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Sample records for frequency harmonic imaging

  1. Sparse SAR imaging for a stepped-frequency harmonic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Gallagher, Kyle; Ranney, Kenneth

    2015-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory is studying the feasibility of using stepped-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for the detection of nonlinear targets with harmonic frequency responses. The approach would filter out all natural clutter and manmade objects in the scene that do not have responses in the harmonic frequency bands. In this paper, we show the formulation of SAR imaging using harmonic responses from nonlinear targets. We also show the degradation in SAR image quality when the radar operates in a restricted and congested frequency spectrum where a significant percentage of the spectrum is either reserved or used by other systems. Fortunately, due to the sparse nature of the nonlinear objects in a typical scene, information in the missing frequency bands can be recovered to reduce the artifacts in SAR imagery. In this paper, we apply our sparse recovery technique to estimate the information in the missing frequency bands. Recovery performance in both raw data and SAR image domain is demonstrated using simulation and measured data from experiment.

  2. 20 MHz/40 MHz Dual Element Transducers for High Frequency Harmonic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Ham; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Liu, Ruibin; Chang, Jin Ho; Silverman, Ronald H.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    Concentric annular type dual element transducers for second harmonic imaging at 20 MHz / 40 MHz were designed and fabricated to improve spatial resolution and depth of penetration for ophthalmic imaging applications. The outer ring element was designed to transmit the 20 MHz signal and the inner circular element was designed to receive the 40 MHz second harmonic signal. Lithium niobate (LiNbO3), with its low dielectric constant, was used as the piezoelectric material to achieve good electrical impedance matching. Double matching layers and conductive backing were used and optimized by KLM modeling to achieve high sensitivity and wide bandwidth for harmonic imaging and superior time-domain characteristics. Prototype transducers were fabricated and evaluated quantitatively and clinically. The average measured center frequency for the transmit ring element was 21 MHz and the one-way 3 dB bandwidth was greater than 50%. The 40 MHz receive element functioned at 31 MHz center frequency with acceptable bandwidth to receive attenuated and frequency downshifted harmonic signal. The lateral beam profile for the 20 MHz ring elements at the focus matched the Field II simulated results well, and the effect of outer ring diameter was also examined. Images of a posterior segment of an excised pig eye and a choroidal nevus of human eye were obtained both for single element and dual element transducers and compared to demonstrate the advantages of dual element harmonic imaging. PMID:19126492

  3. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for the design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers.

  4. Ultrasound harmonic imaging with reducing speckle noise by spatial-frequency compounding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua

    2015-12-01

    Speckle noise is a phenomenon inherent in any coherent imaging process and decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which brings down the imaging quality. Speckle noise reduction is particularly important in the tissue harmonic imaging (THI) since it has the lower energy and the poorer SNR than the fundamental imaging (FI). Recently plane wave imaging (PWI) has been widely explored. Since the entire imaging region can be covered in one emission, the frame rate increases greatly. In PWI, speckle can be reduced by incoherently averaging images with different speckle patterns. Such images can be acquired by varying the angle from which a target is imaged (spatial compounding, SC) or by changing the spectrum of the pulse (frequency compounding, FC). In this paper we demonstrate here that each approach is only a partial solution and that combining them provides a better result than applying either approach separately. We propose a spatial-frequency compounding (SFC) method for THI. The new method brings a good speckle suppression result. To illustrate the performance of our method, experiments have been conducted on the simulated data. A nonlinear simulation platform based on the full-wave model is used in the harmonic imaging simulation. Results show that our method brings the SNR an improvement of up to 50% in comparison with the single frame HI while maintaining a far better performance in both terms of resolution and contrast than the FI. Similar results can be obtained from our further experiments.

  5. Orthogonal Encoding for High-bit Golay Excitation in Dual-Frequency Harmonic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Che-Chou; Peng, Chun-Kai

    Dual-frequency (DF) harmonic imaging simultaneously utilizes the imaging information at both f0and 2f0 frequencies. When phase-coded complementary Golay sequence is combined with DF harmonic imaging to improve signal-to-noise ratio, however, the mutual crosstalk between the f0and 2f0 imaging bands may degrade the image quality. In this study, orthogonal encoding is proposed to suppress the crosstalk artifacts byencoding the f0 and 2f0imaging signals as a1(n) and a2(n) sequence in the first firing and b1(n) and b2(n) sequence in the second firing. The a1(n), b1(n) is one complementary Golay pair and the a2(n), b2(n) is another complementary Golay pair. The two complementary pairs are orthogonal to each other. Both hydrophone measurement and B-mode imaging show that the orthogonal encoding effectively suppresses the mutual crosstalk and restore the resultant main lobe width after Golay decoding.

  6. Harmonic Frequency Lowering

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm for frequency lowering in music was developed and experimentally tested in hearing-impaired listeners. Harmonic frequency lowering (HFL) combines frequency transposition and frequency compression to preserve the harmonic content of music stimuli. Listeners were asked to make judgments regarding detail and sound quality in music stimuli. Stimuli were presented under different signal processing conditions: original, low-pass filtered, HFL, and nonlinear frequency compressed. Results showed that participants reported perceiving the most detail in the HFL condition. In addition, there was no difference in sound quality across conditions. PMID:26834122

  7. A parallel adaptive finite element simplified spherical harmonics approximation solver for frequency domain fluorescence molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yujie; Zhu, Banghe; Shen, Haiou; Rasmussen, John C.; Wang, Ge; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2010-08-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging/tomography may play an important future role in preclinical research and clinical diagnostics. Time- and frequency-domain fluorescence imaging can acquire more measurement information than the continuous wave (CW) counterpart, improving the image quality of fluorescence molecular tomography. Although diffusion approximation (DA) theory has been extensively applied in optical molecular imaging, high-order photon migration models need to be further investigated to match quantitation provided by nuclear imaging. In this paper, a frequency-domain parallel adaptive finite element solver is developed with simplified spherical harmonics (SPN) approximations. To fully evaluate the performance of the SPN approximations, a fast time-resolved tetrahedron-based Monte Carlo fluorescence simulator suitable for complex heterogeneous geometries is developed using a convolution strategy to realize the simulation of the fluorescence excitation and emission. The validation results show that high-order SPN can effectively correct the modeling errors of the diffusion equation, especially when the tissues have high absorption characteristics or when high modulation frequency measurements are used. Furthermore, the parallel adaptive mesh evolution strategy improves the modeling precision and the simulation speed significantly on a realistic digital mouse phantom. This solver is a promising platform for fluorescence molecular tomography using high-order approximations to the radiative transfer equation.

  8. Dual-frequency super harmonic imaging piezoelectric transducers for transrectal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinwook; Li, Sibo; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a 2/14 MHz dual-frequency single-element transducer and a 2/22 MHz sub-array (16/48-elements linear array) transducer were developed for contrast enhanced super-harmonic ultrasound imaging of prostate cancer with the low frequency ultrasound transducer as a transmitter for contrast agent (microbubble) excitation and the high frequency transducer as a receiver for detection of nonlinear responses from microbubbles. The 1-3 piezoelectric composite was used as active materials of the single-element transducers due to its low acoustic impedance and high coupling factor. A high dielectric constant PZT ceramic was used for the sub-array transducer due to its high dielectric property induced relatively low electrical impedance. The possible resonance modes of the active elements were estimated using finite element analysis (FEA). The pulse-echo response, peak-negative pressure and bubble response were tested, followed by in vitro contrast imaging tests using a graphite-gelatin tissue-mimicking phantom. The single-element dual frequency transducer (8 4 2 mm3) showed a -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 56.5% for the transmitter, and 41.8% for the receiver. A 2 MHz-transmitter (730 ?m pitch and 6.5 mm elevation aperture) and a 22 MHz-receiver (240 ?m pitch and 1.5 mm aperture) of the sub-array transducer exhibited -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 51.0% and 40.2%, respectively. The peak negative pressure at the far field was about -1.3 MPa with 200 Vpp, 1-cycle 2 MHz burst, which is high enough to excite microbubbles for nonlinear responses. The 7th harmonic responses from micro bubbles were successfully detected in the phantom imaging test showing a contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of 16 dB.

  9. Color harmonization for images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhen; Miao, Zhenjiang; Wan, Yanli; Wang, Zhifei

    2011-04-01

    Color harmonization is an artistic technique to adjust a set of colors in order to enhance their visual harmony so that they are aesthetically pleasing in terms of human visual perception. We present a new color harmonization method that treats the harmonization as a function optimization. For a given image, we derive a cost function based on the observation that pixels in a small window that have similar unharmonic hues should be harmonized with similar harmonic hues. By minimizing the cost function, we get a harmonized image in which the spatial coherence is preserved. A new matching function is proposed to select the best matching harmonic schemes, and a new component-based preharmonization strategy is proposed to preserve the hue distribution of the harmonized images. Our approach overcomes several shortcomings of the existing color harmonization methods. We test our algorithm with a variety of images to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  10. A theory of frequency domain invariants: spherical harmonic identities for BRDF/lighting transfer and image consistency.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Dhruv; Ramamoorthi, Ravi; Curless, Brian

    2008-02-01

    This paper develops a theory of frequency domain invariants in computer vision. We derive novel identities using spherical harmonics, which are the angular frequency domain analog to common spatial domain invariants such as reflectance ratios. These invariants are derived from the spherical harmonic convolution framework for reflection from a curved surface. Our identities apply in a number of canonical cases, including single and multiple images of objects under the same and different lighting conditions. One important case we consider is two different glossy objects in two different lighting environments. For this case, we derive a novel identity, independent of the specific lighting configurations or BRDFs, that allows us to directly estimate the fourth image if the other three are available. The identity can also be used as an invariant to detecttampering in the images. While this paper is primarily theoretical, it has the potential to lay the mathematical foundations for two important practical applications. First, we can develop more general algorithms for inverse rendering problems, which can directly relight and change material properties by transferring the BRDF or lighting from another object or illumination. Second, we can check the consistency of an image, to detect tampering or image splicing. PMID:18084053

  11. Second harmonic inversion for ultrasound contrast harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pasovic, Mirza; Danilouchkine, Mike; Faez, Telli; van Neer, Paul L M J; Cachard, Christian; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Basset, Olivier; de Jong, Nico

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are small micro-bubbles that behave nonlinearly when exposed to an ultrasound wave. This nonlinear behavior can be observed through the generated higher harmonics in a back-scattered echo. In past years several techniques have been proposed to detect or image harmonics produced by UCAs. In these proposed works, the harmonics generated in the medium during the propagation of the ultrasound wave played an important role, since these harmonics compete with the harmonics generated by the micro-bubbles. We present a method for the reduction of the second harmonic generated during nonlinear-propagation-dubbed second harmonic inversion (SHI). A general expression for the suppression signals is also derived. The SHI technique uses two pulses, p' and p?, of the same frequency f(0) and the same amplitude P(0) to cancel out the second harmonic generated by nonlinearities of the medium. Simulations show that the second harmonic is reduced by 40?dB on a large axial range. Experimental SHI B-mode images, from a tissue-mimicking phantom and UCAs, show an improvement in the agent-to-tissue ratio (ATR) of 20?dB compared to standard second harmonic imaging and 13?dB of improvement in harmonic power Doppler. PMID:21540492

  12. Impact of harmonics on the interpolated DFT frequency estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belega, Daniel; Petri, Dario; Dallet, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The paper investigates the effect of the interference due to spectral leakage on the frequency estimates returned by the Interpolated Discrete Fourier Transform (IpDFT) method based on the Maximum Sidelobe Decay (MSD) windows when harmonically distorted sine-waves are analyzed. The expressions for the frequency estimation error due to both the image of the fundamental tone and harmonics, and the frequency estimator variance due to the combined effect of both the above disturbances and wideband noise are derived. The achieved expressions allow us to identify which harmonics significantly contribute to frequency estimation uncertainty. A new IpDFT-based procedure capable to compensate all the significant effects of harmonics on the frequency estimation accuracy is then proposed. The derived theoretical results are verified through computer simulations. Moreover, the accuracy of the proposed procedure is compared with those of other state-of-the-art frequency estimation methods by means of both computer simulations and experimental results.

  13. Second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M.J.; Biwer, B.M.; Schauer, M.W.; Frye, J.M.; Gruen, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are increasingly being used as in situ surface probes. These techniques are coherent and inherently surface sensitive by the nature of the mediums response to intense laser light. Here we will review these two techniques using aqueous corrosion as an example problem. Aqueous corrosion of technologically important materials such as Fe, Ni and Cr proceeds from a reduced metal surface with layer by layer growth of oxide films mitigated by compositional changes in the chemical makeup of the growing film. Passivation of the metal surface is achieved after growth of only a few tens of atomic layers of metal oxide. Surface Second Harmonic Generation and a related nonlinear laser technique, Sum Frequency Generation have demonstrated an ability to probe the surface composition of growing films even in the presence of aqueous solutions. 96 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Fully parallel adaptive finite element simulation using the simplified spherical harmonics approximations for frequency-domain fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yujie; Zhu, Banghe; Shen, Haiou; Rasmussen, John C.; Wang, Ge; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging/tomography may play an important role in preclinical research and clinical diagnostics as a type of optical molecular. Time- and frequency-domain measurement can acquire more measurement information, reducing the ill-posedness and improving the reconstruction quality of fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography. Although the diffusion approximation (DA) theory has been extensively in optical imaging, high-order photon migration models must be further investigated for application to complex and small tissue volumes. In this paper, a frequency-domain fully parallel adaptive finite element solver is developed with the simplified spherical harmonics (SPN) approximations. To fully evaluate the performance of the SPN approximations, a fast tetrahedron-based Monte Carlo simulator suitable for complex heterogeneous geometries is developed using the convolution strategy to realize the simulation of the fluorescence excitation and emission. With simple and real digital mouse phantoms, the results show that the significant precision and speed improvements are obtained from the parallel adaptive mesh evolution strategy.

  15. Dark-field third-harmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronina-Amitonova, L. V.; Lanin, A. A.; Fedotov, I. V.; Ivashkina, O. I.; Zots, M. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Anokhin, K. V.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2013-08-01

    Coherent cancellation of third-harmonic generation (THG) in a tightly focused laser beam is shown to enable a label-free imaging of individual neurons in representative brain tissues. The intrinsic coherence of third-harmonic buildup and cancellation combined with the nonlinear nature of the process enhances the locality of the dark signal in THG, translating into a remarkable sharpness of dark-field THG images. Unique advantages of this technique for high-contrast subcellular-resolution neuroimaging are demonstrated by comparing THG images of hippocampus and somatosensory cortex in a mouse brain with images visualizing fluorescent protein biomarkers.

  16. Frequency-resolved optical grating using third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Krumbuegel, M.A.; Delong, K.W.

    1995-12-01

    We demonstrate the first frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of an laser oscillator without the time ambiguity using third-harmonic generation. The experiment agrees well with the phase-retrieved spectrograms.

  17. High Frequency Ultrasonic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shung, K Kirk

    2010-01-01

    High frequency ultrasonic imaging is considered by many to be the next frontier in ultrasound. It has many clinical applications ranging from imaging the eye and skin to small animal imaging. Small animal imaging has recently generated intense interest for the purpose of evaluating the efficacy of drugs and gene therapy. Commercial high frequency scanners often termed ultrasonic biomicroscope, or UBM, all use mechanically scanned single element transducers at frequencies between 30 to 60 MHz with a frame rate of 30 frames/second or lower. To alleviate problems with UBMs which include mechanical motion and fixed focusing, high frequency linear arrays and imaging systems in the 2050 MHz range have been developed. In this paper, current efforts in the development of high frequency ultrasonic imaging will be reviewed and potential biomedical applications discussed. PMID:20445825

  18. Plane gyroklinotron at first and third harmonics of cyclotron frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurayev, A.A.; Lukashonok, D.V.; Sinitsyn, A.K. E-mail: timka86@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    The results of gyroklinotron's parameters optimization for efficiency at f = 100 GHz with interaction on first and third harmonics of the cyclotron frequency are presented. The predicted electron gyroklinotron's efficiency reaches 70% on first harmonic and 40% on third harmonic. This is more than in usual gyrotron. Besides in contrast to usual gyrotron the width electron beam on radius of guiding centers of electron orbits in gyroklinotron may considerable exceed working wave length {lambda}. This allows to use in it considerable more power of electron beams EB then in usual gyrotron. (author)

  19. Investigation of plasma diagnostics using a dual frequency harmonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Young-Do; Cho, Sung-Won; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-09-07

    Plasma diagnostic methods using harmonic currents analysis of electrostatic probes were experimentally investigated to understand the differences in their measurement of the plasma parameters. When dual frequency voltage (?{sub 1},?{sub 2}) was applied to a probe, various harmonic currents (?{sub 1},?2?{sub 1},?{sub 2},?2?{sub 2},?{sub 2}?{sub 1},?{sub 2}2?{sub 1}) were generated due to the non-linearity of the probe sheath. The electron temperature can be obtained from the ratio of the two harmonics of the probe currents. According to the combinations of the two harmonics, the sensitivities in the measurement of the electron temperature differed, and this results in a difference of the electron temperature. From experiments and simulation, it is shown that this difference is caused by the systematic and random noise.

  20. Optimizing intracavity high harmonic generation for XUV fs frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jane; Carlson, David R; Jones, R Jason

    2011-11-01

    Previous work has shown that use of a passive enhancement cavity designed for ultrashort pulses can enable the up-conversion of the fs frequency comb into the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral region utilizing the highly nonlinear process of high harmonic generation. This promising approach for an efficient source of highly coherent light in this difficult to reach spectral region promises to be a unique tool for precision spectroscopy and temporally resolved measurements. Yet to date, this approach has not been extensively utilized due in part to the low powers so far achieved and in part due to the challenges in directly probing electronic transitions with the frequency comb itself. We report on a dramatically improved XUV frequency comb producing record power levels to date in the 50-150 nm spectral region based on intracavity high harmonic generation. We measure up to 77 ?W at the 11th harmonic of the fundamental (72 nm) with ?W levels down to the 15th harmonic (53nm). Phase-matching and related design considerations unique to intracavity high harmonic generation are discussed, guided by numerical simulations which provide insight into the role played by intracavity ionization dynamics. We further propose and analyze dual-comb spectroscopy in the XUV and show that the power levels reported here permit this approach for the first time. Dual-comb spectroscopy in this physically rich spectral region promises to enable the study of a significantly broader range of atomic and molecular spectra with unprecedented precision and accuracy. PMID:22109209

  1. Multimode Directional Coupler for Utilization of Harmonic Frequencies from TWTAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2013-01-01

    A novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC) intended for the measurement and potential utilization of the second and higher order harmonic frequencies from high-power traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs) has been successfully designed, fabricated, and tested. The design is based on the characteristic multiple propagation modes of the electrical and magnetic field components of electromagnetic waves in a rectangular waveguide. The purpose was to create a rugged, easily constructed, more efficient waveguide- based MDC for extraction and exploitation of the second harmonic signal from the RF output of high-power TWTs used for space communications. The application would be a satellitebased beacon source needed for Qband and V/W-band atmospheric propagation studies. The MDC could function as a CW narrow-band source or as a wideband source for study of atmospheric group delay effects on highdata- rate links. The MDC is fabricated from two sections of waveguide - a primary one for the fundamental frequency and a secondary waveguide for the second harmonic - that are joined together such that the second harmonic higher order modes are selectively coupled via precision- machined slots for propagation in the secondary waveguide. In the TWTA output waveguide port, both the fundamental and the second harmonic signals are present. These signals propagate in the output waveguide as the dominant and higher order modes, respectively. By including an appropriate mode selective waveguide directional coupler, such as the MDC presented here at the output of the TWTA, the power at the second harmonic can be sampled and amplified to the power level needed for atmospheric propagation studies. The important conclusions from the preliminary test results for the multimode directional coupler are: (1) the second harmonic (Ka-band) can be measured and effectively separated from the fundamental (Ku-band) with no coupling of the latter, (2) power losses in the fundamental frequency are negligible, and (3) the power level of the extracted second harmonic is sufficient for further amplification to power levels needed for practical applications. It was also demonstrated that third order and potentially higher order harmonics are measurable with this device. The design is frequency agnostic, and with the appropriate choice of waveguides, is easily scaled to higher frequency TWTs. The MDC has the same function but with a number of important advantages over the conventional diplexer.

  2. Excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fomichev, V. V.; Fainshtein, S. M.; Chernov, G. P.

    2013-05-15

    An alternative mechanism for the excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics as a result of the development of explosive instability in a weakly relativistic beam-plasma system in the solar atmosphere is proposed. The efficiency of the new mechanism as compared to the previously discussed ones is analyzed.

  3. Second harmonic generation imaging via nonlinear endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongchun; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeremy, Reynolds; Russell, Sarah; Gu, Min

    2010-01-18

    A compact endomicroscope is the only solution for transferring second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging into in vivo imaging and real time monitoring the content and structure of collagen. This is important for early diagnoses of different diseases associated with collagen change. A compact nonlinear endomicroscope using a double clad fiber (DCF) is newly employed in SHG imaging. The experiment shows the core of the DCF can maintain the linear polarization of the excitation laser beam in particular directions, and the degree of polarization of the excitation laser beam directly affects signal to noise ratio of SHG imaging. The nonlinear endomicroscope can display clear three dimensional (3D) SHG images of mouse tail tendon without the aid of contrast agents, which reveals the collagen fiber structure at different depths. The high resolution of SHG imaging from the endomicroscope shows that SHG imaging can reveal additional information about the orientation and degree of organisation of proteins and collagen fibers than two-photon-excited fluorescence imaging. Therefore SHG imaging offers endomicroscopy with additional channel of imaging for understanding more about biological phenomena. PMID:20173949

  4. Detection and Imaging of Nonmetallic Inclusions in Continuously Cast Steel Plates by Higher Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Koichiro; Ito, Toshihiro; Nagata, Yasuaki

    2010-07-01

    Nonmetallic inclusions within coarse columnar dendrites in continuously cast steel plates were detected and imaged by a nonlinear ultrasonic imaging technique. The nonlinear response of the inclusion/steel interface to tensile and compressive stress results in waveform distortion of the incident tone-burst wave, namely, higher harmonics in the frequency domain. By extracting the second harmonic with a band-pass filter and mapping the amplitude, small nonmetallic inclusions trapped at the bottom of coarse columnar dendrites were detected and imaged.

  5. Contrast and harmonic imaging improves accuracy and efficiency of novice readers for dobutamine stress echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlassak, Irmien; Rubin, David N.; Odabashian, Jill A.; Garcia, Mario J.; King, Lisa M.; Lin, Steve S.; Drinko, Jeanne K.; Morehead, Annitta J.; Prior, David L.; Asher, Craig R.; Klein, Allan L.; Thomas, James D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Newer contrast agents as well as tissue harmonic imaging enhance left ventricular (LV) endocardial border delineation, and therefore, improve LV wall-motion analysis. Interpretation of dobutamine stress echocardiography is observer-dependent and requires experience. This study was performed to evaluate whether these new imaging modalities would improve endocardial visualization and enhance accuracy and efficiency of the inexperienced reader interpreting dobutamine stress echocardiography. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-nine consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography. Both fundamental (2.5 MHZ) and harmonic (1.7 and 3.5 MHZ) mode images were obtained in four standard views at rest and at peak stress during a standard dobutamine infusion stress protocol. Following the noncontrast images, Optison was administered intravenously in bolus (0.5-3.0 ml), and fundamental and harmonic images were obtained. The dobutamine echocardiography studies were reviewed by one experienced and one inexperienced echocardiographer. LV segments were graded for image quality and function. Time for interpretation also was recorded. Contrast with harmonic imaging improved the diagnostic concordance of the novice reader to the expert reader by 7.1%, 7.5%, and 12.6% (P < 0.001) as compared with harmonic imaging, fundamental imaging, and fundamental imaging with contrast, respectively. For the novice reader, reading time was reduced by 47%, 55%, and 58% (P < 0.005) as compared with the time needed for fundamental, fundamental contrast, and harmonic modes, respectively. With harmonic imaging, the image quality score was 4.6% higher (P < 0.001) than for fundamental imaging. Image quality scores were not significantly different for noncontrast and contrast images. CONCLUSION: Harmonic imaging with contrast significantly improves the accuracy and efficiency of the novice dobutamine stress echocardiography reader. The use of harmonic imaging reduces the frequency of nondiagnostic wall segments.

  6. 1-GHz harmonically pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Balskus, K; Leitch, S M; Zhang, Z; McCracken, R A; Reid, D T

    2015-01-26

    We present the first example of a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator frequency comb harmonically-pumped by a 333-MHz Ti:sapphire laser to achieve a stabilized signal comb at 1-GHz mode spacing in the 1.1-1.6-m wavelength band. Simultaneous locking of the comb carrier-envelope-offset and repetition frequencies is achieved with uncertainties over 1 s of 0.27 Hz and 5 mHz respectively, which are comparable with those of 0.27 Hz and 1.5 mHz achieved for 333-MHz fundamental pumping. The phase-noise power-spectral density of the CEO frequency integrated from 1 Hz-64 kHz was 2.8 rad for the harmonic comb, 1.0 rad greater than for fundamental pumping. The results show that harmonic operation does not substantially compromise the frequency-stability of the comb, which is shown to be limited only by the Rb atomic frequency reference used. PMID:25835887

  7. Operation of cusptron at fundamental and harmonic cyclotron frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Namkung, W.; Choe, J.Y.; Uhm, H.S.; Ayres, V.

    1988-04-01

    Microwave radiation at the fundamental and harmonic electron cyclotron frequencies is generated by a cusptron oscillator. A low-energy axis-rotating beam of 28 - 30 kV, 0.8 - 3.5 A, 4 ..mu..s, and 60 pps interacts with a single RF mode, both in a circular cavity and in a six-vane circuit by the negative mass instability. In fundamental and second-harmonic frequency generation with a circular circuit, the independently excited modes are TE/sub 11/'s and TE/sub 21/'s with radiation power of more than 1.8 kW and an electronic efficiency of approximately 7.5 percent. Employing a six-vane circuit, microwave radiation at 6.0 (sixth harmonic) and 3.9 GHz (fourth harmonic) is also independently generated with more than 10.4 and 4.0 kW, respectively. Corresponding electronic efficiencies are approximately 10.0 and 9.5 percent.

  8. Second harmonic generation imaging in muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Both, Martin; Vogel, Martin; Fink, Rainer H.; Uttenweiler, Dietmar

    2003-10-01

    We have used second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging to quantify a strong intrinsic SHG-signal from cellular and subcellular muscle fibre preparations. In isolated single muscle cells, the intrinsic SHG-signal periodically follows the striation pattern and strongly depends on the sarcomere length and the polarization of the illuminating laser beam. At the subcellular level, the SHG signal seems to be located mainly at the overlapping region of the (thin) actin and (thick) myosin filaments. Thus, SHG imaging resolves the arrangement of the contractile structures with high resolution non-invasively and without chromophores. It may also allow to study dynamic molecular interactions of the motor protein myosin with actin filaments during force production and muscle shortening.

  9. XUV frequency combs based on intracavity high harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. Jason

    2014-05-01

    Intracavity high harmonic generation utilizing femtosecond enhancement cavities (fsEC's) has been established as an efficient route for the generation of femtosecond frequency combs in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) to the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) spectral regions. Such VUV/XUV frequency combs enable precision spectroscopy of atomic and potentially molecular spectra in an otherwise difficult to access spectral region. An improved understanding of the intracavity ionization dynamics that currently limit pulse enhancement has enabled a new generation of XUV frequency comb sources with significantly higher powers, at the >10 microwatt level per harmonic order extending below 50nm. We have developed a novel time-resolved pump-probe measurement technique to monitor and characterize the intracavity ionization dynamics by utilizing the sensitive response of the fsEC resonance itself to plasma induced nonlinear phase shifts. In recent work, we have developed a high power dual-frequency comb system based on Yb-fiber laser technology. The two phase-coherent frequency combs can be up-converted to the VUV/XUV using the fsEC. Dual-comb spectroscopy has already been established as a powerful spectroscopic method in the infrared. It's extension to the VUV/XUV spectral region will enable robust and high precision direct frequency comb spectroscopy of complex atomic and molecular structure in this spectral region.

  10. Bond length, dipole moment, and harmonic frequency of CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Leslie A.; Liu, Bowen; Lindh, Roland

    1993-01-01

    A detailed comparison of some properties of CO is given, at the modified coupled-pair functional, single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD), and CCSD(T) levels of theory (including a perturbational estimate for connected triple excitations), using a variety of basis sets. With very large one-particle basis sets, the CCSD(T) method gives excellent results for the bond distance, dipole moment, and harmonic frequency of CO. In a (6s 5p 4d 3f 2g 1h) + (1s 1p 1d) basis set, the bond distance is about 0.005a0 too large, the dipole moment about 0.005 a.u. too small, and the frequency about 6/cm too small, when compared with experimental results.

  11. Balancing Vibrations at Harmonic Frequencies by Injecting Harmonic Balancing Signals into the Armature of a Linear Motor/Alternator Coupled to a Stirling Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations at harmonic frequencies are reduced by injecting harmonic balancing signals into the armature of a linear motor/alternator coupled to a Stirling machine. The vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A harmonic balancing signal is generated for selected harmonics of the operating frequency by processing the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each harmonic. Reference inputs for each harmonic are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms at the frequency of the selected harmonic. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the harmonics are summed with a principal control signal. The harmonic balancing signals modify the principal electrical drive voltage and drive the motor/alternator with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each harmonic.

  12. Frequency-chirp rates of harmonics driven by a few-cycle pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M.B.

    2005-08-15

    We present numerical calculations of the time-frequency characteristics of cutoff harmonics generated by few-cycle laser pulses. We find that for driving pulses as short as three optical cycles, the adiabatic prediction for the harmonic chirp rate is very accurate. This negative chirp is so large that the resulting bandwidth causes substantial overlap between neighboring harmonics, and the harmonic phase therefore appears to not vary in time or frequency. By adding a compensating positive chirp to the driving pulse, which reduces the harmonic bandwidth and allows for the appearance of the negative chirp, we can measure the harmonic chirp rates. We also find that the positive chirp on the driving pulse causes the harmonics to shift down in frequency. We show that this counterintuitive result is caused by the change in the strong field continuum dynamics introduced by the variation of the driving frequency with time.

  13. Harmonic, melodic, and frequency height influences in the perception of multivoiced music.

    PubMed

    Palmer, C; Holleran, S

    1994-09-01

    Two experiments addressed the influences of harmonic relations, melody location, and relative frequency height on the perceptual organization of multivoiced music. In Experiment 1, listeners detected pitch changes in multivoiced piano music. Harmonically related pitch changes and those in the middle-frequency range were least noticeable. All pitch changes were noticeable in the high-frequency voice containing the melody (the most important voice), suggesting that melody can dominate harmonic relations. However, the presence of upper partials in the piano timbre used may have accounted for the harmonic effects. Experiment 2 employed pure sine tones, and replicated the effects of Experiment 1. In addition, the influence of the high-frequency melody on the noticeability of harmonically related pitches was lessened by the presence of a second melody. These findings suggest that harmonic, melodic, and relative frequency height relationships among voices interact in the perceptual organization of multivoiced music. PMID:7971130

  14. Multi-Channel Microstrip Transceiver Arrays Using Harmonics for High Field MR Imaging in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bing; Wang, Chunsheng; Lu, Jonathan; Pang, Yong; Nelson, Sarah J; Vigneron, Daniel B; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2012-01-01

    RF transceiver array design using primary and higher order harmonics for in-vivo parallel MR imaging and spectroscopic imaging is proposed. The improved electromagnetic decoupling performance, unique magnetic field distributions and high-frequency operation capabilities of higher-order harmonics of resonators would benefit transceiver arrays for parallel MRI, especially for ultrahigh field parallel MRI. To demonstrate this technique, microstrip transceiver arrays using first and second harmonic resonators were developed for human head parallel imaging at 7T. Phantom and human head images were acquired and evaluated using the GRAPPA reconstruction algorithm. The higher-order harmonic transceiver array design technique was also assessed numerically using FDTD simulation. Compared with regular primary-resonance transceiver designs, the proposed higher-order harmonic technique provided an improved g-factor and increased decoupling among resonant elements without using dedicated decoupling circuits, which would potentially lead to a better parallel imaging performance and ultimately faster and higher quality imaging. The proposed technique is particularly suitable for densely spaced transceiver array design where the increased mutual inductance among the elements becomes problematic. In addition, it also provides a simple approach to readily upgrade the channels of a conventional primary resonator microstrip array to a larger number for faster imaging. PMID:21878410

  15. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  16. Harmonic Spatial Coherence Imaging: An Ultrasonic Imaging Method Based on Backscatter Coherence

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jeremy J; Jakovljevic, Marko; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2012-01-01

    HSCI and SLSC imaging less sensitive to clutter because it has low spatial coherence. The method is based on the coherence of the second harmonic backscatter. Because the same signals that are used to construct harmonic B-mode images are also used to construct HSCI images, the benefits obtained with harmonic imaging are also applicable to HSCI. Harmonic imaging has been the primary tool for suppressing clutter in diagnostic ultrasound imaging, however second harmonic echoes are not necessarily immune to the effects of clutter. HSCI and SLSC imaging are less sensitive to clutter because it has low spatial coherence. Harmonic Spatial Coherence Imaging shows favorable imaging characteristics such as improved contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), improved speckle signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and better delineation of borders and other structures compared to fundamental and harmonic B-mode imaging. CNRs of up to 1.9 were obtained from in vivo imaging of human cardiac tissue with HSCI, compared to 0.6, 0.9, and 1.5 in fundamental B-mode, harmonic B-mode, and SLSC imaging, respectively. In vivo experiments in human liver tissue demonstrated SNRs of up to 3.4 for HSCI compared to 1.9 for harmonic B-mode. Nonlinear simulations of a heart chamber model were consistent with the in vivo experiments. PMID:22547276

  17. Invariant quaternion radial harmonic Fourier moments for color image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-yang, Wang; Wei-yi, Li; Hong-ying, Yang; Pan-pan, Niu; Yong-wei, Li

    2015-03-01

    Moments and moment invariants have become a powerful tool in image processing owing to their image description capability and invariance property. But, conventional methods are mainly introduced to deal with the binary or gray-scale images, and the only approaches for color image always have poor color image description capability. Based on radial harmonic Fourier moments (RHFMs) and quaternion, we introduced the quaternion radial harmonic Fourier moments (QRHFMs) for representing color images in this paper, which can be seen as the generalization of RHFMs for gray-level images. It is shown that the QRHFMs can be obtained from the RHFMs of each color channel. We derived and analyzed the rotation, scaling, and translation (RST) invariant property of QRHFMs. We also discussed the problem of color image retrieval using invariant QRHFMs. Experimental results are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed color image representation.

  18. Supercritical parametric wave phase conjugation as an instrument for narrowband analysis in ultrasonic harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Krutyansky, Leonid; Pernod, Philippe; Brysev, Andrei; Bunkin, Fedor V; Preobrazhensky, Vladimir

    2002-04-01

    Supercritical parametric wave phase conjugation (SWPC) is used for selection and phase conjugation of harmonic components of a nonlinear incident wave. Amplitude of the phase conjugate wave in a supercritical mode is high enough for acoustic nonlinearity of propagation medium to appear. As a result, in particular, doubled and quadrupled frequencies of the incident wave become available for image formation at the same order of the medium nonlinearity. The improvement of the imaging system resolution because of harmonic analysis of the received acoustic signal and compensation of phase distortions caused by wave phase conjugation were observed simultaneously when propagation medium was inhomogeneous. PMID:11989696

  19. Resonant plasmonic nanoparticles for multicolor second harmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accanto, Nicolò; Piatkowski, Lukasz; Hancu, Ion M.; Renger, Jan; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles capable of efficiently generating nonlinear optical signals, like second harmonic generation, are attracting a lot of attention as potential background-free and stable nano-probes for biological imaging. However, second harmonic nanoparticles of different species do not produce readily distinguishable optical signals, as the excitation laser mainly defines their second harmonic spectrum. This is in marked contrast to other fluorescent nano-probes like quantum dots that emit light at different colors depending on their sizes and materials. Here, we present the use of resonant plasmonic nanoparticles, combined with broadband phase-controlled laser pulses, as tunable sources of multicolor second harmonic generation. The resonant plasmonic nanoparticles strongly interact with the electromagnetic field of the incident light, enhancing the efficiency of nonlinear optical processes. Because the plasmon resonance in these structures is spectrally narrower than the laser bandwidth, the plasmonic nanoparticles imprint their fingerprints on the second harmonic spectrum. We show how nanoparticles of different sizes produce different colors in the second harmonic spectra even when excited with the same laser pulse. Using these resonant plasmonic nanoparticles as nano-probes is promising for multicolor second harmonic imaging while keeping all the advantages of nonlinear optical microscopy.

  20. Imaging leukocytes in vivo with third harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Kun; Chen, Chien-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Shing; Wu, Pei-Chun; Hsieh, Tsung-Yuan; Liu, Han-Wen; Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Lin, Win-Li; Chia, Jean-San; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Without a labeling, we demonstrated that lipid granules in leukocytes have distinctive third harmonic generation (THG) contrast. Excited by a 1230nm femtosecond laser, THG signals were generated at a significantly higher level in neutrophils than other mononuclear cells, whereas signals in agranular lymphocytes were one order smaller. These characteristic THG features can also be observed in vivo to trace the newly recruited leukocytes following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Furthermore, using video-rate THG microscopy, we also captured images of blood cells in human capillaries. Quite different from red-blood-cells, every now and then, round and granule rich blood cells with strong THG contrast appeared in circulation. The corresponding volume densities in blood, evaluated from their frequencies of appearance and the velocity of circulation, fall within the physiological range of human white blood cell counts. These results suggested that labeling-free THG imaging may provide timely tracing of leukocyte movement and hematology inspection without disturbing the normal cellular or physiological status.

  1. Harmonic generation by yeast cells in response to low-frequency electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawarathna, D.; Claycomb, J. R.; Cardenas, G.; Gardner, J.; Warmflash, D.; Miller, J. H., Jr.; Widger, W. R.

    2006-05-01

    We report on harmonic generation by budding yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 108cells/ml ) in response to sinusoidal electric fields with amplitudes ranging from zero to 5V/cm in the frequency range 10-300Hz . The cell-generated harmonics are found to exhibit strong amplitude and frequency dependence. Sodium metavanadate, an inhibitor of the proton pump known as H+ -ATPase, and glucose, a substrate of H+ -ATPase, are found to increase harmonic production at low amplitudes while reducing it at large amplitudes. This P-type proton pump can be driven by an oscillatory transmembrane potential, and its nonlinear response is believed to be largely responsible for harmonic production at low frequencies in yeast cells. We find that the observed harmonics show dramatic changes with time and in their field and frequency dependence after perturbing the system by adding an inhibitor, substrate, or membrane depolarizer to the cell suspension.

  2. Confocal Imaging of Biological Tissues Using Second Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B-M.; Stoller, P.; Reiser, K.; Eichler, J.; Yan, M.; Rubenchik, A.; Da Silva, L.

    2000-03-06

    A confocal microscopy imaging system was devised to selectively detect Second harmonic signals generated by biological tissues. Several types of biological tissues were examined using this imaging system, including human teeth, bovine blood vessels, and chicken skin. All these tissues generated strong second harmonic signals. There is considerable evidence that the source of these signals in tissue is collagen. Collagen, the predominant component of most tissues, is known to have second order nonlinear susceptibility. This technique may have diagnostic usefulness in pathophysiological conditions characterized by changes in collagen structure including malignant transformation of nevi, progression of diabetic complications, and abnormalities in wound healing.

  3. Separation of structural modes and harmonic frequencies in Operational Modal Analysis using random decrement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    Operational Modal Analysis (OMA) is used to extract modal parameters of a structure on the basis of their output response measured during operation. OMA, when applied to mechanical engineering structures is often faced with the problem of harmonics present in the output response. A complex structure may have many dominant frequency components in its response frequency spectrum. These may contain frequency components associated with resonant frequencies of the structure, which and the associated mode shapes and the damping factors represent the data of interest, but may also contain frequencies or harmonics associated with the excitation sources. Since in OMA the characteristics of the excitation sources are not known, one of the problems lies in separating the resonant frequencies from the harmonic excitation frequencies. Any error in this regard may lead to an error in modal identification with the consequence that a harmonic may be construed as a structural mode and vice versa. This issue is addressed in this paper and a method is presented for separating resonant frequencies from harmonic excitation frequencies using random decrement of the response. The principle of the method is presented using an analytical study on a single degree of freedom system. The effectiveness of the method is then demonstrated through numerical studies on a lumped parameter multi-degree of freedom system and a simulated plate structure. Detection of single and multiple harmonics in the response that are well separated as well as close to resonant frequencies are considered.

  4. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  5. High harmonic frequency combs for high resolution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, A; Rauschenberger, J; Gohle, Ch; Herrmann, M; Walker, D R; Pervak, V; Fernandez, A; Graf, R; Apolonski, A; Holzwarth, R; Krausz, F; Hänsch, T W; Udem, Th

    2008-06-27

    We generated a series of harmonics in a xenon gas jet inside a cavity seeded by pulses from a Ti:sapphire mode-locked laser with a repetition rate of 10.8 MHz. Harmonics up to 19th order at 43 nm were observed with plateau harmonics at the microW power level. An elaborate dispersion compensation scheme and the use of a moderate repetition rate allowed for this significant improvement in output power of the plateau harmonics of 4 orders of magnitude over previous results. With this power level and repetition rate, high-resolution spectroscopy in the extreme ultraviolet region becomes conceivable. An interesting target would be the 1S-2S transition in hydrogenlike He+ at 60 nm. PMID:18643661

  6. Harmonics of the ion acoustic frequency in the heater induced ion spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, H.; Rietveld, M.T.

    1996-03-01

    The authors report the observation of odd harmonics of ion acoustic frequencies in HF heating experiments from Tromso. These are observed in a very narrow height band, where there are spectral characteristics observed on the ion lines. The authors present a numeric calculation using a Zakharov model which demonstates the existence of such harmonics.

  7. Corneal imaging by second and third harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocas, Arnaud; Jay, Louis; Mottay, Eric; Brunette, Isabelle; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki

    2008-02-01

    Advanced imaging methods are essential tools for improved outcome of refractive surgery. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy are noninvasive high-resolution imaging methods, which can discriminate the different layers of the cornea, thus having strong impact on the outcome of laser surgery. In this work, we use an Ytterbium femtosecond laser as the laser source, the longer wavelength of which reduces scattering, and allows simultaneous SHG and THG imaging. We present SHG and THG images and profiles of pig corneas that clearly show the anterior surface of the cornea, the entry in the stroma and its end, and the posterior surface of the cornea. These observations allow localizing the epithelium, the stroma and the endothelium. Other experiments give information about the structure and cytology of the corneal layers.

  8. Imaging with second-harmonic radiation probes in living tissue

    PubMed Central

    Grange, Rachel; Lanvin, Thomas; Hsieh, Chia-Lung; Pu, Ye; Psaltis, Demetri

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that second-harmonic radiation imaging probes are efficient biomarkers for imaging in living tissue. We show that 100 nm and 300 nm BaTiO3 nanoparticles used as contrast markers could be detected through 50 ?m and 120 ?m of mouse tail tissue in vitro or in vivo. Experimental results and Monte-Carlo simulations are in good agreement. PMID:21991545

  9. Radio-frequency excitation of harmonic microwave radiation from a Penning reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, J.P.; Wharton, C.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Experimental results on multiple-harmonic emission at 8.8 GHz from a Penning reflex discharge (PRD) are reported. Observations of the frequency spectra of microwave emission showed copius harmonic generation of frequencies having two completely different origins: (1) spontaneously excited high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency and (2) high harmonics of the frequency of an injected signal independent of the magnetic field strength, a phenomenon reported here for the first time. For spontaneous harmonic emission there was a current threshold, whose magnitude depended on gas pressure and magnetic field strength. When a signal was injected, however, high harmonics (up to the 18th) could be seen at discharge currents well below this threshold value. Comparisons between the two types of radiation are made and discussion of possible mechanisms is provided. It is concluded that the coupling efficiency of the radio-frequency (rf)-excited emission is dependent on the relationship between the rf drive frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency. Finite Larmor radius effects may also influence this coupling. The plasma sheath size will also be a factor in the transfer of energy from the probe to the bulk plasma. Results which seek to elucidate these effects are presented.

  10. Analysis of the second harmonic generation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dong; Aketagawa, Masato

    2014-12-01

    The second harmonic generation (SHG) of a femtosecond optical frequency comb (FOFC) has been studied. This work focuses on the SHG frequencies that are generated by the mixing of even-numbered frequency components from the original comb with odd-numbered components. It is observed that the generation of those frequencies is the reason the original FOFC and FOFC-based SHG signal have the same repetition frequency. The theoretical derivation agrees with the result of an optical experiment. Our results may be of use with the high-harmonic-generation process and FOFC-based SHG applications, including high-resolution spectroscopy, attosecond pulse generation, and precision length measurement.

  11. Harmonic Frequency Lowering: Effects on the Perception of Music Detail and Sound Quality.

    PubMed

    Kirchberger, Martin; Russo, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm for frequency lowering in music was developed and experimentally tested in hearing-impaired listeners. Harmonic frequency lowering (HFL) combines frequency transposition and frequency compression to preserve the harmonic content of music stimuli. Listeners were asked to make judgments regarding detail and sound quality in music stimuli. Stimuli were presented under different signal processing conditions: original, low-pass filtered, HFL, and nonlinear frequency compressed. Results showed that participants reported perceiving the most detail in the HFL condition. In addition, there was no difference in sound quality across conditions. PMID:26834122

  12. Accurate, explicit formulae for higher harmonic force spectroscopy by frequency modulation-AFM

    PubMed Central

    Kuchuk, Kfir

    2015-01-01

    Summary The nonlinear interaction between an AFM tip and a sample gives rise to oscillations of the cantilever at integral multiples (harmonics) of the fundamental resonance frequency. The higher order harmonics have long been recognized to hold invaluable information on short range interactions but their utilization has thus far been relatively limited due to theoretical and experimental complexities. In particular, existing approximations of the interaction force in terms of higher harmonic amplitudes generally require simultaneous measurements of multiple harmonics to achieve satisfactory accuracy. In the present letter we address the mathematical challenge and derive accurate, explicit formulae for both conservative and dissipative forces in terms of an arbitrary single harmonic. Additionally, we show that in frequency modulation-AFM (FM-AFM) each harmonic carries complete information on the force, obviating the need for multi-harmonic analysis. Finally, we show that higher harmonics may indeed be used to reconstruct short range forces more accurately than the fundamental harmonic when the oscillation amplitude is small compared with the interaction range. PMID:25671159

  13. Alignment maps of tissues: II. Fast harmonic analysis for imaging.

    PubMed

    Tower, T T; Tranquillo, R T

    2001-11-01

    A methodology for generating polarized light retardation and alignment direction images is presented. A rotated quarter-wave plate changes the linear polarized light to a polarized probe with various degrees of ellipticity by which samples are imaged with the use of a circular analyzer. A harmonic representation of image intensity allows simple analysis, requiring only simple image operations and realizing four orders-of-magnitude computational savings for strongly aligned tissues, where linear birefringence is the dominant optical property. The method is demonstrated for a porcine heart valve leaflet. PMID:11606306

  14. Frequency-resolved optical grating using surface third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Krumbuegel, M.A.; Delong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1995-11-01

    We demonstrate the frequency-resolved optical grating technique using third-harmonic generation on the surface of a cover glass with ultra-short optical pulses and compare that with the phase-retrieved spectrogram.

  15. Coherent states and uncertainty relations for the damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Um, Chung-In; George, Thomas F.; Pandey, Lakshmi N.

    1993-01-01

    Starting with evaluations of propagator and wave function for the damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency, exact coherent states are constructed. These coherent states satisfy the properties which coherent states should generally have.

  16. Imaging Collagen Orientation Using Polarization-Modulated Second Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, P; Celliers, P M; Reiser, K M; Rubenchik, A M

    2002-01-10

    We use polarization-modulated second harmonic generation to image fiber orientation in collagen tissues, with an axial resolution of about 10 {micro}m and a transverse resolution of up to 1 {micro}m. A linearly polarized ultra-short pulse (200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser beam is modulated using an electro-optic modulator and quarter-wave plate combination and focused onto a translation stage mounted sample using a microscope objective. The generated second harmonic light is collected using a photomultiplier tube and demodulated using phase sensitive detection to obtain signal intensity and fiber orientation information. In order to obtain second harmonic generation images of different types of collagen organization, we analyze several different tissues, including rat-tail tendon, mouse aorta, mouse fibrotic liver, and porcine skin. We can use our technique to image fibrotic tissue in histological sections of damaged liver and to identify burned tissue in porcine skin to a depth of a few hundred microns. Polarization-modulated second harmonic generation potentially could be a useful clinical technique for diagnosing collagen related disease or damage, especially in the skin.

  17. Acoustic imaging by second harmonic of phase-conjugate wave in inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyl'nov, Yu.; Pernod, P.; Preobrazhensky, V.

    2001-01-01

    Application of the supercritical magnetoelastic wave phase conjugation to harmonic imaging in acoustic C-scan microscopy is demonstrated. Second-harmonic generation by phase-conjugate wave is used for improvement of resolution of an imaging system. Possibility to compensate phase aberrations introduced in harmonic image by inhomogeneity of propagation medium is shown experimentally and explained theoretically.

  18. A frequency scanning method for the identification of harmonic instabilities in HVDC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Gole, A.M.

    1995-10-01

    A Frequency Scanning Method is introduced in the paper to obtain a more accurate frequency characteristic for identifying harmonic instability in HVdc systems. An example of the application is used to identify the resonance frequencies in the CIGRE benchmark model. The paper shows that the Benchmark model is not tuned to the resonance frequency that it was designed for. Using the scanning method, the resonance frequency of the benchmark model may be shifted to demonstrate a simulation of core-saturation type instability.

  19. Fourier transform holography with high harmonic spectra for attosecond imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gareth O; Gonzalez, A I; Knzel, S; Li, L; Lozano, M; Oliva, E; Iwan, B; Daboussi, S; Boutu, W; Merdji, H; Fajardo, M; Zeitoun, Ph

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a method of using a Fourier holographic technique to utilize attosecond soft x-ray pulses to image nanometer-scale objects. A discrete frequency comb of laser-generated high-order harmonics, yielding a train of attosecond pulses, has been used to record spatially and spectrally resolved images. The individual wavelengths were also combined to form a single image, albeit with lower spatial resolution, demonstrating the applicability of the method to using isolated attosecond pulses with continuous bandwidths. PMID:26125403

  20. Analysis and measurement of the modulation transfer function of harmonic shear wave induced phase encoding imaging

    PubMed Central

    McAleavey, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Shear wave induced phase encoding (SWIPE) imaging generates ultrasound backscatter images of tissue-like elastic materials by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of the scatters in the phase of the received echo. In contrast to conventional ultrasound B-scan imaging, SWIPE offers the potential advantages of image formation without beam focusing or steering from a single transducer element, lateral resolution independent of aperture size, and the potential to achieve relatively high lateral resolution with low frequency ultrasound. Here a Fourier series description of the phase modulated echo signal is developed, demonstrating that echo harmonics at multiples of the shear wave frequency reveal target k-space data at identical multiples of the shear wavenumber. Modulation transfer functions of SWIPE imaging systems are calculated for maximum shear wave acceleration and maximum shear constraints, and compared with a conventionally focused aperture. The relative signal-to-noise ratio of the SWIPE method versus a conventionally focused aperture is found through these calculations. Reconstructions of wire targets in a gelatin phantom using 1 and 3.5?MHz ultrasound and a cylindrical shear wave source are presented, generated from the fundamental and second harmonic of the shear wave modulation frequency, demonstrating weak dependence of lateral resolution with ultrasound frequency. PMID:24815265

  1. Analysis and measurement of the modulation transfer function of harmonic shear wave induced phase encoding imaging.

    PubMed

    McAleavey, Stephen A

    2014-05-01

    Shear wave induced phase encoding (SWIPE) imaging generates ultrasound backscatter images of tissue-like elastic materials by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of the scatters in the phase of the received echo. In contrast to conventional ultrasound B-scan imaging, SWIPE offers the potential advantages of image formation without beam focusing or steering from a single transducer element, lateral resolution independent of aperture size, and the potential to achieve relatively high lateral resolution with low frequency ultrasound. Here a Fourier series description of the phase modulated echo signal is developed, demonstrating that echo harmonics at multiples of the shear wave frequency reveal target k-space data at identical multiples of the shear wavenumber. Modulation transfer functions of SWIPE imaging systems are calculated for maximum shear wave acceleration and maximum shear constraints, and compared with a conventionally focused aperture. The relative signal-to-noise ratio of the SWIPE method versus a conventionally focused aperture is found through these calculations. Reconstructions of wire targets in a gelatin phantom using 1 and 3.5?MHz ultrasound and a cylindrical shear wave source are presented, generated from the fundamental and second harmonic of the shear wave modulation frequency, demonstrating weak dependence of lateral resolution with ultrasound frequency. PMID:24815265

  2. Second-harmonic imaging from a modulated domain structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Fuming; Geren, Katrina; Zhu, S N; Xiao, Min

    2010-01-15

    We present a new second-harmonic (SH) imaging technique to study the domains in a hexagonally poled LiTaO(3) nonlinear photonic crystal by using a femtosecond laser. By detecting the SH images at different planes, the distribution of the 180 degrees -inverted ferroelectric domains can be characterized, and the contributions of different nonlinear tensor components, modulated differently in the domain structure, can be selectively determined. Fundamental understanding and potential applications of such SH imaging techniques for the inverted nonlinear domain structures are presented and discussed. PMID:20081960

  3. 2D magnetic nanoparticle imaging using magnetization response second harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Murata, Hayaki; Oishi, Tomoya; Suzuki, Toshifumi; Zhang, Yi

    2015-06-01

    A detection method and an imaging technique for magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated. In MNP detection and in magnetic particle imaging (MPI), the most commonly employed method is the detection of the odd harmonics of the magnetization response. We examined the advantage of using the second harmonic response when applying an AC magnetic modulation field and a DC bias field. If the magnetization response is detected by a Cu-wound-coil detection system, the output voltage from the coil is proportional to the change in the flux, dϕ/dt. Thus, the dependence of the derivative of the magnetization, M, on an AC magnetic modulation field and a DC bias field were calculated and investigated. The calculations were in good agreement with the experimental results. We demonstrated that the use of the second harmonic response for the detection of MNPs has an advantage compared with the usage of the third harmonic response, when the Cu-wound-coil detection system is employed and the amplitude of the ratio of the AC modulation field and a knee field Hac/Hk is less than 2. We also constructed a 2D MPI scanner using a pair of permanent ring magnets with a bore of ϕ80 mm separated by 90 mm. The magnets generated a gradient of Gz=3.17 T/m transverse to the imaging bore and Gx=1.33 T/m along the longitudinal axis. An original concentrated 10 μl Resovist solution in a ϕ2×3 mm2 vessel was used as a sample, and it was imaged by the scanner. As a result, a 2D contour map image could be successfully generated using the method with a lock-in amplifier.

  4. High harmonic emission from a superposition of multiple unrelated frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Siegel, T; Torres, R; Hoffmann, D J; Brugnera, L; Procino, I; Zar, A; Underwood, Jonathan G; Springate, E; Turcu, I C E; Chipperfield, L E; Marangos, J P

    2010-03-29

    We report observations and analysis of high harmonic generation driven by a superposition of fields at 1290 nm and 780 nm. These fields are not commensurate in frequency and the superposition leads to an increase in the yield of the mid-plateau harmonics of more than two orders of magnitude compared to using the 1290 nm field alone. Significant extension of the cut-off photon energy is seen even by adding only a small amount of the 780 nm field. These observations are explained by calculations performed in the strong field approximation. Most importantly we find that enhancement is found to arise as a consequence of both increased ionization in the sum-field and modification of the electron trajectories leading to an earlier return time. The enhanced yield even when using modest intensity fields of 5 x 10(13) Wcm(-2) is extended to the 80 eV range and is a promising route to provide a greater photon number for applications in XUV imaging and time-resolved experiments at a high repetition rate. PMID:20389704

  5. Automated cardiac sarcomere analysis from second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Canadilla, Patricia; Gonzalez-Tendero, Anna; Iruretagoyena, Igor; Crispi, Fatima; Torre, Iratxe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Bijnens, Bart H.; Gratacos, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    Automatic quantification of cardiac muscle properties in tissue sections might provide important information related to different types of diseases. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging provides a stain-free microscopy approach to image cardiac fibers that, combined with our methodology of the automated measurement of the ultrastructure of muscle fibers, computes a reliable set of quantitative image features (sarcomere length, A-band length, thick-thin interaction length, and fiber orientation). We evaluated the performance of our methodology in computer-generated muscle fibers modeling some artifacts that are present during the image acquisition. Then, we also evaluated it by comparing it to manual measurements in SHG images from cardiac tissue of fetal and adult rabbits. The results showed a good performance of our methodology at high signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. We conclude that our automated measurements enable reliable characterization of cardiac fiber tissues to systematically study cardiac tissue in a wide range of conditions.

  6. Single pulse frequency compounding protocol for superharmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilouchkine, M. G.; van Neer, P. L. M. J.; Verweij, M. D.; Matte, G. M.; Vletter, W. B.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; de Jong, N.

    2013-07-01

    Second harmonic imaging is currently accepted as the standard in commercial echographic systems. A new imaging technique, coined as superharmonic imaging (SHI), combines the third till the fifth harmonics, arising during nonlinear sound propagation. It could further enhance the resolution and quality of echographic images. To meet the bandwidth requirement for SHI a dedicated phased array has been developed: a low frequency subarray, intended for transmission, interleaved with a high frequency subarray, used in reception. As the bandwidth of the elements is limited, the spectral gaps in between the harmonics cause multiple (ghost) reflection artifacts. A dual-pulse frequency compounding method aims at suppressing those artifacts at a price of a reduced frame rate. In this study we explore a possibility of performing frequency compounding within a single transmission. The traditional frequency compounding method suppresses the ripples by consecutively emitting two short Gaussian bursts with a slightly different center frequency. In the newly proposed method, the transmit aperture is divided into two parts: the first half is used to send a pulse at the lower center frequency, while the other half simultaneously transmits at a slightly higher center frequency. The suitability of the protocol for medical imaging applications in terms of the steering capabilities was performed in a simulation study with INCS and the hydrophone measurements. Moreover, an experimental study was carried out to find the optimal parameters for the clinical imaging protocol. The latter was subsequently used to obtain the images of a tissue mimicking phantom containing strongly reflecting wires. Additionally, the images of a human heart in the parasternal projection were acquired. The scanning aperture with the developed protocol amounts to approximately 90, which is sufficient to capture the cardiac structures in the standard anatomical projections. The theoretically estimated and experimentally measured grating lobe levels are equal to -28.3 dB and -35.9 dB, respectively. A considerable improvement in the axial resolution of the SHI component (0.73 mm) at -6 dB in comparison with the third harmonic (2.23 mm) was observed. A similar comparison in terms of the lateral resolution slightly favored the superharmonic component by 0.2 mm. Additionally, the images of the tissue mimicking phantom exhibited the absence of the multiple reflection artifacts. The in-vivo acquisition allows one to clearly observe the dynamic of the mitral valve leaflets. The new method is equally effective in eliminating the ripple artifacts associated with SHI as the dual-pulse technique, while the full frame rate is maintained.

  7. Second harmonic imaging and scoring of collagen in fibrotic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-04-01

    We compare second harmonic generation (SHG) to histological and immunohistochemical techniques for the visualization and scoring of collagen in biological tissues. We show that SHG microscopy is highly specific for fibrillar collagens and that combined SHG and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) imaging can provide simultaneous three-dimensional visualization of collagen synthesis and assembly sites in transgenic animal models expressing GFP constructs. Finally, we propose several scores for characterizing collagen accumulation based on SHG images and appropriate for different types of collagen distributions. We illustrate the sensitivity of these scores in a murine model of renal fibrosis using a morphological segmentation of the tissue based on endogenous 2PEF signals.

  8. A new frequency domain arc furnace model for iterative harmonic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mayordomo, J.G.; Beites, L.F.; Asensi, R.; Izzeddine, M.; Zabala, L.; Amantegui, J.

    1997-10-01

    This paper presents a new frequency domain Arc Furnace model for Iterative Harmonic Analysis (IHA) by means of a Newton method. Powerful analytical expressions for harmonic currents and their derivatives are obtained under the balanced conditions of the system. The model offers a three phase configuration where there is no path for homopolar currents. Moreover, it contemplates continuous and discontinuous evolution of the arc current. The solution obtained is validated by means of time domain simulations. Finally, the model was integrated in a harmonic power flow where studies have been performed in a network with more than 700 busbars and 7 actual Arc Furnace Loads.

  9. Intensity dependence of the phase of harmonics in one- and two-frequency laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.-C.; Clark, C. W.

