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Sample records for frequency separation variations

  1. Solar-cycle variations of large frequency separations of acoustic modes: implications for asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broomhall, A.-M.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; New, R.

    2011-06-01

    We have studied solar-cycle changes in the large frequency separations that can be observed in Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON) data. The large frequency separation is often one of the first outputs from asteroseismic studies because it can help constrain stellar properties like mass and radius. We have used three methods for estimating the large separations: use of individual p-mode frequencies, computation of the autocorrelation of frequency-power spectra, and computation of the power spectrum of the power spectrum. The values of the large separations obtained by the different methods are offset from each other and have differing sensitivities to the realization noise. A simple model was used to predict solar-cycle variations in the large separations, indicating that the variations are due to the well-known solar-cycle changes to mode frequency. However, this model is only valid over a restricted frequency range. We discuss the implications of these results for asteroseismology.

  2. Frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutha, A. C.; Hessels, E. A.

    2015-11-01

    A frequency-offset separated-oscillatory-field technique is presented. The technique is a modification of the Ramsey method of separated oscillatory fields [Phys. Rev. 76, 996 (1949), 10.1103/PhysRev.76.996], in which the frequencies of the two separated oscillatory fields are slightly offset from each other, so that the relative phase of the two fields varies continuously with time. With this technique, the detection signal oscillates in time at the offset frequency, and the resonance frequency is obtained by using a simple straight-line fit of the phase of this signal. The technique has the advantages of being insensitive to the frequency response of the experimental system, of being sensitive only to noise at the offset frequency, and of allowing systematic effects to be more cleanly resolved due to the simple lineshape.

  3. Frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezginov, N.; Vutha, A. C.; Ferchichi, I.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2015-05-01

    Improved measurements in atomic hydrogen are needed to shed light on the proton radius puzzle. We are measuring the Lamb shift in hydrogen (n = 2 ,S1 / 2 -->P1 / 2) using a frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields (FOSOF) method. The advantages of this method include its insensitivity to atomic beam intensity fluctuations and the microwave-system frequency response. We present experimental results obtained with this method, towards a new measurement of the proton charge radius. We acknowledge funding from NSERC, CFI, CRC, ORF, and NIST.

  4. 47 CFR 76.612 - Cable television frequency separation standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cable television frequency separation standards... frequency separation standards. All cable television systems which operate in the frequency bands 108-137 and 225-400 MHz shall comply with the following frequency separation standards: (a) In...

  5. 47 CFR 76.612 - Cable television frequency separation standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cable television frequency separation standards... frequency separation standards. All cable television systems which operate in the frequency bands 108-137 and 225-400 MHz shall comply with the following frequency separation standards: (a) In...

  6. 47 CFR 76.612 - Cable television frequency separation standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable television frequency separation standards... frequency separation standards. All cable television systems which operate in the frequency bands 108-137 and 225-400 MHz shall comply with the following frequency separation standards: (a) In...

  7. 47 CFR 76.612 - Cable television frequency separation standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cable television frequency separation standards... frequency separation standards. All cable television systems which operate in the frequency bands 108-137 and 225-400 MHz shall comply with the following frequency separation standards: (a) In...

  8. 47 CFR 76.612 - Cable television frequency separation standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cable television frequency separation standards... frequency separation standards. All cable television systems which operate in the frequency bands 108-137 and 225-400 MHz shall comply with the following frequency separation standards: (a) In...

  9. Vocalization frequency and duration are coded in separate hindbrain nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Chagnaud, Boris P.; Baker, Robert; Bass, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    Temporal patterning is an essential feature of neural networks producing precisely timed behaviours such as vocalizations that are widely used in vertebrate social communication. Here we show that intrinsic and network properties of separate hindbrain neuronal populations encode the natural call attributes of frequency and duration in vocal fish. Intracellular structure/function analyses indicate that call duration is encoded by a sustained membrane depolarization in vocal prepacemaker neurons that innervate downstream pacemaker neurons. Pacemaker neurons, in turn, encode call frequency by rhythmic, ultrafast oscillations in their membrane potential. Pharmacological manipulations show prepacemaker activity to be independent of pacemaker function, thus accounting for natural variation in duration which is the predominant feature distinguishing call types. Prepacemaker neurons also innervate key hindbrain auditory nuclei thereby effectively serving as a call-duration corollary discharge. We propose that premotor compartmentalization of neurons coding distinct acoustic attributes is a fundamental trait of hindbrain vocal pattern generators among vertebrates. PMID:21673667

  10. Seasonal variations of volcanic eruption frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Do volcanic eruptions have a tendency to occur more frequently in the months of May and June? Some past evidence suggests that they do. The present study, based on the new eruption catalog of Simkin et al.(1981), investigates the monthly statistics of the largest eruptions, grouped according to explosive magnitude, geographical latitude, and year. At the 2-delta level, no month-to-month variations in eruption frequency are found to be statistically significant. Examination of previously published month-to-month variations suggests that they, too, are not statistically significant. It is concluded that volcanism, at least averaged over large portions of the globe, is probably not periodic on a seasonal or annual time scale.

  11. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Voltage and frequency variations. 111.01-17 Section 111... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations. Unless otherwise stated, electrical equipment must function at variations of at least ±5 percent of rated...

  12. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Voltage and frequency variations. 111.01-17 Section 111.01-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations....

  13. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Voltage and frequency variations. 111.01-17 Section 111.01-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations....

  14. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voltage and frequency variations. 111.01-17 Section 111.01-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations....

  15. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Voltage and frequency variations. 111.01-17 Section 111.01-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations....

  16. On variation of word frequencies in Russian literary texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    We study the variation of word frequencies in Russian literary texts. Our findings indicate that the standard deviation of a word's frequency across texts depends on its average frequency according to a power law with exponent 1/2 < α < 1, which shows that the rarer words have a relatively larger degree of frequency volatility (that is, higher "burstiness"). A latent factor model has been estimated to investigate the structure of the word frequency distribution. The findings suggest that the dependence of a word's frequency volatility on its average frequency can be explained by the asymmetry in the distribution of latent factors.

  17. Interdecadal variation of TC frequency in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ki-Seon; Cha, Yu-Mi; Kang, Sung-Dae; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2015-07-01

    This study analyzed the climate regime shift using statistical change-point analysis on the time-series tropical cyclone (TC) frequency that affected Japan in July to September. The result showed that there was a significant change in 1995, and since then, it showed a trend of rapidly decreasing frequency. To determine the reason for this, differences between 1995 to 2012 (9512) period and 1978 to 1994 (7894) period were analyzed. First, regarding TC genesis, TCs during the 9512 period showed a characteristic of genesis from the southeast quadrant of the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific and TCs during the 7894 period showed their genesis from the northwest quadrant. Regarding a TC track, TCs in the 7894 period had a strong trend of moving from the far east sea of the Philippines via the East China Sea to the mid-latitude region in East Asia while TCs in the 9512 period showed a trend of moving from the Philippines toward the southern part of China westward. Thus, TC intensity in the 7894 period, which can absorb sufficient energy from the sea as they moved a long distance over the sea, was stronger than that of 9512. Large-scale environments were analyzed to determine the cause of such difference in TC activity occurred between two periods. During the 9512 period, anomalous cold and dry anticyclones were developed strongly in the East Asia continent. As a result, Korea and Japan were affected by the anomalous northerlies thereby preventing TCs in this period from moving toward the mid-latitude region in East Asia. Instead, anomalous easterlies (anomalous trade wind) were developed in the tropical western Pacific so that a high passage frequency from the Philippines to the south China region along the anomalous steering flows was revealed. The characteristics of the anomalous cold and dry anticyclone developed in the East Asia continent were also confirmed by the analysis of air temperature, relative humidity, and sensible heat net flux showing that

  18. Separating More Sources Than Sensors Using Time-Frequency Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linh-Trung, Nguyen; Belouchrani, Adel; Abed-Meraim, Karim; Boashash, Boualem

    2005-12-01

    We examine the problem of blind separation of nonstationary sources in the underdetermined case, where there are more sources than sensors. Since time-frequency (TF) signal processing provides effective tools for dealing with nonstationary signals, we propose a new separation method that is based on time-frequency distributions (TFDs). The underlying assumption is that the original sources are disjoint in the time-frequency (TF) domain. The successful method recovers the sources by performing the following four main procedures. First, the spatial time-frequency distribution (STFD) matrices are computed from the observed mixtures. Next, the auto-source TF points are separated from cross-source TF points thanks to the special structure of these mixture STFD matrices. Then, the vectors that correspond to the selected auto-source points are clustered into different classes according to the spatial directions which differ among different sources; each class, now containing the auto-source points of only one source, gives an estimation of the TFD of this source. Finally, the source waveforms are recovered from their TFD estimates using TF synthesis. Simulated experiments indicate the success of the proposed algorithm in different scenarios. We also contribute with two other modified versions of the algorithm to better deal with auto-source point selection.

  19. Latitudinal variation of chorus frequency observed in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondoh, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Murakami, T.

    1982-07-01

    Latitudinal variations of chorus band frequency have been obtained from frequency-time VLF spectrograms of relatively long ISIS passes received at Syowa station, Antarctica, in 1977 and 1978. The upper and lower limit frequencies of the dayside chorus decrease with L value, and their latitudinal variations roughly agree with a latitudinal variation of one half of the equatorial gyrofrequency. This result is consistent with the dayside magnetospheric chorus model in which the chorus generated near the equatorial magnetosphere propagates along the field lines in the ducted mode or inwards from the original field line in the nonducted model. Nightside choruses were observed in geomagnetically disturbed periods; thus the generation mechanism for the nightside chorus seems to be different from that of the dayside chorus. A new case was found in which the chorus band frequencies at latitudes beyond the plasmapause are higher than those at latitudes inside the plasmapause.

  20. On the variation of interaural time differences with frequency.

    PubMed

    Benichoux, Victor; Rébillat, Marc; Brette, Romain

    2016-04-01

    Interaural time difference (ITD) is a major cue to sound localization in humans and animals. For a given subject and position in space, ITD depends on frequency. This variation is analyzed here using a head related transfer functions (HRTFs) database collected from the literature and comprising human HRTFs from 130 subjects and animal HRTFs from six specimens of different species. For humans, the ITD is found to vary with frequency in a way that shows consistent differences with respect to a spherical head model. Maximal ITD values were found to be about 800 μs in low frequencies and 600 μs in high frequencies. The ITD variation with frequency (up to 200 μs for some positions) occurs within the frequency range where ITD is used to judge the lateral position of a sound source. In addition, ITD varies substantially within the bandwidth of a single auditory filter, leading to systematic differences between envelope and fine-structure ITDs. Because the frequency-dependent pattern of ITD does not display spherical symmetries, it potentially provides cues to elevation and resolves front/back confusion. The fact that the relation between position and ITDs strongly depends on the sound's spectrum in turn suggests that humans and animals make use of this relationship for the localization of sounds. PMID:27106329

  1. Os incae: variation in frequency in major human population groups

    PubMed Central

    HANIHARA, TSUNEHIKO; ISHIDA, HAJIME

    2001-01-01

    The variation in frequency of the Inca bone was examined in major human populations around the world. The New World populations have generally high frequencies of the Inca bone, whereas lower frequencies occur in northeast Asians and Australians. Tibetan/Nepalese and Assam/Sikkim populations in northeast India have more Inca bones than do neighbouring populations. Among modern populations originally derived from eastern Asian population stock, the frequencies are highest in some of the marginal isolated groups. In Central and West Asia as well as in Europe, frequency of the Inca bone is relatively low. The incidence of the complete Inca bone is, moreover, very low in the western hemisphere of the Old World except for Subsaharan Africa. Subsaharan Africans show as a whole a second peak in the occurrence of the Inca bone. Geographical and ethnographical patterns of the frequency variation of the Inca bone found in this study indicate that the possible genetic background for the occurrence of this bone cannot be completely excluded. Relatively high frequencies of the Inca bone in Subsaharan Africans indicate that this trait is not a uniquely eastern Asian regional character. PMID:11273039

  2. Peculiar variations of white dwarf pulsation frequencies and maestro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalessio, James Ruland

    In Part I we report on variations of the normal mode frequencies of the pulsating DB white dwarfs EC 20058-5234 and KIC 8626021 and the pulsating DA white dwarf GD 66. The observations of EC 20058-5234 and KIC 8626021 were motivated by the possibility of measuring the plasmon neutrino production rate of a white dwarf, while the observations of GD 66 were part of a white dwarf pulsation timing based planet search. We announce the discovery of periodic and quasi-periodic variations of multiple normal mode frequencies that cannot be due to the presence of planetary companions. We note the possible signature of a planetary companion to EC 20058-5234 and show that GD 66 cannot have a planet in a several AU orbit down to half a Jupiter mass. We also announce the discovery of secular variations of the normal mode frequencies of all three stars that are inconsistent with cooling alone. Importantly, the rates of period change of several modes of KIC 8626021 are consistent with evolutionary cooling, but are not yet statistically significant. These modes offer the best possibility of measuring the neutrino production rate in a white dwarf. We also observe periodic and secular variations in the frequency of a combination mode that exactly matches the variations predicted by the parent modes, strong observational evidence that combination modes are created by the convection zone and are not normal modes. Periodic variations in the amplitudes of many of these modes is also noted. We hypothesize that these frequency variations are caused by complex variations of the magnetic field strength and geometry, analogous to behavior observed in the Sun. In Part II we describe the MAESTRO software framework and the MAESTRO REDUCE algorithm. MAESTRO is a collection of astronomy specific MatLab software developed by the Whole Earth Telescope. REDUCE is an an algorithm that can extract the brightness of stars on a set of CCD images with minimal configuration and human interaction. The key to

  3. Ion mobility spectrometer using frequency-domain separation

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Butler, Michael A.; Frye, Gregory C.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method is provided for separating and analyzing chemical species in an ion mobility spectrometer using a frequency-domain technique wherein the ions generated from the chemical species are selectively transported through an ion flow channel having a moving electrical potential therein. The moving electrical potential allows the ions to be selected according to ion mobility, with certain of the ions being transported to an ion detector and other of the ions being effectively discriminated against. The apparatus and method have applications for sensitive chemical detection and analysis for monitoring of exhaust gases, hazardous waste sites, industrial processes, aerospace systems, non-proliferation, and treaty verification. The apparatus can be formed as a microelectromechanical device (i.e. a micromachine).

  4. Ion mobility spectrometer using frequency-domain separation

    DOEpatents

    Martin, S.J.; Butler, M.A.; Frye, G.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1998-08-04

    An apparatus and method are provided for separating and analyzing chemical species in an ion mobility spectrometer using a frequency-domain technique wherein the ions generated from the chemical species are selectively transported through an ion flow channel having a moving electrical potential therein. The moving electrical potential allows the ions to be selected according to ion mobility, with certain of the ions being transported to an ion detector and other of the ions being effectively discriminated against. The apparatus and method have applications for sensitive chemical detection and analysis for monitoring of exhaust gases, hazardous waste sites, industrial processes, aerospace systems, non-proliferation, and treaty verification. The apparatus can be formed as a microelectromechanical device (i.e. a micromachine). 6 figs.

  5. Ion optics system incorporating radio frequency mass separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John R.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Results of an experimental study are presented. They show that an RF mass discriminator, based on a Bennett mass spectrometer concept, can be used to discriminate between two species of ions with about a 2-to-1 charge-to-mass ratio. Such a device would be useful for separating monatomic and diatomic oxygen ions in a system designed to simulate the environment that spacecraft encounter in low earth orbit. The influence of changing mass discriminator parameters - such as the spacing of its grids, the amplitude and frequency of RF voltage signals applied to it and the current density of ions incident upon it - on its species discrimination capabilities is discussed. Experimental results are also compared to the results of a simple theoretical model to gain insight into the processes occurring in the discriminator. These results are shown to be in good agreement.

  6. Gravitational dynamos and the low-frequency geomagnetic secular variation.

    PubMed

    Olson, P

    2007-12-18

    Self-sustaining numerical dynamos are used to infer the sources of low-frequency secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Gravitational dynamo models powered by compositional convection in an electrically conducting, rotating fluid shell exhibit several regimes of magnetic field behavior with an increasing Rayleigh number of the convection, including nearly steady dipoles, chaotic nonreversing dipoles, and chaotic reversing dipoles. The time average dipole strength and dipolarity of the magnetic field decrease, whereas the dipole variability, average dipole tilt angle, and frequency of polarity reversals increase with Rayleigh number. Chaotic gravitational dynamos have large-amplitude dipole secular variation with maximum power at frequencies corresponding to a few cycles per million years on Earth. Their external magnetic field structure, dipole statistics, low-frequency power spectra, and polarity reversal frequency are comparable to the geomagnetic field. The magnetic variability is driven by the Lorentz force and is characterized by an inverse correlation between dynamo magnetic and kinetic energy fluctuations. A constant energy dissipation theory accounts for this inverse energy correlation, which is shown to produce conditions favorable for dipole drift, polarity reversals, and excursions. PMID:18048345

  7. Frequency variations of discrete cranial traits in major human populations. I. Supernumerary ossicle variations

    PubMed Central

    HANIHARA, TSUNEHIKO; ISHIDA, HAJIME

    2001-01-01

    Four supernumerary ossicle variations—the ossicle at the lambda, the parietal notch bone, the asterionic bone, and the occipitomastoid bone—were examined for laterality differences, intertrait correlations, sex differences, and between group variations in the samples from around the world. Significant laterality differences were not detected in almost all samples. In some pairs of traits, significant association of occurrence were found. Several geographic samples were sexually dimorphic with respect to the asterionic bone and to a lesser extent for the parietal notch bone. East/Northeast Asians including the Arctic populations in general had lower frequencies of the 4 accessory ossicles. Australians, Melanesians and the majority of the New World peoples, on the other hand, generally had high frequencies. In the western hemisphere of the Old World, Subsaharan Africans had relatively high frequencies. Except for the ossicle at the lambda, the distribution pattern in incidence showed clinal variation from south to north. Any identifiable adaptive value related to environmental or subsistence factors may be expressed in such clinal variation. This may allow us to hypothesise that not only mechanical factors but a founder effect, genetic drift, and population structure could have been the underlying causes for interregional variation and possible clines in the incidences of the accessory ossicles. PMID:11465862

  8. Variations in High Degree Acoustic Mode Frequencies of the Sun during Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, S. C.; Jain, K.; Hill, F.

    2015-10-01

    We examine continuous measurements of the high-degree acoustic mode frequencies of the Sun covering the period from 2001 July to 2014 June. These are obtained through the ring-diagram technique applied to the full-disk Doppler observations made by the Global Oscillation Network Group. The frequency shifts in the degree range of 180 ≤slant {\\ell } ≤slant 1200 are correlated with different proxies of solar activity, e.g., 10.7 cm radio flux, the International Sunspot Number, and the strength of the local magnetic field. In general, a good agreement is found between the shifts and activity indices, and the correlation coefficients are found to be comparable with intermediate-degree mode frequencies. Analyzing the frequency shifts separately for the two cycles, we find that cycle 24 is weaker than cycle 23. Since the magnetic activity is known to be different in the two hemispheres, for the first time, we compute the frequency shifts over the two hemispheres separately and find that the shifts also display hemispheric asymmetry; the amplitude of shifts in the northern hemisphere peaked during late 2011, more than two years earlier than in the south. We further correlate the hemispheric frequency shifts with the hemispheric sunspot number and mean magnetic activity index (MAI). Since the frequency shifts and the hemispheric activity indices are found to be significantly correlated, we suggest that the shifts be used as an indicator of hemispheric activity since not many indices are measured over the two hemispheres separately. We also investigate the variation at different latitudinal bands and conclude that the shifts in active latitudes correlate well with the local MAI.

  9. Commissioning of helium injector for coupled radio frequency quadrupole and separated function radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Shixiang Chen, Jia; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Wenlong; Gao, Shuli; Wang, Zhi; Luo, Yuting; Guo, Zhiyu; Zhang, Ailing; Chen, Jia'er; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049

    2014-02-15

    A project to study a new type of acceleration structure has been launched at Peking University, in which a traditional radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a separated function radio frequency quadrupole are coupled in one cavity to accelerate the He+ beam. A helium injector for this project is developed. The injector consists of a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a 1.16 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT). The commissioning of this injector was carried out and an onsite test was held in June 2013. A 14 mA He+ beam with the energy of 30 keV has been delivered to the end of the LEBT, where a diaphragm with the diameter of 7 mm is located. The position of the diaphragm corresponds to the entrance of the RFQ electrodes. The beam emittance and fraction were measured after the 7 mm diaphragm. Its rms emittance is about 0.14 π mm mrad and the fraction of He+ is about 99%.

  10. Separating Effects of Frequency, Quantity, Disruptive, and Problematic Substance Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Judith A.; And Others

    There is widespread concern about the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs by adolescents and young adults. It has yet to be determined whether drug use in itself is invariably associated with disruptive or problem use of drugs. Additionally, drug use may vary by frequency and quantity of ingestion which may be differentially related to…

  11. Designing structures for dynamical properties via natural frequencies separation. Application to tensegrity structures design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Cornel

    2009-05-01

    The design of structures for dynamic properties is addressed by placing conditions on the separation between natural frequencies. Additional constraints, like lower and upper bounds on the natural frequencies, are also included. A fast numerical algorithm that exploits the mathematical structure of the resulting problem is developed. Examples of the algorithm's application to tensegrity structures design are presented and the connection between natural frequencies separation and proportional damping approximation is analyzed.

  12. Radio-frequency ion deflector for mass separation

    SciTech Connect

    Schlösser, Magnus Rudnev, Vitaly; Ureña, Ángel González

    2015-10-15

    Electrostatic cylindrical deflectors act as energy analyzer for ion beams. In this article, we present that by imposing of a radio-frequency modulation on the deflecting electric field, the ion transmission becomes mass dependent. By the choice of the appropriate frequency, amplitude, and phase, the deflector can be used as mass filter. The basic concept of the new instrument as well as simple mathematic relations are described. These calculations and further numerical simulations show that a mass sensitivity is achievable. Furthermore, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle in experimental measurements, compare the results to those of from a 1 m linear time-of-flight spectrometer, and comment on the mass resolution of the method. Finally, some potential applications are indicated.

  13. Radio-frequency ion deflector for mass separation.

    PubMed

    Schlösser, Magnus; Rudnev, Vitaly; González Ureña, Ángel

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic cylindrical deflectors act as energy analyzer for ion beams. In this article, we present that by imposing of a radio-frequency modulation on the deflecting electric field, the ion transmission becomes mass dependent. By the choice of the appropriate frequency, amplitude, and phase, the deflector can be used as mass filter. The basic concept of the new instrument as well as simple mathematic relations are described. These calculations and further numerical simulations show that a mass sensitivity is achievable. Furthermore, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle in experimental measurements, compare the results to those of from a 1 m linear time-of-flight spectrometer, and comment on the mass resolution of the method. Finally, some potential applications are indicated. PMID:26520948

  14. Frequency variations of discrete cranial traits in major human populations. III. Hyperostotic variations

    PubMed Central

    HANIHARA, TSUNEHIKO; ISHIDA, HAJIME

    2001-01-01

    Seven discrete cranial traits usually categorised as hyperostotic characters, the medial palatine canal, hypoglossal canal bridging, precondylar tubercle, condylus tertius, jugular foramen bridging, auditory exostosis, and mylohyoid bridging were investigated in 81 major human population samples from around the world. Significant asymmetric occurrences of the bilateral traits were detected in the medial palatine canal and jugular foramen bridging in several samples. Significant intertrait associations were found between some pairs of the traits, but not consistently across the large geographical samples. The auditory exostosis showed a predominant occurrence in males. With the exception of the auditory exostosis and mylohyoid bridging in a few samples, significant sex differences were slight. The frequency distributions of the traits (except for the auditory exostosis) showed some interregional clinality and intraregional discontinuity, suggesting that genetic drift could have contributed to the observed pattern of variation. PMID:11554504

  15. Single channel speech separation in modulation frequency domain based on a novel pitch range estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodzadeh, Azar; Abutalebi, Hamid Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Sheikhzadeh, Hamid

    2012-12-01

    Computational Auditory Scene Analysis (CASA) has been the focus in recent literature for speech separation from monaural mixtures. The performance of current CASA systems on voiced speech separation strictly depends on the robustness of the algorithm used for pitch frequency estimation. We propose a new system that estimates pitch (frequency) range of a target utterance and separates voiced portions of target speech. The algorithm, first, estimates the pitch range of target speech in each frame of data in the modulation frequency domain, and then, uses the estimated pitch range for segregating the target speech. The method of pitch range estimation is based on an onset and offset algorithm. Speech separation is performed by filtering the mixture signal with a mask extracted from the modulation spectrogram. A systematic evaluation shows that the proposed system extracts the majority of target speech signal with minimal interference and outperforms previous systems in both pitch extraction and voiced speech separation.

  16. Multibeam single frequency synthetic aperture radar processor for imaging separate range swaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A single-frequency multibeam synthetic aperture radar for large swath imaging is disclosed. Each beam illuminates a separate ""footprint'' (i.e., range and azimuth interval). The distinct azimuth intervals for the separate beams produce a distinct Doppler frequency spectrum for each beam. After range correlation of raw data, an optical processor develops image data for the different beams by spatially separating the beams to place each beam of different Doppler frequency spectrum in a different location in the frequency plane as well as the imaging plane of the optical processor. Selection of a beam for imaging may be made in the frequency plane by adjusting the position of an aperture, or in the image plane by adjusting the position of a slit. The raw data may also be processed in digital form in an analogous manner.

  17. Time Variation of the Distance Separating Bomb and Dive Bomber Subsequent to Bomb Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, Charles W.

    1952-01-01

    A study has been made of the variation of the distance separating bomb and aircraft with time after release as applied to dive-bombing operations, Separation distances determined from this study are presented in terms of two variables only, dive angle and maximum airplane accelerometer reading; the values of separation distance include the effects of delay in initiation of the pull-out and lag in attainment of the maximum normal acceleration.Contains analysis and calculations of the separation distances between bomb and dive bomber following bomb release, Separation distances as determined by the dive angle and the maximum airplane accelerometer reading are presented in a single chart.

  18. Effective simulation for robust inverse lithography using convolution-variation separation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wen; Liu, Shiyuan; Zhou, Xinjiang; Wei, Haiqing

    2014-03-01

    As critical dimension shrinks, pattern density of integrated circuits gets much denser and lithographic process variations become more pronounced. In order to synthesize masks that are robust to process variations, the average wafer performance with respect to process fluctuations is optimized. This approach takes into account process variations explicitly. However, it needs to calculate a large number of optical images under different process variations during its optimizing process and thus significantly increases the computational burden. Most recently, we proposed a convolutionvariation separation (CVS) method for modeling of optical lithography, which separates process variables from the coordinate system and hence enables fast computation of optical images through a wide range of process variations. In this work, we detail the formulation of robust inverse lithography making use of the CVS method, and further investigate the impacts of arbitrary statistical distribution of process variations on the synthesized mask patterns.

  19. Variation in the Input: A Case Study of Manner Class Frequencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daland, Robert

    2013-01-01

    What are the sources of variation in the input, and how much do they matter for language acquisition? This study examines frequency variation in manner-of-articulation classes in child and adult input. The null hypothesis is that segmental frequency distributions of language varieties are unigram (modelable by stationary, ergodic processes), and…

  20. Are short-term variations in solar oscillation frequencies the signature of a second solar dynamo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Fletcher, Stephen T.; Salabert, David; Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne; García, Rafael A.; Jiménez, Antonio; New, Roger

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the well-known 11-year solar cycle, the Sun's magnetic activity also shows significant variation on shorter time scales, e.g. between one and two years. We observe a quasi-biennial (2-year) signal in the solar p-mode oscillation frequencies, which are sensitive probes of the solar interior. The signal is visible in Sun-as-a-star data observed by different instruments and here we describe the results obtained using BiSON, GOLF, and VIRGO data. Our results imply that the 2-year signal is susceptible to the influence of the main 11-year solar cycle. However, the source of the signal appears to be separate from that of the 11-year cycle. We speculate as to whether it might be the signature of a second dynamo, located in the region of near-surface rotational shear.

  1. The use of extrapolation concepts to augment the Frequency Separation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Spiros

    2015-03-01

    The Frequency Separation Technique (FST) is a general method formulated to improve the speed and/or accuracy of lineshape calculations, including strong overlapping collisions, as is the case for ion dynamics. It should be most useful when combined with ultrafast methods, that, however have significant difficulties when the impact regime is approached. These difficulties are addressed by the Frequency Separation Technique, in which the impact limit is correctly recovered. The present work examines the possibility of combining the Frequency Separation Technique with the addition of extrapolation to improve results and minimize errors resulting from the neglect of fast-slow coupling and thus obtain the exact result with a minimum of extra effort. To this end the adequacy of one such ultrafast method, the Frequency Fluctuation Method (FFM) for treating the nonimpact part is examined. It is found that although the FFM is unable to reproduce the nonimpact profile correctly, its coupling with the FST correctly reproduces the total profile.

  2. Frequency variations of solar radio zebras and their power-law spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.

    2014-01-01

    Context. During solar flares several types of radio bursts are observed. The fine striped structures of the type IV solar radio bursts are called zebras. Analyzing them provides important information about the plasma parameters of their radio sources. We present a new analysis of zebras. Aims: Power spectra of the frequency variations of zebras are computed to estimate the spectra of the plasma density variations in radio zebra sources. Methods: Frequency variations of zebra lines and the high-frequency boundary of the whole radio burst were determined with and without the frequency fitting. The computed time dependencies of these variations were analyzed with the Fourier method. Results: First, we computed the variation spectrum of the high-frequency boundary of the whole radio burst, which is composed of several zebra patterns. This power spectrum has a power-law form with a power-law index -1.65. Then, we selected three well-defined zebra-lines in three different zebra patterns and computed the spectra of their frequency variations. The power-law indices in these cases are found to be in the interval between -1.61 and -1.75. Finally, assuming that the zebra-line frequency is generated on the upper-hybrid frequency and that the plasma frequency ωpe is much higher than the electron-cyclotron frequency ωce, the Fourier power spectra are interpreted to be those of the electron plasma density in zebra radio sources.

  3. Spatial pattern separation of chemicals and frequency-independent components by terahertz spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuuki; Kawase, Kodo; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Youichi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2003-10-01

    We separated the component spatial patterns of frequency-dependent absorption in chemicals and frequency-independent components such as plastic, paper, and measurement noise in terahertz (THz) spectroscopic images, using known spectral curves. Our measurement system, which uses a widely tunable coherent THz-wave parametric oscillator source, can image at a specific frequency in the range 1-2 THz. The component patterns of chemicals can easily be extracted by use of the frequency-independent components. This method could be successfully used for nondestructive inspection for the detection of illegal drugs and devices of bioterrorism concealed, e.g., inside mail and packages.

  4. How to separate the low amplitude delta Scuti variation in CoRoT data unambigousely?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benko, Jozsef M.; Paparo, Margit

    2015-08-01

    Rich regular frequency patterns were found in the Fourier spectra of low-amplitude Delta Scuti stars observed by CoRoT satellite. The CoRoT observations are, however, influenced by the disturbing effect of the SAA. The effect is marginal for high amplitude variable stars but it could be dangerous in the case of low amplitude variables, especially if the frequency range of the intrinsic variation overlaps the instrumental frequencies. Systematic tests were carried out both on synthetic and real data. Our aim was to determine a limit amplitude above which we were sure that the frequency pattern belonged to the stars.

  5. High-performance radio frequency transistors based on diameter-separated semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu; Che, Yuchi; Seo, Jung-Woo T.; Gui, Hui; Hersam, Mark C.; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report the high-performance radio-frequency transistors based on the single-walled semiconducting carbon nanotubes with a refined average diameter of ˜1.6 nm. These diameter-separated carbon nanotube transistors show excellent transconductance of 55 μS/μm and desirable drain current saturation with an output resistance of ˜100 KΩ μm. An exceptional radio-frequency performance is also achieved with current gain and power gain cut-off frequencies of 23 GHz and 20 GHz (extrinsic) and 65 GHz and 35 GHz (intrinsic), respectively. These radio-frequency metrics are among the highest reported for the carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. This study provides demonstration of radio frequency transistors based on carbon nanotubes with tailored diameter distributions, which will guide the future application of carbon nanotubes in radio-frequency electronics.

  6. Multibeam single frequency synthetic aperture radar processor for imaging separate range swaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for single frequency multibeam imaging of multiple strips of range swath at high range intervals for those applications where it is desirable to cover a range swath much greater than is possible for a given interpulse interval. Data from a single frequency synthetic aperture radar (in which beam parameters are adjusted so that the return from each successive swath is received during successive interpulse periods) are separated in Dopple frequency for the return from each beam at the frequency plane of the processor. Alternatively, the image formed by each beam may be spatially separated in the azimuth direction and successively selected by positioning an appropriate slit in the recording plane of the processor.

  7. Identification of Neisseria meningitidis genetic loci involved in the modulation of phase variation frequencies.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Heather L; Rasmussen, Andrew W; Stojiljkovic, Igor

    2004-11-01

    It has been proposed that increased phase variation frequencies in Neisseria meningitidis augment transmissibility and invasiveness. A Himar1 mariner transposon mutant library was constructed in serogroup A N. meningitidis and screened for clones with increased phase variation frequencies. Insertions increasing the frequency of slippage events within mononucleotide repeat tracts were identified in three known phase variation-modulating genes (mutS, mutL, and uvrD), as well as six additional loci (pilP, fbpA, fbpB, NMA1233, and two intergenic regions). The implications of these insertion mutations are discussed. PMID:15501815

  8. Tectorial Membrane Morphological Variation: Effects upon Stimulus Frequency Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Bergevin, Christopher; Velenovsky, David S.; Bonine, Kevin E.

    2010-01-01

    The tectorial membrane (TM) is widely believed to play an important role in determining the ear's ability to detect and resolve incoming acoustic information. While it is still unclear precisely what that role is, the TM has been hypothesized to help overcome viscous forces and thereby sharpen mechanical tuning of the sensory cells. Lizards present a unique opportunity to further study the role of the TM given the diverse inner-ear morphological differences across species. Furthermore, stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs), sounds emitted by the ear in response to a tone, noninvasively probe the frequency selectivity of the ear. We report estimates of auditory tuning derived from SFOAEs for 12 different species of lizards with widely varying TM morphology. Despite gross anatomical differences across the species examined herein, low-level SFOAEs were readily measurable in all ears tested, even in non-TM species whose basilar papilla contained as few as 50–60 hair cells. Our measurements generally support theoretical predictions: longer delays/sharper tuning features are found in species with a TM relative to those without. However, SFOAEs from at least one non-TM species (Anolis) with long delays suggest there are likely additional micromechanical factors at play that can directly affect tuning. Additionally, in the one species examined with a continuous TM (Aspidoscelis) where cell-to-cell coupling is presumably relatively stronger, delays were intermediate. This observation appears consistent with recent reports that suggest the TM may play a more complex macromechanical role in the mammalian cochlea via longitudinal energy distribution (and thereby affect tuning). Although significant differences exist between reptilian and mammalian auditory biophysics, understanding lizard OAE generation mechanisms yields significant insight into fundamental principles at work in all vertebrate ears. PMID:20712989

  9. Wide Angle, Single Screen, Gridded Square-Loop Frequency Selective Surface for Diplexing Two Closely Separated Frequency Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The design and performance of a wide angle, single screen, frequency selective surface (FSS) with gridded square-loop path elements are described for diplexing closely separated signal bands, for example, X- and Ku-band signals in an Orbiting Very Long Baseline Interferometer (OVLBI) earth station reflector antenna system, as well as other applications such as military and commercial communications via satellites. Excellent agreement is obtained between the predicted and measured results of this FSS design using the gridded square-loop patch elements sandwiched between 0.0889 cm thick tetrafluoroethylene fluorocarbon polymer (PTFE) slabs. Resonant frequency drift is reduced by 1 GHz with an incidence angle from 0 deg normal to 40 deg from normal.

  10. Adaptive frequency-separation-based energy management system for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Adrian; Bacha, Seddik; Munteanu, Iulian; Bratcu, Antoneta Iuliana; Rumeau, Axel

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with an adaptive frequency-based power sharing method between batteries and ultracapacitors (UC) as power sources within an electric vehicle. An adaptive frequency splitter is used for routing the low-frequency content of power demand into the battery and its high-frequency content into the UC system, taking profit from the UC as a peak power unit. Autonomy may thus be increased while preserving battery state of health and ensuring that UC voltage variations remain confined within certain desired range. Results obtained by real-time experiments on a dedicated test rig validate the proposed energy management approach and recommend it to be applied as power source coordination method to microgrids in general.

  11. Algorithms for Blind Components Separation and Extraction from the Time-Frequency Distribution of Their Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkat, B.; Abed-Meraim, K.

    2004-12-01

    We propose novel algorithms to select and extract separately all the components, using the time-frequency distribution (TFD), of a given multicomponent frequency-modulated (FM) signal. These algorithms do not use any a priori information about the various components. However, their performances highly depend on the cross-terms suppression ability and high time-frequency resolution of the considered TFD. To illustrate the usefulness of the proposed algorithms, we applied them for the estimation of the instantaneous frequency coefficients of a multicomponent signal and the results are compared with those of the higher-order ambiguity function (HAF) algorithm. Monte Carlo simulation results show the superiority of the proposed algorithms over the HAF.

