinical study. Different dermatoses such as benign and malign skin cancers, connective tissue diseases, inflammatory skin diseases and autoimmune bullous skin diseases have been investigated with (i) state-of-the-art and highly sophisticated ultrasound systems for dermatology, (ii) the femtosecond-laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM and (iii) dermoscopes. Dermoscopy provides two-dimensional color imaging of the skin surface with a magnification up to 70x. Ultrasound images are generated from reflections of the emitted ultrasound signal, based on inhomogeneities of the tissue. These echoes are converted to electrical signals. Depending on the ultrasound frequency the penetration depth varies from about 1 mm to 16 mm in dermatological application. The 100-MHz-ultrasound system provided an axial resolution down to 16 ?m and a lateral resolution down to 32 ?m. In contrast to the wide-field ultrasound images, multiphoton tomography provided horizontal optical sections of 0.36×0.36 mm2 down to 200 ?m tissue depth with submicron resolution. The autofluorescence of mitochondrial coenzymes, melanin, and elastin as well as the secondharmonic- generation signal of the collagen network were imaged. The combination of ultrasound and multiphoton tomography provides a novel opportunity for diagnostics of skin disorders.

  11. Extremely High-Frequency Holographic Radar Imaging of Personnel and Mail

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Lechelt, Wayne M.

    2006-08-01

    The awareness of terrorists covertly transporting chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents into government, military, and civilian facilities to harm the occupants has increased dramatically since the attacks of 9/11. Government and civilian security personnel have a need for innovative surveillance technology that can rapidly detect these lethal agents, even when they are hidden away in sealed containers and concealed either under clothing or in hand-carried items such as mailed packages or handbags. Sensor technology that detects BW and CW agents in mail or sealed containers carried under the clothing are under development. One promising sensor technology presently under development to defeat these threats is active millimeter-wave holographic radar imaging, which can readily image concealed items behind paper, cardboard, and clothing. Feasibility imaging studies at frequencies greater than 40 GHz have been conducted to determine whether simulated biological or chemical agents concealed in mail packages or under clothing could be detected using this extremely high-frequency imaging technique. The results of this imaging study will be presented in this paper.

  12. Application of image analysis and time-frequency analysis for tracking the rotating blades vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Hsiung, Wan-Ying; Yang, Yuan-Shen; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the application of the photogrammetric approach to measuring the vibration of a research-scale wind turbine blade model (both damage and undamaged blade). In order to control the excitation (rotation of the wind turbine blade), a motor was used to spin the blades at controlled angular velocities. Two cameras are set in front of the turbine to tape the video images. Through a sequence of stereo image pairs acquired by high speed camera, the images are studied. The camera we used is the BASLER acA2000-340km (2048x1088, 340FPS). Before taking the photos camera calibration was conducted which include lens distortion and skew factor is examined. To analyze the displacement of the motion target on the turbine blade, after loading the 3D calibration, the 3D positions are calculated by using a stereo triangulation technique. Then the displacement fields by image template matching can be calculated. Application of the technique to track the 3D motion of the rotating wind turbine blade is demonstrated by using data from the research-scale wind turbine. Different from the image processing technique data from the contact sensors (accelerometers) is also used. Through Rodrigues' rotation formula to remove the rotation frequency it is easy to extract the out-of-plane motion of the blade, from which the model frequency of the blade can be identified.

  13. Wideband linear power amplifier for high-frequency ultrasonic coded excitation imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyoung; Hu, Changhong; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-04-01

    Linear power amplifiers are critical components in ultrasonic imaging systems that implement chirp-coded excitation. Bench-top commercial power amplifiers are usually used in academic laboratories for high-frequency ultrasound imaging, and the imaging performance depends greatly on these general-purpose instruments. To achieve a wide dynamic range, a power amplifier consisting of two stages is developed for chirp-coded ultrasound imaging applications through the implementation of custom-designed broadband 1:1 transformers and the optimization of feedback circuits. The amplifier has broad bandwidth (5 to 135 MHz), maintaining a linearity up to the 1-dB gain compression point (P1dB) of 41.5 dBm, allowing 16 dBm input power level at 60 MHz. The mean and the maximum values of output third-order intercept points (OIP3) are 51.8 and 53.5 dBm, respectively, between 20 and 110 MHz. With 12 dBm input power, the gain of the amplifier varies between 24 and 29 dB, offering a uniformity which would allow excitation of a 70-MHz single-element transducer with windowed chirp-coded bursts sweeping from 40 to 100 MHz. The performance in high-frequency ultrasound imaging is evaluated with a wire phantom. Echo signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR) of the designed amplifier is 7 dB better than a commercial amplifier, and spatial resolution is maintained. PMID:22547294

  14. Three-dimensional phantoms for curvature correction in spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu T. A.; Le, Hanh N. D.; Vo, Minh; Wang, Zhaoyang; Luu, Long; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity to surface profile of non-contact optical imaging, such as spatial frequency domain imaging, may lead to incorrect measurements of optical properties and consequently erroneous extrapolation of physiological parameters of interest. Previous correction methods have focused on calibration-based, model-based, and computation-based approached. We propose an experimental method to correct the effect of surface profile on spectral images. Three-dimensional (3D) phantoms were built with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic using an accurate 3D imaging and an emergent 3D printing technique. In this study, our method was utilized for the correction of optical properties (absorption coefficient ?a and reduced scattering coefficient ?s?) of objects obtained with a spatial frequency domain imaging system. The correction method was verified on three objects with simple to complex shapes. Incorrect optical properties due to surface with minimum 4 mm variation in height and 80 degree in slope were detected and improved, particularly for the absorption coefficients. The 3D phantom-based correction method is applicable for a wide range of purposes. The advantages and drawbacks of the 3D phantom-based correction methods are discussed in details. PMID:22741068

  15. Generalized frequency-domain synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic imaging of irregularly layered objects.

    PubMed

    Qin, Kaihuai; Yang, Chun; Sun, Feng

    2014-01-01

    In ultrasonic nondestructive testing (NDT), the phase shift migration (PSM) technique, as a frequency-domain implementation of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), can be adopted for imaging of regularly layered objects that are inhomogeneous only in depth but isotropic and homogeneous in the lateral direction. To deal with irregularly layered objects that are anisotropic and inhomogeneous in both the depth and lateral directions, a generalized frequency- domain SAFT, called generalized phase shift migration (GPSM), is proposed in this paper. Compared with PSM, the most significant innovation of GPSM is that the phase shift factor is generalized to handle anisotropic media with lateral velocity variations. The generalization is accomplished by computer programming techniques without modifying the PSM model. In addition, SRFFT (split-radix fast Fourier transform) input/output pruning algorithms are developed and employed in the GPSM algorithm to speed up the image reconstructions. The experiments show that the proposed imaging techniques are capable of reconstructing accurate shapes and interfaces of irregularly layered objects. The computing time of the GPSM algorithm is much less than the time-domain SAFT combined with the ray-tracing technique, which is, at present, the common method used in ultrasonic NDT industry for imaging layered objects. Furthermore, imaging regularly layered objects can be regarded as a special case of the presented technique. PMID:24402900

  16. Development and Testing of a Single Frequency Terahertz Imaging System for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    St. Peter, Benjamin; Yngvesson, Sigfrid; Siqueira, Paul; Kelly, Patrick; Khan, Ashraf; Glick, Stephen; Karellas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The ability to discern malignant from benign tissue in excised human breast specimens in Breast Conservation Surgery (BCS) was evaluated using single frequency terahertz radiation. Terahertz (THz) images of the specimens in reflection mode were obtained by employing a gas laser source and mechanical scanning. The images were correlated with optical histological micrographs of the same specimens, and a mean discrimination of 73% was found for five out of six samples using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. The system design and characterization is discussed in detail. The initial results are encouraging but further development of the technology and clinical evaluation is needed to evaluate its feasibility in the clinical environment. PMID:25055306

  17. Improvement of quasi-monostatic frequency-swept microwave imaging of conducting objects using illumination diversity technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chao-Hsiung Tseng; Tah-Hsiung Chu

    2005-01-01

    A quasi-monostatic frequency-swept microwave imaging system using illumination diversity technique is proposed to have an efficient scattered field acquisition arrangement. The measurement system, calibration method, and experimental results are presented. The image reconstruction principle is developed under physical optics approximation. Reconstructed images of the continuous, discrete conducting objects and B-52 model aircraft measured in the frequency range 7.5-12.5 GHz are

  18. Optical Frequency Domain Imaging of Ex vivo Pulmonary Resection Specimens: Obtaining One to One Image to Histopathology Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Lida P.; Applegate, Matthew B.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Mark, Eugene J.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths1. Squamous cell and small cell cancers typically arise in association with the conducting airways, whereas adenocarcinomas are typically more peripheral in location. Lung malignancy detection early in the disease process may be difficult due to several limitations: radiological resolution, bronchoscopic limitations in evaluating tissue underlying the airway mucosa and identifying early pathologic changes, and small sample size and/or incomplete sampling in histology biopsies. High resolution imaging modalities, such as optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI), provide non-destructive, large area 3-dimensional views of tissue microstructure to depths approaching 2 mm in real time (Figure 1)2-6. OFDI has been utilized in a variety of applications, including evaluation of coronary artery atherosclerosis6,7 and esophageal intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia6,8-10. Bronchoscopic OCT/OFDI has been demonstrated as a safe in vivo imaging tool for evaluating the pulmonary airways11-23 (Animation). OCT has been assessed in pulmonary airways16,23 and parenchyma17,22 of animal models and in vivo human airway14,15. OCT imaging of normal airway has demonstrated visualization of airway layering and alveolar attachments, and evaluation of dysplastic lesions has been found useful in distinguishing grades of dysplasia in the bronchial mucosa11,12,20,21. OFDI imaging of bronchial mucosa has been demonstrated in a short bronchial segment (0.8 cm)18. Additionally, volumetric OFDI spanning multiple airway generations in swine and human pulmonary airways in vivo has been described19. Endobronchial OCT/OFDI is typically performed using thin, flexible catheters, which are compatible with standard bronchoscopic access ports. Additionally, OCT and OFDI needle-based probes have recently been developed, which may be used to image regions of the lung beyond the airway wall or pleural surface17. While OCT/OFDI has been utilized and demonstrated as feasible for in vivo pulmonary imaging, no studies with precisely matched one-to-one OFDI:histology have been performed. Therefore, specific imaging criteria for various pulmonary pathologies have yet to be developed. Histopathological counterparts obtained in vivo consist of only small biopsy fragments, which are difficult to correlate with large OFDI datasets. Additionally, they do not provide the comprehensive histology needed for registration with large volume OFDI. As a result, specific imaging features of pulmonary pathology cannot be developed in the in vivo setting. Precisely matched, one-to-one OFDI and histology correlation is vital to accurately evaluate features seen in OFDI against histology as a gold standard in order to derive specific image interpretation criteria for pulmonary neoplasms and other pulmonary pathologies. Once specific imaging criteria have been developed and validated ex vivo with matched one-to-one histology, the criteria may then be applied to in vivo imaging studies. Here, we present a method for precise, one to one correlation between high resolution optical imaging and histology in ex vivo lung resection specimens. Throughout this manuscript, we describe the techniques used to match OFDI images to histology. However, this method is not specific to OFDI and can be used to obtain histology-registered images for any optical imaging technique. We performed airway centered OFDI with a specialized custom built bronchoscopic 2.4 French (0.8 mm diameter) catheter. Tissue samples were marked with tissue dye, visible in both OFDI and histology. Careful orientation procedures were used to precisely correlate imaging and histological sampling locations. The techniques outlined in this manuscript were used to conduct the first demonstration of volumetric OFDI with precise correlation to tissue-based diagnosis for evaluating pulmonary pathology24. This straightforward, effective technique may be extended to other tissue types to provide precise imaging to histology correlation needed to determine fine imaging features of both nor

  19. Nanoscale subsurface imaging via resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lillehei, Peter T.

    2007-06-01

    A scanning probe microscope methodology, called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), has been developed. It employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features. An analytical model is presented for assessing the RDF-AFUM phase signal resulting from near-surface variations in the sample contact stiffness and from the interaction of the bulk wave with subsurface structures. The application of the model to RDF-AFUM phase measurements of a 12.7?m thick film of LaRC™-CP2 polyimide polymer containing a monolayer of gold nanoparticles embedded 7?m below the specimen surface reveals variations in the Young modulus of the material of approximately 24% over regions roughly 10-35nm wide. The magnitude of the modulus variations suggests the occurrence of contiguous amorphous and crystalline phases within the bulk of the polymer. The RDF-AFUM micrograph indicates a preferential growth of the crystalline phase in the vicinity of the gold nanoparticles.