    1996-05-01

    The phase relationship between an induced atomic dipole moment and a driving laser field is an essential aspect of high harmonic generation (HHG) in a dense medium. A ``phase-matching'' criterion must be fulfilled to obtain coherent amplification of harmonic radiation, which is critical for practical HHG. We have performed numerical calculations on model atoms to survey the intensity dependence of the phase in the case of strong one- or two-frequency laser fields. The calculations show that multiphoton resonances significantly affect the yield of harmonic generation and that in the ``plateau'' regime, the phases exhibit only weak dependence upon the intensity of the driving field. 1996 The American Physical Society.

  10. Imaging a Molecular Orbital Wave Function Using High Harmonic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, David

    2005-05-01

    Single-electron molecular orbital wave functions are mathematical constructs that are used to describe the multi-electron wave function of molecules. The highest lying orbitals are of particular interest since they are responsible for the chemical properties of molecules. To observe them change as molecular bonds are formed and broken is to observe the essence of chemistry. Yet single orbitals are difficult to observe experimentally --- until now impossible on the time scale of chemical reactions. We show that the full 3-dimensional structure of a single orbital can be imaged using a seemingly unlikely technique --- high harmonic generation from aligned molecules using intense femtosecond laser pulses. We show how the broadband harmonic spectra, measured for a series of molecular alignments, lead to a tomographic reconstruction of the single electron orbital wave function of dinitrogen. This leads to ontological discussions about the meaning of a wave function, particularly in a multielectron system. A non-ionizing femtosecond laser pulse creates a rotational wavepacket that causes periodic molecular alignment. A more intense pulse induces high harmonic emission from the aligned molecules. The recollision electron current pulse is characterized as it returns to a reference argon atom. Assuming that we know the shape of the 3p orbital of argon, we can determine the spectral phase and amplitude of the recollision current. The phase of the harmonic emission from nitrogen is referenced to the phase of argon by measuring the interference in a mixed target gas. The polarization of the emission is also recorded by polarimetry. All of these measurements lead to the reconstruction of the nitrogen sigma-g orbital shape. We also show that attosecond dynamics of an electron wave packet can be measured in the high harmonic spectrum.

  11. Fluid simulations of frequency effects on nonlinear harmonics in inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Si Xuejiao; Xu Xiang; Wang Younian; Zhao Shuxia; Bogaerts, A.

    2011-03-15

    A fluid model is self-consistently established to investigate the harmonic effects in an inductively coupled plasma, where the electromagnetic field is solved by the finite difference time domain technique. The spatiotemporal distribution of harmonic current density, harmonic potential, and other plasma quantities, such as radio frequency power deposition, plasma density, and electron temperature, have been investigated. Distinct differences in current density have been observed when calculated with and without Lorentz force, which indicates that the nonlinear Lorentz force plays an important role in the harmonic effects, especially at low frequencies. Moreover, the even harmonics are larger than the odd harmonics both in the current density and the potential. Finally, the dependence of various plasma quantities with and without the Lorentz force on various driving frequencies is also examined. It is shown that the deposited power density decreases and the depth of penetration increases slightly because of the Lorentz force. The electron density increases distinctly while the electron temperature remains almost the same when the Lorentz force is taken into account.

  12. Coupling CARS with multiphoton fluorescence and high harmonic generation imaging modalities using a femtosecond laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongtao; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Zhu, Jiabin; Buhman, Kimberly K.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-02-01

    Multimodal nonlinear optical imaging has opened new opportunities and becomes a powerful tool for imaging complex tissue samples with inherent 3D spatial resolution.. We present a robust and easy-to-operate approach to add the coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging modality to a widely used multiphoton microscope. The laser source composed of a Mai Tai femtosecond laser and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) offers one-beam, two-beam and three-beam modalities. The Mai Tai output at 790 nm is split into two beams, with 80% of the power being used to pump the OPO. The idler output at 2036 nm from OPO is doubled using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. This frequency-doubled idler beam at 1018 nm is sent through a delay line and collinearly combined with the other Mai Tai beam for CARS imaging on a laser-scanning microscope. This Mai Tai beam is also used for multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. The signal output at 1290 nm from OPO is used for SHG and third-harmonic generation (THG) imaging. External detectors are installed for both forward and backward detection, whereas two internal lamda-scan detectors are employed for microspectroscopy analysis. This new system allows vibrationally resonant CARS imaging of lipid bodies, SHG imaging of collagen fibers, and multiphoton fluorescence analysis in fresh tissues. As a preliminary application, the effect of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) deficiency on liver lipid metabolism in mice was investigated.

  13. Effects of ion cyclotron harmonic damping on current drive in the lower hybrid frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.; Ono, M.

    1983-11-01

    We investigate the ion cyclotron harmonic damping effects on slow and fast waves in the lower hybrid frequency range for tokamak reactor parameters. Inclusion of the higher order terms in the hot plasma dielectric tensor introduces ion cyclotron harmonic damping; these terms also contribute to the real part of the dispersion relation and affect the wave trajectories. However, wave absorption by 15 keV deuterium and tritium ions can be avoided by choosing the slow wave frequency above the lower hybrid frequency and the fast wave frequency below the lower hybrid frequency. But preliminary estimates show that energetic alpha particles tend to absorb both the slow and the fast waves. This absorption may become a serious obstacle for fusion-reactor current drive in the lower hybrid frequency range.

  14. Examining the impact of harmonic correlation on vibrational frequencies calculated in localized coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.

    2015-10-01

    Carefully choosing a set of optimized coordinates for performing vibrational frequency calculations can significantly reduce the anharmonic correlation energy from the self-consistent field treatment of molecular vibrations. However, moving away from normal coordinates also introduces an additional source of correlation energy arising from mode-coupling at the harmonic level. The impact of this new component of the vibrational energy is examined for a range of molecules, and a method is proposed for correcting the resulting self-consistent field frequencies by adding the full coupling energy from connected pairs of harmonic and pseudoharmonic modes, termed vibrational self-consistent field (harmonic correlation). This approach is found to lift the vibrational degeneracies arising from coordinate optimization and provides better agreement with experimental and benchmark frequencies than uncorrected vibrational self-consistent field theory without relying on traditional correlated methods.

  15. Artificial Ionization and UHF Radar Response Associated with HF Frequencies near Electron Gyro-Harmonics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, B. J.; Fallen, C. T.; Secan, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results from O-mode ionospheric heating experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska to demonstrate that the magnitude of artificial ionization production is critically dependent on the choice of HF frequency near gyro-harmonics. For O-mode heating in the lower F-region ionosphere, typically about 200 km altitude, artificial ionization enhancements are observed in the lower ionosphere (about 150 - 220 km) and also in the topside ionosphere above about 500 km. Lower ionosphere density enhancements are inferred from HF-enhanced ion and plasma-line signals observed with UHF radar. Upper ionospheric density enhancements have been observed with TEC (total electron content) experiments by monitoring satellite radio beacons where signal paths traverse the HF-modified ionosphere. Both density enhancements and corresponding upward plasma fluxes have also been observed in the upper ionosphere via in-situ satellite observations. The data presented focus mainly on observations near the third and fourth gyro-harmonics. The specific values of the height-dependent gyro-harmonics have been computed from a magnetic model of the field line through the HF heated volume. Experiments with several closely spaced HF frequencies around the gyro-harmonic frequency region show that the magnitude of the lower-ionosphere artificial ionization production maximizes for HF frequencies about 1.0 - 1.5 MHz above the gyro-harmonic frequency. The response is progressively larger as the HF frequency is increased in the frequency region near the gyro-harmonics. For HF frequencies that are initially greater than the gyro-harmonic value the UHF radar scattering cross-section is relatively small, and non-existent or very weak signals are observed; as the signal returns drop in altitude due to density enhancements the HF interaction region passes through lower altitudes where the HF frequency is less than the gyro-harmonic value, for these conditions the radar scattering cross-section is significantly increased and strong signals persist while the high-power HF is present . Simultaneous observations of topside TEC measurements and lower-ionosphere UHF radar observations suggest there is an optimum altitude region to heat the lower F-region in order to produce topside ionosphere density enhancements. The observations are dependent on HF power levels and we show several examples where heating results are only observed for the high-power levels attainable with the HAARP facility.

  16. Electron cyclotron harmonic resonances in high-frequency heating of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2013-09-01

    Electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves under cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction is studied. Theory is formulated; the analytical solutions in the second and fourth harmonic cyclotron resonance cases are obtained, and in the third harmonic case, a first order differential equation governing the evolution of the electron energy is derived. The theory is applied for explaining the generation of artificial ionization layers observed in high-frequency (HF) ionospheric heating experiments. The upper hybrid waves are assumed to be excited parametrically by the O-mode HF heating wave. As the decay mode is the lower hybrid wave, the excited upper hybrid waves have wavelengths ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m, which are short enough to effectively incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect for the harmonic cyclotron resonance interactions as well as have a frequency bandwidth of about 20 kHz, which provides an altitude region of about 10 km for continuous harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction between electrons and descending waves in the slightly inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The numerical results on electron acceleration show that electron fluxes with energies larger than 14 eV are generated in the three harmonic cases. These energetic electrons cause impact ionizations, which are descending to form artificial ionization layers at the bottom of the ionospheric F region.

  17. Electron cyclotron harmonic resonances in high-frequency heating of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2013-09-15

    Electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves under cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction is studied. Theory is formulated; the analytical solutions in the second and fourth harmonic cyclotron resonance cases are obtained, and in the third harmonic case, a first order differential equation governing the evolution of the electron energy is derived. The theory is applied for explaining the generation of artificial ionization layers observed in high-frequency (HF) ionospheric heating experiments. The upper hybrid waves are assumed to be excited parametrically by the O-mode HF heating wave. As the decay mode is the lower hybrid wave, the excited upper hybrid waves have wavelengths ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m, which are short enough to effectively incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect for the harmonic cyclotron resonance interactions as well as have a frequency bandwidth of about 20 kHz, which provides an altitude region of about 10 km for continuous harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction between electrons and descending waves in the slightly inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The numerical results on electron acceleration show that electron fluxes with energies larger than 14 eV are generated in the three harmonic cases. These energetic electrons cause impact ionizations, which are descending to form artificial ionization layers at the bottom of the ionospheric F region.

  18. Frequency dependence of quantum path interference in non-collinear high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Yang, Zhong; Xin-Kui, He; Hao, Teng; Peng, Ye; Li-Feng, Wang; Peng, He; Zhi-Yi, Wei

    2016-02-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) driven by two non-collinear beams including a fundamental and its weak second harmonic is numerically studied. The interference of harmonics from adjacent electron quantum paths is found to be dependent on the relative delay of the driving pulse, and the dependences are different for different harmonic orders. This frequency dependence of the interference is attributed to the spatial frequency chirp in the HHG beam resulting from the harmonic dipole phase, which in turn provides a potential way to gain an insight into the generation of high-order harmonics. As an example, the intensity dependent dipole phase coefficient α is retrieved from the interference fringe. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB922401 and 2013CB922402), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Projects, China (Grant No. 2012YQ12004704), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374356), and the International Joint Research Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61210017).

  19. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  20. Discriminating harmonicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Gerald; Mason, Christine R.; Brughera, Andrew; Chiu, Chung-Yiu Peter

    2003-08-01

    Simultaneous tones that are harmonically related tend to be grouped perceptually to form a unitary auditory image. A partial that is mistuned stands out from the other tones, and harmonic complexes with different fundamental frequencies can readily be perceived as separate auditory objects. These phenomena are evidence for the strong role of harmonicity in perceptual grouping and segregation of sounds. This study measured the discriminability of harmonicity directly. In a two interval, two alternative forced-choice (2I2AFC) paradigm, the listener chose which of two sounds, signal or foil, was composed of tones that more closely matched an exact harmonic relationship. In one experiment, the signal was varied from perfectly harmonic to highly inharmonic by adding frequency perturbation to each component. The foil always had 100% perturbation. Group mean performance decreased from greater than 90% correct for 0% signal perturbation to near chance for 80% signal perturbation. In the second experiment, adding a masker presented simultaneously with the signals and foils disrupted harmonicity. Both monaural and dichotic conditions were tested. Signal level was varied relative to masker level to obtain psychometric functions from which slopes and midpoints were estimated. Dichotic presentation of these audible stimuli improved performance by 3-10 dB, due primarily to a release from ``informational masking'' by the perceptual segregation of the signal from the masker.

  1. Research of second harmonic generation images based on texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Li, Yan; Gong, Haiming; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan

    2014-09-01

    Texture analysis plays a crucial role in identifying objects or regions of interest in an image. It has been applied to a variety of medical image processing, ranging from the detection of disease and the segmentation of specific anatomical structures, to differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy as a potential noninvasive tool for imaging biological tissues has been widely used in medicine, with reduced phototoxicity and photobleaching. In this paper, we clarified the principles of texture analysis including statistical, transform, structural and model-based methods and gave examples of its applications, reviewing studies of the technique. Moreover, we tried to apply texture analysis to the SHG images for the differentiation of human skin scar tissues. Texture analysis method based on local binary pattern (LBP) and wavelet transform was used to extract texture features of SHG images from collagen in normal and abnormal scars, and then the scar SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal ones. Compared with other texture analysis methods with respect to the receiver operating characteristic analysis, LBP combined with wavelet transform was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy. It can provide a new way for clinical diagnosis of scar types. At last, future development of texture analysis in SHG images were discussed.

  2. High average power coherent vuv generation at 10 MHz repetition frequency by intracavity high harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Akira; Zhao, Zhigang; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2015-06-15

    Intracavity high harmonic generation was utilized to generate high average-power coherent radiation at vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) wavelengths. A ytterbium-doped fiber-laser based master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) system with a 10 MHz repetition frequency was developed and used as a driving laser for an external cavity. A series of odd-order harmonic radiations was generated extending down to ? 30 nm (41 eV in photon energy). The 7th harmonic radiation generated was centered at 149 nm and had an average output power of up to 0.5 mW. In this way, we developed a sub-mW coherent vuv-laser with a 10 MHz repetition frequency, which, if used as an excitation laser source for photo-electron spectroscopy, could improve the signal count-rate without deterioration of the spectral-resolution caused by space-charge effects. PMID:26193495

  3. Harmonic-suppressed quadrature-input frequency divider for OFDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haipeng, Fu; Junyan, Ren; Wei, Li; Ning, Li

    2011-12-01

    A fully balanced harmonic-suppressed quadrature-input frequency divider is proposed. The frequency divider improves the quadrature phase accuracy at the output by using both input I/Q signals. Compared with conventional dividers, the circuit achieves an output I/Q phase sequence that is independent of the input I/Q phase sequence. Moreover, the third harmonic is effectively suppressed by employing a double degeneration technique. The design is fabricated in TSMC 0.13-?m CMOS and operated at 1.2 V. While locked at 8.5 GHz, the proposed divider measures a maximum third harmonic rejection of 45 dB and a phase noise of -124 dBc/Hz at a 10 MHz offset. The circuit achieves a locking range of 15% while consuming a total current of 4.5 mA.

  4. Value of tissue harmonic imaging (THI) and contrast harmonic imaging (CHI) in detection and characterisation of breast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jung, E. M.; Jungius, K.-P.; Ertan, K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which tissue harmonic imaging (THI), speckle reduction imaging (SRI), spatial compounding (SC) and contrast can improve detection and differentiation of breast tumours. We examined 38 patients (14 benign, 24 malignant tumours) with different combinations of THI, SRI and SC. The effect on delineation, margin, tissue differentiation and posttumoral phenomena was evaluated with a three-point score. Additionally, 1oo not palpable tumours (diameters: 4–15 mm) were examined by contrast harmonic imaging (CHI) with power Doppler. After bolus injection (0.5 ml Optison), vascularisation and enhancement were observed for 20 min. The best combination for detection of margin, infiltration, echo pattern and posterior lesion boundary was the combination of SRI level 2 with SC low. THI was helpful for lesions OF more than 1 cm depth. In native Power Doppler, vessels were found in 54 of 100 lesions. Within 5 min after contrast medium (CM) injection, marginal and penetrating vessels increased in benign and malignant tumours and central vessels mostly in carcinomas (p<0.05). A diffuse CM accumulation was observed up to 20 min after injection in malignant tumours only (p<0.05). THI, SRI and SC improved delineation and tissue differentiation. Second-generation contrast agent allowed detection of tumour vascularisation with prolonged enhancement. PMID:16823568

  5. Dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers for contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Martin, K Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  6. Dual-Frequency Piezoelectric Transducers for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K. Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F. Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  7. Localized Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound Surgery Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    Recently, an in vivo real-time ultrasound-based monitoring technique that uses localized harmonic motion (LHM) to detect changes in tissues during focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) has been proposed to control the exposure. This technique can potentially be used as well for targeting imaging. In the present study we evaluated the potential of using LHM to detect changes in stiffness and the feasibility of using it for imaging purposes in phantoms and in vivo tumor detection. A single-element FUS transducer (80 mm focal length, 100 mm diameter, 1.485 MHz) was used for inducing a localized harmonic motion and a separate ultrasound diagnostic transducer excited by a pulser/receiver (5 kHz PRF, 5 MHz) was used to track motion. The motion was estimated using cross-correlation techniques on the acquired RF signal. Silicon phantom studies were performed in order to determine the size of inclusion that was possible to detect using this technique. Inclusions were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude and it was possible to depict inclusions as small as 4 mm. The amplitude of the induced LHM was always lower at the inclusions as compared with the one obtained at the surroundings. Ten New Zealand rabbits had VX2 tumors implanted on their thighs and LHM was induced and measured at the tumor region. Tumors (as small as 10 mm in length and 4 mm in width) were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude. PMID:21683514

  8. Second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation to 4950 and 4589 in KTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, K.

    1988-01-01

    KTiOPO4 (KTP) has been found to be phase matchable for type-2 second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation down to 4950 and 4589 A, respectively. Sellmeier's equations which are highly accurate from 1.152 microns to 4590 A are reported.

  9. Second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation to 4950 and 4589 A in KTP

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, K.

    1988-01-01

    KTP has been found to be phase matchable for type-2 second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation down to 4950 and 4589 A, respectively. Sellmeier's equations which are highly accurate from 1.152 ..mu..m to 4590 A are reported.

  10. Increased efficiency of ion acceleration by using femtosecond laser pulses at higher harmonic frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Psikal, J.; Klimo, O.; Weber, S.; Margarone, D.

    2014-07-15

    The influence of laser frequency on laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. When ultrashort intense laser pulse at higher harmonic frequency irradiates a thin solid foil, the target may become re lativistically transparent for significantly lower laser pulse intensity compared with irradiation at fundamental laser frequency. The relativistically induced transparency results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum energies of accelerated ions and their numbers. Our simulation results have shown the increase in maximum proton energy and increase in the number of high-energy protons by a factor of 2 after the interaction of an ultrashort laser pulse of maximum intensity 7??10{sup 21?}W/cm{sup 2} with a fully ionized plastic foil of realistic density and of optimal thickness between 100?nm and 200?nm when switching from the fundamental frequency to the third harmonics.

  11. Data acquisition system for harmonic motion microwave Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Tafreshi, Azadeh Kamali; Karada?, Mrsel; Top, Can Bar??; Gener, Nevzat Gneri

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging (HMMDI) is a hybrid method proposed for breast tumor detection, which images the coupled dielectric and elastic properties of the tissue. In this paper, the performance of a data acquisition system for HMMDI method is evaluated on breast phantom materials. A breast fat phantom including fibro-glandular and tumor phantom regions is produced. The phantom is excited using a focused ultrasound probe and a microwave transmitter. The received microwave signal level is measured on three different points inside the phantom (fat, fibro-glandular, and tumor regions). The experimental results using the designed homodyne receiver proved the effectiveness of the proposed setup. In tumor phantom region, the signal level decreased about 3 dB compared to the signal level obtained from the fibro-glandular phantom area, whereas this signal was about 4 dB higher than the received signal from the fat phantom. PMID:25570591

  12. Quantitative analysis of biological tissues using Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambekar Ramachandra Rao, Raghu; Mehta, Monal R.; Toussaint, Kimani C., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation (FT-SHG) imaging of collagen fibers as a means of performing quantitative analysis of obtained images of selected spatial regions in porcine trachea, ear, and cornea. Two quantitative markers, preferred orientation and maximum spatial frequency are proposed for differentiating structural information between various spatial regions of interest in the specimens. The ear shows consistent maximum spatial frequency and orientation as also observed in its real-space image. However, there are observable changes in the orientation and minimum feature size of fibers in the trachea indicating a more random organization. Finally, the analysis is applied to a 3D image stack of the cornea. It is shown that the standard deviation of the orientation is sensitive to the randomness in fiber orientation. Regions with variations in the maximum spatial frequency, but with relatively constant orientation, suggest that maximum spatial frequency is useful as an independent quantitative marker. We emphasize that FT-SHG is a simple, yet powerful, tool for extracting information from images that is not obvious in real space. This technique can be used as a quantitative biomarker to assess the structure of collagen fibers that may change due to damage from disease or physical injury.

  13. Quantifying thermodynamics of collagen thermal denaturation by second harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Su, Ping-Jung; Lin, Sung-Jan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-06-01

    Time-lapse second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied for the extraction of thermodynamic parameters of collagen thermal denaturation. We found that at sufficiently high temperatures, temporal dependence of SHG intensity from the isothermal treatment of chicken dermal collagen was single exponential and can be modeled by the Arrhenius equation. Activation energy and the frequency factor of chicken dermal collagen thermal denaturation were determined using temporal decays of SHG intensity at different temperatures. Our results show that time-lapse, high temperature SHG imaging can be used to quantify kinetic properties of collagen thermal denaturation within a microscopic volume of 1 nl.

  14. Classical harmonic vibrations with micro amplitudes and low frequencies monitored by quantum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Yi

    2015-11-01

    We study the entanglement dynamics of the two two-level atoms coupled with a single-mode polarized cavity field after incorporating the decoupled atomic centers of mass classical harmonic vibrations with micro amplitudes and low frequencies. We discover a new quantum mechanical measurement effect for the entanglement dynamics. We propose a quantitative vibrant factor to modify the concurrence of the two atomic states. When the vibrant frequencies are very low, we obtain that: (1) the factor depends on the relative vibrant displacements and the initial phases rather than the absolute amplitudes, and reduces the concurrence to three orders of magnitude; (2) the concurrence increases with the increase of the initial phases; (3) the frequency of the harmonic vibration can be obtained by measuring the maximal value of the concurrence during a small measurement time. These results indicate that the extremely weak classical harmonic vibrations can be monitored by the entanglement of quantum states. The effect reported in the paper always works well as long as the internal degrees of freedom of the system (regardless of unitary evolution or non-unitary evolution with time) are decoupled with the external classical harmonic vibrations of atomic centers of mass.

  15. Imaging articular cartilage using second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Jessica C.; Winlove, C. Peter; Knapp, Karen; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Sub cellular resolution images of equine articular cartilage have been obtained using both second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM). The SHGM images clearly map the distribution of the collagen II fibers within the extracellular matrix while the TPFM images show the distribution of endogenous two-photon fluorophores in both the cells and the extracellular matrix, highlighting especially the pericellular matrix and bright 2-3μm diameter features within the cells. To investigate the source of TPF in the extracellular matrix experiments have been carried out to see if it may originate from the proteoglycans. Pure solutions of the following proteoglycans hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate and aggrecan have been imaged, only the aggrecan produced any TPF and here the intensity was not great enough to account for the TPF in the extracellular matrix. Also cartilage samples were subjected to a process to remove proteoglycans and cellular components. After this process the TPF from the samples had decreased by a factor of two, with respect to the SHG intensity.

  16. Enhancing Images By Nonlinear Extrapolation In Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H.; Greenspan, Hayit K.

    1995-01-01

    Improved method of enchancing edges in image involves nonlinear filter operation creating image-intensity components having spatial frequencies higher than those present in input image and locked in phase to lower-frequency input components. In comparison with other edge-enhancement methods involving mostly strengthening of higher-frequency components already present in input, this method computationally simpler and yields better results. Better suited to real-time applications like high-definition television and compression of image data.

  17. Two-Dimensional Frequency Resolved Optomolecular Gating of High-Order Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, A.; Soifer, H.; Pedatzur, O.; Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Bruner, B. D.; Canonge, R.; Catoire, F.; Descamps, D.; Fabre, B.; Mével, E.; Petit, S.; Dudovich, N.; Mairesse, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Probing electronic wave functions of polyatomic molecules is one of the major challenges in high-harmonic spectroscopy. The extremely nonlinear nature of the laser-molecule interaction couples the multiple degrees of freedom of the probed system. We combine two-dimensional control of the electron trajectories and vibrational control of the molecules to disentangle the two main steps in high-harmonic generation—ionization and recombination. We introduce a new measurement scheme, frequency-resolved optomolecular gating, which resolves the temporal amplitude and phase of the harmonic emission from excited molecules. Focusing on the study of vibrational motion in N2 O4 , we show that such advanced schemes provide a unique insight into the structural and dynamical properties of the underlying mechanism.

  18. Two-Dimensional Frequency Resolved Optomolecular Gating of High-Order Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Ferré, A; Soifer, H; Pedatzur, O; Bourassin-Bouchet, C; Bruner, B D; Canonge, R; Catoire, F; Descamps, D; Fabre, B; Mével, E; Petit, S; Dudovich, N; Mairesse, Y

    2016-02-01

    Probing electronic wave functions of polyatomic molecules is one of the major challenges in high-harmonic spectroscopy. The extremely nonlinear nature of the laser-molecule interaction couples the multiple degrees of freedom of the probed system. We combine two-dimensional control of the electron trajectories and vibrational control of the molecules to disentangle the two main steps in high-harmonic generation-ionization and recombination. We introduce a new measurement scheme, frequency-resolved optomolecular gating, which resolves the temporal amplitude and phase of the harmonic emission from excited molecules. Focusing on the study of vibrational motion in N_{2}O_{4}, we show that such advanced schemes provide a unique insight into the structural and dynamical properties of the underlying mechanism. PMID:26894708

  19. Evading surface and detector frequency noise in harmonic oscillator measurements of force gradients

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Eric W.; Lee, SangGap; Hickman, Steven A.; Harrell, Lee E.; Marohn, John A.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and demonstrate a method of measuring small force gradients acting on a harmonic oscillator in which the force-gradient signal of interest is used to parametrically up-convert a forced oscillation below resonance into an amplitude signal at the oscillators resonance frequency. The approach, which we demonstrate in a mechanically detected electron spin resonance experiment, allows the force-gradient signal to evade detector frequency noise by converting a slowly modulated frequency signal into an amplitude signal. PMID:20733934

  20. Nonlinear synthetic aperture radar imaging using a harmonic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Kyle A.; Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Nguyen, Lam H.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of linear and nonlinear targets. Data are collected using a linear/nonlinear step frequency radar. We show that it is indeed possible to produce SAR images using a nonlinear radar. Furthermore, it is shown that the nonlinear radar is able to reduce linear clutter by at least 80 dB compared to a linear radar. The nonlinear SAR images also show the system's ability to detect small electronic devices in the presence of large linear clutter. The system presented here has the ability to completely ignore a 20-inch trihedral corner reflector while detecting a RF mixer with a dipole antenna attached.

  1. Second harmonic generating (SHG) nanoprobes for in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Periklis; Maloney, James; Wu, David; Fraser, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has profoundly changed cell and molecular biology studies by permitting tagged gene products to be followed as they function and interact. The ability of a fluorescent dye to absorb and emit light of different wavelengths allows it to generate startling contrast that, in the best cases, can permit single molecule detection and tracking. However, in many experimental settings, fluorescent probes fall short of their potential due to dye bleaching, dye signal saturation, and tissue autofluorescence. Here, we demonstrate that second harmonic generating (SHG) nanoprobes can be used for in vivo imaging, circumventing many of the limitations of classical fluorescence probes. Under intense illumination, such as at the focus of a laser-scanning microscope, these SHG nanocrystals convert two photons into one photon of half the wavelength; thus, when imaged by conventional two-photon microscopy, SHG nanoprobes appear to generate a signal with an inverse Stokes shift like a fluorescent dye, but with a narrower emission. Unlike commonly used fluorescent probes, SHG nanoprobes neither bleach nor blink, and the signal they generate does not saturate with increasing illumination intensity. The resulting contrast and detectability of SHG nanoprobes provide unique advantages for molecular imaging of living cells and tissues. PMID:20668245

  2. Second harmonic generation imaging in tissue engineering and cartilage pathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus; Olderøy, Magnus; Finnøy, Andreas; Olstad, Kristin; Brinchman, Jan E.

    2015-03-01

    The second harmonic generation from collagen is highly sensitive to what extent collagen molecules are ordered into fibrils as the SHG signal is approximately proportional to the square of the fibril thickness. This can be problematic when interpreting SHG images as thick fibers are much brighter than thinner fibers such that quantification of the amount of collagen present is difficult. On the other hand SHG is therefore also a very sensitive probe to determine whether collagen have assembled into fibrils or are still dissolved as individual collagen molecules. This information is not available from standard histology or immunohistochemical techniques. The degree for fibrillation is an essential component for proper tissue function. We will present the usefulness of SHG imaging in tissue engineering of cartilage as well as cartilage related pathologies. When engineering cartilage it is essential to have the appropriate culturing conditions which cause the collagen molecules to assemble into fibrils. By employing SHG imaging we have studied how cell seeding densities affect the fibrillation of collagen molecules. Furthermore we have used SHG to study pathologies in developing cartilage in a porcine model. In both cases SHG reveals information which is not visible in conventional histology or immunohistochemistry

  3. Functional imaging of muscle cells by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, Valentina; Sacconi, Leonardo; Linari, Marco; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Poggesi, Corrado; Tesi, Chiara; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2006-02-01

    The intrinsically ordered arrays of proteins (mainly actin and myosin) constituting the myofibrils within muscle cells are at the basis of a strong Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) from muscle fibers and isolated myofibrils. We have characterized the SHG signal with regard to its polarization and potential source within the muscle cell. The lateral resolution that can be achieved through SHG imaging of muscle strongly depends on sample depth. In fact, a comparison between intact muscle fibers and single myofibrils demonstrates that, whereas in both cases the alternation of dark I bands and bright A bands is visible, the contours of these bands are much better resolved in myofibrils than in fibers. Further, imaging of myofibrils revealed the presence of a darker zone in the centre of the A band. These effects of scattering by tissue on the image resolution were also studied with regard to the polarization of the SHG signal. The polarization-dependence of SHG intensity represents a powerful tool for the investigation of the structural dynamics occurring in the emitting proteins during the active cycle of muscle contraction. The prospective to perform functional studies requires a complete characterization of the effects of scattering and possibly multiple emitting populations on the measured SHG signal. Also, SHG is extremely sensitive to the degree of order present in the filament array, offering an interesting potential in the development of non-invasive tools for the diagnosis of degenerative diseases affecting skeletal muscles.

  4. Efficient second-harmonic conversion of CW single-frequency Nd:YAG laser light by frequency locking to a monolithic ring frequency doubler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstenberger, D. C.; Tye, G. E.; Wallace, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Efficient second-harmonic conversion of the 1064-nm output of a diode-pumped CW single-frequency Nd:YAG laser to 532 nm was obtained by frequency locking the laser to a monolithic ring resonator constructed of magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate. The conversion efficiency from the fundamental to the second harmonic was 65 percent. Two hundred milliwatts of CW single-frequency 532-nm light were produced from 310 mW of power of 1064-nm light. This represents a conversion efficiency of 20 percent from the 1-W diode laser used to pump the Nd:YAG laser to single-frequency 532-nm output. No signs of degradation were observed for over 500 h of operation.

  5. Coherent control of multiphoton resonance dynamics in high-order-harmonic generation driven by two frequency-comb fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Di; Jiang, Chen-Wei; Li, Fu-li

    2015-10-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the multiphoton resonance dynamics in the high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) process driven by two frequency-comb fields with the carrier frequencies of fundamental and second harmonics, respectively. The many-mode Floquet theorem is employed to provide a nonperturbative and exact treatment of the interaction between a quantum system and frequency-comb laser fields. The coupling of the weak second-harmonic control frequency-comb laser field promises more routes to coherently optimize the multiphoton resonance dynamics and HHG power spectra. First, even-order harmonics are generated due to the coupling of the second-harmonic frequency-comb field. Second, the HHG power spectra can be greatly enhanced via multiphoton resonance, which can be achieved by tuning the carrier-envelope-phase (CEP) shifts and the peak intensities of both frequency-comb fields. Furthermore, besides the multiphoton transitions involving only fundamental-harmonic photons, additional multiphoton transitions involving both fundamental- and second-harmonic photons occur, resulting in the generation of combs with frequencies dependent on CEP shifts of both fields. Different multiphoton transition paths can interfere with each other when the two CEP shifts are matching, and the interference of paths allows one to coherently control the HHG power spectra by varying the relative phase between the fields.

  6. Frequency-resolved optical-gating measurements of ultrashort pulses using surface third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Krumbuegel, M.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1996-09-01

    We demonstrate what is to our knowledge the first frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) technique to measure ultrashort pulses from an unamplified Ti:sapphire laser oscillator without direction-of-time ambiguity. This technique utilizes surface third-harmonic generation as the nonlinear-optical effect and, surprisingly, is the most sensitive third-order FROG geometry yet. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  7. Molecular Mie model for second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, Sarina; Schürer, Benedikt; Sauerbeck, Christian; Peukert, Wolfgang; Peschel, Ulf

    2011-12-01

    A theoretical model to simulate second harmonic and sum frequency generation from stratified spherical particles of arbitrary material is presented and compared with the widely used Rayleigh-Gans-Debye approximation and to experimental results from polystyrene particles with adsorbed malachite green molecules. In this model, the nonlinear polarization is caused by individual dipoles placed in the vicinity of the sphere and is simulated on a molecular basis. This offers greater flexibility to model more sophisticated systems.

  8. CW, single-frequency 229nm laser source for Cd-cooling by harmonic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Yushi; Yarborough, J. M.; Merzlyak, Yevgeny

    2015-02-01

    More than 200mW of CW 229nm for Cd atom cooling application was generated by the 4th harmonic of a single frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser using a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity. With 650mW of 458nm input, 216mW of 229nm power was observed. Conversion efficiency from 458nm to 229nm was more than 33%.

  9. A mechanism for plasma waves at the harmonics of the plasma frequency foreshock boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A bump-on-tail unstable reduced velocity distribution, constructed from data obtained at the upstream boundary of the electron foreshock by the GSFC electron spectrometer experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite, is used as the initial plasma state for a numerical integration of the 1D-Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations. The integration is carried through the growth of the instability, beyond its saturation, and well into the stabilized plasma regime. A power spectrum computed for the electric field of the stabilized plasma is dominated by a narrow peak at the Bohm-Gross frequency of the unstable field mode but also contains significant power at the harmonics of the Bohm-Gross frequency. The harmonic power is in sharp peaks which are split into closely spaced doublets. The fundamental peak at the Bohm-Gross frequency is split into a closely spaced triplet. The mechanism for excitation of the second harmonic is shown to be second order wave-wave coupling.

  10. Second harmonic generation imaging of skeletal muscle tissue and myofibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Mohler, William H.; Plotnikov, Sergey; Millard, Andrew C.

    2006-02-01

    Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging microscopy is used to examine the morphology and structural properties of intact muscle tissue. Using biochemical and optical analysis, we characterize the molecular structure underlying SHG from the complex muscle sarcomere. We find that SHG from isolated myofibrils is abolished by extraction of myosin, but is unaffected by removal or addition of actin filaments. We thus determined that the SHG emission arises from domains of the sarcomere containing thick filaments. By fitting the SHG polarization anisotropy to theoretical response curves, we find an orientation for the harmonophore that corresponds well to the pitch angle of the myosin rod ?-helix with respect to the thick filament axis. Taken together, these data indicate that myosin rod domains are the key structures giving rise to SHG from striated muscle. Using SHG imaging microscopy, we have also examined the effect of optical clearing with glycerol to achieve greater penetration into specimens of skeletal muscle tissue. We find that treatment with 50% glycerol results in a 2.5 fold increase in achievable SHG imaging depth. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis shows quantitatively that the periodicity of the sarcomere structure is unaltered by the clearing process. Also, comparison of the SHG angular polarization dependence shows no change in the supramolecular organization of acto-myosin complexes. We suggest that the primary mechanism of optical clearing in muscle with glycerol treatment results from the reduction of cytoplasmic protein concentration and concomitant decrease in the secondary inner filter effect on the SHG signal. The pronounced lack of dependence of glycerol concentration on the imaging depth indicates that refractive index matching plays only a minor role in the optical clearing of muscle.

  11. Second harmonic generation imaging microscopy of cellular structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Andrew C.; Jin, Lei; Loew, Leslie M.

    2005-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy is an important emerging technique for biological research, with many advantages over existing one- or two-photon fluorescence techniques. A non-linear phenomenon employing mode-locked Ti:sapphire or fiber-based lasers, SHG results in intrinsic optical sectioning without the need for a confocal aperture. Furthermore, as a second-order process SHG is confined to loci lacking a center of symmetry. Many important structural proteins such as collagen and cellulose show intrinsic SHG, thus providing access to sub-resolution information on symmetry. However, we are particularly interested here in "resonance-enhanced" SHG from styryl dyes. In general SHG is a combination of a true second-order process and a third-order process dependent on a static electric field, such that SHG from membrane-bound dyes depends on a cell's trans-membrane potential. With simultaneous patch-clamping and non-linear imaging of cells, we have found that SHG is a sensitive probe of trans-membrane potential with sensitivities that are up to four times better than those obtained under optimal conditions using one-photon fluorescence imaging. With the sensitivity of SHG to local electric fields from other sources such as the membrane dipole potential as well as the quadratic dependence of SHG on concentration, we have found that SHG imaging of styryl dyes is also a powerful technique for the investigation of lipid phases and rafts and for the visualization of the dynamics of membrane-vesicle fusion following fertilization of an ovum.

  12. Nonlinear phase shift and frequency jumps in second-harmonic generation in a dual-cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotoverkh, I I; Lariontsev, E G

    2001-02-28

    Frequency characteristics and the stability of lasing regimes are considered for a solid-state laser with intracavity second-harmonic generation and feedback at the frequency of the second harmonic. Three stationary states differing from each other by a nonlinear phase shift related to second-harmonic generation are investigated. It is shown that jumps in the frequency of laser radiation may be induced by transitions between the considered stationary states as parameters of a dual-cavity laser are smoothly tuned. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  13. Harmonic imaging with fresnel beamforming in the presence of phase aberration.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Man Minh; Shin, Junseob; Yen, Jesse

    2014-10-01

    Fresnel beamforming is a beamforming method with a delay profile similar in shape to a physical Fresnel lens. The advantage of Fresnel beamforming is the reduced channel count, which consists of four to eight transmit and two analog-to-digital receive channels. Fresnel beamforming was found to perform comparably to conventional delay-and-sum beamforming. However, the performance of Fresnel beamforming is highly dependent on focal errors. These focal errors result in high side-lobe levels and further reduce the performance of Fresnel beamforming in the presence of phase aberration. With the advantages of lower side-lobe levels and suppression of aberration effects, harmonic imaging offers an effective solution to the limitations of Fresnel beamforming. We describe the implementation of tissue harmonic imaging and pulse inversion harmonic imaging in Fresnel beamforming, followed by dual apodization with cross-correlation, to improve image quality. Compared with conventional delay-and-sum beamforming, experimental results indicated contrast-to-noise ratio improvements of 10%, 49% and 264% for Fresnel beamforming using tissue harmonic imaging in the cases of no aberrator, 5-mm pork aberrator and 12-mm pork aberrator, respectively. These improvements were 22%, 57% and 352% for Fresnel beamforming using pulse inversion harmonic imaging. Moreover, dual apodization with cross-correlation was found to further improve the contrast-to-noise ratios in all cases. Harmonic imaging was also found to narrow the lateral beamwidth and shorten the axial pulse length by at least 25% and 21%, respectively, for Fresnel beamforming at different aberration levels. These results suggest the effectiveness of harmonic imaging in improving image quality for Fresnel beamforming, especially in the presence of phase aberration. Even though this combination of Fresnel beamforming and harmonic imaging does not outperform delay-and-sum beamforming combined with harmonic imaging, it provides the benefits of reduced channel count and potentially reduced cost and size of ultrasound systems. PMID:25018027

  14. Frequency dependence of optical third-harmonic generation from doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl. A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    In connection with the controversial question about the frequency dependence of the optical third-harmonic generation (THG) from doped graphene, which has recently been discussed in the literature, we develop an analytical theory for the THG susceptibility of doped graphene by using the original Genkin-Mednis nonlinear-conductivity-theory formalism including mixed intra- and interband terms. The theory is free of any nonphysical divergences at zero frequency, and it predicts the main resonant peak in the THG spectrum to be located at the photon energy ?? equal to two thirds of the Fermi energy EF of charge carriers in doped graphene.

  15. Observation of harmonically related solar radio zebra patterns in the 1-4 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Karlick, M.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    A unique case of two zebra patterns related harmonically with ratio of ~ 1:2 was observed by distant radio telescopes at So Jos dos Campos and Ond?ejov Observatories. Accompanied zebras show that the ratio of frequencies of the neighboring zebra lines is in the range of 1.009-1.037. There is a tendency of a decrease of this ratio with decreasing frequency within the specific zebra pattern. Both facts speak in favour of plasma emission models for the zebra pattern fine structure in radio burst continua.

  16. Formation of low-frequency harmonics on the surface of liquid hydrogen and helium in a turbulent regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurahimov, L. V.; Brazhnikov, M. Yu.; Levchenko, A. A.; Lihter, A. M.; Remizov, I. A.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of harmonics at frequencies below a monochromatic pump frequency in a system of capillary-gravity waves on surfaces of liquid hydrogen and superfluid helium in a turbulent regime is studied experimentally. By choosing the spectral characteristics of the exciting force and the resolution in the spectrum of the surface oscillations, it is possible to create conditions for low-frequency wave generation by changing the boundaries of the experimental cell. For certain monochromatic pump frequencies, low-frequency harmonics are observed on liquid hydrogen surfaces only in a rectangular cell. Energy transfer to the low-frequency subharmonics, as well as to high-frequency harmonics, is caused by three-wave decay processes. An inverse cascade develops on superfluid helium surfaces in a cylindrical cell as a result of three-wave decay processes, with about 90% of the energy concentrated in the inverse cascade.

  17. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging and Fourier Transform Spectral Analysis Reveal Damage in Fatigue-Loaded Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Fung, David T.; Sereysky, Jedd B.; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Laudier, Damien M.; Huq, Rumana; Jepsen, Karl J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Flatow, Evan L.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional histologic methods provide valuable information regarding the physical nature of damage in fatigue-loaded tendons, limited to thin, two-dimensional sections. We introduce an imaging method that characterizes tendon microstructure three-dimensionally and develop quantitative, spatial measures of damage formation within tendons. Rat patellar tendons were fatigue loaded in vivo to low, moderate, and high damage levels. Tendon microstructure was characterized using multiphoton microscopy by capturing second harmonic generation signals. Image stacks were analyzed using Fourier transform-derived computations to assess frequency-based properties of damage. Results showed 3D microstructure with progressively increased density and variety of damage patterns, characterized by kinked deformations at low, fiber dissociation at moderate, and fiber thinning and out-of-plane discontinuities at high damage levels. Image analysis generated radial distributions of power spectral gradients, establishing a “fingerprint” of tendon damage. Additionally, matrix damage was mapped using local, discretized orientation vectors. The frequency distribution of vector angles, a measure of damage content, differed from one damage level to the next. This study established an objective 3D imaging and analysis method for tendon microstructure, which characterizes directionality and anisotropy of the tendon microstructure and quantitative measures of damage that will advance investigations of the microstructural basis of degradation that precedes overuse injuries. PMID:20232150

  18. Design of a KA-Band Image Rejection Sub-Harmonic Down-Converter MMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Yang, Tao; Yang, Ziqiang

    2010-12-01

    A Ka band image rejection sub-harmonic down-converter monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) is proposed. It contains a radio frequency (RF) amplifier, a broadband Lange coupler and two balanced mixers with two compact Marchand Baluns. The converter is fabricated by a commercial GaAs 0.2 ?m pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (pHEMT) process, the size of which is 1.5 mm 2 mm. Moreover, an improved nonlinear stability analysis method is presented in this paper. Based on the auxiliary generator (AG) technology, the method can analyze the nonlinear stability of circuits under the terminal impedance mismatched condition by setting the terminal load impedances as optimized variables. This method is applied to the sub-harmonic down-converter and is validated by the simulation and experiment. Experimental results show that from 30 GHz to 40 GHz, the conversion loss (CL) of the converter is less than 10 dB, and the image refection ratio (IMRR) is more than 15 dB.

  19. Probing Nuclear Motion by Frequency Modulation of Molecular High-Order Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xue-Bin; Bandrauk, Andr D.

    2014-11-01

    Molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHOHG) in a non-Born-Oppenheimer treatment of H2 + , D2 + , is investigated by numerical simulations of the corresponding time-dependent Schrdinger equations in full dimensions. As opposed to previous studies on amplitude modulation of intracycle dynamics in MHOHG, we demonstrate redshifts as frequency modulation (FM) of intercycle dynamics in MHOHG. The FM is induced by nuclear motion using intense laser pulses. Compared to fixed-nuclei approximations, the intensity of MHOHG is much higher due to the dependence of enhanced ionization on the internuclear distance. The width and symmetry of the spectrum of each harmonic in MHOHG encode rich information on the dissociation process of molecules at the rising and falling parts of the laser pulses, which can be used to retrieve the nuclear dynamics. Isotope effects are studied to confirm the FM mechanism.

  20. Single pulse frequency compounding protocol for superharmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilouchkine, Mikhail G.; van Neer, Paul L. M. J.; Matte, Guillaume M.; Verweij, Martin D.; de Jong, Nico

    2011-03-01

    Second harmonic imaging is currently adopted as standard in commercial echographic systems. A new imaging technique, coined as superharmonic imaging (SHI), combines the 3rd till the 5th harmonics, arising during nonlinear sound propagation. It could further enhance resolution and quality of echographic images. To meet the bandwidth requirement for SHI a dedicated phased array has been developed: a low frequency subarray, intended for transmission, interleaved with a high frequency subarray, used in reception. As the bandwidth of the elements is limited, the spectral gaps in between the harmonics cause multiple reflection artifacts. Recently, we introduce a dual-pulse frequency compounding (DPFC) method to suppress those artifacts at price of a reduced frame rate. In this study we investigate the feasibility of performing the frequency compounding protocol within a single transmission. The traditional DPFC method constructs each trace in a post-processing stage by summing echoes from two emitted pulses, the second slightly frequency-shifted compared to the first. In the newly proposed method, the transmit aperture is divided into two parts: the first half is used to send a pulse at the lower center frequency, while the other half simultaneously transmits at the higher center frequency. The suitability of the protocol for medical imaging applications in terms of the steering capabilities was performed in a simulation study using the FIELD II toolkit. Moreover, an experimental study was performed to deduce the optimal parametric set for implementation of the clinical imaging protocol. The latter was subsequently used to obtain the images of a tissue mimicking phantom containing strongly reflecting wires. For in-vitro acquisitions the SHI probe with interleaved phased array (44 odd elements at 1MHz and 44 even elements at 3.7MHz elements, optimized for echocardiography) was connected to a fully programmable ultrasound system. The results of the Field II simulations demonstrated that the angle between the main and grating lobe amounted to 90°. The difference in the fundamental pressure level between those lobes was equal to -26.8 dB. Those results suggest that the superharmonic content in the grating lobe was acceptably low. A considerable improvement in the axial resolution of the SHI component (0.73 mm) at -6 dB in comparison with the 3rd harmonic (2.23 mm) was observed. A similar comparison in terms of the lateral resolution slightly favored the superharmonic component by 0.2 mm. Additionally, the images of the tissue mimicking phantom exhibited an absence of the multiple reflection artifacts in the focal and post-focal regions. The new method is equally effective in eliminating the ripple artifacts associated with SHI as the dual pulse technique, while the full frame rate is maintained.

  1. Second harmonic and subharmonic for non-linear wideband contrast imaging using a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer array.

    PubMed

    Novell, Anthony; Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2013-08-01

    When insonified with suitable ultrasound excitation, contrast microbubbles generate various non-linear scattered components, such as the second harmonic (2H) and the subharmonic (SH). In this study, we exploit the wide frequency bandwidth of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) to enhance the response from ultrasound contrast agents by selective imaging of both the 2H and SH components simultaneously. To this end, contrast images using the pulse inversion method were recorded with a 64-element CMUT linear array connected to an open scanner. In comparison to imaging at 2H alone, the wideband imaging including both the 2H and SH contributions provided up to 130% and 180% increases in the signal-to-noise and contrast-to-tissue ratios, respectively. The wide-frequency band of CMUTs offers new opportunities for improved ultrasound contrast agent imaging. PMID:23743105

  2. Extracting tidal frequencies using multivariate harmonic analysis of sea level height time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri-Simkooei, A. R.; Zaminpardaz, S.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    This contribution is seen as a first attempt to extract the tidal frequencies using a multivariate spectral analysis method applied to multiple time series of tide-gauge records. The existing methods are either physics-based in which the ephemeris of Moon, Sun and other planets are used, or are observation-based in which univariate analysis methodsFourier and wavelet for instanceare applied to tidal observations. The existence of many long tide-gauge records around the world allows one to use tidal observations and extract the main tidal constituents for which efficient multivariate methods are to be developed. This contribution applies the multivariate least-squares harmonic estimation (LS-HE) to the tidal time series of the UK tide-gauge stations. The first 413 harmonics of the tidal constituents and their nonlinear components are provided using the multivariate LS-HE. A few observations of the research are highlighted: (1) the multivariate analysis takes information of multiple time series into account in an optimal least- squares sense, and thus the tidal frequencies have higher detection power compared to the univariate analysis. (2) Dominant tidal frequencies range from the long-term signals to the sixth-diurnal species interval. Higher frequencies have negligible effects. (3) The most important tidal constituents (the first 50 frequencies) ordered from their amplitudes range from 212 cm (M2) to 1 cm (OQ2) for the data set considered. There are signals in this list that are not available in the 145 main tidal frequencies of the literature. (4) Tide predictions using different lists of tidal frequencies on five different data sets around the world are compared. The prediction results using the first significant 50 constituents provided promising results on these locations of the world.

  3. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Torrezan, Antonio C; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G

    2010-06-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE(11,2) and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE(11,2,q). The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within 0.7% and 6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:21243088

  4. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Torrezan, Antonio C; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Griffin, Robert G; Barnes, Alexander B

    2010-06-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within 0.7% and 6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:23761938

  5. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:21243088

  6. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2012-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:23761938

  7. An autocorrelation model with place dependence to account for the effect of harmonic number on fundamental frequency discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Joshua G. W.; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    Fundamental frequency (f0) difference limens (DLs) were measured as a function of f0 for sine-and random-phase harmonic complexes, bandpass filtered with 3-dB cutoff frequencies of 2.5 and 3.5 kHz (low region) or 5 and 7 kHz (high region), and presented at an average 15 dB sensation level (approximately 48 dB SPL) per component in a wideband background noise. Fundamental frequencies ranged from 50 to 300 Hz and 100 to 600 Hz in the low and high spectral regions, respectively. In each spectral region, f0 DLs improved dramatically with increasing f0 as approximately the tenth harmonic appeared in the passband. Generally, f0 DLs for complexes with similar harmonic numbers were similar in the two spectral regions. The dependence of f0 discrimination on harmonic number presents a significant challenge to autocorrelation (AC) models of pitch, in which predictions generally depend more on spectral region than harmonic number. A modification involving a “lag window” is proposed and tested, restricting the AC representation to a limited range of lags relative to each channel's characteristic frequency. This modified unitary pitch model was able to account for the dependence of f0 DLs on harmonic number, although this correct behavior was not based on peripheral harmonic resolvability. PMID:16018484

  8. Assessing the accuracy of some popular DFT methods for computing harmonic vibrational frequencies of water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. Coleman; Enyard, Jordan D.; Tschumper, Gregory S.

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of density functional theory (DFT) methods (37 altogether), including pure, hybrid, range-separated hybrid, double-hybrid, and dispersion-corrected functionals, have been employed to compute the harmonic vibrational frequencies of eight small water clusters ranging in size from the dimer to four different isomers of the hexamer. These computed harmonic frequencies have been carefully compared to recently published benchmark values that are expected to be very close to the CCSD(T) complete basis set limit. Of the DFT methods examined here, ?B97 and ?B97X are the most consistently accurate, deviating from the reference values by less than 20 cm-1 on average and never more than 60 cm-1. The performance of double-hybrid methods including B2PLYP and mPW2-PLYP is only slightly better than more economical approaches, such as the M06-L pure functional and the M06-2X hybrid functional. Additionally, dispersion corrections offer very little improvement in computed frequencies.

  9. A 0.33-THz second-harmonic frequency-tunable gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng-Di, Li; Chao-Hai, Du; Xiang-Bo, Qi; Li, Luo; Pu-Kun, Liu

    2016-02-01

    Dynamics of the axial mode transition process in a 0.33-THz second-harmonic gyrotron is investigated to reveal the physical mechanism of realizing broadband frequency tuning in an open cavity circuit. A new interaction mechanism about propagating waves, featured by wave competition and wave cooperation, is presented and provides a new insight into the beam-wave interaction. The two different features revealed in the two different operation regions of low-order axial modes (LOAMs) and high-order axial modes (HOAMs) respectively determine the characteristic of the overall performance of the device essentially. The device performance is obtained by the simulation based on the time-domain nonlinear theory and shows that using a 12-kV/150-mA electron beam and TE‑3,4 mode, the second harmonic gyrotron can generate terahertz radiations with frequency-tuning ranges of about 0.85 GHz and 0.60 GHz via magnetic field and beam voltage tuning, respectively. Additionally, some non-stationary phenomena in the mode startup process are also analyzed. The investigation in this paper presents guidance for future developing high-performance frequency-tunable gyrotrons toward terahertz applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61471007, 61531002, 61522101, and 11275206) and the Seeding Grant for Medicine and Information Science of Peking University, China (Grant No. 2014-MI-01).

  10. A piezoelectric pulse generator for low frequency non-harmonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports a new piezoelectric prototype for pulse generation by energy harvesting from low frequency non-harmonic vibration. The pulse generator presented here consists of two parts: the electromechanical part and the load circuit. A metal rolling rod is used as the proof mass, moving along the substrate to achieve both actuating of the piezoelectric cantilever by magnetic coupling and self-synchronous switching of the circuit. By using this new approach, the energy from the piezoelectric transduction mechanism is regulated simultaneously when it is extracted. This allows a series of tuneable pulses to be generated, which can be applied to self-powered RF wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes.

  11. Assessment of CCSD(T)-F12 Approximations and Basis Sets for Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jan M L; Kesharwani, Manoj K

    2014-05-13

    We consider basis set convergence and the effect of various approximations to CCSD(T)-F12 for a representative sample of harmonic frequencies (the HFREQ2014 set). CCSD(T*)(F12*)/cc-pVDZ-F12 offers a particularly favorable compromise between accuracy and computational cost: its RMSD <3 cm(-1) from the valence CCSD(T) limit is actually less than the remaining discrepancy with the experimental value at the valence CCSD(T) limit (about 5 cm(-1) RMSD). CCSD(T)-F12a and CCSD(T)-F12b appear to benefit from error compensation between CCSD and (T). PMID:26580535

  12. The electromagnetic environment of Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems. Occupational exposure assessment reveals RF harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourzoulidis, G.; Karabetsos, E.; Skamnakis, N.; Kappas, C.; Theodorou, K.; Tsougos, I.; Maris, T. G.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems played a crucial role in the postponement of the former occupational electromagnetic fields (EMF) European Directive (2004/40/EC) and in the formation of the latest exposure limits adopted in the new one (2013/35/EU). Moreover, the complex MRI environment will be finally excluded from the implementation of the new occupational limits, leading to an increased demand for Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) surveillance. The gradient function of MRI systems and the application of the RF excitation frequency result in low and high frequency exposures, respectively. This electromagnetic field exposure, in combination with the increased static magnetic field exposure, makes the MRI environment a unique case of combined EMF exposure. The electromagnetic field levels in close proximity of different MRI systems have been assessed at various frequencies. Quality Assurance (QA) & safety issues were also faced. Preliminary results show initial compliance with the forthcoming limits in each different frequency band, but also revealed peculiar RF harmonic components, of no safety concern, to the whole range detected (20-1000MHz). Further work is needed in order to clarify their origin and characteristics.

  13. A mechanical model to compute elastic modulus of tissues for harmonic motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Shan, Baoxiang; Pelegri, Assimina A; Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2008-07-19

    Numerous experimental and computational methods have been developed to estimate tissue elasticity. The existing testing techniques are generally classified into in vitro, invasive in vivo and non-invasive in vivo. For each experimental method, a computational scheme is accordingly proposed to calculate mechanical properties of soft biological tissues. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a new technique that performs radio frequency (RF) signal tracking to estimate the localized oscillatory motion resulting from a radiation force produced by focused ultrasound. A mechanical model and computational scheme based on the superposition principle are developed in this paper to estimate the Young's modulus of a tissue mimicking phantom and bovine liver in vitro tissue from the harmonic displacement measured by HMI. The simulation results are verified by two groups of measurement data, and good agreement is shown in each comparison. Furthermore, an inverse function is observed to correlate the elastic modulus of uniform phantoms with amplitude of displacement measured in HMI. The computational scheme is also implemented to estimate 3D elastic modulus of bovine liver in vitro. PMID:18571182

  14. Fast frequency-resolved terahertz imaging.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Takashi; Kawada, Yoichi; Toyoda, Haruyoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Akiyama, Koichiro; Takahashi, Hironori

    2011-03-01

    We propose a fast, frequency-resolved, real-time, terahertz imaging method. With our method, images at two specific terahertz frequencies can be acquired in 1 min. Three kinds of drugs (L-histidine, maltose, and CBZ3), which have absorption peaks in the terahertz region, were distinguished in 3 min by using our method. This technique can be used in industrial applications, such as nondestructive testing. PMID:21456777

  15. Second Harmonic Imaging improves Echocardiograph Quality on board the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Hamilton, Douglas; Martin, David; Ebert, Douglas; Melton, Shannon; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) capabilities have been part of the Human Research Facility (HRF) on board the International Space Station (ISS) since 2001. The US equipment on board the ISS includes a first-generation Tissue Harmonic Imaging (THI) option. Harmonic imaging (HI) is the second harmonic response of the tissue to the ultrasound beam and produces robust tissue detail and signal. Since this is a first-generation THI, there are inherent limitations in tissue penetration. As a breakthrough technology, HI extensively advanced the field of ultrasound. In cardiac applications, it drastically improves endocardial border detection and has become a common imaging modality. U.S. images were captured and stored as JPEG stills from the ISS video downlink. US images with and without harmonic imaging option were randomized and provided to volunteers without medical education or US skills for identification of endocardial border. The results were processed and analyzed using applicable statistical calculations. The measurements in US images using HI improved measurement consistency and reproducibility among observers when compared to fundamental imaging. HI has been embraced by the imaging community at large as it improves the quality and data validity of US studies, especially in difficult-to-image cases. Even with the limitations of the first generation THI, HI improved the quality and measurability of many of the downlinked images from the ISS and should be an option utilized with cardiac imaging on board the ISS in all future space missions.

  16. Fully automated muscle quality assessment by Gabor filtering of second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paesen, Rik; Smolders, Sophie; Vega, José Manolo de Hoyos; Eijnde, Bert O.; Hansen, Dominique; Ameloot, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    Although structural changes on the sarcomere level of skeletal muscle are known to occur due to various pathologies, rigorous studies of the reduced sarcomere quality remain scarce. This can possibly be explained by the lack of an objective tool for analyzing and comparing sarcomere images across biological conditions. Recent developments in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy and increasing insight into the interpretation of sarcomere SHG intensity profiles have made SHG microscopy a valuable tool to study microstructural properties of sarcomeres. Typically, sarcomere integrity is analyzed by fitting a set of manually selected, one-dimensional SHG intensity profiles with a supramolecular SHG model. To circumvent this tedious manual selection step, we developed a fully automated image analysis procedure to map the sarcomere disorder for the entire image at once. The algorithm relies on a single-frequency wavelet-based Gabor approach and includes a newly developed normalization procedure allowing for unambiguous data interpretation. The method was validated by showing the correlation between the sarcomere disorder, quantified by the M-band size obtained from manually selected profiles, and the normalized Gabor value ranging from 0 to 1 for decreasing disorder. Finally, to elucidate the applicability of our newly developed protocol, Gabor analysis was used to study the effect of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis on the sarcomere regularity. We believe that the technique developed in this work holds great promise for high-throughput, unbiased, and automated image analysis to study sarcomere integrity by SHG microscopy.

  17. Protection of VHF international distress frequencies from harmonic radiation due to digital television equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, J.

    Digital television picture processing equipment uses a luminance sampling frequency of 13.5 MHz, which can give rise to harmonics at 121.5 and 243 MHz. If such equipment becomes sufficiently widespread as will probably be the case with MAC/packet receivers, it is possible that the cumulative radiation could become significantly high. Since these frequencies are used by the international distress services there is a potential for interference if this unwanted radiation is not controlled at the point of manufacture. Over the last two years this problem was studied by the BBC in conjunction with the EBU. The conclusion is that the distress services will be protected provided that digital television picture processing equipment meets existing electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) standards for information technology equipment. In the case of domestic television this should not present a problem, but for studio equipment, because of its size and complexity, EMC compliance may not be so easy.