  12. A frequency-control particle separation device based on resultant effects of electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiang-Chi; Tung, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2016-08-01

    Particle separation plays an important role in microfluidic sample preparation for various biomedical applications. In this paper, we report a particle manipulation and separation scheme using a microfluidic device based on low-volume/low-voltage electrokinetic frequency modulation. Utilizing a circular micro-electrode array, both electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis can be contributed to manipulate particles in the device by controlling the frequency of applied sinusoidal travelling wave signals. Theoretical simulations based on finite-element methods are employed to establish fundamental understanding of the developed scheme. For experimental demonstration, polystyrene beads (6 μm in diameter) and human promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) are used to validate the frequency-modulation effect. Furthermore, different diameter polystyrene beads (6 μm and 10 μm in diameter) are mixed to show potentials of precise particle separations (˜90% efficiency) by the reported frequency-controlled electrokinetic device. The developed technique can be exploited as an actuation scheme and particle manipulation method for microfluidic sample preparations of low ionic concentration samples.

  13. Instantaneous Polarization Attributes in the Time-frequency Domain: Application to Wave Field Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, M. S.; Kulesh, M.; Holschneider, M.; Scherbaum, F.

    2004-12-01

    In this contribution we propose a method of wave field separation from multicomponent data sets based on the continuous wavelet transform (CWT). We present different approaches for obtaining the time-frequency dependent instantaneous polarization attributes for multicomponent data sets (2C, 3C or more). Using these attributes, we show how to construct filters tailored to separate (filter) different wave types followed by an inverse wavelet transform to obtain the desired wave type in the time domain. The proposed methods are applied on synthetic and experimental data for illustration.

  14. Instantaneous and Frequency-Warped Signal Processing Techniques for Auditory Source Separation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Avery Li-Chun

    This thesis summarizes several contributions to the areas of signal processing and auditory source separation. The philosophy of Frequency-Warped Signal Processing is introduced as a means for separating the AM and FM contributions to the bandwidth of a complex-valued, frequency-varying sinusoid p (n), transforming it into a signal with slowly-varying parameters. This transformation facilitates the removal of p (n) from an additive mixture while minimizing the amount of damage done to other signal components. The average winding rate of a complex-valued phasor is explored as an estimate of the instantaneous frequency. Theorems are provided showing the robustness of this measure. To implement frequency tracking, a Frequency-Locked Loop algorithm is introduced which uses the complex winding error to update its frequency estimate. The input signal is dynamically demodulated and filtered to extract the envelope. This envelope may then be remodulated to reconstruct the target partial, which may be subtracted from the original signal mixture to yield a new, quickly-adapting form of notch filtering. Enhancements to the basic tracker are made which, under certain conditions, attain the Cramer -Rao bound for the instantaneous frequency estimate. To improve tracking, the novel idea of Harmonic -Locked Loop tracking, using N harmonically constrained trackers, is introduced for tracking signals, such as voices and certain musical instruments. The estimated fundamental frequency is computed from a maximum-likelihood weighting of the N tracking estimates, making it highly robust. The result is that harmonic signals, such as voices, can be isolated from complex mixtures in the presence of other spectrally overlapping signals. Additionally, since phase information is preserved, the resynthesized harmonic signals may be removed from the original mixtures with relatively little damage to the residual signal. Finally, a new methodology is given for designing linear-phase FIR filters

  15. Underdetermined Blind Source Separation with Variational Mode Decomposition for Compound Roller Bearing Fault Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Gang; Luo, Ganggang; Zhang, Weihua; Yang, Caijin; Wang, Huaqing

    2016-01-01

    In the condition monitoring of roller bearings, the measured signals are often compounded due to the unknown multi-vibration sources and complex transfer paths. Moreover, the sensors are limited in particular locations and numbers. Thus, this is a problem of underdetermined blind source separation for the vibration sources estimation, which makes it difficult to extract fault features exactly by ordinary methods in running tests. To improve the effectiveness of compound fault diagnosis in roller bearings, the present paper proposes a new method to solve the underdetermined problem and to extract fault features based on variational mode decomposition. In order to surmount the shortcomings of inadequate signals collected through limited sensors, a vibration signal is firstly decomposed into a number of band-limited intrinsic mode functions by variational mode decomposition. Then, the demodulated signal with the Hilbert transform of these multi-channel functions is used as the input matrix for independent component analysis. Finally, the compound faults are separated effectively by carrying out independent component analysis, which enables the fault features to be extracted more easily and identified more clearly. Experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method in compound fault separation, and a comparison experiment shows that the proposed method has higher adaptability and practicability in separating strong noise signals than the commonly-used ensemble empirical mode decomposition method. PMID:27322268

  16. Underdetermined Blind Source Separation with Variational Mode Decomposition for Compound Roller Bearing Fault Signals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gang; Luo, Ganggang; Zhang, Weihua; Yang, Caijin; Wang, Huaqing

    2016-01-01

    In the condition monitoring of roller bearings, the measured signals are often compounded due to the unknown multi-vibration sources and complex transfer paths. Moreover, the sensors are limited in particular locations and numbers. Thus, this is a problem of underdetermined blind source separation for the vibration sources estimation, which makes it difficult to extract fault features exactly by ordinary methods in running tests. To improve the effectiveness of compound fault diagnosis in roller bearings, the present paper proposes a new method to solve the underdetermined problem and to extract fault features based on variational mode decomposition. In order to surmount the shortcomings of inadequate signals collected through limited sensors, a vibration signal is firstly decomposed into a number of band-limited intrinsic mode functions by variational mode decomposition. Then, the demodulated signal with the Hilbert transform of these multi-channel functions is used as the input matrix for independent component analysis. Finally, the compound faults are separated effectively by carrying out independent component analysis, which enables the fault features to be extracted more easily and identified more clearly. Experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method in compound fault separation, and a comparison experiment shows that the proposed method has higher adaptability and practicability in separating strong noise signals than the commonly-used ensemble empirical mode decomposition method. PMID:27322268

  17. Collective frequency variation in network synchronization and reverse PageRank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Taylor, Dane; Sun, Jie; Arenas, Alex

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of natural and engineered phenomena rely on large networks of interacting units to reach a dynamical consensus state where the system collectively operates. Here we study the dynamics of self-organizing systems and show that for generic directed networks the collective frequency of the ensemble is not the same as the mean of the individuals' natural frequencies. Specifically, we show that the collective frequency equals a weighted average of the natural frequencies, where the weights are given by an outflow centrality measure that is equivalent to a reverse PageRank centrality. Our findings uncover an intricate dependence of the collective frequency on both the structural directedness and dynamical heterogeneity of the network, and also reveal an unexplored connection between synchronization and PageRank, which opens the possibility of applying PageRank optimization to synchronization. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of collective frequency variation in real-world networks by considering the UK and Scandinavian power grids.

  18. Frequency variations of discrete cranial traits in major human populations. IV. Vessel and nerve related variations

    PubMed Central

    HANIHARA, TSUNEHIKO; ISHIDA, HAJIME

    2001-01-01

    This concludes a series of descriptive statistical reports on discrete cranial traits in 81 human populations from around the world. Four variants classified as vessel and nerve related characters were investigated: patent condylar canal; supraorbital foramen; accessory infraorbital foramen; and accessory mental foramen. A significant asymmetric occurrence without any side preference was detected for the accessory mental foramen. Significant intertrait associations were found between the accessory infraorbital and supraorbital foramina in the panPacific region and Subsaharan African samples. The intertrait associations between the accessory infraorbital foramen and some traits classified as hypostotic were found mainly in the samples from the western part of the Old World, and those as hyperostotic traits in the samples from eastern Asian and the related population samples. With a few exceptions, the occurrence of a patent condylar canal and a supraorbital foramen was predominant in females, but the accessory infraorbital and accessory mental foramina were predominant in males. The frequency distributions of the traits showed interregional clinality and intraregional discontinuity. A temporal trend was found in the Northeast Asian region in the frequencies of the accessory infraorbital and accessory mental foramina. The diversity of modern human discrete cranial traits may at least in part be attributable to differential retention or intensification from an ancestral pattern. PMID:11554505

  19. Observational Evidence for Variations of the Acoustic Cutoff Frequency with Height in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, A.; Musielak, Z. E.; Staiger, J.; Roth, M.

    2016-03-01

    Direct evidence for the existence of an acoustic cutoff frequency in the solar atmosphere is given by observations performed by using the HELioseismological Large Regions Interferometric DEvice operating on the Vacuum Tower Telescope located on Tenerife. The observational results demonstrate variations of the cutoff with atmospheric heights. The observed variations of the cutoff are compared to theoretical predictions made by using five acoustic cutoff frequencies that have been commonly used in helioseismology and asteroseismology. The comparison shows that none of the theoretical predictions is fully consistent with the observational data. The implication of this finding is far reaching as it urgently requires either major revisions of the existing methods of finding acoustic cutoff frequencies or developing new methods that would much better account for the physical picture underlying the concept of cutoff frequencies in inhomogeneous media.

  20. Global lightning dynamics deduced from Schumann resonance frequency variations at two sites ~ 550 km apart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satori, G.; Mushtak, V.; Neska, M.; Nagy, T.; Barta, V.

    2012-04-01

    Schumann resonance (SR) peak frequencies depend on the lightning source-observer angular distance. The modal phase shift interaction at nodal distances manifests itself as sharp frequency variations: increases or decreases depend on the direction of the source motion with respect to the observer and the mode number. Nagycenk Observatory (47.6° N, 16.7° E), Hungary and Belsk (51.8 ° N, 20.8 ° E), Poland, are relatively close to each other ( ~550 km apart) compared with SR wavelengths. Both stations can approach the nodal position with respect to the African source region for the third Ez mode and to the Asian/American "chimney" regions for the first Ez mode as lightning activity migrates as the seasons change. These two observation sites can be on the different sides of the nodal line region for some weeks twice during a year, indicating the fine seasonal motion of the source regions which causes relatively large frequency variations (some tenth Hz) and different frequency values at the two stations, especially for the third Ez mode. Source-observer distance dependent frequency variations are presented throughout a year by using simultaneous SR observations at Nagycenk (NCK) and Belsk (BLK). The observed frequency changes are supported by the simulation of the distance-dependent frequency variation based on the computed spectra of the vertical electric field components using the Two-Dimensional Telegraph Equation (TDTE) technique (Kirillov, 2002). For the tropical "chimney" regions the diurnal phase of greatest activity has well established spatial-temporal dynamics. Modal peak frequencies are obtained, along with modal intensities and quality factors, by means of the least-squares fitting of "experimental" spectra by the "classic" Lorentzian function (Williams et al., 2006).

  1. High Contrast Imaging with Spitzer: Constraining the Frequency of Giant Planets out to 1000 au Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkan, Stephen; Janson, Markus; Carson, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    We report results of a re-analysis of archival Spitzer IRAC direct imaging surveys encompassing a variety of nearby stars. Our sample is generated from the combined observations of 73 young stars (median age, distance, spectral type = 85 Myr, 23.3 pc, G5) and 48 known exoplanet host stars with unconstrained ages (median distance, spectral type = 22.6 pc, G5). While the small size of Spitzer provides a lower resolution than 8 m class AO-assisted ground-based telescopes, which have been used for constraining the frequency of 0.5–13 M J planets at separations of 10–102 au, its exquisite infrared sensitivity provides the ability to place unmatched constraints on the planetary populations at wider separations. Here we apply sophisticated high-contrast techniques to our sample in order to remove the stellar point-spread function and to open up sensitivity to planetary mass companions down to 5″ separations. This enables sensitivity to 0.5–13 M J planets at physical separations on the order of 102–103 au, allowing us to probe a parameter space that has not previously been systematically explored to any similar degree of sensitivity. Based on a color and proper motion analysis, we do not record any planetary detections. Exploiting this enhanced survey sensitivity, employing Monte Carlo simulations with a Bayesian approach, and assuming a mass distribution of {dn}/{dm}\\propto {m}-1.31, we constrain (at 95% confidence) a population of 0.5–13 M J planets at separations of 100–1000 au with an upper frequency limit of 9%.

  2. System identification through nonstationary data using Time-Frequency Blind Source Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanlin; Kareem, Ahsan

    2016-06-01

    Classical output-only system identification (SI) methods are based on the assumption of stationarity of the system response. However, measured response of buildings and bridges is usually non-stationary due to strong winds (e.g. typhoon, and thunder storm etc.), earthquakes and time-varying vehicle motions. Accordingly, the response data may have time-varying frequency contents and/or overlapping of modal frequencies due to non-stationary colored excitation. This renders traditional methods problematic for modal separation and identification. To address these challenges, a new SI technique based on Time-Frequency Blind Source Separation (TFBSS) is proposed. By selectively utilizing "effective" information in local regions of the time-frequency plane, where only one mode contributes to energy, the proposed technique can successfully identify mode shapes and recover modal responses from the non-stationary response where the traditional SI methods often encounter difficulties. This technique can also handle response with closely spaced modes which is a well-known challenge for the identification of large-scale structures. Based on the separated modal responses, frequency and damping can be easily identified using SI methods based on a single degree of freedom (SDOF) system. In addition to the exclusive advantage of handling non-stationary data and closely spaced modes, the proposed technique also benefits from the absence of the end effects and low sensitivity to noise in modal separation. The efficacy of the proposed technique is demonstrated using several simulation based studies, and compared to the popular Second-Order Blind Identification (SOBI) scheme. It is also noted that even some non-stationary response data can be analyzed by the stationary method SOBI. This paper also delineates non-stationary cases where SOBI and the proposed scheme perform comparably and highlights cases where the proposed approach is more advantageous. Finally, the performance of the

  3. Low-frequency wave modulations in an electronegative dusty plasma in the presence of charge variations.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Samiran; Sarkar, Subrata; Khan, Manoranjan; Gupta, M R

    2011-12-01

    The effects of dust charge variations on low-frequency wave modulations in an electronegative dusty plasma are investigated. The dynamics of the modulated wave is governed by a nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a dissipative term. The dissipation arises due to the nonsteady (nonadiabatic) dust charge variations. Theoretical and numerical investigations predict the formation of dissipative bright (envelope) and dark solitons. The nonsteady charge-variation-induced dissipation reduces the modulational instability growth rate and introduces a characteristic time scale to observe bright solitons. Results are discussed in the context of electronegative dusty plasma experiments. PMID:22304202

  4. Separating Reflective and Fluorescent Components Using High Frequency Illumination in the Spectral Domain.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Lam, Antony; Sato, Imari; Okabe, Takahiro; Sato, Yoichi

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is beneficial to many applications but most traditional methods do not consider fluorescent effects which are present in everyday items ranging from paper to even our food. Furthermore, everyday fluorescent items exhibit a mix of reflection and fluorescence so proper separation of these components is necessary for analyzing them. In recent years, effective imaging methods have been proposed but most require capturing the scene under multiple illuminants. In this paper, we demonstrate efficient separation and recovery of reflectance and fluorescence emission spectra through the use of two high frequency illuminations in the spectral domain. With the obtained fluorescence emission spectra from our high frequency illuminants, we then describe how to estimate the fluorescence absorption spectrum of a material given its emission spectrum. In addition, we provide an in depth analysis of our method and also show that filters can be used in conjunction with standard light sources to generate the required high frequency illuminants. We also test our method under ambient light and demonstrate an application of our method to synthetic relighting of real scenes. PMID:26336113

  5. Negative frequency-dependent preferences and variation in male facial hair

    PubMed Central

    Janif, Zinnia J.; Brooks, Robert C.; Dixson, Barnaby J.

    2014-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent sexual selection maintains striking polymorphisms in secondary sexual traits in several animal species. Here, we test whether frequency of beardedness modulates perceived attractiveness of men's facial hair, a secondary sexual trait subject to considerable cultural variation. We first showed participants a suite of faces, within which we manipulated the frequency of beard thicknesses and then measured preferences for four standard levels of beardedness. Women and men judged heavy stubble and full beards more attractive when presented in treatments where beards were rare than when they were common, with intermediate preferences when intermediate frequencies of beardedness were presented. Likewise, clean-shaven faces were least attractive when clean-shaven faces were most common and more attractive when rare. This pattern in preferences is consistent with negative frequency-dependent selection. PMID:24740903

  6. Negative frequency-dependent preferences and variation in male facial hair.

    PubMed

    Janif, Zinnia J; Brooks, Robert C; Dixson, Barnaby J

    2014-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent sexual selection maintains striking polymorphisms in secondary sexual traits in several animal species. Here, we test whether frequency of beardedness modulates perceived attractiveness of men's facial hair, a secondary sexual trait subject to considerable cultural variation. We first showed participants a suite of faces, within which we manipulated the frequency of beard thicknesses and then measured preferences for four standard levels of beardedness. Women and men judged heavy stubble and full beards more attractive when presented in treatments where beards were rare than when they were common, with intermediate preferences when intermediate frequencies of beardedness were presented. Likewise, clean-shaven faces were least attractive when clean-shaven faces were most common and more attractive when rare. This pattern in preferences is consistent with negative frequency-dependent selection. PMID:24740903

  7. Fundamental Frequency Variation with an Electrolarynx Improves Speech Understanding: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Peter J.; Schlauch, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effect of fundamental frequency (F0) variation on the intelligibility of speech in an alaryngeal talker who used an electrolarynx (EL). Method: One experienced alaryngeal talker produced variable F0 and a constant F0 with his EL as he read sentences aloud. As a control, a group of sentences with variable F0 was…

  8. Low-Frequency Flow Oscillations on Stalled Wings Exhibiting Cellular Separation Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disotell, Kevin James

    One of the most pervasive threats to aircraft controllability is wing stall, a condition associated with loss of lift due to separation of air flow from the wing surface at high angles of attack. A recognized need for improved upset recovery training in extended-envelope flight simulators is a physical understanding of the post-stall aerodynamic environment, particularly key flow phenomena which influence the vehicle trajectory. Large-scale flow structures known as stall cells, which scale with the wing chord and are spatially-periodic along the span, have been previously observed on post-stall airfoils with trailing-edge separation present. Despite extensive documentation of stall cells in the literature, the physical mechanisms behind their formation and evolution have proven to be elusive. The undertaken study has sought to characterize the inherently turbulent separated flow existing above the wing surface with cell formation present. In particular, the question of how the unsteady separated flow may interact with the wing to produce time-averaged cellular surface patterns is considered. Time-resolved, two-component particle image velocimetry measurements were acquired at the plane of symmetry of a single stall cell formed on an extruded NACA 0015 airfoil model at chord Reynolds number of 560,000 to obtain insight into the time-dependent flow structure. The evolution of flow unsteadiness was analyzed over a static angle-of-attack range covering the narrow post-stall regime in which stall cells have been observed. Spectral analysis of velocity fields acquired near the stall angle confirmed a low-frequency flow oscillation previously detected in pointwise surface measurements by Yon and Katz (1998), corresponding to a Strouhal number of 0.042 based on frontal projected chord height. Probability density functions of the streamwise velocity component were used to estimate the convective speed of this mode at approximately half the free-stream velocity, in agreement

  9. Mixed variational potentials and inherent symmetries of the Cahn–Hilliard theory of diffusive phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Miehe, C.; Hildebrand, F. E.; Böger, L.

    2014-01-01

    This work shows that the Cahn–Hilliard theory of diffusive phase separation is related to an intrinsic mixed variational principle that determines the rate of concentration and the chemical potential. The principle characterizes a canonically compact model structure, where the two balances involved for the species content and microforce appear as the Euler equations of a variational statement. The existence of the variational principle underlines an inherent symmetry in the two-field representation of the Cahn–Hilliard theory. This can be exploited in the numerical implementation by the construction of time- and space-discrete incremental potentials, which fully determine the update problems of typical time-stepping procedures. The mixed variational principles provide the most fundamental approach to the finite-element solution of the Cahn–Hilliard equation based on low-order basis functions, leading to monolithic symmetric algebraic systems of iterative update procedures based on a linearization of the nonlinear problem. They induce in a natural format the choice of symmetric solvers for Newton-type iterative updates, providing a speed-up and reduction of data storage when compared with non-symmetric implementations. In this sense, the potentials developed are believed to be fundamental ingredients to a deeper understanding of the Cahn–Hilliard theory. PMID:24711722

  10. Amplitude Variation of Bottom Simulating Reflection with Respect to Frequency - Transitional Base or Attenuation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude of a bottom simulating reflection (BSR), which occurs near the phase boundary between gas hydrate-bearing sediments and underlying gas-filled sediments, strongly depends on the frequency content of a seismic signal, as well as the impedance contrast across the phase boundary. A strong-amplitude BSR, detectable in a conventional seismic profile, is a good indicator of the presence of free gas beneath the phase boundary. However, the BSR as observed in low-frequency multichannel seismic data is generally difficult to identify in high-frequency, single-channel seismic data. To investigate the frequency dependence of BSR amplitudes, single-channel seismic data acquired with an air gun source at Blake Ridge, which is located off the shore of South Carolina, were analyzed in the frequency range of 10-240 Hz. The frequency-dependent impedance contrast caused by the velocity dispersion in partially gas saturated sediments is important to accurately analyze BSR amplitude. Analysis indicates that seismic attenuation of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, velocity dispersion, and a transitional base all contribute to the frequency-dependent BSR amplitude variation in the frequency range of 10-500 Hz. When velocity dispersion is incorporated into the BSR amplitude analysis, the frequency-dependent BSR amplitude at Blake Ridge can be explained with gas hydrate-bearing sediments having a quality factor of about 250 and a transitional base with a thickness of about 1 meter.

  11. Temporal variation of allozyme frequencies in Aedes albifasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, G B; Jiménez, A; Blanco, A; Gardenal, C N

    1997-12-01

    Aedes albifasciatus is a floodwater mosquito widely distributed in Argentina. It is important from economic and medical points of view. A 4-year survey of seasonal variation in allele frequencies in a population of this species was undertaken to determine possible changes in the genetic structure and their correlation with environmental conditions. Significant temporal variation was detected at most of the loci, but it did not follow a cyclic or seasonal pattern. Multivariate analysis of principal components showed a remarkable homogeneity of samples collected from December 1993 to April 1995 and a clear differentiation of the November 1991, March 1992, and November 1993 samples. This variation could be correlated with the magnitude of rainfall occurring in the area. Passive transport of larvae by water streams and river freshets produced by floods would have mixed larvae from breeding sites with different allele frequencies, causing the genetic differentiation observed. PMID:9559091

  12. Analysis of all-frequency variational behavior of the Kirchhoff approximation for a classic surface-scattering model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    In testing a stochastic variational principle at high frequencies by using a Kirchhoffean trial function in an idealized model for surface scattering - a randomly embossed plane - we have found not only the predicted high-frequency improvement but also an unexpected low-frequency improvement in the calculated scattering amplitudes. To investigate systematically the all-frequency variational behavior, we consider here the deterministic one-boss case - Rayleigh's classic model whose exact solution is available for comparison - over all wavelengths, polarizations, and configurations of incidence and scattering. We examine analytically in particular the long-wave limit of the variational-Kirchhoff amplitudes; the results demonstrate improvements in both wavelength and angle depedence for horizontal (TM) polarization and some variational improvements for vertical (TE) polarization. This low-frequency behavior in tandem with the foreseen high-frequency improvement leads to good variational-Kirchhoff results through the intermediate resonance-frequency regime for this model.

  13. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley; Craxton, R. Stephen; Soures, John

    1990-01-01

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temoral oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation.

  14. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Soures, J.

    1990-10-02

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temporal oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation. 16 figs.

  15. Separating cognitive processes with principal components analysis of EEG time-frequency distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernat, Edward M.; Nelson, Lindsay D.; Holroyd, Clay B.; Gehring, William J.; Patrick, Christopher J.

    2008-08-01

    Measurement of EEG event-related potential (ERP) data has been most commonly undertaken in the time-domain, which can be complicated to interpret when separable activity overlaps in time. When the overlapping activity has distinct frequency characteristics, however, time-frequency (TF) signal processing techniques can be useful. The current report utilized ERP data from a cognitive task producing typical feedback-related negativity (FRN) and P300 ERP components which overlap in time. TF transforms were computed using the binomial reduced interference distribution (RID), and the resulting TF activity was then characterized using principal components analysis (PCA). Consistent with previous work, results indicate that the FRN was more related to theta activity (3-7 Hz) and P300 more to delta activity (below 3 Hz). At the same time, both time-domain measures were shown to be mixtures of TF theta and delta activity, highlighting the difficulties with overlapping activity. The TF theta and delta measures, on the other hand, were largely independent from each other, but also independently indexed the feedback stimulus parameters investigated. Results support the view that TF decomposition can greatly improve separation of overlapping EEG/ERP activity relevant to cognitive models of performance monitoring.

  16. High-frequency variations of hydrogen spectral lines in the B3V star η UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhvala, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    We reported the detection of high-frequency variations in the hydrogen Balmer lines in the hot star η UMa of spectral class B3V. Spectral observations of η UMa were carried out with slitless spectrograph (R˜100) installed on the 60 cm Carl Zeiss telescope in the Andrushivka Observatory. Spectra were obtained with a time resolution in the sub-second range. It has been found that the η UMa shows rapid variations in the hydrogen lines Hα, Hβ, Hγ, as well as variations in the atmospheric oxygen lines. The intensity variations in the hydrogen lines varies from 0.2% to 0.5% , and that of the oxygen lines is approximately 2%.

  17. Frequency variations of the earth's obliquity and the 100-kyr ice-age cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han-Shou

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the earth's climate are induced by variations in the earth's orbital parameters which modulate the seasonal distribution of solar radiation. Periodicities in the geological climate record with cycles of 100, 41, and 23 kyr have been linked with changes in obliquity, eccentricity, and precession of the equinoxes. The effect of variations of eccentricity during a 100 kyr period is weak relative to the signals from obliquity and precession variations and it may therefore be expected that the 100 kyr signal in the climate record would be of low intensity. However, this signal dominates the climate record and internal nonlinear processes within the climate system have previously been proposed to account for this fact. The author shows that variations in the frequency of the obliquity cycle can give rise to strong 100-kyr forcing of climate.

  18. Frequency Reuse, Cell Separation, and Capacity Analysis of VHF Digital Link Mode 3 TDMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.; Nguyen, Thanh C.; Apaza, Rafael D.

    2003-01-01

    The most recent studies by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation industry have indicated that it has become increasingly difficult to make new VHF frequency or channel assignments to meet the aviation needs for air-ground communications. FAA has planned for several aggressive improvement measures to the existing systems, but these measures would not meet the projected voice communications needs beyond 2009. FAA found that since 1974 there has been, on the average, a 4 percent annual increase in the number of channel assignments needed to satisfy the air-ground communication traffic (approximately 300 new channel assignments per year). With the planned improvement measures, the channel assignments are expected to reach a maximum number of 16615 channels by about 2010. Hence, the FAA proposed the use of VDL Mode 3 as a new integrated digital voice and data communications systems to meet the future air traffic demand. This paper presents analytical results of frequency reuse; cell separation and capacity estimation of VDL Mode 3 TDMA systems that FAA has planned to implement the future VHF air-ground communications system by the year 2010. For TDMA, it is well understood that the frequency reuse factor is a crucial parameter for capacity estimation. Formulation of this frequency reuse factor is shown, taking into account the limitation imposed by the requirement to have a sufficient Signal to Co-Channel Interference Ratio. Several different values for the Signal to Co-Channel Interference Ratio were utilized corresponding to the current analog VHF DSB-AM systems, and the future digital VDL Mode 3. The required separation of Co-Channel cells is computed for most of the Frequency Protected Service Volumes (FPSV's) currently in use by the FAA. Additionally, the ideal cell capacity for each FPSV is presented. Also, using actual traffic for the Detroit air space, a FPSV traffic distribution model is used to generate a typical cell for channel capacity

  19. Detection of sudden structural damage using blind source separation and time-frequency approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morovati, V.; Kazemi, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    Seismic signal processing is one of the most reliable methods of detecting the structural damage during earthquakes. In this paper, the use of the hybrid method of blind source separation (BSS) and time-frequency analysis (TFA) is explored to detect the changes in the structural response data. The combination of the BSS and TFA is applied to the seismic signals due to the non-stationary nature of them. Firstly, the second-order blind identification technique is used to decompose the response signal of structural vibration into modal coordinate signals which will be mono-components for TFA. Then each mono-component signal is analyzed to extract instantaneous frequency of structure. Numerical simulations and a real-world seismic-excited structure with time-varying frequencies show the accuracy and robustness of the developed algorithm. TFA of extracted sources shows that used method can be successfully applied to structural damage detection. The results also demonstrate that the combined method can be used to identify the time instant of structural damage occurrence more sharply and effectively than by the use of TFA alone.

  20. Auditory stream segregation in monkey auditory cortex: effects of frequency separation, presentation rate, and tone duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Yonatan I.; Arezzo, Joseph C.; Steinschneider, Mitchell

    2004-09-01

    Auditory stream segregation refers to the organization of sequential sounds into ``perceptual streams'' reflecting individual environmental sound sources. In the present study, sequences of alternating high and low tones, ``...ABAB...,'' similar to those used in psychoacoustic experiments on stream segregation, were presented to awake monkeys while neural activity was recorded in primary auditory cortex (A1). Tone frequency separation (ΔF), tone presentation rate (PR), and tone duration (TD) were systematically varied to examine whether neural responses correlate with effects of these variables on perceptual stream segregation. ``A'' tones were fixed at the best frequency of the recording site, while ``B'' tones were displaced in frequency from ``A'' tones by an amount=ΔF. As PR increased, ``B'' tone responses decreased in amplitude to a greater extent than ``A'' tone responses, yielding neural response patterns dominated by ``A'' tone responses occurring at half the alternation rate. Increasing TD facilitated the differential attenuation of ``B'' tone responses. These findings parallel psychoacoustic data and suggest a physiological model of stream segregation whereby increasing ΔF, PR, or TD enhances spatial differentiation of ``A'' tone and ``B'' tone responses along the tonotopic map in A1.

  1. Top down and bottom up selection drives variations in frequency and form of a visual signal

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chien-Wei; Blamires, Sean J.; Liao, Chen-Pan; Tso, I.-Min

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and form of visual signals can be shaped by selection from predators, prey or both. When a signal simultaneously attracts predators and prey, selection may favour a strategy that minimizes risks while attracting prey. Accordingly, varying the frequency and form of the silken decorations added to their web may be a way that Argiope spiders minimize predation while attracting prey. Nonetheless, the role of extraneous factors renders the influences of top down and bottom up selection on decoration frequency and form variation difficult to discern. Here we used dummy spiders and decorations to simulate four possible strategies that the spider Argiope aemula may choose and measured the prey and predator attraction consequences for each in the field. The strategy of decorating at a high frequency with a variable form attracted the most prey, while that of decorating at a high frequency with a fixed form attracted the most predators. These results suggest that mitigating the cost of attracting predators while maintaining prey attraction drives the use of variation in decoration form by many Argiope spp. when decorating frequently. Our study highlights the importance of considering top-down and bottom up selection pressure when devising evolutionary ecology experiments. PMID:25828030

  2. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  3. High frequency variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS observations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future. PMID:25635416

  4. High Frequency Variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future. PMID:25635416

  5. Natural Selection VS. Random Drift: Evidence from Temporal Variation in Allele Frequencies in Nature

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Laurence D.; Barr, Lorraine G.; Ayala, Francisco J.

    1985-01-01

    We have obtained monthly samples of two species, Drosophila pseudoobscura and Drosophila persimilis, in a natural population from Napa County, California. In each species, about 300 genes have been assayed by electrophoresis for each of seven enzyme loci in each monthly sample from March 1972 to June 1975. Using statistical methods developed for the purpose, we have examined whether the allele frequencies at different loci vary in a correlated fashion. The methods used do not detect natural selection when it is deterministic (e.g., overdominance or directional selection), but only when alleles at different loci vary simultaneously in response to the same environmental variations. Moreover, only relatively large fitness differences (of the order of 15%) are detectable. We have found strong evidence of correlated allele frequency variation in 13–20% of the cases examined. We interpret this as evidence that natural selection plays a major role in the evolution of protein polymorphisms in nature. PMID:4054608

  6. The effects of actuation frequency on the separation control over an airfoil using a synthetic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Y.; Okada, K.; Nonomura, T.; Fujii, K.

    2015-06-01

    The simulation of separation control using a synthetic jet (SJ) is conducted around an NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) 0015 airfoil by large-eddy simulation (LES) with a compact difference scheme. The synthetic jet is installed at the leading edge of the airfoil and the effects of an actuation frequency F+ (normalized by chord length and velocity of freestream) are observed. The lift-drag coefficient is recovered the most for F+ = 6. The relationship between momentum addition by turbulent mixing and large vortex structures is investigated using a phase-averaging procedure based on F+. The Reynolds shear stress is decomposed into periodic and turbulent components where the turbulent components are found to be dominant on the airfoil. The strong turbulent components appear near the large vortex structures that are observed in phase- and span-averaged flow fields.

  7. Formant-Frequency Variation and Informational Masking of Speech by Extraneous Formants: Evidence Against Dynamic and Speech-Specific Acoustical Constraints

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    How speech is separated perceptually from other speech remains poorly understood. Recent research indicates that the ability of an extraneous formant to impair intelligibility depends on the variation of its frequency contour. This study explored the effects of manipulating the depth and pattern of that variation. Three formants (F1+F2+F3) constituting synthetic analogues of natural sentences were distributed across the 2 ears, together with a competitor for F2 (F2C) that listeners must reject to optimize recognition (left = F1+F2C; right = F2+F3). The frequency contours of F1 − F3 were each scaled to 50% of their natural depth, with little effect on intelligibility. Competitors were created either by inverting the frequency contour of F2 about its geometric mean (a plausibly speech-like pattern) or using a regular and arbitrary frequency contour (triangle wave, not plausibly speech-like) matched to the average rate and depth of variation for the inverted F2C. Adding a competitor typically reduced intelligibility; this reduction depended on the depth of F2C variation, being greatest for 100%-depth, intermediate for 50%-depth, and least for 0%-depth (constant) F2Cs. This suggests that competitor impact depends on overall depth of frequency variation, not depth relative to that for the target formants. The absence of tuning (i.e., no minimum in intelligibility for the 50% case) suggests that the ability to reject an extraneous formant does not depend on similarity in the depth of formant-frequency variation. Furthermore, triangle-wave competitors were as effective as their more speech-like counterparts, suggesting that the selection of formants from the ensemble also does not depend on speech-specific constraints. PMID:24842068

  8. Formant-frequency variation and informational masking of speech by extraneous formants: evidence against dynamic and speech-specific acoustical constraints.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brian; Summers, Robert J; Bailey, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    How speech is separated perceptually from other speech remains poorly understood. Recent research indicates that the ability of an extraneous formant to impair intelligibility depends on the variation of its frequency contour. This study explored the effects of manipulating the depth and pattern of that variation. Three formants (F1+F2+F3) constituting synthetic analogues of natural sentences were distributed across the 2 ears, together with a competitor for F2 (F2C) that listeners must reject to optimize recognition (left = F1+F2C; right = F2+F3). The frequency contours of F1 - F3 were each scaled to 50% of their natural depth, with little effect on intelligibility. Competitors were created either by inverting the frequency contour of F2 about its geometric mean (a plausibly speech-like pattern) or using a regular and arbitrary frequency contour (triangle wave, not plausibly speech-like) matched to the average rate and depth of variation for the inverted F2C. Adding a competitor typically reduced intelligibility; this reduction depended on the depth of F2C variation, being greatest for 100%-depth, intermediate for 50%-depth, and least for 0%-depth (constant) F2Cs. This suggests that competitor impact depends on overall depth of frequency variation, not depth relative to that for the target formants. The absence of tuning (i.e., no minimum in intelligibility for the 50% case) suggests that the ability to reject an extraneous formant does not depend on similarity in the depth of formant-frequency variation. Furthermore, triangle-wave competitors were as effective as their more speech-like counterparts, suggesting that the selection of formants from the ensemble also does not depend on speech-specific constraints. PMID:24842068

  9. Collective frequency variation in network synchronization and reverse PageRank.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Taylor, Dane; Sun, Jie; Arenas, Alex

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of natural and engineered phenomena rely on large networks of interacting units to reach a dynamical consensus state where the system collectively operates. Here we study the dynamics of self-organizing systems and show that for generic directed networks the collective frequency of the ensemble is not the same as the mean of the individuals' natural frequencies. Specifically, we show that the collective frequency equals a weighted average of the natural frequencies, where the weights are given by an outflow centrality measure that is equivalent to a reverse PageRank centrality. Our findings uncover an intricate dependence of the collective frequency on both the structural directedness and dynamical heterogeneity of the network, and also reveal an unexplored connection between synchronization and PageRank, which opens the possibility of applying PageRank optimization to synchronization. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of collective frequency variation in real-world networks by considering the UK and Scandinavian power grids. PMID:27176319

  10. Separation of Radio-Frequency Sources and Localization of Partial Discharges in Noisy Environments

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The detection of partial discharges (PD) can help in early-warning detection systems to protect critical assets in power systems. The radio-frequency emission of these events can be measured with antennas even when the equipment is in service which reduces dramatically the maintenance costs and favours the implementation of condition-based monitoring systems. The drawback of these type of measurements is the difficulty of having a reference signal to study the events in a classical phase-resolved partial discharge pattern (PRPD). Therefore, in open-air substations and overhead lines where interferences from radio and TV broadcasting and mobile communications are important sources of noise and other pulsed interferences from rectifiers or inverters can be present, it is difficult to identify whether there is partial discharges activity or not. This paper proposes a robust method to separate the events captured with the antennas, identify which of them are partial discharges and localize the piece of equipment that is having problems. The separation is done with power ratio (PR) maps based on the spectral characteristics of the signal and the identification of the type of event is done localizing the source with an array of four antennas. Several classical methods to calculate the time differences of arrival (TDOA) of the emission to the antennas have been tested, and the localization is done using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to minimize a distance function. PMID:25923935

  11. Separation of radio-frequency sources and localization of partial discharges in noisy environments.

    PubMed

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The detection of partial discharges (PD) can help in early-warning detection systems to protect critical assets in power systems. The radio-frequency emission of these events can be measured with antennas even when the equipment is in service which reduces dramatically the maintenance costs and favours the implementation of condition-based monitoring systems. The drawback of these type of measurements is the difficulty of having a reference signal to study the events in a classical phase-resolved partial discharge pattern (PRPD). Therefore, in open-air substations and overhead lines where interferences from radio and TV broadcasting and mobile communications are important sources of noise and other pulsed interferences from rectifiers or inverters can be present, it is difficult to identify whether there is partial discharges activity or not. This paper proposes a robust method to separate the events captured with the antennas, identify which of them are partial discharges and localize the piece of equipment that is having problems. The separation is done with power ratio (PR) maps based on the spectral characteristics of the signal and the identification of the type of event is done localizing the source with an array of four antennas. Several classical methods to calculate the time differences of arrival (TDOA) of the emission to the antennas have been tested, and the localization is done using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to minimize a distance function. PMID:25923935

  12. Implementation of elastic reverse-time migration using wavefield separation in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Wookeen; Pyun, Sukjoon; Bae, Ho Seuk; Shin, Changsoo; Marfurt, Kurt J.