  20. Real-time processing for frequency domain optical imaging based on field programmable gated arrays.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongying

    2014-09-10

    Frequency domain optical imaging (OFDI) provides high resolution and sensitivity. However, the speed of the data processing program in C language limits its application. A real-time imaging system of OFDI based on field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) is proposed. It adopts a high-speed digitizer board PXI14400 from Signatec for interferometric data acquisition. The acquired data is processed in the user defined FPGA on board in real-time with a pipeline data processing algorithm. The algorithm eliminates the complex conjugate ambiguity, overcomes the swept laser source's nonlinearity in k-space, and allows the data to be processed continuously. We also provide an economic method of IQ demodulation for FPGA data processing. The design breaks through the speed bottleneck of data processing, and allows the system to process each sample point at a frequency of 200 MHz. PMID:25321669

  1. Imaging fall Chinook salmon redds in the Columbia River with a dual-frequency identification sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiffan, K.F.; Rondorf, D.W.; Skalicky, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    We tested the efficacy of a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) for imaging and enumeration of fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds in a spawning area below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. The DIDSON uses sound to form near-video-quality images and has the advantages of imaging in zero-visibility water and possessing a greater detection range and field of view than underwater video cameras. We suspected that the large size and distinct morphology of a fall Chinook salmon redd would facilitate acoustic imaging if the DIDSON was towed near the river bottom so as to cast an acoustic shadow from the tailspill over the redd pocket. We tested this idea by observing 22 different redds with an underwater video camera, spatially referencing their locations, and then navigating to them while imaging them with the DIDSON. All 22 redds were successfully imaged with the DIDSON. We subsequently conducted redd searches along transects to compare the number of redds imaged by the DIDSON with the number observed using an underwater video camera. We counted 117 redds with the DIDSON and 81 redds with the underwater video camera. Only one of the redds observed with the underwater video camera was not also documented by the DIDSON. In spite of the DIDSON's high cost, it may serve as a useful tool for enumerating fall Chinook salmon redds in conditions that are not conducive to underwater videography.

  2. System design and image processing algorithms for frequency domain optical coherence tomography in the coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Desmond C.; Xu, Chenyang; Petersen, Christopher; Schmitt, Joseph M.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the design of a frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) system, fiber optic imaging catheter, and image processing algorithms for in vivo clinical use in the human coronary arteries. This technology represents the third generation of commercially-available OCT system developed at LightLab Imaging Inc. over the last ten years, enabling three-dimensional (3D) intravascular imaging at unprecedented speeds and resolutions for a commercial system. The FD-OCT engine is designed around an exclusively licensed micro-cavity swept laser that was co-developed with AXSUN Technologies Ltd. The laser's unique combination of high sweep rates, broad tuning ranges, and narrow linewidth enable imaging at 50,000 axial lines/s with an axial resolution of < 16 ?m in tissue. The disposable 2.7 French (0.9 mm) imaging catheter provides a spot size of < 30 ?m at a working distance of 2 mm. The catheter is rotated at 100 Hz and pulled back 50 mm at 20 mm/s to conduct a high-density spiral scan in 2.5 s. Image processing algorithms have been developed to provide clinically important measurements of vessel lumen dimensions, stent malapposition, and neointimal thickness. This system has been used in over 2000 procedures since August 2007 at over 40 clinical sites, providing cardiologists with an advanced tool for 3D assessment of the coronary arteries.

  3. In-vivo and label-free imaging of cellular and tissue structures in mouse ear skin by using second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eung Jang; Kim, Boram; Ahn, Hong-Gyu; Park, Seung-Han; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Sangyoup

    2015-02-01

    A video-rate multimodal microscope, which can obtain second- and third- harmonic generation (SHG and THG) images simultaneously, is developed for investigating cellular and tissue structures in mouse ear skin. By utilizing in-vivo video-rate epi-detected SHG and THG microscopy, we successfully demonstrate that combined images of subcutaneous cellular components and peripheral nerve fibers, together with the collagen fiber, in the mouse ear pinna can be obtained without employing fluorescent probes. We also show that the flow of red blood cells and the diameter change of arteriole-like blood vessels can be visualized with femtosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 1036 nm. In particular, the epi-THG contrast images of the blood-vessel walls display clearly the difference between the arteriole-like and the venule capillary-like blood-vessel types. We should emphasize that our newly-developed microscope system has a unique feature in that it can produce simultaneous in-vivo label-free SHG and THG images in contrast to the conventional confocal and two-photon microscopes.

  4. ASYMPTOTIC HARMONIC GENERATOR DESIGN VIA MODIFICATION OF VAN DER POL OSCILLATOR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Orlov; L. T. Aguilar; L. Acho; A. Ortiz

    2007-01-01

    A well-known Van der Pol oscillator is modified to be introduced into the synthesis as an asymptotic harmonic generator of the periodic motion. The proposed modification possesses a limit cycle, producing a single harmonic as opposed to multi- harmonics of a standard harmonic oscillator. The parameters of the asymptotic harmonic generator are shown to specify damping, amplitude, and frequency of

  5. Distinction between some saccharides in scattered optical sum frequency intensity images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, G.; Koyama, T.; Tomizawa, S.; Sano, H.

    2005-12-01

    Using an optical sum frequency (SF) microscope with visible and infrared light pulses for excitation, we have attempted to distinguish among four saccharide species. The saccharides we studied were D-glucose, amylopectin, ?-cyclodextrin, and amylose. The wavelength of the infrared light was resonant to CH vibration. Amylose showed very weak sum frequency scattering for CH vibration among the four saccharides. As for the other three saccharides, we found a big difference in the sum frequency spectra of their CH stretching vibration near 2900 cm -1, when the incident visible and infrared light pulses were p- and s-polarized, respectively. Based on these facts, we have demonstrated a distinction between these three saccharides in the scattered SF intensity images.

  6. Application of frequency-domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy as a quantitative analytical tool for microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Elder, A D; Matthews, S M; Swartling, J; Yunus, K; Frank, J H; Brennan, C M; Fisher, A C; Kaminski, C F

    2006-06-12

    We describe the application of wide-field frequency domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to imaging in microfluidic devices. FLIM is performed using low cost, intensity modulated Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) for illumination. The use of lifetime imaging for quantitative analysis within such devices is demonstrated by mapping the molecular diffusion of iodide ions across a microchannel. PMID:19516711

  7. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 30, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2011 1725 Frequency-Domain Optical Tomographic

    E-print Network

    Hielscher, Andreas

    Tomographic Imaging of Arthritic Finger Joints Andreas H. Hielscher*, Member, IEEE, Hyun Keol Kim, Ludguier D imaging of finger joints to date. Overall we evaluated 99 fingers of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 120 fingers from healthy volunteers. Using frequency-do- main imaging techniques we show

  8. Imaging of the interaction of low frequency electric fields with biological tissues by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Adrian F.; Devine, Jack; Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2014-03-01

    We report the use of conventional Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) for visualization of propagation of low frequency electric field in soft biological tissues ex vivo. To increase the overall quality of the experimental images an adaptive Wiener filtering technique has been employed. Fourier domain correlation has been subsequently applied to enhance spatial resolution of images of biological tissues influenced by low frequency electric field. Image processing has been performed on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) utilizing Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) framework in the frequencydomain. The results show that variation in voltage and frequency of the applied electric field relates exponentially to the magnitude of its influence on biological tissue. The magnitude of influence is about twice more for fresh tissue samples in comparison to non-fresh ones. The obtained results suggest that OCT can be used for observation and quantitative evaluation of the electro-kinetic changes in biological tissues under different physiological conditions, functional electrical stimulation, and potentially can be used non-invasively for food quality control.

  9. Compensation of motion artifacts in intracoronary optical frequency domain imaging and optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jinyong; Yoo, Hongki; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-01-01

    Intracoronary optical coherence tomography and optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) have been utilized for two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging of vascular microanatomy. Image quality and the spatial accuracy of multidimensional reconstructions, however, can be degraded due to artifacts resulting from relative motion between the intracoronary catheter and the vessel wall. To track the relative motion of a catheter with regard to the vessel, a motion tracking system was incorporated with a standard OFDI system by using wavelength division multiplexing techniques. Motion of the vessel was acquired by a frequency shift of the backscattered light caused by the Doppler effect. A single monochromatic beam was utilized for tracking the relative longitudinal displacements of a catheter-based fiber probe with regard to the vessel. Although two tracking beams are, in general, required to correct for longitudinal motion artifacts, the accurate reconstruction in a longitudinal view was achieved by the Doppler frequency information of a single beam. Our results demonstrate that the single beam based motion tracking scheme is a cost-effective, practical approach to compensating for longitudinal distortions due to cardiac dynamics, thus leading to accurate quantitative analysis of 3D intracoronary OFDI. PMID:21993895

  10. High-frame-rate 2-D vector blood flow imaging in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Lenge, Matteo; Ramalli, Alessandro; Boni, Enrico; Liebgott, Hervé; Cachard, Christian; Tortoli, Piero

    2014-09-01

    Conventional ultrasound Doppler techniques estimate the blood velocity exclusively in the axial direction to produce the sonograms and color flow maps needed for diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. In this paper, a novel method to produce bi-dimensional maps of 2-D velocity vectors is proposed. The region of interest (ROI) is illuminated by plane waves transmitted at the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) in a fixed direction. For each transmitted plane wave, the backscattered echoes are recombined offline to produce the radio-frequency image of the ROI. The local 2-D phase shifts between consecutive speckle images are efficiently estimated in the frequency domain, to produce vector maps up to 15 kHz PRF. Simulations and in vitro steady-flow experiments with different setup conditions have been conducted to thoroughly evaluate the method's performance. Bias is proved to be lower than 10% in most simulations and lower than 20% in experiments. Further simulations and in vivo experiments have been made to test the approach's feasibility in pulsatile flow conditions. It has been estimated that the computation of the frequency domain algorithm is more than 50 times faster than the computation of the reference 2-D cross-correlation algorithm. PMID:25167150

  11. Analytic signals and harmonic measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Tao

    2006-02-01

    We prove that a sufficient and necessary condition for Hei[Theta](s)=-iei[Theta](s), where H is Hilbert transformation, [Theta] is a continuous and strictly increasing function with [Theta](R)=2[pi], is that d[Theta](s) is a harmonic measure on the line. The counterpart result for the periodic case is also established. The study is motivated by, and has significant impact to time-frequency analysis, especially to aspects of analytic signals inducing instantaneous amplitude and frequency. As a by-product we introduce the theory of Hardy-space-preserving weighted trigonometric series and Fourier transformations induced by harmonic measures in the respective contexts.

  12. Molecular structure, normal coordinate analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies, NBO, HOMO-LUMO analysis and detonation properties of (S)-2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl) butanamide by density functional methods.