  18. Conformation, orientation and interaction in molecular monolayers: A surface second harmonic and sum frequency generation study

    SciTech Connect

    Superfine, R.; Huang, J.Y.; Shen, Y.R.

    1988-12-01

    We have used sum frequency generation (SFG) to study the order in a silane monolayer before and after the deposition of a coadsorbed liquid crystal monolayer. We observe an increase in the order of the chain of the silane molecule induced by the interpenetration of the liquid crystal molecules. By using second harmonic generation (SHG) and SFG, we have studied the orientation and conformation of the liquid crystal molecule on clean and silane coated glass surfaces. On both surfaces, the biphenyl group is tilted by 70{degree} with the alkyl chain end pointing away from the surface. The shift in the C-H stretch frequencies in the coadsorbed system indicates a significant interaction between molecules. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Detection of main tidal frequencies using least squares harmonic estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavian, R.; Hossainali, M. Mashhadi

    2012-11-01

    In this paper the efficiency of the method of Least Squares Harmonic Estimation (LS-HE) for detecting the main tidal frequencies is investigated. Using this method, the tidal spectrum of the sea level data is evaluated at two tidal stations: Bandar Abbas in south of Iran and Workington on the eastern coast of the UK. The amplitudes of the tidal constituents at these two tidal stations are not the same. Moreover, in contrary to the Workington station, the Bandar Abbas tidal record is not an equispaced time series. Therefore, the analysis of the hourly tidal observations in Bandar Abbas and Workington can provide a reasonable insight into the efficiency of this method for analyzing the frequency content of tidal time series. Furthermore, applying the method of Fourier transform to the Workington tidal record provides an independent source of information for evaluating the tidal spectrum proposed by the LS-HE method. According to the obtained results, the spectrums of these two tidal records contain the components with the maximum amplitudes among the expected ones in this time span and some new frequencies in the list of known constituents. In addition, in terms of frequencies with maximum amplitude; the power spectrums derived from two aforementioned methods are the same. These results demonstrate the ability of LS-HE for identifying the frequencies with maximum amplitude in both tidal records.

  20. High-resolution harmonic motion imaging (HR-HMI) for tissue biomechanical property characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Qian, Xuejun; Chiu, Chi Tat; Yu, Mingyue; Jung, Hayong; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Elastography, capable of mapping the biomechanical properties of biological tissues, serves as a useful technique for clinicians to perform disease diagnosis and determine stages of many diseases. Many acoustic radiation force (ARF) based elastography, including acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and harmonic motion imaging (HMI), have been developed to remotely assess the elastic properties of tissues. However, due to the lower operating frequencies of these approaches, their spatial resolutions are insufficient for revealing stiffness distribution on small scale applications, such as cancerous tumor margin detection, atherosclerotic plaque composition analysis and ophthalmologic tissue characterization. Though recently developed ARF-based optical coherence elastography (OCE) methods open a new window for the high resolution elastography, shallow imaging depths significantly limit their usefulness in clinics. Methods The aim of this study is to develop a high-resolution HMI method to assess the tissue biomechanical properties with acceptable field of view (FOV) using a 4 MHz ring transducer for efficient excitation and a 40 MHz needle transducer for accurate detection. Under precise alignment of two confocal transducers, the high-resolution HMI system has a lateral resolution of 314 m and an axial resolution of ?147 m with an effective FOV of 2 mm in depth. Results The performance of this high resolution imaging system was validated on the agar-based tissue mimicking phantoms with different stiffness distributions. These data demonstrated the imaging systems improved resolution and sensitivity on differentiating materials with varying stiffness. In addition, ex vivo imaging of a human atherosclerosis coronary artery demonstrated the capability of high resolution HMI in identifying layer-specific structures and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques based on their stiffness differences. Conclusions All together high resolution HMI appears to be a promising ultrasound-only technology for characterizing tissue biomechanical properties at the microstructural level to improve the image-based diseases diagnosis in multiple clinical applications. PMID:25694960

  1. Possible reasons for the frequency splitting of the harmonics of type II solar radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eselevich, V. G.; Eselevich, M. V.; Zimovets, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    AIA/SDO data in the 193 channel preceding a coronal mass ejection observed at the solar limb on June 13, 2010 are used to simultaneously identify and examine two different shock fronts. The angular size of each front relative to the CME center was about 20, and their propagation directions differed by ?25 (?4 in position angle). The faster front, called the blast shock, advanced the other front, called the piston shock, by R ? (0.02-0.03) R? ( R? is the solar radius) and had a maximum initial speed of V B ? 850 km/s (with V P ? 700 km/s for the piston shock). The appearance and motion of these shocks were accompanied by a Type II radio burst observed at the fundamental frequency F and second harmonic H. Each frequency was split into two close frequencies f 1 and f 2 separated by ? f = f 2 - f 1 ? F, H. It is concluded that the observed frequency splitting ? f of the F and H components of the Type II burst could result from the simultaneous propagation of piston and blast shocks moving with different speeds in somewhat different directions displaying different coronal-plasma densities.

  2. A Preliminary Engineering Design of Intravascular Dual-Frequency Transducers for Contrast-Enhanced Acoustic Angiography and Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probes are not optimized for contrast detection because of their design for high-frequency fundamental-mode imaging. However, data from transcutaneous contrast imaging suggests the possibility of utilizing contrast ultrasound for molecular imaging or vasa vasorum assessment to further elucidate atherosclerotic plaque deposition. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a small-aperture (0.6 3 mm) IVUS probe optimized for high-frequency contrast imaging. The design utilizes a dual-frequency (6.5 MHz/30 MHz) transducer arrangement for exciting microbubbles at low frequencies (near their resonance) and detecting their broadband harmonics at high frequencies, minimizing detected tissue backscatter. The prototype probe is able to generate nonlinear microbubble response with more than 1.2 MPa of rarefractional pressure (mechanical index: 0.48) at 6.5 MHz, and is also able to detect microbubble response with a broadband receiving element (center frequency: 30 MHz, ?6-dB fractional bandwidth: 58.6%). Nonlinear super-harmonics from microbubbles flowing through a 200-?m-diameter micro-tube were clearly detected with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 12 dB. Preliminary phantom imaging at the fundamental frequency (30 MHz) and dual-frequency super-harmonic imaging results suggest the promise of small aperture, dual-frequency IVUS transducers for contrast-enhanced IVUS imaging. PMID:24801226

  3. Three-dimensional structural imaging of starch granules by second-harmonic generation circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, G-Y; Lee, H; Hsu, K-J; Huttunen, M J; Kauranen, M; Lin, Y-Y; Chu, S-W

    2014-03-01

    Chirality is one of the most fundamental and essential structural properties of biological molecules. Many important biological molecules including amino acids and polysaccharides are intrinsically chiral. Conventionally, chiral species can be distinguished by interaction with circularly polarized light, and circular dichroism is one of the best-known approaches for chirality detection. As a linear optical process, circular dichroism suffers from very low signal contrast and lack of spatial resolution in the axial direction. It has been demonstrated that by incorporating nonlinear interaction with circularly polarized excitation, second-harmonic generation circular dichroism can provide much higher signal contrast. However, previous circular dichroism and second-harmonic generation circular dichroism studies are mostly limited to probe chiralities at surfaces and interfaces. It is known that second-harmonic generation, as a second-order nonlinear optical effect, provides excellent optical sectioning capability when combined with a laser-scanning microscope. In this work, we combine the axial resolving power of second-harmonic generation and chiral sensitivity of second-harmonic generation circular dichroism to realize three-dimensional chiral detection in biological tissues. Within the point spread function of a tight focus, second-harmonic generation circular dichroism could arise from the macroscopic supramolecular packing as well as the microscopic intramolecular chirality, so our aim is to clarify the origins of second-harmonic generation circular dichroism response in complicated three-dimensional biological systems. The sample we use is starch granules whose second-harmonic generation-active molecules are amylopectin with both microscopic chirality due to its helical structure and macroscopic chirality due to its crystallized packing. We found that in a starch granule, the second-harmonic generation for right-handed circularly polarized excitation is significantly different from second-harmonic generation for left-handed one, offering excellent second-harmonic generation circular dichroism contrast that approaches 100%. In addition, three-dimensional visualization of second-harmonic generation circular dichroism distribution with sub-micrometer spatial resolution is realized. We observed second-harmonic generation circular dichroism sign change across the starch granules, and the result suggests that in thick biological tissue, second-harmonic generation circular dichroism arises from macroscopic molecular packing. Our result provides a new method to visualize the organization of three-dimensional structures of starch granules. The second-harmonic generation circular dichroism imaging method expands the horizon of nonlinear chiroptical studies from simplified surface/solution environments to complicated biological tissues. PMID:24392849

  4. The role of resolved and unresolved harmonics in pitch perception and frequency modulation discrimination.

    PubMed

    Shackleton, T M; Carlyon, R P

    1994-06-01

    A series of experiments investigated the influence of harmonic resolvability on the pitch of, and the discriminability of differences in fundamental frequency (F0) between, frequency-modulated (FM) harmonic complexes. Both F0 (62.5 to 250 Hz) and spectral region (LOW: 125-625 Hz, MID: 1375-1875 Hz, and HIGH: 3900-5400 Hz) were varied orthogonally. The harmonics that comprised each complex could be summed in either sine (0 degree) phase (SINE) or alternating sine-cosine (0 degree-90 degrees) phase (ALT). Stimuli were presented in a continuous pink-noise background. Pitch-matching experiments revealed that the pitch of ALT-phase stimuli, relative to SINE-phase stimuli, was increased by an octave in the HIGH region, for all F0's, but was the same as that of SINE-phase stimuli when presented in the LOW region. In the MID region, the pitch of ALT-phase relative to SINE-phase stimuli depended on F0, being an octave higher at low F0's, equal at high F0's, and unclear at intermediate F0's. The same stimuli were then used in three measures of discriminability: FM detection thresholds (FMTs), frequency difference limens (FDLs), and FM direction discrimination thresholds (FMDDTs, defined as the minimum FM depth necessary for listeners to discriminate between two complexes modulated 180 degrees out of phase with each other). For all three measures, at all F0's, thresholds were low (< 4% for FMTs, < 5% for FMDDTs, and < 1.5% for FDLs) when stimuli were presented in the LOW region, and high (> 10% for FMTs, > 7% for FMDDTs, and > 2.5% for FDLs) when presented in the HIGH region. When stimuli were presented in the MID region, thresholds were low for low F0's, and high for high F0's. Performance was not markedly affected by the phase relationship between the components of a complex, except for stimuli with intermediate F0's in the MID spectral region, where FDLs and FMDDTs were much higher for ALT-phase stimuli than for SINE-phase stimuli, consistent with their unclear pitch. This difference was much smaller when FMTs were measured. The interaction between F0 and spectral region for both sets of experiments can be accounted for by a single definition of resolvability. PMID:8046144

  5. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, K. S.; Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  6. Frequency Domain Sampling Using Biomedical Imaging Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Gun Ha; Chung, Minji; Kyung, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In magnetic resonance image analysis using physical and computational method, the process of transformation from frequency domain to image domain requires significant amount time because Inverse Fourier Transformation (IFT) takes every frequency points to determine the final output image. This paper shows the mechanisms and physics of image formation using the selectivity of proper k-space by removing different amounts of high or low frequencies to create the most optimal magnetic resonance image of a human tibial bone. Originally, square unit step function, N/2-N/10:N/2 + N/10 = 1, was used during the Fourier Transformations. And Gaussian filter, y = exp(-t2/40n) , where t = h-L/2, h = [0,M], L =2*7*N/40, the size of frequency matrix (M, N) = (365,557) was tested. Also circle equations as a filter, r = sqrt((x-M/2)2 + (y-N/2)2) , were tested in creating the images of the human tibial bone to find an efficient filter. The best efficiency occurred when the exponent n in the proposed Gaussian filter equation is in between 3 and 8, and therefore, a new algorithm is needed to find the exact number since the number is not only an integer.

  7. Can Fourier transform mass spectral resolution be improved by detection at harmonic multiples of the fundamental ion cyclotron orbital frequency?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosshans, Peter B.; Marshall, Alan G.

    1991-06-01

    In has been suggested that resolution of closely spaced peaks in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry could be improved by performing detection at frequencies that are integer multiples (harmonic orders) of the fundamental ICR frequencies of the ions of interest. In general, these detection schemes employ modified ion traps that possess higher symmetry than the D4h symmetry of standard orthorhombic or cylindrical traps. If the frequency-domain peak width for a given ion packet were independent of harmonic order, mass resolving power would indeed increase linearly with harmonic order. In this paper, we analyze ICR peak width (and thus mass resolving power) as a function of harmonic order, for various ICR signal exponential decay models. For example, if the signal from an excited ion packet loses coherence by exponential decrease in ICR orbital radius, then the long-term behavior of the Mth harmonic (i.e., signal at M-fold higher frequency) decays M times faster than the fundamental (first harmonic) signal as detected in the standard mode. Thus, for radial decay, mass resolving power should be approximately independent of M. Alternatively, if ion coherence is lost by means of orbital phase randomization, it is necessary to specify a model for the time-dependence of the ICR orbital phase distribution. We have calculated the FT-ICR spectral linewidth of the Mth frequency multiple for six different functional forms for the time dependent phase distribution. In each case, the phase distribution was forced to evolve so as to produce exponential decay in the magnitude of the signal at the fundamental frequency (i.e., the experimentally observed behavior). For all six de-phasing models, mass resolving power at the Mth frequency multiple was less than that at the fundamental as detected in the standard mode. Yet another signal decay mode is an exponential decrease in the number of ions in a coherently orbiting packet, e.g., collisions of light ions with heavy neutrals (mion << mneutral). In this case, it can be shown that linewidth is independent of harmonic order, and mass resolving power indeed increases linearly with increasing harmonic order. However, high-resolution FT-ICR experiments more typically involve mion [greater-or-equal, slanted] mneutral. Finally, additional practical complications associated with ion traps designed to enhance multiple-frequency detection are discussed. We conclude that multiple-frequency detection will in general not improve (and will in general degrade) ultimate mass resolving power and consequently mass accuracy.

  8. MREIT conductivity imaging based on the local harmonic Bz algorithm: Animal experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Kiwan; Lee, Chang-Ock; Woo, Eung Je; Kim, Hyung Joong; Seo, Jin Keun

    2010-04-01

    From numerous numerical and phantom experiments, MREIT conductivity imaging based on harmonic Bz algorithm shows that it could be yet another useful medical imaging modality. However, in animal experiments, the conventional harmonic Bz algorithm gives poor results near boundaries of problematic regions such as bones, lungs, and gas-filled stomach, and the subject boundary where electrodes are not attached. Since the amount of injected current is low enough for the safety for in vivo animal, the measured Bz data is defected by severe noise. In order to handle such problems, we use the recently developed local harmonic Bz algorithm to obtain conductivity images in our ROI(region of interest) without concerning the defected regions. Furthermore we adopt a denoising algorithm that preserves the ramp structure of Bz data, which informs of the location and size of anomaly. Incorporating these efficient techniques, we provide the conductivity imaging of post-mortem and in vivo animal experiments with high spatial resolution.

  9. Second-order susceptibility imaging with polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Li, Tsung-Hsian; Su, Ping-Jung; Chou, Chen-Kuan; Fwu, Peter Tramyeon; Lin, Sung-Jan; Kim, Daekeun; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has become an important tool for minimally invasive biomedical imaging. However, differentiation of different second harmonic generating species is mainly provided by morphological features. Using excitation polarization-resolved SHG microscopy we determined the ratios of the second-order susceptibility tensor elements at single pixel resolution. Mapping the resultant ratios for each pixel onto an image provides additional contrast for the differentiation of different sources of SHG. We demonstrate this technique by imaging collagen-muscle junction of chicken wing.

  10. Multi-Frequency Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Yu, Mingyue; Chen, Zeyu; Fei, Chunlong; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is frequently associated with the sudden rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque within the coronary artery. Several unique physiological features, including a thin fibrous cap accompanied by a necrotic lipid core, are the targeted indicators for identifying the vulnerable plaques. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), a catheter-based imaging technology, has been routinely performed in clinics for more than 20 years to describe the morphology of the coronary artery and guide percutaneous coronary interventions. However, conventional IVUS cannot facilitate the risk assessment of ACS because of its intrinsic limitations, such as insufficient resolution. Renovation of the IVUS technology is essentially needed to overcome the limitations and enhance the coronary artery characterization. In this paper, a multi-frequency intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging system was developed by incorporating a higher frequency IVUS transducer (80 to 150 MHz) with the conventional IVUS (30–50 MHz) system. The newly developed system maintains the advantage of deeply penetrating imaging with the conventional IVUS, while offering an improved higher resolution image with IVUS at a higher frequency. The prototyped multi-frequency catheter has a clinically compatible size of 0.95 mm and a favorable capability of automated image co-registration. In vitro human coronary artery imaging has demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of the multi-frequency IVUS imaging system to deliver a more comprehensive visualization of the coronary artery. This ultrasonic-only intravascular imaging technique, based on a moderate refinement of the conventional IVUS system, is not only cost-effective from the perspective of manufacturing and clinical practice, but also holds the promise of future translation into clinical benefits. PMID:25585394

  11. Harmonic generation and frequency upconversion in Pr 3+-doped germanosilicate optical fibers pumped at 1.319 ?m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, H. T.; Cardoso, G. C.; de Araujo, M. T.; Dermelho, M. V. D.; Gouveia, E. A.; Gouveia-Neto, A. S.

    1997-02-01

    We report on the generation of visible light signals through harmonic generation and frequency upconversion in Pr 3+-doped germanosilicate single-mode optical fibers pumped by a Q-switched and modelocked Nd:YAG laser operated at 1.319 ?m. Growth rate of the frequency-doubling process seeded by upconversion fluorescence signal and instantaneous efficient frequency-tripling is also demonstrated.

  12. Performance comparison of five frequency domain system identification techniques for helicopter higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a computer simulation comparing the performance of five system identification techniques currently proposed for use with helicopter, frequency domain, higher harmonic vibration control algorithms. The system identification techniques studied were: (1) the weighted least squares method in moving block format, (2) the classical Kalman filter, (3) a generalized Kalman filter, (4) the classical least mean square (LMS) filter, and (5) a generalized LMS filter. The generalized Kalman and LMS filters were derived by allowing for multistep operation, rather than the single-step update approach used by their classical versions. Both open-loop and closed-loop (vibration control mode) identification results are presented in the paper. The algorithms are evaluated in terms of their accuracy, stability, convergence properties, computation speeds, and the relative ease with which these techniques may be directly applied to the helicopter vibration control problem.

  13. Extracting quantitative biomechanical parameters for cartilage from second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; Pierce, David M.; Ricken, Tim; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; de Lange Davies, Catarina

    2011-03-01

    Cartilage from the medial femoral condyle of chicken was sectioned and imaged using second harmonic generation microscopy. Using image analysis techniques based on the Fourier transform we derived quantitative threedimensional data of the fiber direction and dispersion of the collagen fiber network in the superficial layer. These data can be used directly in biomechanical models to enhance the fidelity of these models.

  14. Floquet topological system based on frequency-modulated classical coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Grazia; Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically propose how to observe topological effects in a generic classical system of coupled harmonic oscillators, such as classical pendula or lumped-element electric circuits, whose oscillation frequency is modulated fast in time. Making use of Floquet theory in the high-frequency limit, we identify a regime in which the system is accurately described by a Harper-Hofstadter model where the synthetic magnetic field can be externally tuned via the phase of the frequency modulation of the different oscillators. We illustrate how the topologically protected chiral edge states, as well as the Hofstadter butterfly of bulk bands, can be observed in the driven-dissipative steady state under a monochromatic drive. In analogy with the integer quantum Hall effect, we show how the topological Chern numbers of the bands can be extracted from the mean transverse shift of the steady-state oscillation amplitude distribution. Finally, we discuss the regime where the analogy with the Harper-Hofstadter model breaks down.

  15. Definitions of non-stationary vibration power for time-frequency analysis and computational algorithms based upon harmonic wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, YongHwa; Kim, Kwang-joon

    2015-02-01

    While the vibration power for a set of harmonic force and velocity signals is well defined and known, it is not as popular yet for a set of stationary random force and velocity processes, although it can be found in some literatures. In this paper, the definition of the vibration power for a set of non-stationary random force and velocity signals will be derived for the purpose of a time-frequency analysis based on the definitions of the vibration power for the harmonic and stationary random signals. The non-stationary vibration power, defined as the short-time average of the product of the force and velocity over a given frequency range of interest, can be calculated by three methods: the Wigner-Ville distribution, the short-time Fourier transform, and the harmonic wavelet transform. The latter method is selected in this paper because band-pass filtering can be done without phase distortions, and the frequency ranges can be chosen very flexibly for the time-frequency analysis. Three algorithms for the time-frequency analysis of the non-stationary vibration power using the harmonic wavelet transform are discussed. The first is an algorithm for computation according to the full definition, while the others are approximate. Noting that the force and velocity decomposed into frequency ranges of interest by the harmonic wavelet transform are constructed with coefficients and basis functions, for the second algorithm, it is suggested to prepare a table of time integrals of the product of the basis functions in advance, which are independent of the signals under analysis. How to prepare and utilize the integral table are presented. The third algorithm is based on an evolutionary spectrum. Applications of the algorithms to the time-frequency analysis of the vibration power transmitted from an excitation source to a receiver structure in a simple mechanical system consisting of a cantilever beam and a reaction wheel are presented for illustration.

  16. Face recognition from a single training image under arbitrary unknown lighting using spherical harmonics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Samaras, Dimitris

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we propose two novel methods for face recognition under arbitrary unknown lighting by using spherical harmonics illumination representation, which require only one training image per subject and no 3D shape information. Our methods are based on the recent result which demonstrated that the set of images of a convex Lambertian object obtained under a wide variety of lighting conditions can be approximated accurately by a low-dimensional linear subspace. We provide two methods to estimate the spherical harmonic basis images spanning this space from just one image. Our first method builds the statistical model based on a collection of 2D basis images. We demonstrate that, by using the learned statistics, we can estimate the spherical harmonic basis images from just one image taken under arbitrary illumination conditions if there is no pose variation. Compared to the first method, the second method builds the statistical models directly in 3D spaces by combining the spherical harmonic illumination representation and a 3D morphable model of human faces to recover basis images from images across both poses and illuminations. After estimating the basis images, we use the same recognition scheme for both methods: we recognize the face for which there exists a weighted combination of basis images that is the closest to the test face image. We provide a series of experiments that achieve high recognition rates, under a wide range of illumination conditions, including multiple sources of illumination. Our methods achieve comparable levels of accuracy with methods that have much more onerous training data requirements. Comparison of the two methods is also provided. PMID:16526422

  17. Resonance Properties and Frequencies of AN Electro-Rheological Clutch at Harmonic Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oravsk, Vladimr

    In this paper, a concentric electro-rheological clutch (ERC) is considered, embedded into a broader system: electro-hydro-aggregate (EHA) consisting of an induction motor as an electrodrive (ED) and a brake (B) as a loading machine. For ED, its dynamic moment characteristics and for B, a harmonic loading moment are taken into account. One starts from the corresponding nonlinear nondimensional dynamic model of EHA which is of the 5th order with 14 nondimensional parameters. The steady solution of the model can exhibit resonance which, due to complexity and extensiveness of the model, is very difficult to detect and analyze. Therefore, an analytical solution in the frame of the first approximation is sought, based on the method of small parameter. For this, a few simplifying assumptions are adopted (undamped system, small amplitude and frequency of load and narrow gap in ERC). Then, undamped resonance frequencies are derived and analyzed. Results are compared with resonance curves of the original and unsimplified system and further solution of the problem in question is proposed.

  18. Efficient procedure for the numerical calculation of harmonic vibrational frequencies based on internal coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-08-15

    We propose a general procedure for the numerical calculation of the harmonic vibrational frequencies that is based on internal coordinates and Wilson’s GF methodology via double differentiation of the energy. The internal coordinates are defined as the geometrical parameters of a Z-matrix structure, thus avoiding issues related to their redundancy. Linear arrangements of atoms are described with a dummy atom of infinite mass. The procedure has been automated in FORTRAN90 and its main advantage lies in the nontrivial reduction of the number of single point energy calculations needed for the construction of the Hessian matrix when compared to the corresponding number using double differentiation in Cartesian coordinates. For molecules of C1 symmetry the computational savings amount to 36! − 30, where N is the number of atoms, with additional savings when symmetry is present. Typical applications for small and medium size molecules in their minimum and transition state geometries as well as hydrogen bonded clusters are presented. In all cases the frequencies based on internal coordinates differ on average by < 1 cm-1 from those obtained from Cartesian coordinates.

  19. Imaging Fibrosis and Separating Collagens using Second Harmonic Generation and Phasor Approach to Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ranjit, Suman; Dvornikov, Alexander; Stakic, Milka; Hong, Suk-Hyun; Levi, Moshe; Evans, Ronald M.; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we have used second harmonic generation (SHG) and phasor approach to auto fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to obtain fingerprints of different collagens and then used these fingerprints to observe bone marrow fibrosis in the mouse femur. This is a label free approach towards fast automatable detection of fibrosis in tissue samples. FLIM has previously been used as a method of contrast in different tissues and in this paper phasor approach to FLIM is used to separate collagen I from collagen III, the markers of fibrosis, the largest groups of disorders that are often without any effective therapy. Often characterized by an increase in collagen content of the corresponding tissue, the samples are usually visualized by histochemical staining, which is pathologist dependent and cannot be automated. PMID:26293987

  20. Calculation of HVDC-converter harmonics in frequency domain with regard to asymmetries and comparison with time domain simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rittiger, J.; Kulicke, B.

    1995-10-01

    In order to study the effects of large HVDC converters to the feeding ac networks, it is of importance to explain and to calculate harmonic phenomena which are a result of converter operation. During commissioning of real HVDC converters it could be seen, that harmonics resulting from unsymmetries in the system voltages or from unsymmetries in converter operation led to significant difficulties concerning the system design. For this reason, not only the effects of characteristic but also the effects of noncharacteristic converter harmonics must be taken into account. The aim is to describe the steady state harmonic behavior of the converter. The harmonic spectra are not determined by time domain analysis but instead the solution is found by frequency domain calculations. This can result in reduced calculation time in comparison to conventional fourier analysis of the time functions. The converter is interpreted as an amplitude modulator with voltage and current converter functions which describe the coupling of the dc circuit and the ac network through the converter. To verify the theory, comparison of frequency domain with time domain calculations were carried out.

  1. Real-Time Monitoring Of Regional Tissue Elasticity During FUS Focused Ultrasound Therapy Using Harmonic Motion Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleke, Caroline; Pernot, Mathieu; Konofagou, Elisa

    2006-05-01

    The feasibility of the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) technique for simultaneous monitoring and generation of focused ultrasound therapy using two separate focused ultrasound transducer elements has previously been shown. In this study, a new HMI technique is described that images tissue displacement induced by a harmonic radiation force induced using a single focused ultrasound element. First, wave propagation simulation models were used to compare the use of a single Amplitude-Modulated (AM) focused beam versus two overlapping focused beams as previously implemented for HMI. Simulation results indicated that, unlike in the two-beam configuration, the AM beam produced a consistent, stable focus for the applied harmonic radiation force. The AM beam thus offered the unique advantage of sustaining the application of the spatially-invariant radiation force. Experiments were then performed on gelatin gel phantoms and tissue in vitro bovine liver. The radiation force was generated by a 4.68 MHz focused transducer using a low-frequency Amplitude-Modulated (AM) RF-signal. RF data were acquired at 7.5 MHz with a PRF of 6.5 kHz and displacements were estimated using a 1D cross-correlation algorithm on successive RF signals. Furthermore, taking advantage of the real-time capability of our method, the change in the elastic properties was monitored during focused ultrasound (FUS) ablation of tissue in vitro bovine liver. Based on the harmonic displacements, their temperature-dependence, and the calculated acoustic radiation force, the change in the relative, regional stiffness could be monitored during heating and ablation, both using the displacement amplitude and the resulting phase shift change of the displacement relative to the radiation force temporal profile. In conclusion, the feasibility of using an AM radiation force for HMI for simultaneous monitoring and treatment during ultrasound therapy was demonstrated in phantoms and tissues in vitro. Further study of this method will include, ex vivo and in vivo, stiffness and temperature.

  2. Temporal frequency analysis for improved dynamic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yijing

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) involves acquiring a time series of images to resolve the variations experienced by the imaged object. These dynamic studies include cardiac imaging, functional MRI (fMRI), time-resolved angiography, and contrast agent uptake studies. When dynamic objects are imaged, an ideal approach would be completely filling the k-t space, such that the desired spatial information can be provided at any moment in time. However, usually the imaging speed is too slow to catch all this information. In this dissertation, temporal frequency spectra of both the k-space and the image space have been used to evaluate and develop dynamic sampling and reconstruction strategies. A temporal frequency power spectrum of the k-space data has been used to predict the minimum error of the dynamic imaging for the different sampling strategies. Furthermore, the temporal frequency power spectrum of the k-space data provides the possibility of predicting the locations in k-space where the dynamic changes will occur. Using this information, the most effective sampling strategy can be determined. Unaliasing by Fourier-encoding the overlaps using the temporal dimension (UNFOLD) applies a low-pass filter in the temporal frequency spectrum of the image space to resolve the aliased and nonaliased pixels because of undersampling. However, low-pass filter resolution of the nonaliased images fails if there is overlap between the spatially aliased temporal spectra. A subtraction method has been used to remove the static portion of the image. The aliased and nonaliased dynamic portions are then resolved by comparing the temporal energy of bands in the power spectrum. MR angiography has benefited from use of a contrast agent since 1992, such as increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reduced flow-related artifacts. However, there is a trade-off between spatial resolution and acquisition speed. We describe a strategy for combining SENSE with various time-resolved sampling strategies during the phase when the injected contrast bolus passes through the arteries, thereby enabling the acquisition of a time series of high temporal resolution images. To improve the spatial resolution, high spatial frequencies are then acquired during the venous phase and combined with the previous time-resolved measurements. Arteries and veins can be separated by temporal correlation analysis, which calculates the correlation between a measured arterial or venous reference time curve and the local signal time course to highlight image locations with a time curve similar to the reference function. However, in the cases when the arterial and venous curves are too close in time and similar in shape, the correlation cannot completely separate the artery and vein. For better separation of arteries and veins, temporal correlation analysis was applied to the prewhitened time course with amplified differences between the arterial and venous time curves to obtain clearer masks of arteries and veins.

  3. Second harmonic generation imaging of fascia within thick tissue block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Christian P.; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Lgar, Franois

    2007-06-01

    Comparing the SHG image formation for thin sections of tail tendon fascia and skeletal muscle fascia, we demonstrate that the forward (F) and backward (B) SHG images are vastly different. In addition, despite the different arrangement of the collagen Type I fibrillar architecture forming these two fascias, their ratios of forward over backward signal (F/B) are nearly equal. SHG images of thick tissue blocks of the fascia-muscle unit show only backward features, as opposed to SHG images of tissue blocks of the fascia-tendon unit. These images are an amalgamation of forward and backward features due to the backscattering of forward components within tendon. These forward features disappear when this tissue block is immersed in glycerol as backscattering is hereby suppressed.

  4. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound imaging: Basic principles, present situation and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Snchez, Mara-Victoria; Napolon, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, the development of stabilised microbubble contrast agents and improvements in available ultrasonic equipment, such as harmonic imaging, have enabled us to display microbubble enhancements on a greyscale with optimal contrast and spatial resolution. Recent technological advances made contrast harmonic technology available for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the first time in 2008. Thus, the evaluation of microcirculation is now feasible with EUS, prompting the evolution of contrast-enhanced EUS from vascular imaging to images of the perfused tissue. Although the relevant experience is still preliminary, several reports have highlighted contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) as a promising noninvasive method to visualise and characterise lesions and to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions. Even if histology remains the gold standard, the combination of CH-EUS and EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) can not only render EUS more accurate but may also assist physicians in making decisions when EUS-FNA is inconclusive, increasing the yield of EUS-FNA by guiding the puncture with simultaneous imaging of the vascularity. The development of CH-EUS has also opened up exciting possibilities in other research areas, including monitoring responses to anticancer chemotherapy or to ethanol-induced pancreatic tissue ablation, anticancer therapies based on ultrasound-triggered drug and gene delivery, and therapeutic adjuvants by contrast ultrasound-induced apoptosis. Contrast harmonic imaging is gaining popularity because of its efficacy, simplicity and non-invasive nature, and many expectations are currently resting on this technique. If its potential is confirmed in the near future, contrast harmonic imaging will become a standard practice in EUS. PMID:25400439

  5. On the harmonics of the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratti, E. M.; Belloni, T. M.; Motta, S. E.

    2012-06-01

    GRS 1915+105 is a widely studied black hole binary, well known because of its extremely fast and complex variability. Flaring periods of high variability alternate with 'stable' phases (the plateaux) when the flux is low, the spectra are hard and the timing properties of the source are similar to those of a number of black hole candidates in the hard spectral state. In the plateaux the power density spectra (PDS) are dominated by a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) superposed on to a band-limited noise continuum and accompanied by at least one harmonic. In this paper we focus on three plateaux, presenting the analysis of the PDS and in particular of the LFQPO and its harmonics. While plotting the LFQPO and all the harmonics together on a frequency-width plane, we found the presence of a positive trend of broadening when the frequency increases. This trend can shed light on the nature of the harmonic content of the LFQPO and challenges the usual interpretation of these timing features.

  6. Wearable Second Harmonic Generation Imaging: The Sarcomeric Bridge to the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Williams, Justin C; Campagnola, Paul J

    2015-12-16

    Imaging of sarcomere dynamics invivo in patients has significant clinical importance, as the structure and function is altered in numerous pathologies. In this issue of Neuron, Schnitzer and coworkers (Sanchez etal., 2015)demonstrate this capability through a miniature, wearable Second Harmonic Generation microscope. PMID:26687213

  7. The Harmonic Structure of High-Frequency Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    2004-05-01

    Observations from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer have shown the existence of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) in the X-ray flux from accreting black hole binary systems. In at least two systems, these HFQPOs come in pairs with a 2:3 frequency commensurability. We employ a simple ``hot spot'' model to explain the position and amplitude of the HFQPO peaks. Using the exact geodesic equations for the Kerr metric, we calculate the trajectories of massive test particles, which are treated as isotropic, monochromatic emitters in their rest frames. Photons are traced from the accretion disk to a distant observer to produce time- and frequency-dependent images of the orbiting hot spot and background disk. The power spectrum of the X-ray light curve consists of multiple peaks at integral combinations of the black hole coordinate frequencies. In particular, if the radial frequency is one-third of the azimuthal frequency (as is the case near the innermost stable circular orbit), beat frequencies appear in the power spectrum at two-thirds and four-thirds of the fundamental azimuthal orbital frequency, in agreement with observations. In addition, we model the effects of shearing the hot spot in the disk, producing an arc of emission that also follows a geodesic orbit, as well as the effects of nonplanar orbits that experience Lens-Thirring precession around the black hole axis. By varying the arc length, we are able to explain the relative amplitudes of the QPOs at either 2ν or 3ν in observations from XTE J1550-564 and GRO J1655-40. In the context of this model, the observed power spectra allow us to infer values for the black hole mass and angular momentum and also constrain the parameters of the model, such as the hot spot size and luminosity.

  8. Second-harmonic frequency-resolved optical gating covering two and a half optical octaves using a single spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marceau, C.; Thomas, S.; Kassimi, Y.; Gingras, G.; Witzel, B.

    2015-05-01

    We report the measurement of laser pulse shapes covering the range 580-3250 nm using second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating equipped with a single inexpensive visible-NIR miniature spectrometer and a single pair of homemade broadband beam splitters. Our experimental scheme exploits frequency up-conversion by BBO crystals and appropriate corrections for dispersion, beam splitter filtering and phase-matching efficiency. The signal and idler waves from a commercial optical parametric amplifier pumped by a Ti:Sapphire laser (26 fs, 1 kHz) have been characterized as well as their second harmonic. The pulse shapes out of a commercial difference frequency generation module mixing signal and idler have also been measured up to 3250 nm. The resulting pulses range from 20 to 120 fs, and their chirp characteristics are also exposed. Our approach is demonstrated over most of the doubling crystal transparency range.

  9. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  10. Sum frequency and second harmonic generation from the surface of a liquid microjet

    SciTech Connect

    Smolentsev, Nikolay; Chen, Yixing; Roke, Sylvie; Jena, Kailash C.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2014-11-14

    The use of a liquid microjet as a possible source of interest for Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) spectroscopy is examined. We measured non-resonant SHG scattering patterns from the air/water interface of a microjet of pure water and observe a strong enhancement of the SHG signal for certain scattering angles. These enhancements can be explained by the optical properties and the shape of the liquid microjet. SFG experiments at the surface of a liquid microjet of ethanol in air show that it is also possible to measure the coherent vibrational SFG spectrum of the ethanol/air interface in this way. Our findings are useful for future far-UV or X-ray based nonlinear optical surface experiments on liquid jets. In addition, combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and SHG/SFG measurements are feasible, which will be very useful in improving our understanding of the molecular foundations of electrostatic and chemical surface properties and phenomena.

  11. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads.

    PubMed

    Brigham, John C; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A; Diamessis, Peter J

    2011-01-15

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  12. Erratum: Sources of Image Degradation in Fundamental and Harmonic Ultrasound Imaging: A Nonlinear, Full-Wave, Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain. This numerical method is used to simulate propagation of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse through a measured representation of the human abdomen with heterogeneities in speed of sound, attenuation, density, and nonlinearity. Conventional delay-and-sum beamforming is used to generate point spread functions (PSFs) that display the effects of these heterogeneities. For the particular imaging configuration that is modeled, these PSFs reveal that the primary source of degradation in fundamental imaging is due to reverberation from near-field structures. Compared with fundamental imaging, reverberation clutter in harmonic imaging is 27.1 dB lower. Simulated tissue with uniform velocity but unchanged impedance characteristics indicates that for harmonic imaging, the primary source of degradation is phase aberration. PMID:21693410

  13. Generalized Mach-Zehnder interferometer architectures for radio frequency translation and multiplication: Suppression of unwanted harmonics by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Basilio, Ramn; Hasan, Mehedi; Guemri, Rabiaa; Lucarz, Frdric; Hall, Trevor J.

    2015-11-01

    A generalized array of N parallel phase modulators electrically driven with a progressive 2 ? / N phase shift is analyzed. For N-even, the equivalence of this configuration to parallel Mach-Zehnder architectures, and specifically the equivalence for N=4 to a dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator is shown. A simple approach to the design of this architecture that determines the static optical phase shifts required in each of the N parallel arms to suppress unwanted harmonics while maximizing the harmonics of interest is developed. The proposed design approach is validated by numerical simulations of N=4 and N=6 architectures with properly determined optical phase shifts. Optical single-side-band modulation (lower and upper) and frequency multiplication of an electrical drive signal with high suppression of unwanted harmonics is shown to be achievable.

  14. Three-dimensional high-resolution second-harmonic generation imaging of endogenous structural proteins in biological tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Campagnola, Paul J; Millard, Andrew C; Terasaki, Mark; Hoppe, Pamela E; Malone, Christian J; Mohler, William A

    2002-01-01

    We find that several key endogenous protein structures give rise to intense second-harmonic generation (SHG)-nonabsorptive frequency doubling of an excitation laser line. Second-harmonic imaging microscopy (SHIM) on a laser-scanning system proves, therefore, to be a powerful and unique tool for high-resolution, high-contrast, three-dimensional studies of live cell and tissue architecture. Unlike fluorescence, SHG suffers no inherent photobleaching or toxicity and does not require exogenous labels. Unlike polarization microscopy, SHIM provides intrinsic confocality and deep sectioning in complex tissues. In this study, we demonstrate the clarity of SHIM optical sectioning within unfixed, unstained thick specimens. SHIM and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) were combined in a dual-mode nonlinear microscopy to elucidate the molecular sources of SHG in live cells and tissues. SHG arose not only from coiled-coil complexes within connective tissues and muscle thick filaments, but also from microtubule arrays within interphase and mitotic cells. Both polarization dependence and a local symmetry cancellation effect of SHG allowed the signal from species generating the second harmonic to be decoded, by ratiometric correlation with TPEF, to yield information on local structure below optical resolution. The physical origin of SHG within these tissues is addressed and is attributed to the laser interaction with dipolar protein structures that is enhanced by the intrinsic chirality of the protein helices. PMID:11751336

  15. High-contrast imaging of mycobacterium tuberculosis using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bo Ram; Lee, Eungjang; Park, Seung-Han

    2015-07-01

    Nonlinear optical microcopy has become an important tool in investigating biomaterials due to its various advantages such as label-free imaging capabilities. In particular, it has been shown that third-harmonic generation (THG) signals can be produced at interfaces between an aqueous medium (e.g. cytoplasm, interstitial fluid) and a mineralized lipidic surface. In this work, we have demonstrated that label-free high-contrast THG images of the mycobacterium tuberculosis can be obtained using THG microscopy.

  16. Second-harmonic generation and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy through a rodent mammary imaging window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Pamela A.; Nazir, Muhammad; Szulczewski, Michael J.; Keely, Patricia J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2012-03-01

    Tumor-Associated Collagen Signatures (TACS) have been identified that manifest in specific ways during breast tumor progression and that correspond to patient outcome. There are also compelling metabolic changes associated with carcinoma invasion and progression. We have characterized the difference in the autofluorescent properties of metabolic co-factors, NADH and FAD, between normal and carcinoma breast cell lines. Also, we have shown in vitro that increased collagen density alters metabolic genes which are associated with glycolysis and leads to a more invasive phenotype. Establishing the relationship between collagen density, cellular metabolism, and metastasis in physiologically relevant cancer models is crucial for developing cancer therapies. To study cellular metabolism with respect to collagen density in vivo, we use multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy (MPM) in conjunction with a rodent mammary imaging window implanted in defined mouse cancer models. These models are ideal for the study of collagen changes in vivo, allowing determination of corresponding metabolic changes in breast cancer invasion and progression. To measure cellular metabolism, we collect fluorescence lifetime (FLIM) signatures of NADH and FAD, which are known to change based on the microenvironment of the cells. Additionally, MPM systems are capable of collecting second harmonic generation (SHG) signals which are a nonlinear optical property of collagen. Therefore, MPM, SHG, and FLIM are powerful tools with great potential for characterizing key features of breast carcinoma in vivo. Below we present the current efforts of our collaborative group to develop intravital approaches based on these imaging techniques to look at defined mouse mammary models.

  17. Long-term imaging of mouse embryos using adaptive harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayil, Anisha; Watanabe, Tomoko; Jesacher, Alexander; Wilson, Tony; Srinivas, Shankar; Booth, Martin

    2011-04-01

    We present a detailed description of an adaptive harmonic generation (HG) microscope and culture techniques that permit long-term, three-dimensional imaging of mouse embryos. HG signal from both pre- and postimplantation stage (0.5-5.5 day-old) mouse embryos are fully characterized. The second HG images reveal central spindles during cytokinesis whereas third HG images show several features, such as lipid droplets, nucleoli, and plasma membranes. The embryos are found to develop normally during one-day-long discontinuous HG imaging, permitting the observation of several dynamic events, such as morula compaction and blastocyst formation.

  18. UHF Radar observations at HAARP with HF pump frequencies near electron gyro-harmonics and associated ionospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Brenton; Fallen, Christopher; Secan, James

    Results for HF modification experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska are presented for experiments with the HF pump frequency near third and fourth electron gyro-harmonics. A UHF diagnostic radar with range resolution of 600 m was used to determine time-dependent altitudes of scattering from plasma turbulence during heating experiments. Experiments were conducted with multiple HF frequencies stepped by 20 kHz above and below the gyro-harmonic values. During times of HF heating the HAARP facility has sufficient power to enhance large-scale ionospheric densities in the lower ionosphere (about 150-200 km altitude) and also in the topside ionosphere (above about 350 km). In the lower ionosphere, time-dependent decreases of the altitude of radar scatter result from electron density enhancements. The effects are substantially different even for relatively small frequency steps of 20 kHz. In all cases the time-varying altitude decrease of radar scatter stops about 5-10 km below the gyro-harmonic altitude that is frequency dependent; we infer that electron density enhancements stop at this altitude where the radar signals stop decreasing with altitude. Experiments with corresponding total electron content (TEC) data show that for HF interaction altitudes above about 170 km there is substantial topside electron density increases due to upward electron thermal conduction. For lower altitudes of HF interaction the majority of the thermal energy is transferred to the neutral gas and no significant topside density increases are observed. By selecting an appropriate HF frequency a little greater than the gyro-harmonic value we have demonstrated that the ionospheric response to HF heating is a self-oscillating mode where the HF interaction altitude moves up and down with a period of several minutes. If the interaction region is above about 170 km this also produces a continuously enhanced topside electron density and upward plasma flux. Experiments using an FM scan with the HF frequency increasing near the gyro-harmonic value were conducted. The FM scan rate was sufficiently slow that the electron density was approximately in an equilibrium state. For these experiments the altitude of the HF interaction follows a near straight line downward parallel to the altitude-dependent gyro-harmonic level.

  19. Submillisecond second harmonic holographic imaging of biological specimens in three dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David R.; Winters, David G.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2013-01-01

    Optical microscopy has played a critical role for discovery in biomedical sciences since Hookes introduction of the compound microscope. Recent years have witnessed explosive growth in optical microscopy tools and techniques. Information in microscopy is garnered through contrast mechanisms, usually absorption, scattering, or phase shifts introduced by spatial structure in the sample. The emergence of nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms reveals new information from biological specimens. However, the intensity dependence of nonlinear interactions leads to weak signals, preventing the observation of high-speed dynamics in the 3D context of biological samples. Here, we show that for second harmonic generation imaging, we can increase the 3D volume imaging speed from sub-Hertz speeds to rates in excess of 1,500 volumes imaged per second. This transformational capability is possible by exploiting coherent scattering of second harmonic light from an entire specimen volume, enabling new observational capabilities in biological systems. PMID:24173034

  20. Simultaneous stimulated Raman scattering and higher harmonic generation imaging for liver disease diagnosis without labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (e.g., higher harmonic (second-/third- harmonic) generation (HHG), simulated Raman scattering (SRS)) has high diagnostic sensitivity and chemical specificity, making it a promising tool for label-free tissue and cell imaging. In this work, we report a development of a simultaneous SRS and HHG imaging technique for characterization of liver disease in a bile-duct-ligation rat-modal. HHG visualizes collagens formation and reveals the cell morphologic changes associated with liver fibrosis; whereas SRS identifies the distributions of hepatic fat cells formed in steatosis liver tissue. This work shows that the co-registration of SRS and HHG images can be an effective means for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver steatosis/fibrosis at the cellular and molecular levels.

  1. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  2. High frequency coded imaging system with RF.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Marcin; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2008-08-01

    Coded transmission is an approach to solve the inherent compromise between penetration and resolution required in ultrasound imaging. Our goal was to examine the applicability of the coded excitation to HF (20-35 MHz) ultrasound imaging. A novel real-time imaging system for research and evaluation of the coded transmission was developed. The digital programmable coder- digitizer module based on the field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip supports arbitrary waveform coded transmission and RF echo sampling up to 200 megasamples per second, as well as real-time streaming of digitized RF data via a high-speed USB interface to the PC. All RF and image data processing were implemented in the software. A novel balanced software architecture supports real-time processing and display at rates up to 30 frames/sec. The system was used to acquire quantitative data for sine burst and 16-bit Golay code excitation at 20 MHz fundamental frequency. SNR gain close to 14 dB was obtained. The example of the skin scan clearly shows the extended penetration and improved contrast when a 35-MHz Golay code is used. The system presented is a practical and low-cost implementation of a coded excitation technique in HF ultrasound imaging that can be used as a research tool as well as to be introduced into production. PMID:18986930

  3. Effect of pulse to pulse variation of divergence, pointing and amplitude of copper vapor laser radiations on their second harmonic and sum frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Om; Mahakud, Ramakanta; Nakhe, Shankar V.; Dixit, Sudhir K.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the effect of single pulse stability of divergence angle, beam pointing angle and amplitude of green and yellow radiation pulses of an unstable resonator copper vapor laser (CVL) oscillator in the sum frequency (SF) mixing and second harmonic (SH). The conversion efficiency of sum frequency generation was lower compared to second harmonic processes despite larger fundamental power being used in sum frequency experiments. However the net UV power obtained at the sum frequency was higher than both of the second harmonic UV frequencies. Lower sum frequency generation (SFG) conversion efficiency compared to second harmonic generation (SHG) of individual CVL radiation is attributed to difference in single pulse stability of beam pointing, divergence and amplitude fluctuation of both CVL radiations in addition to commonly known fact of spatio-temporal mis-match. At the same fundamental input power, higher SH conversion efficiency of yellow compared to green is attributed to its better single pulse stability of beam pointing and divergence.

  4. Fundamental analysis and ex vivo validation of thermal lesion mapping using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Gary Y.; Luo, Jianwen; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Marquet, Fabrice; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-10-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on Amplitude-modulated (AM) - Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module, and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework in order to 1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and 2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25-Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6, and 9, the estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.65, 3.19, 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28, 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s, and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was also found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm2) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm2). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo.

  5. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  6. Spectral imaging of breast fibroadenoma using second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA), typically composed of stroma and epithelial cells, is a very common benign breast disease. Women with FA are associated with an increased risk of future breast cancer. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential of multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) for characterizing the morphology of collagen in the human breast fibroadenomas. In the study, high-contrast SHG images of human normal breast tissues and fibroadenoma tissues were obtained for comparison. The morphology of collagen was different between normal breast tissue and fibroadenoma. This study shows that MPLSM has the ability to distinguish fibroadenoma tissues from the normal breast tissues based on the noninvasive SHG imaging. With the advent of the clinical portability of miniature MPLSM, we believe that the technique has great potential to be used in vivo studies and for monitoring the treatment responses of fibroadenomas in clinical.

  7. Measurement and control of the frequency chirp rate of high-order harmonic pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mauritsson, J.; Johnsson, P.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier, A.; Kornelis, W.; Biegert, J.; Keller, U.; Gaarde, M.B.; Schafer, K.J.

    2004-08-01

    We measure the chirp rate of harmonics 13 to 23 in argon by cross correlation with a 12 femtosecond probe pulse. Under low ionization conditions, we directly measure the negative chirp due to the atomic dipole phase, and show that an additional chirp on the pump pulse is transferred to the qth harmonic as q times the fundamental chirp. Our results are in accord with simulations using the experimentally measured 815 nm pump and probe pulses. The ability to measure and manipulate the harmonic chirp rate is essential for the characterization and optimization of attosecond pulse trains.

  8. Revealing the nature of the QPO and its harmonic in GX 339-4 using frequency-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Done, Chris

    2016-03-01

    We use frequency-resolved spectroscopy to examine the energy spectra of the prominent low frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillation (QPO) and its harmonic in GX 339-4. We track the evolution of these spectra as the source makes a transition from a bright low/hard to hard intermediate state. In the hard/intermediate states, the QPO and time averaged spectra are similar and the harmonic is either undetected or similar to the QPO. By contrast, in the softer states, the harmonic is dramatically softer than the QPO spectrum and the time averaged spectrum, and the QPO spectrum is dramatically harder than the time averaged spectrum. Clearly, the existance of these very different spectral shaped components mean that the time-averaged spectra are complex, as also seen by the fact that the softer spectra cannot be well described by a disc, Comptonisation and its reflection. We use the frequency resolved spectra to better constrain the model components, and find that the data are consistent with a time-averaged spectrum which has an additional low temperature, optically thick Comptonisation component. The harmonic can be described by this additional component alone, while the QPO spectrum is similar to that of the hard Comptonisation and its reflection. Neither QPO nor harmonic show signs of the disc component even when it is strong in the time averaged spectrum. This adds to the growing evidence for inhomogeneous Comptonisation in black hole binaries. While the similarity between the harmonic and QPO spectra in the intermediate state can be produced from the angular dependence of Compton scattering in a single region, this cannot explain the dramatic differences seen in the soft state. Instead, we propose that the soft Compton region is located predominantly above the disc while the hard Compton is from the hotter inner flow. Our results therefore point to multiple possible mechanisms for producing harmonic features in the power spectrum. The dominant mechanism in a given observation is likely a function of both inclination angle and inner disc radius.

  9. Harmonic Millimeter Wave Generation and Frequency Up-Conversion Using Optical Injection Locking and Brillouin Selective Sideband Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Zhu, Ning-Hua; Wang, Li-Xian; Liu, Jian-Guo; Qi, Xiao-Qiong; Xie, Liang

    2010-10-01

    Harmonic millimeter wave (mm-wave) generation and frequency up-conversion are experimentally demonstrated using optical injection locking and Brillouin selective sideband amplification (BSSA) induced by stimulated Brillouin scattering in a 10-km single-mode fiber. By using this method, we successfully generate third-harmonic mm-wave at 27 GHz (fLO = 9 GHz) with single sideband (SSB) modulation and up-convert the 2 GHz intermediate frequency signal into the mm-wave band with single mode modulation of the SSB modes. In addition, the mm-wave carrier obtains more than 23 dB power gain due to the BSSA. The transmission experiments show that the generated mm-wave and up-converted signals indicate strong immunity against the chromatic dispersion of the fibers.

  10. Frequency domain lifetime and spectral imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pelet, Serge; Previte, Michael J R; Kim, Daekeun; Kim, Ki Hean; Su, Tsu-Te J; So, Peter T C

    2006-11-01

    In the femtoliter observation volume of a two-photon microscope, multiple fluorophores can be present and complex photophysics can take place. Combined detection of the fluorescence emission spectra and lifetimes can provide deeper insight into specimen properties than these two imaging modalities taken separately. Therefore, we have developed a detection scheme based on a frequency-modulated multichannel photomultiplier, which measures simultaneously the spectrum and the lifetime of the emitted fluorescence. Experimentally, the efficiency of the frequency domain lifetime measurement was compared to a time domain set-up. The performance of this spectrally and lifetime-resolved microscope was evaluated on reference specimens and living cells labeled with three different stains targeting the membrane, the mitochondria, and the nucleus. PMID:16924635

  11. Frequency-resolved optical gating with the use of second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R. ); Hunter, J.; White, W.E. )

    1994-11-01

    We discuss the use of second-harmonic generation (SHG) as the nonlinearity in the technique of frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) for measuring the full intensity and phase evolution of an arbitrary ultrashort pulse. FROG that uses a third-order nonlinearity in the polarization-gate geometry has proved extremely successful, and the algorithm required for extraction of the intensity and the phase from the experimental data is quite robust. However, for pulse intensities less than [similar to] 1 MW, third-order nonlinearities generate insufficient signal strength, and therefore SHG FROG appears necessary. We discuss the theoretical, algorithmic, and experimental considerations of SHG FROG in detail. SHG FROG has an ambiguity in the direction of time, and its traces are somewhat unintuitive. Also, previously published algorithms are generally ineffective at extracting the intensity and the phase of an arbitrary laser pulse from the SHG FROG trace. We present an improved pulse-retrieval algorithm, based on the method of generalized projections, that is far superior to the previously published algorithms, although it is still not so robust as the polarization-gate algorithm. We discuss experimental sources of error such as pump depletion and group-velocity mismatch. We also present several experimental examples of pulses measured with SHG FROG and show that the derived intensities and phases are in agreement with more conventional diagnostic techniques, and we demonstrate the high-dynamic-range capability of SHG FROG. We conclude that, despite the above drawbacks, SHG FROG should be useful in measuring low-energy pulses.

  12. Spatial and energy parameters of laser radiation and second harmonic upon self-frequency doubling

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, G D; Novikov, Aleksei A; Chirkin, Anatolii S

    2005-01-31

    The intracavity second-harmonic generation of laser radiation in an active nonlinear crystal is studied. The spatial distributions of the intensity and power of laser radiation and its second harmonic are calculated by the method of numerical simulations as functions of the parameters of the resonator, active nonlinear crystal, and pump. The analysis is performed for a periodically poled Nd:Mg:LiNbO{sub 3} crystal taking diffraction into account. (active media. lasers)

  13. Generation of third harmonic picosecond pulses at 355 nm by sum frequency mixing in periodically poled MgSLT crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbach, Andr; Schnau, Thomas; Lauritsen, Kristian; Trnkle, Gnther; Erdmann, Rainer

    2015-02-01

    Third harmonic 355nm picosecond pulses are generated by sum frequency mixing in a periodically poled magnesium doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate (PPMgSLT) crystal. The third harmonic generation is based on the 1064nm radiation of a gain-switched distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser which is amplified by a two-stage fiber amplifier. The diode laser is freely triggerable at variable repetition rates up to 80MHz and provides optical pulses of 65 ps FWHM duration and pulse energies in the range of 5 pJ. The 355nm third harmonic generation is realized in a two-step conversion process. First, the 1064nm fundamental radiation is frequency-doubled to 532 nm, afterwards both frequencies are mixed in the PPMgSLT crystal to 355 nm. The UV-radiation shows a pulse width of 60 ps, a good beam profile and stable pulse energy over a wide range of repetition rates by proprietary pump power management. At 355nm a pulse peak power of 5.3W was achieved with 192W pulse peak power of the fundamental radiation.

  14. Application of abstract harmonic analysis to the high-speed recognition of images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usikov, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Methods are constructed for rapidly computing correlation functions using the theory of abstract harmonic analysis. The theory developed includes as a particular case the familiar Fourier transform method for a correlation function which makes it possible to find images which are independent of their translation in the plane. Two examples of the application of the general theory described are the search for images, independent of their rotation and scale, and the search for images which are independent of their translations and rotations in the plane.

  15. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  16. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    The ultra-relativistic electrons, trapped in the inner radiation belts of Jupiter, generates a strong synchrotron radio emission (historically known as the jovian decimeter radiation (DIM)) which is beamed, polarized (~20% linear, ~1% circular) and broadband. It has been extensively observed by radio telescopes/ probes and imaged by radio interferometers over a wide frequency spectrum (from >300 MHz up to 22 GHz). This extended emission presents two main emission peaks constantly located on both sides of the planet close to the magnetic plane. High latitude emissions were also regularly observed at particular frequencies, times and in particular observational configurations. This region of the magnetosphere is "frozen" due to the strong magnetic field (~4.2 G as the equator) and therefore is forced to rotate at the planetary period (T≈9h55m). Due to the tilt (~ 10o) between the spin axis of the planet and the magnetic axis (which can be seen as dipolar in first approximation), the belts and the associated radio emission wobble around the planet center. The analysis of the flux at different frequencies highlighted spatial, temporal and spectral variabilities which origins are now partly understood. The emission varies at different time scales (short-time variations of hours to long-term variation over decades) due to the combination of visibility effect (wobbling, beaming, position of the observer in the magnetic rotating reference frame) [1], [2] and intrinsic local variations (interaction between relativistic electrons and satellites/dust, delayed effect of the solar wind ram pressure, impacts events) [3], [4], [5]. A complete framework is necessary to fully understand the source, loss and transport processes of the electrons originating from outside the belt, migrating by inward diffusion and populating the inner region of the magnetosphere. Only a few and unresolved measurements were made below 300 MHz and the nonsystematic observation of this radio emission, at different epochs only provided, each time, glimpses of the spectral content in different observational configurations. As the synchrotron emission frequency peaks at Vmax / E2B (with Vmax in MHz, E, the electron energy in MeV and B, the magnetic field in Gauss), the low frequency content of this emission is associated with low energy electron populations inside the inner belt and the energetic electrons located in regions of weaker magnetic field (at few jovian radii). Therefore, there is much interest in extending and completing the current knowledge of the synchrotron emission from the belts, with low frequency resolved observations. LOFAR, the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) [6], is a giant flexible and digital ground-based radio interferometer operating in the 30-250 MHz band. It brings very high time (~ μs), frequency (~ kHz) and angular resolutions (~1") and huge sensitivity (mJy). In November 2011, a single 10-hour track enabled to cover an entire planetary rotation and led to the first resolved image of the radiation belts between 127- 172 MHz [7,8]. In Feb 2013, an 2×5h30 joint LOFAR/ WSRT observing campaign seized the state of the radiation belts from 45 MHz up to 5 GHz. We will present the current state of the study (imaging, reconstruction method and modeling) of the radiation belts dynamic with this current set of observations. LOFAR can contribute to the understanding of the physics taking place in the inner belt as well as possibly providing a fast and a systematic "diagnostic" of the state of the belts. The latter represents an opportunity to give context and ground-based support for the arrival of JUNO (NASA) scheduled in July 2016 and also for future missions, such as JUICE (ESA), at the vicinity of Jupiter by the exploration of its icy satellites.