    2012-06-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to the migration of multicomponent data in elastic media with wavefield separation techniques being the most successful. Most of this work has been carried out in the time domain. In this paper, we formulate a multicomponent migration technique in the frequency domain. Reverse-time migration can be viewed as the zero-lag cross-correlation between virtual source and back-propagated wavefields. Cross-correlating the Helmholtz decomposed wavefields rather than directly correlating the vector displacement fields results in sharper, more interpretable images, contaminated by fewer crosstalk artefacts. The end products are separate P and S wave (and if desired, PS and SP) migration images. We test our migration algorithm on synthetic seismic data generated using the SEG/EAGE salt-dome, Overthrust and Marmousi-2 models. We correctly image the location and shape of the target zone for oil exploration using these data sets. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our new migration technique provides good images even when the initial velocity model is only approximate.

  13. In situ cardiac perfusion reveals interspecific variation of intraventricular flow separation in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Joyce, William; Axelsson, Michael; Altimiras, Jordi; Wang, Tobias

    2016-07-15

    The ventricles of non-crocodilian reptiles are incompletely divided and provide an opportunity for mixing of oxygen-poor blood and oxygen-rich blood (intracardiac shunting). However, both cardiac morphology and in vivo shunting patterns exhibit considerable interspecific variation within reptiles. In the present study, we develop an in situ double-perfused heart approach to characterise the propensity and capacity for shunting in five reptile species: the turtle Trachemys scripta, the rock python Python sebae, the yellow anaconda Eunectes notaeus, the varanid lizard Varanus exanthematicus and the bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps To simulate changes in vascular bed resistance, pulmonary and systemic afterloads were independently manipulated and changes in blood flow distribution amongst the central outflow tracts were monitored. As previously demonstrated in Burmese pythons, rock pythons and varanid lizards exhibited pronounced intraventricular flow separation. As pulmonary or systemic afterload was raised, flow in the respective circulation decreased. However, flow in the other circulation, where afterload was constant, remained stable. This correlates with the convergent evolution of intraventricular pressure separation and the large intraventricular muscular ridge, which compartmentalises the ventricle, in these species. Conversely, in the three other species, the pulmonary and systemic flows were strongly mutually dependent, such that the decrease in pulmonary flow in response to elevated pulmonary afterload resulted in redistribution of perfusate to the systemic circuit (and vice versa). Thus, in these species, the muscular ridge appeared labile and blood could readily transverse the intraventricular cava. We conclude that relatively minor structural differences between non-crocodilian reptiles result in the fundamental changes in cardiac function. Further, our study emphasises that functionally similar intracardiac flow separation evolved independently in

  14. Cyclic variations of high-frequency ultrasonic backscattering from blood under pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung

    2009-08-01

    It was shown previously that ultrasonic scattering from whole blood varies during the flow cycle under pulsatile flow both in vitro and in vivo. It has been postulated that the cyclic variations of the backscattering signal are associated with red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in flowing whole blood. To obtain a better understanding of the relationship between blood backscattering and RBC aggregation behavior for pulsatile flowing blood, the present study used high-frequency ultrasound to characterize blood properties. The backscattering signals from both whole blood and an RBC suspension at different peak flow velocities (from 10 to 30 cm/s) and hematocrits (20% and 40%) under pulsatile flow (stroke rate of 20 beats/min) were measured with 3 single-element transducers at frequencies of 10, 35, and 50 MHz in a mock flow loop. To avoid the frequency response problem of a Doppler flowmeter, the integrated backscatter (IB) and flow velocity as functions of time were calculated directly using RF signals from flowing blood. The experimental results showed that cyclic variations of the IB curve were clearly observed at a low flow velocity and a hematocrit of 40% when using 50 MHz ultrasound, and that these variations became weaker as the peak flow velocity increased. However, these cyclic variations were detected only at 10 cm/s when using 10 MHz ultrasound. These results demonstrate that a high flow velocity can stop the formation of rouleaux and that a high hematocrit can promote RBC aggregation to produce cyclic variations of the backscattering signal under pulsatile flow. In addition, slight cyclic variations of the IB curve for an RBC suspension were observed at 35 and 50 MHz. Furthermore, the peak of the IB curve from whole blood led the peak of the velocity waveform when using high-frequency ultrasound, which could be explained by the assumption that a rapid flow can promote RBC aggregation under pulsatile flow. Together, the experimental results showed that the

  15. Variation in Cardiac Pulse Frequencies Modulates vSMC Phenotype Switching During Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Zehra; McFetridge, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    In vitro perfusion systems have exposed vascular constructs to mechanical conditions that emulate physiological pulse pressure and found significant improvements in graft development. However, current models maintain constant, or set pulse/shear mechanics that do not account for the natural temporal variation in frequency. With an aim to develop clinically relevant small diameter vascular grafts, these investigations detail a perfusion culture model that incorporates temporal pulse pressure variation. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that short-term variation in heart rate, such as changes in respiratory activity, plays a significant role in vascular remodeling and graft development. The pulse rate of a healthy volunteer was logged to model the effect of daily activities on heart rate. Vascular bioreactors were used to deliver perfusion conditions based on modeled frequencies of temporal pulse variability, termed Physiologically Modeled Pulse Dynamics (PMPD). Acellular scaffolds derived from the human umbilical vein were seeded with human vascular smooth muscle cells and perfused under defined pulsatile conditions. vSMC exposed to constant pulse frequencies expressed a contractile phenotype, while exposure to PMPD drove cells to a synthetic state with continued cell proliferation, increased tensile strength and stiffness as well as diminished vasoactivity. Results show the temporal variation associated with normal heart physiology to have a profound effect on vascular remodeling and vasoactive function. While these models are representative of vascular regeneration further investigation is required to understanding these and other key regulators in vSMC phenotype switching in non-pathological or wound healing states. This understanding has important clinical implications that may lead to improved treatments that enhance vessel regeneration. PMID:26577103

  16. Gate line edge roughness amplitude and frequency variation effects on intra die MOS device characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadeh, Emad; Gunther, Norman G.; Niemann, Darrell; Rahman, Mahmud

    2006-06-01

    Random fluctuations in fabrication process outcomes such as gate line edge roughness (LER) give rise to corresponding fluctuations in scaled down MOS device characteristics. A thermodynamic-variational model is presented to study the effects of LER on threshold voltage and capacitance of sub-50 nm MOS devices. Conceptually, we treat the geometric definition of the MOS devices on a die as consisting of a collection of gates. In turn, each of these gates has an area, A, and a perimeter, P, defined by nominally straight lines subject to random process outcomes producing roughness. We treat roughness as being deviations from straightness consisting of both transverse amplitude and longitudinal wavelength each having lognormal distribution. We obtain closed-form expressions for variance of threshold voltage ( Vth), and device capacitance ( C) at Onset of Strong Inversion (OSI) for a small device. Using our variational model, we characterized the device electrical properties such as σ and σC in terms of the statistical parameters of the roughness amplitude and spatial frequency, i.e., inverse roughness wavelength. We then verified our model with numerical analysis of Vth roll-off for small devices and σ due to dopant fluctuation. Our model was also benchmarked against TCAD of σ as a function of LER. We then extended our analysis to predict variations in σ and σC versus average LER spatial frequency and amplitude, and oxide-thickness. Given the intuitive expectation that LER of very short wavelengths must also have small amplitude, we have investigated the case in which the amplitude mean is inversely related to the frequency mean. We compare with the situation in which amplitude and frequency mean are unrelated. Given also that the gate perimeter may consist of different LER signature for each side, we have extended our analysis to the case when the LER statistical difference between gate sides is moderate, as well as when it is significantly large.

  17. Variation in relapse frequency and the transmission potential of Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael T.; Shirreff, George; Karl, Stephan; Ghani, Azra C.; Mueller, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    There is substantial variation in the relapse frequency of Plasmodium vivax malaria, with fast-relapsing strains in tropical areas, and slow-relapsing strains in temperate areas with seasonal transmission. We hypothesize that much of the phenotypic diversity in P. vivax relapses arises from selection of relapse frequency to optimize transmission potential in a given environment, in a process similar to the virulence trade-off hypothesis. We develop mathematical models of P. vivax transmission and calculate the basic reproduction number R0 to investigate how transmission potential varies with relapse frequency and seasonality. In tropical zones with year-round transmission, transmission potential is optimized at intermediate relapse frequencies of two to three months: slower-relapsing strains increase the opportunity for onward transmission to mosquitoes, but also increase the risk of being outcompeted by faster-relapsing strains. Seasonality is an important driver of relapse frequency for temperate strains, with the time to first relapse predicted to be six to nine months, coinciding with the duration between seasonal transmission peaks. We predict that there is a threshold degree of seasonality, below which fast-relapsing tropical strains are selected for, and above which slow-relapsing temperate strains dominate, providing an explanation for the observed global distribution of relapse phenotypes. PMID:27030414

  18. Search for Temporal Variations in Alpha Using a Yb^+ Optical Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peik, Ekkehard

    2008-05-01

    Optical frequency standards based on forbidden transitions of trapped and laser-cooled ions have now achieved significantly higher stability and also greater accuracy than primary cesium clocks. At PTB we investigate an optical clock based on the electric quadrupole transition S1/2- D3/2 at 688 THz in the ^171Yb^+ ion and have shown that the frequencies realized in two independent ion traps agree to within a few parts in 10^16. Results from a sequence of precise measurements of the absolute transition frequency are now available that cover a period of seven years. Combined with data obtained at NIST on the quadrupole transition in Hg^+, this allows to derive a model-independent limit for a temporal drift of the fine structure constant alpha. We prepare to observe the electric-octupole transition S1/2- F7/2 of Yb^+ at 642 THz with sub-hertz resolution. This narrow-linewidth reference transition promises a reduced quantum-noise limited instability of the single-ion optical clock. The ratio of the 688 THz and 642 THz reference frequencies can be measured as a dimensionless number with a femtosecond laser frequency comb, independent from the realization of the SI second with cesium clocks. Repeated measurements of this quantity permit to search for temporal variations of alpha with increased sensitivity.

  19. Measuring frequency changes due to microwave power variations as a function of C-field setting in a rubidium frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarosy, E. B.; Johnson, Walter A.; Karuza, Sarunas K.; Voit, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been shown in previous studies that in some cesium frequency standards there exist certain C-field settings that minimize frequency changes that are due to variations in the microwave power. In order to determine whether similar results could be obtained with rubidium (Rb) frequency standards (clocks), we performed a similar study, using a completely automated measurement system, on a commercial Rb standard. From our measurements we found that changing the microwave power to the filter cell resulted in significant changes in frequency, and that the magnitude of these frequency changes at low C-field levels went to zero and decreased as the C-field was increased.

  20. Does infectious disease cause global variation in the frequency of intrastate armed conflict and civil war?

    PubMed

    Letendre, Kenneth; Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy

    2010-08-01

    Geographic and cross-national variation in the frequency of intrastate armed conflict and civil war is a subject of great interest. Previous theory on this variation has focused on the influence on human behaviour of climate, resource competition, national wealth, and cultural characteristics. We present the parasite-stress model of intrastate conflict, which unites previous work on the correlates of intrastate conflict by linking frequency of the outbreak of such conflict, including civil war, to the intensity of infectious disease across countries of the world. High intensity of infectious disease leads to the emergence of xenophobic and ethnocentric cultural norms. These cultures suffer greater poverty and deprivation due to the morbidity and mortality caused by disease, and as a result of decreased investment in public health and welfare. Resource competition among xenophobic and ethnocentric groups within a nation leads to increased frequency of civil war. We present support for the parasite-stress model with regression analyses. We find support for a direct effect of infectious disease on intrastate armed conflict, and support for an indirect effect of infectious disease on the incidence of civil war via its negative effect on national wealth. We consider the entanglements of feedback of conflict into further reduced wealth and increased incidence of disease, and discuss implications for international warfare and global patterns of wealth and imperialism. PMID:20377573

  1. Extended high-frequency bandwidth improves reception of speech in spatially separated masking speech

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Suzanne Carr; Freed, Daniel J.; Nilsson, Michael; Moore, Brian C.J.; Puria, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The hypothesis that extending the audible frequency bandwidth beyond the range currently implemented in most hearing aids can improve speech understanding was tested for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired participants using target sentences and spatially separated masking speech. Design The Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) speech corpus was re-recorded and four masking talkers were recorded at a sample rate of 44.1 kHz. All talkers were male native speakers of American English. Reception threshold for Sentences (RTS) were measured in two spatial configurations. In the asymmetric configuration, the target was presented from −45° azimuth and two colocated masking talkers were presented from +45° azimuth. In the diffuse configuration, the target was presented from 0° azimuth and four masking talkers were each presented from a different azimuth: +45°, +135°, −135°, and −45°. The new speech sentences, masking materials and configurations, collectively termed the ‘Hearing in Speech Test (HIST)’, were presented using lowpass filter cutoff frequencies of 4, 6, 8, and 10 kHz. For the normal-hearing participants, stimuli were presented in the sound field using loudspeakers. For the hearing-impaired participants, the spatial configurations were simulated using earphones, and a multi-band wide dynamic range compressor with a modified CAM2 fitting algorithm was used to compensate for each participant’s hearing loss. Results For the normal-hearing participants (N=24, mean age 40 years), the RTS improved significantly by 3.0 dB when the bandwidth was increased from 4 to 10 kHz, and a significant improvement of 1.3 dB was obtained from extending the bandwidth from 6 to 10 kHz, in both spatial configurations. Hearing-impaired participants (N=25, mean age 71 years) also showed a significant improvement in RTS with extended bandwidth, but the effect was smaller than for the normal-hearing participants. The mean decrease in RTS when the bandwidth was

  2. Blind source separation based on time-frequency morphological characteristics for rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Xiukun

    2016-06-01

    Separation of the components of rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects is essential in obtaining the structural characteristics of such objects. To overcome the problem of rigid structures appearing to have the same spectral structure in the time domain, time-frequency Blind Source Separation (BSS) can be used in combination with image morphology to separate the rigid scattering components of different objects. Based on a highlight model, the separation of the rigid scattering structure of objects with time-frequency distribution is deduced. Using a morphological filter, different characteristics in a Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) observed for single auto term and cross terms can be simplified to remove any cross-term interference. By selecting time and frequency points of the auto terms signal, the accuracy of BSS can be improved. An experimental simulation has been used, with changes in the pulse width of the transmitted signal, the relative amplitude and the time delay parameter, in order to analyzing the feasibility of this new method. Simulation results show that the new method is not only able to separate rigid scattering components, but can also separate the components when elastic scattering and rigid scattering exist at the same time. Experimental results confirm that the new method can be used in separating the rigid scattering structure of underwater objects.

  3. Blind source separation based on time-frequency morphological characteristics for rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Xiukun

    2016-04-01

    Separation of the components of rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects is essential in obtaining the structural characteristics of such objects. To overcome the problem of rigid structures appearing to have the same spectral structure in the time domain, time-frequency Blind Source Separation (BSS) can be used in combination with image morphology to separate the rigid scattering components of different objects. Based on a highlight model, the separation of the rigid scattering structure of objects with time-frequency distribution is deduced. Using a morphological filter, different characteristics in a Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) observed for single auto term and cross terms can be simplified to remove any cross-term interference. By selecting time and frequency points of the auto terms signal, the accuracy of BSS can be improved. An experimental simulation has been used, with changes in the pulse width of the transmitted signal, the relative amplitude and the time delay parameter, in order to analyzing the feasibility of this new method. Simulation results show that the new method is not only able to separate rigid scattering components, but can also separate the components when elastic scattering and rigid scattering exist at the same time. Experimental results confirm that the new method can be used in separating the rigid scattering structure of underwater objects.

  4. Ecological drivers of variation in tool-use frequency across sea otter populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujii, Jessica A; Ralls, Katherine; Tinker, M. Tim

    2015-01-01

    Sea otters are well-known tool users, employing objects such as rocks or shells to break open hard-shelled invertebrate prey. However, little is known about how the frequency of tool use varies among sea otter populations and the factors that drive these differences. We examined 17 years of observational data on prey capture and tool use from 8 sea otter populations ranging from southern California to the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. There were significant differences in the diets of these populations as well as variation in the frequency of tool use. Sea otters at Amchitka Island, Alaska, used tools on less than 1% of dives that resulted in the capture of prey compared with approximately 16% in Monterey, California. The percentage of individuals in the population that used tools ranged from 10% to 93%. In all populations, marine snails and thick-shelled bivalves were most likely to be associated with tool use, whereas soft-bodied prey items such as worms and sea stars were the least likely. The probability that a tool would be used on a given prey type varied across populations. The morphology of the prey item being handled and the prevalence of various types of prey in local diets were major ecological drivers of tool use: together they accounted for about 64% of the variation in tool-use frequency among populations. The remaining variation may be related to changes in the relative costs and benefits to an individual otter of learning to use tools effectively under differing ecological circumstances.

  5. A direct numerical simulation investigation of the synthetic jet frequency effects on separation control of low-Re flow past an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-05-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulations of a synthetic jet (SJ) based separation control of flow past a NACA-0018 (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) airfoil, at 10° angle of attack and Reynolds number 104 based on the airfoil chord length C and uniform inflow velocity U0. The actuator of the SJ is modeled as a spanwise slot on the airfoil leeward surface and is placed just upstream of the leading edge separation position of the uncontrolled flow. The momentum coefficient of the SJ is chosen at a small value 2.13 × 10-4 normalized by that of the inflow. Three forcing frequencies are chosen for the present investigation: the low frequency (LF) F+ = feC/U0 = 0.5, the medium frequency (MF) F+ = 1.0, and the high frequency (HF) F+ = 4.0. We quantify the effects of forcing frequency for each case on the separation control and related vortex dynamics patterns. The simulations are performed using an energy conservative fourth-order parallel code. Numerical results reveal that the geometric variation introduced by the actuator has negligible effects on the mean flow field and the leading edge separation pattern; thus, the separation control effects are attributed to the SJ. The aerodynamic performances of the airfoil, characterized by lift and lift-to-drag ratio, are improved for all controlled cases, with the F+ = 1.0 case being the optimal one. The flow in the shear layer close to the actuator is locked to the jet, while in the wake this lock-in is maintained for the MF case but suppressed by the increasing turbulent fluctuations in the LF and HF cases. The vortex evolution downstream of the actuator presents two modes depending on the frequency: the vortex fragmentation and merging mode in the LF case where the vortex formed due to the SJ breaks up into several vortices and the latter merge as convecting downstream; the discrete vortices mode in the HF case where discrete vortices form and convect downstream without any fragmentation and merging

  6. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stiffness variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by a plurality of force transmitting mechanisms which contact the noise radiating element. Each one of the force transmitting mechanisms includes an expandable element and a spring in contact with the noise radiating element so that excitation of the element varies the spring force applied to the noise radiating element. The elements are actuated by a controller which receives input of a signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the elements and causes the spring force applied to the noise radiating element to be varied. The force transmitting mechanisms can be arranged to either produce bending or linear stiffness variations in the noise radiating element.

  7. Vertical normal modes of human ears: Individual variation and frequency estimation from pinna anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Parham; Takemoto, Hironori; Nishimura, Ryouichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Beyond the first peak of head-related transfer functions or pinna-related transfer functions (PRTFs) human pinnae are known to have two normal modes with "vertical" resonance patterns, involving two or three pressure anti-nodes in cavum, cymba, and fossa. However, little is known about individual variations in these modes, and there is no established model for estimating their center-frequencies from anthropometry. Here, with geometries of 38 pinnae measured, PRTFs were calculated and vertical modes visualized by numerical simulation. Most pinnae were found to have both Cavum-Fossa and Cavum-Cymba modes, with opposite-phase anti-nodes in cavum and either fossa or cymba, respectively. Nevertheless in both modes, fossa involvement varied substantially across pinnae, dependent on scaphoid fossa depth and cymba shallowness. Linear regression models were evaluated in mode frequency estimation, with 3322 measures derived from 31 pinna landmarks. The Cavum-Fossa normal mode frequency was best estimated [correlation coefficient r = 0.89, mean absolute error (MAE) = 257 Hz or 4.4%] by the distance from canal entrance to helix rim, and cymba horizontal depth. The Cavum-Cymba normal mode frequency was best estimated (r = 0.92, MAE = 247 Hz or 3.2%) by the sagittal-plane distance from concha floor to cymba anterior wall, and cavum horizontal depth. PMID:27586714

  8. Separable developmental trajectories for the abilities to detect auditory amplitude and frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Banai, Karen; Sabin, Andrew T; Wright, Beverly A

    2011-10-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are inherent components of most natural sounds. The ability to detect these modulations, considered critical for normal auditory and speech perception, improves over the course of development. However, the extent to which the development of AM and FM detection skills follow different trajectories, and therefore can be attributed to the maturation of separate processes, remains unclear. Here we explored the relationship between the developmental trajectories for the detection of sinusoidal AM and FM in a cross-sectional design employing children aged 8-10 and 11-12 years and adults. For FM of tonal carriers, both average performance (mean) and performance consistency (within-listener standard deviation) were adult-like in the 8-10 y/o. In contrast, in the same listeners, average performance for AM of wideband noise carriers was still not adult-like in the 11-12 y/o, though performance consistency was already mature in the 8-10 y/o. Among the children there were no significant correlations for either measure between the degrees of maturity for AM and FM detection. These differences in developmental trajectory between the two modulation cues and between average detection thresholds and performance consistency suggest that at least partially distinct processes may underlie the development of AM and FM detection as well as the abilities to detect modulation and to do so consistently. PMID:21664958

  9. Wolbachia in European Populations of the Invasive Pest Drosophila suzukii: Regional Variation in Infection Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, Patricia; Martinez, Julien; Fraimout, Antoine; Jiggins, Francis; Andrieux, Thibault; Siozios, Stefanos; Anfora, Gianfranco; Miller, Wolfgang; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Mouton, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The invasive pest Drosophila suzukii is characterized by a specific fresh-fruit targeting behavior and has quickly become a menace for the fruit economy of newly infested North American and European regions. D. suzukii carries a strain of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia, named wSuz, which has a low infection frequency and no reproductive manipulation capabilities in American populations of D. suzukii. To further understand the nature of wSuz biology and assess its utility as a tool for controlling this pest’s populations, we investigated the prevalence of Wolbachia in 23 European D. suzukii populations, and compared our results with those available in American populations. Our data showed a highly variable infection frequency with a mean prevalence of 46%, which is significantly higher than the 17% found in American populations. Based on Multilocus Sequence Typing analysis, a single wSuz strain was diagnosed in all European populations of D. suzukii. In agreement with American data, we found no evidence of cytoplasmic incompatibility induced by wSuz. These findings raise two questions: a) why Wolbachia is maintained in field populations of D. suzukii and b) what are the selective forces responsible for the variation in prevalence within populations, particularly between European and American continents? Our results provide new insights into the D. suzukii-Wolbachia association and highlight regional variations that await further investigation and that should be taken into account for using Wolbachia-based pest management programs. PMID:26809119

  10. An analytical model for Doppler frequency variations of ionospheric HF sounding caused by SSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V.; Fedorov, E.; Yumoto, K.; Ikeda, A.; Sun, T. R.

    2010-10-01

    A theoretical model to interpret the deviations of the Doppler sounding radio frequency during the SSC is proposed. The Doppler response is composed from long-period deviation with time scale ˜10 min and short-lived (˜1 min) positive spike. For the interpretation of this spike, the variations of Doppler velocity induced by compressional and Alfvén waves are theoretically estimated on the basis of the thin ionosphere approximation. The analytical model developed goes beyond the older numerical model which has been in use thus far to explain certain facets of the correlation between geomagnetic variations and HF Doppler shifts. This new model provides the possibility to easily estimate the Doppler frequency response to either Alfvén or compresssional modes for extraordinary and ordinary radio waves. A theoretical estimate indicates that, for the same amplitude of the ground magnetic disturbances, a large-scale compressional mode produces a larger ionospheric response than an Alfvén mode. The plasma vertical displacement caused by the ULF inductive electric field is shown to be the dominating effect. The magnitudes and waveforms of the simultaneously detected ionospheric and magnetic responses on SSC at a low-latitude site in Japan fit the considered model.

  11. Single molecule molecular inversion probes for targeted, high-accuracy detection of low-frequency variation

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Joseph B.; Pritchard, Colin C.; Salipante, Stephen J.; O'Roak, Brian J.; Shendure, Jay

    2013-01-01

    The detection and quantification of genetic heterogeneity in populations of cells is fundamentally important to diverse fields, ranging from microbial evolution to human cancer genetics. However, despite the cost and throughput advances associated with massively parallel sequencing, it remains challenging to reliably detect mutations that are present at a low relative abundance in a given DNA sample. Here we describe smMIP, an assay that combines single molecule tagging with multiplex targeted capture to enable practical and highly sensitive detection of low-frequency or subclonal variation. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we simultaneously resequenced 33 clinically informative cancer genes in eight cell line and 45 clinical cancer samples. Single molecule tagging facilitated extremely accurate consensus calling, with an estimated per-base error rate of 8.4 × 10−6 in cell lines and 2.6 × 10−5 in clinical specimens. False-positive mutations in the single molecule consensus base-calls exhibited patterns predominantly consistent with DNA damage, including 8-oxo-guanine and spontaneous deamination of cytosine. Based on mixing experiments with cell line samples, sensitivity for mutations above 1% frequency was 83% with no false positives. At clinically informative sites, we identified seven low-frequency point mutations (0.2%–4.7%), including BRAF p.V600E (melanoma, 0.2% alternate allele frequency), KRAS p.G12V (lung, 0.6%), JAK2 p.V617F (melanoma, colon, two lung, 0.3%–1.4%), and NRAS p.Q61R (colon, 4.7%). We anticipate that smMIP will be broadly adoptable as a practical and effective method for accurately detecting low-frequency mutations in both research and clinical settings. PMID:23382536

  12. Variation in the human lymphocyte sister chromatid exchange frequency as a function of time: results of daily and twice-weekly sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Christensen, M.L.; Strout, C.L.; McGee, K.A.; Carrano, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    The variation in lymphocyte sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency was investigated in healthy nonsmokers who were not taking any medication. Two separate studies were undertaken. In the first, blood was drawn from four women twice a week for 8 weeks. These donors recorded the onset and termination of menstruation and times of illness. In the second study, blood was obtained from two women and two men for 5 consecutive days on two separate occasions initiated 14 days apart. Analysis of the mean SCE frequencies in each study indicated that significant temporal variation occurred in each donor, and that more variation occurred in the longer study. Some of the variation was found to be associated with the menstrual cycle. In the daily study, most of the variation appeared to be random, but occasional day-to-day changes occurred that were greater than those expected by chance. To determine how well a single SCE sample estimated the pooled mean for each donor in each study, the authors calculated the number of samples that encompassed that donor's pooled mean within 1 or more standard errors. For both studies, about 75% of the samples encompassed the pooled mean within 2 standard errors. An analysis of high-frequency cells (HFCs) was also undertaken. The results for each study indicate that the proportion of HFCs, compared with the use of Fisher's Exact test, is significantly more constant than the means, which were compared by using the t-test. These results coupled with our previous work suggest that HFC analysis may be the method of choice when analyzing data from human population studies.

  13. Mismatch correction modulates mutation frequency and pilus phase and antigenic variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Criss, Alison K; Bonney, Kevin M; Chang, Rhoda A; Duffin, Paul M; LeCuyer, Brian E; Seifert, H Steven

    2010-01-01

    The mismatch correction (MMC) system repairs DNA mismatches and single nucleotide insertions or deletions postreplication. To test the functions of MMC in the obligate human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, homologues of the core MMC genes mutS and mutL were inactivated in strain FA1090. No mutH homologue was found in the FA1090 genome, suggesting that gonococcal MMC is not methyl directed. MMC mutants were compared to a mutant in uvrD, the helicase that functions with MMC in Escherichia coli. Inactivation of MMC or uvrD increased spontaneous resistance to rifampin and nalidixic acid, and MMC/uvrD double mutants exhibited higher mutation frequencies than any single mutant. Loss of MMC marginally enhanced the transformation efficiency of DNA carrying a single nucleotide mismatch but not that of DNA with a 1-kb insertion. Unlike the exquisite UV sensitivity of the uvrD mutant, inactivating MMC did not affect survival after UV irradiation. MMC and uvrD mutants exhibited increased PilC-dependent pilus phase variation. mutS-deficient gonococci underwent an increased frequency of pilin antigenic variation, whereas uvrD had no effect. Recombination tracts in the mutS pilin variants were longer than in parental gonococci but utilized the same donor pilS loci. These results show that gonococcal MMC repairs mismatches and small insertion/deletions in DNA and also affects the recombination events underlying pilin antigenic variation. The differential effects of MMC and uvrD in gonococci unexpectedly reveal that MMC can function independently of uvrD in this human-specific pathogen. PMID:19854909

  14. Seasonal variations in the frequency of atmospheric circulation types in European regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahynova, Monika; Huth, Radan

    2010-05-01

    We propose two versions of an "index of seasonality" to study the annual course in the relative frequency of circulation types in several objective and subjective classifications from the COST733 database. The objective classifications have been developed for twelve European regions (domains D00-D11) in the period 1957-2002 and have fixed numbers of types (9, 18, and 27). Both indices are based on the long-term monthly relative frequency of individual circulation types. For each type we indicate the months with the highest and the lowest relative frequency and calculate their difference (range). The first index - "average seasonality" - is an average of the ranges of all types within a given classification. It is anti-correlated with the number of types - a higher number of types means a lower average seasonality. The second index - "maximum seasonality" - only takes into account the circulation type with the highest range (that is, the type with the most pronounced annual course). This index removes the dependence on the number of circulation types in some of the used classifications. Seasonal variations in the relative frequency of circulation types based on the two indices are generally the highest in the eastern Mediterranean (D11) and in whole Europe (D00). The lowest seasonality is found over the British Isles (D04) and Iceland (D01). There are large differences in the seasonality in the individual classifications, because the degree to which the classification identifies the natural seasonal circulation patterns strongly depends on the classification algorithm used. The research is conducted within the COST733 Action "Harmonisation and Applications of Weather Types Classifications for European Regions". The Czech participation in it is supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic, contract OC115.

  15. High-frequency Earth rotation variations deduced from altimetry-based ocean tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzak, Matthias; Schindelegger, Michael; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Hagedoorn, Jan

    2016-06-01

    A model of diurnal and semi-diurnal variations in Earth rotation parameters (ERP) is constructed based on altimetry-measured tidal heights from a multi-mission empirical ocean tide solution. Barotropic currents contributing to relative angular momentum changes are estimated for nine major tides in a global inversion algorithm that solves the two-dimensional momentum equations on a regular 0.5° grid with a heavily weighted continuity constraint. The influence of 19 minor tides is accounted for by linear admittance interpolation of ocean tidal angular momentum, although the assumption of smooth admittance variations with frequency appears to be a doubtful concept for semi-diurnal mass terms in particular. A validation of the newly derived model based on post-fit corrections to polar motion and universal time (Δ UT1) from the analysis of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations shows a variance reduction for semi-diurnal Δ UT1 residuals that is significant at the 0.05 level with respect to the conventional ERP model. Improvements are also evident for the explicitly modeled K_1 , Q_1 , and K_2 tides in individual ERP components, but large residuals of more than 15 μ as remain at the principal lunar frequencies of O_1 and M_2 . We attribute these shortcomings to uncertainties in the inverted relative angular momentum changes and, to a minor extent, to violation of mass conservation in the empirical ocean tide solution. Further dedicated hydrodynamic modeling efforts of these anomalous constituents are required to meet the accuracy standards of modern space geodesy.

  16. Extreme Recombination Frequencies Shape Genome Variation and Evolution in the Honeybee, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Wallberg, Andreas; Glémin, Sylvain; Webster, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is a fundamental cellular process, with important consequences for evolution and genome integrity. However, we know little about how recombination rates vary across the genomes of most species and the molecular and evolutionary determinants of this variation. The honeybee, Apis mellifera, has extremely high rates of meiotic recombination, although the evolutionary causes and consequences of this are unclear. Here we use patterns of linkage disequilibrium in whole genome resequencing data from 30 diploid honeybees to construct a fine-scale map of rates of crossing over in the genome. We find that, in contrast to vertebrate genomes, the recombination landscape is not strongly punctate. Crossover rates strongly correlate with levels of genetic variation, but not divergence, which indicates a pervasive impact of selection on the genome. Germ-line methylated genes have reduced crossover rate, which could indicate a role of methylation in suppressing recombination. Controlling for the effects of methylation, we do not infer a strong association between gene expression patterns and recombination. The site frequency spectrum is strongly skewed from neutral expectations in honeybees: rare variants are dominated by AT-biased mutations, whereas GC-biased mutations are found at higher frequencies, indicative of a major influence of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), which we infer to generate an allele fixation bias 5 – 50 times the genomic average estimated in humans. We uncover further evidence that this repair bias specifically affects transitions and favours fixation of CpG sites. Recombination, via gBGC, therefore appears to have profound consequences on genome evolution in honeybees and interferes with the process of natural selection. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the forces driving molecular evolution. PMID:25902173

  17. Frequency variation and sensor contribution assessment: Application to an offshore platform in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushun; Li, Huajun; Wang, Weiying; Li, Wei; Wang, Bin

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a time-frequency and multiple-sensor assessment method is presented and then applied to an offshore platform in the South China Sea with the goal of providing a more suitable time duration of measured signals and evaluating each sensor's contribution to mode shapes of interest. By processing all measured signals simultaneously, a series of linear parameters are used to fit the measured signals. A moving window in overlapping steps along the time record of a non-stationary signal is used for time-frequency analysis while a series of amplitude matrices are obtained for all sliced segments. These segments are then used to evaluate each sensor's contribution to some mode(s) of interest. Compared with the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) or S-transform method, the frequencies used in this time-frequency analysis are shared by the sensors involved so that the variations in the results due to the characteristics of different sensors are avoided. In addition, the approach requires only a short-duration segment to obtain high-frequency resolution, which will improve the computing efficiency of modal analysis using measured seat est data. The proposed method could also be used to estimate damping ratios and each sensor's contribution to modes of interest based on the analysis of the series of amplitude matrices; this could be used to guide the installation of sensors in field tests of offshore structures. To demonstrate the proposed method with a time-frequency analysis, a numerical example of a synthesized signal with five segments, each with its owns different frequency componentsincluding a relatively weaker component, is constructed; numerical results from the analysis of this example signal indicate that the approach could yield a sharper image with a good computing efficiency. The second example simulates three signals that represent multiple measurements; this example is used to study each sensor

  18. Nickel-silica nanocomposite: Variation of the blocking temperature with magnetic field and measuring frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Seehra, M. S.; Bonevich, J.

    2008-04-01

    The variations of the blocking temperature TB with measuring frequency fm and applied field H are reported for Ni nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in SiO2 matrix with the nominal composition Ni /SiO2 (15/85). Transmission electron microscopy of the sol-gel prepared NPs yielded a log-normal distribution with diameter D =3.8(0.2)nm whereas x-ray diffraction data yielded D ≃3.3nm. The TB versus fm variation for fm=0.1-1000Hz fits the equation TB=Ta/ln(f0/fm) with f0=2.6×109Hz and Ta=270K whereas TB versus H data follows the equation TB(H)=33(1-H/H0)m with H0=3200Oe and m =2(3/2) for lower (higher) H. These results are compared with the predictions of the Néel-Brown model of magnetic relaxation in noninteracting NPs.

  19. High-Frequency Variation of Purine Biosynthesis Genes Is a Mechanism of Success in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Andrew; Huynh, Steven; Scott, Nichollas E.; Frirdich, Emilisa; Apel, Dmitry; Foster, Leonard J.; Parker, Craig T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phenotypic variation is prevalent in the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, the leading agent of enterocolitis in the developed world. Heterogeneity enhances the survival and adaptive malleability of bacterial populations because variable phenotypes may allow some cells to be protected against future stress. Exposure to hyperosmotic stress previously revealed prevalent differences in growth between C. jejuni strain 81-176 colonies due to resistant or sensitive phenotypes, and these isolated colonies continued to produce progeny with differential phenotypes. In this study, whole-genome sequencing of isolated colonies identified allelic variants of two purine biosynthesis genes, purF and apt, encoding phosphoribosyltransferases that utilize a shared substrate. Genetic analyses determined that purF was essential for fitness, while apt was critical. Traditional and high-depth amplicon-sequencing analyses confirmed extensive intrapopulation genetic variation of purF and apt that resulted in viable strains bearing alleles with in-frame insertion duplications, deletions, or missense polymorphisms. Different purF and apt alleles were associated with various stress survival capabilities under several niche-relevant conditions and contributed to differential intracellular survival in an epithelial cell infection model. Amplicon sequencing revealed that intracellular survival selected for stress-fit purF and apt alleles, as did exposure to oxygen and hyperosmotic stress. Putative protein recognition direct repeat sequences were identified in purF and apt, and a DNA-protein affinity screen captured a predicted exonuclease that promoted the global spontaneous mutation rate. This work illustrates the adaptive properties of high-frequency genetic variation in two housekeeping genes, which influences C. jejuni survival under stress and promotes its success as a pathogen. PMID:26419875

  20. Demeter/ICE Experiment: Study of low frequency transmitter intensity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Moldovan, I.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Al-Haddad, E.; Biagi, P. F.; Parrot, M.