    PubMed

    Renuga, S; Muthu, S

    2014-01-24

    Density functional theory (DFT) computations have become an efficient tool in the prediction of molecular structure, harmonic force fields, vibrational wave numbers as well as the IR and Raman intensities of pharmaceutically important molecule. In this work, we report harmonic vibrational frequencies, molecular structure, NBO and HOMO, LUMO analysis and detonation properties of (S)-2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl) butanamide. The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of (S)-2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl) butanamide were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1) respectively. Harmonic frequencies of this compound were determined and analyzed by DFT utilizing 6-31G(d,p), 6-31+G(d,p) basis sets. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) following the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field Methodology (SQMFF). The calculated infrared and Raman spectra of the title compounds were also stimulated utilizing the scaled force fields and the computed dipole derivatives for IR intensities and polarizability derivatives for Raman intensities. The change in electron density (ED) in the ?(*) and ?(*) antibonding orbital's and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyperconjugation of hydrogen-bonded interaction. Heat of formation (HOF) and calculated density were estimated to evaluate detonation properties using Kamlet-Jacobs equations. The linear polarizability (?) and the first order hyperpolarizability (?) values of the investigated molecule have been computed using DFT calculations. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The observed and calculated wave numbers are found to be in good agreement. On the basis of vibrational analyses, the thermodynamic properties of title compound at different temperatures have been calculated. PMID:24096066

  13. Ex vivo and in vivo second-harmonic-generation imaging of dermal collagen fiber in skin: comparison of imaging characteristics between mode-locked Cr:forsterite and Ti:sapphire lasers.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yu; Ito, Masahiro; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2009-04-01

    Second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy is an interesting new tool for observing dermal collagen fiber in skin. However, conventional SHG microscopy using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser suffers from low penetration depth and a slow image acquisition rate caused by scattering and absorption in tissue, making it difficult to use for in vivo applications on human skin. We develop an SHG microscope equipped with a mode-locked Cr:forsterite laser with a long wavelength and compare its imaging characteristics with that of a Ti:sapphire-laser-based SHG microscope for the measurement of dermal collagen fiber in animal and human skins. The results indicate the suitability of the Cr:forsterite laser-based SHG microscope for in vivo imaging of human skin. PMID:19340128

  14. High-Resolution Harmonics Ultrasound Imaging for Non-Invasive Characterization of Wound Healing in a Pre-Clinical Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Dixith, Sriteja; Vanzant, Daniel; Kim, Jayne; Dickerson, Jennifer L.; Datta, Soma; Powell, Heather; Roy, Sashwati; Bergdall, Valerie; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents the first study employing non-invasive high-resolution harmonic ultrasound imaging to longitudinally characterize skin wound healing. Burn wounds (day 0-42), on the dorsum of a domestic Yorkshire white pig were studied non-invasively using tandem digital planimetry, laser speckle imaging and dual mode (B and Doppler) ultrasound imaging. Wound depth, as measured by B-mode imaging, progressively increased until day 21 and decreased thereafter. Initially, blood flow at the wound edge increased up to day 14 and subsequently regressed to baseline levels by day 21, when the wound was more than 90% closed. Coinciding with regression of blood flow at the wound edge, there was an increase in blood flow in the wound bed. This was observed to regress by day 42. Such changes in wound angiogenesis were corroborated histologically. Gated Doppler imaging quantitated the pulse pressure of the primary feeder artery supplying the wound site. This pulse pressure markedly increased with a bimodal pattern following wounding connecting it to the induction of wound angiogenesis. Finally, ultrasound elastography measured tissue stiffness and visualized growth of new tissue over time. These studies have elegantly captured the physiological sequence of events during the process of wound healing, much of which is anticipated based on certain dynamics in play, to provide the framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms driving these processes. We conclude that the tandem use of non-invasive imaging technologies has the power to provide unprecedented insight into the dynamics of the healing skin tissue. PMID:25799513

  15. High-resolution harmonics ultrasound imaging for non-invasive characterization of wound healing in a pre-clinical Swine model.

    PubMed

    Gnyawali, Surya C; Barki, Kasturi G; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S; Dixith, Sriteja; Vanzant, Daniel; Kim, Jayne; Dickerson, Jennifer L; Datta, Soma; Powell, Heather; Roy, Sashwati; Bergdall, Valerie; Sen, Chandan K

    2015-01-01

    This work represents the first study employing non-invasive high-resolution harmonic ultrasound imaging to longitudinally characterize skin wound healing. Burn wounds (day 0-42), on the dorsum of a domestic Yorkshire white pig were studied non-invasively using tandem digital planimetry, laser speckle imaging and dual mode (B and Doppler) ultrasound imaging. Wound depth, as measured by B-mode imaging, progressively increased until day 21 and decreased thereafter. Initially, blood flow at the wound edge increased up to day 14 and subsequently regressed to baseline levels by day 21, when the wound was more than 90% closed. Coinciding with regression of blood flow at the wound edge, there was an increase in blood flow in the wound bed. This was observed to regress by day 42. Such changes in wound angiogenesis were corroborated histologically. Gated Doppler imaging quantitated the pulse pressure of the primary feeder artery supplying the wound site. This pulse pressure markedly increased with a bimodal pattern following wounding connecting it to the induction of wound angiogenesis. Finally, ultrasound elastography measured tissue stiffness and visualized growth of new tissue over time. These studies have elegantly captured the physiological sequence of events during the process of wound healing, much of which is anticipated based on certain dynamics in play, to provide the framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms driving these processes. We conclude that the tandem use of non-invasive imaging technologies has the power to provide unprecedented insight into the dynamics of the healing skin tissue. PMID:25799513

  16. Nonlinear spectral imaging of human normal skin, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, S. Y.; Yang, J. G.; Zhuang, J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we use nonlinear spectral imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for analyzing the morphology of collagen and elastin and their biochemical variations in basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and normal skin tissue. It was found in this work that there existed apparent differences among BCC, SCC and normal skin in terms of their thickness of the keratin and epithelial layers, their size of elastic fibers, as well as their distribution and spectral characteristics of collagen. These differences can potentially be used to distinguish BCC and SCC from normal skin, and to discriminate between BCC and SCC, as well as to evaluate treatment responses.

  17. High-contrast coherent terahertz imaging of porcine tissue via swept-frequency feedback interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yah Leng; Taimre, Thomas; Bertling, Karl; Dean, Paul; Indjin, Dragan; Valavanis, Alexander; Khanna, Suraj P; Lachab, Mohammad; Schaider, Helmut; Prow, Tarl W; Peter Soyer, H; Wilson, Stephen J; Linfield, Edmund H; Giles Davies, A; Raki?, Aleksandar D

    2014-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the interrogation of biological tissue at terahertz (THz) frequencies, largely due to the contrast in the optical properties of different biological tissues which occur in this electro-magnetic radiation band. Of particular interest are THz biomedical images, which have the potential to highlight different information than those acquired in other frequency bands, thereby providing an augmented picture of biological structures. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of an interferometric biological imaging technique using a THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating at 2.59 THz to perform coherent imaging of porcine tissue samples. We show the potential of this new THz biomedical imaging technique for in vivo studies, by virtue of its reflection geometry and useful tissue penetration depth enabled by the large THz powers emitted by the quantum cascade laser used in this work. The observed clustering of interferometric tissue signatures opens a pathway towards automatic techniques for the discrimination of healthy tissue types for the study of normal physiology and possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:25426324

  18. A quasi-local method for instantaneous frequency estimation with application to structural magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Alvaro; Rodriguez, Paul; Jingyu Liu; Calhoun, Vince; Pattichis, Marios

    2014-08-01

    Spatially-varying signal content can be effectively modeled using amplitude modulation-frequency modulation (AM-FM) representations. The AM-FM representation allow us to extract instantaneous amplitude (IA) and instantaneous frequency (IF) components that can be used to measure non-stationary content in biomedical images and videos. This paper introduces a new method for estimating the IA and the IF based on a quasi-local method (QLM). We provide an extensive comparison of AM-FM demodulation approaches based on QLM and a quasi-eigenfunction approximation method using three different filter-banks: (i) a separable, equiripple design, (ii) a Gabor filter bank, and (iii) a directional filter bank approach based on the Contourlet transform. The results document that the use of the new QLM method with an equiripple filter bank design gave the best IF magnitude estimates for a synthetic image. The new QLM method is then applied to a multi-site schizophrenia dataset (N=307). The dataset included structure magnetic resonance images from healthy controls and patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. The IF magnitude is shown to be less sensitive to variations across sites as opposed to the standard use of SMRI images that suffered from significant dependency on the scanner configurations on different collection sites. Furthermore, the regions of interest identified through the use of the IF magnitude are in agreement with previous studies. PMID:25570248

  19. High-contrast coherent terahertz imaging of porcine tissue via swept-frequency feedback interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yah Leng; Taimre, Thomas; Bertling, Karl; Dean, Paul; Indjin, Dragan; Valavanis, Alexander; Khanna, Suraj P.; Lachab, Mohammad; Schaider, Helmut; Prow, Tarl W.; Peter Soyer, H.; Wilson, Stephen J.; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Raki?, Aleksandar D.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the interrogation of biological tissue at terahertz (THz) frequencies, largely due to the contrast in the optical properties of different biological tissues which occur in this electro-magnetic radiation band. Of particular interest are THz biomedical images, which have the potential to highlight different information than those acquired in other frequency bands, thereby providing an augmented picture of biological structures. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of an interferometric biological imaging technique using a THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating at 2.59 THz to perform coherent imaging of porcine tissue samples. We show the potential of this new THz biomedical imaging technique for in vivo studies, by virtue of its reflection geometry and useful tissue penetration depth enabled by the large THz powers emitted by the quantum cascade laser used in this work. The observed clustering of interferometric tissue signatures opens a pathway towards automatic techniques for the discrimination of healthy tissue types for the study of normal physiology and possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:25426324

  20. Development of a 64 channel ultrasonic high frequency linear array imaging system.

    PubMed

    Hu, ChangHong; Zhang, Lequan; Cannata, Jonathan M; Yen, Jesse; Shung, K Kirk

    2011-12-01

    In order to improve the lateral resolution and extend the field of view of a previously reported 48 element 30 MHz ultrasound linear array and 16-channel digital imaging system, the development of a 256 element 30 MHz linear array and an ultrasound imaging system with increased channel count has been undertaken. This paper reports the design and testing of a 64 channel digital imaging system which consists of an analog front-end pulser/receiver, 64 channels of Time-Gain Compensation (TGC), 64 channels of high-speed digitizer as well as a beamformer. A Personal Computer (PC) is used as the user interface to display real-time images. This system is designed as a platform for the purpose of testing the performance of high frequency linear arrays that have been developed in house. Therefore conventional approaches were taken it its implementation. Flexibility and ease of use are of primary concern whereas consideration of cost-effectiveness and novelty in design are only secondary. Even so, there are many issues at higher frequencies but do not exist at lower frequencies need to be solved. The system provides 64 channels of excitation pulsers while receiving simultaneously at a 20-120 MHz sampling rate to 12-bits. The digitized data from all channels are first fed through Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and then stored in memories. These raw data are accessed by the beamforming processor to re-build the image or to be downloaded to the PC for further processing. The beamformer that applies delays to the echoes of each channel is implemented with the strategy that combines coarse (8.3 ns) and fine delays (2 ns). The coarse delays are integer multiples of the sampling clock rate and are achieved by controlling the write enable pin of the First-In-First-Out (FIFO) memory to obtain valid beamforming data. The fine delays are accomplished with interpolation filters. This system is capable of achieving a maximum frame rate of 50 frames per second. Wire phantom images acquired with this system show a spatial resolution of 146 ?m (lateral) and 54 ?m (axial). Images with excised rabbit and pig eyeball as well as mouse embryo were also acquired to demonstrate its imaging capability. PMID:21684568

  1. Development of a 64 channel ultrasonic high frequency linear array imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Hu, ChangHong; Zhang, Lequan; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Yen, Jesse; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the lateral resolution and extend the field of view of a previously reported 48 element 30 MHz ultrasound linear array and 16-channel digital imaging system, the development of a 256 element 30 MHz linear array and an ultrasound imaging system with increased channel count has been undertaken. This paper reports the design and testing of a 64 channel digital imaging system which consists of an analog front-end pulser/receiver, 64 channels of Time-Gain Compensation (TGC), 64 channels of high-speed digitizer as well as a beamformer. A Personal Computer (PC) is used as the user interface to display real-time images. This system is designed as a platform for the purpose of testing the performance of high frequency linear arrays that have been developed in house. Therefore conventional approaches were taken it its implementation. Flexibility and ease of use are of primary concern whereas consideration of cost-effectiveness and novelty in design are only secondary. Even so, there are many issues at higher frequencies but do not exist at lower frequencies need to be solved. The system provides 64 channels of excitation pulsers while receiving simultaneously at a 20 MHz–120 MHz sampling rate to 12-bits. The digitized data from all channels are first fed through Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and then stored in memories. These raw data are accessed by the beamforming processor to re-build the image or to be downloaded to the PC for further processing. The beamformer that applies delays to the echoes of each channel is implemented with the strategy that combines coarse (8.3ns) and fine delays (2 ns). The coarse delays are integer multiples of the sampling clock rate and are achieved by controlling the write enable pin of the First-In-First-Out (FIFO) memory to obtain valid beamforming data. The fine delays are accomplished with interpolation filters. This system is capable of achieving a maximum frame rate of 50 frames per second. Wire phantom images acquired with this system show a spatial resolution of 146 ?m (lateral) and 54 ?m (axial). Images with excised rabbit and pig eyeball as well as mouse embryo were also acquired to demonstrate its imaging capability. PMID:21684568