  17. Optical second harmonic imaging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring epitaxial oxide thin-film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubano, Andrea; Gnter, Tim; Lilienblum, Martin; Aruta, Carmela; Miletto Granozio, Fabio; Scotti di Uccio, Umberto; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Paparo, Domenico; Fiebig, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Optical second harmonic generation is proposed as a tool for non-invasive, non-destructive, real-time, in-situ imaging of oxide epitaxial film growth. The films can be monitored by surface imaging with a lateral resolution of ?1 ?m on an area of size up to 1 cm2. We demonstrate the potential of the proposed technique by an ex-situ analysis of thin epitaxial SrTiO3 films grown on (1 1 0) NdGaO3 single crystals. Our data show that second harmonic generation provides complementary information to established in-situ monitoring techniques such as reflection high-energy electron diffraction. We demonstrate that this technique can reveal otherwise elusive in-plane inhomogeneities of electrostatic, chemical or structural nature. The presence of such inhomogeneities is independently confirmed by scanning probe microscopy.

  18. Highly efficient quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic generation by frequency doubling of a high-frequency superimposed laser diode.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Mizuuchi, K; Kitaoka, Y; Kato, M

    1995-02-01

    We report highly efficient blue-light generation by frequency doubling of a high-frequency superimposed laser diode, stabilized by a grating feedback technique, in a periodically domain-inverted LiTaO(3) waveguide. To increase second-harmonic generation conversion efficiency, we enhanced the peak power of the laser diode by using a gain-switching method. Locking the oscillation wavelength of the laser diode by the grating feedback technique, we obtained 4.5 mW of average blue-light power with 13% conversion efficiency. PMID:19859158

  19. Imaging 2-D Structures With Receiver Functions Using Harmonic Stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Pelkum, V.

    2010-12-01

    I present a novel technique to image dipping and anisotropic structures using receiver functions. Receiver functions isolate phase conversions from interfaces close to the seismic station. Standard analysis assumes a quasi-flat layered structure and dampens arrivals from dipping interfaces and anisotropic layers, with attempts to extract information on such structures relying on cumbersome and nonunique forward modeling. I use a simple relationship between the radial and transverse component receiver function to detect dipping and anisotropic layers and map their depth and orientation. For dipping interfaces, layers with horizontal or plunging axis anisotropy, and point scatterers, the following relationships hold: After subtracting the azimuthally invariant portion of the radial receiver functions, the remaining signal is an azimuthally shifted version of the transverse receiver functions. The strike of the dipping interface or anisotropy is given by the azimuth of polarity reversals, and the type of structure can be inferred from the amount of phase shift between the components. For a known structure type, the phase shift between the two components provides pseudoevents from back-azimuths with little seismicity. The technique allows structural mapping at depth akin to geological mapping of rock fabric and dipping layers at the surface. It reduces complex wavefield effects to two simple and geologically meaningful parameters, similar to shear wave splitting. I demonstrate the method on the Wind River Thrust as well as other structures within the Transportable Array footprint.

  20. Performance of novel tissue harmonic echo imaging using endoscopic ultrasound for pancreatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Katanuma, Akio; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Osanai, Manabu; Yane, Kei; Kin, Toshifumi; Takaki, Ryo; Matsumori, Tomoaki; Gon, Katsushige; Tomonari, Akiko; Nojima, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Recently, tissue harmonic echo (THE) imaging has advanced with the development of a new endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) monitor/processing unit. With this new technology, penetration (THE-P) and resolution (THE-R) images can be obtained. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of this novel THE imaging using a new processing unit for pancreatic diseases. Patients and methods: Fifty patients with pancreatic lesions (38 cystic, 12 solid) were retrospectively analyzed. At each examination, 3 EUS images of the same pancreatic lesion were obtained using B-mode, THE-P mode, and THE-R mode imaging. Each set of EUS images was randomly arranged and evaluated independently by 4 physicians blinded to the imaging technique. Images were compared using a Likert scale 5-point grading system for each parameter. Results: For cystic lesions, THE-P mode images were significantly superior to conventional B-mode images for visualizing the boundary, septum, nodules, and total image quality (P?images were significantly superior to conventional B-mode images for visualizing the boundary, septum, and total image quality (P?images. THE-R mode images were inferior to conventional B-mode images for visualizing the boundary, internal structure, and total image quality (P?images provided better lesion characterization than conventional B-mode images. Further research is required to determine if this improvement will result in improved EUS diagnostics.

  1. Methods of peripheral nerve tissue preparation for second harmonic generation imaging of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Surabhi; Huq, Rumana; Hausman, Michael R

    2014-03-15

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of the peripheral nerve using multi-photon microscopy is a novel technique with little documentation. It affords the significant possibility of non-destructive imaging of internal nerve anatomy. The nature of nerve tissue, especially its size and viscoelastic properties, present special challenges for microscopy. While nerves are under an innate in situ strain, they retract once dissected, thus distorting microscopic structure. The challenge is to preserve the nerve in its natural strain range to obtain images that most truly reveal its structure. This study examined backscattered SHG images of rat median nerve prepared by several different methods to compare image quality and content. Nerve segments were fixed under strained (constant load or length) and unstrained conditions and imaged as whole nerve as well as plastic (methyl methacrylate) and paraffin embedded sections. These were tested for optimal excitation wavelength, quantitative image contrast, and overall quality. Root mean squared (RMS) contrast proved to be a reliable measure of the level of image contrast perceived by eye. We concluded that images obtained from tissue sections (plastic and paraffin) provided the most accurate and revealing SHG images of peripheral nerve structure. Removing the embedding material prior to imaging significantly improved image quality. Optimal excitation wavelengths were consistent regardless of the preparation method. PMID:23962836

  2. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen fibers in myocardium for atrial fibrillation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chiu, Yu-Wei; Lo, Men Tzung; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2010-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common irregular heart rhythm and the mortality rate for patients with AF is approximately twice the mortality rate for patients with normal sinus rhythm (NSR). Some research has indicated that myocardial fibrosis plays an important role in predisposing patients to AF. Therefore, realizing the relationship between myocardial collagen fibrosis and AF is significant. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is an optically nonlinear coherent process to image the collagen network. We perform SHG microscopic imaging of the collagen fibers in the human atrial myocardium. Utilizing the SHG images, we can identify the differences in morphology and the arrangement of collagen fibers between NSR and AF tissues. We also quantify the arrangement of the collagen fibers using Fourier transform images and calculating the values of angle entropy. We indicate that SHG imaging, a nondestructive and reproducible method to analyze the arrangement of collagen fibers, can provide explicit information about the relationship between myocardial fibrosis and AF.

  3. Chiral imaging of collagen by second-harmonic generation circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H.; Huttunen, M. J.; Hsu, K.-J.; Partanen, M.; Zhuo, G.-Y.; Kauranen, M.; Chu, S.-W.

    2013-01-01

    We provide evidence that the chirality of collagen can give rise to strong second-harmonic generation circular dichroism (SHG-CD) responses in nonlinear microscopy. Although chirality is an intrinsic structural property of collagen, most of the previous studies ignore that property. We demonstrate chiral imaging of individual collagen fibers by using a laser scanning microscope and type-I collagen from pig ligaments. 100% contrast level of SHG-CD is achieved with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. As a new contrast mechanism for imaging chiral structures in bio-tissues, this technique provides information about collagen morphology and three-dimensional orientation of collagen molecules. PMID:23761852

  4. Lensless Diffractive Imaging Using Tabletop Coherent High-Harmonic Soft-X-Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, Richard L.; Paul, Ariel; Raymondson, Daisy A.; Haedrich, Steffen; Gaudiosi, David M.; Holtsnider, Jim; Tobey, Ra'anan I.; Cohen, Oren; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Song, Changyong; Miao Jianwei; Liu Yanwei; Salmassi, Farhad

    2007-08-31

    We present the first experimental demonstration of lensless diffractive imaging using coherent soft x rays generated by a tabletop soft-x-ray source. A 29 nm high harmonic beam illuminates an object, and the subsequent diffraction is collected on an x-ray CCD camera. High dynamic range diffraction patterns are obtained by taking multiple exposures while blocking small-angle diffraction using beam blocks of varying size. These patterns reconstruct to images with 214 nm resolution. This work demonstrates a practical tabletop lensless microscope that promises to find applications in materials science, nanoscience, and biology.

  5. Image enhancement by non-linear extrapolation in frequency space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H. (Inventor); Greenspan, Hayit K. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An input image is enhanced to include spatial frequency components having frequencies higher than those in an input image. To this end, an edge map is generated from the input image using a high band pass filtering technique. An enhancing map is subsequently generated from the edge map, with the enhanced map having spatial frequencies exceeding an initial maximum spatial frequency of the input image. The enhanced map is generated by applying a non-linear operator to the edge map in a manner which preserves the phase transitions of the edges of the input image. The enhanced map is added to the input image to achieve a resulting image having spatial frequencies greater than those in the input image. Simplicity of computations and ease of implementation allow for image sharpening after enlargement and for real-time applications such as videophones, advanced definition television, zooming, and restoration of old motion pictures.

  6. Tripling the maximum imaging depth with third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Murat; Durr, Nicholas; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2015-09-01

    The growing interest in performing high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging has galvanized the use of longer excitation wavelengths and three-photon-based techniques in nonlinear imaging modalities. This study presents a threefold improvement in maximum imaging depth of ex vivo porcine vocal folds using third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy at 1552-nm excitation wavelength compared to two-photon microscopy (TPM) at 776-nm excitation wavelength. The experimental, analytical, and Monte Carlo simulation results reveal that THG improves the maximum imaging depth observed in TPM significantly from 140 to 420 ?m in a highly scattered medium, reaching the expected theoretical imaging depth of seven extinction lengths. This value almost doubles the previously reported normalized imaging depths of 3.5 to 4.5 extinction lengths using three-photon-based imaging modalities. Since tissue absorption is substantial at the excitation wavelength of 1552nm, this study assesses the tissue thermal damage during imaging by obtaining the depth-resolved temperature distribution through a numerical simulation incorporating an experimentally obtained thermal relaxation time (?). By shuttering the laser for a period of 2?, the numerical algorithm estimates a maximum temperature increase of 2C at the maximum imaging depth of 420 ?m. The paper demonstrates that THG imaging using 1552nm as an illumination wavelength with effective thermal management proves to be a powerful deep imaging modality for highly scattering and absorbing tissues, such as scarred vocal folds.

  7. Tripling the maximum imaging depth with third-harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Murat; Durr, Nicholas; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2015-09-01

    The growing interest in performing high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging has galvanized the use of longer excitation wavelengths and three-photon-based techniques in nonlinear imaging modalities. This study presents a threefold improvement in maximum imaging depth of ex vivo porcine vocal folds using third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy at 1552-nm excitation wavelength compared to two-photon microscopy (TPM) at 776-nm excitation wavelength. The experimental, analytical, and Monte Carlo simulation results reveal that THG improves the maximum imaging depth observed in TPM significantly from 140 to 420 ?m in a highly scattered medium, reaching the expected theoretical imaging depth of seven extinction lengths. This value almost doubles the previously reported normalized imaging depths of 3.5 to 4.5 extinction lengths using three-photon-based imaging modalities. Since tissue absorption is substantial at the excitation wavelength of 1552 nm, this study assesses the tissue thermal damage during imaging by obtaining the depth-resolved temperature distribution through a numerical simulation incorporating an experimentally obtained thermal relaxation time (?). By shuttering the laser for a period of 2?, the numerical algorithm estimates a maximum temperature increase of ?2C at the maximum imaging depth of 420 ?m. The paper demonstrates that THG imaging using 1552 nm as an illumination wavelength with effective thermal management proves to be a powerful deep imaging modality for highly scattering and absorbing tissues, such as scarred vocal folds. PMID:26376941

  8. Texture analysis applied to second harmonic generation image data for ovarian cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bruce L; Brewer, Molly A; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Hocker, James; Singh, Vikas; Mackie, Thomas R; Campagnola, Paul J

    2014-09-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantitate the remodeling, we implement a form of texture analysis to delineate the collagen fibrillar morphology observed in second harmonic generation microscopy images of human normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. In the learning stage, a dictionary of textonsfrequently occurring texture features that are identified by measuring the image response to a filter bank of various shapes, sizes, and orientationsis created. By calculating a representative model based on the texton distribution for each tissue type using a training set of respective second harmonic generation images, we then perform classification between images of normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. By optimizing the number of textons and nearest neighbors, we achieved classification accuracy up to 97% based on the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (true positives versus false positives). The local analysis algorithm is a more general method to probe rapidly changing fibrillar morphologies than global analyses such as FFT. It is also more versatile than other texture approaches as the filter bank can be highly tailored to specific applications (e.g., different disease states) by creating customized libraries based on common image features. PMID:26296156

  9. Texture analysis applied to second harmonic generation image data for ovarian cancer classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bruce L.; Brewer, Molly A.; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Hocker, James; Singh, Vikas; Mackie, Thomas R.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2014-09-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantitate the remodeling, we implement a form of texture analysis to delineate the collagen fibrillar morphology observed in second harmonic generation microscopy images of human normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. In the learning stage, a dictionary of "textons"-frequently occurring texture features that are identified by measuring the image response to a filter bank of various shapes, sizes, and orientations-is created. By calculating a representative model based on the texton distribution for each tissue type using a training set of respective second harmonic generation images, we then perform classification between images of normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. By optimizing the number of textons and nearest neighbors, we achieved classification accuracy up to 97% based on the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (true positives versus false positives). The local analysis algorithm is a more general method to probe rapidly changing fibrillar morphologies than global analyses such as FFT. It is also more versatile than other texture approaches as the filter bank can be highly tailored to specific applications (e.g., different disease states) by creating customized libraries based on common image features.

  10. Texture analysis applied to second harmonic generation image data for ovarian cancer classification

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bruce L.; Brewer, Molly A.; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Hocker, James; Singh, Vikas; Mackie, Thomas R.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Remodeling of the extracellular matrix has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantitate the remodeling, we implement a form of texture analysis to delineate the collagen fibrillar morphology observed in second harmonic generation microscopy images of human normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. In the learning stage, a dictionary of textonsfrequently occurring texture features that are identified by measuring the image response to a filter bank of various shapes, sizes, and orientationsis created. By calculating a representative model based on the texton distribution for each tissue type using a training set of respective second harmonic generation images, we then perform classification between images of normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. By optimizing the number of textons and nearest neighbors, we achieved classification accuracy up to 97% based on the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (true positives versus false positives). The local analysis algorithm is a more general method to probe rapidly changing fibrillar morphologies than global analyses such as FFT. It is also more versatile than other texture approaches as the filter bank can be highly tailored to specific applications (e.g., different disease states) by creating customized libraries based on common image features. PMID:26296156

  11. Ferrohydrodynamic modeling of magnetic nanoparticle harmonic spectra for magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavalikar, Rohan; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena; Garraud, Nicolas; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is an emerging imaging technique that uses magnetic nanoparticles as tracers. In order to analyze the quality of nanoparticles developed for MPI, a Magnetic Particle Spectrometer (MPS) is often employed. In this paper, we describe results for predictions of the nanoparticle harmonic spectra obtained in a MPS using three models: the first uses the Langevin function, which does not take into account finite magnetic relaxation; the second model uses the magnetization equation by Shliomis (Sh), which takes into account finite magnetic relaxation using a constant characteristic time scale; and the third model uses the magnetization equation derived by Martsenyuk, Raikher, and Shliomis (MRSh), which takes into account the effect of magnetic field magnitude on the magnetic relaxation time. We make comparisons between these models and with experiments in order to illustrate the effects of field-dependent relaxation in the MPS. The models results suggest that finite relaxation results in a significant drop in signal intensity (magnitude of individual harmonics) and in faster spectral decay. Interestingly, when field dependence of the magnetic relaxation time was taken into account, through the MRSh model, the simulations predict a significant improvement in the performance of the nanoparticles, as compared to the performance predicted by the Sh equation. The comparison between the predictions from models and experimental measurements showed excellent qualitative as well as quantitative agreement up to the 19th harmonic using the Sh and MRSh equations, highlighting the potential of ferrohydrodynamic modeling in MPI.

  12. Homodyne High-Harmonic Spectroscopy: Coherent Imaging of a Unimolecular Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin Bertrand, Julien

    At the heart of high harmonic generation lies a combination of optical and collision physics entwined by a strong laser field. An electron, initially tunnel-ionized by the field, driven away then back in the continuum, finally recombines back to rest in its initial ground state via a radiative transition. The emitted attosecond (atto=10-18) XUV light pulse carries all the information (polarization, amplitude and phase) about the photorecombination continuum-to-ground transition dipolar field. Photorecombination is related to the time-reversed photoionization process. In this perspective, high-harmonic spectroscopy extends well-established photoelectron spectroscopy, based on charged particle detection, to a fully coherent one, based on light characterization. The main achievement presented in this thesis is to use high harmonic generation to probe femtosecond (femto=10-15) chemical dynamics for the first time. Thanks to the coherence imposed by the strong driving laser field, homodyne detection of attosecond pulses from excited molecules undergoing dynamics is achieved, the signal from unexcited molecules acting as the reference local oscillator. First, applying time-resolved high-harmonic spectroscopy to the photodissociation of a diatomic molecule, Br2 ? Br + Br, allows us to follow the break of a chemical bond occurring in a few hundreds of femtoseconds. Second, extending it to a triatomic (NO2) lets us observe both the previously unseen (but predicted) early femtosecond conical intersection dynamics followed by the late picosecond statistical photodissociation taking place in the reaction NO2 ? NO + O. Another important realization of this thesis is the development of a complementary technique to time-resolved high-harmonic spectroscopy called LAPIN, for Linked Attosecond Phase INterferometry. When combined together, time-resolved high-harmonic spectroscopy and LAPIN give access to the complex photorecombination dipole of aligned excited molecules. These achievements lay the basis for electron recollision tomographic imaging of a chemical reaction with unprecedented angstrom (1 angstrom= 0.1 nanometer) spatial resolution. Other contributions dedicated to the development of attosecond science and the generalization of high-harmonic spectroscopy as a novel, fully coherent molecular spectroscopy will also be presented in this thesis.

  13. Echelle spectrograph calibration with a frequency comb based on a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser: a proposal.

    PubMed

    McFerran, J J

    2009-05-10

    Details for constructing an astronomical frequency comb suitable as a wavelength reference for chelle spectrographs associated with optical telescopes are outlined. The source laser for the frequency comb is a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser with a central wavelength of 1.56 microm. The means of producing a repetition rate greater than 7 GHz and a peak optical power of approximately 8 kW are discussed. Conversion of the oscillator light into the visible can occur through a two-step process of (i) nonlinear conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate and (ii) spectral broadening in photonic crystal fiber. While not necessarily octave spanning in spectral range to permit the use of an f -to- 2f interferometer for offset frequency control, the frequency comb can be granted accuracy by linking the mode spacing and a comb tooth to separate frequency references. The design avoids the use of a Fabry-Perot cavity to increase the mode spacing of the frequency comb; however, the level of supermode suppression and sideband asymmetry in the fiber oscillator and in the subsequent frequency conversion stages are aspects that need to be experimentally tested. PMID:19424399

  14. Echelle spectrograph calibration with a frequency comb based on a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser: a proposal

    SciTech Connect

    McFerran, J. J.

    2009-05-10

    Details for constructing an astronomical frequency comb suitable as a wavelength reference for echelle spectrographs associated with optical telescopes are outlined. The source laser for the frequency comb is a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser with a central wavelength of 1.56 {mu}m. The means of producing a repetition rate greater than 7 GHz and a peak optical power of {approx}8 kW are discussed. Conversion of the oscillator light into the visible can occur through a two-step process of (i) nonlinear conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate and (ii) spectral broadening in photonic crystal fiber. While not necessarily octave spanning in spectral range to permit the use of an f -to- 2f interferometer for offset frequency control, the frequency comb can be granted accuracy by linking the mode spacing and a comb tooth to separate frequency references. The design avoids the use of a Fabry-Perot cavity to increase the mode spacing of the frequency comb; however, the level of supermode suppression and sideband asymmetry in the fiber oscillator and in the subsequent frequency conversion stages are aspects that need to be experimentally tested.

  15. Diode-Pumped Nd:KGd(WO4)2 Laser: Lasing at Fundamental and Second Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, A. A.; Dashkevich, U. I.; Orlovich, V. A.; Khodasevich, I. A.

    2015-09-01

    High-power cw and quasi-cw lasing at the fundamental and second harmonic frequencies is obtained from Nd:KGd(WO 4 ) 2 lasers based on Np- and Ng-cut crystals pumped longitudinally by a diode laser at 879 nm. Because of different crystal lengths, the limiting pump power beyond which the crystals undergo thermomechanical damage is 26.8 W for the N p -cut and 17.3 W for the N g -cut. At these pump powers the cw outputs at ? = 1067.2 nm are 9.4 and 5.4 W, respectively, and the N g -cut crystal output is TEM 00 at the fundamental frequency. With quasicontinuous pumping at a 10% duty cycle the instantaneous laser power reaches ~11 W for both cuts with a periodic duration of 10-20 ms. The differential lasing efficiency relative to the absorbed pump power is 66.4% for cw lasing and 77.4% for quasi-cw operation. With intracavity frequency doubling using a KTP crystal, better results were obtained with the N g -cut crystal because of its simpler thermal lensing. The maximum second harmonic power was ~1.1 W for cw operation and ~2.6 W for quasi-cw operation with a diode laser power of 27.3 W.

  16. The utilization of the bubble pressure dependent harmonic resonance frequency for enhanced heating during high intensity focused ultrasound treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojahrood, Amin Jafari; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-10-01

    The use of bubbles in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) enhances tissue heating; however, localization of the treatment is difficult due to harmful effects at non-focal regions. In this study the bubble dynamics were studied through the utilization of resonance curves and bifurcation diagrams of the normalized bubble oscillation amplitude (NBOA) (time varying radius/initial radius) by solving the Hoff model. This method allowed us to study the bubble dynamics in wide ranges of control parameters. Results indicate that, by sonicating the bubbles with their pressure dependent harmonic resonance frequency (e.g. 3.1 MHz for a 5 micron bubble with shell shear modulus of 50 MPa and 100nm thickness), the (NBOA) is negligible below a threshold pressure (PT) (1.5 MPa). For pressures above the PT, the NBOA increases and remains constant for a large pressure range concomitant with a significant increase in higher harmonic emissions. Because of the steep spatial pressure gradient of the HIFU transducer, the non-focal bubbles will be non-resonant as the non-focal pressure is below the PT. Therefore, the undesirable effects of non-focal bubbles will be minimized. The resonant bubbles at the focal region are stable (NBOA<1.4) and radiate significant harmonics thus providing a long lasting controllable enhanced heating.

  17. Frequency-Domain Approach To Determine Magnetic Address-Sensor Separation Distance Using the Harmonic Ratio Method.

    PubMed

    Young, Colin C; Blackley, Benjamin W; Porter, Marc D; Granger, Michael C

    2016-02-16

    In this work, we describe an approach to determine the distance separating a magnetic address from a scanning magnetoresistive sensor, a critical adjustable parameter for certain bioassay analyses where magnetic nanoparticles are used as labels. Our approach is leveraged from the harmonic ratio method (HRM), a method used in the hard drive industry to control the distance separating a magnetoresistive read head from its data platter with nanometer resolution. At the heart of the HRM is an amplitude comparison of a signal's fundamental frequency to that of its harmonics. When the signal is derived from the magnetic field pattern of a periodic array of magnetic addresses, the harmonic ratio contains the information necessary to determine the separation between the address array and the read head. The elegance of the HRM is that there is no need of additional components to the detection platform to determine a separation distance; the streaming "bit signal" contains all the information needed. In this work, we demonstrate that the tenets governing HRM used in the hard drive industry can be applied to the bioanalytical arena where submicrometer to 100 μm separations are required. PMID:26879366

  18. Phase-inversion-based selective harmonic elimination (PI-SHE) in multi-level switched-mode tone- and frequency-modulated excitation.

    PubMed

    Cowell, David M J; Smith, Peter R; Freear, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Switched-mode operation allows the miniaturization of excitation circuitry but suffers from high harmonic distortion. This paper presents a method of phase-inversion-based selective harmonic elimination (PI-SHE) and the use of multiple switching levels. PI-SHE is shown to enable multiples of any selected harmonic to be eliminated through controlled timing of the transition between different excitation voltage levels. Multiples of the third harmonic are shown to be eliminated in three-level tone waveforms. In addition, multiples of the fifth harmonic are shown to be eliminated using five-level tone waveforms. A method of calculating the expected amplitude of each harmonic is presented. The application of PI-SHE in linear frequency-modulated (LFM) excitation is proposed. A heuristic derivation of the spectral properties of multilevel switched LFM waveforms is presented. The performance of the proposed PI-SHE method is confirmed through experimental measurement of the harmonics present in an ultrasound wave using two, three, and five levels for both tone and LFM excitation. The proposed method of controlling harmonics through the use of multilevel switched excitation is especially suitable for applications in which portability, high channel counts, and precise harmonic control are required. PMID:25004472

  19. Optical frequency standard based on a Nd:YAG laser stabilised by saturated absorption resonances in molecular iodine using second-harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, Mikhail N; Okhapkin, M V; Nevsky, A Yu; Bagaev, Sergei N

    2004-12-31

    The results of studies devoted to the development of the optical frequency standard based on a diode-pumped 1064-nm single-frequency ring Nd:YAG laser with intracavity frequency doubling are presented. The laser frequency was stabilised by saturated absorption resonances in molecular iodine at the second-harmonic frequency of the laser (at 532 nm). The saturated absorption resonances were observed in an external luminescent cell. The relative long-term frequency stability achieved in experiments was {approx}6x10{sup -15}. The physical and technical factors affecting the long-term frequency stability and reproducibility are investigated. (optical metrology and quantum frequency standards)

  20. Nonlinear frequency-mixing photoacoustic imaging of a crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigarev, N.; Zakrzewski, J.; Tournat, V.; Gusev, V.

    2009-08-01

    We present a technique for nonlinear photoacoustic imaging of cracks by laser excitation with intensity modulation at two fundamental frequencies combined with detection at mixed frequencies. By exploiting the strong dependence of the photoacoustic emission efficiency on the stateopen or closedof the contacts between the crack faces, remarkably enhanced image contrast is observed, 20 times higher than in linear photoacoustic images at the highest of the fundamental frequencies.

  1. Optical delineation of human malignant melanoma using second harmonic imaging of collagen

    PubMed Central

    Thrasivoulou, C.; Virich, G.; Krenacs, T.; Korom, I.; Becker, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Skin cancer incidence has increased exponentially over the last three decades. In 2008 skin cancer caused 2280 deaths in the UK, with 2067 due to malignant melanoma. Early diagnosis can prevent mortality, however, conventional treatment requires multiple procedures and increasing treatment times. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging could offer diagnosis and demarcation of melanoma borders non-invasively at presentation thereby short-cutting the excision biopsy stage. To test the efficacy and accuracy of SHG imaging of collagen in skin and to delineate the borders of skin cancers, unstained human melanoma biopsy sections were imaged using SHG microscopy. Comparisons with sister sections, stained with H&E or Melan-A were made for correlation of invasion borders. Fresh ex vivo normal human and rat skin was imaged through its whole thickness using SHG to demonstrate this technique is transferable to in vivo tissues. SHG imaging demonstrated detailed collagen distribution in normal skin, with total absence of SHG signal (fibrillar collagen) within the melanoma-invaded tissue. The presence or absence of signal changes dramatically at the borders of the melanoma, accurately demarcating the edges that strongly correlated with H&E and Melan-A defined borders (p<0.002). SHG imaging of ex vivo human and rat skin demonstrated collagen architecture could be imaged through the full thickness of the skin. We propose that SHG imaging could be used for diagnosis and accurate demarcation of melanoma borders on presentation and therefore potentially reduce mortality rates. PMID:21559140

  2. Microwave Imaging Reflectometry for the study of Edge Harmonic Oscillations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Domier, C. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; Kramer, G. J.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Muscatello, C. M.; Nazikian, R.; Shi, L.; Tobias, B. J.; Valeo, E.

    2015-10-01

    Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) is an ELM free mode of operation in which edge-localized harmonic oscillations (EHOs) are believed to enhance particle transport, thereby stabilizing ELMs and preventing damage to the divertor and plasma facing components. Microwave Imaging Reflectometer (MIR) enabling direct comparison between the measured and simulated 2D images of density fluctuations near the edge can determine the 2D structure of density oscillation, which can help to explain the physics behind EHO modes. MIR data sometimes indicate a counter-propagation between dominant (n=1) and higher harmonic modes of coherent EHOs in the steep gradient regions of the pedestal. To preclude diagnostic artifacts, we have performed forward modeling that includes possible optical mis-alignments to show that offsets between transmitting and receiving antennas do not account for this feature. We have also simulated the non-linear structure of the EHO modes, which induces multiple harmonics that are properly charaterized in the synthetic diagnostic. By excluding mis-alignments of optics as well as patially eliminating non-linearity of EHO mode structure as possible explanation for the data, counter-propagation observed in MIR data, which is not corroborated by external Mirnov coil array measurements, may be due to subtleties of the eigenmode structure, such as an inversion radius consistent with a magnetic island. Similar effects are observed in analysis of internal ECE-Imaging and BES data. The identification of a non-ideal structure motivates further exploration of nonlinear models of this instability. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  3. Second harmonic generation imaging of the collagen in myocardium for atrial fibrillation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chiou, Yu-We; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2009-02-01

    Myocardial fibrosis, a common sequela of cardiac hypertrophy, has been shown to be associated with arrhythmias in experimental models. Some research has indicated that myocardial fibrosis plays an important role in predisposing patients to atrial fibrillation. Second harmonic generation (SHG) is an optically nonlinear coherent process to image the collagen network. In this presentation, we observe the SHG images of the collagen matrix in atrial myocardium and we analyzed of collagen fibers arrangement by using Fourier-transform analysis. Moreover, comparing the SHG images of the collagen fibers in atrial myocardium between normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and atrial fibrillation (AF), our result indicated that it is possible to realize the relation between myocardial fibrosis and AF.

  4. The engagement of FDG PET/CT image quality and harmonized quantification: from competitive to complementary.

    PubMed

    Boellaard, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT as a quantitative imaging biomarker requires standardization and harmonization of imaging procedures and PET/CT system performance to obtain repeatable and reproducible quantitative data. However, a PET/CT system optimized to meet international quantitative standards is not necessarily optimized for use as a diagnostic tool (i.e. for lesion detectability). Several solutions have been proposed and validated, but until recently none of them had been implemented commercially. Vendor-provided solutions allowing the use of PET/CT both as a diagnostic tool and as a quantitative imaging biomarker are therefore greatly needed and would be highly appreciated. In this invited perspective one such solution is highlighted. PMID:26424722

  5. Multi-oriented windowed harmonic phase reconstruction for robust cardiac strain imaging.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Royuela-Del-Val, Javier; Sanz-Estébanez, Santiago; Martín-Fernández, Marcos; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for direct estimation of the cardiac strain tensor by extending the harmonic phase reconstruction on tagged magnetic resonance images to obtain more precise and robust measurements. The extension relies on the reconstruction of the local phase of the image by means of the windowed Fourier transform and the acquisition of an overdetermined set of stripe orientations in order to avoid the phase interferences from structures outside the myocardium and the instabilities arising from the application of a gradient operator. Results have shown that increasing the number of acquired orientations provides a significant improvement in the reproducibility of the strain measurements and that the acquisition of an extended set of orientations also improves the reproducibility when compared with acquiring repeated samples from a smaller set of orientations. Additionally, biases in local phase estimation when using the original harmonic phase formulation are greatly diminished by the one here proposed. The ideas here presented allow the design of new methods for motion sensitive magnetic resonance imaging, which could simultaneously improve the resolution, robustness and accuracy of motion estimates. PMID:26745763

  6. Interferometric Backward Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy for Axial Imaging with Accuracy Beyond the Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Nuno M.; McCulloch, Christopher; Barzda, Virginijus

    2014-01-01

    A new nonlinear microscopy technique based on interference of backward-reflected third harmonic generation (I-THG) from multiple interfaces is presented. The technique is used to measure height variations or changes of a layer thickness with an accuracy of up to 5 nm. Height variations of a patterned glass surface and thickness variations of fibroblasts are visualized with the interferometric epi-THG microscope with an accuracy at least two orders of magnitude better than diffraction limit. The microscopy technique can be broadly applied for measuring distance variations between membranes or multilayer structures inside biological tissue and for surface height variation imaging. PMID:24710103

  7. Motionless polarization-resolved second harmonic generation imaging of corneal collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hans G.; Batista, Ana; Uchugonova, Aisada; Knig, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy was used to investigate the collagenous structures of cornea samples in vitro in forward and backward direction. Although structural features appear different in both directions, following an approach by Latour et al. the collagen domain orientation is determined in forward as well as in backward direction, the latter being the only accessible direction for in vivo imaging. The experimental setup enables fast and completely motionless rotation of the polarization direction of 100 fs pulses by a polarization rotation based on a liquid crystal retarder.

  8. Effect of fast harmonic excitation on frequency-locking in a van der Pol Mathieu Duffing oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahsi, Abdelhak; Belhaq, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    We study the effect of high-frequency harmonic excitation on the entrainment area of the main resonance in a van der Pol-Mathieu-Duffing oscillator. An averaging technique is used to derive a self- and parametrically driven equation governing the slow dynamic of the oscillator. The multiple scales method is then performed on the slow dynamic near the main resonance to obtain a reduced autonomous slow flow equations governing the modulation of amplitude and phase of the slow dynamic. These equations are used to determine the steady state response, bifurcation and frequency-response curves. A second multiple scales expansion is used for each of the dependent variables of the slow flow to obtain slow slow flow modulation equations. Analysis of non-trivial equilibrium of this slow slow flow provides approximation of the slow flow limit cycle corresponding to quasi-periodic motion of the slow dynamic of the original system. Results show that fast harmonic excitation can change the nonlinear characteristic spring behavior and affect significantly the entrainment region. Numerical simulations are used to confirm the analytical results.

  9. Harmonic and frequency modulated ultrasonic vocalizations reveal differences in conditioned and unconditioned reward processing.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Erik J; McCowan, Talus J; Cain, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Novelty and sensation seeking (NSS) and ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) are both used as measures of individual differences in reward sensitivity in rodent models. High responders in the inescapable novelty screen have a greater response to low doses of amphetamine and acquire self-administration more rapidly, while the novelty place preference screen is positively correlated with compulsive drug seeking. These screens are uncorrelated and implicated in separate drug abuse models. 50 kHz USVs measure affective state in rats and are evoked by positive stimuli. NSS and USVs are each implicated in drug response, self-administration, and reveal differences in individual behavior, yet their relationship with each other is not understood. The present study screened rats for their response to novelty and measured USVs of all call types in response to heterospecific play to determine the relationships between these individual difference traits. Generally, we hypothesized that 50k Hz USVs would be positively correlated with the NPP screen, and that 22 kHz would be positively correlated with the IEN screen. Results indicate none of the screens were correlated indicating they are measuring different individual difference traits. However, examination of the subtypes of USVs indicated harmonic USVs and the novelty place preference were positively correlated. Harmonic 50 kHz USVs increased in response to reward associated context, suggesting animals conditioned to the heterospecific tickle arena and anticipated rewarding stimuli, while FM only increased in response to tickling. USV subtypes can be used to elucidate differences in attribution of incentive value across conditioned stimuli and receipt of rewarding stimuli. These data provide strong support that harmonic and FM USVs can be used to understand reward processing in addition to NSS. PMID:25827931

  10. Contrast enhancement in second harmonic imaging: discriminating between muscle and collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Artigas, David; Soria, Guadalupe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Torre, Iratxe; Gratacos, Eduard; Planas, Anna M.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2009-07-01

    In this study, polarization second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging is used and data analysis is developed to gain contrast and to discriminate with pixel resolution, in the same image, SHG source architectures. We use mammalian tissue in which both skeletal muscle and fibrilar collagen can be found. The images are fitted point by point using an algorithm based on a biophysical model, where the coefficient of determination is utilized as a filtering mechanism. For the whole image we retrieve for every pixel, the effective orientation, ?e , of the SHG active structures. As a result a new image is formed which its contrast depends on the values of ?e . Collagen presented in the forward direction for a predefined region of interest (ROI), peak distribution of angles ?e centered in the region of ~45, while muscle in the region of ~65. Consequently, collagen and muscle are represented in different colors in the same image. Thus, here we show that it is possible to gain contrast and to discriminate between collagen and muscle without the use of any exogenous labeling or any co-localization with fluorescence imaging.

  11. New Details of the Human Corneal Limbus Revealed With Second Harmonic Generation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Choul Yong; Lee, Jimmy K.; Zhang, Cheng; Chuck, Roy S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report novel findings of the human corneal limbus by using second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. Methods Corneal limbus was imaged by using an inverted two-photon excitation fluorescence microscope. Laser (Ti:Sapphire) was tuned at 850 nm for two-photon excitation. Backscatter signals of SHG and autofluorescence (AF) were collected through a 425/30-nm emission filter and a 525/45-emission filter, respectively. Multiple, consecutive, and overlapping image stacks (z-stack) were acquired for the corneal limbal area. Results Two novel collagen structures were revealed by SHG imaging at the limbus: an anterior limbal cribriform layer and presumed anchoring fibers. Anterior limbal cribriform layer is an intertwined reticular collagen architecture just beneath the limbal epithelial niche and is located between the peripheral cornea and Tenon's/scleral tissue. Autofluorescence imaging revealed high vascularity in this structure. Central to the anterior limbal cribriform layer, radial strands of collagen were found to connect the peripheral cornea to the limbus. These presumed anchoring fibers have both collagen and elastin and were found more extensively in the superficial layers than deep layer and were absent in very deep limbus near Schlemm's canal. Conclusions By using SHG imaging, new details of the collagen architecture of human corneal limbal area were elucidated. High resolution images with volumetric analysis revealed two novel collagen structures. PMID:26393473

  12. phiFLIM: a new method to avoid aliasing in frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Munster, E B; Gadella, T W J

    2004-01-01

    In conventional wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), excitation light is intensity-modulated at megahertz frequencies. Emitted fluorescence is recorded by a CCD camera through an image intensifier, which is modulated at the same frequency. From images recorded at various phase differences between excitation and intensifier gain modulation, the phase and modulation depth of the emitted light is obtained. The fluorescence lifetime is determined from the delay and the decrease in modulation depth of the emission relative to the excitation. A minimum of three images is required, but in this case measurements become susceptible to aliasing caused by the presence of higher harmonics. Taking more images to avoid this is not always possible owing to phototoxicity or movement. A method is introduced, phiFLIM, requiring only three recordings that is not susceptible to aliasing. The phase difference between the excitation and the intensifier is scanned over the entire 360 degrees range following a predefined phase profile, during which the image produced by the intensifier is integrated onto the CCD camera, yielding a single image. Three different images are produced following this procedure, each with a different phase profile. Measurements were performed with a conventional wide-field frequency-domain FLIM system based on an acousto-optic modulator for modulation of the excitation and a microchannel-plate image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera for the detection. By analysis of the harmonic content of measured signals it was found that the third harmonic was effectively the highest present. Using the conventional method with three recordings, phase errors due to aliasing of up to +/- 29 degrees and modulation depth errors of up to 30% were found. Errors in lifetimes of YFP-transfected HeLa cells were as high as 100%. With phiFLIM, using the same specimen and settings, systematic errors due to aliasing did not occur. PMID:14678510

  13. Positional stability and radial dynamics of sonoluminescent bubbles under bi-harmonic driving: Effect of the high-frequency component and its relative phase.

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2016-07-01

    The use of bi-frequency driving in sonoluminescence has proved to be an effective way to avoid the spatial instability (pseudo-orbits) developed by bubbles in systems with high viscous liquids like sulfuric or phosphoric acids. In this work, we present extensive experimental and numerical evidence in order to assess the effect of the high frequency component (PAc(HF)) of a bi-harmonic acoustic pressure field on the dynamic of sonoluminescent bubbles in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid. The present study is mainly focused on the role of the harmonic frequency (Nf0) and the relative phase between the two frequency components (φb) of the acoustic field on the spatial, positional and diffusive stability of the bubbles. The results presented in this work were analyzed by means of three different approaches. First, we discussed some qualitative considerations about the changes observed in the radial dynamics, and the stability of similar bubbles under distinct bi-harmonic drivings. Later, we have investigated, through a series of numerical simulations, how the use of high frequency harmonic components of different order N, affects the positional stability of the SL bubbles. Furthermore, the influence of φb in their radius temporal evolution is systematically explored for harmonics ranging from the second to the fifteenth harmonic (N=2-15). Finally, a multivariate analysis based on the covariance method is performed to study the dependences among the parameters characterizing the SL bubble. Both experimental and numerical results indicate that the impact of PAc(HF) on the positional instability and the radial dynamics turns to be progressively negligible as the order of the high frequency harmonic component grows (i.e. N≫1), however its effectiveness on the reduction of the spatial instability remains unaltered or even improved. PMID:26964988

  14. Inter- and Intra-Observer Variability in Prostate Definition With Tissue Harmonic and Brightness Mode Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, Gurpreet Kaur; Dunscombe, Peter; Meyer, Tyler; Pavamani, Simon; Khan, Rao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare the relative utility of tissue harmonic (H) and brightness (B) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate by studying interobserver and intraobserver variation in prostate delineation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage disease were randomly selected. TRUS images of prostates were acquired using B and H modes. The prostates on all images were contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and five equally trained observers. The observers were blinded to information regarding patient and imaging mode. The volumes of prostate glands and areas of midgland slices were calculated. Volumes contoured were compared among the observers and between observer group and RO. Contours on one patient were repeated five times by four observers to evaluate the intraobserver variability. Results: A one-sample Student t-test showed the volumes outlined by five observers are in agreement (p > 0.05) with the RO. Paired Student t-test showed prostate volumes (p = 0.008) and midgland areas (p = 0.006) with H mode were significantly smaller than that with B mode. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant interobserver variability (p < 0.001) in prostate volumes and areas. Inter- and intraobserver consistency was quantified as the standard deviation of mean volumes and areas, and concordance indices. It was found that for small glands ({<=}35 cc) H mode provided greater interobserver consistency; however, for large glands ({>=}35 cc), B mode provided more consistent estimates. Conclusions: H mode provided superior inter- and intraobserver agreement in prostate volume definition for small to medium prostates. In large glands, H mode does not exhibit any additional advantage. Although harmonic imaging has not proven advantageous for all cases, its utilization seems to be judicious for small prostates.

  15. Low-Power Analog Processing for Sensing Applications: Low-Frequency Harmonic Signal Classification

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel J.; William, Peter E.; Hoffman, Michael W.; Balkir, Sina

    2013-01-01

    A low-power analog sensor front-end is described that reduces the energy required to extract environmental sensing spectral features without using Fast Fouriér Transform (FFT) or wavelet transforms. An Analog Harmonic Transform (AHT) allows selection of only the features needed by the back-end, in contrast to the FFT, where all coefficients must be calculated simultaneously. We also show that the FFT coefficients can be easily calculated from the AHT results by a simple back-substitution. The scheme is tailored for low-power, parallel analog implementation in an integrated circuit (IC). Two different applications are tested with an ideal front-end model and compared to existing studies with the same data sets. Results from the military vehicle classification and identification of machine-bearing fault applications shows that the front-end suits a wide range of harmonic signal sources. Analog-related errors are modeled to evaluate the feasibility of and to set design parameters for an IC implementation to maintain good system-level performance. Design of a preliminary transistor-level integrator circuit in a 0.13 μm complementary metal-oxide-silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit process showed the ability to use online self-calibration to reduce fabrication errors to a sufficiently low level. Estimated power dissipation is about three orders of magnitude less than similar vehicle classification systems that use commercially available FFT spectral extraction. PMID:23892765

  16. Quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging to detect osteogenesis imperfecta in human skin samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, J.; Ferreira, A. E.; D'Souza-Li, L.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that leads to bone fractures due to mutations in the Col1A1 or Col1A2 genes that affect the primary structure of the collagen I chain with the ultimate outcome in collagen I fibrils that are either reduced in quantity or abnormally organized in the whole body. A quick test screening of the patients would largely reduce the sample number to be studied by the time consuming molecular genetics techniques. For this reason an assessment of the human skin collagen structure by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) can be used as a screening technique to speed up the correlation of genetics/phenotype/OI types understanding. In the present work we have used quantitative second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to investigate the collagen matrix organization of the OI human skin samples comparing with normal control patients. By comparing fibril collagen distribution and spatial organization, we calculated the anisotropy and texture patterns of this structural protein. The analysis of the anisotropy was performed by means of the two-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform and image pattern analysis with Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). From these results, we show that statistically different results are obtained for the normal and disease states of OI.

  17. Computational segmentation of collagen fibers from second-harmonic generation images of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S.; Liu, Yuming; Pehlke, Carolyn A.; Conklin, Matthew W.; Szulczewski, Joseph M.; Inman, David R.; Keely, Patricia J.; Nowak, Robert D.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging can help reveal interactions between collagen fibers and cancer cells. Quantitative analysis of SHG images of collagen fibers is challenged by the heterogeneity of collagen structures and low signal-to-noise ratio often found while imaging collagen in tissue. The role of collagen in breast cancer progression can be assessed post acquisition via enhanced computation. To facilitate this, we have implemented and evaluated four algorithms for extracting fiber information, such as number, length, and curvature, from a variety of SHG images of collagen in breast tissue. The image-processing algorithms included a Gaussian filter, SPIRAL-TV filter, Tubeness filter, and curvelet-denoising filter. Fibers are then extracted using an automated tracking algorithm called fiber extraction (FIRE). We evaluated the algorithm performance by comparing length, angle and position of the automatically extracted fibers with those of manually extracted fibers in twenty-five SHG images of breast cancer. We found that the curvelet-denoising filter followed by FIRE, a process we call CT-FIRE, outperforms the other algorithms under investigation. CT-FIRE was then successfully applied to track collagen fiber shape changes over time in an in vivo mouse model for breast cancer. PMID:24407500

  18. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging Analysis of Collagen Arrangement in Human Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Choul Yong; Lee, Jimmy K.; Chuck, Roy S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the horizontal arrangement of human corneal collagen bundles by using second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. Methods Human corneas were imaged with an inverted two photon excitation fluorescence microscope. The excitation laser (Ti:Sapphire) was tuned to 850 nm. Backscatter signals of SHG were collected through a 425/30-nm bandpass emission filter. Multiple, consecutive, and overlapping image stacks (z-stacks) were acquired to generate three dimensional data sets. ImageJ software was used to analyze the arrangement pattern (irregularity) of collagen bundles at each image plane. Results Collagen bundles in the corneal lamellae demonstrated a complex layout merging and splitting within a single lamellar plane. The patterns were significantly different in the superficial and limbal cornea when compared with deep and central regions. Collagen bundles were smaller in the superficial layer and larger in deep lamellae. Conclusions By using SHG imaging, the horizontal arrangement of corneal collagen bundles was elucidated at different depths and focal regions of the human cornea. PMID:26313297

  19. Computational segmentation of collagen fibers from second-harmonic generation images of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S.; Liu, Yuming; Pehlke, Carolyn A.; Conklin, Matthew W.; Szulczewski, Joseph M.; Inman, David R.; Keely, Patricia J.; Nowak, Robert D.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging can help reveal interactions between collagen fibers and cancer cells. Quantitative analysis of SHG images of collagen fibers is challenged by the heterogeneity of collagen structures and low signal-to-noise ratio often found while imaging collagen in tissue. The role of collagen in breast cancer progression can be assessed post acquisition via enhanced computation. To facilitate this, we have implemented and evaluated four algorithms for extracting fiber information, such as number, length, and curvature, from a variety of SHG images of collagen in breast tissue. The image-processing algorithms included a Gaussian filter, SPIRAL-TV filter, Tubeness filter, and curvelet-denoising filter. Fibers are then extracted using an automated tracking algorithm called fiber extraction (FIRE). We evaluated the algorithm performance by comparing length, angle and position of the automatically extracted fibers with those of manually extracted fibers in twenty-five SHG images of breast cancer. We found that the curvelet-denoising filter followed by FIRE, a process we call CT-FIRE, outperforms the other algorithms under investigation. CT-FIRE was then successfully applied to track collagen fiber shape changes over time in an in vivo mouse model for breast cancer.

  20. Application of Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation imaging to the rat cervix.

    PubMed

    Lau, T Y; Sangha, H K; Chien, E K; McFarlin, B L; Wagoner Johnson, A J; Toussaint, K C

    2013-07-01

    We present the application of Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation (FT-SHG) imaging to evaluate the arrangement of collagen fibers in five nonpregnant rat cervices. Tissue slices from the mid-cervix and near the external orifice of the cervix were analyzed in both two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). We validate that the cervical microstructure can be quantitatively assessed in three dimensions using FT-SHG imaging and observe collagen fibers oriented both in and out-of-plane in the outermost and the innermost layers, which cannot be observed using 2D FT-SHG analysis alone. This approach has the potential to be a clinically applicable method for measuring progressive changes in collagen organization during cervical remodeling in humans. PMID:23600456

  1. Selective corneal imaging using combined second-harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Alvin T.; Nassif, Nader; Zoumi, Aikaterini; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2002-12-01

    A multiphoton microscope employing second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF) is used for high-resolution ex vivo imaging of rabbit cornea in a backscattering geometry. Endogenous TPF and SHG signals from corneal cells and extracellular matrix, respectively, are clearly visible without exogenous dyes. Spectral characterization of these upconverted signals provides confirmation of the structural origin of both TPF and SHG, and spectral imaging facilitates the separation of keratocyte and epithelial cells from the collagen-rich corneal stroma. The polarization dependence of collagen SHG is used to highlight fiber orientation, and three-dimensional SHG tomography reveals that approximately 88% of the stromal volume is occupied by collagen lamellae.

  2. Coherent EUV light from high-order harmonic generation: Enhancement and applications to lensless diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Ariel J.

    2007-12-01

    The first half of this thesis presents the first demonstration of quasi-phase matching in the coherent high-order harmonic conversion of ultrafast laser pulses into the EUV region of the spectrum. To achieve this quasi-phase matching, a novel method of fabricating hollow waveguides with a modulated inner diameter was developed. This technique lead to significant enhancements of EUV flux at wavelengths shorter than were previously accessible by known phase-matching techniques. In the second half of this thesis, the first tabletop demonstration of lensless diffractive imaging with EUV light is presented using HHG in a gas-filled hollow waveguide to provide coherent illumination. This tabletop microscope shows a spatial resolution of 200 nm and a large depth of field. Furthermore, the technique is easily scalable to shorter wavelengths of interest to biological imaging.

  3. Cellular internalization of LiNbO3 nanocrystals for second harmonic imaging and the effects on stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Qiu, Jichuan; Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Ma, Baojin; Mou, Xiaoning; Tanes, Michael; Jiang, Huaidong; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-31

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) nanocrystals have recently been reported to label cancer cells and other functional cell lines due to their unique double-frequency property. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) nanocrystals as SHG labels for imaging stem cells. Rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were labeled with LN nanocrystals in order to study the cellular internalization of the nanocrystals and the influence on stem cell differentiation. The results showed that LN nanocrystals were endocytosed by the rMSCs and the distribution of the internalized nanoparticles demonstrated a high consistency with the orientation of the actin filaments. Besides, LN-labeled rMSCs showed a concentration-dependent viability. Most importantly, rMSCs labeled with 50 μg per mL of LN nanocrystals retained their ability to differentiate into both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. The results prove that LN nanocrystals can be used as a cytocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) light driven cell label for long-term imaging, without hindering stem cell differentiation. This work will promote the use of LN nanocrystals to broader applications like deep-tissue tracking, remote drug delivery and stem cell therapy. PMID:27001708

  4. Thin and Slow Smoke Detection by Using Frequency Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guang; Oe, Shunitiro

    In this paper, a new method to detect thin and slow smoke for early fire alarm by using frequency image has been proposed. The correlation coefficient of the frequency image between the current stage and the initial stage are calculated, so are the gray image correlation coefficient of the color image. When the thin smoke close to transparent enters into the camera view, the correlation coefficient of the frequency image becomes small, while the gray image correlation coefficient of the color image hardly change and keep large. When something which is not transparent, like human beings, etc., enters into the camera view, the correlation coefficient of the frequency image becomes small, as well as that of color image. Based on the difference of correlation coefficient between frequency image and color image in different situations, the thin smoke can be detected. Also, considering the movement of the thin smoke, miss detection caused by the illustration change or noise can be avoided. Several experiments in different situations are carried out, and the experimental results show the effect of the proposed method.

  5. Clinical evaluation of synthetic aperture harmonic imaging for scanning focal malignant liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Hansen, Peter Mller; Madsen, Signe Sloth; Krohn, Paul Suno; Lange, Theis; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Jensen, Jrgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to perform a clinical comparison of synthetic aperture sequential beamforming tissue harmonic imaging (SASB-THI) sequences with a conventional imaging technique, dynamic receive focusing with THI (DRF-THI). Both techniques used pulse inversion and were recorded interleaved using a commercial ultrasound system (UltraView 800, BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark). Thirty-one patients with malignant focal liver lesions (confirmed by biopsy or computed tomography/magnetic resonance) were scanned. Detection of malignant focal liver lesions and preference of image quality were evaluated blinded off-line by eight radiologists. In total, 2,032 evaluations of 127 image sequences were completed. The sensitivity (77% SASB-THI, 76% DRF-THI, p= 0.54) and specificity (71% SASB-THI, 72% DRF-THI, p= 0.67) of detection of liver lesions and the evaluation of image quality (p= 0.63) did not differ between SASB-THI and DRF-THI. This study indicates the ability of SASB-THI in a true clinical setting. PMID:26095533

  6. Applications of Second-Harmonic Generation Imaging Microscopy in Ovarian and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Karissa; Campagnola, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective, we discuss how the nonlinear optical technique of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has been used to greatly enhance our understanding of the tumor microenvironment (TME) of breast and ovarian cancer. Striking changes in collagen architecture are associated with these epithelial cancers, and SHG can image these changes with great sensitivity and specificity with submicrometer resolution. This information has not historically been exploited by pathologists but has the potential to enhance diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. We summarize the utility of image processing tools that analyze fiber morphology in SHG images of breast and ovarian cancer in human tissues and animal models. We also describe methods that exploit the SHG physical underpinnings that are effective in delineating normal and malignant tissues. First we describe the use of polarization-resolved SHG that yields metrics related to macromolecular and supramolecular structures. The coherence and corresponding phase-matching process of SHG results in emission directionality (forward to backward), which is related to sub-resolution fibrillar assembly. These analyses are more general and more broadly applicable than purely morphology-based analyses; however, they are more computationally intensive. Intravital imaging techniques are also emerging that incorporate all of these quantitative analyses. Now, all these techniques can be coupled with rapidly advancing miniaturization of imaging systems to afford their use in clinical situations including enhancing pathology analysis and also in assisting in real-time surgical determination of tumor margins. PMID:25987830

  7. Surface land mine detection in airborne images using the circular harmonics transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Ronald J.; Chamarthy, Pavan K.; Agarwal, Sanjeev; Mitchell, O. Robert

    2002-08-01

    Multi-band medium wave infrared (MWIR) image data collected from the Lightweight Airborne multispectral Minefield Detection-Interim (LAMD-I) program is examined for the detection of surface landmines. Because the orientation of the image acquisition from aircraft with respect to the mine and the minefield is unknown, there is a need to develop an orientation invariant-based approach for landmine and minefield detection. A rotation invariant circular harmonics transform (CHT)-based approach is presented for surface landmine detection. The magnitude information from the CHT is used for finding mine-like regions within the MWIR images. A three-tiered hierarchical thresholding technique provides the basis for highlighting potential surface landmines. Mine shape and size information are used for generating landmine confidence values. Surface landmine detection capability is presented for 82 MWIR broadband images with sand and short and long grass terrain conditions for daytime and nighttime acquired MWIR image data. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves are used for comparing experimental results from this technique with an existing an adaptive multi-band CFAR detector (RX approach).

  8. Design of a Second Harmonic Double-Beam Continuous Wave Gyrotron with Operating Frequency of 0.79 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. N.; Glyavin, M. Yu; Sedov, A. S.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu; Idehara, T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the most essential steps of a design study of a novel second harmonic gyrotron operating in CW (continuous wave) regime at a frequency of 0.79 THz and an output power of 1-100 W. It is based on a novel idea for suppression of the parasitic modes using a double-beam electron-optical system (EOS). It includes a triode magnetron injection gun (MIG), which forms two high-quality helical electron beams (HEB). Different schemes, namely one with two generating beams and another with one generating and one absorbing beam, have been investigated and compared. It has been shown that the scheme with two generating beams is more advantageous since it allows an effective suppression of the parasitic modes and a stable single-mode operation at the second harmonic resonance. A MIG which is appropriate for the realization of the latter scheme has been optimized using numerical codes for computer-aided design (CAD). It forms beams with practically equal pitch factors and moderate velocity spread. The construction of the gun is not sensitive to small misalignments and shifts of the electrodes and the magnetic field. Among the most promising characteristics of the presented design are an improved mode selection and a stable single-mode generation at currents that are two to three times higher than the currents in the single-beam (i.e., conventional) gyrotrons.

  9. Efficiency of different methods of extra-cavity second harmonic generation of continuous wave single-frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Khripunov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey; Radnatarov, Daba

    2016-01-20

    This work presents for the first time to the best of our knowledge a comparative efficiency analysis among various techniques of extra-cavity second harmonic generation (SHG) of continuous-wave single-frequency radiation in nonperiodically poled nonlinear crystals within a broad range of power levels. Efficiency of nonlinear radiation transformation at powers from 1W to 10kW was studied in three different configurations: with an external power-enhancement cavity and without the cavity in the case of single and double radiation pass through a nonlinear crystal. It is demonstrated that at power levels exceeding 1kW, the efficiencies of methods with and without external power-enhancement cavities become comparable, whereas at even higher powers, SHG by a single or double pass through a nonlinear crystal becomes preferable because of the relatively high efficiency of nonlinear transformation and fairly simple implementation. PMID:26835924

  10. Amplitude-frequency analysis of the Earth orientation parameters and the variation of the second zonal harmonic of the geopotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, V. V.; Filippova, A. S.; Markov, Yu. G.; Perepelkin, V.

    2014-12-01

    An amplitude-frequency analysis of the rotary-oscillatory Earth motion under the action of gravitational-tidal perturbing torques from the Sun and the Moon is carried out using the classical mechanics' methods. The simulation results of the oscillatory process in the motion of the Earth pole and the variations of the second zonal harmonic delta c_20 of the geopotential are studied. Based on the dynamic Euler-Liouville equations expressions for amplitude and phase of the Earth pole oscillations are obtained. A comparison of the spectral power densities of the time series between the Earth pole coordinates and the delta c_20 variations of the geopotential is carried out. A functional dependence of the aforementioned component of the geopotential from the amplitude and phase of the Earth's pole oscillatory process is shown.

  11. Submicron imaging in the EUV spectral range using high-harmonic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, M.; Frke, R.; Wilhein, T.; Kleineberg, U.; Pohl, M.; Spielmann, Ch.; Krausz, F.

    2003-03-01

    Nowadays, high-harmonic generation is a state-of-the art technique for laboratory extreme ultra-violet (EUV) sources providing electromagnetic radiation with photon energies up to some hundreds of eV. In contrast to other laser-based EUV-sources, the emitted pulses have pulse durations that are shorter or in the order of the driving laser pulse duration, i.e. fs or less. We report on first experiments using a high-harmonic source for microscopy imaging with radiation of 96 eV close to the silicon-L-edge at 100 eV. A simple setup with a zone plate as objective and a mica test sample yields a spatial resolution of 0.8 ?m limited by the pixel size of the back-illuminated ccd used as detector. The advantage of the presented microscopy technique is less found in the achievable spatial resolution but in the combination of moderate spatial and high temporal resolution.

  12. Accuracy of a random-walk-based approach in the determination of equilibrium bond lengths and harmonic frequencies for some doublet first-row diatomic radicals.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shih-I

    2005-08-15

    The accuracy of equilibrium bond lengths and harmonic frequencies for 12 doublet first-row diatomic radicals is presented as predicted by the fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck random walk guided by the floating spherical Gaussian orbital and spherical Gaussian geminal-type trial wave function. Compared to the experimental determined values, the random-walk-based approach gives the absolute mean deviations of 0.0019 A and 18 cm-1 for the equilibrium bond length and harmonic frequency, respectively. We also compare the random-walk-based results with some coupled-cluster-based values. PMID:16229556

  13. Improved Estimation of Ultrasound Thermal Strain Using Pulse Inversion Harmonic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuan; Nguyen, Man M; James, Isaac B; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter; Leers, Steven A; Kim, Kang

    2016-05-01

    Thermal (temporal) strain imaging (TSI) is being developed to detect the lipid-rich core of atherosclerotic plaques and presence of fatty liver disease. However, the effects of ultrasonic clutter on TSI have not been considered. In this study, we evaluated whether pulse inversion harmonic imaging (PIHI) could be used to improve estimates of thermal (temporal) strain. Using mixed castor oil-gelatin phantoms of different concentrations and artificially introduced clutter, we found that PIHI improved the signal-to-noise ratio of TSI by an average of 213% or 52.1% relative to 3.3- and 6.6-MHz imaging, respectively. In a phantom constructed using human liposuction fat in the presence of clutter, the contrast-to-noise ratio was degraded by 35.1% for PIHI compared with 62.4% and 43.7% for 3.3- and 6.6-MHz imaging, respectively. These findings were further validated using an ex vivo carotid endarterectomy sample. PIHI can be used to improve estimates of thermal (temporal) strain in the presence of clutter. PMID:26948260

  14. Monitoring process of human keloid formation based on second harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. S.; Chen, S.; Chen, J. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zheng, L. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Wang, D. J.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, the morphological variation of collagen among the whole dermis from keloid tissue was investigated using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. In the deep dermis of keloids, collagen bundles show apparently regular gap. In the middle dermis, the collagen bundles are randomly oriented and loosely arranged in the pattern of fine mesh while the collagen bundles are organized in a parallel manner in the superficial dermis near the epidermis. The developed parameters COI and BD can be used to further quantitatively describe these changes. Our results demonstrate the potential of SHG microscopy to understand the formation process of human keloid scar at the cellular level through imaging collagen variations in different depth of dermis.