    2012-04-01

    We report on low frequency (LF) transmitter signal recorded by the 'Instrument Capteur Electrique' (ICE) experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We mainly consider the signal emitted by the Brasov broadcasting station (25.60E, 45.75N) at frequency of about 153 kHz. We analyze the reception conditions of this transmitter several weeks before the occurrence of the Vrancea earthquakes, on October, 27th, 2004. Ground-based observations revealed the presence of sudden decrease of the Y-component of the magnetic field at Muntele Rosu Observatory (Romania), at about 68 km from the epicenter, as reported by Moldovan et al. (Rom. Journ. Phys., Vol. 54, Nos. 1-2, p. 249-261, Bucharest, 2009). In this contribution we attempt to check if the LF Brasov signal was also subject to similar disturbances as observed by the ground-station. We focus on the variation of the LF transmitter intensity levels, several weeks before and after the Vrancea earthquake occurrence. We discuss the physical parameters which may disturb the signal reception in particular the geomagnetic activity and the signal to noise ratios.

  1. Hydrological niche separation explains seasonal and inter-annual variations of vegetation dynamics in seasonally dry tropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Medvigy, D.; Powers, J. S.; Becknell, J. M.; Guan, K.

    2015-12-01

    Despite ample water supply, vegetation dynamics are subject to seasonal water stress in large fraction of tropical forests. These seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs) account for over 40% of tropical forests, harbor high biodiversity, have large potential carbon sink due to forest recovery from human disturbance and also play a critical role in global carbon budget and inter-annual variations. Plants in this biome display notably diverse responses to seasonal and inter-annual variations of water availability, especially inter-specific variations in canopy seasonality and biomass growth. Current process-based dynamic vegetation models cannot represent these diversities and are shown to perform poorly on simulating drought responses of tropical forests, calling into question of their ability to accurately simulate future changes in SDTFs. Accumulated field observations, suggest that hydrological niche separation driven by coordinated plant functional traits is associated with plants' performance under drought. Yet, it remains not clear whether the physiology-level hydrological niche separation can explain the ecosystem-level diversity observed in SDTFs. Here, we test the theory with a model-data fusion approach. We implemented a new plant hydrodynamic module that is able to track leaf water potential at sub-daily scale in ED2 model. We further incorporated a hydrological niche separation scheme based on a meta-data analysis of key functional traits in SDTFs. Simulated ecological patterns with and without hydrological niche separation were then compared with remote-sensing and long-term field observations from an SDTF site in Palo Verde, Costa Rica. Using several numerical experiments, we specifically examine the following questions: (i) Whether hydrological niche separation can explain the diversity in canopy seasonality and biomass growth? (ii) How important are the yet uncertain belowground functional traits, especially root profile in determining canopy

  2. Ethnic Variations in the Connection between Work-Induced Family Separation and Turnover Intent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behnke, Andrew O.; MacDermid, Shelley M.; Anderson, James C.; Weiss, Howard M.

    2010-01-01

    Using conservation of resources theory, this study examines the role of resources in the relationship between work-induced family separation and workers' intentions to leave their employment and how these relationships vary across ethnic groups. Analyses of a large representative sample of military members reveal that family separation is…

  3. The Effect of Sweep-Angle Variation on the Turbulence Structure in a Separated, Three-Dimensional Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbach, H.-J.

    A three-dimensional separated flow behind a swept, backward-facing step is investigated by means of DNS for ReH = C∞H/ν = 3000 with the purpose to identify changes in the statistical turbulence structure due to a variation of the sweep angle α from 0° up to 60°. With increasing sweep angle, the near-wall turbulence structure inside the separation bubble and downstream of reattachment changes due to the presence of an edge-parallel mean flow component W. Turbulence production due to the spanwise shear ∂W/∂y at the wall becomes significant and competes with the processes caused by impingement of the separated shear-layer. Changes due to a sweep angle variation can be interpreted in terms of two competing velocity scales which control the global budget of turbulent kinetic energy: the step-normal component U∞ = C∞cosα throughout the separated flow region and the velocity difference C∞ across the entire shear-layer downstream of reattachment. As a consequence, the significance of history effects for the development into a two-dimensional boundary layer decreases with increasing sweep angle. For α >=50°, near-wall streaks tend to form inside the separated flow region.

  4. VARLET and PHALET two wavelet based filter methods to separate stellar variation, orbital disturbances and instrumental effects from transit events in stellar light curves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grziwa, S.; Korth, J.; Pätzold, M.

    2014-04-01

    The space telescopes CoRoT and Kepler provided a huge number of high-resolution stellar light curves. The light curves are searched for transit signals which may be produced by planets when passing in front of the stellar disc. Various flux variations by star spots, pulsation, flares, glitches, hot pixels etc., however, dominate the stellar light curves and mask faint transit signals in particular of small exoplanets, which may lead to missed candidates or a high rate of false detections. Full automated filtering and detection algorithms only make it possible to manage the huge number of stellar light curves to search for transits. This will become even more important in the future missions PLATO and TESS. The Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung (RIUPF) as one of the CoRoT detection teams has developed two model independent wavelet based filter techniques VARLET and PHALET to reduce the flux variability in light curves in order to improve the search for transits. The VARLET filter separates faint transit signals from stellar variations without using a-priori information of the target star. VARLET distinguishes variations by frequency, amplitude and shape. VARLET separates the large-scale variations from the white noise. The transit feature, however, is not extracted and still contained in the noise time series which makes it now much easier to search for transits by the search routine EXOTRANS (Grziwa, S. et al.2012 [1]). The PHALET filter is used to separate periodic features with well-known periods independent of their shape. With PHALET it is possible to separate detected diluting binaries and other periodic effects (e.g. disturbances caused by the spacecraft motion in the Earth orbit). The main purpose, however, is to separate already detected transits to search for transits from additional planets in the stellar systems. RIU-PF searched all Kepler light curves for planetary transits by including VARLET and PHALET in the processing pipeline. The results

  5. PERIODIC VARIATIONS IN THE O - C DIAGRAMS OF FIVE PULSATION FREQUENCIES OF THE DB WHITE DWARF EC 20058-5234

    SciTech Connect

    Dalessio, J.; Provencal, J. L.; Shipman, H. L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sullivan, T.; Kilkenny, D.; Fraga, L.; Sefako, R.

    2013-03-01

    Variations in the pulsation arrival time of five independent pulsation frequencies of the DB white dwarf EC 20058-5234 individually imitate the effects of reflex motion induced by a planet or companion but are inconsistent when considered in unison. The pulsation frequencies vary periodically in a 12.9 year cycle and undergo secular changes that are inconsistent with simple neutrino plus photon-cooling models. The magnitude of the periodic and secular variations increases with the period of the pulsations, possibly hinting that the corresponding physical mechanism is located near the surface of the star. The phase of the periodic variations appears coupled to the sign of the secular variations. The standards for pulsation-timing-based detection of planetary companions around pulsating white dwarfs, and possibly other variables such as subdwarf B stars, should be re-evaluated. The physical mechanism responsible for this surprising result may involve a redistribution of angular momentum or a magnetic cycle. Additionally, variations in a supposed combination frequency are shown to match the sum of the variations of the parent frequencies to remarkable precision, an expected but unprecedented confirmation of theoretical predictions.

  6. Large separations or regular technical patterns? Could data sampling mimic the frequency range of pulsating Delta Scuti stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparo, Margit; Benko, Jozsef M.; Hareter, Markus; Guzik, Joyce A.

    2015-08-01

    Asteroseismology allows unique information on the inner structure of stars. The large separation between the consecutive radial orders and the small separation of the modes with different l values are well-known and useful parameters characterizing solar-type oscillations. The large separation was derived only for a few Delta Scuti stars which are pulsating in the non-asymptotic regime. Theoretical investigations do not predict a high level of regularity of the excited modes. We carried out a search for regularity in a sample of Delta Scuti stars observed by CoRoT (91 stars). Usually the Fourier Transform or the histogram of frequency differences were used. The echelle diagrams represent the regularity when it was found. As a preliminary step we isolated set(s) of frequencies with quasi-equal spacing. Surprisingly not only a single pattern but up to six patterns were found in most of the stars. The patterns are regularly shifted with respect to each other. The echelle diagrams helped to reduce the scatter of the spacing. The derived spacing supported the better interpretation of the FT diagrams. There is no doubt of the existence of regular patterns. The interpretation is questionable: do the Delta Scuti stars behave so regularly, or we are faced with a technical pattern that obscures the real frequency pattern of the low amplitude Delta Scuti pulsation?

  7. Height and critical frequency variations of the sporadic-E layer at midlatitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šauli, P.; Bourdillon, A.

    2008-12-01

    The present study concerns variations in height and critical frequency of sporadic E layer over a wide period range of hours to several days, covering tidal and planetary oscillation domain. Besides periodicities in the tidal and planetary range that are known to occur within time series of critical frequencies (foEs) of sporadic-E layer [Pancheva, D., Haldoupis, C., Meek, C.E., Manson, A.H., Mitchell, N.J., 2003. Evidence of a role for modulated atmospheric tides in the dependence of sporadic E layers on planetary waves. Journal of Geophysical Research 108, Art. No. 1176; Haldoupis, C., Pancheva, D., Michell, N.J., 2004. A study of tidal and planetary wave periodicities present in midlatitude sporadic E layers. Journal of Geophysical Research 109, Art. No. A02302] among others, we evidence the existence of the 4-day planetary wave well developed in the height of sporadic E time serie (hEs). Moreover it is shown that the central-period of the diurnal tidal component of hEs is not exactly 24 h but it varies between 22 and 26 h at the planetary wave period. At a first glance, this is surprising since the origin of the diurnal tide is a forced oscillation with a 24 h period due to the Earth rotation and the periodic heating of the atmosphere by the Sun. Our interpretation is based on the perturbation of the height of the Es layer imposed by the planetary wave. In this mechanism the Es layer is moved up and down by the planetary wave producing a Doppler effect and resulting in a shift of the central-period around 24 h. With this interpretation, the excursion of the central-period is related to the vertical velocity perturbation of the Es layer due to the planetary wave. For a central period varying between 22 and 26 h the peturbation velocities are 0.026 and , respectively.

  8. Perceptual Qualities of Ethanol Depend on Concentration, and Variation in These Percepts Associates with Drinking Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Nolden, Alissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol, the pharmaceutically active ingredient in all alcoholic beverages, elicits multiple percepts including sweet, bitter, drying, and burning. However, quality-specific perceptual dose-response functions have not been previously reported. Also, individual differences in ethanol perception may associate with differences in alcoholic beverage use. Here, we describe the chemosensory profile of ethanol across concentrations in a convenience sample of mixed-age adults; secondarily, we explore whether individual differences in various qualities from ethanol associate with alcohol use behaviors. Methods Participants (n=100, 33 men) aged 21 to 55 (mean 33 years) tasted ethanol in water (4, 8, 16, 32, and 48 % v/v) and rated sweetness, bitterness, drying, and burning/tingling on four general Labeled Magnitude Scales. Demographic question and alcohol use measures (years drinking and reported frequency of drinking occasions) were also collected. Results Intensity of most qualities increased as a function of ethanol concentration, although the dominant sensation differed with concentration. The dominant sensation for 8 and 16 % ethanol was bitterness (7.4±1.0; 13.5±1.4), whereas for 32 and 48 % ethanol, burning/tingling was the dominant sensation (29.7±2.1; 44.7±2.4). Variation in quality-specific intensities of sampled ethanol explained variability in the reported intake frequency for beer, wine, straight spirits, and number of drinking occasions. The number of years reported drinking (grand mean 10.5±0.8) was not significantly associated with perceptual ratings for sampled ethanol. Conclusions In a convenience sample of mixed-aged adults, the sensations from suprathreshold ethanol varied by concentration: bitterness dominated at lower concentrations, while burn dominated at higher concentrations. Exploratory analyses also suggest that differences in chemosensory responses across participants may associate with measures of alcohol use. PMID:27594968

  9. Frequency-wavenumber implementation for P- and S-wave separation from multi-component seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ma, Xiaona; Fu, Chao; Gu, Bingluo; Liang, Guanghe

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a frequency-wavenumber domain scheme to separate P- and S-waves from multi-component seismic data at the free surface. Based on the relationship between the P- and S-wave separated elastic equation, and the divergence and curl operators, we modify the equation to make it applicable to surface seismic data. In the modified equation, the P-wavenumber is chosen to reject the P-waves, and the S-wavenumber is chosen to eliminate the S-waves. The changes in the P-S amplitude ratio caused by the wavenumber choice are corrected. For the free surface condition, an up-going wavefield separation filter is introduced into the modified equation, which can remove the free surface effects from the surface seismic data. In the case of a free surface exhibiting lateral heterogeneity, the seismic data are first transformed into the frequency domain using the fast Fourier transform (FFT), and then are transformed into the wavenumber domain using the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). In the second transform using the DFT, the modified equation is used to separate the P- and S-waves. Numerical tests on synthetic data for three models demonstrate the good performance and accuracy of the scheme.

  10. Adaptive Feedforward Compensation by Specified Step Settling Considering Resonance Frequency Variation and Constraint on Control Input Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshihiro; Wada, Masatake; Iwasaki, Makoto; Hirai, Hiromu

    This paper presents an adaptive feedfowad (FF) compensation method based on a deadbeat control framework for fast and precise positioning in mechatronic systems. The conventional FF compensation approach can design a FF compensator by considering both the frequency shaping and amplitude of FF control input, to suppress the response variations due to the perturbations in plant resonance frequency. However, since the conventional approach is not adaptive against frequency variations, an overshoot and/or undershoot response at the settling region would deteriorate the positioning performance. In this research, therefore, the proposed FF compensation approach with an adaptive identification system for the resonance frequency is adopted to achieve the desired positioning performance. The effectiveness of the proposed FF compensation approach has been verified by experiments using a prototype of an industrial positioning device.

  11. Frequency-Domain Blind Source Separation of Many Speech Signals Using Near-Field and Far-Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Ryo; Sawada, Hiroshi; Araki, Shoko; Makino, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    We discuss the frequency-domain blind source separation (BSS) of convolutive mixtures when the number of source signals is large, and the potential source locations are omnidirectional. The most critical problem related to the frequency-domain BSS is the permutation problem, and geometric information is helpful as regards solving it. In this paper, we propose a method for obtaining proper geometric information with which to solve the permutation problem when the number of source signals is large and some of the signals come from the same or a similar direction. First, we describe a method for estimating the absolute DOA by using relative DOAs obtained by the solution provided by independent component analysis (ICA) and the far-field model. Next, we propose a method for estimating the spheres on which source signals exist by using ICA solution and the near-field model. We also address another problem with regard to frequency-domain BSS that arises from the circularity of discrete-frequency representation. We discuss the characteristics of the problem and present a solution for solving it. Experimental results using eight microphones in a room show that the proposed method can separate a mixture of six speech signals arriving from various directions, even when two of them come from the same direction.

  12. Independent vector analysis based on overlapped cliques of variable width for frequency-domain blind signal separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Intae; Jang, Gil-Jin

    2012-12-01

    A novel method is proposed to improve the performance of independent vector analysis (IVA) for blind signal separation of acoustic mixtures. IVA is a frequency-domain approach that successfully resolves the well-known permutation problem by applying a spherical dependency model to all pairs of frequency bins. The dependency model of IVA is equivalent to a single clique in an undirected graph; a clique in graph theory is defined as a subset of vertices in which any pair of vertices is connected by an undirected edge. Therefore, IVA imposes the same amount of statistical dependency on every pair of frequency bins, which may not match the characteristics of real-world signals. The proposed method allows variable amounts of statistical dependencies according to the correlation coefficients observed in real acoustic signals and, hence, enables more accurate modeling of statistical dependencies. A number of cliques constitutes the new dependency graph so that neighboring frequency bins are assigned to the same clique, while distant bins are assigned to different cliques. The permutation ambiguity is resolved by overlapped frequency bins between neighboring cliques. For speech signals, we observed especially strong correlations across neighboring frequency bins and a decrease in these correlations with an increase in the distance between bins. The clique sizes are either fixed, or determined by the reciprocal of the mel-frequency scale to impose a wider dependency on low-frequency components. Experimental results showed improved performances over conventional IVA. The signal-to-interference ratio improved from 15.5 to 18.8 dB on average for seven different source locations. When we varied the clique sizes according to the observed correlations, the stability of the proposed method increased with a large number of cliques.

  13. Seasonal Variation and Frequency Distribution of Ectoparasites in Crossbreed Cattle in Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz da Costa, Maria do Socorro; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi; Lima, Walter dos Santos; Ferraz da Costa, Ana Julia; Facury Filho, Elias Jorge; Araujo, Ricardo Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the seasonal variation and frequency distribution of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, Haematobia irritans, and Dermatobia hominis on crossbred heifers under field conditions in the northeast of Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil. From November 2007 to September 2009 (23 months), 40 heifers aged 16.6 ± 2.4 months were divided into groups A (1/4 Holstein × 3/4 Gir) and B (1/2 Holstein × 1/2 Gir) and had the monthly infestation estimated along with the climatic conditions. The mean maximum and minimum temperatures were 28.5 and 19°C, respectively. The ectoparasites were present on animals in all months of the year. The levels of ticks on the animals were low (3.0 ± 0.2 ticks/animal), with the highest density in midwinter. The temperature was the climatic factor that most influenced the tick levels. The population of H. irritans (13.9 ± 0.3 flies/animal) and D. hominis (1.5 ± 0.2 larvae/animal) on heifers was more influenced by rainfall and exhibited two population peaks during the year. 1/2 Holstein heifers harbored significantly more H. irritans and D. hominis than 1/4 Holstein heifers. The results are discussed considering the most appropriate periods to apply ectoparasiticides and the genetic make-up of the animals. PMID:26464941

  14. Design of radio frequency system for the riken separated sector cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; Chiba, Y.; Kohara, S.; Kumata, Y.; Ogiwara, K.; Oikawa, Y.; Takeshita, I.; Yokoyama, I.

    1985-10-01

    The radio-frequency (RF) system of the RIKEN SSC (K=540) is required to work in a frequency range of 20 to 45 MHz and to generate the maximum acceleration voltage 250 kV. A new movable box type variable frequency resonator is designed for that purpose. This resonator is a compact half wave length coaxial type ((2.1 m(H) x 3.5 m(W) x 1.6 m(D)). The delta shaped dee whose radial length is 2.7 m is supported in median plane by vertical stems from the both sides. The resonant frequency is varied by moving the boxes surrounding the stems. The performance of this resonator is studied on a one-fourth scale model. The maximum power loss is estimated to be 250 kW for the required dee voltages and the radially increasing voltage distributions are obtained. The RF power is fed into the resonator through a 50 ..cap omega.. coaxial feeder line ( about 1.8 m length) which is coupled with the resonator in good impedance matching by means of a variable capacitive coupler. The final amplifier is of grounded grid configuration; load resistance matching is made by a variable capacitor inserted in series at its output port. The final amplifier and its components are studied on full sized models. The result shows the movable box type resonator and power amplifier satisfy the design aim.

  15. Frequency-Domain Approach To Determine Magnetic Address-Sensor Separation Distance Using the Harmonic Ratio Method.

    PubMed

    Young, Colin C; Blackley, Benjamin W; Porter, Marc D; Granger, Michael C

    2016-02-16

    In this work, we describe an approach to determine the distance separating a magnetic address from a scanning magnetoresistive sensor, a critical adjustable parameter for certain bioassay analyses where magnetic nanoparticles are used as labels. Our approach is leveraged from the harmonic ratio method (HRM), a method used in the hard drive industry to control the distance separating a magnetoresistive read head from its data platter with nanometer resolution. At the heart of the HRM is an amplitude comparison of a signal's fundamental frequency to that of its harmonics. When the signal is derived from the magnetic field pattern of a periodic array of magnetic addresses, the harmonic ratio contains the information necessary to determine the separation between the address array and the read head. The elegance of the HRM is that there is no need of additional components to the detection platform to determine a separation distance; the streaming "bit signal" contains all the information needed. In this work, we demonstrate that the tenets governing HRM used in the hard drive industry can be applied to the bioanalytical arena where submicrometer to 100 μm separations are required. PMID:26879366

  16. Belt separation system under slat in fattening pig housing: effect of belt type and extraction frequency.

    PubMed

    Alonso, F; Vázquez, J; Ovejero, I; Garcimartín, M A; Mateos, A; Sánchez, E

    2010-08-01

    The efficiency of manure separation by a conveyor belt under a partially slatted floor for fattening pigs was determined for two types of belts, a flat belt with an incline of up to 6 degrees transversely and a concave belt with an incline of up to 1 degrees longitudinally. A 31.20% and 23.75% dry matter content of the solid fraction was obtained for the flat and concave belt, respectively. The flat belt was more efficient at 6 degrees than other slope angles. The residence time of the manure on the two belt types influenced the separation efficiency from a live weight of 63.00 kg upwards. The quantity of residue produced with this system was reduced to 25-40% with respect to a pit system under slat. This could mean a remarkable reduction in costs of storage, transport and application of manure. PMID:20338748

  17. Maintaining acoustic communication at a cocktail party: heterospecific masking noise improves signal detection through frequency separation

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, M. E.; Römer, H.; Hartbauer, M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We examined acoustic masking in a chirping katydid species of the Mecopoda elongata complex due to interference with a sympatric Mecopoda species where males produce continuous trills at high amplitudes. Frequency spectra of both calling songs range from 1 to 80 kHz; the chirper species has more energy in a narrow frequency band at 2 kHz and above 40 kHz. Behaviourally, chirper males successfully phase-locked their chirps to playbacks of conspecific chirps under masking conditions at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of −8 dB. After the 2 kHz band in the chirp had been equalised to the level in the masking trill, the breakdown of phase-locked synchrony occurred at a SNR of +7 dB. The remarkable receiver performance is partially mirrored in the selective response of a first-order auditory interneuron (TN1) to conspecific chirps under these masking conditions. However, the selective response is only maintained for a stimulus including the 2 kHz component, although this frequency band has no influence on the unmasked TN1 response. Remarkably, the addition of masking noise at 65 dB sound pressure level (SPL) to threshold response levels of TN1 for pure tones of 2 kHz enhanced the sensitivity of the response by 10 dB. Thus, the spectral dissimilarity between masker and signal at a rather low frequency appears to be of crucial importance for the ability of the chirping species to communicate under strong masking by the trilling species. We discuss the possible properties underlying the cellular/synaptic mechanisms of the ‘novelty detector’. PMID:24307713

  18. A Tri-Band Frequency Selective Surface (FSS) to Diplex Widely Separated Bands for Millimeter Wave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poojali, Jayaprakash; Ray, Shaumik; Pesala, Bala; Chitti, Krishnamurthy V.; Arunachalam, Kavitha

    2016-06-01

    A substrate-backed frequency selective surface (FSS) is presented for diplexing the widely separated frequency spectrum centered at 55, 89, and 183 GHz with varying bandwidth for spatial separation in the quasi-optical feed network of the millimeter wave sounder. A unit cell composed of a crossed dipole integrated with a circular ring and loaded inside a square ring is optimized for tri-band frequency response with transmission window at 89 GHz and rejection windows at 55 and 183 GHz. The reflection and transmission losses predicted for the optimized unit cell (728 μm × 728 μm) composed of dissimilar resonant shapes is less than 0.5 dB for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations and wide angle of incidence (0°-45°). The FSS is fabricated on a 175-μm-thick quartz substrate using microfabrication techniques. The transmission characteristics measured with continuous wave (CW) terahertz transmit receive system are in good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  19. Impact of atmospheric changes on the low-frequency variations of convective afternoon rainfall activity over Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wan-Ru; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung; Wang, Shih-Yu; Chen, Jian-Pu

    2015-09-01

    This study examines the characteristics of low-frequency variations (defined as decadal-scale changes) in summer (June-August) convective afternoon rainfall (CAR) activity over Taiwan during 1961-2012. Using 3-hourly rain gauge data, it was found that (1) the CAR frequency exhibits a secular trend and the 10-20 decadal oscillation, (2) the trend in CAR frequency is positive in northern Taiwan but negative in central and southern Taiwan, and (3) the CAR rate increased over most of the lower plains but decreased over the mountain range of Taiwan. Diagnoses using the Japanese ReAnalysis (JRA-55) data and surface observations indicate that the low-frequency variations in CAR frequency are closely associated with the variations in monsoon southwesterly winds over the South China Sea and island-wide sea breeze convergence. The regional low-level circulation changes are linked to sea surface temperature anomalies over the Niño-4 region and its 10-20 year (quasi-decadal) oscillation. Regarding the processes that change the CAR rate in the trending patterns, it was found that increases in the moisture flux convergence and the moist (conditional) instability over the lower plains together explain the stronger CAR events in the long run.

  20. Frequency ratio of two optical clock transitions in 171Yb+ and constraints on the time variation of fundamental constants.

    PubMed

    Godun, R M; Nisbet-Jones, P B R; Jones, J M; King, S A; Johnson, L A M; Margolis, H S; Szymaniec, K; Lea, S N; Bongs, K; Gill, P

    2014-11-21

    Singly ionized ytterbium, with ultranarrow optical clock transitions at 467 and 436 nm, is a convenient system for the realization of optical atomic clocks and tests of present-day variation of fundamental constants. We present the first direct measurement of the frequency ratio of these two clock transitions, without reference to a cesium primary standard, and using the same single ion of 171Yb+. The absolute frequencies of both transitions are also presented, each with a relative standard uncertainty of 6×10(-16). Combining our results with those from other experiments, we report a threefold improvement in the constraint on the time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ/μ=0.2(1.1)×10(-16)  yr(-1), along with an improved constraint on time variation of the fine structure constant, α/α=-0.7(2.1)×10(-17)  yr(-1). PMID:25479482

  1. A mechanism for decadal variations in the frequency of extreme El Niño events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Cai, W.

    2015-12-01

    The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the largest source of Earth's climate variability on interannual time scales, has massive impacts on extreme weathers, agriculture and ecosystems, particularly during extreme El Niño events, such as the 1982/83 and 1997/98 episodes. However, the associated mechanism is not fully understood, hindering their forecasts, as attested by the false alarm of an extreme El Niño in 2014 predicted by many models. Recent studies have identified additional precursors beyond westerly wind anomalies and oceanic heat content along the equatorial Pacific, including the southwest Pacific southerly jets, which tend to occur strongly and concurrently with equatorial westerly anomalies during extreme El Niño, but NOT during weak El Niño events. Here we show that the concurrences of southwest Pacific southerlies, anomalous equatorial westerlies, and their relationship, are modulated by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)/Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), even on daily timescales. During a positive phase of the PDO/IPO, occurrences of westerly wind events (WWEs), in the region between the Maritime continent and the eastern Pacific Ocean, are reinforced by the southwest Pacific southerly surges (SPSSs) in austral winter. By contrast, during a negative phase of the PDO/IPO, such SPSSs are not reinforcing WWEs; instead stronger SPSSs are associated with weaker WWEs. This interdecadal contrast in the relationship between SPSSs and WWEs contributes to the decadal variations in the frequency of extreme El Niño events. The associated mechanism will be discussed.

  2. Irreversibility and entropy production in transport phenomena, IV: Symmetry, integrated intermediate processes and separated variational principles for multi-currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masuo

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of entropy production in transport phenomena is discussed again by emphasizing the role of symmetry of non-equilibrium states and also by reformulating Einstein’s theory of Brownian motion to derive entropy production from it. This yields conceptual reviews of the previous papers [M. Suzuki, Physica A 390 (2011) 1904; 391 (2012) 1074; 392 (2013) 314]. Separated variational principles of steady states for multi external fields {Xi} and induced currents {Ji} are proposed by extending the principle of minimum integrated entropy production found by the present author for a single external field. The basic strategy of our theory on steady states is to take in all the intermediate processes from the equilibrium state to the final possible steady states in order to study the irreversible physics even in the steady states. As an application of this principle, Gransdorff-Prigogine’s evolution criterion inequality (or stability condition) dXP≡∫dr∑iJidXi≤0 is derived in the stronger form dQi≡∫drJidXi≤0 for individual force Xi and current Ji even in nonlinear responses which depend on all the external forces {Xk} nonlinearly. This is called “separated evolution criterion”. Some explicit demonstrations of the present general theory to simple electric circuits with multi external fields are given in order to clarify the physical essence of our new theory and to realize the condition of its validity concerning the existence of the solutions of the simultaneous equations obtained by the separated variational principles. It is also instructive to compare the two results obtained by the new variational theory and by the old scheme based on the instantaneous entropy production. This seems to be suggestive even to the energy problem in the world.

  3. Time-Frequency Theta and Delta Measures Index Separable Components of Feedback Processing in a Gambling Task

    PubMed Central

    Bernat, Edward M.; Nelson, Lindsay D.; Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work using gambling tasks indicate that the feedback negativity (FN) reflects primary or salient stimulus attributes (often gain vs. loss), whereas the feedback-P300 appears sensitive to secondary stimulus information. A recent time-frequency approach has characterized separable theta (3–7 Hz) and delta (0–3 Hz) feedback processes, independently sensitive to primary feedback attributes, specifically loss and gain outcomes respectively (Bernat et al., 2011). The current study extends this time-frequency work to evaluate both primary and secondary (relative outcome and outcome magnitude) feedback attributes. Consistent with previous reports, theta indexed an initial, lower-level response sensitive to the primary (most salient) feedback attributes (specifically losses), while delta was sensitive to both primary attributes (specifically gains) and assessed secondary stimulus features. PMID:25581491

  4. Evaluation of range-separated hybrid density functionals for the prediction of vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and Raman activities†

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Janesko, Benjamin G.

    2016-01-01

    We present an assessment of different density functionals, with emphasis on range-separated hybrids, for the prediction of fundamental and harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and Raman activities. Additionally, we discuss the basis set convergence of vibrational properties of H2O with long-range corrected hybrids. Our results show that B3LYP is the best functional for predicting vibrational frequencies (both fundamental and harmonic); the screened-PBE hybrid (HSE) density functional works best for infrared intensities, and the long-range corrected PBE (LC-ωPBE), M06-HF, and M06-L density functionals are almost as good as MP2 for predicting Raman activities. We show the predicted Raman spectrum of adenine as an example of a medium-size molecule where a DFT/Sadlej pVTZ calculation is affordable and compare our results against the experimental spectrum. PMID:18989473

  5. Separation of topographic and intrinsic backscatter variations in biscopic radar images: A magic airbrush

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    Shaded-relief maps portraying landforms as they would appear in the absence of variations in the intrinsic brightness of the surface are a venerable and extremely useful tool in planetary geology. Such maps have traditionally been produced by a highly labor intensive manual process. Skilled cartographer-artists develop detailed mental images of landforms by meticulous scrutiny of all available data, and are able to use an airbrush and electric eraser to draw these images on a map. This process becomes increasingly time-consuming or even impossible if - as is true for radar data in general and Magellan data in particular - the effects on image brightness of varying scattering properties greatly outweigh those of slope variations. Because of the difficulty of interpreting relief in the Magellan images, the airbrush technique is being used only to remove obvious artifacts from low-resolution, shaded-relief images computed digitally from altimetric data. A surprisingly simple digital-processing technique that can be applied to pairs of radar images to produce shaded-relief-like results at the full image resolution is described. These shaded-relief images can be used not only as base maps, but to improve the accuracy of quantitative topographic mapping by radarclinometry and stereoanalysis.

  6. Variation in pH of Model Secondary Organic Aerosol during Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation.

    PubMed

    Dallemagne, Magda A; Huang, Xiau Ya; Eddingsaas, Nathan C

    2016-05-12

    The majority of atmospheric aerosols consist of both organic and inorganic components. At intermediate relative humidity (RH), atmospheric aerosol can undergo liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in which the organic and inorganic fractions segregate from each other. We have extended the study of LLPS to the effect that phase separation has on the pH of the overall aerosols and the pH of the individual phases. Using confocal microscopy and pH sensitive dyes, the pH of internally mixed model aerosols consisting of polyethylene glycol 400 and ammonium sulfate as well as the pH of the organic fraction during LLPS have been directly measured. During LLPS, the pH of the organic fraction was observed to increase to 4.2 ± 0.2 from 3.8 ± 0.1 under high RH when the aerosol was internally mixed. In addition, the high spatial resolution of the confocal microscope allowed us to characterize the composition of each of the phases, and we have observed that during LLPS the organic shell still contains large quantities of water and should be characterized as an aqueous organic-rich phase rather than simply an organic phase. PMID:27082856

  7. Development of Equipment to Separate Nonthermal and Thermal Effects of Radio Frequency Energy on Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Geveke; M. Kozempel; C. Brunkhorst

    1999-11-01

    A radio frequency (RF) dielectric heater has been developed for isolating thermal and nonthermal effects of RF energy on microorganisms in liquid foods. The modified heater enables the simultaneous application of RF energy and removal of thermal energy from the liquids. A double-pipe heat exchanger is an integral part of the heater. The outer pipe is made of Teflon. The inner pipe is made of stainless steel that is grounded in the RF circuit. Liquid food flows through the annular region between the two concentric pipes. Cooling water flows through the stainless steel pipe. The food in the annular region absorbs the RF energy. Concurrently, the cooling water flowing in the inner pipe removes the thermal energy from the food, thus controlling the temperature.

  8. Radial-femoral concordance in time and frequency domain-based estimates of systemic arterial respiratory variation.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Robert H; Colquhoun, Douglas A; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M; Gillies, George T; Durieux, Marcel E

    2012-10-01

    Commonly used arterial respiratory variation metrics are based on mathematical analysis of arterial waveforms in the time domain. Because the shape of the arterial waveform is dependent on the site at which it is measured, we hypothesized that analysis of the arterial waveform in the frequency domain might provide a relatively site-independent means of measuring arterial respiratory variation. Radial and femoral arterial blood pressures were measured in nineteen patients undergoing liver transplantation. Systolic pressure variation (SPV), pulse pressure variation (PPV), area under the curve variation (AUCV), and mean arterial pressure variation (MAPV) at radial and femoral sites were calculated off-line. Two metrics, "Spectral Peak Ratio" (SPeR) and "Spectral Power Ratio" (SPoR) based on ratios of the spectral peak and spectral area (power) at the respiratory and cardiac frequencies, were calculated at both radial and femoral sites. Variance among radial-femoral differences was compared and correlation coefficients describing the relationship between respiratory variation at the radial and femoral sites were developed. The variance in radial-femoral differences were significantly different (p < 0.001). The correlation between radial and femoral estimates of respiratory variation were 0.746, 0.658, 0.858, 0.882, 0.941, and 0.925 for SPV, PPV, AUCV, MAPV, SPeR, and SPoR, respectively. Assuming a PPV treatment threshold of 12 % (or equivalent), differences in treatment decisions based on radial or femoral estimates would arise in 12, 14, 5.4, 5.7, 4.8, and 5.5 % of minutes for SPV, PPV, AUCV, MAPV, spectral peak ratio, and spectral power ratio, respectively. As compared to frequency domain-based estimates of respiratory variation, SPV and PPV are relatively dependent on the anatomic site at which they are measured. Spectral peak and power ratios are relatively site-independent means of measuring respiratory variation, and may offer a useful alternative to time

  9. Effects of magnitude and frequency of variations in external power output on simulated cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Wells, Marc; Atkinson, Greg; Marwood, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical models of cycling time-trial performance have indicated adverse effects of variations in external power output on overall performance times. Nevertheless, the precise influences of the magnitude and number of these variations over different distances of time trial are unclear. A hypothetical cyclist (body mass 70 kg, bicycle mass 10 kg) was studied using a mathematical model of cycling, which included the effects of acceleration. Performance times were modelled over distances of 4-40 km, mean power outputs of 200-600 W, power variation amplitudes of 5-15% and variation frequencies of 2-32 per time-trial. Effects of a "fast-start" strategy were compared with those of a constant-power strategy. Varying power improved 4-km performance at all power outputs, with the greatest improvement being 0.90 s for ± 15% power variation. For distances of 16.1, 20 and 40 km, varying power by ± 15% increased times by 3.29, 4.46 and 10.43 s respectively, suggesting that in long-duration cycling in constant environmental conditions, cyclists should strive to reduce power variation to maximise performance. The novel finding of the present study is that these effects are augmented with increasing event distance, amplitude and period of variation. These two latter factors reflect a poor adherence to a constant speed. PMID:23711074

  10. Temporal variations of cathode performance in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells with different separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Suor, Denis; Liu, Shumeng; Li, Jiaqi; Wu, Zhichao

    2014-12-01

    An ideal separator is essential for efficient power production from air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, we use different kinds of membranes as separators, including Nafion 117 proton exchange membrane, polyethersulfone and poly(vinylidene fluoride) microfiltration membranes. Temporal variations of cathode performance are monitored during the experiment. Results show that MFCs with microfiltration membranes present higher power output but deterioration is still observed after about 600-h operation. With the utilization of appropriate separators (e.g., polyethersulfone membrane), biofouling, cation fouling and chemical scale fouling of the cathodes are alleviated while reaction fouling seems inevitable. Moreover, it is found that Coulombic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) are also related to the cathode performance. Despite relatively high oxygen diffusivity (1.49 × 10-5 cm2 s-1), CE and EE of the MFC with 0.1 μm pore-size polyethersulfone membrane can reach 92.8% and 13.7%, respectively, when its average power density registers 403.5 mW m-2. This phenomenon might be attributed to the finding that the overall substrate consumption rate due to oxygen reduction and respiration is almost constant in the air-cathode MFCs. Oxygen leakage into the electrolyte can be inhibited due to the efficient oxygen reduction reaction on the surface of the cathode.