  2. Magnetically-coated silica nanospheres for dual-mode imaging at low ultrasound frequency

    PubMed Central

    Chiriacò, Fernanda; Soloperto, Giulia; Greco, Antonio; Conversano, Francesco; Ragusa, Andrea; Menichetti, Luca; Casciaro, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To experimentally investigate the acoustical behavior of different dual-mode nanosized contrast agents (NPCAs) for echographic medical imaging at low ultrasound (US) frequency. METHODS: We synthesized three different nanosized structures: (1) Pure silica nanospheres (SiNSs); (2) FePt-iron oxide (FePt-IO)-coated SiNSs; and (3) IO-coated SiNSs, employing three different diameter of SiNS-core (160, 330 and 660 nm). Tissue mimicking phantoms made of agarose gel solution containing 5 mg of different NPCAs in 2 mL-Eppendorf tubes, were insonified by a commercial echographic system at three different low US pulse values (2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 MHz). The raw radiofrequency signal, backscattered from each considered NPCA containing sample, has been processed in order to calculate the US average backscatter intensity and compare the acoustic behavior of the different NPCA types. RESULTS: The highest US contrast was exhibited by pure SiNSs; FePt-IO-coated SiNSs acoustical behavior followed a similar trend of pure SiNSs with a slight difference in terms of brightness values. The acoustic response of the examined NPCAs resulted function of both SiNS diameter and US frequency. Specifically, higher US frequencies determined higher value of the backscatter for a given SiNS diameter. Frequency-dependent enhancement was marked for pure SiNSs and became less remarkable for FePt-IO-coated SiNSs, whereas IO-coated SiNSs resulted almost unaffected by such frequency variations. Pure and FePt-IO-coated SiNSs evidenced an image backscatter increasing with the diameter up to 330 nm. Conversely, among the types of NPCA tested, IO-coated SiNSs showed the lowest acoustical response for each synthesized diameter and employed US frequency, although a diameter-dependent raising trend was evidenced. CONCLUSION: The US characterization of magnetically covered SiNS shows that FePt-IO, rather than IO, was the best magnetic coating for realizing NPCAs suitable for dual mode imaging of deep organs, combining US and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24349645

  3. Low-frequency quantitative ultrasound imaging of cell death in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J. [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Papanicolau, Naum; Tadayyon, Hadi [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Lee, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Zubovits, Judit [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Sadeghian, Alireza [Department of Computer Science, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Computer Science, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Karshafian, Raffi [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Giles, Anoja [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Kolios, Michael C. [Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Currently, no clinical imaging modality is used routinely to assess tumor response to cancer therapies within hours to days of the delivery of treatment. Here, the authors demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency to quantitatively detect changes in tumors in response to cancer therapies using preclinical mouse models.Methods: Conventional low-frequency and corresponding high-frequency ultrasound (ranging from 4 to 28 MHz) were used along with quantitative spectroscopic and signal envelope statistical analyses on data obtained from xenograft tumors treated with chemotherapy, x-ray radiation, as well as a novel vascular targeting microbubble therapy.Results: Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers indicated significant changes in cell-death associated parameters in responsive tumors. Specifically changes in the midband fit, spectral slope, and 0-MHz intercept biomarkers were investigated for different types of treatment and demonstrated cell-death related changes. The midband fit and 0-MHz intercept biomarker derived from low-frequency data demonstrated increases ranging approximately from 0 to 6 dBr and 0 to 8 dBr, respectively, depending on treatments administrated. These data paralleled results observed for high-frequency ultrasound data. Statistical analysis of ultrasound signal envelope was performed as an alternative method to obtain histogram-based biomarkers and provided confirmatory results. Histological analysis of tumor specimens indicated up to 61% cell death present in the tumors depending on treatments administered, consistent with quantitative ultrasound findings indicating cell death. Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers demonstrated a good correlation with histological morphological findings indicative of cell death (r{sup 2}= 0.71, 0.82; p < 0.001).Conclusions: In summary, the results provide preclinical evidence, for the first time, that quantitative ultrasound used at a clinically relevant frequency, in addition to high-frequency ultrasound, can detect tissue changes associated with cell death in vivo in response to cancer treatments.

  4. In vivo intracardiac optical coherence tomography imaging through percutaneous access: toward image-guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2011-11-01

    Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheter to image endocardial wall in actively beating hearts through percutaneous access. We reported the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. This is a critical step toward image-guided RFA in a clinical setting. A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardial wall. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium, and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  5. The impact of spatial and spectral frequencies in structured light imaging of thick tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jessie Ruth

    This research focuses on development of structured light imaging (SLI), a new optical imaging technique based on spatial frequency domain modulation. The goal of this method is to quantitatively measure and map tissue optical properties, absorption and scattering, to determine tissue biochemical structure and composition. The work presented here extends the technology's spatial and spectral frequency impact. First, to expand the depth sectioning capability of spatial frequency modulation, a layered tissue model was developed, validated and shown to accurately recover in vivo parameters in skin (epidermis and dermis), effectively filtering out signal from the underlying subcutaneous tissue. Next, to expand the impact of spectral frequency information, the SLI system was combined with a Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), which eliminates the need to scan through wavelengths when gathering multispectral information. A single SLI-CTIS measurement gathers 36 absorption maps and 36 scattering maps, with a resulting measurement speed ˜30 times faster than the liquid crystal tunable filter method currently employed in multispectral SLI systems. The multispectral information can be used to determine the concentrations of multiple tissue chromophores and the relative density of the tissue. This is immediately useful for monitoring the brain for signs of trauma, including monitoring of oxygen delivery across the brain, mapping of hemoglobin concentration to detect hemorrhage, mapping of water content to monitor edema, and mapping of tissue density to monitor swelling. A simple in vivo brain injury example is presented to demonstrate recovery of these parameters. Finally, to demonstrate the spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of the SLI-CTIS system, measurements were performed on in vivo mouse brain during seizure with electroencephalography (EEG) confirmation.

  6. Microwave heating of electrons of a dense plasma column at frequencies higher than electron cyclotron frequency: Part II. Excited electron cyclotron harmonic waves and their resonant wave-wave interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Datlov; R. Klíma; L. Kryska; V. N. Budnikov; O. N. Shcherbinin

    1973-01-01

    In the overdense collisionless plasma column inserted through the narrow sides of a rectangular waveguide, the excited electron cyclotron harmonic waves (CHWs) are studied by means of two movable probes and a phase interferometer in the range of parameters of 2 > omega\\/omega ce >1; 0·5 < ( omega pe \\/omega)2 < 15. Two kinds of CH waves have been

  7. Multi-mode and multi-frequency guided wave imaging via chirp excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Jennifer E.; Lee, Sang Jun; Hall, James S.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2011-04-01

    Guided wave imaging has shown great potential for structural health monitoring applications by providing a way to visualize and characterize structural damage. For successful implementation of delay-and-sum and other elliptical imaging algorithms employing guided ultrasonic waves, some degree of mode purity is required because echoes from undesired modes cause imaging artifacts that obscure damage. But it is also desirable to utilize multiple modes because different modes may exhibit increased sensitivity to different types and orientations of defects. The well-known modetuning effect can be employed to use the same PZT transducers for generating and receiving multiple modes by exciting the transducers with narrowband tone bursts at different frequencies. However, this process is inconvenient and timeconsuming, particularly if extensive signal averaging is required to achieve a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, both acquisition time and data storage requirements may be prohibitive if signals from many narrowband tone burst excitations are measured. In this paper, we utilize a chirp excitation to excite PZT transducers over a broad frequency range to acquire multi-modal data with a single transmission, which can significantly reduce both the measurement time and the quantity of data. Each received signal from a chirp excitation is post-processed to obtain multiple signals corresponding to different narrowband frequency ranges. Narrowband signals with the best mode purity and echo shape are selected and then used to generate multiple images of damage in a target structure. The efficacy of the proposed technique is demonstrated experimentally using an aluminum plate instrumented with a spatially distributed array of piezoelectric sensors and with simulated damage.

  8. Factors governing selection of operating frequency for subsurface- imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-12-31

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, subsurface imaging is complicated by propagation loss in the soil and surface-clutter response. Both the loss and surface-clutter response depend on the operating frequency. This paper examines several factors which provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. No distinction can be made between objects at different heights when viewed with a conventional imaging radar (which uses a one-dimensional synthetic aperture), and the return from a buried object must compete with the return from the surface clutter. Thus, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell`s equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper VIHF through UHF spectrum ({approximately}100 MHz - 1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  9. High Frequency Coils for Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, John Thomas, Jr.

    To extend the inherent signal-to-noise (S/N) advantage of high field (4T+) NMR to clinical imaging and spectroscopy, a new approach to designing RF surface and volume coils is required. As coils approach wavelength dimensions, the performance of conventional lumped element (L,C) designs succumbs to: (1) non uniform current distributions resulting in decreased homogeneity, fill factor, and increased electric field losses, (2) decreased conductor skin depths resulting in increased ohmic losses, and (3) high inductance resulting in self resonance near or below the desired frequency of operation. At lower frequencies the phase change due to finite propagation velocity of transmit and receive signals on coil conductors is negligible. Therefore, the conventional design approach considers a DC (Biot-Savart) field only, for an unloaded (free-space) RF coil. This study recognizes and solves the problems of high field, clinical coil design. At higher radiofrequencies, the distributed nature of the coil and patient structure is considered in both circuit design and theory. Lumped elements are replaced by transmission line and cavity elements. Lumped element circuit theory is replaced by transmission line or transverse electromagnetic (TEM) theory. DC field analysis is replaced with fully time-dependent AC analysis for the coil and the human load. AC field losses and resultant heating in living tissues are investigated with regard to safety assurance for high frequency clinical coil design and application. By designing high frequency coils with the high frequency methods presented herein, desired B1 field characteristics are optimized, coil and patient losses are minimized, and self resonance is maximized. Clinical results obtained with these coils have verified for the first time the clear advantages of human NMR imaging and spectroscopy at 4 Tesla and above.