  15. Second-Harmonic Generation Imaging of Membrane Potential with Photon Counting

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiang; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) can be used for imaging membrane potential in neurons, but poor signal-to-noise (S/N)limits accurate measurements of small voltage transients. We use photon counting to improve the S/N of weak SHG signal detection. Photon counting generates shot-noise limited and integrable signals, eliminates pulse-to-pulse variation, and built-in discriminators reduces the background to practically zero. In single trials, by using photon counting, we obtain a more than a twofold S/N increase over analog voltage detection. Trial-to-trial variability is also reduced by 50%. Finally, we show that, using photon counting, the kinetics of fast events such as action potentials can be recorded more accurately. PMID:18986606

  16. Molecular Order of Arterial Collagen Using Circular Polarization Second-Harmonic Generation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Raphal; Mattson, Jeffrey M; Wu, Juwell W; Zhang, Yanhang; Lin, Charles P

    2016-02-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) originates from the interaction between upconverted fields from individual scatterers. This renders SHG microscopy highly sensitive to molecular distribution. Here, we aim to take advantage of the difference in SHG between aligned and partially aligned molecules to probe the degree of molecular order during biomechanical testing, independently of the absolute orientation of the scattering molecules. Toward this goal, we implemented a circular polarization SHG imaging approach and used it to quantify the intensity change associated with collagen fibers straightening in the arterial wall during mechanical stretching. We were able to observe the delayed alignment of collagen fibers during mechanical loading, thus demonstrating a simple method to characterize molecular distribution using intensity information alone. PMID:26806883

  17. Optimization of Contrast-to-Tissue Ratio Through Pulse Windowing in Dual-Frequency "Acoustic Angiography" Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Shelton, Sarah E; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    Early-stage tumors in many cancers are characterized by vascular remodeling, indicative of transformations in cell function. We have previously presented a high-resolution ultrasound imaging approach to detecting these changes that is based on microbubble contrast agents. In this technique, images are formed from only the higher harmonics of microbubble contrast agents, producing images of vasculature alone with 100- to 200-?m resolution. In this study, shaped transmit pulses were used to image the higher broadband harmonic echoes of microbubble contrast agents, and the effects of varying pulse window and phasing on microbubble and tissue harmonic echoes were evaluated using a dual-frequency transducer in vitro and in vivo. An increase in the contrast-to-tissue ratio of 6.8 2.3 dB was observed in vitro using an inverted pulse with a cosine window relative to a non-inverted pulse with a rectangular window. The increase in mean image intensity resulting from contrast enhancement in vivo in five rodents was 13.9 3.0 dB greater for an inverted cosine-windowed pulse and 17.8 3.6 dB greater for a non-inverted Gaussian-windowed pulse relative to a non-inverted pulse with a rectangular window. Implications for pre-clinical and diagnostic imaging are discussed. PMID:25819467

  18. Fast second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating using only a pulse shaper.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Daniel E; Fuller, Franklin D; Ogilvie, Jennifer P

    2013-08-15

    In many ultrafast contexts, a collinear pulse-shaping frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) technique is desired. Some applicable techniques already exist, but they suffer from one of two issues: either they require many time points to allow for Fourier filtering, or they do not yield a traditional FROG trace. To overcome these issues, we propose and demonstrate a fast new phase-cycled FROG technique using a pulse shaper. PMID:24104626

  19. First and second harmonic ECRH experience at gyrotron frequencies at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.

    1987-11-01

    Plasma heating of electrons in both mirror machines and tokamaks, using mm wave gyrotron sources, have been carried out in many experiments in recent years. The technology for both sources and mode-preserving waveguide transmission systems is well developed at power levels of 200 kW. At LLNL electron heating at 28 GHz in the TMX-U tandem mirror has been used to create hot electrons required for a thermal barrier (potential well). TMX-U, and other devices operating at lower frequency and power (10 GHz, few kW), routinely generates electron populations with mean energies of 100 to 500 keV and densities in the low to mid 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ range. Radial pressure profiles vary from peaked-on-axis to hollow and are dependent on the mod-B resonance surfaces. Experiments on the axisymmetric mirror SM-1 have shown improved heating efficiency using multiple frequencies with narrow frequency separation. The importance of rf diffusion in determining electron confinement has been shown in CONSTANCE B. Fokker-Planck and particle orbit models have been useful for understanding the importance of cavity heating for creating runaway electrons, the sensitivity of hot electron production to cold plasma, the reduction of electron lifetime by rf diffusion, and the effect of multiple frequencies on heating stochasticity. Potential wells generated in plasmas with large fractions of mirror-trapped electrons have been measured in TMX-U. These offer prospects for enhanced confinement of highly stripped ions. 11 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Near Field Imaging at Microwave and Millemeter Wave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2007-06-03

    Near field imaging at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies is useful for a wide variety of applications including concealed weapon detection, through-wall and inner-wall imaging, ground penetrating radar imaging, radar cross section analysis, and non-destructive evaluation of materials. A variety of novel imaging techniques have been developed for many of these applications at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) . These techniques make use of wideband holographic wavefront reconstruction methods, and have been developed to optimize the image quality and resolution. This paper will summarize several of these techniques and show imaging results for several interesting application areas.

  1. Structural Characterization of Edematous Corneas by Forward and Backward Second Harmonic Generation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chiu-Mei; Lo, Wen; Chen, Wei-Liang; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Liu, Guang-Yu; Wang, Sheng-Shun; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to image and quantify the structural changes of corneal edema by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Bovine cornea was used as an experimental model to characterize structural alterations in edematous corneas. Forward SHG and backward SHG signals were simultaneously collected from normal and edematous bovine corneas to reveal the morphological differences between them. In edematous cornea, both an uneven expansion in the lamellar interspacing and an increased lamellar thickness in the posterior stroma (depth > 200 ?m) were identified, whereas the anterior stroma, composed of interwoven collagen architecture, remained unaffected. Our findings of heterogeneous structural alteration at the microscopic scale in edematous corneas suggest that the strength of collagen cross-linking is heterogeneous in the corneal stroma. In addition, we found that qualitative backward SHG collagen fiber imaging and depth-dependent signal decay can be used to detect and diagnose corneal edema. Our work demonstrates that SHG imaging can provide morphological information for the investigation of corneal edema biophysics, and may be applied in the evaluation of advancing corneal edema invivo. PMID:19686668

  2. Contrast enhancement in combined two-photon second harmonic imaging of skin by using hyperosmotic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, R.; Massi, D.; Stambouli, D.; Sampson, D. D.; Pavone, F. S.

    2006-02-01

    We used combined simultaneous two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPE) and second harmonic generation microscopy (SHG) on human skin tissue slices. We studied the effect caused by topical application of optical clearing agents (OCAs). We demonstrated that hyperosmotic agents as glycerol, propylene glycol and glucose in aqueous solution, are all effective in improving excitation light penetration depth and in enhancing image contrast. The effect caused on acquired images by sample immersion in OCAs or in their aqueous dilution, was studied. We observed a similar clearing effect with TPE and SHG acquisitions, with different effectiveness and rising time for each agent. The TPE acquired data are in good agreement with a simple diffusion model developed. From the SHG acquisition some different behaviour was observed. All three agents are potentially bio-compatible and effective in reducing scattering, improving light penetration depth and image contrast. Use of OCA can be suitable for in vivo application in two-photon microscopy, as well as in other techniques performing optical biopsy of human skin tissue.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of skeletal muscle defects in second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenhua; Raben, Nina; Ralston, Evelyn

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle pathologies cause irregularities in the normally periodic organization of the myofibrils. Objective grading of muscle morphology is necessary to assess muscle health, compare biopsies, and evaluate treatments and the evolution of disease. To facilitate such quantitation, we have developed a fast, sensitive, automatic imaging analysis software. It detects major and minor morphological changes by combining texture features and Fourier transform (FT) techniques. We apply this tool to second harmonic generation (SHG) images of muscle fibers which visualize the repeating myosin bands. Texture features are then calculated by using a Haralick gray-level cooccurrence matrix in MATLAB. Two scores are retrieved from the texture correlation plot by using FT and curve-fitting methods. The sensitivity of the technique was tested on SHG images of human adult and infant muscle biopsies and of mouse muscle samples. The scores are strongly correlated to muscle fiber condition. We named the software MARS (muscle assessment and rating scores). It is executed automatically and is highly sensitive even to subtle defects. We propose MARS as a powerful and unbiased tool to assess muscle health.

  4. Quantitative evaluation of skeletal muscle defects in second harmonic generation images

    PubMed Central

    Raben, Nina; Ralston, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Skeletal muscle pathologies cause irregularities in the normally periodic organization of the myofibrils. Objective grading of muscle morphology is necessary to assess muscle health, compare biopsies, and evaluate treatments and the evolution of disease. To facilitate such quantitation, we have developed a fast, sensitive, automatic imaging analysis software. It detects major and minor morphological changes by combining texture features and Fourier transform (FT) techniques. We apply this tool to second harmonic generation (SHG) images of muscle fibers which visualize the repeating myosin bands. Texture features are then calculated by using a Haralick gray-level cooccurrence matrix in MATLAB. Two scores are retrieved from the texture correlation plot by using FT and curve-fitting methods. The sensitivity of the technique was tested on SHG images of human adult and infant muscle biopsies and of mouse muscle samples. The scores are strongly correlated to muscle fiber condition. We named the software MARS (muscle assessment and rating scores). It is executed automatically and is highly sensitive even to subtle defects. We propose MARS as a powerful and unbiased tool to assess muscle health. PMID:23377006

  5. Imaging elastic and collagen fibers with sulforhodamine B and second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Clment; Vial, Jean-Claude; Douady, Julien; van der Sanden, Boudewijn

    2008-02-01

    Since the early nineties, multiphoton microscopy has become a powerful tool to investigate morphological and physiological parameters in vivo or on thick ex vivo sections. To stain structures of interest many dyes have been developed and two-photon properties (cross section, excitation and emission spectra) of existing ones have been characterized. Recently, our team has shown a new property of sulforhodamine B (SRB). This dye has the ability to bind specifically elastic fibers. The observation of elastin using its endofluorescence properties was already widely described but required long exposition delays up to 10s and the imaging depth was limited to approximately 50 ?m. With a multiphoton microscope and SRB, it is possible to observe elastic fibers directly in the living animal or on thick tissue sections with a micrometric spatial resolution in less than one second per image with an imaging depth of ~ 200 ?m. Moreover, with an appropriate set of filters, we can acquire simultaneously the SRB and the second harmonic generation (SHG) signals of collagen fibers. Here, we report various applications of this new staining method on different arterial rings. The layers of the arterial wall, as well as, the elastic lamellae are observed and are numbered. With the addition of a nuclear stain such as the Hoechst 33342, a more accurate morphological study of the arterial walls can be accomplished. Finally, an intravital observation of the saphenous artery morphology is presented.

  6. Articular Cartilage Zonal Differentiation via 3D Second Harmonic Generation Imaging Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Rajeev; Campbell, Kirby R.; Tilbury, Karissa B.; Vanderby, Ray; Block, Walter F.; Kijowski, Richard; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The collagen structure throughout the patella has not been thoroughly investigated by 3D imaging, where the majority of the exiting data comes from histological cross sections. It is important to have a better understanding of the architecture in normal tissues, where this could then be applied to imaging of diseased states. Methods To address this shortcoming, we investigated the combined use of collagen specific Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging and measurement of bulk optical properties to characterize collagen fiber orientations of the histologically defined zones of bovine articular cartilage. Forward and backward SHG intensities from sections from superficial, middle and deep zones were collected as a function of depth and analyzed by Monte Carlo simulations to extract the SHG creation direction, which is related to the fibrillar assembly. Results Our results revealed differences in SHG forward-backward response between the three zones, where these are consistent with a previously developed model of SHG emission. Some of the findings are consistent with that from other modalities; however, SHG analysis showed the middle zone had the most organized fibril assembly. While not distinct, we also report bulk optical property values for these different zones within the patella. Conclusions Collectively, these results provide quantitative measurements of structural changes at both the fiber and fibril assembly of the different cartilage zones and reveals structural information not possible by other microscope modalities. This can provide quantitative insight to the collagen fiber network in normal cartilage, which may ultimately be developed as a biomarker for osteoarthritis. PMID:25738523

  7. Beat-Frequency/Microsphere Medical Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Pretlow, Robert A., III

    1995-01-01

    Medical ultrasonic imaging system designed to provide quantitative data on various flows of blood in chambers, blood vessels, muscles, and tissues of heart. Sensitive enough to yield readings on flows of blood in heart even when microspheres used as ultrasonic contrast agents injected far from heart and diluted by circulation of blood elsewhere in body.

  8. Elucidating low-frequency vibrational dynamics in calcite and water with time-resolved third-harmonic generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2015-07-14

    Low-frequency vibrations are foundational for material properties including thermal conductivity and chemical reactivity. To resolve the intrinsic molecular conformational dynamics in condensed phase, we implement time-resolved third-harmonic generation (TRTHG) spectroscopy to unravel collective skeletal motions in calcite, water, and aqueous salt solution in situ. The lifetime of three Raman-active modes in polycrystalline calcite at 155, 282 and 703 cm(-1) is found to be ca. 1.6 ps, 1.3 ps and 250 fs, respectively. The lifetime difference is due to crystallographic defects and anharmonic effects. By incorporating a home-built wire-guided liquid jet, we apply TRTHG to investigate pure water and ZnCl2 aqueous solution, revealing ultrafast dynamics of water intermolecular stretching and librational bands below 500 cm(-1) and a characteristic 280 cm(-1) vibrational mode in the ZnCl4(H2O)2(2-) complex. TRTHG proves to be a compact and versatile technique that directly uses the 800 nm fundamental laser pulse output to capture ultrafast low-frequency vibrational motion snapshots in condensed-phase materials including the omnipresent water, which provides the important time dimension to spectral characterization of molecular structure-function relationships. PMID:26062639

  9. Multi-level effects in the high-order harmonic generation driven by intense frequency-comb laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Di; Jiang, Chen-Wei; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-07-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) driven by intense frequency-comb laser fields can be dramatically enhanced via multiphoton resonance by tuning the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) shift, without increasing the driving intensity. However, the multiphoton-resonant enhancement (MRE) factor in the realistic atomic hydrogen is much smaller than that in a two-level system. To study the deviation, we present a theoretical investigation of the multiphoton resonance dynamics of three-level systems driven by intense frequency-comb laser fields. The many-mode Floquet theorem (MMFT) is employed to provide a nonperturbative and exact treatment of the interaction between the quantum system and the laser fields. The investigations show that the dipole interaction of a two-level system with the third level affects the multiphoton resonance dynamics and enhances the HHG spectra. It is the dipole interaction of the excited level of the two-level system with other levels that results in the smaller MRE factor in the realistic atomic system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374239, 21203144, and 11074199), the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20120201120056), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China.

  10. Holographic Radar Imaging Privacy Techniques Utilizing Dual-Frequency Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.; Sheen, David M.

    2008-04-18

    Over the last 15 years, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has performed significant research and development activities to enhance the state of the art of holographic radar imaging systems to be used at security checkpoints for screening people for concealed threats hidden under their garments. These enhancement activities included improvements to privacy techniques to remove human features and providing automatic detection of body-worn concealed threats. The enhanced privacy and detection methods used both physical and software imaging techniques. The physical imaging techniques included polarization-diversity illumination and reception, dual-frequency implementation, and high-frequency imaging at 60 GHz. Software imaging techniques to enhance the privacy of the person under surveillance included extracting concealed threat artifacts from the imagery to automatically detect the threat. This paper will focus on physical privacy techniques using dual-frequency implementation.

  11. Generating high-frequency, rotating magnetic fields with low harmonic content

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Litvinenko, V.; Meng, W.; Pikin, A.; Skaritka, J.

    2011-09-13

    The future electron-ion collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory demands a high-current, polarized, bunched electron beam [http://www.bnl.gov/cad/eRhic]. One of the challenges here is to combine the bunched beams generated by multiple cathodes so to address the issue of designing and prototyping a combiner with high-frequency (700 kHz) rotational magnetic fields. This article presents its design, and simulation, and details some of the test results from this unprecedented device.

  12. Improved synthetic aperture focusing technique with applications in high-frequency ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Lin; Guan, Wei-Jung; Li, Pai-Chi

    2004-01-01

    Synthetic aperture focusing using a virtual source was used previously to increase the penetration and to extend the depth of focus in high-frequency ultrasonic imaging. However, the performance of synthetic aperture focusing is limited by its high sidelobes. In this paper, an adaptive weighting technique based on a focusing-quality index is introduced to suppress the sidelobes. The focusing-quality index is derived from the spatial spectrum of the scan-line data along the mechanical scan direction (i.e., the synthetic aperture direction) after focusing delays relative to the virtual source have been applied. The proposed technique is of particular value in high-frequency ultrasound in which dynamic focusing using array transducers is not yet possible. Experimental ultrasound data from a 50-MHz imaging system with a single-crystal transducer (f-number = 2) are used to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed technique on both wire targets and speckle-generating objects. An in vivo experiment also is performed on a mouse to further demonstrate the effectiveness. Both 50-MHz fundamental imaging and 50-MHz tissue harmonic imaging are tested. The results clearly demonstrate the effectiveness in sidelobe reduction and background-noise suppression for both imaging modes. The principles, experimental results, and implementation issues of the new technique are described in this paper. PMID:14995017

  13. Ultra high frequency imaging acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-05-23

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  14. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  15. The Calculation of Accurate Harmonic Frequencies of Large Molecules: The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, a Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of naphthalene neutral and cation are studied at the self-consistent-field (SCF), second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2), and density functional theory (DFT) levels using a variety of one-particle basis sets. Very accurate frequencies can be obtained at the DFT level in conjunction with large basis sets if they are scaled with two factors, one for the C-H stretches and a second for all other modes. We also find remarkably good agreement at the B3LYP/4-31G level using only one scale factor. Unlike the neutral PAHs where all methods do reasonably well for the intensities, only the DFT results are accurate for the PAH cations. The failure of the SCF and MP2 methods is caused by symmetry breaking and an inability to describe charge delocalization. We present several interesting cases of symmetry breaking in this study. An assessment is made as to whether an ensemble of PAH neutrals or cations could account for the unidentified infrared bands observed in many astronomical sources.

  16. Biomechanical assessment and monitoring of thermal ablation using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Gary Yi

    Cancer remains, one of the major public health problems in the United States as well as many other countries worldwide. According to According to the World Health Organization, cancer is currently the leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 7.6 million deaths annually, and 25% of the annual death was due to Cancer during the year of 2011. In the long history of the cancer treatment field, many treatment options have been established up to date. Traditional procedures include surgical procedures as well as systemic therapies such as biologic therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and radiation therapy. Nevertheless, side-effects are often associated with such procedures due to the systemic delivery across the entire body. Recently technologies have been focused on localized therapy under minimally or noninvasive procedure with imaging-guidance, such as cryoablation, laser ablation, radio-frequency (RF) ablation, and High Intensity F-ocused Ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU is a non-invasive procedure aims to coagulate tissue thermally at a localized focal zone created with noninvasively emitting a set of focused ultrasound beams while the surrounding healthy tissues remain relatively untreated. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a dynamic, radiation-force-based imaging technique, which utilizes a single HIFU transducer by emitting an Amplitude-modulated (AM) beam to both thermally ablate the tumor while inducing a stable oscillatory tissue displacement at its focal zone. The oscillatory response is then estimated by a cross-correlation based motion tracking technique on the signal collected by a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. HMIFU addresses the most critical aspect and one of the major unmet needs of HIFU treatment, which is the ability to perform real-time monitoring and mapping of tissue property change during the HIFU treatment. In this dissertation, both the assessment and monitoring aspects of HMIFU have been investigated fundamentally and experimentally through development of both a 1-D and 2-D based system. The performance assessment of HMIFU technique in depicting the lesion size increase as well as the lesion-to-background displacement contrast was first demonstrated using a 3D, FE-based interdisciplinary simulation framework. Through the development of 1-D HMIFU system, a multi-parametric monitoring approach was presented where presented where the focal HMI displacement, phase shift (Deltaφ), and correlation coefficients were monitored along with thermocouple and PCD under the HIFU treatment sequence with boiling and slow denaturation. For HIFU treatments with slow denaturation, consistent displacement increase-then-decrease trend was observed, indicating tissue softening-then-stiffening and phase shift increased with treatment time in agreement with mechanical testing outcomes. The correlation coefficient remained high throughout the entire treatment time under a minimized broadband energy and boiling mechanism. Contrarily, both displacement and phase shift changes lacked consistency under HIFU treatment sequences with boiling due to the presence of strong boiling mechanism confirmed by both PCD and thermocouple monitoring. In order to facilitate its clinical translation, a fully-integrated, clinically 2D real-time HMIFU system was also developed, which is capable of providing 2D real-time streaming during HIFU treatment up to 15 Hz without interruption. Reproducibility studies of the system showed consistent displacement estimation on tissue-mimicking phantoms as well as monitoring of tissue-softening-then-stiffening phase change across 16 out of 19 liver specimens (Increasing rate in phase shift (Deltaφ): 0.73+/-0.69 %/s, Decreasing rate in phase shift (Deltaφ): 0.60+/-0.19 %/s) along with thermocouple monitoring (Increasing: 0.84+/-1.15 %/ °C, Decreasing: 2.03+/- 0.93%/ °C) and validation of tissue stiffening using mechanical testing. In addition, the 2-D HMIFU system feasibility on preclinical pancreatic tumor mice model was also demonstrated in vivo, where HMI displacement decreases were observed across three of five treatment locations on the kP(f)c model at 20.8+/-6.84, 18.6+/-1.46, and 24.0+/-5.43%, as well as across four of the seven treatment locations on the KPC model at 39.5+/-2.98%, 34.5+/-21.5%, 16.0+/-3.05%, and 35.0+/-3.12% along with H&E histological confirmation. In order to improve the quantitative monitoring aspect of HMIFU, a novel, model-independent method for the estimating Young's modulus based on strain profile was also implemented, where 1-D HMIFU system showed feasibilities on polyacrylamide phantom (EHMI/E ≈ 2.3) and liver specimen (EHMI/E ≈ 8.1), and 2-D HMIFU system showed feasibilities on copolymer phantom(EHMI/E ≈ 30.4), liver specimen(E HMI/E ≈ 211.3), as well as HIFU treated liver specimen(EHMI,end /EHMI,beginning ≈ 5.96). In conclusion, the outcomes from the aforementioned studies successfully showed the feasibility of both HMIFU systems in multi-parametric monitoring of HIFU treatment with slow denaturation and boiling, which prepares its stage towards clinical translation.

  17. Image enhancement by adjusting the contrast of spatial frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ching-Chung

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate a brand-new method for image enhancement by adjusting the contrast of different spatial frequencies. Fine characteristics of an image are well enhanced with negligible side effects. This method is easy to implement owing to its simple optical basis.

  18. Optimal configuration for vibration frequencies in a ring of harmonic oscillators: The nonidentical mass effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuai; Zhang, Guo-Yong; He, Zhiwei; Zhan, Meng

    2015-06-01

    The parameter diversity effect in coupled nonidentical elements has attracted persistent interest in nonlinear dynamics. Of fundamental importance is the so-called optimal configuration problem for how the spatial position of elements with different parameters precisely determines the dynamics of the whole system. In this work, we study the optimal configuration problem for the vibration spectra in the classical mass-spring model with a ring configuration, paying particular attention to how the configuration of different masses affects the second smallest vibration frequency ( ? 2) and the largest one ( ? N ). For the extreme values of ? 2 and ? N , namely, ( ? 2)min, ( ? 2)max, ( ? N )min, and ( ? N )max, we find some explicit organization rules for the optimal configurations and some approximation rules when the explicit organization rules are not available. The different distributions of ? 2 and ? N are compared. These findings are interesting and valuable for uncovering the underlying mechanism of the parameter diversity effect in more general cases.

  19. Prediction and measurement of low-frequency harmonic noise of a hovering model helicopter rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarawal, H. R.; Schmitz, F. H.; Boxwell, D. A.

    Far-field acoustic data for a model helicopter rotor have been gathered in a large open-jet, acoustically treated wind tunnel with the rotor operating in hover and out of ground-effect. The four-bladed Boeing 360 model rotor with advanced airfoils, planform, and tip shape was run over a range of conditions typical of today's modern helicopter main rotor. Near in-plane acoustic measurements were compared with two independent implementations of classical linear theory. Measured steady thrust and torque were used together with a free-wake analysis (to predict the thrust and drag distributions along the rotor radius) as input to this first-principles theoretical approach. Good agreement between theory and experiment was shown for both amplitude and phase for measurements made in those positions that minimized distortion of the radiated acoustic signature at low-frequencies.

  20. Extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B.; Kirshbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (<20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts.

  1. Interest of second harmonic generation imaging to study collageneous matrix modification in osteoarthritis disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, Elisabeth; de Isla, Natalia; Marchal, Luc; Mainard, Didier; Stoltz, Jean-Franois; Dumas, Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Cartilage degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis affect the organization of the biological extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding chondrocytes. This ECM is mainly composed by collagen giving rise to a strong Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) Signal, due to its high non linear susceptibility. Mechanical stress leads to perturbation of the collagen network comparable to modification occurring in disease. To be sure that SHG signal comes specifically from the collagen network, the enzymatical action of Collagenase was followed. We clearly noted the decrease of the collagen specific signal according to incubation time due to enzymatic degradation. To characterize structural modification on the arrangement of collagen fibers in the ECM, we used image analysis based on co-occurrence matrix (Haralick). Textural features give information like homogeneity ('Angular Second Moment') or size of textural elements ('Inverse Difference Moment', 'Correlation'). Samples submitted to compression are characterized by higher 'Correlation', associated with a decrease of 'IDM' and 'ASM'. Those evolutions suggest the presence of long linear structures, an effect of packing of collagen fibrils and the apparition of nodes where the density of collagen is important versus areas showing a lack of molecules. Collagen I, II and VI are biomarkers characterising disease states since its presence is increased in pathological cartilage (osteoarthritis). Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) associated to Spectral and SHG analysis confirmed the presence of Collagen I and II in the extracellular and Collagen VI in the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes. SHG, FLIM and Spectral Imaging combined with multiphoton excitation enable tissue imaging at deep penetration. We pointed out a local modification of the ECM of cartilage without any labelling (SHG) under mechanical stress. Thus the association of all these techniques represents a potential diagnosis tool for disorganization of collagen.

  2. Functional imaging of skeletal muscle fiber in different physiological states by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Tesi, C.; Piroddi, N.; Poggesi, C.; Castiglioni, C.; Milani, A.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2007-07-01

    The intrinsically ordered arrays of proteins in skeletal muscle allows imaging of this tissue by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG). Biochemical and colocalization studies have gathered an increasing wealth of clues for the attribution of the molecular origin of the muscle SHG signal to the motor protein myosin. Thus, SHG represents a potentially very powerful tool in the investigation of structural dynamics occurring in muscle during active production of force. A full characterization of the polarization-dependence of the SHG signal represents a very selective information on the orientation of the emitting proteins and their dynamics during contraction, provided that different physiological states of muscle (relaxed, rigor and active) exhibit distinct patterns of SHG polarization dependence. Here polarization data are obtained from single frog muscle fibers at rest and during isometric contraction and interpreted, by means of a model, in terms of an average orientation of the SHG emitters which are structured with a cylindrical symmetry about the fiber axis. Optimizing the setup for accurate polarization measurements with SHG, we developed a line scan imaging method allowing measurement of SHG polarization curves in different physiological states. We demonstrate that muscle fiber displays a measurable variation of the orientation of SHG emitters with the transition from rest to isometric contraction.

  3. Depth-sensitive subsurface imaging of polymer nanocomposites using second harmonic Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Castaeda-Uribe, Octavio Alejandro; Reifenberger, Ronald; Raman, Arvind; Avila, Alba

    2015-03-24

    We study the depth sensitivity and spatial resolution of subsurface imaging of polymer nanocomposites using second harmonic mapping in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM). This method allows the visualization of the clustering and percolation of buried Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) via capacitance gradient (?C/?z) maps. We develop a multilayered sample where thin layers of neat Polyimide (PI) (?80 nm per layer) are sequentially spin-coated on well-dispersed SWCNT/Polyimide (PI) nanocomposite films. The multilayer nanocomposite system allows the acquisition of ?C/?z images of three-dimensional percolating networks of SWCNTs at different depths in the same region of the sample. We detect CNTs at a depth of ?430 nm, and notice that the spatial resolution progressively deteriorates with increasing depth of the buried CNTs. Computational trends of ?C/?z vs CNT depth correlate the sensitivity and depth resolution with field penetration and spreading, and enable a possible approach to three-dimensional subsurface structure reconstruction. The results open the door to nondestructive, three-dimensional tomography and nanometrology techniques for nanocomposite applications. PMID:25591106

  4. Label-free imaging of Schwann cell myelination by third harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyungsik; Sharoukhov, Denis; Kassim, Imran; Zhang, Yanqing; Salzer, James L.; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic axon–glial cell interaction underlying myelination is hampered by the lack of suitable imaging techniques. Here we demonstrate third harmonic generation microscopy (THGM) for label-free imaging of myelinating Schwann cells in live culture and ex vivo and in vivo tissue. A 3D structure was acquired for a variety of compact and noncompact myelin domains, including juxtaparanodes, Schmidt–Lanterman incisures, and Cajal bands. Other subcellular features of Schwann cells that escape traditional optical microscopies were also visualized. We tested THGM for morphometry of compact myelin. Unlike current methods based on electron microscopy, g-ratio could be determined along an extended length of myelinated fiber in the physiological condition. The precision of THGM-based g-ratio estimation was corroborated in mouse models of hypomyelination. Finally, we demonstrated the feasibility of THGM to monitor morphological changes of myelin during postnatal development and degeneration. The outstanding capabilities of THGM may be useful for elucidation of the mechanism of myelin formation and pathogenesis. PMID:25453108

  5. Second harmonic generation imaging of skin wound healing and scarring in a rabbit ear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiyan; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Skin wound healing and scarring in rabbit ears was examined by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Rabbit ear wound model was created by punching from the ventral surface with removal of epidermis, dermis and perichondrium. The samples were collected weekly, and cut into 100 ?m thickness sections for SHG imaging. SHG imaging system was operated at 810 nm, producing SHG signals at half the excitation wavelength 405 nm. A Plan-Neofluar objective (x40 and NA=0.75) was employed for focusing the excitation beam into tissue samples and was also used to collect the backscattered intrinsic SHG signals. Our results showed apparent difference in collagen content and microstructure at various wound healing and scarring time points. It suggested that SHG signals from collagen can serve as a good indicator for characterization of wound status. With the advancement on miniaturization, microscopy based on SHG will become a valuable tool for monitoring the wound healing and scarring in vivo, and help to guide the improvement of scar appearance with appropriate and subtle modulation during wound healing based on better understanding of scarring response mechanism.

  6. In vivo wound healing diagnosis with second harmonic and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-06-01

    Skin wounds heal when a series of cell lineages are triggered, followed by collagen deposition, to reconstruct damaged tissues. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic rate in vivo during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy respectively. The metabolic rate of cells is reflected through the lifetime of the autofluorescence from the co-enzyme protein, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, due to its change in the relative concentration of bound and free forms. A higher than normal cellular metabolic rate is observed during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually after eight days of wound formation. SHG signal intensity change indicates the net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase, and net regeneration begins on day five. Eventually, the quantity of collagen increases gradually to form a scar tissue as the final product. Importantly, this work demonstrates the feasibility of an in vivo imaging approach for a normal wound on rat skin, which has the potential to supplement the noninvasive clinical diagnosis of wounds.

  7. Second harmonic generation imaging as a potential tool for staging pregnancy and predicting preterm birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akins, Meredith L.; Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Mahendroo, Mala

    2010-03-01

    We use second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to assess changes in collagen structure of murine cervix during cervical remodeling of normal pregnancy and in a preterm birth model. Visual inspection of SHG images revealed substantial changes in collagen morphology throughout normal gestation. SHG images collected in both the forward and backward directions were analyzed quantitatively for changes in overall mean intensity, forward to backward intensity ratio, collagen fiber size, and porosity. Changes in mean SHG intensity and intensity ratio take place in early pregnancy, suggesting that submicroscopic changes in collagen fibril size and arrangement occur before macroscopic changes become evident. Fiber size progressively increased from early to late pregnancy, while pores between collagen fibers became larger and farther apart. Analysis of collagen features in premature cervical remodeling show that changes in collagen structure are dissimilar from normal remodeling. The ability to quantify multiple morphological features of collagen that characterize normal cervical remodeling and distinguish abnormal remodeling in preterm birth models supports future studies aimed at development of SHG endoscopic devices for clinical assessment of collagen changes during pregnancy in women and for predicting risk of preterm labor which occurs in 12.5% of all pregnancies.

  8. Statistical Validation of Brain Tumor Shape Approximation via Spherical Harmonics for Image-Guided Neurosurgery1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Talos, Ion-Florin; Bhagwat, Jui G.; Haker, Steven J.; Black, Peter M.; Zou, Kelly H.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Surgical planning now routinely uses both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) models that integrate data from multiple imaging modalities, each highlighting one or more aspects of morphology or function. We performed a preliminary evaluation of the use of spherical harmonics (SH) in approximating the 3D shape and estimating the volume of brain tumors of varying characteristics. Materials and Methods Magnetic resonance (MR) images from five patients with brain tumors were selected randomly from our MR-guided neurosurgical practice. Standardized mean square reconstruction errors (SMSRE) by tumor volume were measured. Validation metrics for comparing performances of the SH method against segmented contours (SC) were the dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and standardized Euclidean distance (SED) measure. Results Tumor volume range was 2241385189 mm3, and range of number of vertices in triangulated models was 36746544. At SH approximations with degree of at least 30, SMSRE were within 1.66 10?5 mm?1. Summary measures yielded a DSC range of 0.890.99 (pooled median, 0.97 and significantly >0.7; P < .001) and an SED range of 0.00020.0028 (pooled median, 0.0005). Conclusion 3D shapes of tumors may be approximated by using SH for neurosurgical applications. PMID:15831419

  9. Feasibility of low-frequency ultrasound imaging using parametric sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Adachi, Hideo; Kamakura, Tomoo

    2015-10-01

    The penetration depth of high-frequency ultrasound is limited, since the ultrasound at high frequency is much attenuated by medium viscosity. In this study, to resolve this problem, we propose low-frequency ultrasound imaging using parametric sound sources as a low-frequency directive sound. In order to verify the proposed imaging method in water, a ring type transducer with the center hole was used to transmit modulated primary ultrasounds with center frequency of 2.8 MHz, and a hydrophone placed within the hole of transmitter was used to receive chirp-modulated parametric sound echoes with center frequency of 300 kHz and a bandwidth of 400 kHz. After receiving parametric sound echo signals from a target with dimensions of several centimeters, a pulse compression technique was applied to the signals in order to improve the range resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The obtained B mode images reveal the feasibility of low-frequency ultrasound imaging using compressed parametric sounds.

  10. Analytical Bistatic k Space Images Compared to Experimental Swept Frequency EAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeffer, John; Cooper, Brett; Hom, Kam

    2004-01-01

    A case study of flat plate scattering images obtained by the analytical bistatic k space and experimental swept frequency ISAR methods is presented. The key advantage of the bistatic k space image is that a single excitation is required, i.e., one frequency I one angle. This means that prediction approaches such as MOM only need to compute one solution at a single frequency. Bistatic image Fourier transform data are obtained by computing the scattered field at various bistatic positions about the body in k space. Experimental image Fourier transform data are obtained from the measured response to a bandwidth of frequencies over a target rotation range.

  11. Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography: Phantom imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sujin; Jun, Sung Chan; Seo, Jin Keun; Lee, Jeehyun; Woo, Eung Je; Holder, David

    2010-04-01

    Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography (fdEIT) using a weighted voltage difference has been proposed as a means to provide images of admittivity changes at different frequencies. This weighted difference method is an effective way to extract anomaly information while eliminating background effects by unknown boundary geometry, uncertainty in electrode positions and other systematic measurement artefacts. It also properly handles the interplay between conductivity and permittivity in measured boundary voltage data. Though the proposed fdEIT algorithm is promising for applications such as detection of hemorrhagic stroke and breast cancer, more validation studies are needed. In this paper, we performed two-and three-dimensional numerical simulations and phantom experiments. Backgrounds of imaging objects were either saline or carrot pieces suspended in saline. We used carrot pieces to simulate a more realistic frequency-dependent admittivity distribution. Test objects were banana, potato or conductive gel with known admittivity spectra. When the background was saline, both simple and weighted difference approaches produced reasonably accurate images. The weighted difference method yielded better images from two-dimensional imaging objects with background of carrot pieces. For the three-dimensional head-shaped phantom, the advantage of the weighted frequency difference method over the simple difference method is not as obvious as in the case of the two-dimensional phantom. It is unclear if this is due to measurement errors or limitations in the linear algorithm. Further refinement and validation of the frequency difference image reconstructions are currently in progress.

  12. Low frequency radio synthesis imaging of the galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Michael Evans

    2005-11-01

    The Very Large Array radio interferometer has been equipped with new receivers to allow observations at 330 and 74 MHz, frequencies much lower than were previously possible with this instrument. Though the VLA dishes are not optimal for working at these frequencies, the system is successful and regular observations are now taken at these frequencies. However, new data analysis techniques are required to work at these frequencies. The technique of self- calibration, used to remove small atmospheric effects at higher frequencies, has been adapted to compensate for ionospheric turbulence in much the same way that adaptive optics is used in the optical regime. Faceted imaging techniques are required to compensate for the noncoplanar image distortion that affects the system due to the wide fields of view at these frequencies (~2.3 at 330 MHz and ~11 at 74 MHz). Furthermore, radio frequency interference is a much larger problem at these frequencies than in higher frequencies and novel approaches to its mitigation are required. These new techniques and new system are allowing for imaging of the radio sky at sensitivities and resolutions orders of magnitude higher than were possible with the low frequency systems of decades past. In this work I discuss the advancements in low frequency data techniques required to make high resolution, high sensitivity, large field of view measurements with the new Very Large Array low frequency system and then detail the results of turning this new system and techniques on the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. At 330 MHz I image the Galactic center region with roughly 10 inches resolution and 1.6 mJy beam -1 sensitivity. New Galactic center nonthermal filaments, new pulsar candidates, and the lowest frequency detection to date of the radio source associated with our Galaxy's central massive black hole result. At 74 MHz I image a region of the sky roughly 40 x 6 with, ~10 feet resolution. I use the high opacity of H II regions at 74 MHz to extract three-dimensional data on the distribution of Galactic cosmic ray emissivity, a measurement possible only at low radio frequencies.

  13. Coherent states and geometric phases of a generalized damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent mass and frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, I. A.; de Lima, D. A. P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we study the generalized harmonic oscillator with arbitrary time-dependent mass and frequency subjected to a linear velocity-dependent frictional force from classical and quantum points of view. We obtain the solution of the classical equation of motion of this system for some particular cases and derive an equation of motion that describes three different systems. Furthermore, with the help of the quantum invariant method and using quadratic invariants we solve analytically and exactly the time-dependent Schrdinger equation for this system. Afterwards, we construct coherent states for the quantized system and employ them to investigate some of the system's quantum properties such as quantum fluctuations of the coordinate and the momentum as well as the corresponding uncertainty product. In addition, we derive the geometric, dynamical and Berry phases for this nonstationary system. Finally, we evaluate the dynamical and Berry phases for three special cases and surprisingly find identical expressions for the dynamical phase and the same formulae for the Berry's phase.

  14. Testing a simple control law to reduce broadband frequency harmonic vibrations using semi-active tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    This paper is focused on the control problems related to semi-active tuned mass dampers (TMDs) used to reduce harmonic vibrations, specially involving civil structures. A simplified version of the phase control law is derived and its effectiveness is investigated and evaluated. The objective is to improve the functioning of control systems of this type by simplifying the measurement process and reducing the number of variables involved, making the control system more feasible and reliable. Because the control law is of ON/OFF type, combined with appropriate trigger conditions, the activity of the actuation system may be significantly reduced, which may be of few seconds a day in many practical cases, increasing the durability of the device and reducing its maintenance. Moreover, due to the ability of the control system to command the motion of the inertial mass, the semi-active TMD is relatively insensitive to its initial tuning, resulting in the capability of self-tuning and in the possibility of controlling several vibration modes of a structure over a significant broadband frequency.

  15. Real-time Monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Ablation of In Vitro Canine Livers Using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU).

    PubMed

    Grondin, Julien; Payen, Thomas; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a technique that can perform and monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. An oscillatory motion is generated at the focus of a 93-element and 4.5 MHz center frequency HIFU transducer by applying a 25 Hz amplitude-modulated signal using a function generator. A 64-element and 2.5 MHz imaging transducer with 68kPa peak pressure is confocally placed at the center of the HIFU transducer to acquire the radio-frequency (RF) channel data. In this protocol, real-time monitoring of thermal ablation using HIFU with an acoustic power of 7 W on canine livers in vitro is described. HIFU treatment is applied on the tissue during 2 min and the ablated region is imaged in real-time using diverging or plane wave imaging up to 1,000 frames/second. The matrix of RF channel data is multiplied by a sparse matrix for image reconstruction. The reconstructed field of view is of 90 for diverging wave and 20 mm for plane wave imaging and the data are sampled at 80 MHz. The reconstruction is performed on a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) in order to image in real-time at a 4.5 display frame rate. 1-D normalized cross-correlation of the reconstructed RF data is used to estimate axial displacements in the focal region. The magnitude of the peak-to-peak displacement at the focal depth decreases during the thermal ablation which denotes stiffening of the tissue due to the formation of a lesion. The displacement signal-to-noise ratio (SNRd) at the focal area for plane wave was 1.4 times higher than for diverging wave showing that plane wave imaging appears to produce better displacement maps quality for HMIFU than diverging wave imaging. PMID:26556647

  16. Third harmonic frequency generation by type-I critically phase-matched LiB3O5 crystal by means of optically active quartz crystal.

    PubMed

    Gapontsev, Valentin P; Tyrtyshnyy, Valentin A; Vershinin, Oleg I; Davydov, Boris L; Oulianov, Dmitri A

    2013-02-11

    We present a method of third harmonic generation at 355 nm by frequency mixing of fundamental and second harmonic radiation of an ytterbium nanosecond pulsed all-fiber laser in a type-I phase-matched LiB(3)O(5) (LBO) crystal where originally orthogonal polarization planes of the fundamental and second harmonic beams are aligned by an optically active quartz crystal. 8 W of ultraviolet light at 355 nm were achieved with 40% conversion efficiency from 1064 nm radiation. The conversion efficiency obtained in a type-I phase-matched LBO THG crystal was 1.6 times higher than the one achieved in a type-II LBO crystal at similar experimental conditions. In comparison to half-wave plates traditionally used for polarization alignment the optically active quartz crystal has much lower temperature dependence and requires simpler optical alignment. PMID:23481827

  17. Time dependent Doppler shifts in high-order harmonic generation in intense laser interactions with solid density plasma and frequency chirped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, E. C.; Zhang, P.; He, Z.-H.; Dollar, F.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2015-05-15

    High order harmonic generation from solid targets is a compelling route to generating intense attosecond or even zeptosecond pulses. However, the effects of ion motion on the generation of harmonics have only recently started to be considered. Here, we study the effects of ion motion in harmonics production at ultrahigh laser intensities interacting with solid density plasma. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we find that there is an optimum density for harmonic production that depends on laser intensity, which scales linearly with a{sub 0} with no ion motion but with a reduced scaling if ion motion is included. We derive a scaling for this optimum density with ion motion and also find that the background ion motion induces Doppler red-shifts in the harmonic structures of the reflected pulse. The temporal structure of the Doppler shifts is correlated to the envelope of the incident laser pulse. We demonstrate that by introducing a frequency chirp in the incident pulse we are able to eliminate these Doppler shifts almost completely.

  18. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focal spot localization using harmonic motion imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the  -3dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R2 = 0.821 at p  <  0.002 in the 2D HMI system. We demonstrated the feasibility of using this HMI-based technique to localize the HIFU focal spot without inducing thermal changes during the planning phase. The focal spot localization method has also been applied on ex vivo human breast tissue ablation and can be fully integrated into any HMI system for planning purposes.

  19. High Frequency Ultrasound Imaging of Cartilage-Bone Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Y.; Saijo, Y.; Ando, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Hozumi, N.; Hatori, K.; Itoi, E.

    High frequency ultrasound microscope with central frequency of 100 MHz was developed. The system was capable of (1) conventional C-mode acoustic microscope imaging of thinly sliced tissue, (2) ultrasound impedance imaging of the surface of in vitro thick tissue and (3) 3D ultrasound imaging of inside of the in vitro tissue. In the present study, cylindrical cartilage-bone unit specimens were removed from rat knee joints and evaluated with the equipment. The resolution was enough to visualize the articular cartilage surface morphology and the subchondral bone. Compared with histological sections observed by optical microscope, it can also differentiate the non-calcified zone and calcified zone of the articular cartilage. High frequency ultrasound microscope will provide important information of the structural changes of the articular cartilage.

  20. Quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic Talbot self-imaging in a 2D periodically-poled LiTaO3 crystal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongmei; Wei, Dunzhao; Zhang, Yong; Zou, Jiong; Hu, X P; Zhu, S N; Xiao, Min

    2013-06-17

    We demonstrate the improved second-harmonic Talbot self-imaging through the quasi-phase-matching technique in a 2D periodically-poled LiTaO(3) crystal. The domain structure not only composes a nonlinear optical grating which is necessary to realize nonlinear Talbot self-imaging, but also provides reciprocal vectors to satisfy the phase-matching condition for second-harmonic generation. Our experimental results show that quasi-phase-matching can improve the intensity of the second-harmonic Talbot self-imaging by a factor of 21. PMID:23787586

  1. High-frequency ultrasonic imaging and its applications in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermert, Helmut; Vogt, Michael C.

    1999-06-01

    Utilizing transducers with center frequencies and bandwidths both up to 100 MHz high frequency ultrasound allows high resolution imaging in fluids and tissue with a resolution down to approximately 10 micrometers . In addition to the increased resolution for medical imaging the backscatter properties of biological tissue are of considerable diagnostic advantage which change more rapidly with increasing frequency than the spatial resolution does. Because of the increasing attenuation of ultrasound in tissue at higher frequencies only small near surface areas can be imaged. For applications in dermatology recent research activities and instrument developments have included B-Scan systems (skin: thickness of layers, tumors, inflammatory diseases), flow visualization concepts (diagnosis of the cutaneous microcirculation), and tissue characterization (tumorous skin areas). As transducer and array technology has limitations high frequency imaging systems mainly utilize mechanically scanned single element transducers. They require special scanning procedures as well as signal processing techniques in order to optimize resolution, range, and signal-to-noise ratio. The paper will give an overview of these techniques and will also present some examples of applications in dermatology.

  2. Finding the Secret of Image Saliency in the Frequency Domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Duan, Ling-Yu; Chen, Xiaowu; Huang, Tiejun; Tian, Yonghong

    2015-12-01

    There are two sides to every story of visual saliency modeling in the frequency domain. On the one hand, image saliency can be effectively estimated by applying simple operations to the frequency spectrum. On the other hand, it is still unclear which part of the frequency spectrum contributes the most to popping-out targets and suppressing distractors. Toward this end, this paper tentatively explores the secret of image saliency in the frequency domain. From the results obtained in several qualitative and quantitative experiments, we find that the secret of visual saliency may mainly hide in the phases of intermediate frequencies. To explain this finding, we reinterpret the concept of discrete Fourier transform from the perspective of template-based contrast computation and thus develop several principles for designing the saliency detector in the frequency domain. Following these principles, we propose a novel approach to design the saliency detector under the assistance of prior knowledge obtained through both unsupervised and supervised learning processes. Experimental results on a public image benchmark show that the learned saliency detector outperforms 18 state-of-the-art approaches in predicting human fixations. PMID:26539848

  3. A cost-efficient frequency-domain photoacoustic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBoulluec, Peter; Liu, Hanli; Yuan, Baohong

    2013-09-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging techniques have recently attracted much attention and can be used for noninvasive imaging of biological tissues. Most PA imaging systems in research laboratories use the time domain method with expensive nanosecond pulsed lasers that are not affordable for most educational laboratories. Using an intensity modulated light source to excite PA signals is an alternative technique, known as the frequency domain method, with a much lower cost. In this paper, we describe a simple frequency domain PA system and demonstrate its imaging capability. The system provides opportunities not only to observe PA signals in tissue phantoms but also to acquire hands-on skills in PA signal detection. It also provides opportunities to explore the underlying mechanisms of the PA effect.

  4. A cost-efficient frequency-domain photoacoustic imaging system

    PubMed Central

    LeBoulluec, Peter; Liu, Hanli; Yuan, Baohong

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging techniques have recently attracted much attention and can be used for noninvasive imaging of biological tissues. Most PA imaging systems in research laboratories use the time domain method with expensive nanosecond pulsed lasers that are not affordable for most educational laboratories. Using an intensity modulated light source to excite PA signals is an alternative technique, known as the frequency domain method, with a much lower cost. In this paper, we describe a simple frequency domain PA system and demonstrate its imaging capability. The system provides opportunities not only to observe PA signals in tissue phantoms, but also to acquire hands-on skills in PA signal detection. It also provides opportunities to explore the underlying mechanisms of the PA effect. PMID:24659823

  5. Effect of bandwidth on beam smoothing and frequency conversion at the third harmonic of the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D.M.; Henesian, M.A.; Dixit, S.N.; Powell, H.T.; Thompson, C.E.; Weiland, T.L.

    1993-05-01

    We present the results of experiments performed on the Nova laser system to determine the effect of bandwidth on third harmonic (3{omega}) frequency conversion and beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Our experiments utilized a wide bandwidth fiber optic cross-phase modulated (XPM) source and a narrower bandwidth microwave modulated (FM) source, each centered at 1053 nm (1{omega}). The FM source produced {approximately}2 cm{sup {minus}1} of bandwidth, modulated at 3 GHz; the XPM bandwidth was varied from 5 to 15 cm{sup {minus}1}, modulated by the temporally noisy output of a multimode Nd:glass laser ({le} 500 GHz). The FM beam showed no evidence of self-phase modulation in the laser chain produced by intensity fluctuations, and 1{omega} bandwidth was tripled upon conversion to 3{omega} (2--6 cm{sup {minus}1}). The 1{omega} XPM bandwidth increased by {ge} 25% due to self-phase modulation in the laser chain (16--22 cm{sup {minus}1}) due to it`s relative noisy temporal structure. Over 50% of the 1{omega} XPM bandwidth was transferred to the 3{omega} beam (22--36 cm{sup {minus}1}), yielding 0.13% bandwidth at 3{omega}. The maximum intrinsic narrowband 3{omega} frequency conversion obtained using a type-II/type-II KDP crystal array was 62%. The intrinsic efficiency obtained at the Nova 10-beam chamber is typically > 65%. We have developed broadband frequency conversion codes and broadband pulse simulations to model our results, and have obtained good agreement with experiment. Using a random phase plate without bandwidth, we obtained a smoothing level, {sigma}/I {approximately} 0.79, defined by the rms variance normalized with respect to the average intensity. This is less than the theoretically expected value of 1 for an ideal speckle pattern, and could be evidence of polarization smoothing as a result of focus lens birefringence. With spectral dispersion and RPP we demonstrated an excellent level of smoothing with the XPM source.

  6. Imaging and spectroscopy at terahertz frequencies using hot electron bolometer technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerecht, Eyal; Gu, Dazhen; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Yngvesson, Sigfrid

    2006-10-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy at terahertz frequencies (defined roughly as 300 GHz - 3 THz) have great potential for both healthcare and homeland security applications. Terahertz frequencies correspond to energy level transitions of important molecules in biology and astrophysics. Terahertz radiation (T-rays) can penetrate clothing and, to some extent, can also penetrate biological materials, and because of their shorter wavelengths they offer higher spatial resolution than microwaves or millimeter waves. We describe the development of a novel two-dimensional scanning, passive, terahertz imaging system based on a hot electron bolometer (HEB) detector element. HEB mixers are near quantum noise limited heterodyne detectors operating over the entire terahertz spectrum. HEB devices absorb terahertz radiation up to the visible range due to the very short momentum scattering times. The terahertz imaging system consists of a front-end heterodyne detector integrated with a state-of-the-art monolithic microwave integrated-circuit low-noise amplifier (MMIC LNA) on the same mixer block. The terahertz local oscillator (LO) signal is provided by a commercial harmonic multiplier source.

  7. Interactive ultrasound image retrieval using magnitude frequency spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jae Gon; Kim, Nam Chul; Chun, Young Deok; Park, Jun Hyo; Bae, Jun Ik

    2003-05-01

    An efficient algorithm is proposed for interactive ultrasound image retrieval using magnitude frequency spectrum (MFS). The interactive retrieval is especially intended to be useful for training an intern to diagnose with ultrasound images. In the retrieval process, information on which are relevant to a query image among object images retrieved in the previous iteration is fed back by user interaction. In order to improve discrimination between a query image and each of object images in a database (DB) by using the MFS, which is powerful for ultrasound image retrieval, we incorporate feature vector normalization and root filtering in feature extraction. To effectively integrate the feedback information, we use a feedback scheme based on Rocchio equation, where the feature of a query image is replaced with the weighted average of the feature of a query image and those of object images. Experimental results for real ultrasound images show that while yielding a precision of about 75% at a recall of about 8% in the initial retrieval, the interactive procedure yields a great performance improvement, that is, a precision of about 95% in the third iteration.

  8. High-frequency ultrasound imaging for breast cancer biopsy guidance.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Thomas; Yoon, Changhan; Choi, Hojong; Eliahoo, Payam; Kim, Hyung Ham; Yamashita, Mary W; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda J; Lang, Julie E; Sener, Stephen F; Vallone, John; Martin, Sue E; Kirk Shung, K

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided core needle biopsy is the current gold standard for breast cancer diagnosis. Microcalcifications, an important radiographic finding on mammography suggestive of early breast cancer such as ductal carcinoma in situ, are usually biopsied under stereotactic guidance. This procedure, however, is uncomfortable for patients and requires the use of ionizing radiation. It would be preferable to biopsy microcalcifications under ultrasound guidance since it is a faster procedure, more comfortable for the patient, and requires no radiation. However, microcalcifications cannot reliably be detected with the current standard ultrasound imaging systems. This study is motivated by the clinical need for real-time high-resolution ultrasound imaging of microcalcifications, so that biopsies can be accurately performed under ultrasound guidance. We have investigated how high-frequency ultrasound imaging can enable visualization of microstructures in ex vivo breast tissue biopsy samples. We generated B-mode images of breast tissue and applied the Nakagami filtering technique to help refine image output so that microcalcifications could be better assessed during ultrasound-guided core biopsies. We describe the preliminary clinical results of high-frequency ultrasound imaging of ex vivo breast biopsy tissue with microcalcifications and without Nakagami filtering and the correlation of these images with the pathology examination by hematoxylin and eosin stain and whole slide digital scanning. PMID:26693167

  9. Multi-frequency Defect Selective Imaging via Nonlinear Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor; Busse, Gerd

    The concept of defect-selective ultrasonic nonlinear imaging is based on visualization of strongly nonlinear inclusions in the form of localized cracked defects. For intense excitation, the ultrasonic response of defects is affected by mechanical constraint between their fragments that makes their vibrations extremely nonlinear. The cracked flaws, therefore, efficiently generate multiple new frequencies, which can be used as a nonlinear "tag" to detect and image them. In this paper, the methodologies of nonlinear scanning laser vibrometry (NSLV) and nonlinear air-coupled emission (NACE) are applied for nonlinear imaging of various defects in hi-tech and constructional materials. A broad database obtained demonstrates evident advantages of the nonlinear approach over its linear counterpart. The higher-order nonlinear frequencies provide increase in signal-to-noise ratio and enhance the contrast of imaging. Unlike conventional ultrasonic instruments, the nonlinear approach yields abundant multi-frequency information on defect location. The application of image recognition and processing algorithms is described and shown to improve reliability and quality of ultrasonic imaging.

  10. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-03-01

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  11. Pulsed Coherent Teragraphy: Imaging in the Terahertz Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    Principles of recording the amplitudes and phases of wave fields in the terahertz (THz) frequency range are considered and methodology and schemes used for imaging in this range are analyzed. Generation of THz radiation by femtosecond optical pulses and registration of THz electric field waveforms allow the methods for holographic recording and image restoration to be developed. Results of the experiments on reconstruction of phase characteristics of THz field by the suggested holographic method are demonstrated and the influence of the experimental parameters on the quality of image restoration in time-resolved THz holography is analyzed.

  12. Tomographic imaging via spectral encoding of spatial frequency

    PubMed Central

    Uttam, Shikhar; Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Bista, Rajan K.; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional optical tomographic imaging plays an important role in biomedical research and clinical applications. We introduce spectral tomographic imaging (STI) via spectral encoding of spatial frequency principle that not only has the capability for visualizing the three-dimensional object at sub-micron resolution but also providing spatially-resolved quantitative characterization of its structure with nanoscale accuracy for any volume of interest within the object. The theoretical basis and the proof-of-concept numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of spectral tomographic imaging. PMID:23546131

  13. Multi-modal image matching based on local frequency information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Lei, Zhihui; Yu, Qifeng; Zhang, Xiaohu; Shang, Yang; Hou, Wang

    2013-12-01

    This paper challenges the issue of matching between multi-modal images with similar physical structures but different appearances. To emphasize the common structural information while suppressing the illumination and sensor-dependent information between multi-modal images, two image representations namely Mean Local Phase Angle (MLPA) and Frequency Spread Phase Congruency (FSPC) are proposed by using local frequency information in Log-Gabor wavelet transformation space. A confidence-aided similarity (CAS) that consists of a confidence component and a similarity component is designed to establish the correspondence between multi-modal images. The two representations are both invariant to contrast reversal and non-homogeneous illumination variation, and without any derivative or thresholding operation. The CAS that integrates MLPA with FSPC tightly instead of treating them separately can more weight the common structures emphasized by FSPC, and therefore further eliminate the influence of different sensor properties. We demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of our method by comparing it with those popular methods of multi-modal image matching. Experimental results show that our method improves the traditional multi-modal image matching, and can work robustly even in quite challenging situations (e.g. SAR & optical image).

  14. Exchange and polarization effect in high-order harmonic imaging of molecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sukiasyan, Suren; Ivanov, Misha Yu.; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Smirnova, Olga; Brabec, Thomas

    2010-10-15

    We analyze the importance of exchange, polarization, and electron-electron correlation in high-order harmonic generation in molecules interacting with intense laser fields. We find that electron exchange can become particularly important for harmonic emission associated with intermediate excitations in the molecular ion. In particular, for orbitals associated with two-hole one-particle excitations, exchange effects can eliminate structure-related minima and maxima in the harmonic spectra. Laser-induced polarization of the neutral molecule may also have major effects on orbital structure-related minima and maxima in the harmonic spectra. Finally, we show how exchange terms in recombination can be viewed as a shakedownlike process induced by sudden electronic excitation in the ion.

  15. Walk-Off-Induced Modulation Instability, Temporal Pattern Formation, and Frequency Comb Generation in Cavity-Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Leo, F; Hansson, T; Ricciardi, I; De Rosa, M; Coen, S; Wabnitz, S; Erkintalo, M

    2016-01-22

    We derive a time-domain mean-field equation to model the full temporal and spectral dynamics of light in singly resonant cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We show that the temporal walk-off between the fundamental and the second-harmonic fields plays a decisive role under realistic conditions, giving rise to rich, previously unidentified nonlinear behavior. Through linear stability analysis and numerical simulations, we discover a new kind of quadratic modulation instability which leads to the formation of optical frequency combs and associated time-domain dissipative structures. Our numerical simulations show excellent agreement with recent experimental observations of frequency combs in quadratic nonlinear media [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063839 (2015)]. Thus, in addition to unveiling a new, experimentally accessible regime of nonlinear dynamics, our work enables predictive modeling of frequency comb generation in cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We expect our findings to have wide impact on the study of temporal and spectral dynamics in a diverse range of dispersive, quadratically nonlinear resonators. PMID:26849598

  16. Walk-Off-Induced Modulation Instability, Temporal Pattern Formation, and Frequency Comb Generation in Cavity-Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, F.; Hansson, T.; Ricciardi, I.; De Rosa, M.; Coen, S.; Wabnitz, S.; Erkintalo, M.