  11. Annual ionospheric variations of the critical frequency foF2 at the equatorial stations during the solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktash, Lilia

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed annual ionospheric variations of the critical frequency foF2 at the equatorial stations during the solar minima. There are essential distinctions between the global TEC (total electron content) and foF2 annual variations during the last two solar minima. Many authors concluded that the annual means of foF2 and the global TEC were reduced, while others investigations no found essential variations as compared with the previous solar minimum. Most if not all of authors suppose that the possible source of this phenomenon is the low level of the EUV (extreme ultraviolet) during the solar minima. The aim of our paper is to amplify these conclusions or to propose new factor which can change ionosphere parameters during the solar minima. We calculated annual variations of foF2 at the equatorial stations and compared these data with Dst annual variations. We found that in addition to low level of the EUV during the solar minima, geomagnetic storms effects have to be included as the influencing factor on annual ionospheric variations.

  12. High frequency genetic variation of purine biosynthesis genes is a mechanism of success in Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenotypic variation is prevalent among progeny of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, the leading agent of enterocolitis in the developed world. Heterogeneity bestows increased survival to bacterial populations because variable phenotypes ensure some cells will be protected against future s...

  13. Low frequency electric field variations during HF transmissions on a mother-daughter rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, T. J.; Maynard, M. C.; Holtet, J. A.; Karlsen, N. O.; Egeland, A.; Moe, T. E.; Troim, J.

    1977-01-01

    HF wave propagation experiments were conducted on Mother-Daughter rockets in the polar ionosphere. Swept frequency transmissions from the Mother, nominally covering the range from 0.5 to 5 MHz in both CW and pulse modes, are received by the Daughter. In the most recent rocket of the series, the Mother also contained an AC electric field spectrometer covering the frequency range from 10 Hz to 100 kHz in four decade bands. The low frequency response of the ionosphere with respect to waves emitted from the onboard HF transmitter is examined.

  14. Characterizing low-frequency oscillation of Hall thrusters by dielectric wall temperature variation

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Guo; Liqiu, Wei E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Yongjie, Ding

    2014-05-15

    The low-frequency oscillation characteristics of a Hall thruster were investigated by varying the dielectric wall temperature. Experimental results indicate that increasing the dielectric wall temperature can result in an increase in the amplitude of low-frequency oscillation and a slight decrease in its frequency. Physical analysis revealed that this change is related to the secondary electron emissions at different dielectric wall temperatures. The evidence suggests that this technique can serve as an effective way for future studies to examine how secondary electron emissions affect a discharging thruster.

  15. Variation in viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage below, up to and above healthy gait-relevant loading frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Hamid; Shepherd, Duncan ET

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the variation in viscoelastic properties of femoral head bovine articular cartilage, on-bone, over five orders of magnitude of loading frequency. These frequencies ranged from below, up to and above healthy gait-relevant frequencies, using<1, 1–5 and 10 Hz, respectively. Dynamic mechanical analysis was used to measure storage and loss stiffness. A maximum compressive force of 36 N was applied through a chamfered-end, 5.2-mm-diameter, indenter. This induced a maximum nominal stress of 1.7 MPa. The ratio of storage to loss stiffness increased from near parity (2.5) at low frequencies to 11.4 at 10 Hz. This was the result of a significant logarithmic increase (p < 0.05) in storage stiffness with frequency, from 367 N/mm (0.001 Hz) up to 1460 N/mm (10 Hz). In contrast, the loss stiffness remained approximately constant. In conclusion, viscoelastic properties of articular cartilage measured at frequencies below those of gait activities are poor predictors of its relevant dynamic mechanical behaviour. PMID:25767149

  16. Variation in viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage below, up to and above healthy gait-relevant loading frequencies.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Hamid; Espino, Daniel M; Shepherd, Duncan E T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the variation in viscoelastic properties of femoral head bovine articular cartilage, on-bone, over five orders of magnitude of loading frequency. These frequencies ranged from below, up to and above healthy gait-relevant frequencies, using<1, 1-5 and 10 Hz, respectively. Dynamic mechanical analysis was used to measure storage and loss stiffness. A maximum compressive force of 36 N was applied through a chamfered-end, 5.2-mm-diameter, indenter. This induced a maximum nominal stress of 1.7 MPa. The ratio of storage to loss stiffness increased from near parity (2.5) at low frequencies to 11.4 at 10 Hz. This was the result of a significant logarithmic increase (p < 0.05) in storage stiffness with frequency, from 367 N/mm (0.001 Hz) up to 1460 N/mm (10 Hz). In contrast, the loss stiffness remained approximately constant. In conclusion, viscoelastic properties of articular cartilage measured at frequencies below those of gait activities are poor predictors of its relevant dynamic mechanical behaviour. PMID:25767149

  17. The impact of variation in low-frequency interaural cross correlation on auditory spatial imagery in stereophonic loudspeaker reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, William

    2005-04-01

    Several attributes of auditory spatial imagery associated with stereophonic sound reproduction are strongly modulated by variation in interaural cross correlation (IACC) within low frequency bands. Nonetheless, a standard practice in bass management for two-channel and multichannel loudspeaker reproduction is to mix low-frequency musical content to a single channel for reproduction via a single driver (e.g., a subwoofer). This paper reviews the results of psychoacoustic studies which support the conclusion that reproduction via multiple drivers of decorrelated low-frequency signals significantly affects such important spatial attributes as auditory source width (ASW), auditory source distance (ASD), and listener envelopment (LEV). A variety of methods have been employed in these tests, including forced choice discrimination and identification, and direct ratings of both global dissimilarity and distinct attributes. Contrary to assumptions that underlie industrial standards established in 1994 by ITU-R. Recommendation BS.775-1, these findings imply that substantial stereophonic spatial information exists within audio signals at frequencies below the 80 to 120 Hz range of prescribed subwoofer cutoff frequencies, and that loudspeaker reproduction of decorrelated signals at frequencies as low as 50 Hz can have an impact upon auditory spatial imagery. [Work supported by VRQ.

  18. Variation in the Frequency and Extent of Hybridization between Leucosceptrum japonicum and L. stellipilum (Lamiaceae) in the Central Japanese Mainland

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Maki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the frequency and extent of hybridization among mixed populations located in the same contact zone provide natural laboratories for the study of extrinsic reproductive isolation maintaining species integrity. In this study, we examined the pattern of hybridization between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum among mixed populations in different localities of a contact zone. The genetic structures from three sympatric populations and six mixed populations in the hybrid zone, and five reference populations far from the contact zone, were characterized using 10 neutral nuclear microsatellite markers. Evidence from genetic distance-based clustering analysis, the frequency distribution of admixture proportion values, and the hybrid category assignment approaches indicated that the frequency and extent of hybridization varied considerably among populations in the contact zone between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum. One likely explanation is that variation in exogenous (ecological) selection among populations might contribute to differences in frequency and extent of hybridization. The present study will facilitate future research exploring the evolution of reproductive isolation between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum. PMID:25738505

  19. Time-Frequency Analysis of Beach Bacteria Variations and its Implication for Recreational Water Quality Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper explores the potential of time-frequency wavelet analysis in resolving beach bacteria concentration and possible explanatory variables across multiple time scales with temporal information still preserved. The wavelet scalograms of E. coli concentrations and the explan...

  20. Genome-wide variation of the somatic mutation frequency in transgenic plants

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga; Hohn, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    In order to analyse the frequency of point mutations in whole plants, several constructs containing single nonsense mutations in the β-glucuronidase (uidA) gene were used to generate transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Upon histochemical staining of transgenic plants, sectors indicative of transgene reactivation appeared. Reversion frequencies were in the range of 10–7–10–8 events per base pair, exceeding the previous estimates for other eukaryotes at least 100-fold. The frequency was dependent on the position of the mutation substrate within the transgene and the position of the transgene within the Arabidopsis genome. An inverse relationship between the level of transgene transcription and mutation frequency was observed in single-copy lines. DNA-damaging factors induced the mutation frequency by a factor of up to 56 for UV-C, a factor of 3 for X-rays and a factor of 2 for methyl methanesulfonate. This novel plant mutation-monitoring system allowed us to measure the frequencies of point mutation in whole plants and may be used as an alternative or complement to study the mutagenicity of different environmental factors on the higher eukaryote’s genome. PMID:10970837

  1. Studies of the variations of the first Schumann resonance frequency during the solar flare on 7 March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongjuan; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2015-05-01

    The ELF measurements at the YS station in China during the X5.4 solar flare on 7 March 2012 are examined. The first modal Schumann resonance (SR) frequencies of the horizontal magnetic field components were found to increase by 0.1-0.2 Hz during the X-ray burst. During the enhancement of the proton flux, the first modal frequency of the east-west magnetic field component decreases by approximately 0.6 Hz at most, while the variation in the north-south magnetic field component is less well defined. The mechanisms of the variations are simulated with a finite difference time domain technique by modeling the perturbed conductivity profile in the day-night asymmetric Earth-ionosphere cavity and modeling the global lightning source with the raw flash data measured by satellites. The simulated varying trends of the SR frequencies observed near the ground with the altitudes of the conductivity perturbations are nearly the same as those previously reported and are interpreted by the two characteristic height model first proposed by Greifinger and Greifinger. It is concluded that the SR frequencies increase for enhanced conductivity above the altitude of 60-70 km because of the lowered magnetic height and decrease for enhanced conductivity below this altitude due to the lowered electric height. This finding can explain the opposite behaviors of the SR frequencies during X-ray bursts and strong solar proton events (SPEs). The simulation model in this work proved to be effective, with the simulated shifts in the values of SR frequencies during X-ray bursts and SPEs being close to the practical measurements.

  2. Two-Point Observations of High- and Low-Frequency Variations of Helium Abundance in the Solar Win

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safrankova, J.; Cagas, P.; Nemecek, Z.; Prech, L.; Zastenker, G. N.; Riazantseva, M.

    2014-12-01

    Variations of the abundance of heavy species observed in the solar wind are usually attributed to spacecraft encounters with streams emanating from different places and altitudes in the source region and their further evolution is considered as being negligible. These conclusions are based on an analysis of highly averaged data and much less attention was devoted to variations on the time scale of seconds. The BMSW instrument onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft provides a high-time resolution data of the helium and proton fluxes and proton velocity, density, and temperature that suitable for investigations of rapid variations. The paper compares measurements in two points (Spektr-R and Wind) and focuses on the changes of helium abundance on this middle scale and on their correlations with variations of other parameters. We have found that only a low-frequency part of He abundance variations can be attributed to changes of the source region, whereas a significant portion of them could be generated by in-transit turbulence that is probably driven by the speed difference between the ion species.

  3. Implementing fast sideband-modulated ``wah-wah'' pulses for driving transmon qubits with tight frequency separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesterinen, V.; Saira, O.-P.; Bruno, A.; Egger, D. J.; Wilhelm, F. K.; Dicarlo, L.

    2014-03-01

    Packing multiple transmon qubits in a narrow frequency band is challenging due to the limited transmon anharmonicity: control drives targeting one qubit may drive the leakage transition of another. This cross-driving effect grows with decreasing gate time, potentially imposing a quantum speed limit. The widely used DRAG (derivative removal by adiabatic gate) technique only suppresses leakage in the targeted transmon. Adding a modulation tone to a Gaussian pulse envelope in one quadrature, and complementing with DRAG in the other, has been predicted [1] to reduce both intrinsic and cross-driving leakage. We have experimentally verified the performance of this new pulse-shaping method, termed ``wah-wah,'' with two transmons in a 2D circuit QED architecture. We optimize the modulation frequency and amplitude, and characterize the gate fidelity using randomized benchmarking (RB) and quantum process tomography. Pulses on the two qubits are characterized separately and simultaneously by interleaving the RB sequences. Wah-wah pulses show decoherence-limited fidelity at gate speeds where DRAG pulses add significant error. Research supported by NWO, EU projects SOLID and SCALEQIT, and the Research Foundation of Helsinki University of Technology.

  4. Variation of Magnetic Particle Imaging Tracer Performance With Amplitude and Frequency of the Applied Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Khandhar, Amit P.; Kemp, Scott J.; Ota, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Takemura, Yasushi; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic response of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) tracers varies with the slew rate of the applied magnetic field, as well as with the tracer's average magnetic core size. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 drive fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. We studied how several different sizes of monodisperse MPI tracers behaved under different drive field amplitude and frequency, using magnetic particle spectrometry and ac hysteresis for drive field conditions at 16, 26, and 40 kHz, with field amplitudes from 5 to 40 mT/μ0. We observed that both field amplitude and frequency can influence the tracer behavior, but that the magnetic behavior is consistent when the slew rate (the product of field amplitude and frequency) is consistent. However, smaller amplitudes provide a correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of a minor hysteresis loop. PMID:26023242

  5. Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor nozzle natural frequency variations with burn time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, C. Y.; Mason, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of erosion and thermal degradation on the Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle's structural dynamic characteristics were analytically evaluated. Also considered was stiffening of the structure due to internal pressurization. A detailed NASTRAN finite element model of the nozzle was developed and used to evaluate the influence of these effects at several discrete times during motor burn. Methods were developed for treating erosion and thermal degradation, and a procedure was developed to account for internal pressure stiffening using differential stiffness matrix techniques. Results were verified using static firing test accelerometer data. Fast Fourier Transform and Maximum Entropy Method techniques were applied to the data to generate waterfall plots which track modal frequencies with burn time. Results indicate that the lower frequency nozzle 'vectoring' modes are only slightly affected by erosion, thermal effects and internal pressurization. The higher frequency shell modes of the nozzle are, however, significantly reduced.

  6. Searches for high frequency variations in the 8-B neutrino flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Rielage, Keith; Seibert, Stanley R; Hime, Andrew; Elliott, Steven R; Stonehill, L C; Wouters, J M; Aharmim, B; Ahmed, S N; Anthony, A E; Barros, N; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Belttran, B; Bergevin, M; Biller, S D; Boudjemline, K; Burritt, T H; Cai, B; Chan, Y D; Chauhan, D; Chen, M; Cleveland, B T; Cox - Mobrand, G A; Dai, X; Deng, H; Detwiler, J; Dimarco, M; Doe, P J; Drouin, P - L; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Earle, E D; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Ford, R J; Formaggilo, J A; Gagnon, N; Goon, J Tm; Guillian, E; Habib, S; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Howard, C; Howe, M A; Huang, M; Jamieson, B; Jelley, N A; Keeter, K J; Klein, J R; Kos, M; Kraus, C; Krauss, C B; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Loach, J C; Maclellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Martin, R; Mccauley, N; Mc Donald, A B; Mcgee, S; Miffin, C; Miller, M L; Monreal, B; Monroe, J; Morissette, B; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; O' Keeffe, H M; Oblath, N S; Orebi Gann, G D; Oser, S M; Ott, R A; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Prior, G; Reitzner, S D; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Schwendener, M H; Secrest, J A; Seibert, S R; Simard, O; Sinclair, D; Sinclair, L; Skensved, P; Sonley, T J; Tesic, G; Tolich, N; Tsui, T; Tunnell, C D; Van Berg, R; Van Devender, B A; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Wan Chan Tseung, H; West, N; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wright, A; Yeh, M; Zhang, F; Zuber, K

    2009-01-01

    We have peformed three searches for high-frequency signals in the solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), motivated by the possibility that solar g-mode oscillations could affect the production or propagation of solar {sup 8}B neutrinos. The first search looked for any significant peak in the frequency range l/day to 144/day, with a sensitivity to sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 12% or greater. The second search focused on regions in which g-mode signals have been claimed by experiments aboard the SoHO satellite, and was sensitive to signals with amplitudes of 10% or greater. The third search looked for extra power across the entire frequency band. No statistically significant signal was detected in any of the three searches.

  7. Longitudinal frequency variation of long-lasting EMIC Pc1-Pc2 waves localized in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.-H.; Shiokawa, K.; Mann, I. R.; Park, J.-S.; Kwon, H.-J.; Hyun, K.; Jin, H.; Connors, M.

    2016-02-01

    Long-lasting (> 20 h) electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) Pc1-Pc2 waves were observed by the Athabasca (L =˜ 4.6) induction magnetometer and Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity (L =˜ 4-6) fluxgate magnetometers on 5 April 2007. These waves showed a systematic frequency change with local time, the minimum frequency near dusk, and the maximum frequency near dawn. Assuming the plasmapause as a potential source region of the waves, we estimated the plasmapause location from localized proton enhancement (LPE) events observed at NOAA-Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites and METOP-2 satellites. We found that the longitudinal frequency variation of EMIC waves has a clear correlation with the estimated plasmapause location and that the waves are in the frequency band between the equatorial helium and oxygen gyrofrequencies at the estimated plasmapause. With our analysis results we suggest that the LPE events are caused by wave-particle interaction with the helium band EMIC waves generated near the plasmapause.

  8. Quantitatively analyzing dielectrical properties of resins and mapping permittivity variations in CFRP with high-frequency eddy current device technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gäbler, Simone; Heuer, Henning; Heinrich, Gert; Kupke, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Eddy current testing is well-established for non-destructive characterization of electrical conductive materials. The development of high-frequency eddy current technology (with frequency ranges up to 100 MHz) made it even possible to extend the classical fields of application towards less conductive materials like CFRP. Maxwell's equations and recent research show that the use of high-frequency eddy current technology is also suitable for non-conductive materials. In that case the change of complex impedance of the probing coil contains information on sample permittivity. This paper shows that even a quantitative measurement of complex permittivity with high-frequency eddy current device technology is possible using an appropriate calibration. Measurement accuracy is comparable to commercial capacitive dielectric analyzers. If the sample material is electrically conductive, both, permittivity and conductivity influence the complex impedance measured with high-frequency eddy current devices. Depending on the measurement setup and the sheet resistance of the sample a parallel characterization of both parameters is possible on isotropic multi-layer materials. On CFRP the permittivity measurement is much more complex due to the capacitive effects between the carbon rovings. However, first results show that at least the local permittivity variations (like those caused by thermal damages) are detectable.

  9. Vowel Identification by Listeners with Hearing Impairment in Response to Variation in Formant Frequencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molis, Michelle R.; Leek, Marjorie R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the influence of presentation level and mild-to-moderate hearing loss on the identification of a set of vowel tokens systematically varying in the frequency locations of their second and third formants. Method: Five listeners with normal hearing (NH listeners) and five listeners with hearing impairment (HI listeners)…

  10. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  11. Path loss variation of on-body UWB channel in the frequency bands of IEEE 802.15.6 standard.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dayananda; Sarma, Kanak C; Mahanta, Anil

    2016-06-01

    The wireless body area network (WBAN) has gaining tremendous attention among researchers and academicians for its envisioned applications in healthcare service. Ultra wideband (UWB) radio technology is considered as excellent air interface for communication among body area network devices. Characterisation and modelling of channel parameters are utmost prerequisite for the development of reliable communication system. The path loss of on-body UWB channel for each frequency band defined in IEEE 802.15.6 standard is experimentally determined. The parameters of path loss model are statistically determined by analysing measurement data. Both the line-of-sight and non-line-of-sight channel conditions are considered in the measurement. Variations of parameter values with the size of human body are analysed along with the variation of parameter values with the surrounding environments. It is observed that the parameters of the path loss model vary with the frequency band as well as with the body size and surrounding environment. The derived parameter values are specific to the particular frequency bands of IEEE 802.15.6 standard, which will be useful for the development of efficient UWB WBAN system. PMID:27382482

  12. Corner Frequency Variation in the Southeastern Region of the 1992 Nicaragua Tsunami Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, H. M. M.; Bilek, S. L.; Phillips, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    At the Nicaragua portion of the Middle America Trench, where the Cocos Plate is subducting at ~85 mm/yr, a tsunami earthquake (mb 5.3, Ms 7.2, Mw 7.6) occurred at 15 km depth on 2 September 1992, causing a tsunami up to 8 m high and >116 deaths. A tsunami earthquake is characterized by deficiency in high frequency radiated energy and large tsunami for its Ms. Tsunami earthquakes are relatively rare, but their occurrence presents a significant hazard to coastal populations, so the potential to identify tsunami earthquake regions has wide-reaching hazard implications. Here we examine the notion that the cause of the dominantly low frequency energy in the 1992 tsunami earthquake may also manifest in small earthquakes in the same area. We examine 241 events within and south of the 1992 rupture limits with hypocenters 8-30 km depth and 1.7 < Mw < 4.6, recorded by land station and ocean bottom seismometers in southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica from November 2005 to June 2006. Event source parameters moment, corner frequency, and stress drop are determined using the spectral ratios of S-wave coda. Mean stress drop inside the 1992 rupture area is 3.2 MPa, and immediately south of the 1992 rupture zone mean stress drop is 10.4 MPa. Inside and outside the 1992 rupture zone at similar depths, the increase in stress drop is by a factor of five and occurs abruptly over <50 km. The mean corner frequency of events in the 1992 rupture area is ~45% the mean corner frequency value for events south of the 1992 rupture zone. Therefore, our results demonstrate different source parameter characteristics for microseismicity in the region of a past tsunami earthquake. If this finding can be reproduced at other subduction zones, it may significantly improve subduction zone coastal hazard assessment.

  13. Seasonal and regional variations in extreme precipitation event frequency using CMIP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, E.; Sriver, R. L.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Kunkel, K. E.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how the frequency and intensity of extreme precipitation events are changing is important for regional risk assessments and adaptation planning. Here we use observational data and an ensemble of climate change model experiments (from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5)) to examine past and potential future seasonal changes in extreme precipitation event frequency over the United States. Using the extreme precipitation index as a metric for extreme precipitation change, we find key differences between models and observations. In particular, the CMIP5 models tend to overestimate the number of spring events and underestimate the number of summer events. This seasonal shift in the models is amplified in projections. These results provide a basis for evaluating climate model skill in simulating observed seasonality and changes in regional extreme precipitation. Additionally, we highlight key sources of variability and uncertainty that can potentially inform regional impact analyses and adaptation planning.

  14. Monitoring of ULF (ultra-low-frequency) Geomagnetic Variations Associated with Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Masashi; Hattori, Katsumi; Ohta, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    ULF (ultra-low-frequency) electromagnetic emission is recently recognized as one of the most promising candidates for short-term earthquake prediction. This paper reviews previous convincing evidence on the presence of ULF emissions before a few large earthquakes. Then, we present our network of ULF monitoring in the Tokyo area by describing our ULF magnetic sensors and we finally present a few, latest results on seismogenic electromagnetic emissions for recent large earthquakes with the use of sophisticated signal processings.

  15. High-frequency variations in Earth rotation and the planetary momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    The major focus of the subject contract was on helping to resolve one of the more notable discrepancies still existing in the axial momentum budget of the solid Earth-atmosphere system, namely the disappearance of coherence between length-of-day (l.o.d.) and atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) at periods shorter than about a fortnight. Recognizing the importance of identifying the source of the high-frequency momentum budget anomaly, the scientific community organized two special measurement campaigns (SEARCH '92 and CONT '94) to obtain the best possible determinations of l.o.d. and AAM. An additional goal was to analyze newly developed estimates of the torques that transfer momentum between the atmosphere and its underlying surface to determine whether the ocean might be a reservoir of momentum on short time scales. Discrepancies between AAM and l.o.d. at sub-fortnightly periods have been attributed to either measurement errors in these quantities or the need to incorporate oceanic angular momentum into the planetary budget. Results from the SEARCH '92 and CONT '94 campaigns suggest that when special attention is paid to the quality of the measurements, better agreement between l.o.d. and AAM at high frequencies can be obtained. The mechanism most responsible for the high-frequency changes observed in AAM during these campaigns involves a direct coupling to the solid Earth, i.e, the mountain torque, thereby obviating a significant oceanic role.

  16. Semi-continuous mesophilic anaerobic digester performance under variations in solids retention time and feeding frequency.

    PubMed

    Manser, Nathan D; Mihelcic, James R; Ergas, Sarina J

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this research was to understand the effect of solids retention time (SRT) and feeding frequency on the performance of anaerobic digesters used to recover bioenergy from swine waste. Semi-continuous mesophilic anaerobic digesters were operated at varying SRTs and feeding frequencies. Performance metrics included biogas and methane production rates, biomass robustness and functionality and removals of volatile solids, soluble chemical oxygen demand, the fecal-indicator bacteria Escherichia coli, and the human pathogen Salmonella. Biochemical methane formation potential and specific methanogenic activity assays were used to demonstrate biomass robustness and functionality. Results indicated that anaerobic digesters fed weekly had higher average methane yields (0.20 vs. 0.18m(3)CH4/kg-VSadded), specific methanogenic activities (40 vs. 35ml/day), and fecal indicator bacteria destruction (99.9% vs. 99.4%) than those fed every-other day. Salmonella, soluble COD, and VS destruction did not change with varied feeding frequency; however, higher removals were observed with longer SRT. PMID:25965953

  17. Atomic Transition Frequencies, Isotope Shifts, and Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine Structure Constant for Studies of Quasar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest spatial and temporal variation of fundamental "constants" in the Universe. A change in the fine structure constant, α = {e}2/hslash c , could be detected via shifts in the frequencies of atomic transitions in quasar absorption systems. Recent studies using 140 absorption systems from the Keck telescope and 153 from the Very Large Telescope, suggest that α varies spatially (61). That is, in one direction on the sky α seems to have been smaller at the time of absorption, while in the opposite direction it seems to have been larger.

  18. Greater variation in BCL-2 mutation frequency among lymphocytes of heavy smokers than among those of controls

    SciTech Connect

    Cortopassi, G.A.; Liu, Y.; Bell, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    It is possible that the risk for tumors in specific human individuals might be most usefully estimated by determining the frequency of (rare) somatic mutations at oncogenic loci in their tissue. Using a sensitive nested PCR assay, we have investigated the frequency of rare t(14;18) (q32;q21) translocations at the bcl-2 proto-oncogene locus in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 85 smokers and 36 control non-smokers. The variation in translocation frequencies (plus or minus the variation at the 95% confidence interval) were 1.4 {+-} -0.37 per million lymphocytes among smokers, versus 0.53 {+-} -0.20 among non-smokers, a 2.6-fold excess of such oncogenic translocations among lymphocytes of smokers. Logistic regression analysis including age, race, sex, years of smoking and pack-years indicated that only current smoking was significantly associated with increased frequency of the translocation of bcl-2 occur in 85% of follicular lymphoma tumors, and about 50% of all Non-Hodgkin`s Lymphoma, and are thought to be the result of errors of the V(D)J recombinase. Epidemiological studies by others have shown that there is about a two-fold higher relative risk of Non-Hodgkin`s Lymphoma for heavy smokers vs. non-smokers. We speculate that one reason for excess NHL tumors among heavy smokers may be their increased average burden of t(14;18) mutations, and that smoke-derived substances may induce errors of the V(D)J recombinase by mutagenic or antigenic mechanisms.

  19. Improving Processes of Mechanized Pulsed Arc Welding of Low-Frequency Range Variation of Mode Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu N.; Solodskiy, S. A.; Ulyanova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    A new technology of low-frequency modulation of the arc current in MAG and MIG welding is presented. The technology provides control of thermal and crystallization processes, stabilizes the time of formation and crystallization of the weld pool. Conducting theoretical studies allowed formulating the basic criteria for obtaining strong permanent joints for high-duty structures, providing conditions for more equilibrium structure of the deposited metal and the smaller width of the HAZ. The stabilization of time of the formation and crystallization of the weld pool improves the formation of the weld and increases productivity in welding thin sheet metal.

  20. Seasonal Variation of Frequency of High Current Lightning Discharges Observed by JLDN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mikihisa; Ishii, Masaru; Fujii, Fumiyuki; Matsui, Michihiro

    Seasonal variations of number of high current lightning discharges exceeding 100kA observed by JLDN (Japanese Lightning Detection Network) were analyzed. The months with averaged altitudes of -10°C level higher than 5.7km are classified as ordinary summer from the viewpoint of lightning activity. Meanwhile, on the coast of the Sea of Japan, more than 90% of negative high current lightning discharges were -GC (Ground to Cloud) strokes in the months when monthly averaged altitudes of -10°C level are lower than 2.7km. These months are classified as the winter lightning season when upward lightning flashes frequently occur. Months other than winter or summer are classified as spring or autumn. In these seasons, the proportions of positive high current lightning discharges are higher than those of negative discharges like winter. Thus, the charge structure in the thunderclouds of spring and autumn may be similar to that in winter, and high current lightning strokes tend to occur. Since this variation of seasons is different in each area of Japan, relation of seasons, areas, and densities of high current lightning discharges were analyzed.

  1. Variation in low-frequency estimates of sound levels based on different units of analysis.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Russell S; Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Smith, Chad M

    2014-02-01

    The measurement and analysis of underwater sound is a complicated process because of the variable durations of contributing sources and constantly changing water column dynamics. Because the ambient sound distribution does not always follow a Gaussian structure and may be nonstationary in time, analysis over an extended period is required to accurately characterize the data. Utilizing recordings from the Indian Ocean, the temporal variation in ambient sound including transient signals was examined using multiple processing window lengths and subsampling intervals. Results illustrate the degree of uncertainty in sound levels based on different units of analysis. The average difference between sound level estimates in the 10-30 Hz band due to subsampling was 2 dB and as high as 4 dB. The difference in the full band (5-110 Hz) was as high as 6 dB. Longer averaging windows (200 vs 60 s) resulted in larger variations over different subsampling intervals. This work demonstrates how sampling protocols within a single dataset can influence results and acknowledges that comparative studies at the same location but with different sampling protocols can be substantial if signal processing parameters are not statistically accounted for to confirm interpretation of results and observed trends. PMID:25234879

  2. Seasonal variation in phosphorus concentration-discharge hysteresis inferred from high-frequency in situ monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieroza, M. Z.; Heathwaite, A. L.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution in situ total phosphorus (TP), total reactive phosphorus (TRP) and turbidity (TURB) time series are presented for a groundwater-dominated agricultural catchment. Meta-analysis of concentration-discharge (c-q) intra-storm signatures for 61 storm events revealed dominant hysteretic patterns with similar frequency of anti-clockwise and clockwise responses; different determinands (TP, TRP, TURB) behaved similarly. We found that the c-q loop direction is controlled by seasonally variable flow discharge and temperature whereas the magnitude is controlled by antecedent rainfall. Anti-clockwise storm events showed lower flow discharge and higher temperature compared to clockwise events. Hydrological controls were more important for clockwise events and TP and TURB responses, whereas in-stream biogeochemical controls were important for anti-clockwise storm events and TRP responses. Based on the best predictors of the direction of the hysteresis loops, we calibrated and validated a simple fuzzy logic inference model (FIS) to determine likely direction of the c-q responses. We show that seasonal and inter-storm succession in clockwise and anti-clockwise responses corroborates the transition in P transport from a chemostatic to an episodic regime. Our work delivers new insights for the evidence base on the complexity of phosphorus dynamics. We show the critical value of high-frequency in situ observations in advancing understanding of freshwater biogeochemical processes.

  3. High Frequency Variations of Arctic Ocean Bottom Pressure and Their Relation to Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta Ferriz, A. C.; Morison, J.; Kwok, R.

    2009-12-01

    The ocean bottom pressure (OBP) was measured at the North Pole from 2005 to 2008, as part of the North Pole Environmental Observatory. OBP shows a spectral peak at a period of about 19 days, which is consistent with modeling results of OBP from the PanArctic Ice-Ocean Model Assimilation System, PIOMAS. The OBP measured in the central Beaufort Sea from 2003 to 2008 as part of the Beaufort Gyre Exploration Project shows the same spectral peak. The variations in Beaufort Sea OBP are well correlated with those at the North Pole. This signal is also detected in the sea level pressure (SLP) records from the NCEP/NCAR re-analysis for the same time as the observations of OBP. Similarly, Morison [1990] found a spectral peak at 19 days in OBP observations across the West Spitsbergen Current, in Fram Strait. Here we explore two questions: What is the source of the 19-day period atmospheric signal and how is this signal transferred to the ocean. Based on satellite altimetry, it has been shown that the inverted barometer effect applies in the Arctic Ocean at daily to weekly time-scales [Kwok, et al., 2006]. Indeed, comparison of OBP from PIOMAS, which assumes a perfect inverted barometer, with observed OBP suggests that departures from the inverted barometer response are small. The fact that the PIOMAS OBP without direct atmosphere pressure loading shows a spectral peak that is similar to observed OBP, suggests that these oscillations are wind (pressure gradient) driven rather than due to direct atmospheric loading. The basin-averaged OBP variations from PIOMAS are well correlated with the atmospheric pressure over Scandinavia. This is consistent with a correlation between southerly winds in Fram Strait and the basin-averaged OBP, with the pressure lagging the wind by 1-2 days. Through examination of atmospheric pressure data and ice-ocean model results, we investigate the hypotheses that the SLP variation is related to the passage of planetary waves across the North Atlantic

  4. Forcing of polar motion in the Chandler frequency band: An opportunity to evaluate interannual climate variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plag, H.-P.; Chao, B. F.; Gross, R. S.; Van Dam, T.

    The Earth rotates about its axis once per day but does not do so uniformly. The length of the day changes by as much as a millisecond from day to day and the Earth wobbles as it rotates. That the Earth should wobble was predicted by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in 1765, but it was not until 1891 that the wobbling motion of the Earth was detected by the American astronomer Seth Carlo Chandler, Jr. In fact, Chandler observed that the Earth has two distinct wobbles, one with an annual period and the other with a 14-month period. The annual wobble is a forced motion of the Earth caused by seasonal variations in the atmosphere, oceans, and hydrosphere.

  5. Frequency of close companions among Kepler planets—a transit time variation study

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Wu, Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-07-10

    A transiting planet exhibits sinusoidal transit time variations (TTVs) if perturbed by a companion near a mean-motion resonance. We search for sinusoidal TTVs in more than 2600 Kepler candidates, using the publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q12). We find that the TTV fractions rise strikingly with the transit multiplicity. Systems where four or more planets transit enjoy a TTV fraction that is roughly five times higher than those where a single planet transits, and about twice as high as those for doubles and triples. In contrast, models in which all transiting planets arise from similar dynamical configurations predict comparable TTV fractions among these different systems. One simple explanation for our results is that there are at least two different classes of Kepler systems, one closely packed and one more sparsely populated.

  6. Low-frequency variations in sea level and currents in south San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.

    1982-01-01

    In order to examine physical process in the subtidal time range, sea-level and current meter data for south San Francisco Bay (South Bay) were filtered using a low-pass digital filter to remove tidal period variations. and then subjected to an empirical orthogonal function analysis. For the sea-level data, there is one dominant empirical mode that is correlated with nonlocal coastal forcing. A small amount of the variance is associated with local wind setup. For the current meter data, there are two dominant empirical modes that correlate with local wind forcing and tidal forcing over the spring-neap cycle. In general, South Bay is dominated by coastal forcing on sea level during all seasons, and dominated by wind and tidal forcing on the residual currants during the summer.

  7. Can the Tibetan Plateau snow cover influence the interannual variations of Eurasian heat wave frequency?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Hua; Li, Yun

    2016-06-01

    The Eurasian continent has experienced significant year-to-year variations of summer heat waves during the past decades. Several possible factors, such as ocean temperature, soil moisture, and changes in land use and greenhouse gases, have been identified in previous studies, but the mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, it is found that the Tibetan Plateau snow cover (TPSC) is closely linked to the interannual variations of summer heat waves over Eurasia. The TPSC variability explains more than 30 % of the total variances of heat wave variability in the southern Europe and northeastern Asia (SENA) region. A set of numerical experiments reveal that the reduced TPSC may induce a distinct teleconnection pattern across the Eurasian continent, with two anomalous high pressure centers in the upper troposphere over the SENA region, which may lead to a reduction of the cloud formation near the surface. The less cloud cover tends to increase the net shortwave radiation and favor a stronger surface sensible heat flux in the dry surface condition over the SENA region, resulting in a deeper, warmer and drier atmospheric boundary layer that would further inhibit the local cloud formation. Such a positive land-atmosphere feedback may dry the surface even further, heat the near-surface atmosphere and thereby intensify the local heat waves. The above dynamical processes also operate on interdecadal time scales. Given the reduction of the TPSC could become more pronounced with increasing levels of greenhouse gases in a warming climate, we infer that the TPSC may play an increasingly important role in shaping the summer heat waves over the SENA region in next decades.

  8. Frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields: A demonstration of a new technique for a measurement of the helium n=2 triplet P fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzakerley, D. W.; Kato, K.; George, M. C.; Vutha, A. C.; Skinner, T. D. G.; Bezginov, N.; Hessels, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    We perform a proof-of-principle demonstration of the frequency-offset separated oscillatory field (FOSOF) technique. For the FOSOF technique, the two separated field have frequencies which are offset from each other, so that the relative phases of the fields varies linearly in time. This proof-of-principle demonstration measures the 23 P1 m = 1 to 23 P2 m = 1 transition in atomic helium and demonstrates the usefulness of the FOSOF technique for high-precision atomic measurements. Supported by NSERC, CRC.

  9. Solar radial velocity variations and the search for Venus enabled by a laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David F.; Dumusque, Xavier; Li, Chih-Hao; Glenday, Alexander; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently demonstrated 50 cm/s sensitivity in measuring the radial velocity (RV) between the Earth and Sun using a simple, compact solar telescope feeding the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Italian National Telescope calibrated with our green astro-comb. The green astro-comb is a laser frequency comb optimized for calibrating astrophysical spectrographs. We have been operating the solar telescope to detect the RV signal of the Sun as a star for the past year both to study RV jitter associated with stellar (solar) fluctuations and to demonstrate sensitivity of these instruments to detect terrestrial exoplanets. In this talk I will present results from calibrating the HARPS-N exoplanet searcher spectrograph, solar RV stability, and the current status of our search for the signature of Venus.