  10. Improved myocardial contrast with second harmonic transient ultrasound response imaging in humans using intravenous perfluorocarbon-exposed sonicated dextrose albumin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas R. Porter; Feng Xie; David Kricsfeld; Robert W. Armbruster

    1996-01-01

    Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine whether a new method of ultrasound imaging (transient response imaging) could improve the myocardial contrast after intravenous injections of perfluorocarbon-exposed sonicated dextrose albumin microbubble contrast medium in humans.Background. We have shown in animals that very low doses of intravenous contrast medium can produce transient but significantly better myocardial contrast when diagnostic

  11. Analysis of collagen organization in mouse achilles tendon using high-frequency ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Riggin, Corinne N; Sarver, Joseph J; Freedman, Benjamin R; Thomas, Stephen J; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2014-02-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are traumatic injuries, and techniques for assessing repair outcomes rely on patient-based measures of pain and function, which do not directly assess tendon healing. Consequently, there is a need for a quantitative, in vivo measure of tendon properties. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to validate ultrasound imaging for evaluating collagen organization in tendons. In this study, we compared our novel, high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) imaging and analysis method to a standard measure of collagen organization, crossed polarizer (CP) imaging. Eighteen mouse Achilles tendons were harvested and placed into a testing fixture where HFUS and CP imaging could be performed simultaneously in a controlled loading environment. Two experiments were conducted: (1) effect of loading on collagen alignment and (2) effect of an excisional injury on collagen alignment. As expected, it was found that both the HFUS and CP methods could reliably detect an increase in alignment with increasing load, as well as a decrease in alignment with injury. This HFUS method demonstrates that structural measures of collagen organization in tendon can be determined through ultrasound imaging. This experiment also provides a mechanistic evaluation of tissue structure that could potentially be used to develop a targeted approach to aid in rehabilitation or monitor return to activity after tendon injury. PMID:24356929

  12. Feasibility demonstration of frequency domain terahertz imaging in breast cancer margin determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yngvesson, Sigfrid K.; St. Peter, Benjamin; Siqueira, Paul; Kelly, Patrick; Glick, Stephen; Karellas, Andrew; Khan, Ashraf

    2012-03-01

    In breast conservation surgery, surgeons attempt to remove malignant tissue along with a surrounding margin of healthy tissue. Subsequent pathological analysis determines if those margins are clear of malignant tissue, a process that typically requires at least one day. Only then can it be determined whether a follow-up surgery is necessary. This possibility of re-excision is undesirable in terms of reducing patient morbidity, emotional stress and healthcare. It has been shown that terahertz (THz) images of breast specimens can accurately differentiate between breast carcinoma, normal fibroglandular tissue, and adipose tissue. That study employed the Time-Domain Spectroscopy (TDS) technique. We are instead developing a new technique, Frequency-Domain Terahertz Imaging (FDTI). In this joint project between UMass/Amherst and UMass Medical School/Worcester (UMMS), we are investigating the feasibility of the FDTI technique for THz reflection imaging of breast cancer margins. Our system, which produces mechanically scanned images of size 2cm x 2cm, uses a THz gas laser. The system is calibrated with mixtures of water and ethanol and reflection coefficients as low as 1% have been measured. Images from phantoms and specimens cut from breast cancer lumpectomies at UMMS will be presented. Finally, there will be a discussion of a possible transition of this FDTI setup to a compact and inexpensive CMOS THz camera for use in the operating room.

  13. Measuring myofiber orientations from high-frequency ultrasound images using multiscale decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Fei, Baowei

    2014-07-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) has the ability to image both skeletal and cardiac muscles. The quantitative assessment of these myofiber orientations has a number of applications in both research and clinical examinations; however, difficulties arise due to the severe speckle noise contained in the HFU images. Thus, for the purpose of automatically measuring myofiber orientations from two-dimensional HFU images, we propose a two-step multiscale image decomposition method. It combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter and a coherence enhancing diffusion filter to extract myofibers. This method has been verified by ultrasound data from simulated phantoms, excised fiber phantoms, specimens of porcine hearts, and human skeletal muscles in vivo. The quantitative evaluations of both phantoms indicated that the myofiber measurements of our proposed method were more accurate than other methods. The myofiber orientations extracted from different layers of the porcine hearts matched the prediction of an established cardiac mode and demonstrated the feasibility of extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from HFU images ex vivo. Moreover, HFU also demonstrated the ability to measure myofiber orientations in vivo.

  14. Application of optical coherence tomography and high-frequency ultrasound imaging during noninvasive laser vasectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-04-01

    A noninvasive approach to vasectomy may eliminate male fear of complications related to surgery and increase its acceptance. Noninvasive laser thermal occlusion of the canine vas deferens has recently been reported. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) are compared for monitoring laser thermal coagulation of the vas in an acute canine model. Bilateral noninvasive laser coagulation of the vas was performed in six dogs (n=12 vasa) using a Ytterbium fiber laser wavelength of 1075 nm, incident power of 9.0 W, pulse duration of 500 ms, pulse rate of 1 Hz, and 3-mm-diameter spot. Cryogen spray cooling was used to prevent skin burns during the procedure. An OCT system with endoscopic probe and a HFUS system with 20-MHz transducer were used to image the vas immediately before and after the procedure. Vasa were then excised and processed for gross and histologic analysis for comparison with OCT and HFUS images. OCT provided high-resolution, superficial imaging of the compressed vas within the vas ring clamp, while HFUS provided deeper imaging of the vas held manually in the scrotal fold. Both OCT and high HFUS are promising imaging modalities for real-time confirmation of vas occlusion during noninvasive laser vasectomy.

  15. Application of optical coherence tomography and high-frequency ultrasound imaging during noninvasive laser vasectomy.

    PubMed

    Cilip, Christopher M; Allaf, Mohamad E; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2012-04-01

    A noninvasive approach to vasectomy may eliminate male fear of complications related to surgery and increase its acceptance. Noninvasive laser thermal occlusion of the canine vas deferens has recently been reported. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) are compared for monitoring laser thermal coagulation of the vas in an acute canine model. Bilateral noninvasive laser coagulation of the vas was performed in six dogs (n=12 vasa) using a Ytterbium fiber laser wavelength of 1075 nm, incident power of 9.0 W, pulse duration of 500 ms, pulse rate of 1 Hz, and 3-mm-diameter spot. Cryogen spray cooling was used to prevent skin burns during the procedure. An OCT system with endoscopic probe and a HFUS system with 20-MHz transducer were used to image the vas immediately before and after the procedure. Vasa were then excised and processed for gross and histologic analysis for comparison with OCT and HFUS images. OCT provided high-resolution, superficial imaging of the compressed vas within the vas ring clamp, while HFUS provided deeper imaging of the vas held manually in the scrotal fold. Both OCT and high HFUS are promising imaging modalities for real-time confirmation of vas occlusion during noninvasive laser vasectomy. PMID:22559684

  16. Feasibility demonstration of frequency domain terahertz imaging in breast cancer margin determination

    PubMed Central

    Yngvesson, Sigfrid K.; St. Peter, Benjamin; Siqueira, Paul; Kelly, Patrick; Glick, Stephen; Karellas, Andrew; Khan, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    In breast conservation surgery, surgeons attempt to remove malignant tissue along with a surrounding margin of healthy tissue. Subsequent pathological analysis determines if those margins are clear of malignant tissue, a process that typically requires at least one day. Only then can it be determined whether a follow-up surgery is necessary. This possibility of re-excision is undesirable in terms of reducing patient morbidity, emotional stress and healthcare. It has been shown that terahertz (THz) images of breast specimens can accurately differentiate between breast carcinoma, normal fibroglandular tissue, and adipose tissue. That study employed the Time-Domain Spectroscopy (TDS) technique. We are instead developing a new technique, Frequency-Domain Terahertz Imaging (FDTI). In this joint project between UMass/Amherst and UMass Medical School/Worcester (UMMS), we are investigating the feasibility of the FDTI technique for THz reflection imaging of breast cancer margins. Our system, which produces mechanically scanned images of size 2cm × 2cm, uses a THz gas laser. The system is calibrated with mixtures of water and ethanol and reflection coefficients as low as 1% have been measured. Images from phantoms and specimens cut from breast cancer lumpectomies at UMMS will be presented. Finally, there will be a discussion of a possible transition of this FDTI setup to a compact and inexpensive CMOS THz camera for use in the operating room. PMID:24353380

  17. Fast radio imaging of Jupiter's magnetosphere at low-frequencies with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, P.

    2004-12-01

    Jupiter emits intense decameter (DAM) radio waves, detectable from the ground in the range ˜10-40 MHz. They are produced by energetic electron precipitations in its auroral regions (auroral-DAM), as well as near the magnetic footprints of the Galilean satellite Io (Io-DAM). Radio imaging of these decameter emissions with arcsecond angular resolution and millisecond time resolution should provide: an improved mapping of the surface planetary magnetic field, via imaging of instantaneous cyclotron sources of highest frequency; measurements of the beaming angle of the radiation relative to the local magnetic field, as a function of frequency; detailed information on the Io-Jupiter electrodynamic interaction, in particular the lead angle between the Io flux tube and the radio emitting field line; direct information on the origin of the sporadic drifting decameter S-bursts, thought to be electron bunches propagating along magnetic field lines, and possibly revealing electric potential drops along these field lines; direct observation of DAM emission possibly related to the Ganymede-Jupiter, Europa-Jupiter and/or Callisto-Jupiter interactions, and their energetics; information on the magnetospheric dynamics, via correlation of radio images with ultraviolet and infrared images of the aurora as well as of the Galilean satellite footprints, and study of their temporal variations; an improved mapping of the Jovian plasma environment (especially the Io torus) via the propagation effects that it induces on the radio waves propagating through it (Faraday rotation, diffraction fringes, etc.); possibly on the long-term a better accuracy on the determination of Jupiter's rotation period. Fast imaging should be permitted by the very high intensity of Jovian decameter bursts. LOFAR's capability to measure the full polarization of the incoming waves will be exploited. The main limitation will come from the maximum angular resolution reachable. We discuss several approaches for bringing it close to the value of ˜1? at 30-40 MHz, as required for the above studies.

  18. High speed miniature motorized endoscopic probe for 3D optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-03-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. This is the smallest motorized high speed OCT probe to our knowledge. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 ?m and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  19. Monitoring the Low Frequency Sky with the LWA1 and the Prototype All-Sky Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenberger, Kenneth Steven; LWA Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We present findings from the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). PASI cross-correlates a live stream of all 260 dual-polarization dipole antennas of the LWA1, creates all-sky images, and uploads them to the LWA-TV website in near real-time. PASI has recorded over 14,000 hours of all-sky images at frequencies between 10 and 88 MHz. These data have resulted in the discovery of radio emission from large meteors (Fireballs), and has been used to set improved limits on slow transients at 38, 52, and 74 MHz. PASI is also being used to characterize how the ionosphere affects low frequency transient astronomy. Construction of the LWA has been supported by the Office of Naval Research under Contract N00014-07-C-0147. Support for operations and continuing development of the LWA1 is provided by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1139963 and AST-1139974 of the University Radio Observatory program.

  20. First Spectroscopic Imaging Observations of the Sun at Low Radio Frequencies with the Murchison Widefield Array Prototype

    E-print Network

    Oberoi, Divya

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9–201.6 MHz. ...

  1. Stimulated electromagnetic emission near electron cyclotron harmonics in the ionosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. B. Leyser; B. Thide; H. Derblom; A. Hedberg; B. Lundborg; P. Stubbe; H. Kopka; M. Rietveld

    1989-01-01

    Observations of electromagnetic emission stimulated by a high-frequency radio wave injected into the ionosphere from a ground-based powerful transmitter operated near harmonics of the ionospheric electron cyclotron frequency are reported. Significant changes in the spectrum of the stimulated electromagnetic radiation were obtained as the injected frequency was varied in small steps around these harmonics. The experimental results are attributed to

  2. Frequency Domain Fluorescent Molecular Tomography and Molecular Probes for Small Animal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujala, Naresh Gandhi

    Fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) is a noninvasive biomedical optical imaging that enables 3-dimensional quantitative determination of fluorochromes distributed in biological tissues. There are three methods for imaging large volume tissues based on different light sources: (a) using a light source of constant intensity, through a continuous or constant wave, (b) using a light source that is intensity modulated with a radio frequency (RF), and (c) using ultrafast pulses in the femtosecond range. In this study, we have developed a frequency domain fluorescent molecular tomographic system based on the heterodyne technique, using a single source and detector pair that can be used for small animal imaging. In our system, the intensity of the laser source is modulated with a RF frequency to produce a diffuse photon density wave in the tissue. The phase of the diffuse photon density wave is measured by comparing the reference signal with the signal from the tissue using a phasemeter. The data acquisition was performed by using a Labview program. The results suggest that we can measure the phase change from the heterogeneous inside tissue. Combined with fiber optics and filter sets, the system can be used to sensitively image the targeted fluorescent molecular probes, allowing the detection of cancer at an early stage. We used the system to detect the tumor-targeting molecular probe Alexa Fluor 680 and Alexa Fluor 750 bombesin peptide conjugates in phantoms as well as mouse tissues. We also developed and evaluated fluorescent Bombesin (BBN) probes to target gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors for optical molecular imaging. GRP receptors are over-expressed in several types of human cancer cells, including breast, prostate, small cell lung, and pancreatic cancers. BBN is a 14 amino acid peptide that is an analogue to human gastrin-releasing peptide that binds specifically to GRPr receptors. BBN conjugates are significant in cancer detection and therapy. The optical molecular probe AF750 BBN peptide exhibits optimal pharmacokinetic properties for targeting GRPr in mice. Fluorescent microscopic imaging of the molecular probe in PC-3 prostate and T-47D breast cancer cell lines indicated specific uptake, internalization, and receptor blocking of these probes. In vivo investigations in severely compromised immunodeficient (SCID) mice bearing xenografted PC-3 prostate and T47-D breast cancer lesions demonstrated the ability of this new molecular probe to specifically target tumor tissue with high selectively and affinity.