    2016-01-01

    We derive a time-domain mean-field equation to model the full temporal and spectral dynamics of light in singly resonant cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We show that the temporal walk-off between the fundamental and the second-harmonic fields plays a decisive role under realistic conditions, giving rise to rich, previously unidentified nonlinear behavior. Through linear stability analysis and numerical simulations, we discover a new kind of quadratic modulation instability which leads to the formation of optical frequency combs and associated time-domain dissipative structures. Our numerical simulations show excellent agreement with recent experimental observations of frequency combs in quadratic nonlinear media [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063839 (2015)]. Thus, in addition to unveiling a new, experimentally accessible regime of nonlinear dynamics, our work enables predictive modeling of frequency comb generation in cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We expect our findings to have wide impact on the study of temporal and spectral dynamics in a diverse range of dispersive, quadratically nonlinear resonators.

  17. Experimental investigation of the ionospheric hysteresis effect on the threshold excitation level of the Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samimi, A.; Scales, W.; Cruz, M.; Isham, B.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent experimental observations of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) spectrum during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic show structures ordered by ion gyro-frequency. The proposed generation mechanism considers parametric decay of a pump upper hybrid/electron Bernstein (UH/EB) wave into another UH/EB and a group of neutralized ion Bernstein waves. The presumption of the proposed mechanism is that the pump electromagnetic wave is converted into the UH/EB wave. This conversion process generates field aligned irregularity which exhibits hysteresis effect. The predicted ionospheric hysteresis effect is studied during the PARS 2012 at HAARP. The preliminary results are presented for the first time. Also, experimental study of the effects of 1) the transmitter beam angle and 2) the transmitter frequency offset relative to the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency on the ion gyro-harmonic structures in the SEE spectrum are provided. The aforementioned observations are compared to the predictions of the analytical model. Possible connection of the SEE spectral features and artificially generated ionospheric descending layer is also discussed

  18. Polarization dependant in vivo second harmonic generation imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans vulval, pharynx, and body wall muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Santos, Susana; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Mathew, Manoj; Thayil K. N., Anisha; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2008-02-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging has emerged in recent years as an important laboratory imaging technique since it can provide unique structural information with submicron resolution. It enjoys the benefits of non-invasive interaction establishing this imaging modality as ideal for in vivo investigation of tissue architectures. In this study we present, polarization dependant high resolution SHG images of Caenorhabditis elegans muscles in vivo. We imaged a variety of muscular structures such as body walls, pharynx and vulva. By fitting the experimental data into a cylindrical symmetry spatial model we mapped the corresponding signal distribution of the ? (2) tensor and identified its main axis orientation for different sarcomeres of the earth worm. The cylindrical symmetry was considered to arise from the thick filaments architecture of the inside active volume. Moreover, our theoretical analysis allowed calculating the mean orientation of harmonophores (myosin helical pitch). Ultimately, we recorded and analysed vulvae muscle dynamics, where SHG signal decreased during in vivo contraction.

  19. Pulse-modulated second harmonic imaging microscope quantitatively demonstrates marked increase of collagen in tumor after chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Anju M.; Xu, Shuoyu; Sun, Wanxin; Zhou, Jianbiao; Tai, Dean C. S.; Chen, Chien-Shing; Rajapakse, Jagath C.; So, Peter T. C.; Yu, Hanry

    2010-09-01

    Pulse-modulated second harmonic imaging microscopes (PM-SHIMs) exhibit improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over conventional SHIMs on sensitive imaging and quantification of weak collagen signals inside tissues. We quantify the spatial distribution of sparse collagen inside a xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) tumor specimens treated with a new drug against receptor tyrosine kinase (ABT-869), and observe a significant increase in collagen area percentage, collagen fiber length, fiber width, and fiber number after chemotherapy. This finding reveals new insights into tumor responses to chemotherapy and suggests caution in developing new drugs and therapeutic regimens against cancers.

  20. Determination of Optimal Imaging Mode for Ultrasonographic Detection of Subdermal Contraceptive Rods: Comparison of Spatial Compound, Conventional, and Tissue Harmonic Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungjun; Seo, Kyung; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Park, Jeong Seon; Kim, Ah Hyun; Park, Ah Young; Kim, Yaena

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine which mode of ultrasonography (US), among the conventional, spatial compound, and tissue-harmonic methods, exhibits the best performance for the detection of Implanon® with respect to generation of posterior acoustic shadowing (PAS). Materials and Methods A total of 21 patients, referred for localization of impalpable Implanon®, underwent US, using the three modes with default settings (i.e., wide focal zone). Representative transverse images of the rods, according to each mode for all patients, were obtained. The resulting 63 images were reviewed by four observers. The observers provided a confidence score for the presence of PAS, using a five-point scale ranging from 1 (definitely absent) to 5 (definitely present), with scores of 4 or 5 for PAS being considered as detection. The average scores of PAS, obtained from the three different modes for each observer, were compared using one-way repeated measure ANOVA. The detection rates were compared using a weighted least square method. Results Statistically, the tissue harmonic mode was significantly superior to the other two modes, when comparing the average scores of PAS for all observers (p < 0.00-1). The detection rate was also highest for the tissue harmonic mode (p < 0.001). Conclusion Tissue harmonic mode in uS appears to be the most suitable in detecting subdermal contraceptive implant rods. PMID:22977328

  1. Multiscale nonlinear frequency response analysis of single-layered graphene sheet under impulse and harmonic excitation using the atomistic finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Sachin O.; Singh, S. P.

    2015-04-01

    The atomistic finite element method (AFEM) is a multiscale technique where a sequential mode is used to transfer information between two length scales to model and simulate nanostructures at the continuum level. This method is used in this paper to investigate the nonlinear frequency response of a single-layered graphene sheet (SLGS) for impulse and harmonic excitation. The multi-body interatomic Tersoff-Brenner (TB) potential is used to represent the energy between two adjacent carbon atoms. Based on the TB potential, the equivalent geometric and elastic properties of carbon-carbon bonds are derived which are consistent with the material constitutive relations. These properties are used further to derive the nonlinear material model (stress-strain curve) of carbon-carbon bonds based on the force-deflection curve using the multi-body interatomic Tersoff-Brenner potential. A square SLGS is considered and its nonlinear vibration characteristics under an impulse and harmonic excitation for bridged, cantilever and clamped boundary conditions are investigated using the derived nonlinear material model (NMM). Before using the proposed nonlinear material model, the derived equivalent geometric and elastic properties of carbon-carbon bond are validated using molecular dynamics simulation results. The geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities are included in the nonlinear frequency response analysis. The investigated results of the nonlinear frequency response analysis are compared with those of the linear frequency response analysis, and the effect of the nonlinear behavior of carbon-carbon bonds on the frequency response of SLGS is studied.

  2. Effect of Frequency and Migration Aperture on Seismic Diffraction Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Y.; Ghosh, D. P.; Moussavi Alashloo, S. Y.; Sum, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    Conventional processing and migration frequently give successful results in using specular reflections to estimate the subsurface geometry and strength of continuous reflector geology. However, the correct interpretation of the true geological gaps, such as fault, fracture, karsts and pinch-outs, is one of the main objectives in seismic data processing and interpretation. In regular processing/migration sequence the diffraction response is suppressed because of the lack of choosing the right migration aperture. Kirchhoff migration is a tool to represent the seismic data as a summation of diffraction hyperbolas governed by the velocities at their apex. In this paper, we have investigated two different velocity models to show the effects of different frequencies and aperture size. We used the diffraction-based and data oriented approach that is dependent on the migration aperture from a low to high aperture to properly image the section. We have done the error analysis between the un-imaged and imaged section after processing and observed that the low aperture can give the undesired result for sharp edges. For the same model, we have applied different frequencies to show the effect of frequencies on seismic Imaging and migration.

  3. Three frequency false-color image of Prince Albert, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-frequency, false color image of Prince Albert, Canada, centered at 53.91 north latitude and 104.69 west longitude. It was produced using data from the X-band, C-band and L-band radars that comprise the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). SIR-C/X-SAR acquired this image on the 20th orbit of the Shuttle Endeavour. The area is located 40 km north and 30 km east of the town of Prince Albert in the Saskatchewan province of Canada. The image covers the area east of the Candle Lake, between gravel surface highways 120 and 106 and west of 106. The area in the middle of the image covers the entire Nipawin (Narrow Hills) provincial park. Most of the dark blue areas in the image are the ice covered lakes. The dark area on the top right corner of the image is the White Gull Lake north of the intersection of highway 120 and 913. The right middle part of the image shows Lake Ispuchaw and Lower Fishing Lake. The deforested areas are shown by light

  4. Simulation of low radio frequency solar images using HART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkevitch, L. V.; Oberoi, D.; Benjamin, M. D.; Sokolov, I.

    2011-12-01

    The diagnostic potential of low radio frequency (< 300 MHz) solar observations has long been recognized. The radio waves are refracted by the smoothly and slowly varying large scale coronal structure and scattered by the small scale inhomogeneities. In addition, the presence of coronal magnetic fields make the coronal plasma dichroic in nature implying that even the unpolarized thermal radiation picks up some degree of polarization depending upon the details of the magnetic field geometry. The very same effects which impart the low radio frequencies its rich diagnostic power, also complicate the interpretation of these observations to extract coronal physics. A detailed analysis of coronal brightness temperature images necessarily requires a sophisticated understanding of coronal propagation and a robust and flexible numerical implementation to serve as a simulation tool. In anticipation of the solar images from the new generation of capable low radio frequency interferometers like the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), we have been working on the design and development of a coronal propagation simulation tool. Christened Haystack and AOSS Ray Tracer (HART), this tool traces rays through a corona with specified electron density and temperature distributions. HART computes the appropriate radiative transfer to obtain the brightness temperature for each of the rays. This results in a simulated image corresponding to a specified observing frequency in each of the Stokes parameters. In view of the large number of pixels expected in the eventual images from the MWA and other instruments, and the large number of spectral slices for which these images would need to be simulated, considerable attention was paid to developing and implementing a robust and numerically efficient multi-threaded ray tracing algorithm. Here we describe the salient features of the flexible HART framework, presenting the current status of its implementation and the plans for near term development.

  5. A Time-Frequency Respiration Tracking System using Non-Contact Bed Sensors with Harmonic Artifact Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Zachary T.; Jacobs, Peter G.; Riley, Thomas C.; Hagen, Chad C.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep apnea is a serious health condition that affects many individuals and has been associated with serious health conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Clinical diagnosis of sleep apnea requires that a patient spend the night in a sleep clinic while being wired up to numerous obtrusive sensors. We are developing a system that utilizes respiration rate and breathing amplitude inferred from non-contact bed sensors (i.e. load cells placed under bed supports) to detect sleep apnea. Multi-harmonic artifacts generated either biologically or as a result of the impulse response of the bed have made it challenging to track respiration rate and amplitude with high resolution in time. In this paper, we present an algorithm that can accurately track respiration on a second-by-second basis while removing noise harmonics. The algorithm is tested using data collected from 5 patients during overnight sleep studies. Respiration rate is compared with polysomnography estimations of respiration rate estimated by a technician following clinical standards. Results indicate that certain subjects exhibit a large harmonic component of their breathing signal that can be removed by our algorithm. When compared with technician transcribed respiration rates using polysomnography signals, we demonstrate improved accuracy of respiration rate tracking using harmonic artifact rejection (mean error: 0.18 breaths/minute) over tracking not using harmonic artifact rejection (mean error: −2.74 breaths/minute). PMID:26738176

  6. Bipolar-power-transistor-based limiter for high frequency ultrasound imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hojong; Yang, Hao-Chung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2013-01-01

    High performance limiters are described in this paper for applications in high frequency ultrasound imaging systems. Limiters protect the ultrasound receiver from the high voltage (HV) spikes produced by the transmitter. We present a new bipolar power transistor (BPT) configuration and compare its design and performance to a diode limiter used in traditional ultrasound research and one commercially available limiter. Limiter performance depends greatly on the insertion loss (IL), total harmonic distortion (THD) and response time (RT), each of which will be evaluated in all the limiters. The results indicated that, compared with commercial limiter, BPT-based limiter had less IL (–7.7 dB), THD (–74.6 dB) and lower RT (43 ns) at 100MHz. To evaluate the capability of these limiters, they were connected to a 100 MHz single element transducer and a two-way pulse-echo test was performed. It was found that the -6 dB bandwidth and sensitivity of the transducer using BPT-based limiter were better than those of the commercial limiter by 22 % and 140 %, respectively. Compared to the commercial limiter, BPT-based limiter is shown to be capable of minimizing signal attenuation, RT and THD at high frequencies and is thus suited for high frequency ultrasound applications. PMID:24199954

  7. Harmonic engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-10-20

    A high efficiency harmonic engine based on a resonantly reciprocating piston expander that extracts work from heat and pressurizes working fluid in a reciprocating piston compressor. The engine preferably includes harmonic oscillator valves capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into and out of the expander, and also preferably includes a shunt line connecting an expansion chamber of the expander to a buffer chamber of the expander for minimizing pressure variations in the fluidic circuit of the engine. The engine is especially designed to operate with very high temperature input to the expander and very low temperature input to the compressor, to produce very high thermal conversion efficiency.

  8. Extending the ICRF to higher radio frequencies - first imaging results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fey, A. L.; Boboltz, D. A.; Charlot, P.; Fomalont, E. B.; Lanyi, G. E.; Zhang, L. D.

    2005-01-01

    We present first imaging results and source structure analysis of 65 extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of a joint NASA USNO NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory program to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The long term goals of this program are a) to develop higher frequency reference frames for improved deep space navigation b) to extend the VLBA calibrator catalog at 24 and 43 GHz c) to provide the benefit of the ICRF catalog to new applications at these higher frequencies and d) to study source structure variation at 24 and 43 GHz in order to improve the astrometric accuracy. Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  9. Multispectral mid-infrared imaging using frequency upconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nicolai; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2013-03-01

    It has recently been shown that it is possible to upconvert infrared images to the near infrared region with high quantum efficiency and low noise by three-wave mixing with a laser field [1]. If the mixing laser is single-frequency, the upconverted image is simply a band-pass filtered version of the infrared object field, with a bandwidth corresponding given by the acceptance parameter of the conversion process, and a center frequency given by the phase-match condition. Tuning of the phase-matched wavelengths has previously been demonstrated by changing the temperature [2] or angle [3 Keywords: Infrared imaging, nonlinear frequency conversion, diode lasers, upconversion ] of the nonlinear material. Unfortunately, temperature tuning is slow, and angle tuning typically results in alignment issues. Here we present a novel approach where the wavelength of the mixing field is used as a tuning parameter, allowing for fast tuning and hence potentially fast image acquisition, paving the way for upconversion based real time multispectral imaging. In the present realization the upconversion module consists of an external cavity tapered diode laser in a Littrow configuration with a computer controlled feedback grating. The output from a tunable laser is used as seed for a fiber amplifier system, boosting the power to approx. 3 W over the tuning range from 1025 to 1085 nm. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, the infrared wavelength that can be phase-matched is tunable over more than 200 nm. Using a crystal with multiple poling periods allows for upconversion within the entire transparency range of the nonlinear material.

  10. Three frequency false color image of Flevoland, the Netherlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-frequency false color image of Flevoland, the Netherlands, centered at 52.4 degrees north latitude, 5.4 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Shuttle Endeavour. The area shown covers an area approximately 25 kilometers by 28 kilometers. Flevoland, which fills the lower two-thirds of the image, is a very flat area that is made up of reclaimed land that is used for agriculture and forestry. At the top of the image, across the canal from Flevoland, is an older forest shown in red; the city of Harderwijk is shown in white on the shore of the canal. At this time of the year, the agricultural fields are bare soil, and they show up in this image in blue. The dark blue areas are water and the small dots in the canal are boats. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43941.

  11. Concealed weapons detection using low-frequency magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollars, Byron G.; Sallee, Bradley; Durrett, Michael G.; Cruce, Clay; Hallidy, William

    1997-02-01

    Military personnel, law-enforcement officers, and civilians face ever-increasing dangers from persons carrying concealed handguns and other weapons. In direct correspondence with this danger is a need for more sophisticated means of detecting concealed weapons. We have developed a novel concealed-weapons detector based on the principle of low- frequency magnetic imaging. The detector is configured as a portal, and constructs an image of electrically conductive objects transported through it with a potential spatial resolution of approximately 1 inch. Measurements on a breadboard version of the weapons detector have, to date, yielded a resolution of 2 inches. In operation, magnetic dipole radiation, emitted by transmitting antennas in the perimeter of the portal, is scattered from conductive objects and is picked up by receive antennas, also positioned around the portal. With sufficient measurements, each with a different geometry, a solution to the inverse scattering problem can be found. The result is an image of conductive objects in the detector. The detector is sensitive to all metals, semiconductors, and conductive composites. The measured conductivity image formed by the detector is combined with the video signal from a visible CCD camera to form a composite image of persons transiting the detector portal and the conductive objects they are carrying. Accompanying image recognition software could be used to determine the threat level of objects based upon shape, conductivity, and placement on the person of the carrier, and provide cueing, logging, or alarm functions to the operator if suspect weapons are identified. The low- power, low-frequency emissions from the detector are at levels considered safe to humans and medical implants..

  12. O PLIF imaging in flames using a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, Kathryn N.; Sutton, Jeffrey A.

    2014-07-01

    Spectrally-narrow- (~0.003 cm-1) and broadband (>1 cm-1) fluorescence excitation of the electronic transition of formaldehyde (CH2O) in laminar premixed and non-premixed flames is investigated using the third-harmonic output from a tunable, injection-seeded Nd:YAG laser. Spectrally-resolved, CH2O fluorescence excitation spectra are examined over a broad range of conditions including room-temperature vapor cells and lean-to-rich premixed methane/air and dimethyl ether/air flames in order to understand the origin of the fluorescence using both narrowband and broadband excitation strategies. The measured CH2O excitation spectra are nearly identical in all conditions considered which cover a broad range of composition and temperature conditions. These results imply that the predominant emission signature is CH2O and suggest the potential for quantitative in-flame CH2O LIF measurements using room-temperature calibration and existing fluorescence models. A specific emphasis of this study is on CH2O isolation and potential fluorescence interference in the context of single-shot planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging in flames. The PLIF results indicate that for the premixed flames investigated, both narrowband (Nd:YAG laser operating in single mode) and broadband (no injection seeding) excitation yield a reliable marker of the CH2O distribution, with no indication of major interference from additional species. However, frequency-tuned narrowband excitation resulted in a collected fluorescence emission signal that increased by a factor of two as compared to broadband excitation. In the methane-based non-premixed flames, evidence of the excitation of additional species (such as PAH) was noted; however, the impact of this interference is reduced when using narrowband excitation. Similar to the premixed flames, the CH2O fluorescence emission signal increased by approximately a factor of two when using spectrally tuned, narrowband excitation from the third-harmonic output of an injection-seeded Nd:YAG laser. The current results indicate that narrowband excitation of CH2O near 355 nm using the third-harmonic output of an injection-seeded Nd:YAG laser results in increased fluorescence emission signal and hence a reduced effect of interference from additional flame-generated species as compared to conventional broadband excitation using a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser.

  13. Frequency Identification of Vibration Signals Using Video Camera Image Data

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Yih-Nen; Wu, Chia-Hung

    2012-01-01

    This study showed that an image data acquisition system connecting a high-speed camera or webcam to a notebook or personal computer (PC) can precisely capture most dominant modes of vibration signal, but may involve the non-physical modes induced by the insufficient frame rates. Using a simple model, frequencies of these modes are properly predicted and excluded. Two experimental designs, which involve using an LED light source and a vibration exciter, are proposed to demonstrate the performance. First, the original gray-level resolution of a video camera from, for instance, 0 to 256 levels, was enhanced by summing gray-level data of all pixels in a small region around the point of interest. The image signal was further enhanced by attaching a white paper sheet marked with a black line on the surface of the vibration system in operation to increase the gray-level resolution. Experimental results showed that the Prosilica CV640C CMOS high-speed camera has the critical frequency of inducing the false mode at 60 Hz, whereas that of the webcam is 7.8 Hz. Several factors were proven to have the effect of partially suppressing the non-physical modes, but they cannot eliminate them completely. Two examples, the prominent vibration modes of which are less than the associated critical frequencies, are examined to demonstrate the performances of the proposed systems. In general, the experimental data show that the non-contact type image data acquisition systems are potential tools for collecting the low-frequency vibration signal of a system. PMID:23202026

  14. Time and Space Resolved High Harmonic Imaging of Electron Tunnelling from Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.

    2009-05-01

    High harmonic generation in intense laser fields carries the promise of combining sub-Angstrom spatial and attosecond temporal resolution of electronic structures and dynamics in molecules, see e.g. [1-3]. High harmonic emission occurs when an electron detached from a molecule by an intense laser field recombines with the parent ion [4]. Similar to Young's double-slit experiment, recombination to several ``lobes'' of the same molecular orbital can produce interference minima and maxima in harmonic intensities [1]. These minima (maxima) carry structural information -- they occur when the de-Broglie wavelength of the recombining electron matches distances between the centers. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that amplitude minima (maxima) in the harmonic spectra can also have dynamical origin, reflecting multi-electron dynamics in the molecule. We use high harmonic spectra to record this dynamics and reconstruct the position of the hole left in the molecule after ionization. Experimental data are consistent with the hole starting in different places as the ionization dynamics changes from tunnelling to the multi-photon regime. Importantly, hole localization and subsequent attosecond dynamics are induced even in the tunnelling limit. Thus, even ``static'' tunnelling induced by a tip of a tunnelling microscope will generate similar attosecond dynamics in a sample. We anticipate that our approach will become standard in disentangling spatial and temporal information from high harmonic spectra of molecules.[4pt] In collaboration with Serguei Patchkovskii, National Research Council, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada; Yann Mairesse, NRC Canada and CELIA, Universit'e Bordeaux I, UMR 5107 (CNRS, Bordeaux 1, CEA), 351 Cours de la Lib'eration, 33405 Talence Cedex, France; Nirit Dudovich, NRC Canada and Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel; David Villeneuve, Paul Corkum, NRC Canada; and Misha Yu. Ivanov, NRC Canada and Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London SW7 2BW, United Kingdom. [4pt] [1] Lein, M., et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 183903 (2002).[0pt] [2] Itatani, J. et al. Nature 432, 834 (2004).[0pt] [3] Baker, S. et al Science 312, 424 (2006).[0pt] [4] Corkum, P. B.Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 1994 (1993).

  15. Optimum frequency for subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, most conventional synthetic-aperture radars operate at higher microwave frequencies which do not significantly penetrate below the soil surface. This study attempts to provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. Since the radar return from a buried object must compete with the return from surface clutter, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell's equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Initial results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30 MHz), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper vhf through uhf spectrum ([approximately]100 MHz--1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  16. High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging of Cancerous Lymph Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Coron, Alain; Hata, Masaki; Machi, Junji; Yanagihara, Eugene; Laugier, Pascal; Feleppa, Ernest J.

    2009-07-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) offers a means of investigating biological tissue at the microscopic level. High-frequency, quantitative-ultrasound (QUS) methods were developed to characterize freshly-dissected lymph nodes of cancer patients. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound data were acquired from lymph nodes using a 25.6-MHz center-frequency transducer. Each node was inked prior to 3D histological fixation to recover orientation after sectioning. Backscattered echo signals were processed to yield two QUS estimates associated with tissue microstructure: scatterer size and acoustic concentration. The QUS estimates were computed following established methods using a Gaussian scattering model. Four lymph nodes from a patient with stage-3 colon cancer were evaluated as an illustrative case. QUS images were generated for this patient by expressing QUS estimates as color-encoded pixels and overlaying them on conventional gray-scale B-mode images. The single metastatic node had an average scatterer size that was significantly larger than the average scatterer size of the other nodes, and the statistics of both QUS estimates in the metastatic node showed greater variance than the statistics of the other nodes. Results indicate that the methods may provide a useful means of identifying small metastatic foci in dissected lymph nodes that might not be detectable using current standard pathology procedures.

  17. Coherent Raman spectro-imaging with laser frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqu, Nathalie; Hnsch, Theodor W

    2013-10-17

    Advances in optical spectroscopy and microscopy have had a profound impact throughout the physical, chemical and biological sciences. One example is coherent Raman spectroscopy, a versatile technique interrogating vibrational transitions in molecules. It offers high spatial resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capabilities that make it a label-free tool for the non-destructive and chemically selective probing of complex systems. Indeed, single-colour Raman bands have been imaged in biological tissue at video rates by using ultra-short-pulse lasers. However, identifying multiple, and possibly unknown, molecules requires broad spectral bandwidth and high resolution. Moderate spectral spans combined with high-speed acquisition are now within reach using multichannel detection or frequency-swept laser beams. Laser frequency combs are finding increasing use for broadband molecular linear absorption spectroscopy. Here we show, by exploring their potential for nonlinear spectroscopy, that they can be harnessed for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and spectro-imaging. The method uses two combs and can simultaneously measure, on the microsecond timescale, all spectral elements over a wide bandwidth and with high resolution on a single photodetector. Although the overall measurement time in our proof-of-principle experiments is limited by the waiting times between successive spectral acquisitions, this limitation can be overcome with further system development. We therefore expect that our approach of using laser frequency combs will not only enable new applications for nonlinear microscopy but also benefit other nonlinear spectroscopic techniques. PMID:24132293

  18. Coherent Raman spectro-imaging with laser frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqu, Nathalie; Hnsch, Theodor W.

    2013-10-01

    Advances in optical spectroscopy and microscopy have had a profound impact throughout the physical, chemical and biological sciences. One example is coherent Raman spectroscopy, a versatile technique interrogating vibrational transitions in molecules. It offers high spatial resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capabilities that make it a label-free tool for the non-destructive and chemically selective probing of complex systems. Indeed, single-colour Raman bands have been imaged in biological tissue at video rates by using ultra-short-pulse lasers. However, identifying multiple, and possibly unknown, molecules requires broad spectral bandwidth and high resolution. Moderate spectral spans combined with high-speed acquisition are now within reach using multichannel detection or frequency-swept laser beams. Laser frequency combs are finding increasing use for broadband molecular linear absorption spectroscopy. Here we show, by exploring their potential for nonlinear spectroscopy, that they can be harnessed for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and spectro-imaging. The method uses two combs and can simultaneously measure, on the microsecond timescale, all spectral elements over a wide bandwidth and with high resolution on a single photodetector. Although the overall measurement time in our proof-of-principle experiments is limited by the waiting times between successive spectral acquisitions, this limitation can be overcome with further system development. We therefore expect that our approach of using laser frequency combs will not only enable new applications for nonlinear microscopy but also benefit other nonlinear spectroscopic techniques.

  19. Linewidth of the harmonics in a microwave frequency comb generated by focusing a mode-locked ultrafast laser on a tunneling junction

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, Mark J.; Stenger, Frank S.; Yarotski, Dmitry A.

    2013-12-14

    Previous analyses suggest that microwave frequency combs (MFCs) with harmonics having extremely narrow linewidths could be produced by photodetection with a mode-locked ultrafast laser. In the MFC generated by focusing a passively mode-locked ultrafast laser on a tunneling junction, 200 harmonics from 74.254?MHz to 14.85?GHz have reproducible measured linewidths approximating the 1?Hz resolution bandwidth (RBW) of the spectrum analyzer. However, in new measurements at a RBW of 0.1?Hz, the linewidths are distributed from 0.12 to 1.17?Hz. Measurements and analysis suggest that, because the laser is not stabilized, the stochastic drift in the pulse repetition rate is the cause for the distribution in measured linewidths. It appears that there are three cases in which the RBW is (1) greater than, (2) less than, or (3) comparable with the intrinsic linewidth. The measured spectra in the third class are stochastic and may show two or more peaks at a single harmonic.

  20. Brillouin-zone integration schemes: an efficiency study for the phonon frequency moments of the harmonic, solid, one-component plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, R.C.; Gubernatis, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The efficiency of four different Brillouin-zone integration schemes including the uniform mesh, special point method, special directions method, and Holas method are compared for calculating moments of the harmonic phonon frequencies of the solid one-component plasma. Very accurate values for the moments are also presented. The Holas method for which weights and integration points can easily be generated has roughly the same efficiency as the special directions method, which is much superior to the uniform mesh and special point methods for this problem.

  1. Spatial-frequency-based metric for image superresolution.

    PubMed

    Woods, Matthew; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K

    2015-11-01

    The image processing technique known as superresolution (SR) has the potential to allow engineers to specify lower resolution and, therefore, less expensive cameras for a given task by enhancing the base camera's resolution. This is especially true in the remote detection and classification of objects in the environment, such as aircraft or human faces. Performing each of these tasks requires a minimum image "sharpness" which is quantified by a maximum resolvable spatial frequency, which is, in turn, a function of the camera optics, pixel sampling density, and signal-to-noise ratio. Much of the existing SR literature focuses on SR performance metrics for candidate algorithms, such as perceived image quality or peak SNR. These metrics can be misleading because they also credit deblurring and/or denoising in addition to true SR. In this paper, we propose a new, task-based metric where the performance of an SR algorithm is, instead, directly tied to the probability of successfully detecting critical spatial frequencies within the scene. PMID:26560915

  2. Multitone harmonic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Martone, Anthony F.

    2013-05-01

    Nonlinear radar exploits the electronic response from a target whose reflected frequencies are different from those transmitted. Reception of frequencies that are not part of the transmitted probe distinguishes the received signal from a linear return produced by clutter and indicates the presence of electronics. Presented in this paper is a type of nonlinear radar that transmits multiple frequencies and listens for a harmonic of these frequencies as well as other frequencies near that harmonic. A laboratory test-bed has been constructed to demonstrate the multitone radar concept. Measurements of nonlinear responses from RF devices probed by multiple tones are reported.

  3. Detecting structural information of scatterers using spatial frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Krauter, Philipp; Nothelfer, Steffen; Foschum, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Liemert, Andr; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate optical phantom experiments on the phase function parameter ? using spatial frequency domain imaging. The incorporation of two different types of scattering particles allows for control of the optical phantoms' microscopic scattering properties. By laterally structuring areas with either TiO2 or Al2O3 scattering particles, we were able to obtain almost pure subdiffusive scattering contrast in a single optical phantom. Optical parameter mapping was then achieved using an analytical radiative transfer model revealing the microscopic structural contrast on a macroscopic field of view. As part of our study, we explain several correction and referencing techniques for high spatial frequency analysis and experimentally study the sampling depth of the subdiffusive parameter ?.

  4. High Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging of Solid Tumors in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelze, M. L.; O'Brien, W. D.; Zachary, J. F.

    A mammary carcinoma and a sarcoma were grown in mice and imaged with ultrasound transducers operating with a center frequency of 20 MHz. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) analysis was used to characterize the tumors using the bandwidth of 10 to 25 MHz. Initial QUS estimates of the scatterer properties (average scatterer diameter and acoustic concentration) did not reveal differences between the two kinds of tumors. Examination of the tumors using light microscopy indicated definite structural differences between the two kinds of tumors. In order to draw out the structural differences with ultrasound, a higher frequency probe (center frequency measured at 70 MHz) was used to interrogate the two kinds of tumors and new models were applied to the QUS analysis. QUS scatterer diameter images of the tumors were constructed using the high frequency probe. Several models for scattering were implemented to obtain estimates of scatterer properties in order to relate estimated scatterer properties to real tissue microstructure. The Anderson model for scattering from a fluid-filled sphere differentiated the two kinds of tumors but did not yield scatterer property estimates that resembled underlying structure. Using the Anderson model, the average estimated scatterer diameters were 25.5 0.14 ?m for the carcinoma and 57.5 2.90 for the sarcoma. A new cell model was developed, which was based on scattering from a cell by incorporating the effects of the cytoskeleton and nucleus. The new cell model yielded estimates that appeared to reflect underlying structure more accurately but did not separate the two kinds of tumors. Using the new cell model, the average estimated scatterer diameters were 15.6 2.2 ?m for the carcinoma and 16.8 3.82 ?m for the sarcoma. The new cell model yielded estimates close to the actual nuclear diameter of the cell (13 ?m)

  5. Evanescent-wave-induced frequency shift for optical superresolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiang; Kuang, Cuifang; Li, Yanghui; Liu, Xu

    2013-07-15

    We propose a method to enhance the resolution and break the diffraction limit. The superresolution imaging is realized by incorporating total internal reflection (TIR) illumination with a passive spatial frequency shift mechanism. Meanwhile, TIR supplies a surface field with a limited penetration depth, which demonstrates that the axial resolution can be improved simultaneously. The superresolution capability is confirmed both theoretically and experimentally. Compared with microfiber-based former work, this idea possesses promising merits, providing a wider viewing field and a simpler configuration for variable illumination orientations, thereby implying abundant application potentials. PMID:23939079

  6. Focused high frequency needle transducer for ultrasonic imaging and trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Zhou, Qifa; Kirk Shung, K.

    2012-07-01

    A miniature focused needle transducer (<1 mm) was fabricated using the press-focusing technique. The measured pulse-echo waveform showed the transducer had center frequency of 57.5 MHz with 54% bandwidth and 14 dB insertion loss. To evaluate the performance of this type of transducer, invitro ultrasonic biomicroscopy imaging on the rabbit eye was obtained. Moreover, a single beam acoustic trapping experiment was performed using this transducer. Trapping of targeted particle size smaller than the ultrasonic wavelength was observed. Potential applications of these devices include minimally invasive measurements of retinal blood flow and single beam acoustic trapping of microparticles.

  7. Harmonic vibrational frequencies: scale factors for pure, hybrid, hybrid meta, and double-hybrid functionals in conjunction with correlation consistent basis sets.

    PubMed

    Laury, Marie L; Boesch, Scott E; Haken, Ian; Sinha, Pankaj; Wheeler, Ralph A; Wilson, Angela K

    2011-08-01

    Scale factors for (a) low (<1000 cm(-1)) and high harmonic vibrational frequencies, (b) thermal contributions to enthalpy and entropy, and (c) zero-point vibrational energies have been determined for five hybrid functionals (B3P86, B3PW91, PBE1PBE, BH&HLYP, MPW1K), five pure functionals (BLYP, BPW91, PBEPBE, HCTH93, and BP86), four hybrid meta functionals (M05, M05-2X, M06, and M06-2X) and one double-hybrid functional (B2GP-PLYP) in combination with the correlation consistent basis sets [cc-pVnZ and aug-cc-pVnZ, n = D(2),T(3),Q(4)]. Calculations for vibrational frequencies were carried out on 41 organic molecules and an additional set of 22 small molecules was used for the zero-point vibrational energy scale factors. Before scaling, approximately 25% of the calculated frequencies were within 3% of experimental frequencies. Upon application of the derived scale factors, nearly 90% of the calculated frequencies deviated less than 3% from the experimental frequencies for all of the functionals when the augmented correlation consistent basis sets were used. PMID:21598273

  8. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki H. (Lafayette, CA); Xie, Gan Q. (Berkeley, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The traveltimes corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter .alpha. for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography.

  9. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lee, K.H.; Xie, G.Q.

    1994-12-13

    A method is described for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The travel times corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter [alpha] for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography. 13 figures.

  10. Extended Finite Element Method with Simplified Spherical Harmonics Approximation for the Forward Model of Optical Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yi, Huangjian; Zhang, Qitan; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin

    2012-01-01

    An extended finite element method (XFEM) for the forward model of 3D optical molecular imaging is developed with simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SPN). In XFEM scheme of SPN equations, the signed distance function is employed to accurately represent the internal tissue boundary, and then it is used to construct the enriched basis function of the finite element scheme. Therefore, the finite element calculation can be carried out without the time-consuming internal boundary mesh generation. Moreover, the required overly fine mesh conforming to the complex tissue boundary which leads to excess time cost can be avoided. XFEM conveniences its application to tissues with complex internal structure and improves the computational efficiency. Phantom and digital mouse experiments were carried out to validate the efficiency of the proposed method. Compared with standard finite element method and classical Monte Carlo (MC) method, the validation results show the merits and potential of the XFEM for optical imaging. PMID:23227108

  11. Monitoring the effect of low-level laser therapy in healing process of skin with second harmonic generation imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoman; Yu, Biying; Weng, Cuncheng; Li, Hui

    2014-11-01

    The 632nm wavelength low intensity He-Ne laser was used to irradiated on 15 mice which had skin wound. The dynamic changes and wound healing processes were observed with nonlinear spectral imaging technology. We observed that:(1)The wound healing process was accelerated by the low-level laser therapy(LLLT);(2)The new tissues produced second harmonic generation (SHG) signals. Collagen content and microstructure differed dramatically at different time pointed along the wound healing. Our observation shows that the low intensity He-Ne laser irradiation can accelerate the healing process of skin wound in mice, and SHG imaging technique can be used to observe wound healing process, which is useful for quantitative characterization of wound status during wound healing process.

  12. Label-free imaging of basement membranes differentiates normal, precancerous, and cancerous colonic tissues by second-harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Yan, Jun; Chen, Gang; Shi, Hong; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Lu, Jianping; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen

    2012-01-01

    Since changes in the basement membranes are the critical indicators for differentiating normal, precancerous, and cancerous colonic tissues, direct visualization of these warning signs is essential for the early diagnosis and treatment of colonic cancer. Here, we present that second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy can probe the changes of basement membranes in different colonic cancer stages. Our results also show the capability of using the quantitative analyses of images for quantifying these changes in different cancer stages. These results suggest that SHG microscopy has the potential in label-freely imaging the changes of basement membranes for effectively distinguishing between normal, precancerous, and cancerous colonic tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the dynamics of basement membrane changes in different colonic cancer stages using entirely intrinsic source of contrast. PMID:22715404

  13. Time-frequency analysis of functional optical mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Randall L.; Graber, Harry L.; Schmitz, Christoph H.; Tarantini, Frank; Khoury, Georges; Naar, David J.; Panetta, Thomas F.; Lewis, Theophilus; Pei, Yaling

    2003-07-01

    We have introduced working technology that provides for time-series imaging of the hemoglobin signal in large tissue structures. In this study we have explored our ability to detect aberrant time-frequency responses of breast vasculature for subjects with Stage II breast cancer at rest and in response to simple provocations. The hypothesis being explored is that time-series imaging will be sensitive to the known structural and functional malformations of the tumor vasculature. Mammographic studies were conducted using an adjustable hemisheric measuring head containing 21 source and 21 detector locations (441 source-detector pairs). Simultaneous dual-wavelength studies were performed at 760 and 830 nm at a framing rate of ~2.7 Hz. Optical measures were performed on women lying prone with the breast hanging in a pendant position. Two class of measures were performed: (1) 20- minute baseline measure wherein the subject was at rest; (2) provocation studies wherein the subject was asked to perform some simple breathing maneuvers. Collected data were analyzed to identify the time-frequency structure and central tendencies of the detector responses and those of the image time series. Imaging data were generated using the Normalized Difference Method (Pei et al., Appl. Opt. 40, 5755-5769, 2001). Results obtained clearly document three classes of anomalies when compared to the normal contralateral breast. 1) Breast tumors exhibit altered oxygen supply/demand imbalance in response to an oxidative challenge (breath hold). 2) The vasomotor response of the tumor vasculature is mainly depressed and exhibits an altered modulation. 3) The affected area of the breast wherein the altered vasomotor signature is seen extends well beyond the limits of the tumor itself.

  14. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  15. Imaging interplanetary CMEs at radio frequency from solar polar orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Hao; Yan, Jingye; Wang, Chi; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Shui

    2011-09-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) represent a great concentration of mass and energy input into the lower corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions change in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, observations of CMEs are important for understanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. This paper discusses a proposed mission, the Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) mission, which will observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs to distances of near 0.35 AU from the Sun. The orbit of SPORT is an elliptical solar polar orbit. The inclination angle between the orbit and ecliptic plane should be about 90°. The main payload on board SPORT will be an imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band (radio telescope), which can follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs. The images that are obtained by the radio telescope embody the brightness temperature of the objectives. Due to the very large size required for the antenna aperture of the radio telescope, we adopt interferometric imaging technology to reduce it. Interferometric imaging technology is based on indirect spatial frequency domain measurements plus Fourier transformation. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind ion instrument, an energetic particle detector, a magnetometer, a wave detector and a solar radio burst spectrometer.

  16. Fast 3D subsurface imaging with stepped-frequency GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarik, Matthew P.; Burns, Joseph; Thelen, Brian T.; Sutter, Lena

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates an algorithm for forming 3D images of the subsurface using stepped-frequency GPR data. The algorithm is specifically designed for a handheld GPR and therefore accounts for the irregular sampling pattern in the data and the spatially-variant air-ground interface by estimating an effective "ground-plane" and then registering the data to the plane. The algorithm efficiently solves the 4th-order polynomial for the Snell reflection points using a fully vectorized iterative scheme. The forward operator is implemented efficiently using an accelerated nonuniform FFT (Greengard and Lee, 2004); the adjoint operator is implemented efficiently using an interpolation step coupled with an upsampled FFT. The imaging is done as a linearized version of the full inverse problem, which is regularized using a sparsity constraint to reduce sidelobes and therefore improve image localization. Applying an appropriate sparsity constraint, the algorithm is able to eliminate most the surrounding clutter and sidelobes, while still rendering valuable image properties such as shape and size. The algorithm is applied to simulated data, controlled experimental data (made available by Dr. Waymond Scott, Georgia Institute of Technology), and government-provided data with irregular sampling and air-ground interface.

  17. Space-frequency quantization for image compression with directionlets.

    PubMed

    Velisavljevi?, Vladan; Beferull-Lozano, Baltasar; Vetterli, Martin

    2007-07-01

    The standard separable 2-D wavelet transform (WT) has recently achieved a great success in image processing because it provides a sparse representation of smooth images. However, it fails to efficiently capture 1-D discontinuities, like edges or contours. These features, being elongated and characterized by geometrical regularity along different directions, intersect and generate many large magnitude wavelet coefficients. Since contours are very important elements in the visual perception of images, to provide a good visual quality of compressed images, it is fundamental to preserve good reconstruction of these directional features. In our previous work, we proposed a construction of critically sampled perfect reconstruction transforms with directional vanishing moments imposed in the corresponding basis functions along different directions, called directionlets. In this paper, we show how to design and implement a novel efficient space-frequency quantization (SFQ) compression algorithm using directionlets. Our new compression method outperforms the standard SFQ in a rate-distortion sense, both in terms of mean-square error and visual quality, especially in the low-rate compression regime. We also show that our compression method, does not increase the order of computational complexity as compared to the standard SFQ algorithm. PMID:17605375

  18. Reconstruction of sectional images in frequency-domain based photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Banghe; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2011-11-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is based upon the generation of an ultrasound pulse arising from subsurface tissue absorption due to pulsed laser excitation, and measurement of its surface time-of-arrival. Expensive and bulky pulsed lasers with high peak fluence powers may provide shortcomings for applications of PA imaging in medicine and biology. These limitations may be overcome with the frequency-domain PA measurements, which employ modulated rather than pulsed light to generate the acoustic wave. In this contribution, we model the single modulation frequency based PA pressures on the measurement plane through the diffraction approximation and then employ a convolution approach to reconstruct the sectional image slices. The results demonstrate that the proposed method with appropriate data post-processing is capable of recovering sectional images while suppressing the defocused noise resulting from the other sections. PMID:22109207

  19. Molecular structure, Normal Coordinate Analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies, Natural Bond Orbital, TD-DFT calculations and biological activity analysis of antioxidant drug 7-hydroxycoumarin.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, S; Sylvestre, S; Jayarajan, D; Amalanathan, M; Oudayakumar, K; Gnanapoongothai, T; Jayavarthanan, T

    2013-01-15

    In this work, we report harmonic vibrational frequencies, molecular structure, NBO and HOMO, LUMO analysis of Umbelliferone also known as 7-hydroxycoumarin (7HC). The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by computation (monomer and dimmer) shows good agreement with experimental XRD data. Harmonic frequencies of 7HC were determined and analyzed by DFT utilizing 6-311+G(d,p) as basis set. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) following the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field Methodology (SQMFF). The change in electron density (ED) in the ?* and ?* antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyperconjugation of hydrogen-bonded interaction. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) complements with the experimental findings. The simulated spectra satisfactorily coincides with the experimental spectra. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi and Enterococcus faecalis. PMID:23123244

  20. Detecting vocal fatigue in student singers using acoustic measures of mean fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonics-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisakun, Siphan

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the ability of four acoustic parameters, mean fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonics-to-noise ratio, to detect vocal fatigue in student singers. The participants are 15 voice students, who perform two distinct tasks, data collection task and vocal fatiguing task. The data collection task includes the sustained vowel /a/, reading a standard passage, and self-rate on a vocal fatigue form. The vocal fatiguing task is the vocal practice of musical scores for a total of 45 minutes. The four acoustic parameters are extracted using the software EZVoicePlus. The data analyses are performed to answer eight research questions. The first four questions relate to correlations of the self-rating scale and each of the four parameters. The next four research questions relate to differences in the parameters over time using one-factor repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). The result yields a proposed acoustic profile of vocal fatigue in student singers. This profile is characterized by increased fundamental frequency; slightly decreased jitter; slightly decreased shimmer; and slightly increased harmonics-to-noise ratio. The proposed profile requires further investigation.

  1. Molecular structure, Normal Coordinate Analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies, Natural Bond Orbital, TD-DFT calculations and biological activity analysis of antioxidant drug 7-hydroxycoumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, S.; Sylvestre, S.; Jayarajan, D.; Amalanathan, M.; Oudayakumar, K.; Gnanapoongothai, T.; Jayavarthanan, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report harmonic vibrational frequencies, molecular structure, NBO and HOMO, LUMO analysis of Umbelliferone also known as 7-hydroxycoumarin (7HC). The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by computation (monomer and dimmer) shows good agreement with experimental XRD data. Harmonic frequencies of 7HC were determined and analyzed by DFT utilizing 6-311+G(d,p) as basis set. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) following the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field Methodology (SQMFF). The change in electron density (ED) in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyperconjugation of hydrogen-bonded interaction. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) complements with the experimental findings. The simulated spectra satisfactorily coincides with the experimental spectra. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi and Enterococcus faecalis.

  2. Fiber-feedback optical parametric oscillator for half-harmonic generation of sub-100-fs frequency combs around 2 ?m.

    PubMed

    Ingold, Kirk A; Marandi, Alireza; Digonnet, Michel J F; Byer, Robert L

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate a femtosecond fiber-feedback optical parametric oscillator (OPO) at degeneracy. The OPO cavity comprises an 80-cm-long fiber composed of a combination of normal and anomalous dispersion sections that provide a net intracavity group delay dispersion close to zero. By using a mode-locked, Yb-doped fiber laser as the pump, we achieved half-harmonic generation of 250-MHz, 1.2-nJ nearly transform-limited 97-fs pulses centered at 2090 nm with a total conversion efficiency of 36%. PMID:26371938

  3. Minimally invasive multiphoton and harmonic generation imaging of extracellular matrix structures in lung airway and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Thomas; Hirota, Jeremy A; Wadsworth, Samuel; Knight, Darryl A

    2011-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become a powerful imaging method for minimally invasive evaluation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and cellular structures deep within tissues in their native environments. This technology, which uses ultra-short femto-second laser pulses as the excitation source, is efficient in multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF) of endogenously fluorescent macromolecular systems and induction of highly specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from non-centrosymmetric macromolecules such as fibrillar collagens. Both these signals can be captured simultaneously to provide spatially resolved 3D structural organization of ECM as well as cellular morphologies in lung or airway tissue with spectral specificity and sensitivity. These imaging modalities are minimally invasive since structures deep within tissues can be visualized without the need for tissue fixation and/or sectioning. Much of the traditional histological and chemical procedures associated with conventional microscopy methods, which may alter native structure of lung tissue samples, can be circumvented to generate more accurate 3D morphological and fine structural information. In addition to outlining basic principles associated with MPEF and SHG microscopy methods, this review reports potential uses of these high resolution imaging modalities in lung structural imaging. We place special emphasis on imaging 3D structural features of airways, visualizing and quantifying ECM remodeling associated with mouse asthma model as well as the potential uses for multiphoton microscopy in in vitro airway applications. PMID:21497667

  4. Label-free and real-time imaging of dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes in cellular nucleus using second harmonic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes have been probed for the first time with the use of second harmonic microscopy. Unlike conventional approaches, second harmonic microscopy provides a label-free and real-time approach to detect DNA conformational changes. Upon dehydration, cellular DNA undergoes a transition from B- to A-form, whereas cellular nuclei change from invisible to visible under second harmonic microscopy. These results showed that DNA is a second order nonlinear optical material. We further confirmed this by characterizing the nonlinear optical properties of extracted DNA from human cells. Our findings open a new path for SHG imaging. DNA can change its conformations under many circumstances. For example: normal cells turning into cancerous cells and drug molecules binding with DNA. Therefore, the detection of DNA conformational changes with second harmonic microscopy will be a useful tool in cancer therapy and new drug discovery.

  5. Interferometric SAR imaging by transmitting stepped frequency chaotic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Gu, Xiang; Zhai, Wenshuai; Dong, Xiao; Shi, Xiaojin; Kang, Xueyan

    2015-10-01

    Noise radar has been applied in many fields since it was proposed more than 50 years ago. However, it has not been applied to interferometric SAR imaging yet as far as we know. This paper introduces our recent work on interferometric noise radar. An interferometric SAR system was developed which can transmit both chirp signal and chaotic noise signal (CNS) at multiple carrier frequencies. An airborne experiment with this system by transmitting both signals was carried out, and the data were processed to show the capability of interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The results shows that although the interferometric phase quality of CNS is degraded due to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is lower compared with that of chirp signal, we still can get satisfied DEM after multi-looking processing. Another work of this paper is to apply compressed sensing (CS) theory to the interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The CS theory states that if a signal is sparse, then it can be accurately reconstructed with much less sampled data than that regularly required according to Nyquist Sampling Theory. To form a structured random matrix, if the transmitted signal is of fixed waveform, then random subsampling is needed. However, if the transmitted signal is of random waveform, then only uniform subsampling is needed. This is another advantage of noise signal. Both the interferometric phase images and the DEMs by regular method and by CS method are processed with results compared. It is shown that the degradation of interferometric phases due to subsampling is larger than that of amplitude image.

  6. Imaging nonadiabatic laser-driven electron transient localization through high-order harmonic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michelle; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Becker, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Theoretical predictions and indirect experimental observation hint that electrons within molecular systems can undergo highly nonadiabatic and transient localization on a sub-field cycle timescale. Direct observation of this rapid behavior is experimentally challenging, but would enable insights into laser-driven electron behavior on an attosecond time scale. In this theoretical study, we present and analyze signatures of intramolecular electron dynamics imprinted upon the molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHOHG) and above threshold ionization spectra of H2+driven by mid-infrared wavelength light at moderate intensity and extended internuclear distances. We relate structural minima within the MHOHG spectrum and non-odd harmonic generation to electron dynamics at the time of ionization, demonstrating that the transient localization of the electron upon the counterintuitive nucleus results in the modulation of the radiated signal, allowing for the tracking of electron dynamics with sub-field cycle temporal resolution. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER16103), and the U.S. National Science Foundation (Graduate Research Fellowship, Grants No. PHY-1125844 and No. PHY-1068706).

  7. Direct imaging of radio-frequency modes via traveling wave magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonyushkin, A.; Deelchand, D. K.; Van de Moortele, P.-F.; Adriany, G.; Kiruluta, A.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an experimental method for direct 2D and 3D imaging of magnetic radio-frequency (rf) field distribution in metal-dielectric structures based on traveling wave (TW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (>7 T). The typical apparatus would include an ultra-high field whole body or small bore MRI scanner, waveguide elements filled with MRI active dielectrics with predefined electric and magnetic properties, and TW rf transmit-receive probes. We validated the technique by obtaining TW MR images of the magnetic field distribution of the rf modes of circular waveguide filled with deionized water in a 16.4 T small-bore MRI scanner and compared the MR images with numerical simulations. Our MRI technique opens up a practical non-perturbed way of imaging of previously inaccessible rf field distribution of modes inside various shapes metal waveguides with inserted dielectric objects, including waveguide mode converters and transformers.

  8. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Corrado; J.E. Bondaryk; V. Godino

    1998-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and Ieaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containment in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify a technique(s) for inspection of inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary. Acoustic imaging has been identified as one of these potential techniques. A numerical feasibility study investigated the use of high-frequency bistatic acoustic imaging techniques for inspection of inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary of nuclear power plant containment. The range-dependent version of the OASES Code developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was utilized to perform a series of numerical simulations. OASES is a well developed and extensively tested code for evaluation of the acoustic field in a system of stratified fluid and/or elastic layers. Using the code, an arbitrary number of fluid or solid elastic layers are interleaved, with the outer layers modeled as halfspaces. High frequency vibrational sources were modeled to simulate elastic waves in the steel. The received field due to an arbitrary source array can be calculated at arbitrary depth and range positions. In this numerical study, waves that reflect and scatter from surface roughness caused by modeled degradations (e.g., corrosion) are detected and used to identify and map the steel degradation. Variables in the numerical study included frequency, flaw size, interrogation distance, and sensor incident angle.Based on these analytical simulations, it is considered unlikely that acoustic imaging technology can be used to investigate embedded steel liners of reinforced concrete containment. The thin steel liner and high signal losses to the concrete make this application difficult. Results for portions of steel containment embedded in concrete are more encouraging in that they indicate that the intrinsic backscatter from degradations representing thickness reductions from 10 to 80% the shell thickness are sufficient to permit detection. It is recommended that a controlled experimental program be conducted in which sensor levels are calibrated against degradations to determine if current sensor technology can input sufficient power into the system to provide return levels within the dynamic range of the receivers.

  9. Multi-view second-harmonic generation imaging of mouse tail tendon via reflective micro-prisms.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bruce; Campbell, Kirby R; Cox, Benjamin L; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Superfine, Richard; Campagnola, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    Here we experimentally show that second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging is not sensitive to collagen fibers oriented parallel to the direction of laser propagation and, as a consequence, can potentially miss important structural information. As an alternative approach, we demonstrate the use of reflective micro-prisms to enable multi-view SHG imaging of mouse tail tendon by redirecting the focused excitation and collection of subsequent emission. Our approach data corroborates the theoretical treatment on vanishing and nonvanishing orientations, where fibers along the laser direction are largely transparent by SHG. In strong contrast, the two-photon excited fluorescence of dye-labeled collagen fibers is isotropic and is not subject to this constraint. We utilized Pearson correlation to quantify differences in fluorescent and backward detected SHG images of the tendon fiber structure, where the SHG and TPEF were highly statistically correlated (0.6-0.8) for perpendicular excitation but were uncorrelated for excitation parallel to the fiber axis. The results suggest that improved imaging of 3D collagen structure is possible with multi-view SHG microscopy. PMID:26125402

  10. Coupled third-order simplified spherical harmonics and diffusion equation-based fluorescence tomographic imaging of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Sun, Fangfang; Yang, Defu; Liang, Jimin

    2015-09-01

    For fluorescence tomographic imaging of small animals, the liver is usually regarded as a low-scattering tissue and is surrounded by adipose, kidneys, and heart, all of which have a high scattering property. This leads to a breakdown of the diffusion equation (DE)-based reconstruction method as well as a heavy computational burden for the simplified spherical harmonics equation (SPN). Coupling the SPN and DE provides a perfect balance between the imaging accuracy and computational burden. The coupled third-order SPN and DE (CSDE)-based reconstruction method is developed for fluorescence tomographic imaging. This is achieved by doubly using the CSDE for the excitation and emission processes of the fluorescence propagation. At the same time, the finite-element method and hybrid multilevel regularization strategy are incorporated in inverse reconstruction. The CSDE-based reconstruction method is first demonstrated with a digital mouse-based liver cancer simulation, which reveals superior performance compared with the SPN and DE-based methods. It is more accurate than the DE-based method and has lesser computational burden than the SPN-based method. The feasibility of the proposed approach in applications of in vivo studies is also illustrated with a liver cancer mouse-based in situ experiment, revealing its potential application in whole-body imaging of small animals.

  11. Coupled third-order simplified spherical harmonics and diffusion equation-based fluorescence tomographic imaging of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueli; Sun, Fangfang; Yang, Defu; Liang, Jimin

    2015-09-01

    For fluorescence tomographic imaging of small animals, the liver is usually regarded as a low-scattering tissue and is surrounded by adipose, kidneys, and heart, all of which have a high scattering property. This leads to a breakdown of the diffusion equation (DE)based reconstruction method as well as a heavy computational burden for the simplified spherical harmonics equation (SP(N)). Coupling the SP(N) and DE provides a perfect balance between the imaging accuracy and computational burden. The coupled third-order SPN and DE (CSDE)-based reconstruction method is developed for fluorescence tomographic imaging. This is achieved by doubly using the CSDE for the excitation and emission processes of the fluorescence propagation. At the same time, the finite-element method and hybrid multilevel regularization strategy are incorporated in inverse reconstruction. The CSDE-based reconstruction method is first demonstrated with a digital mouse-based liver cancer simulation, which reveals superior performance compared with the SPN and DE-based methods. It is more accurate than the DE-based method and has lesser computational burden than the SPN-based method. The feasibility of the proposed approach in applications of in vivo studies is also illustrated with a liver cancer mouse-based in situ experiment, revealing its potential application in whole-body imaging of small animals. PMID:26385654

  12. Harmonic Golay coded excitation based on harmonic quadrature demodulation method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Min; Song, Jae-Hee; Song, Tai-Kyong

    2008-01-01

    Harmonic coded excitation techniques have been used to increase SNR of harmonic imaging with limited peak voltage. Harmonic Golay coded excitation, in particular, generates each scan line using four transmit-receive cycles, unlike conventional Golay coded excitation method, thus resulting in low frame rates. In this paper we propose a method of increasing the frame rate of said method without impacting the image quality. The proposed method performs two transmit-receive cycles using QPSK code to ensure that the harmonic components of incoming signals are Golay coded and uses harmonic quadrature demodulation to extract compressed second harmonic component only. The proposed method has been validated through mathematical analysis and MATLAB simulation, and has been verified to yield a limited error of -52.08dB compared to the ideal case. Therefore, the proposed method doubles the frame rate compared to the existing harmonic Golay coded excitation method without significantly deteriorating the image quality. PMID:19164018

  13. Tracking harmonic notch filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emo, Frederick L.

    1990-07-01

    Disclosed in this patent is an electronic filter for automatically tracking and removing harmonically related interfering electrical signals such as power line interference harmonics without attenuating other signals of interest even though the signals are frequency stable and/or near the interference signal frequencies. The filter comprises a very narrow band electronic commutated capacitor-bank comb-notch filter driven by a counter/decoder circuit which is in turn driven by a phase locked loop. The filter also comprises two narrow band analog filters tuned to the two lowest harmonics of the interfering signal and drives the comb-notch at unit multiples of the fundamental of the interference frequency. This action is continuous such that center frequencies of the notches are automatically adjusted to compensate for small variations in the interference frequency.

  14. Dual-frequency acoustic droplet vaporization detection for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Arena, Christopher B; Novell, Anthony; Sheeran, Paul S; Puett, Connor; Moyer, Linsey C; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Liquid-filled perfluorocarbon droplets emit a unique acoustic signature when vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles using ultrasound. Here, we conducted a pilot study in a tissue-mimicking flow phantom to explore the spatial aspects of droplet vaporization and investigate the effects of applied pressure and droplet concentration on image contrast and axial and lateral resolution. Control microbubble contrast agents were used for comparison. A confocal dual-frequency transducer was used to transmit at 8 MHz and passively receive at 1 MHz. Droplet signals were of significantly higher energy than microbubble signals. This resulted in improved signal separation and high contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTR). Specifically, with a peak negative pressure (PNP) of 450 kPa applied at the focus, the CTR of B-mode images was 18.3 dB for droplets and -0.4 for microbubbles. The lateral resolution was dictated by the size of the droplet activation area, with lower pressures resulting in smaller activation areas and improved lateral resolution (0.67 mm at 450 kPa). The axial resolution in droplet images was dictated by the size of the initial droplet and was independent of the properties of the transmit pulse (3.86 mm at 450 kPa). In post-processing, time-domain averaging (TDA) improved droplet and microbubble signal separation at high pressures (640 kPa and 700 kPa). Taken together, these results indicate that it is possible to generate high-sensitivity, high-contrast images of vaporization events. In the future, this has the potential to be applied in combination with droplet-mediated therapy to track treatment outcomes or as a standalone diagnostic system to monitor the physical properties of the surrounding environment. PMID:26415125

  15. Harmonic engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.; Sewall, Noel; Boroa, Carl

    2014-08-19

    An engine based on a reciprocating piston engine that extracts work from pressurized working fluid. The engine includes a harmonic oscillator inlet valve capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into of the engine. In particular, the inlet valve includes an inlet valve head and a spring arranged together as a harmonic oscillator so that the inlet valve head is moveable from an unbiased equilibrium position to a biased closed position occluding an inlet. Upon releasing the inlet valve the inlet valve head undergoes a single oscillation past the equilibrium positio to a maximum open position and returns to a biased return position close to the closed position to choke the flow and produce a pressure drop across the inlet valve causing the inlet valve to close. Protrusions carried either by the inlet valve head or piston head are used to bump open the inlet valve from the closed position and initiate the single oscillation of the inlet valve head, and protrusions carried either by the outlet valve head or piston head are used to close the outlet valve ahead of the bump opening of the inlet valve.