  10. Population-ethnic group specific genome variation allele frequency data: a querying and visualization journey.

    PubMed

    Viennas, Emmanouil; Gkantouna, Vassiliki; Ioannou, Marina; Georgitsi, Marianthi; Rigou, Maria; Poulas, Konstantinos; Patrinos, George P; Tzimas, Giannis

    2012-08-01

    National/ethnic mutation databases aim to document the genetic heterogeneity in various populations and ethnic groups worldwide. We have previously reported the development and upgrade of FINDbase (www.findbase.org), a database recording causative mutations and pharmacogenomic marker allele frequencies in various populations around the globe. Although this database has recently been upgraded, we continuously try to enhance its functionality by providing more advanced visualization tools that would further assist effective data querying and comparisons. We are currently experimenting in various visualization techniques on the existing FINDbase causative mutation data collection aiming to provide a dynamic research tool for the worldwide scientific community. We have developed an interactive web-based application for population-based mutation data retrieval. It supports sophisticated data exploration allowing users to apply advanced filtering criteria upon a set of multiple views of the underlying data collection and enables browsing the relationships between individual datasets in a novel and meaningful way. PMID:22659238

  11. Global patterns of variation in allele and haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium across the CYP2E1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Mukherjee, Namita; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Khaliq, Shagufta; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Mehdi, S. Qasim; Speed, William C.; Kidd, Judith R.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2E1, gene symbol CYP2E1, is one of a family of enzymes with a central role in activating and detoxifying xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. Genetic variation at this gene has been reported in different human populations, and some association studies have reported increased risk for cancers and other diseases. To the best of our knowledge, multi-SNP haplotypes and linkage disequilibrium (LD) have not been systematically studied for CYP2E1 in multiple populations. Haplotypes can greatly increase the power both to identify patterns of genetic variation relevant for gene expression as well as to detect disease-related susceptibility mutations. We present frequency and LD data and analyses for 11 polymorphisms and their haplotypes that we have studied on over 2,600 individuals from 50 human population samples representing the major geographical regions of the world. The diverse patterns of haplotype variation found in the different populations we have studied show that ethnicity may be an important variable helping to explain inconsistencies that have been reported by association studies. More studies clearly are needed of the variants we have studied, especially those in the 5′ region, such as the VNTR, as well as studies of additional polymorphisms known for this gene to establish evidence relating any systematic differences in gene expression that exist to the haplotypes at this gene. PMID:18663376

  12. Air temperature variations on the Atlantic - Arctic boundary since 1802: the low-frequency pattern and ocean teleconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, K. R.; Overland, J. E.; Jónsson, T.; Smoliak, B. V.

    2010-12-01

    A two-hundred year instrumental record of annual surface air temperature (SAT) in the Atlantic - Arctic boundary region was reconstructed from four station-based composite time series (Fig. 1). Credibility is supported by ice core records, other temperature proxies, and historical evidence. This record (designated TNA) provides new perspective on past climate fluctuations in a region where pivotal climate system processes occur and where unexplained low-frequency variations were observed during the 20th century. TNA shows that the low-frequency pattern of the 20th century does not have a clear analog in the previous century. During the 19th century decadal-scale climate fluctuations occurred in irregular episodes; none were as distinctive as the early 20th century warming event (~1920 to mid-century), which is the most striking historical feature in the record. Evidence of a strong teleconnection between TNA and SST anomalies in the western boundary current - southern recirculation gyre (WBC) region of the North Atlantic Ocean provides an opportunity to reframe the problem of low-frequency variability in the region in terms tractable to theory and empirical investigation. Positive fluctuations in both TNA (and by extension other climate variables associated with it) and SST in the WBC region could be initiated by persistent variations in the large-scale atmospheric circulation that promote the advection of warm maritime air into the Atlantic - Arctic region and simultaneously limit flux-induced cooling in the Nordic Seas and the WBC/recirculation gyre region. This leads to enhanced ocean heat storage in both regions and may consequently reinforce anomalous atmospheric circulation patterns like those observed during the early 20th century warming event. Figure 1. Extended annual mean SAT record for the Atlantic - Arctic boundary region (TNA). The early 20th century warming (ETCW) episode is marked. Regions represented by station-based composite SAT records used in

  13. Telomere Length Affects the Frequency and Mechanism of Antigenic Variation in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Hovel-Miner, Galadriel A.; Boothroyd, Catharine E.; Mugnier, Monica; Dreesen, Oliver; Cross, George A. M.; Papavasiliou, F. Nina

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a master of antigenic variation and immune response evasion. Utilizing a genomic repertoire of more than 1000 Variant Surface Glycoprotein-encoding genes (VSGs), T. brucei can change its protein coat by “switching” from the expression of one VSG to another. Each active VSG is monoallelically expressed from only one of approximately 15 subtelomeric sites. Switching VSG expression occurs by three predominant mechanisms, arguably the most significant of which is the non-reciprocal exchange of VSG containing DNA by duplicative gene conversion (GC). How T. brucei orchestrates its complex switching mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Recent work has demonstrated that an exogenous DNA break in the active site could initiate a GC based switch, yet the source of the switch-initiating DNA lesion under natural conditions is still unknown. Here we investigated the hypothesis that telomere length directly affects VSG switching. We demonstrate that telomerase deficient strains with short telomeres switch more frequently than genetically identical strains with long telomeres and that, when the telomere is short, switching preferentially occurs by GC. Our data supports the hypothesis that a short telomere at the active VSG expression site results in an increase in subtelomeric DNA breaks, which can initiate GC based switching. In addition to their significance for T. brucei and telomere biology, the findings presented here have implications for the many diverse pathogens that organize their antigenic genes in subtelomeric regions. PMID:22952449

  14. Spatial variations in the frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes in the southwestern Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-Y.; Sibuet, J.-C.; Lee, C.-S.; Hsu, S.-K.; Klingelhoefer, F.

    2007-04-01

    The relations between the frequency of occurrence and the magnitude of earthquakes are established in the southern Okinawa Trough for 2823 relocated earthquakes recorded during a passive ocean bottom seismometer experiment. Three high b-values areas are identified: (1) for an area offshore of the Ilan Plain, south of the andesitic Kueishantao Island from a depth of 50 km to the surface, thereby confirming the subduction component of the island andesites; (2) for a body lying along the 123.3°E meridian at depths ranging from 0 to 50 km that may reflect the high temperature inflow rising up from a slab tear; (3) for a third cylindrical body about 15 km in diameter beneath the Cross Backarc Volcanic Trail, at depths ranging from 0 to 15 km. This anomaly might be related to the presence of a magma chamber at the base of the crust already evidenced by tomographic and geochemical results. The high b-values are generally linked to magmatic and geothermal activities, although most of the seismicity is linked to normal faulting processes in the southern Okinawa Trough.

  15. Spatial-temporal variation of low-frequency earthquake bursts near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunquan; Guyer, Robert; Shelly, David; Trugman, Daniel; Frank, William; Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Tectonic tremor (TT) and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) have been found in the deeper crust of various tectonic environments globally in the last decade. The spatial-temporal behaviour of LFEs provides insight into deep fault zone processes. In this study, we examine recurrence times from a 12-yr catalogue of 88 LFE families with ˜730 000 LFEs in the vicinity of the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) in central California. We apply an automatic burst detection algorithm to the LFE recurrence times to identify the clustering behaviour of LFEs (LFE bursts) in each family. We find that the burst behaviours in the northern and southern LFE groups differ. Generally, the northern group has longer burst duration but fewer LFEs per burst, while the southern group has shorter burst duration but more LFEs per burst. The southern group LFE bursts are generally more correlated than the northern group, suggesting more coherent deep fault slip and relatively simpler deep fault structure beneath the locked section of SAF. We also found that the 2004 Parkfield earthquake clearly increased the number of LFEs per burst and average burst duration for both the northern and the southern groups, with a relatively larger effect on the northern group. This could be due to the weakness of northern part of the fault, or the northwesterly rupture direction of the Parkfield earthquake.

  16. Spatial variations in the frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes at Mount Pinatubo volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, J.J.; McNutt, S.R.; Power, J.A.; Wyss, M.

    2004-01-01

    The frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes measured by the b-value is mapped in two and three dimensions at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, to a depth of 14 km below the summit. We analyzed 1406 well-located earthquakes with magnitudes MD ???0.73, recorded from late June through August 1991, using the maximum likelihood method. We found that b-values are higher than normal (b = 1.0) and range between b = 1.0 and b = 1.8. The computed b-values are lower in the areas adjacent to and west-southwest of the vent, whereas two prominent regions of anomalously high b-values (b ??? 1.7) are resolved, one located 2 km northeast of the vent between 0 and 4 km depth and a second located 5 km southeast of the vent below 8 km depth. The statistical differences between selected regions of low and high b-values are established at the 99% confidence level. The high b-value anomalies are spatially well correlated with low-velocity anomalies derived from earlier P-wave travel-time tomography studies. Our dataset was not suitable for analyzing changes in b-values as a function of time. We infer that the high b-value anomalies around Mount Pinatubo are regions of increased crack density, and/or high pore pressure, related to the presence of nearby magma bodies.

  17. Genetic variation frequencies in Wilms' tumor: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changkai; Dai, Rong; Li, Xuliang; Liu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Over the last few decades, numerous biomarkers in Wilms' tumor have been confirmed and shown variations in prevalence. Most of these studies were based on small sample sizes. We carried out a meta-analysis of the research published from 1992 to 2015 to obtain more precise and comprehensive outcomes for genetic tests. In the present study, 70 out of 5175 published reports were eligible for the meta-analysis, which was carried out using Stata 12.0 software. Pooled prevalence for gene mutations WT1, WTX, CTNNB1, TP53, MYCN, DROSHA, and DGCR8 was 0.141 (0.104, 0.178), 0.147 (0.110, 0.184), 0.140 (0.100, 0.190), 0.410 (0.214, 0.605), 0.071 (0.041, 0.100), 0.082 (0.048, 0.116), and 0.036 (0.026, 0.046), respectively. Pooled prevalence of loss of heterozygosity at 1p, 11p, 11q, 16q, and 22q was 0.109 (0.084, 0.133), 0.334 (0.295, 0.373), 0.199 (0.146, 0.252), 0.151 (0.129, 0.172), and 0.148 (0.108, 0.189), respectively. Pooled prevalence of 1q and chromosome 12 gain was 0.218 (0.161, 0.275) and 0.273 (0.195, 0.350), respectively. The limited prevalence of currently known genetic alterations in Wilms' tumors indicates that significant drivers of initiation and progression remain to be discovered. Subgroup analyses indicated that ethnicity may be one of the sources of heterogeneity. However, in meta-regression analyses, no study-level characteristics of indicators were found to be significant. In addition, the findings of our sensitivity analysis and possible publication bias remind us to interpret results with caution. PMID:26892980

  18. Variations in Dream Recall Frequency and Dream Theme Diversity by Age and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Tore

    2012-01-01

    We assessed dream recall frequency (DRF) and dream theme diversity (DTD) with an internet questionnaire among a cohort of 28,888 male and female participants aged 10–79 years in a cross-sectional design. DRF increased from adolescence (ages 10–19) to early adulthood (20–29) and then decreased again for the next 20 years. The nature of this decrease differed for males and females. For males, it began earlier (30–39), proceeded more gradually, and reached a nadir earlier (40–49) than it did for females. For females, it began later (40–49), dropped more abruptly, and reached nadir later (50–59). Marked sex differences were observed for age strata 10–19 through 40–49 and year-by-year analyses estimated the window for these differences to be more precisely from 14 to 44 years. DTD decreased linearly with age for both sexes up to 50–59 and then dropped even more sharply for 60–79. There was a sex difference favoring males on this measure but only for ages 10–19. Findings replicate, in a single sample, those from several previous studies showing an increase in DRF from adolescence to early adulthood, a subsequent decrease primarily in early and middle adulthood, and different patterns of age-related decrease in the two sexes. Age-related changes in sleep structure, such as decreasing %REM sleep which parallel the observed dream recall changes, might help explain these findings, but these sleep changes are much smaller and more gradual in nature. Changes in the phase and amplitude of circadian rhythms of REM propensity and generational differences in life experiences may also account for some part of the findings. That decreases in DTD parallel known age-related decreases in episodic and autobiographical memory may signify that this new diversity measure indexes an aspect of autobiographical memory that also influences dream recall. PMID:22783222

  19. Interindividual variation of sensitivity to frequency modulation: its relation with click-evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Sho; Furukawa, Shigeto; Yamagishi, Shimpei; Hirota, Koich; Kashino, Makio

    2014-04-01

    The frequency modulation detection limen (FMDL) with a low modulation rate has been used as a measure of the listener's sensitivity to the temporal fine structure of a stimulus, which is represented by the pattern of neural phase locking at the auditory periphery. An alternative to the phase locking cue, the excitation pattern cue, has been suggested to contribute to frequency modulation (FM) detection. If the excitation pattern cue has a significant contribution to low-rate FM detection, the functionality of cochlear mechanics underlying the excitation pattern should be reflected in low-rate FMDLs. This study explored the relationship between cochlear mechanics and low-rate FMDLs by evaluating physiological measures of cochlear functions, namely distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs). DPOAEs and CEOAEs reflect nonlinear cochlear gain. CEOAEs have been considered also to reflect the degree of irregularity, such as spatial variations in number or geometry of outer hair cells, on the basilar membrane. The irregularity profile could affect the reliability of the phase locking cue, thereby influencing the FMDLs. The features extracted from DPOAEs and CEOAEs, when combined, could account for more than 30 % of the inter-listener variation of low-rate FMDLs. This implies that both cochlear gain and irregularity on the basilar membrane have some influence on sensitivity to low-rate FM: the loss of cochlear gain or broader tuning might influence the excitation pattern cue, and the irregularity on the basilar membrane might disturb the ability to use the phase locking cue. PMID:24504749

  20. High frequency variations of the main magnetic field: convergence of observations and theory (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jault, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the main magnetic field variations has been hindered by the discrepancy between the periods (from months to years) of the simplest linear wave phenomena and the relatively long time intervals (10 to 100 years) over which magnetic field changes can be confidently monitored. A theoretical description of short-period waves within the Earth's fluid core is at hand. Quasi-geostrophic inertial waves (akin to Rossby waves in the atmosphere) are slightly modified in the presence of magnetic fields and torsional oscillations consist of differential motion between coaxial rigid cylindrical annuli. Torsional oscillations are sensitive to the whole magnetic field that they shear in the course of their propagation. From their modelling, we have thus gained an estimate for the magnetic field strength in the core interior. There is now ongoing work to extend the theoretical framework to longer times. Furthermore, data collected from the Swarm constellation of three satellites to be launched this year by ESA will permit to better separate the internal and external magnetic signals. We may thus dream to detect quasi-geostrophic inertial waves. As the spectral ranges of theoretical models and observations begin to overlap, we can now go beyond the understanding of the magnetic field variations as the juxtaposition of partial models, arranged as a set of nested Matryoshka dolls. This talk will give illustrations for this statement, among which the question of induction in the lower mantle.

  1. High-frequency sea level variations and implications for coastal flooding: A case study of the Solent, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsoy, Ozgun; Haigh, Ivan D.; Wadey, Matthew P.; Nicholls, Robert J.; Wells, Neil C.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the occurrence and characteristics of high-frequency (<6 h) sea level variations in the Solent, UK - a mesotidal estuarine strait located in the central English Channel. A 14-year time series (2000-2013) of sea level observations sampled at 15-min intervals from the Southampton tide gauge was analyzed. The 8 highest-energy events have a mean amplitude of approximately 0.6 m and a dominant period of around 4 h. These events correspond with periods of enhanced meteorological activity, namely a marked reduction in air pressure and onset of strong southwesterly-southeasterly winds. Sea level observations from tide gauges around the Solent and the wider English Channel region (23 in total) were used to assess the spatial characteristics of these events. Analysis of time series and phase information indicates the occurrence of standing waves oscillating across the English Channel between southern England and northern France. This study provides a unique example of standing waves generated by extra-tropical cyclones over a large basin (the English Channel) with implications for flood inundation. The event of 28th October 2013 - the highest-amplitude (1.16 m) event in the record - was associated with minor coastal flooding at Yarmouth, Isle of Wight. This flood occurred during a neap tide, when such events are widely thought to be impossible. Hence, our findings emphasize the relevance of high-frequency sea level variability for regional sea level forecasting and flood risk management.

  2. School-Based Racial and Gender Discrimination among African American Adolescents: Exploring Gender Variation in Frequency and Implications for Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Chavous, Tabbye M.; Griffin, Tiffany M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined school-based racial and gender discrimination experiences among African American adolescents in Grade 8 (n = 204 girls; n = 209 boys). A primary goal was exploring gender variation in frequency of both types of discrimination and associations of discrimination with academic and psychological functioning among girls and boys. Girls and boys did not vary in reported racial discrimination frequency, but boys reported more gender discrimination experiences. Multiple regression analyses within gender groups indicated that among girls and boys, racial discrimination and gender discrimination predicted higher depressive symptoms and school importance and racial discrimination predicted self-esteem. Racial and gender discrimination were also negatively associated with grade point average among boys but were not significantly associated in girls’ analyses. Significant gender discrimination X racial discrimination interactions resulted in the girls’ models predicting psychological outcomes and in boys’ models predicting academic achievement. Taken together, findings suggest the importance of considering gender- and race-related experiences in understanding academic and psychological adjustment among African American adolescents. PMID:22837794

  3. Separation of the low-frequency atmospheric variability into non-Gaussian multidimensional sources by Independent Subspace Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Carlos; Ribeiro, Andreia

    2016-04-01

    An efficient nonlinear method of statistical source separation of space-distributed non-Gaussian distributed data is proposed. The method relies in the so called Independent Subspace Analysis (ISA), being tested on a long time-series of the stream-function field of an atmospheric quasi-geostrophic 3-level model (QG3) simulating the winter's monthly variability of the Northern Hemisphere. ISA generalizes the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) by looking for multidimensional and minimally dependent, uncorrelated and non-Gaussian distributed statistical sources among the rotated projections or subspaces of the multivariate probability distribution of the leading principal components of the working field whereas ICA restrict to scalar sources. The rationale of that technique relies upon the projection pursuit technique, looking for data projections of enhanced interest. In order to accomplish the decomposition, we maximize measures of the sources' non-Gaussianity by contrast functions which are given by squares of nonlinear, cross-cumulant-based correlations involving the variables spanning the sources. Therefore sources are sought matching certain nonlinear data structures. The maximized contrast function is built in such a way that it provides the minimization of the mean square of the residuals of certain nonlinear regressions. The issuing residuals, followed by spherization, provide a new set of nonlinear variable changes that are at once uncorrelated, quasi-independent and quasi-Gaussian, representing an advantage with respect to the Independent Components (scalar sources) obtained by ICA where the non-Gaussianity is concentrated into the non-Gaussian scalar sources. The new scalar sources obtained by the above process encompass the attractor's curvature thus providing improved nonlinear model indices of the low-frequency atmospheric variability which is useful since large circulation indices are nonlinearly correlated. The non-Gaussian tested sources (dyads and

  4. Evaluation of variation in ( m_p/m_e) from the frequency difference between the 15N2+ and 87Sr transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    The uncertainty of the 87Sr1 S0-3 P0 transition frequency (429 THz) has been reduced to the level of 10^{-18}. Also, the 15N2+ Q(0) vibrational transition frequency is expected to be measured with an uncertainty of 10^{-17} , and the v = 0-7 transition frequency (422 THz) is close to the 87Sr transition frequency. In this paper, we propose a test for the variation in the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ via precise measurement of the difference (f_d=7 THz) between these transition frequencies. By measuring f_d within the uncertainty of 10^{-16}, a variation in μ of 4 × 10^{-18} can be detected. The 15N2+ v =0 -7 Q(0) transition frequency is free from Zeeman and electric quadrupole shifts. The dc Stark coefficient is about 0.2 mHz/(V/cm)2, and the measurement of f_d with an uncertainty lower than 10^{-16} appears to be attainable using molecular ions in a string crystal. The 15N2+ transition frequency is observed via the two-photon excitation of a laser with a wavelength of 1422 nm (laser A). Another laser with a wavelength of 1396 nm (laser B) is used as a 87Sr clock laser after frequency doubling. The frequency difference between lasers A and B (3.5 THz) should be measured using a frequency comb. Lasers A and B can be transferred to another laboratory via an optical fiber. Therefore, a sensitive test of the variation in μ can be performed in cooperation between two distant laboratories.

  5. Holocene flood frequency across the Central Alps - solar forcing and evidence for variations in North Atlantic atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Stefanie B.; Glur, Lukas; Gilli, Adrian; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2013-11-01

    The frequency of large-scale heavy precipitation events in the European Alps is expected to undergo substantial changes with current climate change. Hence, knowledge about the past natural variability of floods caused by heavy precipitation constitutes important input for climate projections. We present a comprehensive Holocene (10,000 years) reconstruction of the flood frequency in the Central European Alps combining 15 lacustrine sediment records. These records provide an extensive catalog of flood deposits, which were generated by flood-induced underflows delivering terrestrial material to the lake floors. The multi-archive approach allows suppressing local weather patterns, such as thunderstorms, from the obtained climate signal. We reconstructed mainly late spring to fall events since ice cover and precipitation in form of snow in winter at high-altitude study sites do inhibit the generation of flood layers. We found that flood frequency was higher during cool periods, coinciding with lows in solar activity. In addition, flood occurrence shows periodicities that are also observed in reconstructions of solar activity from 14C and 10Be records (2500-3000, 900-1200, as well as of about 710, 500, 350, 208 (Suess cycle), 150, 104 and 87 (Gleissberg cycle) years). As atmospheric mechanism, we propose an expansion/shrinking of the Hadley cell with increasing/decreasing air temperature, causing dry/wet conditions in Central Europe during phases of high/low solar activity. Furthermore, differences between the flood patterns from the Northern Alps and the Southern Alps indicate changes in North Atlantic circulation. Enhanced flood occurrence in the South compared to the North suggests a pronounced southward position of the Westerlies and/or blocking over the northern North Atlantic, hence resembling a negative NAO state (most distinct from 4.2 to 2.4 kyr BP and during the Little Ice Age). South-Alpine flood activity therefore provides a qualitative record of variations

  6. The variations of ionosphere critical frequency of E layer over the equatorial geomagnetic region in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenpankho, Prasert; Ishii, Mamoru; Supnithi, Pornchai

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the values of the critical frequency of the ionospheric E layer, foE, obtained at Chumphon ionospheric observatory station, Thailand. For a declining phase of the solar cycle 23 during the year 2005-2008 and an inclining phase of the solar cycle 24 during the year 2009-2013, the foE data have been used to investigate the foE variations over the equatorial geomagnetic region in Southeast Asia. A comparison between the observation data and International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model has also been investigated and studied. The results show that the foE obtained from IRI 2012 model underestimates foE from Chumphon station especially during the period of 7-11 am and after 6 pm for each day and all seasons. As the results combining with the previous investigations, we suggest that the underestimation of ionospheric foE by IRI 2012 model is helpful for the correction and improvement of IRI model in an equatorial Asia region.

  7. Temperature variation of ultralow frequency modes and mean square displacements in solid lasamide (diuretic drug) studied by 35Cl-NQR, X-ray and DFT/QTAIM.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Kasprzak, Jerzy; Tomczak, Magdalena; Maurin, Jan Krzysztof

    2012-10-25

    The application of combined (35)Cl-NQR/X-ray/DFT/QTAIM methods to study the temperature variation of anisotropic displacement parameters and ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic torsional vibrations in the solid state is illustrated on the example of 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamolybenzoic acid (lasamide, DSBA) which is a diuretic and an intermediate in the synthesis of furosemide and thus its common impurity. The crystallographic structure of lasamide is solved by X-ray diffraction and refined to a final R-factor of 3.06% at room temperature. Lasamide is found to crystallize in the triclinic space group P-1, with two equivalent molecules in the unit cell a = 7.5984(3) Å, b = 8.3158(3) Å, c = 8.6892(3) Å; α = 81.212(3)°, β = 73.799(3)°, γ = 67.599(3)°. Its molecules form symmetric dimers linked by two short and linear intermolecular hydrogen bonds O-H···O (O-H···O = 2.648 Å and ∠OHO = 171.5°), which are further linked by weaker and longer intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-H···O (N-H···O = 2.965 Å and ∠NHO = 166.4°). Two (35)Cl-NQR resonance frequencies, 36.899 and 37.129 MHz, revealed at room temperature are assigned to chlorine sites at the ortho and para positions, relative to the carboxyl functional group, respectively. The difference in C-Cl(1) and C-Cl(2) bond lengths only slightly affects the value of (35)Cl-NQR frequencies, which results mainly from chemical inequivalence of chlorine atoms but also involvement in different intermolecular interactions pattern. The smooth decrease in both (35)Cl-NQR frequencies with increasing temperature in the range of 77-300 K testifies to the averaging of EFG tensor at each chlorine site due to anharmonic torsional vibrations. Lasamide is thermally stable; no temperature-induced release of chlorine or decomposition of this compound is detected. The temperature dependence of ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic small-angle internal torsional vibrations averaging EFG tensor and mean square angle

  8. Multi-frequency inversion-charge pumping for charge separation and mobility analysis in high-k/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Djara, V.; Cherkaoui, K.; Negara, M. A.; Hurley, P. K.

    2015-11-28

    An alternative multi-frequency inversion-charge pumping (MFICP) technique was developed to directly separate the inversion charge density (N{sub inv}) from the trapped charge density in high-k/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This approach relies on the fitting of the frequency response of border traps, obtained from inversion-charge pumping measurements performed over a wide range of frequencies at room temperature on a single MOSFET, using a modified charge trapping model. The obtained model yielded the capture time constant and density of border traps located at energy levels aligned with the InGaAs conduction band. Moreover, the combination of MFICP and pulsed I{sub d}-V{sub g} measurements enabled an accurate effective mobility vs N{sub inv} extraction and analysis. The data obtained using the MFICP approach are consistent with the most recent reports on high-k/InGaAs.

  9. Response of a hydrothermal system to magmatic heat inferred from temporal variations in the complex frequencies of long-period events at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate temporal variations in the complex frequencies (frequency and quality factor Q) of long-period (LP) events that occurred at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, central Japan. We analyze LP waveforms observed at this volcano in the period between 1988 and 1995, which covers a seismically active period between 1989 and 1993. Systematic temporal variations in the complex frequencies are observed in October-November 1989, July-October 1991, and September 1992-January 1993. We use acoustic properties of a crack filled with hydrothermal fluids to interpret the observed temporal variations in the complex frequencies. The temporal variations in October-November 1989 can be divided into two periods, which are explained by a gradual decrease and increase of a gas-volume fraction in a water-steam mixture in a crack, respectively. The temporal variations in July-October 1991 can be also divided into two periods. These variations in the first and second periods are similar to those observed in November 1989 and in September-November 1992, respectively, and are interpreted as drying of a water-steam mixture and misty gas in a crack, respectively. The repeated nature of the temporal variations observed in similar seasons between July and November suggests the existence of seasonality in the occurrence of LP events. This may be caused by a seasonally variable meteoritic water supply to a hydrothermal system, which may have been heated by the flux of volcanic gases from magma beneath this volcano. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Learning to be different: Acquired skills, social learning, frequency dependence, and environmental variation can cause behaviourally mediated foraging specializations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tinker, M.T.; Mangel, M.; Estes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    ) Offspring can learn foraging skills from their mothers (matrilineal social learning). (6) Food abundance is limited, such that average individual energy reserves are low Additionally, the following factors increase the likelihood of alternative specializations co-occurring in a predator population: (1) The predator exerts effective top-down control of prey abundance, resulting in frequency-dependent dynamics. (2) There is stochastic Variation in prey population dynamics, but this Variation is neither too extreme in magnitude nor too 'slow' with respect to the time required for an individual forager to learn new foraging skills. For a given predator population, we deduce that the degree of specialization will be highest for those prey types requiring complex capture or handling skills, while prey species that are both profitable and easy to capture and handle will be included in the diet of all individuals. Frequency-dependent benefits of selecting alternative prey types, combined with the ability of foragers to improve their foraging skills by learning, and transmit learned skills to offspring, can result in behaviourally mediated foraging specialization, and also lead to the co-existence of alternative specializations. The extent of such specialization is predicted to be a variable trait, increasing in locations or years when intra-specific competition is high relative to inter-specific competition. ?? 2009 M. Tim Tinker.

  11. Artificial neural networks for retrieving absorption and reduced scattering spectra from frequency-domain diffuse reflectance spectroscopy at short source-detector separation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chen, Chien-Chih; Huang, Po-Jung; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) based on the frequency-domain (FD) technique has been employed to investigate the optical properties of deep tissues such as breast and brain using source to detector separation up to 40 mm. Due to the modeling and system limitations, efficient and precise determination of turbid sample optical properties from the FD diffuse reflectance acquired at a source-detector separation (SDS) of around 1 mm has not been demonstrated. In this study, we revealed that at SDS of 1 mm, acquiring FD diffuse reflectance at multiple frequencies is necessary for alleviating the influence of inevitable measurement uncertainty on the optical property recovery accuracy. Furthermore, we developed artificial neural networks (ANNs) trained by Monte Carlo simulation generated databases that were capable of efficiently determining FD reflectance at multiple frequencies. The ANNs could work in conjunction with a least-square optimization algorithm to rapidly (within 1 second), accurately (within 10%) quantify the sample optical properties from FD reflectance measured at SDS of 1 mm. In addition, we demonstrated that incorporating the steady-state apparatus into the FD DRS system with 1 mm SDS would enable obtaining broadband absorption and reduced scattering spectra of turbid samples in the wavelength range from 650 to 1000 nm. PMID:27446671

  12. Separating components of variation in measurement series using maximum likelihood estimation. Application to patient position data in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, J. P.; Mayles, W. P. M.; Mayles, H. M.; Syndikus, I.

    2014-10-01

    Maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) is presented as a statistical tool to evaluate the contribution of measurement error to any measurement series where the same quantity is measured using different independent methods. The technique was tested against artificial data sets; generated for values of underlying variation in the quantity and measurement error between 0.5 mm and 3 mm. In each case the simulation parameters were determined within 0.1 mm. The technique was applied to analyzing external random positioning errors from positional audit data for 112 pelvic radiotherapy patients. Patient position offsets were measured using portal imaging analysis and external body surface measures. Using MLE to analyze all methods in parallel it was possible to ascertain the measurement error for each method and the underlying positional variation. In the (AP / Lat / SI) directions the standard deviations of the measured patient position errors from portal imaging were (3.3 mm / 2.3 mm / 1.9 mm), arising from underlying variations of (2.7 mm / 1.5 mm / 1.4 mm) and measurement uncertainties of (1.8 mm / 1.8 mm / 1.3 mm), respectively. The measurement errors agree well with published studies. MLE used in this manner could be applied to any study in which the same quantity is measured using independent methods.

  13. Multidecadal changes in winter circulation-climate relationship in Europe: frequency variations, within-type modifications, and long-term trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küttel, Marcel; Luterbacher, Jürg; Wanner, Heinz

    2011-03-01

    Using pressure fields classified by the SANDRA algorithm, this study investigates the changes in the relationship between North Atlantic/European sea level pressure (SLP) and gridded European winter (DJF) temperature and precipitation back to 1750. Important changes in the frequency of the SLP clusters are found, though none of them indicating significant long-term trends. However, for the majority of the SLP clusters a tendency toward overall warmer and partly wetter winter conditions is found, most pronounced over the last decades. This suggests important within-type variations, i.e. the temperature and precipitation fields related to a particular SLP pattern change their characteristics over time. Using a decomposition scheme we find for temperature and precipitation that within-type-related variations dominate over those due to changed frequencies of the SLP clusters: Approximately 70% (60%) of European winter temperature (precipitation) variations can be explained by within-type changes, most strongly expressed over Eastern Europe and Scandinavia. This indicates that the current European winter warming cannot be explained by changed frequencies of the SLP patterns alone, but to a larger degree by changed characteristics of the patterns themselves. Potential sources of within-type variations are discussed.

  14. Lunar regolith thickness estimation using dual frequency microwave brightness temperature and influence of vertical variation of FeO+TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, S.; Mohan, Shiv; Murty, SripadaV. S.

    2015-01-01

    Desiccated lunar regolith emits substantial amount of radiation in microwave region, which can be used to decipher regolith thickness distribution. We have evolved a dual frequency microwave brightness index for the estimation of regolith thickness using simulated passive microwave brightness temperature (TB) expected from Chandrayaan-2 at L (1.25 GHz)- and S (2.1 GHz)-bands. We used a three-layer model to simulate TB by varying the dominant parameters like bulk density (ρ), dielectric permittivity and FeO+TiO2 (S) content. The inversion of regolith thickness is carried out using simulation of TB for both the frequencies under a variety of ρ and S contents. Subsequently, a first order empirical model for regolith thickness estimation is evolved using a new dual frequency index involving both the TB. Inverted regolith thickness has been shown to be in good agreement with in-situ measurements at Apollo regions, using single (L-band) and dual frequency index. Inverted thickness for the Apollo14 and Apollo17 locations differ from mare and highland region estimation, which is further analysed to elucidate the role of vertical variation of FeO+TiO2 content. With the FeO+TiO2 variation vertically by ±1-2 wt%, the first order assessment of estimated regolith thickness is found to vary by ~0.5 m and ~1 m, respectively, by single- and dual-frequency approaches. Impact basin ejecta (Apollo14) and mare-highland transition region (Apollo17) are probable zones where vertical variation of FeO+TiO2 occurs along with lateral variations. This lateral- and vertical-mixing of FeO+TiO2 may influence the emitted TB from lunar regolith.

  15. Variation in crossover frequency of EMIC waves in plasmasphere estimated from ion cyclotron whistler waves observed by Van Allen Probe A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Shoya; Kasahara, Yoshiya; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    We report variations in the propagation of the H+ band ion cyclotron whistlers observed by Van Allen Probe A. Ion cyclotron whistlers are one of the EMIC (electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves generated by mode conversion from lightning whistlers. Crossover frequency is an important frequency for the ion cyclotron whistlers, which is a function of the variations in the local heavy-ion composition. We surveyed waveform data obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument and Integrated Science instrument and found that 3461 H+ band ion cyclotron whistlers were observed from 572 km to 5992 km in altitude. The main finding is that the crossover frequencies of the observed events decreased with increasing altitude. These results support the hypothesis that the total heavy-ion density decreases with increasing altitude. Furthermore, in 96% of all observed events, the crossover frequencies exceeded 0.5fH+, which suggests that the EMIC dispersion relation contains a frequency gap of around 0.5fH+.

  16. Variational calculations of the {Lambda}-separation energy of the {sub {Lambda}}{sup 17}O hypernucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A.A.; Pieper, S.C.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-05-01

    Variational Monte Carlo calculations have been made for the {sub {Lambda}}{sup 17}O hypernucleus using realistic two- and three-baryon interactions. A two-pion exchange potential with spin- and space-exchange components is used for the {Lambda}{ital N} potential. Three-body two-pion exchange and strongly repulsive dispersive {Lambda}{ital NN} interactions are also included. The trial wave function is constructed from pair- and triplet-correlation operators acting on a single-particle determinant. These operators consist of central, spin, isospin, tensor, and three-baryon potential components. A cluster Monte Carlo method is developed for noncentral correlations and is used with up to four-baryon clusters in our calculations. The three-baryon {Lambda}{ital NN} force is discussed.

  17. Separate and combined effects of static stability and shear variation on the baroclinic instability of a two-layer current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyun, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Quasi-geostrophic disturbance instability characteristics are studied in light of a linearized, two-layer Eady model in which both the static stability and the zonal current shear are uniform but different in each layer. It is shown that the qualitative character of the instability is determined by the sign of the basic-state potential vorticity gradient at the layer interface, and that there is a qualitative similarity between the effects of Richardson number variations due to changes in static stability and those due to changes in shear. The two-layer model is also used to construct an analog of the Williams (1974) continuous model of generalized Eady waves, the basic state in that case having zero potential vorticity gradient in the interior. The model results are in good agreement with the earlier Williams findings.