  3. High-frequency annular array with coaxial illumination for dual-modality ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Filoux, Erwan; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chitnis, Parag V.; Aristizábal, Orlando; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a combined ultrasound and photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) system used to obtain high-quality, co-registered images of mouse-embryo anatomy and vasculature. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >20 MHz) is utilized to obtain high-resolution anatomical images of small animals while PAI provides high-contrast images of the vascular network. The imaging system is based on a 40 MHz, 5-element, 6 mm aperture annular-array transducer with a 800 ?m diameter hole through its central element. The transducer was integrated in a cage-plate assembly allowing for a collimated laser beam to pass through the hole so that the optical and acoustic beams were collinear. The assembly was mounted on a two-axis, motorized stage to enable the simultaneous acquisition of co-registered HFU and PA volumetric data. Data were collected from all five elements in receive and a synthetic-focusing algorithm was applied in post-processing to beamform the data and increase the spatial resolution and depth-of-field (DOF) of the HFU and PA images. Phantom measurements showed that the system could achieve high-resolution images (down to 90 ?m for HFU and 150 ?m for PAI) and a large DOF of >8 mm. Volume renderings of a mouse embryo showed that the scanner allowed for visualizing morphologically precise anatomy of the entire embryo along with corresponding co-registered vasculature. Major head vessels, such as the superior sagittal sinus or rostral vein, were clearly identified as well as limb bud vasculature. PMID:23742556

  4. Low-frequency MTF estimation for digital imaging devices using slanted-edge analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Don; Burns, Peter D.

    2003-12-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) metrology and interpretation for digital image capture devices has usually concentrated on mid- to high-frequency information, relative to the half-sampling frequency. These regions typically quantify characteristics and operations such as sharpening, limiting resolution, and aliasing. However, a potential wealth of low-frequency, visually significant information is often masked in existing measurement results because of spatial data truncation. For print or document scanners, this influences measurements in the spatial frequency range of 0 to 2.0 cycles/mm, where the effects of veiling flare, micro flare, and integrating cavity effect (ICE) often manifest themselves. Using a form of edge-gradient analysis based on slanted edges, we present a method for measurement of these characteristics. By carefully adapting this well-established technique, these phenomena can be quantified. We also show how, in many cases, these effects can be treated as other spread-function or device-MTF components. The theory and field metrology of several devices using the adapted technique are also presented.

  5. Wavelength optimization for rapid chromophore mapping using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Amaan; Dell, Steven; Cuccia, David J.; Gioux, Sylvain; Durkin, Anthony J.; Frangioni, John V.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) utilizes multiple-frequency structured illumination and model-based computation to generate two-dimensional maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties. SFDI absorption data are measured at multiple wavelengths and used to fit for the tissue concentration of intrinsic chromophores in each pixel. This is done with a priori knowledge of the basis spectra of common tissue chromophores, such as oxyhemoglobin (ctO2Hb), deoxyhemoglobin (ctHHb), water (ctH2O), and bulk lipid. The quality of in vivo SFDI fits for the hemoglobin parameters ctO2Hb and ctHHb is dependent on wavelength selection, fitting parameters, and acquisition rate. The latter is critical because SFDI acquisition time is up to six times longer than planar two-wavelength multispectral imaging due to projection of multiple-frequency spatial patterns. Thus, motion artifact during in vivo measurements compromises the quality of the reconstruction. Optimal wavelength selection is examined through matrix decomposition of basis spectra, simulation of data, and dynamic in vivo measurements of a human forearm during cuff occlusion. Fitting parameters that minimize cross-talk from additional tissue chromophores, such as water and lipid, are determined. On the basis of this work, a wavelength pair of 670 nm?850 nm is determined to be the optimal two-wavelength combination for in vivo hemodynamic tissue measurements provided that assumptions for water and lipid fractions are made in the fitting process. In our SFDI case study, wavelength optimization reduces acquisition time over 30-fold to 1.5s compared to 50s for a full 34-wavelength acquisition. The wavelength optimization enables dynamic imaging of arterial occlusions with improved spatial resolution due to reduction of motion artifacts. PMID:21198164

  6. On the imaging of radio-frequency electromagnetic data forcross-borehole mineral exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Chouteau, M.; Boerner, D. E.; Wang, J.

    1998-11-01

    Radio-frequency (typically from 0.1 to 20 MHz) electromagneti c methods are powerful tools for locating conductive mineralization in ore exploration and mine development. Yet data interpretation is complicated by the non-linear relationship between the observed electric and magnetic fields and the electrical parameters of the Earth. The principal means of quantifying inversion capabilities is to compute synthetic data sets using accurate numerical models and to perform the inversion under controlled conditions. Our specific interest is in locating 3-D bodies that are highly conductive relative to the host rock. An excellent approximation for this class of targets, at least at radio frequencies, is to assume that the bodies are infinitely conductive. The numerical advantage of this assumption is that inhomogeneities can be represented simply as internal boundaries where the total electric and magnetic fields are identically equal to zero. Ensuring numerical stability thus does not require excessive discretization in conductive regions since the maximum grid cell size is determined only by the electrical parameters of the host material. We use a finite-difference time-domain approach to compute the total electric and magnetic fields everywhere within the background medium and validate the code by comparisons with two analytical solutions. One common means of interpreting radio-frequency electromagnetic data is to assume linearity between the model parameters and physical response and to apply tomographic image reconstruction methods. While relatively simple and inexpensive, the limitations and applicability of tomographic imaging methods to non-linear electromagnetic data acquired in complicated, 3-D mineral exploration environments are not well understood. Our initial study involves applying the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique to recover images of the electrical properties of a conductive inclusion. Several examples show that the structural geometry of bodies between boreholes can be reliably imaged using both frequency-doma in and time-domain data. Phase data seem more amenable to recovering geometry information from tomographic reconstruction methods than amplitude data. However, attenuation data provide better constraints on the electrical properties of the geological media and thus form an essential complement to primarily geometrical information obtained from phase tomography. Non-linear inversion methods will probably be required to incorporate the amplitude data for accurate reconstructions of the subsurface.

  7. Laser frequency offset locking scheme for high-field imaging of cold atoms

    E-print Network

    Puentes, Graciana

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple and flexible frequency offset locking scheme developed for high-field imaging of ultra-cold atoms which relies on commercially available RF electronics only. The main new ingredient is the use of the sharp amplitude response of a home-made RF filter to provide an error signal for locking the lasers. We were able to offset lock two independent diode lasers within a capture range of 200 MHz, and with a tuning range of up to 1.4GHz. The beat-note residual fluctuations for offset locked lasers are bellow 2MHz for integration times of several hundreds of seconds.

  8. 24 mm depth range discretely swept optical frequency domain imaging in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuma, Hideo; Choi, DongHak; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Hiro-Oka, Hideaki; Ohbayashi, Kohji

    2009-02-01

    A large depth range is needed if optical coherence tomography (OCT) is to be used to observe multiple teeth simultaneously. A discretely swept optical frequency domain imaging system with a 24-mm depth range was made by using a superstructure-grating distributed Bragg reflector (SSG-DBR) laser as the light source and setting the frequencystep interval to be 3.13 GHz (? ~ 0.026 nm). The swept wavelength range was 40 nm centered at 1580 nm, the resolution was 29 ?m, and the A-scan rate was 1.3 kHz. Application of the OCT system to a dental phantom was demonstrated.

  9. Sources of difference frequency sound in a dual-frequency imaging system with implications for monitoring thermal surgery

    E-print Network

    Thierman, Jonathan S. (Jonathan Sidney), 1976-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) parametric effect, which can be considered an imaging artifact. Additionally, it may be possible to use the nonlinear interaction of scattered waves to form images that rely on the presence of small scatterers; a ...

  10. P4B5 The Role of Local Center Frequency Estimation in Doppler-Based Strain Imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hua Xie; Thomas Gauthier; Anna T. Fernandez

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasound frequency-dependent attenuation causes a downshift in the spectrum as ultrasound waves propagate through attenuating tissue. Therefore, assuming a constant center frequency in Doppler (autocorrelation) based strain imaging will result in displacement estimation error and ultimately affect strain values, especially when using broadband signals. Here we derive a theoretical expression, based on a Gaussian-enveloped pulse, for the strain estimation error

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Low-frequency (115-175MHz) image of M51 (Mulcahy+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, D. D.; Horneffer, A.; Beck, R.; Heald, G.; Fletcher, A.; Scaife, A.; Adebahr, B.; Anderson, J. M.; Bonafede, A.; Brueggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Chyzy, K. T.; Conway, J.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Ensslin, T.; Haverkorn, M.; Horellou, C.; Iacobelli, M.; Israel, F. P.; Junklewitz, H.; Jurusik, W.; Koehler, J.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Orru, E.; Paladino, R.; Pizzo, R.; Reich, W.; Roettgering, H. J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Stokes I FITS image of M51 observed with LOFAR High Frequency Antennas (HBA) with a mean frequency of 151MHz at 20-arcsec resolution. Full details of the data reduction are explained in section 2 of the paper. (2 data files).

  12. Characterization of collagen fibers by means of texture analysis of second harmonic generation images using orientation-dependent gray level co-occurrence matrix method.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenyan; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunyou; Gou, Shanmiao; Fu, Ling

    2012-02-01

    Collagen is the most prominent protein in the human body, making up 30% of the total protein content. Quantitative studies have shown structural differences between collagen fibers of the normal and diseased tissues, due to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the pathological process. The dominant orientation, which is an important characteristic of collagen fibers, has not been taken into consideration for quantitative collagen analysis. Based on the conventional gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method, the authors proposed the orientation-dependent GLCM (OD-GLCM) method by estimating the dominant orientation of collagen fibers. The authors validated the utility of the OD-GLCM method on second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopic images of tendons from rats with different ages. Compared with conventional GLCM method, the authors' method has not only improved the discrimination between different tissues but also provided additional texture information of the orderliness of collagen fibers and the fiber size. The OD-GLCM method was further applied to the differentiation of the preliminary SHG images of normal and cancerous human pancreatic tissues. The combination of SHG microscopy and the OD-GLCM method might be helpful for the evaluation of diseases marked with abnormal collagen morphology. PMID:22463039

  13. Characterization of collagen fibers by means of texture analysis of second harmonic generation images using orientation-dependent gray level co-occurrence matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenyan; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunyou; Gou, Shanmiao; Fu, Ling

    2012-02-01

    Collagen is the most prominent protein in the human body, making up 30% of the total protein content. Quantitative studies have shown structural differences between collagen fibers of the normal and diseased tissues, due to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the pathological process. The dominant orientation, which is an important characteristic of collagen fibers, has not been taken into consideration for quantitative collagen analysis. Based on the conventional gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method, the authors proposed the orientation-dependent GLCM (OD-GLCM) method by estimating the dominant orientation of collagen fibers. The authors validated the utility of the OD-GLCM method on second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopic images of tendons from rats with different ages. Compared with conventional GLCM method, the authors' method has not only improved the discrimination between different tissues but also provided additional texture information of the orderliness of collagen fibers and the fiber size. The OD-GLCM method was further applied to the differentiation of the preliminary SHG images of normal and cancerous human pancreatic tissues. The combination of SHG microscopy and the OD-GLCM method might be helpful for the evaluation of diseases marked with abnormal collagen morphology.