  16. Polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation imaging for liver fibrosis assessment without labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Pan, Shiying; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-10-01

    We apply the polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation (PR-SHG) microscopy to investigate the changes of collagen typings (type I vs type III) and collagen fibril orientations of liver tissue in bile-duct-ligation (BDL) rat models. The PR-SHG results show that the second-order susceptibility tensor ratios (?31/?15 and ?33/?15) of collagen fibers increase with liver fibrotic progression after BDL surgery, reflecting an increase of the type III collagen component with the severity of liver fibrosis; and the square root of the collagen type III to type I ratio linearly correlates (R2 = 0.98) with histopathological scores. Furthermore, the collagen fibril orientations become more random with liver fibrosis transformation as compared to normal liver tissue. This work demonstrates that PR-SHG microscopy has the potential for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver fibrosis based on quantitative analysis of collagen typings and fibril orientations.

  17. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) contrast imaging in biomaterial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Xuye; Lyubovitsky, Julia

    2015-07-01

    Collagen hydrogels are natural biomaterials that comprise 3D networks of high water content and have viscoelastic properties and biocompatibility similar to native tissues. Consequently, these materials play an important role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine for quite some time. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) contrasts transpire as valuable label-free spectroscopic probes for analysis of these biomaterials and this presentation will report the structural, mechanical and physicochemical parameters leading to the observed optical SHG and TPF effects in synthesized 3D collagen hydrogels. We will present results regarding understanding the dependency of collagen fiber formation on ion types, new results regarding strengthening of these biomaterials with a nontoxic chemical cross-linker genipin and polarization selection of collagen fibers' orientations.

  18. Time domain simulation of harmonic ultrasound images and beam patterns in 3D using the k-space pseudospectral method.

    PubMed

    Treeby, Bradley E; Tumen, Mustafa; Cox, B T

    2011-01-01

    A k-space pseudospectral model is developed for the fast full-wave simulation of nonlinear ultrasound propagation through heterogeneous media. The model uses a novel equation of state to account for nonlinearity in addition to power law absorption. The spectral calculation of the spatial gradients enables a significant reduction in the number of required grid nodes compared to finite difference methods. The model is parallelized using a graphical processing unit (GPU) which allows the simulation of individual ultrasound scan lines using a 256 x 256 x 128 voxel grid in less than five minutes. Several numerical examples are given, including the simulation of harmonic ultrasound images and beam patterns using a linear phased array transducer. PMID:22003638

  19. Microscopic imaging of glyceraldehyde-induced tissue glycation with intrinsic second harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yu Jer; Granelli, Joseph; Tirumalasetty, Manasa; Lyubovitsky, Julia

    2013-02-01

    The bioinspired approaches to tissue strengthening and preservation rely on non-toxic cross-linking agents one of which is glyceraldehyde. In this study we used multiphoton microscopy that employs second harmonic generation (SHG) contrast to evaluate collagen microstructures and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) contrast to monitor progression of cross-linking upon treatment of tissues with glyceraldehyde. We examined collagen hydrogels assembled at 37 C and 27 C, bovine scleral and corneal tissues, skin as well as rat tail tendons. The results show a different effect of glyceraldehyde on collagen microstructures within the above tissues. This effect depends on the original microstructural assembly of collagen within a specific tissue. Our data suggests that epidermis (in skin and cornea) will protect collagen from cross-linking with glyceraldehyde. The work highlights benefits of monitoring progression of collagen cross-linking and effects of cross-linking on fiber microstructures as imaged with SHG and TPF signals.

  20. Analysis of forward and backward Second Harmonic Generation images to probe the nanoscale structure of collagen within bone and cartilage.

    PubMed

    Houle, Marie-Andre; Couture, Charles-Andr; Bancelin, Stphane; Van der Kolk, Jarno; Auger, Etienne; Brown, Cameron; Popov, Konstantin; Ramunno, Lora; Lgar, Franois

    2015-11-01

    Collagen ultrastructure plays a central role in the function of a wide range of connective tissues. Studying collagen structure at the microscopic scale is therefore of considerable interest to understand the mechanisms of tissue pathologies. Here, we use second harmonic generation microscopy to characterize collagen structure within bone and articular cartilage in human knees. We analyze the intensity dependence on polarization and discuss the differences between Forward and Backward images in both tissues. Focusing on articular cartilage, we observe an increase in Forward/Backward ratio from the cartilage surface to the bone. Coupling these results to numerical simulations reveals the evolution of collagen fibril diameter and spatial organization as a function of depth within cartilage. PMID:26349534

  1. Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory and its analytic gradients: accurate equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Bozkaya, U?ur; Sherrill, C David

    2013-08-01

    Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory [or simply "optimized CEPA(0)," OCEPA(0), for short] and its analytic energy gradients are presented. For variational optimization of the molecular orbitals for the OCEPA(0) method, a Lagrangian-based approach is used along with an orbital direct inversion of the iterative subspace algorithm. The cost of the method is comparable to that of CCSD [O(N(6)) scaling] for energy computations. However, for analytic gradient computations the OCEPA(0) method is only half as expensive as CCSD since there is no need to solve the ?2-amplitude equation for OCEPA(0). The performance of the OCEPA(0) method is compared with that of the canonical MP2, CEPA(0), CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods, for equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions between radicals. For bond lengths of both closed and open-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method improves upon CEPA(0) and CCSD by 25%-43% and 38%-53%, respectively, with Dunning's cc-pCVQZ basis set. Especially for the open-shell test set, the performance of OCEPA(0) is comparable with that of CCSD(T) (?R is 0.0003 A? on average). For harmonic vibrational frequencies of closed-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method again outperforms CEPA(0) and CCSD by 33%-79% and 53%-79%, respectively. For harmonic vibrational frequencies of open-shell molecules, the mean absolute error (MAE) of the OCEPA(0) method (39 cm(-1)) is fortuitously even better than that of CCSD(T) (50 cm(-1)), while the MAEs of CEPA(0) (184 cm(-1)) and CCSD (84 cm(-1)) are considerably higher. For complete basis set estimates of hydrogen transfer reaction energies, the OCEPA(0) method again exhibits a substantially better performance than CEPA(0), providing a mean absolute error of 0.7 kcal mol(-1), which is more than 6 times lower than that of CEPA(0) (4.6 kcal mol(-1)), and comparing to MP2 (7.7 kcal mol(-1)) there is a more than 10-fold reduction in errors. Whereas the MAE for the CCSD method is only 0.1 kcal mol(-1) lower than that of OCEPA(0). Overall, the present application results indicate that the OCEPA(0) method is very promising not only for challenging open-shell systems but also for closed-shell molecules. PMID:23927240

  2. Linking high harmonics from gases and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vampa, G.; Hammond, T. J.; Thiré, N.; Schmidt, B. E.; Légaré, F.; McDonald, C. R.; Brabec, T.; Corkum, P. B.

    2015-06-01

    When intense light interacts with an atomic gas, recollision between an ionizing electron and its parent ion creates high-order harmonics of the fundamental laser frequency. This sub-cycle effect generates coherent soft X-rays and attosecond pulses, and provides a means to image molecular orbitals. Recently, high harmonics have been generated from bulk crystals, but what mechanism dominates the emission remains uncertain. To resolve this issue, we adapt measurement methods from gas-phase research to solid zinc oxide driven by mid-infrared laser fields of 0.25 volts per ångström. We find that when we alter the generation process with a second-harmonic beam, the modified harmonic spectrum bears the signature of a generalized recollision between an electron and its associated hole. In addition, we find that solid-state high harmonics are perturbed by fields so weak that they are present in conventional electronic circuits, thus opening a route to integrate electronics with attosecond and high-harmonic technology. Future experiments will permit the band structure of a solid to be tomographically reconstructed.

  3. Linking high harmonics from gases and solids.

    PubMed

    Vampa, G; Hammond, T J; Thir, N; Schmidt, B E; Lgar, F; McDonald, C R; Brabec, T; Corkum, P B

    2015-06-25

    When intense light interacts with an atomic gas, recollision between an ionizing electron and its parent ion creates high-order harmonics of the fundamental laser frequency. This sub-cycle effect generates coherent soft X-rays and attosecond pulses, and provides a means to image molecular orbitals. Recently, high harmonics have been generated from bulk crystals, but what mechanism dominates the emission remains uncertain. To resolve this issue, we adapt measurement methods from gas-phase research to solid zinc oxide driven by mid-infrared laser fields of 0.25 volts per ngstrm. We find that when we alter the generation process with a second-harmonic beam, the modified harmonic spectrum bears the signature of a generalized recollision between an electron and its associated hole. In addition, we find that solid-state high harmonics are perturbed by fields so weak that they are present in conventional electronic circuits, thus opening a route to integrate electronics with attosecond and high-harmonic technology. Future experiments will permit the band structure of a solid to be tomographically reconstructed. PMID:26108855

  4. Radio-frequency energy quantification in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Leeor

    Mapping of radio frequency (RF) energy deposition has been challenging for 50+ years, especially, when scanning patients in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. As result, electromagnetic simulation software is often used for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR), the rate of RF energy deposition in tissue. The thesis work presents challenges associated with aligning information provided by electromagnetic simulation and MRI experiments. As result of the limitations of simulations, experimental methods for the quantification of SAR were established. A system for quantification of the total RF energy deposition was developed for parallel transmit MRI (a system that uses multiple antennas to excite and image the body). The system is capable of monitoring and predicting channel-by-channel RF energy deposition, whole body SAR and capable of tracking potential hardware failures that occur in the transmit chain and may cause the deposition of excessive energy into patients. Similarly, we demonstrated that local RF power deposition can be mapped and predicted for parallel transmit systems based on a series of MRI temperature mapping acquisitions. Resulting from the work, we developed tools for optimal reconstruction temperature maps from MRI acquisitions. The tools developed for temperature mapping paved the way for utilizing MRI as a diagnostic tool for evaluation of RF/microwave emitting device safety. Quantification of the RF energy was demonstrated for both MRI compatible and non-MRI-compatible devices (such as cell phones), while having the advantage of being noninvasive, of providing millimeter resolution and high accuracy.

  5. Harmonic analysis of electrical distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This report presents data pertaining to research on harmonics of electric power distribution systems. Harmonic data is presented on RMS and average measurements for determination of harmonics in buildings; fluorescent ballast; variable frequency drive; georator geosine harmonic data; uninterruptible power supply; delta-wye transformer; westinghouse suresine; liebert datawave; and active injection mode filter data.

  6. Three-dimensional simulations of harmonic radiation and harmonic lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, M.J.; McVey, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    Characteristics of the harmonic emission from free-electron lasers (FELs) are examined in the spontaneous, coherent-spontaneous and stimulated emission regimes. The radiation at both odd and even harmonic frequencies is treated for electron beams with finite emittance and energy spread. In the spontaneous emission regime, the transverse radiation patterns including the transverse frequency dependences, are given. How this expression is modified to include energy spread and emittance is described. In the coherent-spontaneous emission and stimulated emission regimes, the interaction of the radiation fields with the electrons must be treated self-consistently. Here, a single-frequency distributed transverse source function for each electron is used in the harmonic version of the 3-D code FELEX to model the harmonic radiation. The code has recently been modified to simultaneously model the fundamental and harmonic interactions for multiple-pass oscillator simulations. These modifications facilitate the examination of FELs under various operating conditions. When the FEL is lasing at the fundamental, the evolution of the harmonic fields can be examined. This evolution is unique in the sense that the electron beam radiates at the harmonic frequencies in the presence of the harmonic radiation circulating in the cavity. As a result, enhancements of the harmonic emission can be observed. Finally, harmonic lasing can occur in cases where there is sufficient gain to overcome cavity losses and lasing at the fundamental can be suppressed. The characteristics and efficiency of these interactions are explored. 11 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Imaging Interplanetary CMEs at Radio Frequency From Solar Polar Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Chi; Wang, C. B.; Wang, S.

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are violent discharges of plasma and magnetic fields from the Sun's corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, the detection of CMEs is important for un-derstanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. The Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) is a proposed mission to observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from solar polar orbit. The main payload (radio telescope) on board SPORT will be an in-terferometric imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band, which will follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from a distance of a few solar radii to near 1 AU from solar polar orbit. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind plasma experiment, a solar wind ion composition instrument, an energetic particle detector, a wave detector, a mag-netometer and an interplanetary radio burst tracker. In this paper, we first describe the current shortage of interplanetary CME observations. Next, the scientific motivation and objectives of SPORT are introduced. We discuss the basic specifications of the main radio telescope of SPORT with reference to the radio emission mechanisms and the radio frequency band to be observed. Finally, we discuss the key technologies of the SPORT mission, including the con-ceptual design of the main telescope, the image retrieval algorithm and the solar polar orbit injection. Other payloads and their respective observation objectives are also briefly discussed. Key words: Interplanetary CMEs; Interferometric imaging; Solar polar orbit; Radiometer.

  8. Imaging the grain boundaries in polycrystalline MoS2 monolayer by non-invasive second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jinxin; Jiang, Tao; Ji, Qingqing; Zhang, Yanfeng; Gong, Xingao; Liu, Wei-Tao; Wu, Shiwei

    2015-03-01

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers have showed intriguing physical properties for high performance quantum electronics. In order to utilize them in technological applications at industrial scale, mass production of this two dimensional materials via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is demanded and urged. Despite the success of growing large-scale monolayer, limited grain size and emergence of grain boundary remain as the major hurdle being single crystalline sheets. To resolve this issue, it is necessary to image the grain and grain boundary, and further understand their formation with statistical significance. Here we used second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, a noninvasive coherent imaging technique, to image the grain and grain boundary in CVD grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide. The destructive interference between neighboring grains enabled us to pinpoint the location of grain boundary; the anisotropic polarization pattern permitted us to determine the type of grain boundary. Furthermore, this high-throughput characterization technique allows statistical analysis of hundreds of grain and grain boundary, unambiguously revealing that the CVD growth mechanism of monolayer MoS2.

  9. Optical interference-based image encryption using circular harmonic expansion and spherical illumination in gyrator transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qu; Guo, Qing; Lei, Liang; Zhou, Jinyun

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a new optical interference-based encryption method using off-axis circular harmonic component (CHC) expansion and iterative phase retrieval algorithm in gyrator transform (GT) domain is proposed. Off-axis CHC expansion is employed to divide the inverse GT spectrum of primitive image into two parts: the zero-order CHC and the sum of the other CHCs. The sum term of CHCs is further encrypted into a complex image whose amplitude constraint is devised to be the amplitude of zero-order CHC by the iterative retrieval GT algorithm. The amplitude part of CHC is the final ciphertext which has rotation-symmetric distribution. Three phase-only keys, the main keys of this proposal, are also calculated during the digital encryption process. To recover the primitive image correctly, two identical ciphertexts placed in the two interference branch should be illuminated by two spherical waves with required parameters (wavelength and radius). Moreover, rotational center of ciphertexts must be placed in a predefined position, which is off the optical axis. The transform angles of GTs, the propagation parameters of spherical waves and the relative position of rotational center of ciphertext are sensitive additional keys for correct retrieval. Numerical simulation tests have been carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  10. Diagnostic potential of multimodal imaging of ovarian tissue using optical coherence tomography and second-harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Welge, Weston A.; DeMarco, Andrew T.; Watson, Jennifer M.; Rice, Photini S.; Barton, Jennifer K.; Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Ovarian cancer is particularly deadly because it is usually diagnosed after it has metastasized. We have previously identified features of ovarian cancer using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy (targeting collagen). OCT provides an image of the ovarian microstructure, while SHG provides a high-resolution map of collagen fiber bundle arrangement. Here, we investigated the diagnostic potential of dual-modality OCT and SHG imaging. We conducted a fully crossed, multireader, multicase study using seven human observers. Each observer classified 44 ex vivo mouse ovaries (16 normal and 28 abnormal) as normal or abnormal from OCT, SHG, and simultaneously viewed, coregistered OCT and SHG images and provided a confidence rating on a six-point scale. We determined the average receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, area under the ROC curves (AUC), and other quantitative figures of merit. The results show that OCT has diagnostic potential with an average AUC of 0.910.06. The average AUC for SHG was less promising at 0.710.13. The average AUC for simultaneous OCT and SHG was not significantly different from OCT alone, possibly due to the limited SHG field of view. The high performance of OCT and coregistered OCT and SHG warrants further investigation. PMID:25798444

  11. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus.

    PubMed

    Nocente, M; Cazzaniga, C; Tardocchi, M; Binda, F; Eriksson, J; Giacomelli, L; Muraro, A; Rebai, M; Sharapov, S; Gorini, G

    2015-10-01

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices. PMID:26520949

  12. Harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2012-12-01

    We show that the Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is made of three major cycles that are closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (~9.93 year), to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years) and to a central cycle that may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle. The central harmonic is approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A harmonic model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals major beat periods occurring at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. Equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic solar proxy records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Sporer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima around 1900-1920 and 1960-1980, the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005, and a secular upward trending during the 20th century. The latter modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature modulation since 1850. The model forecasts a new prolonged solar minimum during 2020-2045, which is produced by the minima of both the 61 and 115-year reconstructed cycles. Finally, the model predicts that during low solar activity periods, the solar cycle length tends to be longer, as some researchers have claimed. These results indicate that both solar and climate oscillations are linked to planetary motion and, furthermore, their timing can be reasonably hindcast and forecast for decades, centuries and millennia. The demonstrated geometrical synchronicity between solar and climate data patterns with the proposed solar/planetary harmonic model rebuts a major critique (by Smythe and Eddy, 1977) of the theory of planetary tidal influence on the Sun. Moreover, we discuss preliminary physical mechanisms based on magnetic and gravitational couplings. A gravitational coupling is supported by the Mass-Luminosity relation. References: Scafetta N. (2010, 2012a, 2012b, 2012c, 2012d). J. of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics: 10.1016/j.jastp.2012.04.002; 10.1016/j.jastp.2012.02.016; 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.12.005; 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.10.013; 10.1016/j.jastp.2010.04.015

  13. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Binda, F.; Eriksson, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Muraro, A.; Rebai, M.; Sharapov, S.; Gorini, G.

    2015-10-01

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices.

  14. The role of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of childhood febrile urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    İlarslan, Nisa Eda Çullas; Fitöz, Ömer Suat; Öztuna, Derya Gökmen; Küçük, Nuriye Özlem; Yalçınkaya, Fatma Fatoş

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study assessed the ability of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the detection of childhood febrile urinary tract infections in comparison with the gold standard reference method: Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinicacid renal cortical scintigraphy. Material and Methods: This prospective study included 60 patients who were hospitalized with a first episode of febrile urinary tract infections. All children were examined with dimercaptosuccinicacid scan and tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound within the first 3 days of admission. Results: Signs indicative of acute infection were observed in 29 patients according to the results of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound while dimercaptosuccinicacid scan revealed abnormal findings in 33 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tissue harmonic imaging combined with power Doppler ultrasound using dimercaptosuccinicacid scintigraphy as the reference method in patients diagnosed with first episode febrile urinary tract infections were calculated as 57.58% (95% confidence interval: 40.81%–72.76%); 62.96% (95% confidence interval: 44.23%–78.47%); 65.52% (95% confidence interval: 52.04%–77%); 54.84% (95% confidence interval: 41.54%–67.52%); respectively. Conclusions: Although current results exhibit inadequate success of power Doppler ultrasound, this practical and radiation-free method may soon be comprise a part of the routine ultrasonographic evaluation of febrile urinary tract infections of childhood if patients are evaluated early and under appropriate sedation. PMID:26265892

  15. Four-frequency polarizing microscope for recording plasma images in the wavelength range 0.4-1.1 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, B. L.; Mal'kova, S. V.; Osipov, M. V.; Puzyrev, V. N.; Saakyan, A. T.; Starodub, A. N.; Fedotov, S. I.; Fronya, A. A.; Shutyak, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    The optical scheme and design of a four-frequency polarizing microscope intended for simultaneous recording of plasma images in the wavelength range 0.4-1.1 {mu}m with the spatial resolution 12 {mu}m in the entire spectral range are described. The effectiveness of such a microscope in studies of plasmas produced on interaction of laser radiation with a target is demonstrated. The plasma images are obtained at the frequencies {omega}{sub 0}, (3/2){omega}{sub 0}, 2{omega}{sub 0}, and (5/2){omega}{sub 0}, where {omega}{sub 0} corresponds to the frequency of heating radiation. The transformation coefficient that characterizes the efficiency of conversion of heating radiation into the 2{omega}{sub 0}, (3/2){omega}{sub 0}, and (5/2){omega}{sub 0} harmonics generated in the plasma is determined.

  16. Multi-parametric monitoring of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2012-11-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and relative phase-shift during high energy HIFU where tissue boiling occurs. Forty three (n=18) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens. Two dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10-, 20-and 30-s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11W. For the 10-, 20-, and 30-s treatment cases, a steady decrease in the displacement (-8.674.80, -14.447.77, 24.0312.11?m), compressive strain -0.160.06, -0.710.30, -0.680.36 %, and phase shift +1.806.80, -15.809.44, -18.6213.14 were obtained, respectively, indicating overall increase of relative stiffness and decrease of the viscosity-to-stiffness ratio during heating. After treatment, 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions showed an increased lesion-to-background contrast of 1.340.19, 1.980.30, 2.260.80 and lesion size of 40.958.06, 47.64.87, and 52.232.19 mm2, respectively, which was validated again with pathology 25.176.99, 42.171.77, 47.173.10 mm2. Additionally, studies also investigated the performance of mutli-parametric monitoring under the influence of boiling and attenuation change due to tissue boiling, where discrepancies were found such as deteriorated displacement SNR and reversed lesion-to-background displacement contrast with indication on possible increase in attenuation and tissue gelatification or pulverization. Despite the challenge of the boiling mechanism, the relative phase shift served as consist biomechanical tissue response independent of changes in acoustic properties throughout the HIFU treatment. In addition, the 2D HMI displacement images were able to confirm and quantify the change in dimensions of the thermal lesion site. Therefore, the multi-parametric HMIFU was shown capable of monitoring and mapping tissue viscoelastic response changes during and after HIFU treatment.

  17. High-frequency ultrasound annular array imaging. Part II: digital beamformer design and imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chang-Hong; Snook, Kevin A; Cao, Pei-Jie; Shung, K Kirk

    2006-02-01

    This is the second part of a two-paper series reporting a recent effort in the development of a high-frequency annular array ultrasound imaging system. In this paper an imaging system composed of a six-element, 43 MHz annular array transducer, a six-channel analog front-end, a field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based beamformer, and a digital signal processor (DSP) microprocessor-based scan converter will be described. A computer is used as the interface for image display. The beamformer that applies delays to the echoes for each channel is implemented with the strategy of combining the coarse and fine delays. The coarse delays that are integer multiples of the clock periods are achieved by using a first-in-first-out (FIFO) structure, and the fine delays are obtained with a fractional delay (FD) filter. Using this principle, dynamic receiving focusing is achieved. The image from a wire phantom obtained with the imaging system was compared to that from a prototype ultrasonic backscatter microscope with a 45 MHz single-element transducer. The improved lateral resolution and depth of field from the wire phantom image were observed. Images from an excised rabbit eye sample also were obtained, and fine anatomical structures were discerned. PMID:16529105

  18. In vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access: towards image guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. We aim to develop optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging guidance for RFA. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using OCT catheter to image endocardia wall in active beating hearts through percutaneous access. This is a critical step toward image guided RFA in a clinic setting. METHODS A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into active beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardia wall. The images were then acquired at 10 frames per second at an axial resolution and lateral resolution of 15 ?m. RESULTS We report the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in active beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. CONCLUSIONS It is feasible to acquire OCT images in beating hearts through percutaneous access. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  19. Polarization dependence of aligned collagen tissues imaged with second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    vila, Francisco J; Del Barco, Oscar; Bueno, Juan M

    2015-08-01

    A polarimetric second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope was used to analyze the dependence between polarization and SHG signal from collagen-based samples. A theoretical model was also developed to investigate the SHG intensity as a function of different polarization states for a set of quasiparallel fibers. Numerical simulations were compared to experimental SHG intensity values and a fairly good agreement was found. Linear polarized light produced periodical changes in the emitted SHG signal with a maximum of intensity corresponding to polarization parallel to the main orientation of the fibers, regardless the ratio of hyperpolarizabilities, ?? . A similar behavior was found for elliptical states located along a vertical meridian on the Poincar sphere (i.e., null azimuth) although the modulation of the SHG signal was different. Our numerical calculations described a dramatic change in this regular trend when ?? changed from positive to negative values. Moreover, we provide an experimental method (based on the analysis of the modulation of the SHG signal) to determine the value of the ratio ?? and, consequently, to obtain information about the internal organization of the collagen fibers. PMID:26263415

  20. Assessment of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions with Spherical Harmonics: Comparison of MR Imaging and Pathologic Findings1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Shalmon, Bruria; Zou, Kelly H.; Azhari, Haim; Nass, Dvora; Achiron, Anat

    2005-01-01

    Spherical harmonics (SH) were used to approximate the volume and three-dimensional geometry of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in deceased patients. The institutional ethical committee does not require its approval for studies involving pathologic specimens. Pathologic findings were used as the reference standard. In addition, lesion volume was measured with cylindrical approximation (CA). Volumetric comparisons of biases were based on summary statistics, Spearman correlation, Wilcoxon test, and two-way analysis of variance. Shape comparison metrics included mean distance and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Eight of 11 lesions had smaller biases with SH method (P < .001). Median biases with SH and CA did not differ significantly, as compared with pathologic findings (r = 1.00 vs 0.99, respectively). Variances of the biases were significantly smaller for SH (P =.04). Ranges of normalized distance and DSC were 0.1%2.5% and 75%96%, respectively. Mean DSC was significantly higher than 70% (P < .001). SH method provided unbiased lesion volume and added geometric information that may enable a better understanding of the pathogenesis and lesion evolution over time. PMID:15833980

  1. Quantification of collagen fiber organization in biological tissues at cellular and molecular scales using second-harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambekar Ramachandra Rao, Raghu

    Collagen is the most abundant structural protein found in the human body, and is responsible for providing structure and function to tissues. Collagen molecules organize naturally into structures called fibers on the scale of the wavelength of light and lack inversion symmetry, thus allowing for the process of second harmonic generation (SHG) when exposed to intense incident light. We have developed two quantitative techniques: Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation (FT-SHG) imaging and generalized chi2 second-harmonic generation (chi2-SHG) imaging. In order to show that FT-SHG imaging can be used as a valuable diagnostic tool for real-world biological problems, we first investigate collagenase-induced injury in horse tendons. Clear differences in collagen fiber organization between normal and injured tendon are quantified. In particular, we observe that the regularly oriented organization of collagen fibers in normal tendons is disrupted in injured tendons leading to a more random organization. We also observe that FT-SHG microscopy is more sensitive in assessing tendon injury compared to the conventional polarized light microscopy. The second study includes quantifying collagen fibers in cortical bone using FT-SHG imaging and comparing it with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further, as an example study, we show how FT-SHG imaging could be used to quantify changes in bone structure as a function of age. Some initial work and future directions for extending FT-SHG to 3D are also discussed. The second technique, chi2-SHG imaging, takes advantage of the coherent nature of SHG and utilizes polarization to extract the second-order susceptibility (d elements) which provides information on molecular organization, i.e., it provides access to sub-diffractional changes "optically". We use chi2-SHG in combination with FT-SHG imaging to investigate a couple of biological problems. First, we quantify differences in collagen fiber organization between cornea and sclera of the eye in order to investigate their properties of transparency and opacity, respectively. We find from chi2-SHG imaging that there is no statistical difference in the values of d elements between cornea and sclera, indicating that the underlying collagen structure generating SHG from the two is similar at the level of detection of SHG microscopy. However, the difference lies in the spatial organization of these collagen fibers as observed from FT-SHG imaging. We find that cornea contains lamellae with patches of ordered and uniform diameter collagen fibers with axial order, which could be the reason for its transparent behavior. Conversely, there are no lamellae in sclera (i.e., no axial order), and fibers are thicker, denser, have inconsistent diameters, and possess relatively inhomogeneous orientations, leading to its opaque nature. We also utilized the two techniques to assess differences in stromal collagen fibers for several human breast tissue conditions: normal, hyperplasia, dysplasia, and malignant. Using FT-SHG imaging, we note differences between malignant and other pathological conditions through the metric A.I. ratio. Using generalized chi2-SHG imaging, we observe structural changes in collagen at the molecular scale, and a particular d element showed a more sensitive differentiation between breast tissue conditions, except between hyperplasia and normal/dysplasia. We also find that the trigonal symmetry (3m) is a more appropriate model to describe collagen fibers in malignant tissues as opposed to the conventionally used hexagonal symmetry (C6). Furthermore, the percentage of abnormal collagen fibers could potentially be used as a metric for differentiating breast tissue conditions. We also introduce a technique for extending chi2-SHG to fibers with curvature which is useful for generating chi2-image maps (in terms of d elements) instead of the conventional SHG intensity images. The spatial variations in d elements will provide additional information. For example, in breast cancer tissues, it may help in observing how fibers change from normal to malignant spatially, especially around region of cancerous cells. Finally, we discuss some of the interesting immediate and later future work of quantitative SHG imaging we aim to carry out in our lab. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  2. Multi-scale harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    The Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is found to be made of three major cycles with periods of about 9.98, 10.9 and 11.86 years. The side frequencies appear to be closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (range between 9.5 and 10.5 years, and median 9.93 years) and to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years). The central cycle may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle that appears to be approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A simplified harmonic constituent model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals complex quasi-periodic interference/beat patterns. The major beat periods occur at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. We show that equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Sprer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima that occurred during 1900-1920 and 1960-1980 and the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005 and a secular upward trending during the 20th century: this modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature modulation since 1850. The model forecasts a new prolonged solar minimum during 2020-2045, which would be produced by the minima of both the 61 and 115-year reconstructed cycles. Finally, the model predicts that during low solar activity periods, the solar cycle length tends to be longer, as some researchers have claimed. These results clearly indicate that both solar and climate oscillations are linked to planetary motion and, furthermore, their timing can be reasonably hindcast and forecast for decades, centuries and millennia. The demonstrated geometrical synchronicity between solar and climate data patterns with the proposed solar/planetary harmonic model rebuts a major critique (by Smythe and Eddy, 1977) of the theory of planetary tidal influence on the Sun. Other qualitative discussions are added about the plausibility of a planetary influence on solar activity.

  3. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  4. Combined nonlinear laser imaging (two-photon excitation fluorescence, second and third-harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopies) in ovarian tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, J.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Bottcher-Luiz, F.; Andrade, L. A. L. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    We applied Two-photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF), Second/Third Harmonic Generation (SHG and THG) and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) Non Linear Optics (NLO) Laser-Scanning Microscopy within the same imaging platform to evaluate their use as a diagnostic tool in ovarian tumors. We assess of applicability of this multimodal approach to perform a pathological evaluation of serous and mucinous tumors in human samples. The combination of TPEF-SHG-THG imaging provided complementary information about the interface epithelium/stromal, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillar tissue architecture (SHG). The fact that H&E staining is the standard method used in clinical pathology and that the stored samples are usually fixed makes it important a re-evaluation of these samples with NLO microscopy to compare new results with a library of already existing samples. FLIM, however, depends on the chemical environment around the fluorophors that was completely changed after fixation; therefore it only makes sense in unstained samples. Our FLIM results in unstained samples demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate healthy epithelia from serous or mucinous epithelia. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the different imaging modalities used showed that multimodal nonlinear microscopy has the potential to differentiate between cancerous and healthy ovarian tissue.

  5. Three Dimensional Speckle Imaging Employing a Frequency-Locked Tunable Diode Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schiffern, John T.; Mendoza, Albert

    2015-09-01

    We describe a high accuracy frequency stepping method for a tunable diode laser to improve a three dimensional (3D) imaging approach based upon interferometric speckle imaging. The approach, modeled after Takeda, exploits tuning an illumination laser in frequency as speckle interferograms of the object (specklegrams) are acquired at each frequency in a Michelson interferometer. The resulting 3D hypercube of specklegrams encode spatial information in the x-y plane of each image with laser tuning arrayed along its z-axis. We present laboratory data of before and after results showing enhanced 3D imaging resulting from precise laser frequency control.

  6. In vivo time-lapse imaging of skin burn wound healing using second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Wound healing is a process to repair the damaged tissue caused by thermal burn, incised wound, or stab wound. Although the wound healing has many aspects, it is common for dynamics of collagen fiber, such as decomposition, production, or growth, to be closely related with wound healing. If such the healing process can be visualized as a timelapse image of the collagen fiber in the same subject, one may obtain new findings regarding biological repairing mechanisms in the healing process. In this article, to investigate the temporal modoification of dermal collagen fiber in the burn wound healing, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, minimal invasiveness, deep penetration, the absence of interference from background light, and in vivo measurement without additional staining. Since SHG light arises from a non-centrosymmetric triple helix of three polypeptide chains in the collagen molecule, SHG intensity sensitively reflects the structure maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates. A series of time-lapse SHG images during the wound healing process of 2 weeks clearly indicated that condensation and melting of dermal collagen fibers by the deep dermal burn, decomposition of the damaged collagen fibers in the inflammation phase, production of new collagen fibers in the proliferation phase, and the growth of the new collagen fibers in the remodeling phase. These results show a high potential of SHG microscopy for optical assessment of the wound healing process in vivo.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  8. Non-contact, ultrasound-based indentation method for measuring elastic properties of biological tissues using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by harmonic motion imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking radiofrequency signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the measured Young’s modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r2 > 0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r2 = 0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI = 2.62  ±  0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting = 4.2  ±  2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens.

  9. Imaging of Zebrafish In Vivo with Second-Harmonic Generation Reveals Shortened Sarcomeres Associated with Myopathy Induced by Statin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Lin, Dar-Shong; Chow, Cho-Yen; Chang, Chia-Jen; Liau, Ian

    2011-01-01

    We employed second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and the zebrafish model to investigate the myopathy caused by statin in vivo with emphasis on the altered microstructures of the muscle sarcomere, the fundamental contractile element of muscles. This approach derives an advantage of SHG imaging to observe the striated skeletal muscle of living zebrafish based on signals produced mainly from the thick myosin filament of sarcomeres without employing exogenous labels, and eliminates concern about the distortion of muscle structures caused by sample preparation in conventional histological examination. The treatment with statin caused a significantly shortened sarcomere relative to an untreated control (1.73±0.09 µm vs 1.91±0.08 µm, P<0.05) while the morphological integrity of the muscle fibers remained largely intact. Mechanistic tests indicated that this microstructural disorder was associated with the biosynthetic pathway of cholesterol, or, specifically, with the impaired production of mevalonate by statins. This microstructural disorder exhibited a strong dependence on both the dosage and the duration of treatment, indicating a possibility to assess the severity of muscle injury according to the altered length of the sarcomeres. In contrast to a conventional assessment of muscle injury using clinical biomarkers in blood, such as creatine kinase that is released from only disrupted myocytes, the ability to determine microstructural modification of sarcomeres allows diagnosis of muscle injury before an onset of conventional clinical symptoms. In light of the increasing prevalence of the incidence of muscle injuries caused by new therapies, our work consolidates the combined use of the zebrafish and SHG imaging as an effective and sensitive means to evaluate the safety profile of new therapeutic targets in vivo. PMID:21966365

  10. Can recent innovations in harmonic analysis 'explain' key findings in natural image statistics?

    PubMed

    Donoho, D L; Flesia, A G

    2001-08-01

    Recently, applied mathematicians have been pursuing the goal of sparse coding of certain mathematical models of images with edges. They have found by mathematical analysis that, instead of wavelets and Fourier methods, sparse coding leads towards new systems: ridgelets and curvelets. These new systems have elements distributed across a range of scales and locations, but also orientations. In fact they have highly direction-specific elements and exhibit increasing numbers of distinct directions as we go to successively finer scales. Meanwhile, researchers in natural scene statistics (NSS) have been attempting to find sparse codes for natural images. The new systems they have found by computational optimization have elements distributed across a range of scales and locations, but also orientations. The new systems are certainly unlike wavelet and Gabor systems, on the one hand because of the multi-orientation and on the other hand because of the multi-scale nature. There is a certain degree of visual resemblance between the findings in the two fields, which suggests the hypothesis that certain important findings in the NSS literature might possibly be explained by the slogan: edges are the dominant features in images, and curvelets are the right tool for representing edges. We consider here certain empirical consequences of this hypothesis, looking at key findings of the NSS literature and conducting studies of curvelet and ridgelet transforms on synthetic and real images, to see if the results are consistent with predictions from this slogan. Our first experiment measures the nonGaussianity of Fourier, wavelet, ridgelet and curvelet coefficients over a database of synthetic and photographic images. Empirically the curvelet coefficients exhibit noticeably higher kurtosis than wavelet, ridgelet, or Fourier coefficients. This is consistent with the hypothesis. Our second experiment studies the inter-scale correlation of wavelet coefficient energies at the same location. We describe a simple experiment showing that presence of edges explains these correlations. We also develop a crude nonlinear 'partial correlation' by considering the correlation between wavelet parents and children after a few curvelet coefficients are removed. When we kill the few biggest coefficients of the curvelet transform, much of the correlation between wavelet subbands disappears--consistent with the hypothesis. We suggest implications for future discussions about NSS. PMID:11563535

  11. Imaging in electrically conductive porous media without frequency encoding.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Horn, J A; Walbrecker, J O

    2012-07-01

    Understanding multi-phase fluid flow and transport processes under various pressure, temperature, and salinity conditions is a key feature in many remote monitoring applications, such as long-term storage of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) or nuclear waste in geological formations. We propose a low-field NMR tomographic method to non-invasively image the water-content distribution in electrically conductive formations in relatively large-scale experiments (?1 m(3) sample volumes). Operating in the weak magnetic field of Earth entails low Larmor frequencies at which electromagnetic fields can penetrate electrically conductive material. The low signal strengths associated with NMR in Earth's field are enhanced by pre-polarization before signal recording. To localize the origin of the NMR signal in the sample region we do not employ magnetic field gradients, as is done in conventional NMR imaging, because they can be difficult to control in the large sample volumes that we are concerned with, and may be biased by magnetic materials in the sample. Instead, we utilize the spatially dependent inhomogeneity of fields generated by surface coils that are installed around the sample volume. This relatively simple setup makes the instrument inexpensive and mobile (it can be potentially installed in remote locations outside of a laboratory), while allowing spatial resolution of the order of 10 cm. We demonstrate the general feasibility of our approach in a simulated CO(2) injection experiment, where we locate and quantify the drop in water content following gas injection into a water-saturated cylindrical sample of 0.45 m radius and 0.9 m height. Our setup comprises four surface coils and an array consisting of three volume coils surrounding the sample. The proposed tomographic NMR methodology provides a more direct estimate of fluid content and properties than can be achieved with acoustic or electromagnetic methods alone. Therefore, we expect that our proposed method is relevant for geophysical applications, such as for monitoring CO(2) injections in saline aquifers or detecting water leakage into nuclear waste deposit sites installed in electrically conductive formations. PMID:22683582

  12. Second-order fractional Talbot effect induced frequency-doubling optical pulse injection for 40 GHz rational-harmonic mode-locking of an SOA fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Jui; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-09-01

    A second-order fractional Talbot effect induced frequency-doubling of a 10 GHz optical pulse-train is demonstrated to backward injection mode-lock a semiconductor optical amplifier fiber laser (SOAFL) for 40 GHz rational-harmonic mode-locking (RHML). That is, a real all-optical gain-modulation of the SOAFL can be created by injecting such a time-multiplexed but pseudo-frequency-doubled pulse-train into the cavity. The time-multiplexing pulse-train can thus be transformed into a frequency-multiplied pulse-train via cross-gain modulation (XGM). The optical pulse-train at 10 GHz is generated by nonlinearly driving an electro-absorption modulator (EAM), which experiences the second-order fractional Talbot effect after propagating through a 4 km long dispersion compensation fiber (DCF). The DCF not only plays the role of frequency-doubler but also compensates the frequency chirp of the 10 GHz optical pulse-train. The pulsewidth broadening from 22 to 60 ps for initiating the time-domain Talbot effect is simulated by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. With careful detuning of the RF modulation power of the EAM at 5 dBm, the generated 20 GHz optical pulse-train exhibits a positive frequency chirp with minimum peak-to-peak value of 2 GHz, and the peak-amplitude fluctuation between adjacent pulses is below 1.4%. In comparison with the SOAFL pulse-train repeated at 40 GHz generated by the fourth-order purely RHML process, the optimized second-order fractional Talbot effect in combination with the second-order RHML mechanism significantly enhances the modulation-depth of RHML, thus improving the on/off extinction ratio of the 40 GHz SOAFL pulse-train from 1.8 to 5.6 dB. Such a new scheme also provides a more stable 40 GHz RHML pulse-train from the SOAFL with its timing jitter reducing from 0.51 to 0.23 ps.

  13. A real-time algorithm for the harmonic estimation and frequency tracking of dominant components in fusion plasma magnetic diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Alves, D; Coelho, R

    2013-08-01

    The real-time tracking of instantaneous quantities such as frequency, amplitude, and phase of components immerse in noisy signals has been a common problem in many scientific and engineering fields such as power systems and delivery, telecommunications, and acoustics for the past decades. In magnetically confined fusion research, extracting this sort of information from magnetic signals can be of valuable assistance in, for instance, feedback control of detrimental magnetohydrodynamic modes and disruption avoidance mechanisms by monitoring instability growth or anticipating mode-locking events. This work is focused on nonlinear Kalman filter based methods for tackling this problem. Similar methods have already proven their merits and have been successfully employed in this scientific domain in applications such as amplitude demodulation for the motional Stark effect diagnostic. In the course of this work, three approaches are described, compared, and discussed using magnetic signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak plasma discharges for benchmarking purposes. PMID:24011401

  14. Analytical Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies for the Green Fluorescent Protein Computed with ONIOM: Chromophore Mode Character and Its Response to Environment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lee M; Lasoroski, Aurlie; Champion, Paul M; Sage, J Timothy; Frisch, Michael J; van Thor, Jasper J; Bearpark, Michael J

    2014-02-11

    A systematic comparison of different environmental effects on the vibrational modes of the 4-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone (HBDI) chromophore using the ONIOM method allows us to model how the molecule's spectroscopic transitions are modified in the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). ONIOM(QM:MM) reduces the expense of normal mode calculations when computing the majority of second derivatives only at the MM level. New developments described here for the efficient solution of the CPHF equations, including contributions from electrostatic interactions with environment charges, mean that QM model systems of ?100 atoms can be embedded within a much larger MM environment of ?5000 atoms. The resulting vibrational normal modes, their associated frequencies, and dipole derivative vectors have been used to interpret experimental difference spectra (GFPI2-GFPA), chromophore vibrational Stark shifts, and changes in the difference between electronic and vibrational transition dipoles (mode angles) in the protein environment. PMID:26580050

  15. A real-time algorithm for the harmonic estimation and frequency tracking of dominant components in fusion plasma magnetic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, D.; Coelho, R. [Associação Euratom Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-08-15

    The real-time tracking of instantaneous quantities such as frequency, amplitude, and phase of components immerse in noisy signals has been a common problem in many scientific and engineering fields such as power systems and delivery, telecommunications, and acoustics for the past decades. In magnetically confined fusion research, extracting this sort of information from magnetic signals can be of valuable assistance in, for instance, feedback control of detrimental magnetohydrodynamic modes and disruption avoidance mechanisms by monitoring instability growth or anticipating mode-locking events. This work is focused on nonlinear Kalman filter based methods for tackling this problem. Similar methods have already proven their merits and have been successfully employed in this scientific domain in applications such as amplitude demodulation for the motional Stark effect diagnostic. In the course of this work, three approaches are described, compared, and discussed using magnetic signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak plasma discharges for benchmarking purposes.

  16. Effects of density functionals and dispersion interactions on geometries, bond energies and harmonic frequencies of Etbnd UX3 (E = N, P, CH; X = H, F, Cl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Krishna Kumar; Patidar, Pankaj; Patidar, Sunil Kumar; Vishwakarma, Ravi

    2014-12-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed to evaluate the geometries, bonding nature and harmonic frequencies of the compounds [Etbnd UX3] at DFT, DFT-D3, DFT-D3(BJ) and DFT-dDSc levels using different density functionals BP86, BLYP, PBE, revPBE, PW91, TPSS and M06-L. The stretching frequency of Utbnd N bond in [Ntbnd UF3] calculated with DFT/BLYP closely resembles with the experimental value. The performance of different density functionals for accurate Utbnd N vibrational frequencies follows the order BLYP > revPBE > BP86 > PW91 > TPSS > PBE > M06-L. The BLYP functional gives accurate value of the Utbnd E bond distances. The uranium atom in the studied compounds [Etbnd UX3] is positively charged. Upon going from [Etbnd UF3] to [Etbnd UCl3], the partial Hirshfeld charge on uranium atom decreases because of the lower electronegativity of chlorine compared to flourine. The Gopinathan-Jug bond order for Utbnd E bonds ranges from 2.90 to 3.29. The Utbnd E bond dissociation energies vary with different density functionals as M06-L < TPSS < BLYP < revPBE < BP86 < PBE ≈ PW91. The orbital interactions ΔEorb, in all studied compounds [Etbnd UX3] are larger than the electrostatic interaction ΔEelstat, which means the Utbnd N bonds in these compound have greater degree of covalent character (in the range 63.8-77.2%). The Usbnd E σ-bonding interaction is the dominant bonding interaction in the nitride and methylidyne complexes while it is weaker in [Ptbnd UX3]. The dispersion energy contributions to the total bond dissociation energies are rather small. Compared to the Grimme's D3(BJ) corrections, the Corminboeuf's dispersion corrections are larger with metaGGA functionals (TPSS, M06-L) while smaller with GGA functionals.

  17. High-intensity focused ultrasound monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) under boiling or slow denaturation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-07-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method that utilizes an amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force at the HIFU focus and estimates the focal tissue displacement to monitor the HIFU thermal treatment. In this study, the performance of HMIFU under acoustic, thermal, and mechanical effects was investigated. The performance of HMIFU was assessed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 13) under slow denaturation or boiling regimes. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to assess the acoustic cavitation activity, and a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. During lesioning with slow denaturation, high quality displacements (correlation coefficient above 0.97) were observed under minimum cavitation noise, indicating the tissue initial-softening-then- stiffening property change. During HIFU with boiling, HMIFU monitored a consistent change in lesion-to-background displacement contrast (0.46 0.37) despite the presence of strong cavitation noise due to boiling during lesion formation. Therefore, HMIFU effectively monitored softening-then-stiffening during lesioning under slow denaturation, and detected lesioning under boiling with a distinct change in displacement contrast under boiling in the presence of cavitation. In conclusion, HMIFU was shown under both boiling and slow denaturation regimes to be effective in HIFU monitoring and lesioning identification without being significantly affected by cavitation noise. PMID:26168177

  18. Co-registration of ultrasound and frequency-domain photoacoustic radar images and image improvement for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the co-registration of ultrasound (US) and frequency domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) images with significant image improvement from applying image normalization, filtering and amplification techniques. Achieving PA imaging functionality on a commercial Ultrasound instrument could accelerate clinical acceptance and use. Experimental results presented demonstrate live animal testing and show enhancements in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast and spatial resolution. The co-registered image produced from the US and phase PA images, provides more information than both images independently.

  19. Matching Rules for Collective Behaviors on Complex Networks: Optimal Configurations for Vibration Frequencies of Networked Harmonic Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Meng; Liu, Shuai; He, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    The structure-dynamics-function has become one of central problems in modern sciences, and it is a great challenge to unveil the organization rules for different dynamical processes on networks. In this work, we study the vibration spectra of the classical mass spring model with different masses on complex networks, and pay our attention to how the mass spatial configuration influences the second-smallest vibrational frequency () and the largest one (). For random networks, we find that becomes maximal and becomes minimal if the node degrees are point-to-point-positively correlated with the masses. In these cases, we call it point-to-point matching. Moreover, becomes minimal under the condition that the heaviest mass is placed on the lowest-degree vertex, and is maximal as long as the lightest mass is placed on the highest-degree vertex, and in both cases all other masses can be arbitrarily settled. Correspondingly, we call it single-point matching. These findings indicate that the matchings between the node dynamics (parameter) and the node position rule the global systems dynamics, and sometimes only one node is enough to control the collective behaviors of the whole system. Therefore, the matching rules might be the common organization rules for collective behaviors on networks. PMID:24386088

  20. Matching rules for collective behaviors on complex networks: optimal configurations for vibration frequencies of networked harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Meng; Liu, Shuai; He, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    The structure-dynamics-function has become one of central problems in modern sciences, and it is a great challenge to unveil the organization rules for different dynamical processes on networks. In this work, we study the vibration spectra of the classical mass spring model with different masses on complex networks, and pay our attention to how the mass spatial configuration influences the second-smallest vibrational frequency (?2) and the largest one (?N). For random networks, we find that ?2 becomes maximal and ?N becomes minimal if the node degrees are point-to-point-positively correlated with the masses. In these cases, we call it point-to-point matching. Moreover, ?2 becomes minimal under the condition that the heaviest mass is placed on the lowest-degree vertex, and ?N is maximal as long as the lightest mass is placed on the highest-degree vertex, and in both cases all other masses can be arbitrarily settled. Correspondingly, we call it single-point matching. These findings indicate that the matchings between the node dynamics (parameter) and the node position rule the global systems dynamics, and sometimes only one node is enough to control the collective behaviors of the whole system. Therefore, the matching rules might be the common organization rules for collective behaviors on networks. PMID:24386088

  1. Multibeam single frequency synthetic aperture radar processor for imaging separate range swaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A single-frequency multibeam synthetic aperture radar for large swath imaging is disclosed. Each beam illuminates a separate ""footprint'' (i.e., range and azimuth interval). The distinct azimuth intervals for the separate beams produce a distinct Doppler frequency spectrum for each beam. After range correlation of raw data, an optical processor develops image data for the different beams by spatially separating the beams to place each beam of different Doppler frequency spectrum in a different location in the frequency plane as well as the imaging plane of the optical processor. Selection of a beam for imaging may be made in the frequency plane by adjusting the position of an aperture, or in the image plane by adjusting the position of a slit. The raw data may also be processed in digital form in an analogous manner.

  2. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darne, Chinmay D.; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I.-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Smith, Anne M.; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-12-01

    The work presented herein describes the system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens micro positron emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be 0.7% and 0.3, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 M IRDye800CW and 68Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. Three-dimensional mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP3) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate the FDPM approach. Finally, the PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The obtained results validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging.

  3. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Darne, Chinmay D.; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Smith, Anne M.; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2012-01-01

    The work presented herein describes system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens microPET/CT commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be 0.7% and 0.3, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 ?M IRDye800CW and 68Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. 3-D mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP3) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate FDPM approach. Finally, PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The results obtained validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging. PMID:23171509

  4. Sparse matrix beamforming and image reconstruction for real-time 2D HIFU monitoring using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) with in vitro validation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gary Y.; Provost, Jean; Grondin, Julien; Wang, Shutao; Marquet, Fabrice; Bunting, Ethan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method. HMIFU utilizes an Amplitude-Modulated (fAM = 25 Hz) HIFU beam to induce a localized focal oscillatory motion, which is simultaneously estimated and imaged by confocally-aligned imaging transducer. HMIFU feasibilities have been previously shown in silico, in vitro, and in vivo in 1-D or 2-D monitoring of HIFU treatment. The objective of this study is to develop and show the feasibility of a novel fast beamforming algorithm for image reconstruction using GPU-based sparse-matrix operation with real-time feedback. In this study, the algorithm was implemented onto a fully integrated, clinically relevant HMIFU system composed of a 93-element HIFU transducer (fcenter = 4.5MHz) and coaxially-aligned 64-element phased array (fcenter = 2.5MHz) for displacement excitation and motion estimation, respectively. A single transmit beam with divergent beam transmit was used while fast beamforming was implemented using a GPU-based delay-and-sum method and a sparse-matrix operation. Axial HMI displacements were then estimated from the RF signals using a 1-D normalized cross-correlation method and streamed to a graphic user interface. The present work developed and implemented a sparse matrix beamforming onto a fully-integrated, clinically relevant system, which can stream displacement images up to 15 Hz using a GPU-based processing, an increase of 100 fold in rate of streaming displacement images compared to conventional CPU-based conventional beamforming and reconstruction processing. The achieved feedback rate is also currently the fastest and only approach that does not require interrupting the HIFU treatment amongst the acoustic radiation force based HIFU imaging techniques. Results in phantom experiments showed reproducible displacement imaging, and monitoring of twenty two in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2D system showed a consistent average focal displacement decrease of 46.7±14.6% during lesion formation. Complementary focal temperature monitoring also indicated an average rate of displacement increase and decrease with focal temperature at 0.84±1.15 %/ °C, and 2.03± 0.93%/ °C, respectively. These results reinforce the HMIFU capability of estimating and monitoring stiffness related changes in real time. Current ongoing studies include clinical translation of the presented system for monitoring of HIFU treatment for breast and pancreatic tumor applications. PMID:24960528

  5. RETRACTED Studies on the effect of instability of divergence, pointing and amplitude of green and yellow radiation pulses of copper vapour laser in second harmonic and sum frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Om; Mahakud, Ramakanta; Nakhe, Shankar V.; Dixit, Sudhir K.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents the effect of single pulse stability of divergence angle, beam pointing angle and amplitude of green and yellow radiation pulses of an unstable resonator copper vapour laser (CVL) oscillator in the sum frequency mixing and second harmonic. The conversion efficiency of sum frequency generation was lower compared to second harmonic processes despite larger fundamental power being used in sum frequency experiments. However the net UV power obtained at the sum frequency was higher than both of the second harmonic UV frequencies. Lower SFG conversion efficiency (12.4%271 nm) compared to SHG (16.7%255 nm, 14.5%289 nm) of individual CVL radiations is attributed to difference in single pulse stability of beam pointing, divergence and amplitude fluctuation of both CVL radiations in addition to commonly known fact of spatio-temporal mis-match. At the same fundamental input power (2.7 W), higher SH conversion efficiency of yellow (12.7%) compared to green (11.0%) is attributed to its better single pulse stability of beam pointing and divergence.

  6. Sparse matrix beamforming and image reconstruction for 2-D HIFU monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) with in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Provost, Jean; Grondin, Julien; Wang, Shutao; Marquet, Fabrice; Bunting, Ethan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-11-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) utilizes an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam to induce a localized focal oscillatory motion simultaneously estimated. The objective of this study is to develop and show the feasibility of a novel fast beamforming algorithm for image reconstruction using GPU-based sparse-matrix operation with real-time feedback. In this study, the algorithm was implemented onto a fully integrated, clinically relevant HMIFU system. A single divergent transmit beam was used while fast beamforming was implemented using a GPU-based delay-and-sum method and a sparse-matrix operation. Axial HMI displacements were then estimated from the RF signals using a 1-D normalized cross-correlation method and streamed to a graphic user interface with frame rates up to 15 Hz, a 100-fold increase compared to conventional CPU-based processing. The real-time feedback rate does not require interrupting the HIFU treatment. Results in phantom experiments showed reproducible HMI images and monitoring of 22 in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2-D system demonstrated reproducible displacement imaging, and monitoring of 22 in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2-D system showed a consistent average focal displacement decrease of 46.7 14.6% during lesion formation. Complementary focal temperature monitoring also indicated an average rate of displacement increase and decrease with focal temperature at 0.841.15%/()C, and 2.030.93%/()C , respectively. These results reinforce the HMIFU capability of estimating and monitoring stiffness related changes in real time. Current ongoing studies include clinical translation of the presented system for monitoring of HIFU treatment for breast and pancreatic tumor applications. PMID:24960528

  7. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1983-08-31

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  8. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

    1985-01-01

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  9. Effect of quantum modes in biological electron transfer reactions: A useful approximation for the harmonic model with frequency change and Duchinsky rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, EunJoo; Medvedev, Emile S.; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2000-05-01

    Although general theory of quantum effects in nonadiabatic electron transfer (ET) reactions based on spin-boson Hamiltonian is well known, its application to problems of biological interest is hampered by the amount of computational work needed to map the details of the real system onto the parameters of the model. In this paper we propose a new formulation of theory of quantum effects which remedies many defects of the usual approach. In the harmonic approximation an exact expression for the rate of electron transfer has long been known that includes effects of frequency change and Duchinsky rotation (mixing) of vibrational modes of donor and acceptor complexes. This expression, however, is not suitable for practical applications due to its complexity. We have developed an exceptionally accurate approximation that is capable of capturing all details of real redox systems typical for biological problems, yet simple enough to be practical. The approximation is based on the well-known Jortner expression for the quantum rate. We describe a method for calculation of the parameters of the Jortner model, average quantum frequency and average excitation number, which are usually treated as adjustable parameters, and in our case are calculated by ab initio quantum chemistry methods. The model is tested against the exact result. We also have tested another useful approximation, which is as good as the first one, however, in a limited region around maximum of ET rate. In this approximation the rate constant has the same form as the semiclassical Marcus expression, except that instead of one reorganization energy ?, it contains two ?'s. We show how these parameters can be calculated for realistic systems. Examples of such calculations are presented for a novel electron transfer between tryptophan and tyrosine, which was discovered recently in photolyase, a DNA repair enzyme, and some other biological systems.

  10. A hybrid frequency-spatial domain infrared image enhancement approach evaluated by fuzzy entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Fleuret, Julien; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Traditional homomorphic enhancement method is only attributed to the frequency domain processing, which could not enhance the image outline effectively. A better homomorphic algorithm could consider the dynamic range of image to compress and expand gray levels of the target and thus enhance image details. After the frequency domain enhancement, the deployment of mathematical morphology could smooth the outline of the image in spatial domain. This paper develops an effectively comprehensive approach to optimize the contrast of infrared image, utilizing non-linear filtering in frequency domain and top-hat and bottom-hat transforms in spatial domain. Besides, a fuzzy entropy scheme is defined to verify the improved infrared image enhancement effects. Experimental results indicate that, through the proposed method, the image details and contours can be better enhanced comparing with other methods.

  11. Low-frequency magnetic subsurface imaging: reconstructing conductivity images of biological tissues via magnetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, K Ozdal; Gencer, Nevzat G

    2009-04-01

    A new data acquisition system has been developed. This system measures the external magnetic fields due to induced currents in the body at a relatively low operation frequency of 50 kHz . Data is obtained by scanning a 2-D area on the body surface. For each transmitter position, a single sample (averaged) of the field distribution is used for image reconstruction. The Steepest Descent Algorithm is used to solve the inverse problem related to the field profiles. High-resolution images of agar blocks and an anesthetized leech are presented. The system sensitivity is measured as 13.2 mV/(S/m) using saline solution phantoms and as 155 V/S using resistors. The signal to noise ratio in the measurements is calculated to be 35.44 dB. The linearity in the measurements is explored using saline solutions in the biological conductivity range. The nonlinearity is measured to be 3.96% of the full scale. The nonlinearity is found to be 0.12% when resistor phantoms are used. The spatial resolution in the conductivity images is measured as 9.36 mm for a 7.5-mm-diameter cylindrical agar object. The results show that it is possible to distinguish two bars separated 14.4 mm from each other. PMID:19272994

  12. Alzheimer's disease diagnosis on structural MR images using circular harmonic functions descriptors on hippocampus and posterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Ben Ahmed, Olfa; Mizotin, Maxim; Benois-Pineau, Jenny; Allard, Michle; Catheline, Gwnalle; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2015-09-01

    Recently, several pattern recognition methods have been proposed to automatically discriminate between patients with and without Alzheimer's disease using different imaging modalities: sMRI, fMRI, PET and SPECT. Classical approaches in visual information retrieval have been successfully used for analysis of structural MRI brain images. In this paper, we use the visual indexing framework and pattern recognition analysis based on structural MRI data to discriminate three classes of subjects: normal controls (NC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The approach uses the circular harmonic functions (CHFs) to extract local features from the most involved areas in the disease: hippocampus and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in each slice in all three brain projections. The features are quantized using the Bag-of-Visual-Words approach to build one signature by brain (subject). This yields a transformation of a full 3D image of brain ROIs into a 1D signature, a histogram of quantized features. To reduce the dimensionality of the signature, we use the PCA technique. Support vector machines classifiers are then applied to classify groups. The experiments were conducted on a subset of ADNI dataset and applied to the "Bordeaux-3City" dataset. The results showed that our approach achieves respectively for ADNI dataset and "Bordeaux-3City" dataset; for AD vs NC classification, an accuracy of 83.77% and 78%, a specificity of 88.2% and 80.4% and a sensitivity of 79.09% and 74.7%. For NC vs MCI classification we achieved for the ADNI datasets an accuracy of 69.45%, a specificity of 74.8% and a sensitivity of 62.52%. For the most challenging classification task (AD vs MCI), we reached an accuracy of 62.07%, a specificity of 75.15% and a sensitivity of 49.02%. The use of PCC visual features description improves classification results by more than 5% compared to the use of hippocampus features only. Our approach is automatic, less time-consuming and does not require the intervention of the clinician during the disease diagnosis. PMID:26069906

  13. Model of thermal infrared image texture generation based on the scenery space frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hai-He; Bai, Ting-Zhu; Qu, Xiao-Xia

    2015-04-01

    Infrared texture is an important feature in identifying scenery. To simulate infrared image texture effectively at different distances, we propose a model of infrared image texture generation based on scenery space frequency and the image pyramid degradation principle. First, we build a spatial frequency filter model based on imaging distance, taking into account the detector's maximum spatial frequency, and use the filter to process a "zero" distance infrared image texture. Second, taking into consideration the actual temperature difference of the scenery's details due to variation of the imaging distance and the effect of atmospheric transmission, we compare the actual temperature difference with the minimum resolvable temperature difference of the thermal imaging system at a specific frequency and produce a new image texture. The results show that the simulated multiresolution infrared image textures produced by the proposed model are very similar (lowest mean square error=0.51 and highest peak signal-to-noise ratio=117.59) to the images captured by the thermal imager. Therefore, the proposed model can effectively simulate infrared image textures at different distances.