  18. Spatial variation in the molecular tilt orientational order within the solid domains of phase-separated, mixed dialkylphosphatidylcholine monolayers.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jacqueline; Badia, Antonella

    2008-03-01

    The miscibility of the solid-phase-forming distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) and the fluid-phase-forming dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) at the air/water interface was investigated by the Langmuir film balance. Surface pressure-area isotherms suggest that mixtures containing 25.0-62.5-mol% DLPC (range of composition investigated) are phase-separated. The lateral structure of the DSPC/DLPC monolayers was imaged by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) as a function of the surface pressure. Quasi-circular condensed domains appeared at pressures between 0 and 0.5mN m(-1), and these structures were already fully developed at approximately 1mN m(-1). Further compression of the monolayers above 1mN m(-1) merely brought the domains closer together. The mixed monolayers consisted of solid domains of DSPC, approximately 3-20 micro in size, in a fluid matrix of DLPC. BAM and the phase contrast mode of intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the quasi-circular DSPC domains are divided into segments of different reflectivities (BAM) or phase shift (AFM) that arise from abrupt changes in the long-range orientational order of the tilted hydrocarbon chains. The DSPC domains in DSPC/DLPC internally exhibited star and cardioid textures that were heretofore only reported for single-component lipid monolayers in the phase coexistence region. PMID:18206112

  19. Phase separation induced shell thickness variations in electrospun hollow Bioglass 45S5 fiber mats for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Durgalakshmi, D; Balakumar, S

    2015-06-21

    In the present study, sub-micron sized hollow Bioglass 45S5 nanofibers are synthesised using an electrospinning technique with the assistance of polyvinyl pyrrolidone. The electrospinning process parameters are optimized to obtain reproducible nanofibers. The effects of solvent and polymer concentrations on the morphology and formation of fibers are studied. Ethanol and water are used to vary the concentration and it is observed that an increase in dilution by water decreases the shell thickness of the hollow fibers. The mechanism of the formation of the hollow fibers is attributed to phase separation, which occurs during physical cooling of the fibers. Fibers prepared from a solution diluted with an equal ratio of ethanol and water show a higher performance in drug loading and releasing kinetics due to their narrow and linear size distribution. These fibers are also highly suitable for bone tissue engineering applications due to their linear fibrous 3D structural mat architecture and they are suitable for large size scaling. PMID:25994501

  20. Variations of boundary reaction rate and particle size on the diffusion-induced stress in a phase separating electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; He, Linghui; Ni, Yong; Song, Yicheng

    2014-10-14

    In contrast to the case of single-phase delithiation wherein faster discharging leads to higher diffusion-induced stress (DIS), this paper reports nonmonotonous dependency of the boundary reaction rate on the DIS in nanosized spherical electrode accompanying phase separation. It is attributed to a transition from two-phase to single-phase delithiation driven by increase of the boundary reaction rate leading to narrowing and vanishing of the miscibility gap in a range of the particle size. The profiles of lithium concentration and the DIS are identified during the transition based on a continuum model. The resultant maximum DIS first decreases in the region of two-phase delithiation and later returns to increase in the region of single-phase delithiation with the increase of the boundary reaction rate. A map for the failure behavior in the spherical electrode particle is constructed based on the Tresca failure criterion. These results indicate that the failure caused by the DIS can be avoided by appropriate selection of the said parameters in such electrodes.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL-BASED DISCUSSION FOR THE SEPARATION OF RESIDUAL STRESSES AND COLD WORK IN SHOT PEENED IN718 USING HIGH FREQUENCY EDDY CURRENT SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Hillmann, S.; Heuer, H.; Robbert, A.; Meyendorf, N.; Baron, H.-U.; Bamberg, J.

    2010-02-22

    Typical aero engine alloys, such as IN718, can be surface-treated by shot peening to induce near-surface compressive strains. To calculate the remaining operation time for those critical aero engine components, a quantitative nondestructive determination of near-surface strain gradients has to be developed. We have demonstrated in the past, that it is possible to obtain a characteristic depth profile (surface and sub-surface) of the electrical conductivity of shot peened specimen by using high-frequency eddy current techniques. The measured conductivity profile is resulting from residual stresses, cold work, surface roughness, and the microstructure of the material. The objective is to measure residual stresses (separately from other material properties) in such components after a defined life time. It can be assumed, that surface roughness and microstructure remain unchanged in IN718 materials over their lifetime, but cold work and residual stresses can change independently. Consequently, there is a need to clearly separate the information from both material properties of received eddy current conductivity signals in order to obtain specific information related to residual stresses. This paper presents results acquired from different experiments, conducted to separate both effects by using the eddy current technique on shot peened IN718 materials. We present different physical approaches and illustrate the experiments to solve them. In addition, we will demonstrate that there is a need to use additional techniques, for example ultrasonic time-of-flight measurements, to separate the effects of residual stresses from compound (mixed) signals obtained on cold work samples.

  2. On the separation of internal and boundary damage in slender bars using longitudinal vibration frequencies and equivalent linearization of damaged bolted joint response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argatov, Ivan; Butcher, Eric A.

    2011-06-01

    The problem of detecting localized large-scale internal damage in structures with imperfect bolted joints is considered. The proposed damage detection strategy utilizes the structural damping and an equivalent linearization of the bolted lap joint response to separate the combined boundary damage from localized large-scale internal damage. The frequencies are found approximately using asymptotic analysis and a perturbation technique. The proposed approach is illustrated on an example of longitudinal vibrations in a slender elastic bar with both ends clamped by bolted lap joints with different levels of damage. It is found that while the proposed method allows for the estimation of internal damage severity once the crack location is known, it gives multiple possible crack locations so that other methods (e.g., mode shapes) are required to obtain a unique crack location.

  3. The pulse amplitude variation with QPO frequency in SAX J1808.4-3658: Resonances with the accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliskan, Sirin; Alpar, Mehmet Ali; Sasmaz Mus, Sinem

    2016-07-01

    SAX J1808.4-3658 is an accreting millisecond pulsar with a spin period of 401 Hz. The pulsed amplitudes of this source vary with its kHz QPO frequencies (Bult & van der Klis 2015). The pulsed amplitude peaks at certain upper kHz QPO frequencies which we associate with boundary layer modes of the viscous accretion disk (Erkut et al. 2008). We model this as peaks in the energy dissipation rate at the accretion caps due to resonances between the accretion column and the driving modes of the boundary layer.

  4. Frequency variations of quasi-periodic ELF-VLF emissions: A possible new ground-based diagnostic of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, J.; Engebretson, M.; Arnoldy, R.; Inan, U.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic pulsations and quasi-periodic (QP) amplitude modulations of ELF-VLF waves at Pc 3-4 frequencies (15-50 mHz) are commonly observed simultaneously in cusp-latitude data. The naturally occurring ELF-VLF emissions are believed to be modulated within the magnetosphere by the compressional component of geomagnetic pulsations formed external to the magnetosphere. The authors have examined data from South Pole Station (L {approximately} 14) to determine the occurrence and characteristics of QP emissions. On the basis of 14 months of data during 1987 and 1988 they found that QP emissions typically appeared in both the 0.5-1 kHz and 1-2 kHz receiver channels at South Pole Station and ocassionally in the 2-4 kHz channel. The QP emission frequency appeared to depend on solar wind parameters and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, and the months near fall equinox in both 1987 and 1988 showed a significant increase in the percentage of QP emissions only in the lowest-frequency channel. The authors present a model consistent with these variations in which high-latitude (nonequatorial) magnetic field minima near the magnetopause play a major role, because the field magnitude governs both the frequency of ELF-VLF emissions and the whistler mode propagation cutoffs. Because the field in these regions will be strongly influenced by solar wind and IMF parameters, variations in the frequency of such emissions may be useful in providing ground-based diagnostics of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere. 32 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Frequency Ratio of Two Optical Clock Transitions in Yb+ 171 and Constraints on the Time Variation of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godun, R. M.; Nisbet-Jones, P. B. R.; Jones, J. M.; King, S. A.; Johnson, L. A. M.; Margolis, H. S.; Szymaniec, K.; Lea, S. N.; Bongs, K.; Gill, P.

    2014-11-01

    Singly ionized ytterbium, with ultranarrow optical clock transitions at 467 and 436 nm, is a convenient system for the realization of optical atomic clocks and tests of present-day variation of fundamental constants. We present the first direct measurement of the frequency ratio of these two clock transitions, without reference to a cesium primary standard, and using the same single ion of Yb+ 171 . The absolute frequencies of both transitions are also presented, each with a relative standard uncertainty of 6 ×1 0-16. Combining our results with those from other experiments, we report a threefold improvement in the constraint on the time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ ˙ /μ =0.2 (1.1 )×1 0-16 yr-1 , along with an improved constraint on time variation of the fine structure constant, α ˙ /α =-0.7 (2.1 )×1 0-17 yr-1 .

  6. Time variation in the low-frequency spectrum of Vela-like pulsar B1800-21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Rahul; Rożko, Karolina; Lewandowski, Wojciech; Kijak, Jarosław; Dembska, Marta

    2016-05-01

    We report the flux measurement of the Vela-like pulsar B1800-21 at the low radio frequency regime over multiple epochs spanning several years. The spectrum shows a turnover around the GHz frequency range and represents a typical example of gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) pulsar. Our observations revealed that the pulsar spectrum show a significant evolution during the observing period with the low-frequency part of the spectrum becoming steeper, with a higher turnover frequency, for a period of several years before reverting back to the initial shape during the latest measurements. The spectral change over times spanning several years requires dense structures, with free electron densities around 1000-20 000 cm-3 and physical dimensions ˜220 au, in the interstellar medium (ISM) traversing across the pulsar line of sight. We look into the possible sites of such structures in the ISM and likely mechanisms particularly the thermal free-free absorption as possible explanations for the change.

  7. Effects of exposure time on variations in the structure and hydrophobicity of polyvinylidene fluoride membranes prepared via vapor-induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuelian; Fan, Hongwei; Dong, Yajun; Song, Yanna; Han, Hua

    2012-08-01

    The present investigation revealed how the surface morphology and hydrophobicity of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes, which were prepared via a vapor-induced phase separation (VIPS) method, were affected by the exposure time. The mass variation of the cast film was recorded. Membrane morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal behaviors of membranes were examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) was employed to analyze the crystalline structures of the overall membranes and the surface layers. The results showed that different membrane morphologies and hydrophobicities could be obtained by changing the exposure time. A long exposure time facilitated the crystallization process, resulting in the formation of a porous skin and particle morphology, which increased the hydrophobicity of the surface. A short exposure time favored the formation of a digitate macrovoid and dense skin resulting from liquid-liquid phase separation in the immersion process, which reduced surface hydrophobicity. The water permeate flux in vacuum membrane distillation was greatly affected by the membrane porosity and surface hydrophobicity.

  8. Separating water-potential induced swelling and shrinking from measured radial stem variations reveals a cambial growth and osmotic concentration signal.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tommy; Hölttä, Teemu; Berninger, Frank; Mäkinen, Harri; Nöjd, Pekka; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2016-02-01

    The quantification of cambial growth over short time periods has been hampered by problems to discern between growth and the swelling and shrinking of a tree stem. This paper presents a model, which separates cambial growth and reversible water-potential induced diurnal changes from simultaneously measured whole stem and xylem radial variations, from field-measured Scots pine trees in Finland. The modelled growth, which includes osmotic concentration changes, was compared with (direct) dendrometer measurements and microcore samples. In addition, the relationship of modelled growth and dendrometer measurements to environmental factors was analysed. The results showed that the water-potential induced changes of tree radius were successfully separated from stem growth. Daily growth predicted by the model exhibited a high correlation with the modelled daily changes of osmotic concentration in phloem, and a temperature dependency in early summer. Late-summer growth saw higher dependency on water availability and temperature. Evaluation of the model against dendrometer measurements showed that the latter masked a true environmental signal in stem growth due to water-potential induced changes. The model provides better understanding of radial growth physiology and offers potential to examine growth dynamics and changes due to osmotic concentration, and how the environment affects growth. PMID:25808847

  9. The Tracking Study: Description of a randomized controlled trial of variations on weight tracking frequency in a behavioral weight loss program

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Jennifer A.; Jeffery, Robert W.; Crow, Scott J.; Brelje, Kerrin L.; Pacanowski, Carly R.; Gavin, Kara L.; Smolenski, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    Observational evidence from behavioral weight control trials and community studies suggests that greater frequency of weighing oneself, or tracking weight, is associated with better weight outcomes. Conversely, it has also been suggested that frequent weight tracking may have a negative impact on mental health and outcomes during weight loss, but there are minimal experimental data that address this concern in the context of an active weight loss program. To achieve the long-term goal of strengthening behavioral weight loss programs, the purpose of this randomized controlled trial (the Tracking Study) is to test variations on frequency of self-weighing during a behavioral weight loss program, and to examine psychosocial and mental health correlates of weight tracking and weight loss outcomes. Three hundred thirty-nine overweight and obese adults were recruited and randomized to one of three variations on weight tracking frequency during a 12-month weight loss program with a 12-month follow-up: daily weight tracking, weekly weight tracking, or no weight tracking. The primary outcome is weight in kilograms at 24 months. The weight loss program integrates each weight tracking instruction with standard behavioral weight loss techniques (goal setting, self-monitoring, stimulus control, dietary and physical activity enhancements, lifestyle modifications); participants in weight tracking conditions were provided with wireless Internet technology (Wi-Fi-enabled digital scales and touchscreen personal devices) to facilitate weight tracking during the study. This paper describes the study design, intervention features, recruitment, and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the Tracking Study. PMID:25533727

  10. Annual variations of the amplitude characteristic of the noise magnetic field in the ELF frequency range based on the results of high-latitude observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pchelkin, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    The annual variation of a number of amplitude characteristics of the noise electromagnetic field in the frequency range near the first Schumann resonance (and in particular the mean values of the modulus of horizontal magnetic components and parameters of the distribution function of noise pulses over amplitudes) was obtained and analyzed based on the results of three-year measurements performed at the high-latitude magnetic observatory Lovozero. The summer increase in mean and median values of the magnetic component of noises associated with electrical storms and the lack of annual variations of the exponent that empirically describes the distribution of amplitudes of noise signals were found. The relationship between the seasonal (winter/summer in the northern hemisphere) increase in the mean value of the modulus of the horizontal magnetic field component and seasonal increase in the global number of lightning discharges is shown by the correlation of the results of satellite observations and measurements of the magnetic component.

  11. Localized frameshift mutation generates selective, high-frequency phase variation of a surface lipoprotein encoded by a mycoplasma ABC transporter operon.

    PubMed Central

    Theiss, P; Wise, K S

    1997-01-01

    The wall-less mycoplasmas have revealed unusual microbial strategies for adaptive variation of antigenic membrane proteins exposed during their surface colonization of host cells. In particular, high-frequency mutations affecting the expression of selected surface lipoproteins have been increasingly documented for this group of organisms. A novel manifestation of mutational phase variation is shown here to occur in Mycoplasma fermentans, a chronic human infectious agent and possible AIDS-associated pathogen. A putative ABC type transport operon encoding four gene products is identified. The 3' distal gene encoding P78, a known surface-exposed antigen and the proposed substrate-binding lipoprotein of the transporter, is subject to localized hypermutation in a short homopolymeric tract of adenine residues located in the N-terminal coding region of the mature product. High-frequency, reversible insertion/deletion frameshift mutations lead to selective phase variation in P78 expression, whereas the putative nucleotide-binding protein, P63, encoded by the most 5' gene of the operon, is continually expressed. Mutation-based phase variation in specific surface-exposed microbial transporter components may provide an adaptive advantage for immune evasion, while continued expression of other elements of the same transporter may preserve essential metabolic functions and confer alternative substrate specificity. These features could be critical in mycoplasmas, where limitations in both transcriptional regulators and transport systems may prevail. This study also documents that P63 contains an uncharacteristic hydrophobic sequence between predicted nucleotide binding motifs and displays an amphiphilic character in detergent fractionation. Both features are consistent with an evolutionary adaptation favoring integral association of this putative energy-transducing component with the single mycoplasma membrane. PMID:9190819

  12. The allele frequency spectrum in genome-wide human variation data reveals signals of differential demographic history in three large world populations.

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Gabor T; Czabarka, Eva; Murvai, Janos; Sherry, Stephen T

    2004-01-01

    We have studied a genome-wide set of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequency measures for African-American, East Asian, and European-American samples. For this analysis we derived a simple, closed mathematical formulation for the spectrum of expected allele frequencies when the sampled populations have experienced nonstationary demographic histories. The direct calculation generates the spectrum orders of magnitude faster than coalescent simulations do and allows us to generate spectra for a large number of alternative histories on a multidimensional parameter grid. Model-fitting experiments using this grid reveal significant population-specific differences among the demographic histories that best describe the observed allele frequency spectra. European and Asian spectra show a bottleneck-shaped history: a reduction of effective population size in the past followed by a recent phase of size recovery. In contrast, the African-American spectrum shows a history of moderate but uninterrupted population expansion. These differences are expected to have profound consequences for the design of medical association studies. The analytical methods developed for this study, i.e., a closed mathematical formulation for the allele frequency spectrum, correcting the ascertainment bias introduced by shallow SNP sampling, and dealing with variable sample sizes provide a general framework for the analysis of public variation data. PMID:15020430

  13. Low-frequency variations in surface atmospheric humidity, temperature, and precipitation: Inferences from reanalyses and monthly gridded observational data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, A. J.; Willett, K. M.; Jones, P. D.; Thorne, P. W.; Dee, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented of a reduction in relative humidity over low-latitude and midlatitude land areas over a period of about 10 years leading up to 2008, based on monthly anomalies in surface air temperature and humidity from comprehensive European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts reanalyses (ERA-40 and ERA-Interim) and from Climatic Research Unit and Hadley Centre analyses of monthly station temperature data (CRUTEM3) and synoptic humidity observations (HadCRUH). The data sets agree well for both temperature and humidity variations for periods and places of overlap, although the average warming over land is larger for the fully sampled ERA data than for the spatially and temporally incomplete CRUTEM3 data. Near-surface specific humidity varies similarly over land and sea, suggesting that the recent reduction in relative humidity over land may be due to limited moisture supply from the oceans, where evaporation has been limited by sea surface temperatures that have not risen in concert with temperatures over land. Continental precipitation from the reanalyses is compared with a new gauge-based Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) data set, with the combined gauge and satellite products of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and the Climate Prediction Center (CPC), Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP), and with CPC's independent gauge analysis of precipitation over land (PREC/L). The reanalyses agree best with the new GPCC and latest GPCP data sets, with ERA-Interim significantly better than ERA-40 at capturing monthly variability. Shifts over time in the differences among the precipitation data sets make it difficult to assess their longer-term variations and any link with longer-term variations in humidity.

  14. Low-frequency Intensity Variation of the South Asian High and its relationship to Boreal Summer Intraseasonal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wei; Ren, Xuejuan

    2016-04-01

    The South Asian High (SAH) is an important member among the Asian summer monsoon circulations in the upper troposphere located over the Tibean Plateau and its surrounding areas during boreal summer. This research attempts to study the characteristics and mechanisms of low-frequency oscillation of SAH, using daily ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset and NECP/NCAR OLR data. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF)analysis is performed on 200hPa geopotential height low-frequency anomalies over the 20°-35°N, 35°-110°E for June, July and August from 1979 to 2013. The first EOF mode shows a monopole pattern capturing the strengthening or weakening of the SAH's body. The power spectrum analysis of the corresponding principal component (PC1) time series shows that the first mode has a period about 10-30 days. Positive anomalies appear in the 200hPa geopotential height and negative anomalies appear in their north side when SAH is in positive low-frequency phase. A band with negative outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) anomalies presents from the Arabian Sea, north of Indian Peninsula to Southeast China and Japan Island. Correspondingly, positive anomalous rainfall are contiguous in the north of Indian Peninsula, south of Tibetan Plateau, Southeast China and Japan Island. The lead-lag regression analysis demonstrates that from day -12 to day 0, negative OLR anomalies band move northward and northwest from the equatorial Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengals, the South China sea and Western North Pacific to the Arabian Sea, north of Indian Peninsula, south of Tibetan Plateau, Southeast China and Japan Island. Corresponding to OLR anomalies, positive rainfall anomalies band have the similar evolution. The spatial pattern of anomalies in integrated apparent heat source and integrated apparent moisture sink resemble that of rainfall and OLR, which correspond more anomalous condensation heat release. The lead-lag regression analysis also shows that the OLR band moving northward

  15. Seasonal, annual and geographic variation in color morph frequencies of the cricket frog, Acris crepitans, in Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    A three-year field study was conducted in Illinois to investigate seasonal, annual and geographic variation in color morph proportions of the cricket frog, Acris crepitans. Life history information (i.e., time of overwintering, emergence of adults in spring, breeding, metamorphosis, emergence of juveniles in summer, and growth and survival) for A. crepitans color morphs was compared to evaluate the potential adaptive significance of this polymorphism. Although seasonal variations in color morph proportions were not significant, some annual and geographic differences were. No differences were found among morphs related to the timing of various life history events. Studies of individual movements, dispersal, growth and survivorship also revealed no differences among morphs. Comparison of these data, as well as physiological and behavioral data for A. crepitans from Illinois, with similar data from Texas and elsewhere suggests that different factors must operate throughout the species range to maintain this color polymorphism. Chance may be a major factor in determining color morph proportions in localized populations in Illinois. 22 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Variation of Dielectric and Electrical Properties of Zr-Substituted Lead Calcium Iron Niobate with Temperature and Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Maalti; Bahel, Shalini; Narang, Sukhleen Bindra

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study is to improve the dielectric properties of lead calcium iron niobate with Zr substitution, and to make it suitable for multilayer capacitor applications in resonant circuits. (Pb0.45Ca0.55)(Fe0.5Nb0.5)1-y Zr y O3 dielectric ceramics where y varies from 0.00 to 0.15 in steps of 0.03, that have been synthesized by the columbite precursor method. Dielectric and electrical properties were measured as a function of frequency (10 kHz to 1 MHz) and temperature. Two frequency dependent anomalies were observed in relative permittivity (ɛ r) versus temperature (T) plots around 375 K and between 500 K and 575 K. The temperature coefficient of relative permittivity, (τ ɛ ) has been improved with the substitution of (Fe0.5Nb0.5)4+ ions by Zr4+ ions at B-sites. The single semicircle, observed in Nyquist plots at different temperatures, suggests a single relaxation process in the synthesized samples. The activation energies obtained from different dependences are found to be approximately comparable.

  17. Microsatellite frequencies vary with body mass and body temperature in mammals, suggesting correlated variation in mutation rate

    PubMed Central

    Filipe, Laura N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Substitution rate is often found to correlate with life history traits such as body mass, a predictor of population size and longevity, and body temperature. The underlying mechanism is unclear but most models invoke either natural selection or factors such as generation length that change the number of mutation opportunities per unit time. Here we use published genome sequences from 69 mammals to ask whether life history traits impact another form of genetic mutation, the high rates of predominantly neutral slippage in microsatellites. We find that the length-frequency distributions of three common dinucleotide motifs differ greatly between even closely related species. These frequency differences correlate with body mass and body temperature and can be used to predict the phenotype of an unknown species. Importantly, different length microsatellites show complicated patterns of excess and deficit that cannot be explained by a simple model where species with short generation lengths have experienced more mutations. Instead, the patterns probably require changes in mutation rate that impact alleles of different length to different extents. Body temperature plausibly influences mutation rate by modulating the propensity for slippage. Existing hypotheses struggle to account for a link between body mass and mutation rate. However, body mass correlates inversely with population size, which in turn predicts heterozygosity. We suggest that heterozygote instability, HI, the idea that heterozygous sites show increased mutability, could provide a plausible link between body mass and mutation rate. PMID:25392761

  18. Relationship between crack defects in magnetic tiles and variation frequencies of high-order vibration mode based on modal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lin; Yang, Suijun; Wang, Xueying; Hou, Dexin

    2010-08-01

    Conventional sonic testing method has such limitations as monotony of signal characteristic quantity, regular shape requirement of measured workpiece, limited ability to identify only one type of defect, etc. This paper establishes the mathematical model of modal vector of free vibration object of arbitrary order, analyzes the effects of vibration modes on the various types of crack default with magnetic tiles commonly used in industry as study object, then gives the relationship between the frequencies of high-order vibration mode and the location, length, depth of the same type crack defects and that between the frequencies of high-order vibration mode and 4 kinds of defects common in magnetic tiles including axial short crack through the top of the arc, tangential short crack through the bottom of the arc, tangential crack in the intrados and axial crack in the intrados, and finally 3 types of magnetic tiles were tested to verify its effectiveness. The results are very helpful in automatic detection of internal defects in workpieces.

  19. Microsatellite frequencies vary with body mass and body temperature in mammals, suggesting correlated variation in mutation rate.

    PubMed

    Amos, William; Filipe, Laura N S

    2014-01-01

    Substitution rate is often found to correlate with life history traits such as body mass, a predictor of population size and longevity, and body temperature. The underlying mechanism is unclear but most models invoke either natural selection or factors such as generation length that change the number of mutation opportunities per unit time. Here we use published genome sequences from 69 mammals to ask whether life history traits impact another form of genetic mutation, the high rates of predominantly neutral slippage in microsatellites. We find that the length-frequency distributions of three common dinucleotide motifs differ greatly between even closely related species. These frequency differences correlate with body mass and body temperature and can be used to predict the phenotype of an unknown species. Importantly, different length microsatellites show complicated patterns of excess and deficit that cannot be explained by a simple model where species with short generation lengths have experienced more mutations. Instead, the patterns probably require changes in mutation rate that impact alleles of different length to different extents. Body temperature plausibly influences mutation rate by modulating the propensity for slippage. Existing hypotheses struggle to account for a link between body mass and mutation rate. However, body mass correlates inversely with population size, which in turn predicts heterozygosity. We suggest that heterozygote instability, HI, the idea that heterozygous sites show increased mutability, could provide a plausible link between body mass and mutation rate. PMID:25392761

  20. Binary frequency of planet-host stars at wide separations. A new brown dwarf companion to a planet-host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodieu, N.; Pérez-Garrido, A.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Gauza, B.; Ruiz, M. T.; Rebolo, R.; Pinfield, D. J.; Martín, E. L.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: The aim of the project is to improve our knowledge on the multiplicity of planet-host stars at wide physical separations. Methods: We cross-matched approximately 6200 square degree area of the southern sky imaged by the Visible Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) Hemisphere Survey (VHS) with the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) to look for wide common proper motion companions to known planet-host stars. We complemented our astrometric search with photometric criteria. Results: We confirmed spectroscopically the co-moving nature of seven sources out of 16 companion candidates and discarded eight, while the remaining one stays as a candidate. Among these new wide companions to planet-host stars, we discovered a T4.5 dwarf companion at 6.3 arcmin (~9000 au) from HIP 70849, a K7V star which hosts a 9 Jupiter mass planet with an eccentric orbit. We also report two new stellar M dwarf companions to one G and one metal-rich K star. We infer stellar and substellar binary frequencies for our complete sample of 37 targets of 5.4±3.8% and 2.7±2.7% (1σ confidence level), respectively, for projected physical separations larger than ~60-160 au assuming the range of distances of planet-host stars (24-75 pc). These values are comparable to the frequencies of non planet-host stars. We find that the period-eccentricity trend holds with a lack of multiple systems with planets at large eccentricities (e> 0.2) for periods less than 40 days. However, the lack of planets more massive than 2.5 Jupiter masses and short periods (<40 days) orbiting single stars is not so obvious due to recent discoveries by ground-based transit surveys and space missions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgSpectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/569/A120Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research

  1. Intra-individual variation in the vocalized frequency of the Taiwanese leaf-nosed bat, Hipposideros terasensis, influenced by conspecific colony members.

    PubMed

    Hiryu, Shizuko; Katsura, Koji; Nagato, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Hideo; Lin, Liang-Kong; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi

    2006-08-01

    We examined the intra-individual variation in resting frequency of the constant-frequency component of the second harmonic of the pulse (F (rest)) over 4 years in a laboratory colony of the Taiwanese leaf-nosed bat (Hipposideros terasensis). Patterns of change in F (rest) were observed when individuals were added to or removed from the colony so that we investigated whether F (rest) was affected by neighboring colony members. F (rest) of each bat continually showed a long-term gradual change throughout the year, and all bats in the colony increased or decreased their F (rest) in the same direction as a group non-seasonally. The greatest short-term changes were observed when new bats with a relatively low F (rest) joined the colony and F (rest) of new bats converged with those of the original colony members around 8 -16 days after their introduction. Conversely, a single individual showed sudden short-term decrease in F (rest) after its isolation from other colony members. These findings strongly indicate that F (rest) is flexible according to the presence of neighboring conspecific bats. We suggest that the audio-vocal feedback for conspecific pulses appears to be involved in the short- or long-term intra-individual variation in F (rest) other than factors previously thought such as age or season. PMID:16538514

  2. Highly-Efficient Charge Separation and Polaron Delocalization in Polymer-Fullerene Bulk-Heterojunctions: A Comparative Multi-Frequency EPR & DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Jens; Mardis, Kristy L.; Banks, Brian P.; Grooms, Gregory M.; Sperlich, Andreas; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Beaupré, Serge; Leclerc, Mario; Xu, Tao; Yu, Luping; Poluektov, Oleg G.

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing depletion of fossil fuels has led to an intensive search for additional renewable energy sources. Solar-based technologies could provide sufficient energy to satisfy the global economic demands in the near future. Photovoltaic (PV) cells are the most promising man-made devices for direct solar energy utilization. Understanding the charge separation and charge transport in PV materials at a molecular level is crucial for improving the efficiency of the solar cells. Here, we use light-induced EPR spectroscopy combined with DFT calculations to study the electronic structure of charge separated states in blends of polymers (P3HT, PCDTBT, and PTB7) and fullerene derivatives (C60-PCBM and C70-PCBM). Solar cells made with the same composites as active layers show power conversion efficiencies of 3.3% (P3HT), 6.1% (PCDTBT), and 7.3% (PTB7), respectively. Under illumination of these composites, two paramagnetic species are formed due to photo-induced electron transfer between the conjugated polymer and the fullerene. They are the positive, P+, and negative, P-, polarons on the polymer backbone and fullerene cage, respectively, and correspond to radical cations and radical anions. Using the high spectral resolution of high-frequency EPR (130 GHz), the EPR spectra of these species were resolved and principal components of the g-tensors were assigned. Light-induced pulsed ENDOR spectroscopy allowed the determination of 1H hyperfine coupling constants of photogenerated positive and negative polarons. The experimental results obtained for the different polymer-fullerene composites have been compared with DFT calculations, revealing that in all three systems the positive polaron is distributed over distances of 40 - 60 Å on the polymer chain. This corresponds to about 15 thiophene units for P3HT, approximately three units PCDTBT, and about three to four units for PTB7. No spin density delocalization between neighboring fullerene molecules was detected by EPR. Strong

  3. Variation of optical characteristics of polarized laser radiation in dielectric upon its low-frequency rotation and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.; Portnov, D. I.; Sadovnikov, S. V.; Kauts, V. L.; Sharandin, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The results of experiments in which coherent laser radiation with wavelength λ = 0.632991 µm experienced rotation of its plane of polarization, beam deviation, and change of intensity after propagating through an optical disk made of TF3 glass with refractive index n = 1.71250 and glued to a gyromotor, are discussed. The experiments were conducted at angle of incidence of the beam on a flat surface of the optical disk v = 60°. The rotational frequency of the disk was varied from 2 to 10 Hz for two directions of rotation. At low speed of rotation, the main factor causing mechanical deformations and, as a result, changes in optical characteristics of radiation propagated through the optical disk is heating of the metal—glass interface.

  4. Variation in Holocene El Niño frequencies: Climate records and cultural consequences in ancient Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandweiss, Daniel H.; Maasch, Kirk A.; Burger, Richard L.; Richardson, James B., III; Rollins, Harold B.; Clement, Amy

    2001-07-01

    Analysis of mollusks from archaeological sites on the north and central coasts of Peru indicates that between ca. 5800 and 3200 2800 cal yr B.P., El Niño events were less frequent than today, with modern, rapid recurrence intervals achieved only after that time. For several millennia prior to 5.8 ka, El Niño events had been absent or very different from today. The phenomena called El Niño have had severe consequences for the modern and colonial (historically recorded) inhabitants of Peru, and El Niño events also influenced prehistoric cultural development: the onset of El Niño events at 5.8 ka correlates temporally with the beginning of monumental temple construction on the Peruvian coast, and the increase in El Niño frequency after 3.2 2.8 ka correlates with the abandonment of monumental temples in the same region.

  5. Using recent high-frequency surveys to reconstitute 35 years of organic carbon variations in a eutrophic lowland river.

    PubMed

    Minaudo, C; Moatar, F; Coynel, A; Etcheber, H; Gassama, N; Curie, F

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC), total suspended solids (TSS), were measured daily, and phytoplankton pigments (chlorophyll-a and pheopigments) were measured every 3 days at three strategic stations along the eutrophic Loire River between November 2011 and November 2013 marked by a high annual and seasonal variability in hydrological regimes. This unique high-frequency dataset allowed to determine the POC origin (autochthonous or allochthonous). Some strong relationships were evidenced between POC, total pigments and TSS and were tested on a long-term database with a lower frequency (monthly data) to reconstitute unmeasured algal and detrital POC concentrations and estimate annual total organic carbon (TOC) fluxes from 1980 onwards. The results were subjected to only ≈25 % uncertainty and showed that the annual TOC fluxes at the outlet of the Loire River decreased from 520 10(3) tC year(-1) (i.e. 4.7 t km(-2) year(-1)) in the early 1990s to 150 10(3) tC year(-1) (i.e. 1.4 t km(-2) year(-1)) in 2012. Although DOC always dominates, the autochthonous POC represented 35 % of the TOC load at the basin outlet by the end of the 1980s and declined to finally represent 15 % only of the TOC. The control of phosphorus direct inputs and the invasion by Corbicula clams spp. which both occurred since the early 1990s probably highly reduced the development of phytoplankton. Consequently, the autochthonous POC contribution declined and TSS concentrations in summertime significantly decreased as well as a result of both less phytoplankton and less calcite precipitation. At the present time, at least 75 % of the POC has allochthonous origins in the upper Middle Loire but downstream, autochthonous POC dominates during summer phytoplanktonic blooms when total pigments concentrations reach up to 70 μg L(-1) (equivalent to 75 % of the total POC). PMID:26687084

  6. Higher frequency of social learning in China than in the West shows cultural variation in the dynamics of cultural evolution.

    PubMed

    Mesoudi, Alex; Chang, Lei; Murray, Keelin; Lu, Hui Jing

    2015-01-01

    Cultural evolutionary models have identified a range of conditions under which social learning (copying others) is predicted to be adaptive relative to asocial learning (learning on one's own), particularly in humans where socially learned information can accumulate over successive generations. However, cultural evolution and behavioural economics experiments have consistently shown apparently maladaptive under-utilization of social information in Western populations. Here we provide experimental evidence of cultural variation in people's use of social learning, potentially explaining this mismatch. People in mainland China showed significantly more social learning than British people in an artefact-design task designed to assess the adaptiveness of social information use. People in Hong Kong, and Chinese immigrants in the UK, resembled British people in their social information use, suggesting a recent shift in these groups from social to asocial learning due to exposure to Western culture. Finally, Chinese mainland participants responded less than other participants to increased environmental change within the task. Our results suggest that learning strategies in humans are culturally variable and not genetically fixed, necessitating the study of the 'social learning of social learning strategies' whereby the dynamics of cultural evolution are responsive to social processes, such as migration, education and globalization. PMID:25392473

  7. Assessment of periodic sub-diurnal Earth rotation variations at tidal frequencies through transformation of VLBI normal equation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, Thomas; Tesmer Née Böckmann, Sarah; Nothnagel, Axel

    2011-09-01

    We present an empirical model for periodic variations of diurnal and sub-diurnal Earth rotation parameters (ERPs) that was derived based on the transformation of normal equation (NEQ) systems of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observing sessions. NEQ systems that contain highly resolved polar motion and UT1-TAI with a temporal resolution of 15 min were generated and then transformed to the coefficients of the tidal ERP model to be solved for. To investigate the quality of this model, comparisons with empirical models from the Global Positioning System (GPS), another VLBI model and the model adopted by the conventions of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) were performed. The absolute coefficients of these models agree almost completely within 7.5 μ as in polar motion and 0.5 μ s in UT1-TAI. Several bigger differences exist, which are discussed in this paper. To be able to compare the model estimates with results of the continuous VLBI campaigns, where signals with periods of 8 and 6 h were detected, terms in the ter- and quarter-diurnal band were included in the tidal ERP model. Unfortunately, almost no common features with the results of continuous VLBI campaigns or ERP predictions in these tidal bands can be seen.

  8. Natural variation in the sequence of PSY1 and frequency of favorable polymorphisms among tropical and temperate maize germplasm.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhiyuan; Chai, Yuchao; Zhou, Yi; Yang, Xiaohong; Warburton, Marilyn L; Xu, Shutu; Cai, Ye; Zhang, Dalong; Li, Jiansheng; Yan, Jianbing

    2013-04-01

    Provitamin A (Pro-VA) is necessary for human vision and immune system health, especially in growing children. The first committed step in the maize carotenoid biosynthesis pathway is catalyzed by phytoene synthase 1 (encoded by PSY1) which controls the flux of substrates into the pathway. The flow of these substrates could be directed into production of the β-branch carotenoids (the step controlled largely by the lycopene epsilon cyclase gene), but terminated after the production of β-carotene, rather than allowing it to be converted into the next metabolite (the step controlled largely by the β-carotenoid hydroxylase gene). In this study, PSY1 was subjected to association mapping in two diverse maize populations, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in one segregating population, and expression analysis of lines polymorphic for sites within PSY1. The results indicated that a 378-bp InDel upstream of the transcription start site and a SNP in the fifth exon resulting in a Thr to Asn substitution, explaining 7 and 8 % of the total carotenoid variation, respectively, may be functional sites associated with total carotenoid levels in maize grain. Analysis of the evolution of PSY1 strongly suggests that there was positive selection for these polymorphic sites after the divergence of yellow maize from white maize. PMID:23238762

  9. Higher frequency of social learning in China than in the West shows cultural variation in the dynamics of cultural evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mesoudi, Alex; Chang, Lei; Murray, Keelin; Lu, Hui Jing

    2015-01-01

    Cultural evolutionary models have identified a range of conditions under which social learning (copying others) is predicted to be adaptive relative to asocial learning (learning on one's own), particularly in humans where socially learned information can accumulate over successive generations. However, cultural evolution and behavioural economics experiments have consistently shown apparently maladaptive under-utilization of social information in Western populations. Here we provide experimental evidence of cultural variation in people's use of social learning, potentially explaining this mismatch. People in mainland China showed significantly more social learning than British people in an artefact-design task designed to assess the adaptiveness of social information use. People in Hong Kong, and Chinese immigrants in the UK, resembled British people in their social information use, suggesting a recent shift in these groups from social to asocial learning due to exposure to Western culture. Finally, Chinese mainland participants responded less than other participants to increased environmental change within the task. Our results suggest that learning strategies in humans are culturally variable and not genetically fixed, necessitating the study of the ‘social learning of social learning strategies' whereby the dynamics of cultural evolution are responsive to social processes, such as migration, education and globalization. PMID:25392473

  10. Free-Ranging Male Koalas Use Size-Related Variation in Formant Frequencies to Assess Rival Males

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Benjamin D.; Whisson, Desley A.; Reby, David

    2013-01-01

    Although the use of formant frequencies in nonhuman animal vocal communication systems has received considerable recent interest, only a few studies have examined the importance of these acoustic cues to body size during intra-sexual competition between males. Here we used playback experiments to present free-ranging male koalas with re-synthesised bellow vocalisations in which the formants were shifted to simulate either a large or a small adult male. We found that male looking responses did not differ according to the size variant condition played back. In contrast, male koalas produced longer bellows and spent more time bellowing when they were presented with playbacks simulating larger rivals. In addition, males were significantly slower to respond to this class of playback stimuli than they were to bellows simulating small males. Our results indicate that male koalas invest more effort into their vocal responses when they are presented with bellows that have lower formants indicative of larger rivals, but also show that males are slower to engage in vocal exchanges with larger males that represent more dangerous rivals. By demonstrating that male koalas use formants to assess rivals during the breeding season we have provided evidence that male-male competition constitutes an important selection pressure for broadcasting and attending to size-related formant information in this species. Further empirical studies should investigate the extent to which the use of formants during intra-sexual competition is widespread throughout mammals. PMID:23922967

  11. Spatial variations in the frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, West Indies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, J.A.; Wyss, M.; Latchman, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes measured by the b-value is determined as a function of space beneath Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, from data recorded between August 1, 1995 and March 31, 1996. A volume of anomalously high b-values (b > 3.0) with a 1.5 km radius is imaged at depths of 0 and 1.5 km beneath English's Crater and Chance's Peak. This high b-value anomaly extends southwest to Gage's Soufriere. At depths greater than 2.5 km volumes of comparatively low b-values (b-1) are found beneath St. George's Hill, Windy Hill, and below 2.5 km depth and to the south of English's Crater. We speculate the depth of high b-value anomalies under volcanoes may be a function of silica content, modified by some additional factors, with the most siliceous having these volumes that are highly fractured or contain high pore pressure at the shallowest depths. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. High frequency (hourly) variation in vertical distribution and abundance of meroplanktonic larvae in nearshore waters during strong internal tidal forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liévana MacTavish, A.; Ladah, L. B.; Lavín, M. F.; Filonov, A.; Tapia, Fabian J.; Leichter, J.