  14. High frequency photoacoustic imaging for in vivo visualizing blood flow of zebrafish heart.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyoung; Cummins, Thomas M; Harrison, Michael; Lee, Jungwoo; Zhou, Qifa; Lien, Ching-Ling; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-06-17

    A technique on high frame rate(28fps), high frequency co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging for visualizing zebrafish heart blood flow was demonstrated. This approach was achieved with a 40MHz light weight(0.38g) ring-type transducer, serving as the ultrasound transmitter and receiver, to allow an optic fiber, coupled with a 532nm laser, to be inserted into the hole. From the wire target study, axial resolutions of 38µm and 42µm were obtained for ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging, respectively. Carbon nanotubes were utilized as contrast agents to increase the flow signal level by 20dB in phantom studies, and zebrafish heart blood flow was successfully observed. PMID:23787651

  15. High-frequency scannerless imaging laser radar for industrial inspection and measurement applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.L.; Williams, R.J.; Matthews, J.D.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a high-frequency scannerless imaging laser radar system to evaluate its viability as an industrial inspection and measurement sensor. We modified an existing 5.5-Mhz scannerless laser radar to operate at 150 Mhz, and measured its performance including its spatial resolution and range resolution. We also developed new algorithms that allow rapid data reduction with improved range resolution. The resulting 150-Mhz ladar system demonstrated a range resolution of better than 3 mm, which represents nearly a factor-of-100 improvement in range resolution over the existing scannerless laser radar system. Based on this work, we believe that a scannerless range imager with 1- to 2-mm range resolution is feasible. This work was performed as part of a small-business CRADA between Sandia National Laboratories and Perceptron, Inc.

  16. High Frequency PMN-PT 1–3 Composite Transducer for Ultrasonic Imaging Application

    PubMed Central

    SUN, PING; WANG, GAOFENG; WU, DAWEI; ZHU, BENPENG; HU, CHANGHONG; LIU, CHANGGENG; DJUTH, FRANK T.; ZHOU, QIFA; SHUNG, K. KIRK

    2011-01-01

    Development of PMN-PT single crystal/epoxy 1–3 composites for high-frequency ultrasonic transducers application is presented. The composite was fabricated by using a DRIE dry etching process with a 45% volume fraction of PMN-PT. A 35 MHz ultrasound flat transducer was fabricated with the composite, which was found to have an effective electromechanical coupling coefficient of 0.81, an insertion loss of 18 db, and a –6 dB bandwidth as high as 100%. Tungsten wire phantom image shows that the transducer had an axial resolution of 30 ?m, which was in good agreement with the theoretical expectation. The initial results showed that the PMN-PT/epoxy 1–3 composite has many attractive properties over conventional piezoelectric materials for medical imaging applications. PMID:21869845

  17. Safe range gated imaging LIDAR with a nanosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, Roberto; Wallhead, Ian; Molina, Teresa

    2014-05-01

    In this work we have constructed a range gated imaging LIDAR with the aim to show the potential of this technique as well as to further determine aspects such as the typical energy per pulse needed, the illumination distribution of the laser source and the safety class. For this, we built a custom frequency doubled nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser as illumination source, a CCD coupled to a generation II image intensifier and a simple progressive delays set for the camera gate using a pulse delay generator. At low levels of the illumination pulse and assuming safety perimeter around the system of approx. 1.5 m, the LIDAR could be classified as class 2M. In these conditions, we could resolve objects as far as 690 m.

  18. Are harmonic recommendations according to IEEE and IEC too restrictive?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ewald F. Fuchs; Dietrich J. Roesler; Mohammad A. S. Masoum

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the effects of voltage and current harmonics on induction machines, transformers, appliances, and relays show that the present versions of IEEE and IEC are too restrictive for low-frequency voltage and current (integer) harmonics, as they apply to residential power systems. It is recommended that not rigid but flexible guidelines are established so that different harmonic

  19. Transmission characteristics of cyclotron harmonic waves in plasma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. W. Crawford; H. H. Weiss

    1966-01-01

    In recent years the importance of cyclotron harmonic waves has become apparent in many branches of plasma physics. For example, it has been demonstrated that they are involved in the anomalously high noise radiation near the electron cyclotron harmonic frequencies that has been observed from thermonuclear fusion study devices, and that they can explain the cyclotron harmonic resonances observed in

  20. Effect of Microbubble Size on Fundamental Mode High Frequency Ultrasound Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sirsi, Shashank; Feshitan, Jameel; Kwan, James; Homma, Shunichi; Borden, Mark

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound imaging using microbubble (MB) contrast agents is becoming increasingly popular in pre-clinical and small animal studies of anatomy, flow and vascular expression of molecular epitopes. Currently, in vivo imaging studies rely on highly polydisperse microbubble suspensions, which may provide a complex and varied acoustic response. In order to study the effect of individual microbubble size populations, microbubbles of 1-2 ?m, 4-5 ?m, and 6-8 ?m diameter were isolated using the technique of differential centrifugation. Size-selected microbubbles were imaged in the mouse kidney over a range of concentrations using a Visualsonics Vevo 770 ultrasound imaging system with a 40-MHz probe in fundamental mode. Results demonstrate that contrast enhancement and circulation persistence are strongly dependent on microbubble size and concentration. Large microbubbles (4-5 and 6-8 ?m) strongly enhanced the ultrasound image with positive contrast, while 1-2 ?m microbubbles showed little enhancement. For example, the total integrated contrast enhancement, measured by the area under the time-intensity curve (AUC), increased 16-fold for 6-8 ?m diameter microbubbles at 5×107 MB/bolus compared to 4-5 ?m microbubbles at the same concentration. Interestingly, 1-2 ?m diameter microbubbles, at any concentration, did not measurably enhance the integrated ultrasound signal at tissue depth, but did noticeably attenuate the signal, indicating that they had a low scattering-to-attenuation ratio. When concentration matched, larger microbubbles were more persistent in circulation. However, when volume matched, all microbubble sizes had a similar circulation half-life. These results indicated that dissolution of the gas core plays a larger role in contrast elimination than filtering by the lungs and spleen. The results of this study show that microbubbles can be tailored for optimal contrast enhancement in fundamental mode imaging. PMID:20447755

  1. Skin-scanning technique for superficial blood flow imaging using a high-frequency ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Jiun; Cheng, Chih-Hao; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a skin-scanning technique with a high-frequency ultrasound imaging system that enables images to be acquired at the fixed depth of field of a single-element focused transducer along the profile of an object contour by simultaneously moving the transducer in the horizontal and vertical directions. The scanning path, which closely parallels the profile of the object contour, was determined from the intensity difference between an object and the background in a brightness-mode image. The transducer moved along the profile of the object contour while maintaining a constant distance interval between adjacent pairs of ultrasonic signals in the horizontal direction. The image was then reconstructed by applying an alignment process to eliminate the distortion. The performance of skin-scanning technique was verified in vitro experiment using an arc-shaped phantom and the results showed a percentage error of 0.55% for the volumetric blood flow estimates. Moreover, in vivo experiment on a subcutaneous tumor was also performed. The results indicated that the proposed technique can accurately estimate the blood flow information along the profile of the object contour and avoid distortion of the morphology of blood vessels. The skin-scanning technique has potential for assessing superficial blood flows and prognoses in the oncology and dermatology fields. PMID:23850423

  2. Effect of ultrasonic transducer frequency on the registration of ultrasound to CT vertebral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Diane M.; Herring, Jeannette L.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    1999-05-01

    Researchers of computer-assisted surgical systems are seeking to reduce the invasiveness of spinal procedures through the use of intra-operative ultrasound (US). Given a favorable registration of vertebral US images to pre-operative CT scans, the individual vertebrae in physical space would be mapped to the patient's corresponding image space. In this work a method is proposed for transcutaneous localization of a lumbar vertebra in US images and a subsequent registration of vertebral surfaces from US and CT. In this study, US scans of a life-size plastic spine phantom were obtained using B-mode transducers of frequencies 3.5 and 4.5 MHz. The spine was immersed in a water tank and images from the L2 vertebra were captured in the transverse plane. A point-to-surface registration that is a modification of the Besl/McKay algorithm was applied to extracted US vertebral surface points and a triangulated surface representation of corresponding CT scans. The results of this registration have been qualitatively assessed, and both data sets visually algin along the entire L2 vertebra. Presently, more than 250,000 lumbo-sacral spinal surgeries are performed annually; consequently, minimizing the intervention in this region could have an extensive positive effect for both the procedure and the patient.

  3. Spatial frequency-dependent signal-to-noise ratio as a generalized measure of image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Philipp; Batz, Lothar; Ruhrnschopf, Ernst-Peter; Hoheisel, Martin

    2005-04-01

    A generalized, objective image quality measure can be defined for X-ray based medical projection imaging: the spatial frequency-dependent signal-to-noise ratio SNR = SNR(u,v). This function includes the three main image quality parameters, i.e. spatial resolution, object contrast, and noise. The quantity is intimately related to the DQE concept, however its focus is not to characterize the detector, but rather the detectability of a certain object embedded into a defined background. So also effects from focus size and radiation scatter can be quantified by this method. The SNR(u,v) is independent of basic linear post-processing steps such as appropriate windowing or spatial filtering. The consideration of the human visual system is beyond the scope of this concept. By means of this quantity, different X-ray systems and setups can be compared with each other and with theoretical calculations. Moreover, X-ray systems (i.e. detector, beam quality, geometry, anti-scatter grid, basic linear post-processing steps etc.) can be optimized to deliver the best object detectability for a given patient dose. In this paper SNR(u,v) is defined using analytical formulas. Furthermore, we demonstrate how it can be applied with a test phantom to a typical flat panel detector system by a combination of analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. Finally the way this function can be used to optimize an X-ray imaging device is demonstrated.

  4. Fast, limited-data photoacoustic imaging for multiplexed systems using a frequency-domain estimation technique

    PubMed Central

    Gamelin, John K.; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A new frequency-domain estimation algorithm has been developed that uses a priori information to simultaneously improve imaging quality and time resolution in photoacoustic tomography with incomplete data sets. Methods: The method involves application of a single-stage Wiener optimal filter to augment data sets by interpolation between measurement locations using relationships determined in a reference scan. The filter can be applied in real-time using FFT methods using either fixed or dynamic references and used with any imaging algorithm. The performance of the method is compared to a modified version of constrained backprojection algorithms using simulations and experimental investigations. Results: Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach for tracking dynamic photoacoustic activity for data sets with limited views (90°) or tomographic views with a reduced number of acquisition angles at any given time (?32). Experimental data of contrast uptake and washout using a 512-element curved transducer with 8:1 electronic multiplexing with the algorithm demonstrate full two-dimensional tomographic imaging with a temporal resolution better than 130 ms. Conclusions: The estimation algorithm enables high spatial resolution, real-time imaging of dynamic physiological events or volumetric regions for photoacoustic systems employing multiplexing or scanning. PMID:21520862

  5. Sunspots and Their Simple Harmonic Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, C. I.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an example of a simple harmonic motion, the apparent motion of sunspots due to the Sun's rotation, is described, which can be used to teach this subject to high-school students. Using real images of the Sun, students can calculate the star's rotation period with the simple harmonic motion mathematical expression.

  6. Harmonic retrieval of regenerative machining chatter responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Wencai; Lin, Jieqiong

    2013-12-01

    Based on cross fourth-order cumulants, a total least square ESPRIT approach to jointly estimating harmonic parameters in hybrid colored noises is presented, which is applied to investigate the harmonic retrieval of regenerative machining chatter responses. Taking into consideration the multiple-regenerative effect, the delayed machining dynamics under the excitation of stochastic noises is modeled, and a recursive algorithm of the solution to the delayed machining dynamics is proposed. The harmonic parameter estimation of regenerative chatter responses is detailed, which include the harmonic frequencies, cross powers, and phase shifts between successive cuts. The results demonstrate that the presented harmonic parameter estimation approach can eliminate the hybrid colored noises, retrieve the harmonic parameters with excellent estimation performance, and extract the evolution features of regenerative machining chatter.