  14. Diffuse reflection imaging at terahertz frequencies for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, P.; Khanna, S.; Chakraborty, S.; Lachab, M.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.

    2007-10-01

    We report diffuse reflection imaging of concealed powdered samples in atmospheric air using a quantum cascade laser operating at 2.83 THz. The imaging system uses a helium-cooled silicon bolometer for mapping radiation diffusely reflected and scattered from samples, and a room-temperature pyroelectric sensor for simultaneously acquiring a specular image. A range of powders concealed within plastic packaging and standard FedEx envelopes was imaged with a resolution of better than 0.5 mm, and it was possible to detect powdered samples concealed within packaging from which there was a strong component of surface reflection. The feasibility of performing dual-wavelength diffuse reflection imaging for identification of illicit drugs and explosives is discussed.

  15. A novel dual-frequency imaging method for intravascular ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Chen, Yan; Wong, Chi-Man; Liu, Baoqiang; Dai, Jiyan; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which is able to delineate internal structures of vessel wall with fine spatial resolution, has greatly enriched the knowledge of coronary atherosclerosis. A novel dual-frequency imaging method is proposed in this paper for intravascular imaging applications. A probe combined two ultrasonic transducer elements with different center frequencies (36 MHz and 78 MHz) is designed and fabricated with PMN-PT single crystal material. It has the ability to balance both imaging depth and resolution, which are important imaging parameters for clinical test. A dual-channel imaging platform is also proposed for real-time imaging, and this platform has been proven to support programmable processing algorithms, flexible imaging control, and raw RF data acquisition for IVUS applications. Testing results show that the -6 dB axial and lateral imaging resolutions of low-frequency ultrasound are 78 and 132 μm, respectively. In terms of high-frequency ultrasound, axial and lateral resolutions are determined to be as high as 34 and 106 μm. In vitro intravascular imaging on healthy swine aorta is conducted to demonstrate the performance of the dual-frequency imaging method for IVUS applications. PMID:25454093

  16. Performance comparison of ISAR imaging method based on time frequency transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chunjian; Guo, Chenjiang; Xu, Jiadong

    2013-03-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) can image the moving target, especially the target in the air, so it is important in the air defence and missile defence system. Time-frequency Transform was applied to ISAR imaging process widely. Several time frequency transforms were introduced. Noise jamming methods were analysed, and when these noise jamming were added to the echo of the ISAR receiver, the image can become blur even can't to be identify. But the effect is different to the different time frequency analysis. The results of simulation experiment show the Performance Comparison of the method.

  17. Model-based frequency response characterization of a digital-image analysis system for epifluorescence microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazra, Rajeeb; Viles, Charles L.; Park, Stephen K.; Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Sieracki, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a model-based method for estimating the spatial frequency response of a digital-imaging system (e.g., a CCD camera) that is modeled as a linear, shift-invariant image acquisition subsystem that is cascaded with a linear, shift-variant sampling subsystem. The method characterizes the 2D frequency response of the image acquisition subsystem to beyond the Nyquist frequency by accounting explicitly for insufficient sampling and the sample-scene phase. Results for simulated systems and a real CCD-based epifluorescence microscopy system are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method.

  18. Effects of frequencies of AC modulation voltage on piezoelectric-induced images using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.H. . E-mail: mmcjxu@polyu.edu.hk; Woo, C.H.; Shi, S.Q.; Wang, Y.

    2004-07-15

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film is prepared by sol-gel method on Pt/Ti electrode/SiO{sub 2}/Si wafer. Local poling is performed on the PZT film using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The topography and piezoelectric-induced (PEI) images on the polarized PZT film are recorded using AFM at piezo-responsive mode, operated with an AC voltage at varying frequencies. The best PEI image was obtained at the frequency around 300 kHz. It is explained that the change of piezoelectric vibrations and input noise signals with the frequency of AC modulation voltage affects the intensity of PEI images.

  19. Spatial pattern separation of chemicals and frequency-independent components by terahertz spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuuki; Kawase, Kodo; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Youichi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2003-10-01

    We separated the component spatial patterns of frequency-dependent absorption in chemicals and frequency-independent components such as plastic, paper, and measurement noise in terahertz (THz) spectroscopic images, using known spectral curves. Our measurement system, which uses a widely tunable coherent THz-wave parametric oscillator source, can image at a specific frequency in the range 1-2 THz. The component patterns of chemicals can easily be extracted by use of the frequency-independent components. This method could be successfully used for nondestructive inspection for the detection of illegal drugs and devices of bioterrorism concealed, e.g., inside mail and packages.

  20. Imaging of collagen matrix remodeling in three-dimensional space using second harmonic generation and two photon excitation fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Carthy, Jon; McManus, Bruce

    2009-02-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG), a nonlinear optical phenomenon, exhibits several in-common characteristics of twophoton excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy. These characteristics include identical equipment requirements from experiment to experiment and the intrinsic capability of generating 3-dimensional (D) high resolution images. Structural protein arrays that are highly ordered, such as collagen, produce strong SHG signals without the need for any exogenous label (stain). SHG and TPEF can be used together to provide information on structural rearrangements in 3D space of the collagen matrix associated with various physiological processes. In this study, we used SHG and TPEF to detect cellmediated structural reorganization of the extracellular collagen matrix in 3D space triggered by dimensional changes of embedded fibroblasts. These fibroblasts were cultured in native type I collagen gels and were stimulated to contract for a period of 24 hours. The gels were stained for cell nuclei with Hoechst and for actin with phalloidin conjugated to Alexa Fluor 488. We used non-de-scanned detectors and spectral scanning mode both in the reflection geometry for generating the 3D images and for SHG spectra, respectively. We used a tunable infrared laser with 100-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 80-MHz tuned to 800-nm for Hoechst and Alexa 488 excitations. We employed a broad range of excitation wavelengths (800 to 880-nm) with a scan interval of 10 nm to detect the SHG signal. We found that spectrally clean SHG signal peaked at 414-nm with excitation wavelength of 830-nm. The SHG spectrum has a full width half maximum (FWHM) bandwidth of 6.60-nm, which is consistent with its scaling relation to FWHM bandwidth 100-fs excitation pulses. When stimulated to contract, we found the fibroblasts to be highly elongated as well as interconnected in 2D space, and the collagen matrix, in the form of a visibly clear fibril structure, accumulated around the cells. In the absence of contraction, on the other hand, the cells were predominantly round in shape and no sign of collagen accumulation around the cell was evident despite the presence of SHG signal as well as the fibrillar collagen morphology in the collagen matrix. We here conclude that SHG in conjunction with TPEF can serve as a noninvasive method to provide spatially resolved 3D structural reorganization of collagen matrices triggered by various physiological processes.

  1. Multi-chromatic magnetic resonance imaging using frequency lock-in suppression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Hwang, Dennis W

    2015-10-01

    This study developed a multi-chromatic MR contrast using the frequency lock-in technique. An electronic feedback device that generates a specific narrow-frequency-bandwidth RF field is presented. The effects of this RF field on MR images are assessed both theoretically and experimentally. Spectroscopy and imaging experiments were performed. Frequency tuning allowed the selected spectral peak to be suppressed. Phantom tests using methanol, ethanol, and water showed different contrasts using different feedback RF field frequencies. The frequency lock-in was also found to help differentiate among the small structural variations in biological tissues. The contrast achieved in in vivo mouse brain imaging using the lock-in suppressed technique indicated a better spatial discrimination when compared with that achieved using conventional imaging methods, especially in the hippocampus region. Selective lock-in suppressed imaging is a new approach to provide frequency information in MRI; rather than determining the evolution of image contrast over time, this approach allows small susceptibility variations to be distinguished by tuning the frequency of the narrow-bandwidth lock-in RF field. A new and enhanced contrast can be achieved using this technique. PMID:26282163

  2. Evaluation of influences of frequency and amplitude on image degradation caused by satellite vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Yi-Bing; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Li-Jun; Zheng, Cheng; Wang, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Satellite vibrations during exposure will lead to pixel aliasing of remote sensors, resulting in the deterioration of image quality. In this paper, we expose the problem and discuss the characteristics of satellite vibrations, and then present a pixel mixing model. The idea of mean mixing ratio (MMR) is proposed. MMR computations for different frequencies are implemented. In the mixing model, a coefficient matrix is introduced to estimate each mixed pixel. Thus, the simulation of degraded image can be performed when the vibration attitudes are known. The computation of MMR takes into consideration the influences of various frequencies and amplitudes. Therefore, the roles of these parameters played in the degradation progress are identified. Computations show that under the same vibration amplitude, the influence of vibrations fluctuates with the variation of frequency. The fluctuation becomes smaller as the frequency rises. Two kinds of vibration imaging experiments are performed: different amplitudes with the same frequency and different frequencies with the same amplitude. Results are found to be in very good agreement with the theoretical results. MMR has a better description of image quality than modulation transfer function (MTF). The influence of vibrations is determined mainly by the amplitude rather than the frequency. The influence of vibrations on image quality becomes gradually stable with the increase of frequency. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB329202) and the Basic Industrial Technology Project of China (Grant No. J312012B002).

  3. Digital parallel frequency-domain spectroscopy for tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Arnesano, Cosimo; Santoro, Ylenia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Near-infrared (NIR) (650 to 1000 nm) optical properties of turbid media can be quantified accurately and noninvasively using methods based on diffuse reflectance or transmittance, such as frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM). Conventional FDPM techniques based on white-light steady-state (SS) spectral measurements in conjunction with the acquisition of frequency-domain (FD) data at selected wavelengths using laser diodes are used to measure broadband NIR scattering-corrected absorption spectra of turbid media. These techniques are limited by the number of wavelength points used to obtain FD data and by the sweeping technique used to collect FD data over a relatively large range. We have developed a method that introduces several improvements in the acquisition of optical parameters, based on the digital parallel acquisition of a comb of frequencies and on the use of a white laser as a single light source for both FD and SS measurements. The source, due to the high brightness, allows a higher penetration depth with an extremely low power on the sample. The parallel acquisition decreases the time required by standard serial systems that scan through a range of modulation frequencies. Furthermore, all-digital acquisition removes analog noise, avoids the analog mixer, and does not create radiofrequency interference or emission. PMID:23085915

  4. Digital parallel frequency-domain spectroscopy for tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Arnesano, Cosimo; Santoro, Ylenia; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-09-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) (650 to 1000 nm) optical properties of turbid media can be quantified accurately and noninvasively using methods based on diffuse reflectance or transmittance, such as frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM). Conventional FDPM techniques based on white-light steady-state (SS) spectral measurements in conjunction with the acquisition of frequency-domain (FD) data at selected wavelengths using laser diodes are used to measure broadband NIR scattering-corrected absorption spectra of turbid media. These techniques are limited by the number of wavelength points used to obtain FD data and by the sweeping technique used to collect FD data over a relatively large range. We have developed a method that introduces several improvements in the acquisition of optical parameters, based on the digital parallel acquisition of a comb of frequencies and on the use of a white laser as a single light source for both FD and SS measurements. The source, due to the high brightness, allows a higher penetration depth with an extremely low power on the sample. The parallel acquisition decreases the time required by standard serial systems that scan through a range of modulation frequencies. Furthermore, all-digital acquisition removes analog noise, avoids the analog mixer, and does not create radiofrequency interference or emission. PMID:23085915

  5. Multispectral imaging of tissue absorption and scattering using spatial frequency domain imaging and a computed-tomography imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jessie R.; Cuccia, David J.; Johnson, William R.; Bearman, Gregory H.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Hsu, Mike; Lin, Alexander; Binder, Devin K.; Wilson, Dan; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach for rapidly and quantitatively mapping tissue absorption and scattering spectra in a wide-field, noncontact imaging geometry by combining multifrequency spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) with a computed-tomography imaging spectrometer (CTIS). SFDI overcomes the need to spatially scan a source, and is based on the projection and analysis of periodic structured illumination patterns. CTIS provides a throughput advantage by simultaneously diffracting multiple spectral images onto a single CCD chip to gather spectra at every pixel of the image, thus providing spatial and spectral information in a single snapshot. The spatial-spectral data set was acquired 30 times faster than with our wavelength-scanning liquid crystal tunable filter camera, even though it is not yet optimized for speed. Here we demonstrate that the combined SFDI-CTIS is capable of rapid, multispectral imaging of tissue absorption and scattering in a noncontact, nonscanning platform. The combined system was validated for 36 wavelengths between 650-1000 nm in tissue simulating phantoms over a range of tissue-like absorption and scattering properties. The average percent error for the range of absorption coefficients (?a) was less than 10% from 650-800 nm, and less than 20% from 800-1000 nm. The average percent error in reduced scattering coefficients (?s') was less than 5% from 650-700 nm and less than 3% from 700-1000 nm. The SFDI-CTIS platform was applied to a mouse model of brain injury in order to demonstrate the utility of this approach in characterizing spatially and spectrally varying tissue optical properties.

  6. Multispectral imaging of tissue absorption and scattering using spatial frequency domain imaging and a computed-tomography imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jessie R; Cuccia, David J; Johnson, William R; Bearman, Gregory H; Durkin, Anthony J; Hsu, Mike; Lin, Alexander; Binder, Devin K; Wilson, Dan; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach for rapidly and quantitatively mapping tissue absorption and scattering spectra in a wide-field, noncontact imaging geometry by combining multifrequency spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) with a computed-tomography imaging spectrometer (CTIS). SFDI overcomes the need to spatially scan a source, and is based on the projection and analysis of periodic structured illumination patterns. CTIS provides a throughput advantage by simultaneously diffracting multiple spectral images onto a single CCD chip to gather spectra at every pixel of the image, thus providing spatial and spectral information in a single snapshot. The spatial-spectral data set was acquired 30 times faster than with our wavelength-scanning liquid crystal tunable filter camera, even though it is not yet optimized for speed. Here we demonstrate that the combined SFDI-CTIS is capable of rapid, multispectral imaging of tissue absorption and scattering in a noncontact, nonscanning platform. The combined system was validated for 36 wavelengths between 650-1000 nm in tissue simulating phantoms over a range of tissue-like absorption and scattering properties. The average percent error for the range of absorption coefficients (?a) was less than 10% from 650-800 nm, and less than 20% from 800-1000 nm. The average percent error in reduced scattering coefficients (?s') was less than 5% from 650-700 nm and less than 3% from 700-1000 nm. The SFDI-CTIS platform was applied to a mouse model of brain injury in order to demonstrate the utility of this approach in characterizing spatially and spectrally varying tissue optical properties. PMID:21280902

  7. Optimal geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the global minima of water clusters (H2O)n, n=2-6, and several hexamer local minima at the CCSD(T) level of theory

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Apra, Edoardo; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-09-21

    We report the first optimum geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies for the ring pentamer and several water hexamer (prism, cage, cyclic and two book) at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. All five hexamer isomer minima previously reported by MP2 are also minima on the CCSD(T) potential energy surface (PES). In addition, all CCSD(T) minimum energy structures for the n=2-6 cluster isomers are quite close to the ones previously obtained by MP2 on the respective PESs, as confirmed by a modified Procrustes analysis that quantifies the difference between any two cluster geometries. The CCSD(T) results confirm the cooperative effect of the homodromic ring networks (systematic contraction of the nearest-neighbor (nn) intermolecular separations with cluster size) previously reported by MP2, albeit with O-O distances shorter by ~0.02 , indicating that MP2 overcorrects this effect. The harmonic frequencies at the minimum geometries were obtained by the double differentiation of the CCSD(T) energy using an efficient scheme based on internal coordinates that reduces the number of required single point energy evaluations by ~15% when compared to the corresponding double differentiation using Cartesian coordinates. Negligible differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) are found for the librational modes, while uniform increases of ~15 and ~25 cm-1 are observed for the bending and free OH harmonic frequencies. The largest differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) are observed for the harmonic hydrogen bonded frequencies. The CCSD(T) red shifts from the monomer frequencies (??) are smaller than the MP2 ones, due to the fact that the former produces shorter elongations (?R) of the respective hydrogen bonded OH lengths from the monomer value with respect to the latter. Both the MP2 and CCSD(T) results for the hydrogen bonded frequencies were found to closely follow the relation - ?? = s ? ?R, with a rate of s = 20.3 cm-1 / 0.001 . The CCSD(T) harmonic frequencies, when corrected using the MP2 anharmonicities obtained from second order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2), produce anharmonicCCSD(T) estimates that are within < 60 cm-1 from the measured infrared (IR) active bands of the n=2-6 clusters and furthermore trace the observed red shifts with respect to the monomer (??) quite accurately. The energetic order between the various hexamer isomers on the PES (prism has the lowest energy) previously reported at MP2 was found to be preserved at the CCSD(T) level, whereas the inclusion of anharmonic corrections further stabilizes the cage among the hexamer isomers.

  8. Current collapse imaging of Schottky gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by electric field-induced optical second-harmonic generation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuno, Takashi Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Uesugi, Tsutomu; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2014-06-23

    Two-dimensional current collapse imaging of a Schottky gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor device was achieved by optical electric field-induced second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurements. EFISHG measurements can detect the electric field produced by carriers trapped in the on-state of the device, which leads to current collapse. Immediately after (e.g., 1, 100, or 800 μs) the completion of drain-stress voltage (200 V) in the off-state, the second-harmonic (SH) signals appeared within 2 μm from the gate edge on the drain electrode. The SH signal intensity became weak with time, which suggests that the trapped carriers are emitted from the trap sites. The SH signal location supports the well-known virtual gate model for current collapse.

  9. Fiber bundle based endomicroscopy prototype with two collection channels for simultaneous coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and second harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengfan; Satira, Zachary A.; Wang, Xi; Xu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xu; Wong, Kelvin; Chen, Shufen; Xin, Jianguo; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2014-02-01

    Label-free multiphoton imaging is promising for replacing biopsy and could offer new strategies for intraoperative or surgical applications. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging could provide lipid-band contrast, and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging is useful for imaging collagen, tendon and muscle fibers. A combination of these two imaging modalities could provide rich information and this combination has been studied by researchers to investigate diseases through microscopy imaging. The combination of these two imaging modalities in endomicroscopy imaging has been rarely investigated. In this research, a fiber bundle consisted of one excitation fiber and 18 collection fibers was developed in our endomicroscopy prototype. The 18 collection fibers were divided into two collection channels with 9 fibers in each channel. These two channels could be used together as one channel for effective signal collection or used separately for simplifying detection part of the system. Differences of collection pattern of these two channels were investigated. Collection difference of central excitation fiber and surrounding 18 fibers was also investigated, which reveals the potential ability of this system to measure forward to backward (F/B) ratio in SHG imaging. CARS imaging of mouse adipocyte and SHG imaging of mouse tail tendon were performed to demonstrate the CARS and SHG tissue imaging performance of this system. Simultaneous CARS and SHG imaging ability of this system was demonstrated by mouse tail imaging. This fiber bundle based endomicroscopy imaging prototype, offers a promising platform for constructing efficient fiber-based CARS and SHG multimodal endomicroscopes for label free intraoperative imaging applications.

  10. High-frequency ultrasound miniature transducers for tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokosawa, Koichi; Ito, Yukio; Sano, Syuzo; Shinomura, Ryuichi; Sato, Yutaka

    1997-04-01

    We have fabricated a miniature 120-MHz transducer for imaging the internal structure of living samples, and mounted it in a 3-mm-diameter rod-shaped probe which ensures contact with a tissue to evaluate the tissue imaging capability of the transducer. The transducer consists of a thin film of 12.5-micrometer thick ZnO sandwiched between two metal electrodes, the bottom one deposited on a sapphire substrate whose other face has a polished concave-sphere acoustic lens. Both the lens diameter and the sphere radius are 0.5 mm; that is, the F number of the lens is 1. The lens of the transducer faces outwards in the probe so that the ultrasound can be transmitted and received directly by it in the radial direction of the rod without any mirrors. As the probe rotates mechanically around its axis and shifts in the direction of the axis, a cylindrical plane created by the locus of the beam focus is located inside of the tissue. Using this scanning, we form tissue images in the C-scan mode in a cylindrical plane within the target tissue. Preliminary results for imaging an in vitro bovine kidney sample into which the probe was inserted demonstrate that the fabricated probe can image microscopic structure inside tissue samples.

  11. Discovery of deep and shallow trap states from step structures of rutile TiO{sub 2} vicinal surfaces by second harmonic and sum frequency generation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro

    2011-04-21

    In this report, local electronic structures of steps and terraces on rutile TiO{sub 2} single crystal faces were studied by second harmonic and sum frequency generation (SHG/SFG) spectroscopy. We attained selective measurement of the local electronic states of the step bunches formed on the vicinal (17 18 1) and (15 13 0) surfaces using a recently developed step-selective probing technique. The electronic structures of the flat (110)-(1x1) (the terrace face of the vicinal surfaces) and (011)-(2x1) surfaces were also discussed. The SHG/SFG spectra showed that step structures are mainly responsible for the formation of trap states, since significant resonances from the trap states were observed only from the vicinal surfaces. We detected deep hole trap (DHT) states and shallow electron trap (SET) states selectively from the step bunches on the vicinal surfaces. Detailed analysis of the SHG/SFG spectra showed that the DHT and SET states are more likely to be induced at the top edges of the step bunches than on their hillsides. Unlike the SET states, the DHT states were observed only at the step bunches parallel to [1 1 1][equivalent to the step bunches formed on the (17 18 1) surface]. Photocatalytic activity for each TiO{sub 2} sample was also measured through methylene blue photodegradation reactions and was found to follow the sequence: (110) < (17 18 1) < (15 13 0) < (011), indicating that steps along [0 0 1] are more reactive than steps along [1 1 1]. This result implies that the presence of the DHT states observed from the step bunches parallel to [1 1 1] did not effectively contribute to the methylene blue photodegradation reactions.

  12. Fast 3-D photoacoustic imaging in vivo with a high frequency ultrasound array toward clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liang; Maslov, Konstantin; Bitton, Rachel; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-02-01

    We present an in vivo reflection-mode photoacoustic microscopy system that performs B-scan imaging at 50 Hz with realtime beamforming and 3-D imaging of 166 B-scan frames at 1 Hz with post-beamforming. To our knowledge, this speed is currently the fastest in high frequency photoacoustic imaging. In addition, with a custom fiber based light delivery system, the imaging device is capable of performing handheld operation. Software for image processing and display with clinically user-friendly graphic user interface (GUI) is developed. The system has axial, lateral, and elevational resolutions of 25, 70, and 200 ?m, respectively, and can image 3 mm deep in scattering biological tissue. Volumetric images of subcutaneous vasculature in murine are demonstrated in vivo. The system is anticipated to have potential clinical applications in skin melanoma detection due to its unique ability to image in realtime and to image anatomical sites inaccessible to other imaging systems.

  13. Waveguide harmonic damper for klystron amplifier.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.

    1998-10-27

    A waveguide harmonic damper was designed for removing the harmonic frequency power from the klystron amplifiers of the APS linac. Straight coaxial probe antennas are used in a rectangular waveguide to form a damper. A linear array of the probe antennas is used on a narrow wall of the rectangular waveguide for damping klystron harmonics while decoupling the fundamental frequency in dominent TE{sub 01} mode. The klystron harmonics can exist in the waveguide as waveguide higher-order modes above cutoff. Computer simulations are made to investigate the waveguide harmonic damping characteristics of the damper.

  14. Optical image and laser slope meter intercomparisons of high-frequency waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubard, S. C.; Krimmel, J. E.; Thebaud, L. R.; Evans, D. D.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1980-01-01

    Spectral analyses of optical images of the ocean surface, obtained by a digital video system, are presented and compared with wave data measured simultaneously by the JPL Waverider-mounted laser slope meter. The image analyses, which incorporate several new ideas, provide two-dimensional wave number spectra of slope, covering wavelengths from 10 cm to 10 m. These slope spectra are converted to wave height spectra by a new technique which includes the effects of sky radiance gradients. Space-time spectra are also presented for waves whose frequencies are less than 2 Hz. The JPL slope frequency spectra are compared with image wave number spectra which have been converted to frequency spectra by use of the gravity wave dispersion relation. Results of comparisons between the frequency spectra obtained from the two different measurements show reasonable agreement for frequencies less than 3 Hz.

  15. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: Imaging and Source Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boboltz, David A.; Fey, Alan L.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Edward B.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Zhang, Li-Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-braid) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  16. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  17. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lilehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscope methodology has been developed that employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever fundamental resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of embedded nanoscale features.

  18. Simultaneous sum-frequency and vibro-acoustography imaging for nondestructive evaluation and testing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.; Silva, G. T.; Greenleaf, J. F.; Fatemi, M.

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution ultrasound imaging systems for inspection of defects and flaws in materials are of great demand in many industries. Among these systems, Vibro-acoustography (VA) has shown excellent capabilities as a noncontact method for nondestructive high-resolution imaging applications. This method consists of mixing two confocal ultrasound beams, slightly shifted in frequency, to produce a dynamic (oscillatory) radiation force in the region of their intersection. This force vibrates the object placed at the focus of the confocal transducer. As a result of the applied force, an acoustic emission field at the difference frequency of the primary incident ultrasound beams is produced. In addition to the difference frequency acoustic emission signal, there exists another signal at the sum frequency, formed in the intersection region of the two primary beams. The goal of this study is to investigate the formation of high-resolution images using the sum frequency of ultrasound waves in VA while concurrently forming the conventional difference-frequency VA image, thereby increasing the amount of information acquired during a single scan. A theoretical model describing the sum-frequency wave propagation, including beam forming and image formation in the confocal configuration, is developed and verified experimentally. Moreover, sample experiments are performed on a flawed fiber-reinforced ceramic composite plate. Images at both the difference and sum frequencies are compared and discussed. Results show that the sum-frequency image produces a high-resolution C scan of the plate by which the flaws and structural details of the plate can be detected.

  19. Harmonic uniflow engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2016-03-22

    A reciprocating-piston uniflow engine includes a harmonic oscillator inlet valve capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into the engine. In particular, the inlet valve includes an inlet valve head and a spring arranged together as a harmonic oscillator so that the inlet valve head is moveable from an unbiased equilibrium position to a biased closed position occluding an inlet. When released, the inlet valve head undergoes a single oscillation past the equilibrium position to a maximum open position and returns to a biased return position close to the closed position to choke the flow and produce a pressure drop across the inlet valve causing the inlet valve to close. In other embodiments, the harmonic oscillator arrangement of the inlet valve enables the uniflow engine to be reversibly operated as a uniflow compressor.

  20. Frequency response and directivity of highly sensitive optical microresonator detectors for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenheim, James A.; Li, Jing; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.

    2015-03-01

    Plano-convex optical microresonator detectors have been developed as an alternative to planar Fabry-Prot (FP) sensors used in all-optical photoacoustic imaging systems with the potential to provide two or more orders-of-magnitude higher detection sensitivity. This study further characterises the performance of these detectors by investigating their normal incidence frequency response and frequency-dependent directivity. It is shown that sensors with thicknesses in the range ~50-320?m provide broadband, smooth frequency response characteristics and low directional sensitivity. This suggests that a photoacoustic imaging system based on microresonator detectors may be capable of imaging with similar performance to the FP system but with significantly higher sensitivity, paving the way to deep tissue imaging applications such as the clinical assessment of breast cancer and preclinical whole body small animal imaging.

  1. Optical correlation of spatial-frequency-shifted images in a photorefractive BSO correlator.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Abtine; Becker, Michael F

    2004-03-10

    The optical cross correlation of an image with another image that was spatial-frequency shifted in one dimension was demonstrated in a photorefractive VanderLugt correlator. The first image was stored as a Fourier-transform hologram in a photorefractive Bi12SiO20 crystal (BSO) and was successively correlated with different spatial-frequency-shifted versions of a second image. We implemented the spatial-frequency shift by rotating a galvanometer mirror in an image plane, causing the Fourier transform to be shifted laterally in the BSO. We verified that the resulting operation in the BSO was an accurate complex multiplication of the shifted and the stored Fourier transforms. As many as 20 successive readouts were conducted without measurable erasure of the stored hologram. The dynamic range, saturation behavior, and other performance parameters were measured and are discussed. PMID:15046173

  2. High fidelity magnetic resonance imaging by frequency sweep encoding and Fourier decoding.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Xiang, Yun

    2010-06-01

    Using a RF pulse with linear frequency sweep and a simultaneous encoding gradient, magnetization is sequentially excited accompanied by a quadratic phase profile. This quadratic dependence of magnetization phase on position dephases magnetization away from its vertices, allowing direct spatial encoding and image formation in the time domain. In this work, we show that Fourier decoding or least square fitting in combination with frequency sweep spatial encoding schemes can generate high fidelity images and we also extend spatial encoding to include nonlinear frequency sweep. Application to in vivo multiscan susceptibility-weighted imaging is demonstrated. Our results show that Fourier-decoded, spatially encoded images compare favorably with conventional high resolution images while preserving the unique features of sequential excitation. PMID:20223688

  3. Noncontact imaging of burn depth and extent in a porcine model using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Amaan; Saggese, Steve; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Nanney, Lillian; Cuccia, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The standard of care for clinical assessment of burn severity and extent lacks a quantitative measurement. In this work, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) was used to measure 48 thermal burns of graded severity (superficial partial, deep partial, and full thickness) in a porcine model. Functional (total hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation) and structural parameters (tissue scattering) derived from the SFDI measurements were monitored over 72h for each burn type and compared to gold standard histological measurements of burn depth. Tissue oxygen saturation (stO2) and total hemoglobin (ctHbT) differentiated superficial partial thickness burns from more severe burn types after 2 and 72h, respectively (p<0.01), but were unable to differentiate deep partial from full thickness wounds in the first 72h. Tissue scattering parameters separated superficial burns from all burn types immediately after injury (p<0.01), and separated all three burn types from each other after 24h (p<0.01). Tissue scattering parameters also showed a strong negative correlation to histological burn depth as measured by vimentin immunostain (r2>0.89). These results show promise for the use of SFDI-derived tissue scattering as a correlation to burn depth and the potential to assess burn depth via a combination of SFDI functional and structural parameters. PMID:25147961

  4. Three-dimensional speckle imaging employing a frequency-locked tunable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Bret D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schiffern, John T.; Mendoza, Albert

    2015-09-01

    We describe a high accuracy frequency stepping method for a tunable diode laser to improve a three dimensional (3D) imaging approach based upon interferometric speckle imaging. The approach, modeled after Takeda, exploits tuning an illumination laser in frequency as speckle interferograms of the object (specklegrams) are acquired at each frequency in a Michelson interferometer. The resulting 3D hypercube of specklegrams encode spatial information in the x-y plane of each image with laser tuning arrayed along its z-axis. The specklegrams are processed by Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) along the z-axis of the hypercube and the center of the peak in the resulting power spectrum for each pixel encodes its surface height. Alternatively, Takeda's method can be followed which uses the phase of the FFT, unwraps it, and determines the surface height encoded in the slope of a line fitted to the phase. Wraparound of modulations above the Nyquist limit results in ambiguity in the optical path difference (OPD) between test and reference surfaces. Wraparound also amplifies measurement noise caused by errors and jitter in frequency stepping the illumination laser. By locking the laser frequency to successive cavity modes of a reference confocal interferometer, tuning is precisely controlled resulting in dramatically improved imaging quality/. We present laboratory data of before and after results showing enhanced 3D imaging resulting from precise laser frequency control.

  5. Axial standing-wave illumination frequency-domain imaging (SWIF)

    PubMed Central

    Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    Despite their tremendous contribution to biomedical research and diagnosis, conventional spatial sampling techniques such as wide-field, point scanning or selective plane illumination microscopy face inherent limiting trade-offs between spatial resolution, field-of-view, phototoxicity and recording speed. Several of these trade-offs are the result of spatial sampling with diffracting beams. Here, we introduce a new strategy for fluorescence imaging, SWIF, which instead encodes the axial profile of a sample in the Fourier domain. We demonstrate how this can be achieved with propagation-invariant illumination patterns that extend over several millimeters and robustly propagate through layers of varying refractive index. This enabled us to image a lateral field-of-view of 0.8 mm x 1.5 mm with an axial resolution of 2.4 µm – greatly exceeding the lateral field-of-view of conventional illumination techniques (~100 µm) at comparable resolution. Thus, SWIF allowed us to surpass the limitations of diffracting illumination beams and untangle lateral field-of-view from resolution. PMID:24921798

  6. Elimination of depth degeneracy in optical frequency-domain imaging through polarization-based optical demodulation.

    PubMed

    Vakoc, B J; Yun, S H; Tearney, G J; Bouma, B E

    2006-02-01

    A novel optical frequency-domain imaging system is demonstrated that employs a passive optical demodulation circuit and a chirped digital acquisition clock derived from a voltage-controlled oscillator. The demodulation circuit allows the separation of signals from positive and negative depths to better than 50 dB, thereby eliminating depth degeneracy and doubling the imaging depth range. Our system design is compatible with dual-balanced and polarization-diverse detection, important techniques in the practical biomedical application of optical frequency-domain imaging. PMID:16480209

  7. Final Scientific/Technical Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063 Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henry Kapteyn

    2006-06-06

    The objective of this project was to develop experimental techniques for using coherent extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation generated using the high-order harmonic generation technique, as an illumination source for studies of high-density plasmas relevant to the stockpile stewardship mission. In this project, we made considerable progress, including the first demonstration of imaging of dynamic processes using this coherent ultrashort pulse light. This work also stimulated considerable progress in the development of the required ultrashort EUV pulses, and in the development of new laser technologies that have been commercialized. We also demonstrated the first EUV sources that exhibit full intrinsic optical coherence. This work resulted in 12 publications.

  8. High-sensitivity and high-spatial-resolution imaging of self-assembled monolayer on platinum using radially polarized beam excited second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Niioka, Hirohiko; Ashida, Koichiro; Yoshiki, Keisuke; Araki, Tsutomu

    2015-11-01

    High-sensitivity, high-spatial-resolution imaging of organic monolayers on platinum with second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy using radially polarized beam excitation is investigated. A tightly focused, radially polarized beam forms a longitudinal electric field at the focus. The longitudinal field is enhanced at a metal surface and increases the intensity of SHG from the molecules on the metal surface. The SHG signal from a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a platinum surface excited by a radially polarized beam is approximately 3.7 times higher than that obtained with a linearly polarized beam. Improved spatial resolution is also demonstrated using a SAM patterned by electron beam lithography.

  9. High efficiency intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2005-03-01

    We have built and tested a highly efficient source of pulsed 320 nm light based on intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. The four-mirror nonplanar ring optical cavity uses the RISTRA geometry, denoting rotated-image singly-resonant twisted rectangle. The cavity contains a type-II xz-cut KTP crystal pumped by the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG to generate an 803~nm signal and 1576 nm idler, and a type-II BBO crystal to sum-frequency mix the 532 nm pump and cavity-resonant 803 nm signal to generate 320 nm light. The cavity is configured so pump light passes first through the BBO crystal and then through the KTP crystal with the 320 nm light exiting through the output coupler following the BBO sum-frequency crystal. The cavity output coupler is designed to be a high reflector at 532 nm, have high transmission at 320 nm, and reflect approximately 85% at 803 nm. With this configuration we've obtained 1064 nm to 320 nm optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24% and generated single-frequency ? = 320 nm pulses with energies up to 140 mJ.

  10. High-efficiency intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Darrell Jewell; Smith, Arlee Virgil

    2005-02-01

    We have built and tested a highly efficient source of pulsed 320 nm light based on intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. The four-mirror nonplanar ring optical cavity uses the RISTRA geometry, denoting rotated-image singly-resonant twisted rectangle. The cavity contains a type-II xz-cut KTP crystal pumped by the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG to generate an 803{approx}nm signal and 1576 nm idler, and a type-II BBO crystal to sum-frequency mix the 532 nm pump and cavity-resonant 803 nm signal to generate 320 nm light. The cavity is configured so pump light passes first through the BBO crystal and then through the KTP crystal with the 320 nm light exiting through the output coupler following the BBO sum-frequency crystal. The cavity output coupler is designed to be a high reflector at 532 nm, have high transmission at 320 nm, and reflect approximately 85% at 803 nm. With this configuration we've obtained 1064 nm to 320 nm optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24% and generated single-frequency {lambda} = 320 nm pulses with energies up to 140 mJ.

  11. Spatial and frequency-based super-resolution of ultrasound images

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mon-Ju; Karls, Joseph; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Vanderby, Ray; Sethares, William

    2014-01-01

    Modern ultrasound systems can output video images containing more spatial and temporal information than still images. Super-resolution techniques can exploit additional information but face two challenges: image registration and complex motion. In addition, information from multiple available frequencies is unexploited. Herein, we utilised these information sources to create better ultrasound images and videos, extending existing technologies for image capture. Spatial and frequency-based super-resolution processing using multiple motion estimation and frequency combination was applied to ultrasound videos of deforming models. Processed images are larger, have greater clarity and detail, and less variability in intensity between frames. Significantly, strain measurements are more accurate and precise than those from raw videos, and have a higher contrast ratio between ‘tumour’ and ‘surrounding tissue’ in a phantom model. We attribute improvements to reduced noise and increased resolution in processed images. Our methods can significantly improve quantitative and qualitative assessments of ultrasound images when compared assessments of standard images. PMID:25191631

  12. Three-dimensional sparse image reconstruction for terahertz surface layer holography with random step frequency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Li, Chao; Sun, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Qunying; Fang, Guangyou

    2015-07-15

    In this Letter, a sparse image reconstruction approach is proposed for three-dimensional (3D) terahertz (THz) surface layer holography by a sharply dwindled amount of frequency samples, without reducing the high quality of the final reconstructed 3D THz images. To avoid the range ambiguity resulting from the reduction of frequency samples, a random step frequency method is adopted to evaluate the rough range profile of the 3D surface layer. With the obtained range profile, a de-ambiguity procedure is proposed to demodulate the sparse echoed data to greatly compress the maximum nonambiguous range and recover all the information for 3D holography image reconstruction. Proof-of-state experiments are performed in 0.2-THz band. The results verify the effectiveness and the efficiency of the sparse imaging scheme for THz surface layer 3D holography. PMID:26176475

  13. Ultrahigh-frequency EEG during fMRI: pushing the limits of imaging-artifact correction.

    PubMed

    Freyer, Frank; Becker, Robert; Anami, Kimitaka; Curio, Gabriel; Villringer, Arno; Ritter, Petra

    2009-10-15

    Although solutions for imaging-artifact correction in simultaneous EEG-fMRI are improving, residual artifacts after correction still considerably affect the EEG spectrum in the ultrafast frequency band above 100 Hz. Yet this band contains subtle but valuable physiological signatures such as fast gamma oscillations or evoked high-frequency (600 Hz) bursts related to spiking of thalamocortical and cortical neurons. Here we introduce a simultaneous EEG-fMRI approach that integrates hard and software modifications for continuous acquisition of ultrafast EEG oscillations during fMRI. Our approach is based upon and extends the established method of averaged artifact subtraction (AAS). Particularly for recovery of ultrahigh-frequency EEG signatures, AAS requires invariantly sampled and constant imaging-artifact waveforms to achieve optimal imaging-artifact correction. Consequently, we adjusted our acquisition setup such that both physiological ultrahigh-frequency EEG and invariantly sampled imaging artifacts were captured. In addition, we extended the AAS algorithm to cope with other, non-sampling related sources of imaging-artifact variations such as subject movements. A cascaded principal component analysis finally removed remaining imaging-artifact residuals. We provide a detailed evaluation of averaged ultrahigh-frequency signals and unaveraged broadband EEG spectra up to 1 kHz. Evoked nanovolt-sized high-frequency bursts were successfully recovered during periods of MR data acquisition afflicted by imaging artifacts in the millivolt range. Compared to periods without imaging artifacts they exhibited the same mean amplitudes, latencies and waveforms and a signal-to-noise ratio of 72%. Furthermore we identified consistent dipole sources. In conclusion, ultrafast EEG oscillations can be continuously monitored during fMRI using the proposed approach. PMID:19539035

  14. Enhance resolution on OCT profilometry measurements using harmonic artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raele, Marcus Paulo; De Pretto, Lucas Ramos; de Freitas, Anderson Z.

    2015-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) systems, as all low coherence interferometry equipments, are mainly grouped in two categories: Time Domain and Frequency Domain, depending on the methodology of data analysis. When measuring samples with high reflectivity, using Frequency Domain systems, detrimental features on OCT images can appear as a replication of a feature at multiple depths on the resulting image, referred as harmonics by the community. This work presents the potential to access better axial resolution and accuracy results on profile measurements analyzing higher harmonics. A variety of measurements of samples with different features, such as roughness, angles and movement evaluation were performed in order to demonstrate the advantages of this approach as a low cost way to have better visualization of reliefs close to the system nominal axial resolution.

  15. Optimal geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the global minima of water clusters (H2O)n, n = 2-6, and several hexamer local minima at the CCSD(T) level of theory.

    PubMed

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Aprà, Edoardo; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2013-09-21

    We report the first optimum geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies for the ring pentamer and several water hexamer (prism, cage, cyclic and two book) at the coupled-cluster including single, double, and full perturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. All five examined hexamer isomer minima previously reported by Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) are also minima on the CCSD(T) potential energy surface (PES). In addition, all CCSD(T) minimum energy structures for the n = 2-6 cluster isomers are quite close to the ones previously obtained by MP2 on the respective PESs, as confirmed by a modified Procrustes analysis that quantifies the difference between any two cluster geometries. The CCSD(T) results confirm the cooperative effect of the homodromic ring networks (systematic contraction of the nearest-neighbor (nn) intermolecular separations with cluster size) previously reported by MP2, albeit with O-O distances shorter by ~0.02 Å, indicating that MP2 overcorrects this effect. The harmonic frequencies at the minimum geometries were obtained by the double differentiation of the CCSD(T) energy using an efficient scheme based on internal coordinates that reduces the number of required single point energy evaluations by ~15% when compared to the corresponding double differentiation using Cartesian coordinates. Negligible differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) frequencies are found for the librational modes, while uniform increases of ~15 and ~25 cm(-1) are observed for the bending and "free" OH harmonic frequencies. The largest differences between CCSD(T) and MP2 are observed for the harmonic hydrogen bonded frequencies, for which the former produces larger absolute values than the latter. Their CCSD(T) redshifts from the monomer values (Δω) are smaller than the MP2 ones, due to the fact that CCSD(T) produces shorter elongations (ΔR) of the respective hydrogen bonded OH lengths from the monomer value with respect to MP2. Both the MP2 and CCSD(T) results for the hydrogen bonded frequencies were found to closely follow the relation -Δω = s · ΔR, with a rate of s = 20.2 cm(-1)/0.001 Å for hydrogen bonded frequencies with IR intensities >400 km/mol. The CCSD(T) harmonic frequencies, when corrected using the MP2 anharmonicities obtained from second order vibrational perturbation theory, produce anharmonic CCSD(T) estimates that are within <60 cm(-1) from the measured infrared (IR) active bands of the n = 2-6 clusters. Furthermore, the CCSD(T) harmonic redshifts (with respect to the monomer) trace the measured ones quite accurately. The energetic order between the various hexamer isomers on the PES (prism has the lowest energy) previously reported at MP2 was found to be preserved at the CCSD(T) level, whereas the inclusion of anharmonic corrections further stabilizes the cage among the hexamer isomers. PMID:24070285

  16. Optimal geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the global minima of water clusters (H2O)n, n = 2-6, and several hexamer local minima at the CCSD(T) level of theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Aprà, Edoardo; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-09-01

    We report the first optimum geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies for the ring pentamer and several water hexamer (prism, cage, cyclic and two book) at the coupled-cluster including single, double, and full perturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. All five examined hexamer isomer minima previously reported by Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) are also minima on the CCSD(T) potential energy surface (PES). In addition, all CCSD(T) minimum energy structures for the n = 2-6 cluster isomers are quite close to the ones previously obtained by MP2 on the respective PESs, as confirmed by a modified Procrustes analysis that quantifies the difference between any two cluster geometries. The CCSD(T) results confirm the cooperative effect of the homodromic ring networks (systematic contraction of the nearest-neighbor (nn) intermolecular separations with cluster size) previously reported by MP2, albeit with O-O distances shorter by ˜0.02 Å, indicating that MP2 overcorrects this effect. The harmonic frequencies at the minimum geometries were obtained by the double differentiation of the CCSD(T) energy using an efficient scheme based on internal coordinates that reduces the number of required single point energy evaluations by ˜15% when compared to the corresponding double differentiation using Cartesian coordinates. Negligible differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) frequencies are found for the librational modes, while uniform increases of ˜15 and ˜25 cm-1 are observed for the bending and "free" OH harmonic frequencies. The largest differences between CCSD(T) and MP2 are observed for the harmonic hydrogen bonded frequencies, for which the former produces larger absolute values than the latter. Their CCSD(T) redshifts from the monomer values (Δω) are smaller than the MP2 ones, due to the fact that CCSD(T) produces shorter elongations (ΔR) of the respective hydrogen bonded OH lengths from the monomer value with respect to MP2. Both the MP2 and CCSD(T) results for the hydrogen bonded frequencies were found to closely follow the relation -Δω = s . ΔR, with a rate of s = 20.2 cm-1/0.001 Å for hydrogen bonded frequencies with IR intensities >400 km/mol. The CCSD(T) harmonic frequencies, when corrected using the MP2 anharmonicities obtained from second order vibrational perturbation theory, produce anharmonic CCSD(T) estimates that are within <60 cm-1 from the measured infrared (IR) active bands of the n = 2-6 clusters. Furthermore, the CCSD(T) harmonic redshifts (with respect to the monomer) trace the measured ones quite accurately. The energetic order between the various hexamer isomers on the PES (prism has the lowest energy) previously reported at MP2 was found to be preserved at the CCSD(T) level, whereas the inclusion of anharmonic corrections further stabilizes the cage among the hexamer isomers.

  17. The analysis of frequency domain characteristics of emotional images in eye-tracking experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Boqiang; Ma, Huimin; Wang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Although recently eye-tracking method has been introduced into behavioral experiments based on dot-probe paradigm, some characteristics in eye-tracking data do not draw as much attention as traditional characteristics like reaction time. It is also necessary to associate eye-tracking data to characteristics of images shown in experiments. In this research, new variables, such as fixation length, times of fixation and times of eye movement, in eye-tracking data were extracted from a behavioral experiment based on dot probe paradigm. They were analyzed and compared to traditional reaction time. After the analysis of positive and negative scenery images, parameters such as hue frequency spectrum PAR (Peak to Average Ratio) were extracted and showed difference between negative and positive images. These parameters of emotional images could discriminate scenery images according to their emotions in an SVM classifier well. Besides, it was found that images' hue frequency spectrum PAR is obviously relevant to eye-tracking statistics. When the dot was on the negative side, negative images' hue frequency spectrum PAR and horizontal eye-jumps confirmed to hyperbolic distribution, while that of positive images was linear with horizontal eye-jumps. The result could help to explain the mechanism of human's attention and boost the study in computer vision.

  18. Multipixel system for gigahertz frequency-domain optical imaging of finger joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, Uwe J.; Beuthan, Jrgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2008-03-01

    Frequency-domain optical imaging systems have shown great promise for characterizing blood oxygenation, hemodynamics, and other physiological parameters in human and animal tissues. However, most of the frequency domain systems presented so far operate with source modulation frequencies below 150MHz. At these low frequencies, their ability to provide accurate data for small tissue geometries such as encountered in imaging of finger joints or rodents is limited. Here, we present a new system that can provide data up to 1GHz using an intensity modulated charged coupled device camera. After data processing, the images show the two-dimensional distribution of amplitude and phase of the light modulation on the finger surface. The system performance was investigated and test measurements on optical tissue phantoms were taken to investigate whether higher frequencies yield better signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). It could be shown that local changes in optical tissue properties, as they appear in the initial stages of rheumatoid arthritis in a finger joint, are detectable by simple image evaluation, with the range of modulation frequency around 500MHz proving to yield the highest SNR.

  19. Stand-off real-time synthetic imaging at mm-wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Matthias; Keil, Andreas; Peuser, Joern; Loeffler, Torsten; Paetzold, Martin; Kolb, Andreas; Sprenger, Thorsten; Hils, Bernd; Haring Bolvar, Peter

    2012-06-01

    We report on the development of an active stand-off imaging system operating in the 80 GHz - 110 GHz frequency range. 3D real-time imaging is enabled by a combination of a mechanically scanned one-dimensional conventional imaging projection with a rotating metallic reflector and a two-dimensional synthetic imaging reconstruction with a linear array of transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) elements. The system is conceived, in order to allow a resolution better than 1cm both in lateral, as well as in range directions by using a multi-view imaging geometry with an aperture larger than 2 m x 2 m. The operation distance is 8.5 - 9 m. The 2D synthetically reconstructed imaging planes are derived from the correlation of 20 sources and 24 coherent detectors. Range information is obtained by operating in a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) mode. Real-time imaging is enabled by implementing the synthetic image reconstruction algorithms on a general purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU) system. A multi-view imaging geometry is implemented, in order to enhance the imaging resolution and to reduce the influence of specular reflections.

  20. Harmonic generation at high intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.; Kulander, K.C.

    1993-06-01

    Atomic electrons subject to intense laser fields can absorb many photons, leading either to multiphoton ionization or the emission of a single, energetic photon which can be a high multiple of the laser frequency. The latter process, high-order harmonic generation, has been observed experimentally using a range of laser wavelengths and intensities over the past several years. Harmonic generation spectra have a generic form: a steep decline for the low order harmonics, followed by a plateau extending to high harmonic order, and finally an abrupt cutoff beyond which no harmonics are discernible. During the plateau the harmonic production is a very weak function of the process order. Harmonic generation is a promising source of coherent, tunable radiation in the XUV to soft X-ray range which could have a variety of scientific and possibly technological applications. Its conversion from an interesting multiphoton phenomenon to a useful laboratory radiation source requires a complete understanding of both its microscopic and macroscopic aspects. We present some recent results on the response of single atoms at intensities relevant to the short pulse experiments. The calculations employ time-dependent methods, which we briefly review in the next section. Following that we discuss the behavior of the harmonics as a function of laser intensity. Two features are notable: the slow scaling of the harmonic intensities with laser intensity, and the rapid variation in the phase of the individual harmonics with respect to harmonic order. We then give a simple empirical formula that predicts the extent of the plateau for a given ionization potential, wavelength and intensity.

  1. Generating an image of dispersive energy by frequency decomposition and slant stacking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for calculating an image of dispersive energy in the frequency-velocity (f-v) domain. The frequency decomposition is first applied to a shot gather in the offset-time domain to stretch impulsive data into pseudo-vibroseis data or frequency-swept data. Because there is a deterministic relationship between frequency and time in a sweep used in the frequency decomposition, the first step theoretically completes the transform from time to frequency. The slant stacking is then performed on the frequency-swept data to complete the transform from offset to velocity. This simple two-step algorithm generates an image of dispersive energy in the f-v domain. The straightforward transform only uses offset information of data so that this algorithm can be applied to data acquired with arbitrary geophone-acquisition geometry. Examples of synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that this algorithm generates accurate images of dispersive energy of the fundamental as well as higher modes. ?? Birkha??user Verlag, Basel, 2007.

  2. Automated shimming at 1.5 T using echo-planar image frequency maps.

    PubMed

    Reese, T G; Davis, T L; Weisskoff, R M

    1995-01-01

    Using echo-planar imaging, we developed an automated image-based procedure to shim the static (B0) field. Our method uses the rapid acquisition capability of echo-planar imaging to collect the required frequency data rapidly, rendering the shim data acquisition time negligible in comparison with the total study time. We address image distortion issues involved in echo-planar imaging acquisition of the data and formulate analytic methods for arriving at an optimal shim for the NMR imaging experiment in a single iteration. We investigated the use of cost functions other than least-squares (Chebychev, high-order numeric) and found that choice between the cost functions we tested was irrelevant to resultant image quality, at least when used in conjunction with low-order shims. With appropriate integration, the method has become routine practice for investigators at our laboratory. PMID:8748496

  3. Limitations on squeezing and formation of the superposition of two macroscopically distinguishable states at fundamental frequency in the process of second harmonic generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitin, S. P.; Masalov, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    The results of numerical simulations of quantum state evolution in the process of second harmonic generation (SHG) are discussed. It is shown that at a particular moment of time in the fundamental mode initially coherent state turns into a superposition of two macroscopically distinguished states. The question of whether this superposition exhibits quantum interference is analyzed.

  4. Simultaneous storage of patient information with medical images in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Rajendra; Niranjan, U C; Iyengar, S S; Kannathal, N; Min, Lim Choo

    2004-10-01

    Digital watermarking is a technique of hiding specific identification data for copyright authentication. Most of the medical images are compressed by joint photographic experts group (JPEG) standard for storage. The watermarking is adapted here for interleaving patient information with medical images during JPEG compression, to reduce storage and transmission overheads. The text data is encrypted before interleaving with images in the frequency domain to ensure greater security. The graphical signals are also interleaved with the image. The result of this work is tabulated for a specific example and also compared with the spatial domain interleaving. PMID:15313538

  5. Towards spatial frequency domain optical imaging of neurovascular coupling in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alexander J.; Konecky, Soren D.; Rice, Tyler B.; Green, Kim N.; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-02-01

    Early neurovascular coupling (NVC) changes in Alzheimer's disease can potentially provide imaging biomarkers to assist with diagnosis and treatment. Previous efforts to quantify NVC with intrinsic signal imaging have required assumptions of baseline optical pathlength to calculate changes in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations during evoked stimuli. In this work, we present an economical spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) platform utilizing a commercially available LED projector, camera, and off-the-shelf optical components suitable for imaging dynamic optical properties. The fast acquisition platform described in this work is validated on silicone phantoms and demonstrated in neuroimaging of a mouse model.

  6. Metamaterial fibres for subdiffraction imaging and focusing at terahertz frequencies over optically long distances

    PubMed Central

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J.; Fischer, Bernd M.; Walther, Markus; Fleming, Simon C.; Argyros, Alexander; Kuhlmey, Boris T.

    2013-01-01

    Using conventional materials, the resolution of focusing and imaging devices is limited by diffraction to about half the wavelength of light, as high spatial frequencies do not propagate in isotropic materials. Wire array metamaterials, because of their extreme anisotropy, can beat this limit; however, focusing with these has only been demonstrated up to microwave frequencies and using propagation over a few wavelengths only. Here we show that the principle can be scaled to frequencies orders of magnitudes higher and to considerably longer propagation lengths. We demonstrate imaging through straight and tapered wire arrays operating in the terahertz spectrum, with unprecedented propagation of near field information over hundreds of wavelengths and focusing down to 1/28 of the wavelength with a net increase in power density. Applications could include in vivo terahertz-endoscopes with resolution compatible with imaging individual cells. PMID:24162458

  7. Metamaterial fibres for subdiffraction imaging and focusing at terahertz frequencies over optically long distances.

    PubMed

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J; Fischer, Bernd M; Walther, Markus; Fleming, Simon C; Argyros, Alexander; Kuhlmey, Boris T

    2013-01-01

    Using conventional materials, the resolution of focusing and imaging devices is limited by diffraction to about half the wavelength of light, as high spatial frequencies do not propagate in isotropic materials. Wire array metamaterials, because of their extreme anisotropy, can beat this limit; however, focusing with these has only been demonstrated up to microwave frequencies and using propagation over a few wavelengths only. Here we show that the principle can be scaled to frequencies orders of magnitudes higher and to considerably longer propagation lengths. We demonstrate imaging through straight and tapered wire arrays operating in the terahertz spectrum, with unprecedented propagation of near field information over hundreds of wavelengths and focusing down to 1/28 of the wavelength with a net increase in power density. Applications could include in vivo terahertz-endoscopes with resolution compatible with imaging individual cells. PMID:24162458

  8. A Method for Synthesis of Frequency-Time Radio Images in Non-Radiating Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyatyev, Yu. N.; Donets, I. V.; Onishchenko, V. S.; Reizenkind, Y. A.; Shevchenko, V. N.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a modification of the known method used to synthesize frequency time radio images in non-radiating radars and based on minimization of the r.m.s. deviation of the observation data vector from its linear model with an additional limitation imposed on the L1 norm of the vector of the evaluated amplitudes of two-dimensional signal distribution in the range of delays and Doppler frequencies. The essence of the modification is that instead of solving the problem of conditional minimization at a full array in the "time delay—Doppler frequency shift" coordinates, this problem is solved sequentially for the zeroth and a preset frequency shift. In combination with additional computational tricks, the proposed modification allows one to increase the computational efficiency of image formation by three orders of magnitude.

  9. Signal processing and image formation using low-frequency ultra-wideband radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam H.; Ressler, Marc; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2004-09-01

    In support of the U.S. Army Night Vision And Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has developed infrastructures, tools, and algorithms to evaluate the data set. This paper focuses on the signal processing and image formation using data from a low-frequency ultra-wideband sensor. We examine various issues that are associated with this class of SAR databases such as radio frequency interference (RFI), the effects of spectral notches, and errors in motion measurement to image quality. We show the pre-processing steps such as frequency and phase calibration, radio frequency interference extraction. We also show the application of digital spotlight technique to correct motion errors introduced by the measurement system. Finally, we show the resulting SAR imagery of various minefields.

  10. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-21

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets’ surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  11. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-01

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets' surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  12. Frequency-spatial cues based sea-surface salient target detection from UAV image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoliang; Liu, Xiaolin; Yu, Qifeng; Liu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm for salient target detection from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) sea surface image using frequency and spatial cues. The algorithm is consisted of three parts: background suppression in the frequency domain, adaptive smoothing of the background suppressed image and salient target detection via adaptive thresholding, region growth and cluster. The sea surface background in UAV image is modeled as non-salient components which correspond to the spikes of the amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. The background suppression is achieved by removing the spikes using a low pass Gaussian kernel of proper scale. In order to eliminate the negative effects brought by the complex textures, a Gaussian blur kernel is introduced to process the background suppressed image and its scale is determined by the entropy of the background suppressed image. The salient target is detected using adaptive thresholding, region growth and cluster performed on the blurred background suppressed image. Experiments on a large number of images indicate that the algorithm proposed in this paper can detected the sea surface salient target accurately and efficiently.

  13. Multi-parametric monitoring and assessment of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) boiling by Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU): An ex vivo feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and change in relative phase-shift during high energy HIFU treatment with tissue boiling. Forty three (n=43) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n=28). Two dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10-s, 20-s and 30-s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11W, which were selected and verified as treatment parameters capable of inducing boiling using both thermocouple and Passive Cavitation Detection (PCD) measurements. Although a steady decrease in the displacement, compressive strain, and relative change in the focal phase shift (??) were obtained in numerous cases, indicating an overall increase in relative stiffness, the study outcomes also showed that during boiling, a reverse lesion-to-background displacement contrast was detected, indicating potential change in tissue absorption, geometrical change and/or, mechanical gelatification or pulverization. Following treatment, corresponding 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions also mapped consistent discrepancy in the lesion-to-background displacement contrast. Despite unpredictable changes in acoustic properties with boiling, the relative change in phase shift showed a consistent decrease, indicating its robustness to monitor biomechanical properties independent of the acoustic property change throughout the HIFU treatment. In addition, the 2D HMI displacement images confirmed and indicated the increase in the thermal lesion size with treatment duration, which was validated against pathology. In conclusion, multi-parametric HMIFU was shown capable of monitoring and mapping tissue viscoelastic response changes during and after HIFU boiling, some of which were independent of the acoustic parameter changes. PMID:24556974

  14. Multi-parametric monitoring and assessment of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) boiling by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): an ex vivo feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-03-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and change in relative phase shift during high energy HIFU treatment with tissue boiling. Forty three (n = 43) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 28). Two-dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10 s, 20 s and 30 s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11 W, which were selected and verified as treatment parameters capable of inducing boiling using both thermocouple and passive cavitation detection (PCD) measurements. Although a steady decrease in the displacement, compressive strain, and relative change in the focal phase shift (??) were obtained in numerous cases, indicating an overall increase in relative stiffness, the study outcomes also showed that during boiling, a reverse lesion-to-background displacement contrast was detected, indicating potential change in tissue absorption, geometrical change and/or, mechanical gelatification or pulverization. Following treatment, corresponding 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions also mapped consistent discrepancy in the lesion-to-background displacement contrast. Despite the expectedly chaotic ch