  7. Frequency-domain seismic modeling with the MUMPS sparse direct solver: application to the imaging of the

    E-print Network

    Uçar, Bora

    Frequency-domain seismic modeling with the MUMPS sparse direct solver: application to the imaging of the earth's interior. Abstract Seismic imaging has many applications in civil engineering, risk hazard the complete resolution of the partial differential wave equation. Once the wave equation has been solved

  8. Second-harmonic generation and the conservation of orbital angular momentum with high-order Laguerre-Gaussian modes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Courtial; K. Dholakia; L. Allen; M. J. Padgett

    1997-01-01

    Laguerre-Gaussian modes of various order are frequency doubled. The azimuthal phase structure of the second-harmonic light is measured directly by interfering the beam with its mirror image. We show that the orbital angular momentum per photon is doubled, so conserving the orbital angular momentum in the light beam. The frequency-doubled output beam is shown to have a Gegenbauer-Gaussian amplitude distribution

  9. Harmonic Current Suppression for PMSM by Repetitive Perfect Tracking Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    PM motor drives are widely used for high performance servo applications. However, PM motor has imperfect sinusoidal flux distribution which causes harmonic current. Dead time of inverter and current measurement error leads to harmonic current, too. The repetitive control method was applied to the harmonic current suppression. For the repetitive control which is based on the internal model principle, the characteristic of the harmonic suppression is excellent. However, it amplifies inter-harmonic components. The inter-harmonic components have frequencies with non-integral multiples of the fundamental frequency. Therefore, the feedforward compensation is applied for the harmonic current to improve a suppression characteristic. Authors proposed harmonic current suppression control of PM motor in ?? coordinate by using repetitive perfect tracking control with PWM-hold model. Finally, we show the advantages of proposed method by simulations and experiments.

  10. Comparison of Focused and Near-Field Imaging of Spray on Foam Insulation (SOFI) at Millimeter Wave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharkovshy, S.; Zoughi, R.; Hepburn, F. L.

    2007-01-01

    Millimeter wave imaging techniques can provide high spatial-resolution images of various composites. Lens antennas may be incorporated into the imaging system to provide a small incident beam footprint. Another approach may involve the use of horn antennas, which if operating in their near-fields, images with reasonably high spatial-resolutions may also be obtained. This paper gives a comparison between such near-field and focused far-field imaging of the Space Shuttle Spray on Foam Insulation (SOFI) used in its external fuel tank at millimeter wave frequencies. Small horn antennas and lens antennas with relatively long depth of focus were used in this investigation.

  11. Preoperative Mapping of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Using Spatial Frequency Domain and Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Muffoletto, Daniel; Huihui, Jonathan; Saager, Rolf; Keymel, Kenneth; Paquette, Anne; Morgan, Janet; Zeitouni, Nathalie; Sunar, Ulas

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is usually by surgical excision or Mohs micrographic surgery and alternatively may include photodynamic therapy (PDT). To guide surgery and to optimize PDT, information about the tumor structure, optical parameters, and vasculature is desired. Materials and Methods Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) can map optical absorption, scattering, and fluorescence parameters that can enhance tumor contrast and quantify light and photosensitizer dose. High frequency ultrasound (HFUS) imaging can provide high-resolution tumor structure and depth, which is useful for both surgery and PDT planning. Results Here, we present preliminary results from our recently developed clinical instrument for patients with NMSC. We quantified optical absorption and scattering, blood oxygen saturation (StO2), and total hemoglobin concentration (THC) with SFDI and lesion thickness with ultrasound. These results were compared to histological thickness of excised tumor sections. Conclusions SFDI quantified optical parameters with high precision, and multiwavelength analysis enabled 2D mappings of tissue StO2 and THC. HFUS quantified tumor thickness that correlated well with histology. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the instrument for noninvasive mapping of optical, physiological, and ultrasound contrasts in human skin tumors for surgery guidance and therapy planning. PMID:24439339

  12. Frequency-selective quantification of skin perfusion behavior during allergic testing using photoplethysmography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanik, Nikolai; Blazek, Claudia; Pereira, Carina; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis of allergic immediate-type reactions is dependent on the visual assessment of the attending physician. With our novel non-obtrusive, camera-based photoplethysmography imaging (PPGI) setup, perfusion in the allergic testing area can be quantified and results displayed with spatial resolution in functional mappings. Thereby, each PPGI camera pixel can be assumed to be a classical (skin-based) reflective mode PPG sensor. An algorithm for post-processing of collected PPGI video sequences was developed to transfer black-and-white PPGI images into virtual 3D perfusion maps. For the first time, frequency selected perfusion quantification was assessed. For the presented evaluation, PPGI data from our clinical study were used [1]. For this purpose, different concentrations of histamine dilutions were administered to 27 healthy volunteers. Our results show clear trends in an increase in heartbeat synchronous perfusion rhythms and, simultaneously, a decrease of lower frequency vasomotor rhythms in these areas. These results, published for the first time, allow new insight into the distribution of skin perfusion dynamics and demonstrate the intuitive clinical usability of the proposed system.

  13. A Nonlinear Harmonic Model for Fitting Satellite Image Time Series: Analysis and Prediction of Land Cover Dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugo Carrao; P. Gonalves; Mário Caetano

    2010-01-01

    Numerous efforts have been made to develop models to fit multispectral reflectance and vegetation index (VI) time series from satellite images for diverse land cover classes. The common objective of these models is to derive a set of measurable parameters that are able to characterize and to reproduce the land cover dynamics of natural- and human-induced ecosystems. Good-fitting models should

  14. Frequency-dependent processing and interpretation (FDPI) of seismic data for identifying, imaging and monitoring fluid-saturated underground reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Goloshubin, Gennady M.; Korneev, Valeri A.

    2006-11-14

    A method for identifying, imaging and monitoring dry or fluid-saturated underground reservoirs using seismic waves reflected from target porous or fractured layers is set forth. Seismic imaging the porous or fractured layer occurs by low pass filtering of the windowed reflections from the target porous or fractured layers leaving frequencies below low-most corner (or full width at half maximum) of a recorded frequency spectra. Additionally, the ratio of image amplitudes is shown to be approximately proportional to reservoir permeability, viscosity of fluid, and the fluid saturation of the porous or fractured layers.

  15. The motion analysis of fire video images based on moment features and flicker frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Fong, N. K.; Chow, W. K.; Wong, L. T.; Lu, Puyi; Xu, Dian-Guo

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, motion analysis methods based on the moment features and flicker frequency features for early fire flame from ordinary CCD video camera were proposed, and in order to describe the changing of flame and disturbance of non-flame phenomena further more, the average changing pixel number of the first-order moments of consecutive flames has been defined in the moment analysis as well. The first-order moments of all kinds of flames used in our experiments present irregularly flickering, and their average changing pixel numbers of first-order moments are greater than fire-like disturbances. For the analysis of flicker frequency of flame, which is extracted and calculated in spatial domain, and therefore it is computational simple and fast. The method of extracting flicker frequency from video images is not affected by the catalogues of combustion material and distance. In experiments, we adopted two kinds of flames, i. e., fixed flame and movable flame. Many comparing and disturbing experiments were done and verified that the methods can be used as criteria for early fire detection.

  16. Extended radar observations with the frequency radar domain interferometric imaging (FII) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.; Crochet, M.

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we present high-resolution observations obtained with the Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU) radar (Shigaraki, Japan, /34.85°N, /136.10°E) using the frequency radar domain interferometric imaging (FII) technique. This technique has recently been introduced for improving the range resolution capabilities of the mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars which are limited by their minimum pulse length. The Fourier-based imaging, the Capon method have been performed with 5 equally spaced frequencies between 46.25 and 46.75MHz and with an initial range resolution of 300m. These results have been compared firstly to results obtained using the frequency domain interferometry (FDI) technique with ?f=0.5MHz and, secondly, to results from a classical Doppler beam swinging (DBS) mode applied with a range resolution of 150m. Thin echoing structures could be tracked owing to the improved radar range resolution and some complex structures possibly related to Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities have been detected. Indeed, these structures appeared within the core of a wind shear and were associated with intense vertical wind fluctuations. Moreover, a well-defined thin echo layer was found in an altitude range located below the height of the wind shear. The radar observations have not been fully interpreted yet because the radar configuration was not adapted for this kind of study and because of the lack of complementary information provided by other techniques when the interesting echoing phenomena occurred. However, the results confirm the high potentialities of the FII technique for the study of atmospheric dynamics at small scales.

  17. A new x-ray scatter reduction method based on frequency division multiplexing x-ray imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Chang, S.; Lu, J. P.; Zhou, O.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray scatter may significantly degrade imaging performance in x-ray radiography applications, including flatpanel detector-based x-ray imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT (CBCT), primarily due to their large projection field sizes. It results in soft tissue contrast reduction, potentially severe image artifacts, and increased patient dose. Several different approaches have been developed to reject the scatter contributions, including analytical calculation, empirical algorithms, Monte-Carlo simulation, blocker based measurement, and slot scan technique. We recently developed a new x-ray scatter rejection method based on nanotechnology-enabled frequency division multiplexing x-ray (FDMX) imaging technique. The key enabling technology is the carbon nanotube (CNT)-based multi-beam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technology. The proposed FDMX imaging system has a MBFEX source with an array of x-ray tubes. The x-ray radiation from each individual x-ray tube is modulated at a certain given frequency. The collimated x-ray beams passed through the object and were captured by a high speed x-ray detector. A demultiplexing algorithm was applied to reject the scatter radiation from the primary radiation based on their different modulation frequencies. The x-ray images generated by the FDMX imaging technique clearly demonstrated improved imaging quality in terms of lower scatter-to-primary-ratio (SPR) and higher contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). It shows great potential of improving x-ray imaging performance and reducing patient dose.

  18. Experimental Study of High-Range-Resolution Medical Acoustic Imaging for Multiple Target Detection by Frequency Domain Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Sato, Toru

    2009-07-01

    We employed frequency domain interferometry (FDI) for use as a medical acoustic imager to detect multiple targets with high range resolution. The phase of each frequency component of an echo varies with the frequency, and target intervals can be estimated from the phase variance. This processing technique is generally used in radar imaging. When the interference within a range gate is coherent, the cross correlation between the desired signal and the coherent interference signal is nonzero. The Capon method works under the guiding principle that output power minimization cancels the desired signal with a coherent interference signal. Therefore, we utilize frequency averaging to suppress the correlation of the coherent interference. The results of computational simulations using a pseudoecho signal show that the Capon method with adaptive frequency averaging (AFA) provides a higher range resolution than a conventional method. These techniques were experimentally investigated and we confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method of processing by FDI.

  19. A method for the frequency control in time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Shogo; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu, E-mail: omatsuda@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)] [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We describe an extension of the time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging based on the optical pump-probe technique with periodic light source at a fixed repetition frequency. Usually such imaging measurement may generate and detect acoustic waves with their frequencies only at or near the integer multiples of the repetition frequency. Here we propose a method which utilizes the amplitude modulation of the excitation pulse train to modify the generation frequency free from the mentioned limitation, and allows for the first time the discrimination of the resulted upper- and lower-side-band frequency components in the detection. The validity of the method is demonstrated in a simple measurement on an isotropic glass plate covered by a metal thin film to extract the dispersion curves of the surface acoustic waves.

  20. Biophysical control of intertidal benthic macroalgae revealed by high-frequency multispectral camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Daphne; van Dalen, Jeroen; Wielemaker-van den Dool, Annette; Dijkstra, Jasper T.; Ysebaert, Tom

    2014-07-01

    Intertidal benthic macroalgae are a biological quality indicator in estuaries and coasts. While remote sensing has been applied to quantify the spatial distribution of such macroalgae, it is generally not used for their monitoring. We examined the day-to-day and seasonal dynamics of macroalgal cover on a sandy intertidal flat using visible and near-infrared images from a time-lapse camera mounted on a tower. Benthic algae were identified using supervised, semi-supervised and unsupervised classification techniques, validated with monthly ground-truthing over one year. A supervised classification (based on maximum likelihood, using training areas identified in the field) performed best in discriminating between sediment, benthic diatom films and macroalgae, with highest spectral separability between macroalgae and diatoms in spring/summer. An automated unsupervised classification (based on the Normalised Differential Vegetation Index NDVI) allowed detection of daily changes in macroalgal coverage without the need for calibration. This method showed a bloom of macroalgae (filamentous green algae, Ulva sp.) in summer with > 60% cover, but with pronounced superimposed day-to-day variation in cover. Waves were a major factor in regulating macroalgal cover, but regrowth of the thalli after a summer storm was fast (2 weeks). Images and in situ data demonstrated that the protruding tubes of the polychaete Lanice conchilega facilitated both settlement (anchorage) and survival (resistance to waves) of the macroalgae. Thus, high-frequency, high resolution images revealed the mechanisms for regulating the dynamics in cover of the macroalgae and for their spatial structuring. Ramifications for the mode, timing, frequency and evaluation of monitoring macroalgae by field and remote sensing surveys are discussed.