    2016-04-01

    We related the vertical distribution and abundance of nearshore meroplankton at hourly time scales with internal tidal wave events. We proposed that significant changes in plankter abundance would occur across internal tidal fronts, and that surface and bottom strata would respond in opposite fashions. First-mode internal tidal bores propagating in the alongshore direction were detected in water-column currents and baroclinic temperature changes. Surface and bottom currents always flowed in opposite directions, and abrupt flow reversals coincided with large temperature changes during arrival of bores. Crab zoeae and barnacle cyprids were more abundant in the bottom strata, whereas barnacle nauplii showed the opposite pattern. Significant changes in vertical distribution and abundance of target meroplankters occurred across internal tidal fronts, especially for crabs at depth, with surface and bottom organisms responding in opposite fashions. Changes in plankter abundance were significantly correlated with current flows in the strata where they were most abundant. The manner in which plankters were affected (increasing or decreasing abundance) appeared to be modulated by their vertical position within the water column. The significant differences found at the high frequencies of this study, maintained across sampling days, suggest that nearshore meroplankton populations may have greater and more consistent temporal and vertical variability than previously considered.

  13. Seasonal Variations of the James Webb Space Telescope Orbital Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jonathan; Peterson, Jeremy; Villac, Benjamin; Yu, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    LV separation state is fixed ECEF, so inertial states vary with hourly, daily, monthly, and yearly frequencies The net effect of all frequencies leads to significant variations in orbit geometry Injection states can be matched with invariant manifolds of periodic orbits in the CR3BP to explain observed final orbit.

  14. Racial variations in frequency and phenotypes of APC and MUTYH mutations in 6,169 individuals undergoing genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Inra, Jennifer A.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Grover, Shilpa; McFarland, Ashley; Syngal, Sapna; Kastrinos, Fay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether differences in frequency and phenotype of APC and MUTYH mutations exist among racially/ethnically diverse populations. Methods 6169 individuals with personal and/or family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) and polyps were studied. APC testing involved full sequencing/large rearrangement analysis (FS/LRA); MUTYH involved “panel testing” (for Y165C, G382D mutations), or FS/LRA, performed by Myriad Genetics, a commercial laboratory. Subjects were identified as Caucasian, Asian, African American (AA), or Other. Statistical tests included Chi-Square, Fisher’s Exact, ANOVA and z-approximation. Results 17.5% had pathogenic APC mutations. 4.8% were biallelic MUTYH carriers. 18% were non-Caucasian with >100 adenomas and younger ages of adenoma or CRC diagnosis (p<0.0001) than Caucasians. The overall APC mutation rate was higher in Asians, AAs and Others compared to Caucasians (25.2%, 30.9%, 24%, 15.5%;p<0.0001) but similar in all groups when adjusted for polyp burden. More MUTYH biallelic carriers were Caucasian or Other than Asian or AA (5%, 7%, 2.7%, 0.3%;p<0.0001). Among Caucasians, 5% were biallelic carriers identified by panel testing versus 2% by sequencing/LRA (p=0.002). Among non-Caucasians, 3% undergoing panel testing were biallelic carriers versus 10% identified by sequencing/LRA(p<0.0002). Conclusion Non-Caucasians undergo genetic testing at more advanced stages of polyposis and/or younger ages of CRC/polyp diagnosis. Restricted MUTYH analysis may miss significant numbers of biallelic carriers, particularly in non-Caucasians. PMID:25590978

  15. High-Frequency Observation of Water Spectrum and Its Application in Monitoring of Dynamic Variation of Suspended Materials in the Hangzhou Bay.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qian; Pan, De-lu; He, Xian-qiang; Zhu, Qian-kun; Gong, Fang; Huang, Hai-qing

    2015-11-01

    In situ measurement of water spectrum is the basis of the validation of the ocean color remote sensing. The traditional method to obtain the water spectrum is based on the shipboard measurement at limited stations, which is difficult to meet the requirement of validation of ocean color remote sensing in the highly dynamic coastal waters. To overcome this shortage, continuously observing systems of water spectrum have been developed in the world. However, so far, there are still few high-frequency observation systems of the water spectrum in coastal waters, especially in the highly turbid and high-dynamic waters. Here, we established a high-frequency water-spectrum observing system based on tower in the Hangzhou Bay. The system measures the water spectrum at a step of 3 minutes, which can fully match the satellite observation. In this paper, we primarily developed a data processing method for the tower-based high-frequency water spectrum data, to realize automatic judgment of clear sky, sun glint, platform shadow, and weak illumination, etc. , and verified the processing results. The results show that the normalized water-leaving radiance spectra obtained through tower observation have relatively high consistency with the shipboard measurement results, with correlation coefficient of more than 0. 99, and average relative error of 9.96%. In addition, the long-term observation capability of the tower-based high-frequency water-spectrum observing system was evaluated, and the results show that although the system has run for one year, the normalized water-leaving radiance obtained by this system have good consistency with the synchronously measurement by Portable spectrometer ASD in respect of spectral shape and value, with correlation coefficient of more than 0.90 and average relative error of 6.48%. Moreover, the water spectra from high-frequency observation by the system can be used to effectively monitor the rapid dynamic variation in concentration of suspended

  16. Product separator

    DOEpatents

    Welsh, Robert A.; Deurbrouck, Albert W.

    1976-01-20

    A secondary light sensitive photoelectric product separator for use with a primary product separator that concentrates a material so that it is visually distinguishable from adjacent materials. The concentrate separation is accomplished first by feeding the material onto a vibratory inclined surface with a liquid flow, such as a wet concentrating table. Vibrations generally perpendicular to the stream direction of flow cause the concentrate to separate from its mixture according to its color. When the concentrate and its surrounding stream reach the recovery end of the table, a detecting device notes the line of color demarcation and triggers a signal if it differs from a normal condition. If no difference is noted nothing moves on the second separator. However, if a difference is detected in the constant monitoring of the color line's location, a product splitter and recovery unit normally positioned near the color line at the recovery end, moves to a new position. In this manner the selected separated concentrate is recovered at a maximum rate regardless of variations in the flow stream or other conditions present.

  17. Variations in the critical frequency of the ionospheric F-region during magnetic storms in 2008-2012 at auroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchensky, D. V.

    2014-09-01

    Fifty-one magnetic storms occurred during the last solar half-cycle of transition from the epoch minimum to the epoch maximum are considered. Ionospheric ( foF2) and magnetic ( X component) data from Sodankyla observatory, Finland, were used for the analysis, as well as values of the Σ Kp indices of magnetic activity. The dependence of variations in the critical frequency foF2 was studied before, during, and after each storm. It has been revealed that a major effect (ME) takes place for all of the storms analyzed. It consists in the following: the first maximum in foF2 values occurs several days before the onset of the active phase of a storm, then foF2 attains its minimum during the active phase, and the second maximum occurred after the active phase. Five principals, the most frequent types of variation in foF2 during a storm, have been revealed. However, special cases (30%) in which an ME exists but shifts rightward several days along the time axis are observable. Ionospheric "memory" (inertia) from 8-9 h to 2 days has been revealed. It has been ascertained that the occurrence of the first ME maximum can be considered a magnetic storm precursor. Such a precursor potentially can be used for forecasting the beginning of magnetic storm development, which is important for space weather problems.

  18. Variations of the critical foE-frequency of the ionosphere connected with earthquakes. Evaluation of observations of the vertical sounding station "Tokyo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liperovskaya, Elena V.; Meister, Claudia-Veronika; Hoffmann, Dieter H. H.; Silina, Alexandra S.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work the critical frequencies foE and foF2 of the ionosphere are considered as possible earthquake precursors. The statistical analysis of the critical frequencies is carried out based on the data of the vertical sounding station (VSS) "Kokubunji" ("Tokyo") (ϕ = 35.7o N, λ = 139.5o E, 1957-1988) obtained every hour. Disturbances are considered on the background of seasonal, geomagnetic as well as 11-years and 27-days Solar variations. Special normalized parameters E and F are introduced, which represent the almost seasonal-independent parts of foE and foF2. Days with high Solar (Wolf number > 100) and geomagnetic (ΣKp > 25) activities are excluded from the analysis. For all data (observed every hour) analysed, no correlations of the normalized parameters E and F are found. One day before the seismic shock, a positive correlation is observed. The superimposed epochs method is used to determine the temporal behaviour of E and F. It is found that E and F decrease one day before the earthquakes provided that the seismic shocks occur at distances 600 < R < 1000 km from the VSS, and that the focus of earthquakes with magnitudes M > 5.5 is situated at depths smaller than 60 km. The reliability of the effect is larger than 98 %. Possible physical mechanisms of the phenomenon are discussed.

  19. Modeling the variations of reflection coefficient of Earth's lower ionosphere using very low frequency radio wave data by artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Keyvan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Marbouti, Marjan; Tan, Le Minh

    2016-08-01

    The ionized atmosphere lying from 50 to 600 km above surface, known as ionosphere, contains high amount of electrons and ions. Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves with frequencies between 3 and 30 kHz are reflected from the lower ionosphere specifically D-region. A lot of applications in long range communications and navigation systems have been inspired by this characteristic of ionosphere. There are several factors which affect the ionization rate in this region, such as: time of day (presence of sun in the sky), solar zenith angle (seasons) and solar activities. Due to nonlinear response of ionospheric reflection coefficient to these factors, finding an accurate relation between these parameters and reflection coefficient is an arduous task. In order to model these kinds of nonlinear functionalities, some numerical methods are employed. One of these methods is artificial neural network (ANN). In this paper, the VLF radio wave data of 4 sudden ionospheric disturbance (SID) stations are given to a multi-layer perceptron ANN in order to simulate the variations of reflection coefficient of D region ionosphere. After training, validation and testing the ANN, outputs of ANN and observed values are plotted together for 2 random cases of each station. By evaluating the results using 2 parameters of pearson correlation coefficient and root mean square error, a satisfying agreement was found between ANN outputs and real observed data.

  20. Natural variation in IL-2 sensitivity influences regulatory T cell frequency and function in individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jennie H.M.; Cutler, Antony J.; Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Reading, James L.; Cooper, Nicholas J.; Wallace, Chris; Clarke, Pamela; Smyth, Deborah J.; Boyce, Christopher S.; Gao, Guo-Jian; Todd, John A.; Wicker, Linda S.; Tree, Timothy I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Defective immune homeostasis in the balance between FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and effector T cells is a likely contributing factor in the loss of self-tolerance observed in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Given the importance of interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling in the generation and function of Tregs, observations that polymorphisms in genes in the IL-2 pathway associate with T1D and that some individuals with T1D exhibit reduced IL-2 signaling, indicate that impairment of this pathway may play a role in Treg dysfunction and the pathogenesis of T1D. Here, we have examined IL-2 sensitivity in CD4+ T-cell subsets in 70 individuals with long-standing T1D allowing us to investigate the impact of low IL-2 sensitivity on Treg frequency and function. IL-2 responsiveness, measured by STAT5a phosphorylation, was found to be a very stable phenotype within individuals, but exhibited considerable inter-individual variation and was influenced by T1D-associated PTPN2 gene polymorphisms. Tregs from individuals with lower IL-2 signaling were reduced in frequency, were less able to maintain expression of FOXP3 under limiting concentrations of IL-2 and displayed reduced suppressor function. These results suggest that reduced IL-2 signaling may be used to identify patients with highest Treg dysfunction who may benefit most from IL-2 immunotherapy. PMID:26224887

  1. Frequency and Angular Variations of Land Surface Microwave Emissivities: Can we Estimate SSM/T and AMSU Emissivities from SSM/I Emissivities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Rossow, William B.; Pardo-Carrion, Juan R.

    1999-01-01

    To retrieve temperature and humidity profiles from SSM/T and AMSU, it is important to quantify the contribution of the Earth surface emission. So far, no global estimates of the land surface emissivities are available at SSM/T and AMSU frequencies and scanning conditions. The land surface emissivities have been previously calculated for the globe from the SSM/I conical scanner between 19 and 85 GHz. To analyze the feasibility of deriving SSM/T and AMSU land surface emissivities from SSM/I emissivities, the spectral and angular variations of the emissivities are studied, with the help of ground-based measurements, models and satellite estimates. Up to 100 GHz, for snow and ice free areas, the SSM/T and AMSU emissivities can be derived with useful accuracy from the SSM/I emissivities- The emissivities can be linearly interpolated in frequency. Based on ground-based emissivity measurements of various surface types, a simple model is proposed to estimate SSM/T and AMSU emissivities for all zenith angles knowing only the emissivities for the vertical and horizontal polarizations at 53 deg zenith angle. The method is tested on the SSM/T-2 91.655 GHz channels. The mean difference between the SSM/T-2 and SSM/I-derived emissivities is less than or equal to 0.01 for all zenith angles with an r.m.s. difference of approx. = 0.02. Above 100 GHz, preliminary results are presented at 150 GHz, based on SSM/T-2 observations and are compared with the very few estimations available in the literature.

  2. Hg(+) Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we review the development of Hg(+) microwave frequency standards for use in high reliability and continuous operation applications. In recent work we have demonstrated short-term frequency stability of 3 x 10(exp -14)/nu(sub tau) when a cryogenic oscillator of stability 2-3 x 10(exp 15) was used a the local oscillator. The trapped ion frequency standard employs a Hg-202 discharge lamp to optically pump the trapped Hg(+)-199 clock ions and a helium buffer gas to cool the ions to near room temperature. We describe a small Hg(+) ion trap based frequency standard with an extended linear ion trap (LITE) architecture which separates the optical state selection region from the clock resonance region. This separation allows the use of novel trap configurations in the resonance region since no optical pumping is carried out there. A method for measuring the size of an ion cloud inside a linear trap with a 12-rod trap is currently being investigated. At approx. 10(exp -12), the 2nd order Doppler shift for trapped mercury ion frequency standards is one of the largest frequency offsets and its measurement to the 1% level would represent an advance in insuring the very long-term stability of these standards to the 10(exp -14) or better level. Finally, we describe atomic clock comparison experiments that can probe for a time variation of the fine structure constant, alpha = e(exp 2)/2(pi)hc, at the level of 10(exp -20)/year as predicted in some Grand Unified String Theories.

  3. Along-strike variations in fault frictional properties along the San Andreas Fault near Cholame, California from joint earthquake and low-frequency earthquake relocations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrington, R.M; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Griffiths, E.M.; Zeng, X.; Thurber, C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations of low‐frequency earthquakes (LFEs) and tectonic tremor along the Parkfield–Cholame segment of the San Andreas fault suggest slow‐slip earthquakes occur in a transition zone between the shallow fault, which accommodates slip by a combination of aseismic creep and earthquakes (<15  km depth), and the deep fault, which accommodates slip by stable sliding (>35  km depth). However, the spatial relationship between shallow earthquakes and LFEs remains unclear. Here, we present precise relocations of 34 earthquakes and 34 LFEs recorded during a temporary deployment of 13 broadband seismic stations from May 2010 to July 2011. We use the temporary array waveform data, along with data from permanent seismic stations and a new high‐resolution 3D velocity model, to illuminate the fine‐scale details of the seismicity distribution near Cholame and the relation to the distribution of LFEs. The depth of the boundary between earthquakes and LFE hypocenters changes along strike and roughly follows the 350°C isotherm, suggesting frictional behavior may be, in part, thermally controlled. We observe no overlap in the depth of earthquakes and LFEs, with an ∼5  km separation between the deepest earthquakes and shallowest LFEs. In addition, clustering in the relocated seismicity near the 2004 Mw 6.0 Parkfield earthquake hypocenter and near the northern boundary of the 1857 Mw 7.8 Fort Tejon rupture may highlight areas of frictional heterogeneities on the fault where earthquakes tend to nucleate.

  4. Cu mesh's super-hydrophobic and oleophobic properties with variations in gravitational pressure and surface components for oil/water separation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Zhang, Qin; Xiao, Haibo; Xu, Jie; Li, Qintao; Pan, Xiaohui; Huang, Zhiyong

    2014-09-01

    The super-hydrophobic and super-oleophilic properties of various materials have been utilized to separate oil from water. These properties induce both oil penetration and water slide off. This research demonstrates that the mesh with both super-hydrophobic and oleophobic properties, with a water contact angle (WCA) higher than 150° and oil contact angle (OCA) near 140°, can also be used to separate oil from. Oil has a higher probability than water of entering into the interstice of the Cu mesh surface and passing through it due to the capillarity effect, van der Waals attractions and the effects of gravitational pressure. The modified mesh surface can easily adsorb the oil, which then forms a film, due to the very strong adhesion properties of the oil molecules. The oil film then contributes to the water sliding off. These properties can be used to separate oil from water with separation efficiencies reaching 99.3%. Additionally, the separation of an oil/water mixture using sand permeated with oil yielded separation efficiencies exceeding 90%.

  5. Kerosene-water separation in T-junction with orientation upward branch with a 60° angle: Variation of diameter ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitasari, Dewi; Indarto, Purnomo, Khasani

    2016-06-01

    Research on the T-junction is still underway for the flow of liquid-liquid (kerosene-water). Some research on the characteristics of kerosene-water separation was performed using T-junction oriented upward branch with a 60° angle. To observe the effect of diameters ratio on the phase separation that produced T-junction then made a test section with a horizontal pipe diameter 36 mm, while the side arm 36 mm diameter, 26 mm and 19 mm (diameters ratio of 1, 0.7 and 0.5) by using plexiglass pipe type. Based on experimental results and visualization of data flow in the test section, to the value obtained 60% water cut, the maximum separation efficiency of 94%, FK = 0.94 and FW = 0.001 with a diameter ratio of 1. For other diameter ratio of 0.7 and 0.5 respectively separation efficiency of 66%, FK = 1 and Fw = 0.34 for 0.7 and separation efficiency of 84%, FK = 1 and Fw = 0.16 for 0.5, the best value is obtained at a water cut 60% too. All the best conditions to achieve the above-stratified flow pattern.

  6. Effect of pulse to pulse variation of divergence, pointing and amplitude of copper vapor laser radiations on their second harmonic and sum frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Om; Mahakud, Ramakanta; Nakhe, Shankar V.; Dixit, Sudhir K.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the effect of single pulse stability of divergence angle, beam pointing angle and amplitude of green and yellow radiation pulses of an unstable resonator copper vapor laser (CVL) oscillator in the sum frequency (SF) mixing and second harmonic (SH). The conversion efficiency of sum frequency generation was lower compared to second harmonic processes despite larger fundamental power being used in sum frequency experiments. However the net UV power obtained at the sum frequency was higher than both of the second harmonic UV frequencies. Lower sum frequency generation (SFG) conversion efficiency compared to second harmonic generation (SHG) of individual CVL radiation is attributed to difference in single pulse stability of beam pointing, divergence and amplitude fluctuation of both CVL radiations in addition to commonly known fact of spatio-temporal mis-match. At the same fundamental input power, higher SH conversion efficiency of yellow compared to green is attributed to its better single pulse stability of beam pointing and divergence.

  7. Separable Processes Before, During, and After the N400 Elicited by Previously Inferred and New Information: Evidence from Time-Frequency Decompositions

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Vaughn R.; Bernat, Edward M.; van den Broek, Paul; Collins, Paul F.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Marsolek, Chad J.

    2012-01-01

    Successful comprehension during reading often requires inferring information not explicitly presented. This information is readily accessible when subsequently encountered, and a neural correlate of this is an attenuation of the N400 event-related potential (ERP). We used ERPs and time-frequency (TF) analysis to investigate neural correlates of processing inferred information after a causal coherence inference had been generated during text comprehension. Participants read short texts, some of which promoted inference generation. After each text, they performed lexical decisions to target words that were unrelated or inference-related to the preceding text. Consistent with previous findings, inference-related words elicited an attenuated N400 relative to unrelated words. TF analyses revealed unique contributions to the N400 from activity occurring at 1–6 Hz (theta) and 0–2 Hz (delta), supporting the view that multiple, sequential processes underlie the N400. PMID:23165117

  8. Low frequency cultural noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Jin Soo; Kang, Tae-Seob; Baag, Chang-Eob

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal cultural seismic noise is observed in the frequency range of 0.01-0.05 Hz. Cultural noise generated by human activities is generally observed in frequencies above 1 Hz, and is greater in the daytime than at night. The low-frequency noise presented in this paper exhibits a characteristic amplitude variation and can be easily identified from time domain seismograms in the frequency range of interest. The amplitude variation is predominantly in the vertical component, but the horizontal components also show variations. Low-frequency noise is markedly periodic, which reinforces its interpretation as cultural noise. Such noise is observed world-wide, but is limited to areas in the vicinity of railways. The amplitude variation in seismograms correlates strongly with railway timetables, and the waveform shows a wavelength shift associated with the Doppler effect, which indicates that the origin of seismic background noise in the frequency range 0.01-0.05 Hz is railways.

  9. Separation of climate- and geology-induced variations in the hydrological response of a regional karstified aquifer: determination of a geologic transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slimani, S.; Massei, N.; Dupont, J.-P.; Mesquita, J.; Laignel, B.

    2009-04-01

    Worldwide, karst hydrosystems represent a great potential in terms of water ressources. However, such heterogenous systems are characterized by a highly non-linear response to input signals. In the region of Upper Normandy (Northwestern France), where almost 100% of drinking water supply comes from ground water, the Chalk karst aquifer is characterized by the presence of a thick surficial formations cover which is unequally distributed over the area according to the regional geological context. This structural context also implies a significant spatial variability of the aquifer thickness. To assess the overall hydrologic variability of this aquifer, we use long-term hydraulic head and precipitation time series (20 years) to analyse their relationships according to such specific geological conditions. By continuous wavelet transform, the hydraulic head time series were found to exhibit long-term variations that represented a great amount of variance in some locations, what we could eventually relate to climate-induced oscillations. This was particularly the case of those locations where the aquifer thickness was important. The climate-induced oscillations found were of the order of 2-3-yr and 5-6-yr which would well correspond to some modes of oscillation linked to the positive/negative regimes of the North Atlantic Oscillation. In addition, the corresponding variations in hydrological time series exhibited a clear increase in the explanation of total variance from the early 90's up to the end of the series. In a second time, in order to assess the role of the geological medium in the precipitation/head relationship, we proposed to filter out those long-term spectral components inherent to climate fluctuations. This allowed identification of the head response to precipitation throughout the entire 20-yr period of study for short-term infra-annual time scales. Cross-correlation between the input and output signals after filtering out of long-term components showed

  10. A coherent frequency-bearing tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlms, D. E.; Cohen, A. O.; Hampton, M. L.; Johnson, G. W.

    The passive measurement of target bearing can be achieved by estimating the phase difference between spatially separated observations of a narrow-band signal. The estimation of this phase difference requires algorithms to track variations in received frequency and the phase difference. This paper presents such an algorithm: a coherently coupled frequency-bearing tracker (CCFBT). The CCFBT is derived from extended Kalman filter theory. A linearized covariance analysis predicts performance above threshold, and an approximate rule predicts threshold. Simulation results verify the covariance analysis and threshold predictions.

  11. Variation in the Spacer Regions Separating tRNA Genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum Distinguishes Recent Clinical Isolates from the Same Location

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Sarah M.; Grayson, T. Hilton; Chambers, Edel M.; Cooper, Lynne F.; Barker, Gavin A.; Gilpin, Martyn L.

    2001-01-01

    A means for distinguishing between clinical isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum that is based on the PCR amplification of length polymorphisms in the tRNA intergenic spacer regions (tDNA-ILPs) was investigated. The method used primers specific to nucleotide sequences of R. salmoninarum tRNA genes and tRNA intergenic spacer regions that had been generated by using consensus tRNA gene primers. Twenty-one PCR products were sequenced from five isolates of R. salmoninarum from the United States, England, and Scotland, and four complete tRNA genes and spacer regions were identified. Sixteen specific PCR primers were designed and tested singly and in all possible pairwise combinations for their potential to discriminate between isolates from recent clinical outbreaks of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the United Kingdom. Fourteen of the isolates were cultured from kidney samples taken from fish displaying clinical signs of BKD on five farms, and some of the isolates came from the same farm and at the same time. The tDNA-ILP profiles separated 22 clinical isolates into nine groups and highlighted that some farms may have had more than one source of infection. The grouping of isolates improved on the discriminatory power of previously reported typing methods based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and restriction fragment length profiles developed using insertion sequence IS994. Our method enabled us to make divisions between closely related clinical isolates of R. salmoninarum that have identical exact tandem repeat (ETR-A) loci, rRNA intergenic spacer sequences, and IS994 profiles. PMID:11136759

  12. Variation in the spacer regions separating tRNA genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum distinguishes recent clinical isolates from the same location.

    PubMed

    Alexander, S M; Grayson, T H; Chambers, E M; Cooper, L F; Barker, G A; Gilpin, M L

    2001-01-01

    A means for distinguishing between clinical isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum that is based on the PCR amplification of length polymorphisms in the tRNA intergenic spacer regions (tDNA-ILPs) was investigated. The method used primers specific to nucleotide sequences of R. salmoninarum tRNA genes and tRNA intergenic spacer regions that had been generated by using consensus tRNA gene primers. Twenty-one PCR products were sequenced from five isolates of R. salmoninarum from the United States, England, and Scotland, and four complete tRNA genes and spacer regions were identified. Sixteen specific PCR primers were designed and tested singly and in all possible pairwise combinations for their potential to discriminate between isolates from recent clinical outbreaks of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the United Kingdom. Fourteen of the isolates were cultured from kidney samples taken from fish displaying clinical signs of BKD on five farms, and some of the isolates came from the same farm and at the same time. The tDNA-ILP profiles separated 22 clinical isolates into nine groups and highlighted that some farms may have had more than one source of infection. The grouping of isolates improved on the discriminatory power of previously reported typing methods based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and restriction fragment length profiles developed using insertion sequence IS994. Our method enabled us to make divisions between closely related clinical isolates of R. salmoninarum that have identical exact tandem repeat (ETR-A) loci, rRNA intergenic spacer sequences, and IS994 profiles. PMID:11136759

  13. On the evolution of high-frequency ingredients of the secular variation and of their expression at core surface, as inferred from observatory data and main field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetrescu, C.; Dobrica, V.; Stefan, C.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of the first time derivative, with the residual external contribution removed, of H, Z, and D for 24 observatories world-wide with 100-150 years long time series, shows the presence in data of a so-called ~80-year variation. The geographical distribution and its temporal evolution as revealed by 400 years time span of the gufm1 field model is derived and discussed. Time-longitude, time-latitude plots and spectral analysis have been used to derive quantitative information on the ~80-year variation features. The analysis has been extended to the radial component of the geomagnetic field at the core surface. The results indicate that the ~80-year variation entirely accounts for the field with time-averaged axisymmetric component subtracted and high-pass-filtered with cutoff period 400 years of Finlay and Jackson (2003).

  14. Frequency spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call "frequency spirals." These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  15. Features of amplitude and Doppler frequency variation of ELF/VLF waves generated by "beat-wave" HF heating at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, E. D.; Shumilov, O. I.; Kasatkina, E. A.; Gomonov, A. D.

    2014-07-01

    Observations of extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) radio waves generated by a "beat-wave" (BW) high frequency (~ 4.04-4.9 MHz) ionospheric heating are presented. ELF waves were registered with the ELF receiver located at Lovozero (68°N, 35°E), 660 km east from the European Incoherent Scatter Tromso heating facility (69.6°N, 19.2°E). Frequency shifts between the generated beat-wave and received ELF waves were detected in all sessions. It is shown that the amplitudes of ELF waves depend on the auroral electrojet current strength. Our results showing a strong dependence of ELF signal intensities on the substorm development seem to support the conclusion that electrojet currents may affect the BW generation of ELF/VLF waves.

  16. Orbital changes, variation in solar activity and increased anthropogenic activities: controls on the Holocene flood frequency in the Lake Ledro area, Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannière, B.; Magny, M.; Joannin, S.; Simonneau, A.; Wirth, S. B.; Hamann, Y.; Chapron, E.; Gilli, A.; Desmet, M.; Anselmetti, F. S.

    2013-05-01

    Two lacustrine sediment cores from Lake Ledro in northern Italy were studied to produce chronologies of flood events for the past 10 000 yr. For this purpose, we have developed an automatic method that objectively identifies the sedimentary imprint of river floods in the downstream lake basin. The method was based on colour data extracted from processed core photographs, and the count data were analysed to capture the flood signal. Flood frequency and reconstructed sedimentary dynamics were compared with lake-level changes and pollen inferred vegetation dynamics. The results suggest a record marked by low flood frequency during the early and middle Holocene (10 000-4500 cal BP). Only modest increases during short intervals are recorded at ca. 8000, 7500, and 7100 cal BP. After 4500-4000 cal BP, the record shows a shift toward increased flood frequency. With the exception of two short intervals around 2900-2500 and 1800-1400 cal BP, which show a slightly reduced number of floods, the trend of increasing flood frequency prevailed until the 20th century, reaching a maximum between the 16th and the 19th centuries. Brief-flood frequency increases recorded during the early and middle Holocene can be attributed to cold climatic oscillations. On a centennial time scale, major changes in flood frequency, such as those observed after ca. 4500/4000 and 500 cal BP, can be attributed to large-scale climatic changes such as the Neo-glacial and Little Ice Age, which are under orbital and possibly solar control. However, in the Bronze Age and during the Middle Ages and modern times, forest clearing and land use probably partially control the flood activity.

  17. Ultracapacitor separator

    DOEpatents

    Wei, Chang; Jerabek, Elihu Calvin; LeBlanc, Jr., Oliver Harris

    2001-03-06

    An ultracapacitor includes two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying the pores in the electrodes and separator. The electrolyte is a polar aprotic organic solvent and a salt. The porous separator comprises a wet laid cellulosic material.

  18. Orbital changes, variation in solar activity and increased anthropogenic activities: controls on the Holocene flood frequency in the Lake Ledro area, Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannière, B.; Magny, M.; Joannin, S.; Simonneau, A.; Wirth, S. B.; Hamann, Y.; Chapron, E.; Gilli, A.; Desmet, M.; Anselmetti, F. S.

    2012-09-01

    Two lacustrine sediment cores from Lake Ledro in Northern Italy were studied to produce chronologies of flood events for the past 10 000 yr. For this purpose, we have developed an automatic method that objectively identifies the sedimentary imprint of river floods in the downstream lake basin. The automatic counting of flood deposits was based on colour data extracted from processed core photographs, and the count data were processed to capture the flood signal. Automatic quantification was compared with naked-eye counting. Counts were performed twice on the proximal and distal cores to provide an objective and reproducible record of flood frequency. Geophysical and geochemical analyses made it possible to distinguish event deposits from background sedimentation. Flood frequency and reconstructed sedimentary dynamics were compared with lake-level changes and pollen dynamics inferred from vegetation data. The data suggest a record marked by low flood frequency during the early and middle Holocene (10 000-4500 cal BP). Only modest increases during short intervals are recorded at ca. 8000, 7500, and 7100 cal BP. The last third of the Holocene is characterised by a shift toward increased flood frequency at ca. 4500-4000 cal BP. With the exception of two short intervals around 2900-2500 and 1800-1400 cal BP, which show a slightly reduced number of floods, the trend of increasing flood frequency prevailed until the 20th century, reaching a maximum between the 16th and the 19th centuries. Brief-flood frequency increases recorded during the early and middle Holocene can be attributed to cold climatic oscillations. On a centennial time scale, major changes in flood frequency, such as those observed at ca. 4500 and 500 cal BP, can be attributed to large-scale climatic changes such as the Neo-glacial and Little Ice Age, which are under orbital and possibly solar control. The role of climate as the main forcing factor in flood activity is supported by the lake-level records

  19. Influence of flow separation location on phonation onset1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2008-01-01

    The influence of flow separation location on eigenmode synchronization and phonation onset was investigated in a two-dimensional, aeroelastic, continuum model of phonation. A linear stability analysis showed that flow separation played a critical role in initiating eigenmode synchronization and phonation. For a given glottal configuration, a small variation in the flow separation location along the vocal fold surface may lead to a qualitatively different eigenmode-synchronization pattern, and different phonation threshold pressure and frequency. This high sensitivity suggests a need for phonation models to be capable of accurate prediction of the flow separation location. Analysis with different glottal channel geometries showed that a minimum phonation threshold pressure existed for a rectangular glottal channel, consistent with previous experiments. However, in contrast to previous theoretical analyses, this study showed that phonation was facilitated, rather than prohibited, by the upstream movement of the flow separation point within a divergent glottis. PMID:19045659

  20. Variation in adult sex ratio alters the association between courtship, mating frequency and paternity in the lek-forming fruitfly Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Leftwich, P T; Edward, D A; Alphey, L; Gage, M J G; Chapman, T

    2012-09-01

    The intensity with which males deliver courtship and the frequency with which they mate are key components of male reproductive success. However, we expect the strength of the relationship between these traits and a male's overall paternity to be strongly context dependent, for example to be altered significantly by the extent of post-mating competition. We tested this prediction in a lekking insect, Ceratitis capitata (medfly). We examined the effect of manipulating the sex ratio from male- to female-biased (high and low male competition, respectively) on courtship behaviour, mating frequency and paternity of focal males. Under high male competition, focal males delivered significantly more courtship but gained lower paternity than under lower competition. Paternity was positively associated with mating frequency and small residual testes size. However, the association between mating frequency and paternity was significantly stronger under low competition. We conclude that manipulation of sex ratio significantly altered the predictors of mating success and paternity. The relationship between pre- and post-mating success is therefore plastic and alters according to the prevailing level of competition. The results highlight the importance of post-copulatory processes in lekking species and illuminate selection pressures placed on insects such as medflies that are mass reared for pest control. PMID:22725666

  1. Inductive pulsed phase thermography for reducing or enlarging the effect of surface emissivity variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruizhen; He, Yunze; Gao, Bin; Tian, Gui Yun

    2014-11-01

    Emissivity variation introduces illusory temperature inhomogeneity and results in false alarms in infrared thermography, thus, it is important to separate the influence of surface emissivity variation. This letter experimentally demonstrates the advantages of phase information to reduce or enlarge the effect of surface emissivity variation with inductive pulsed phase thermography, where inductive excitation is emissivity-independent and avoids the effect of emissivity variation in heating process. The directly heated area and the indirectly heated area are divided in the phasegrams. The emissivity variation is removed or enlarged perfectly at the specific frequency and defect detectability is improved remarkably.

  2. Variations of high frequency parameter of heart rate variability following osteopathic manipulative treatment in healthy subjects compared to control group and sham therapy: randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ruffini, Nuria; D'Alessandro, Giandomenico; Mariani, Nicolò; Pollastrelli, Alberto; Cardinali, Lucia; Cerritelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Context: Heart Rate Variability (HRV) indicates how heart rate changes in response to inner and external stimuli. HRV is linked to health status and it is an indirect marker of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. Objective: To investigate the influence of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy subjects, compared with sham therapy and control group. Methods: Sixty-six healthy subjects, both male and female, were included in the present 3-armed randomized placebo controlled within subject cross-over single blinded study. Participants were asymptomatic adults (26.7 ± 8.4 y, 51% male, BMI 18.5 ± 4.8), both smokers and non-smokers and not on medications. At enrollment subjects were randomized in three groups: A, B, C. Standardized structural evaluation followed by a patient need-based osteopathic treatment was performed in the first session of group A and in the second session of group B. Standardized evaluation followed by a protocoled sham treatment was provided in the second session of group A and in the first session of group B. No intervention was performed in the two sessions of group C, acting as a time-control. The trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01908920. Main Outcomes Measures: HRV was calculated from electrocardiography before, during and after the intervention, for a total amount time of 25 min and considering frequency domain as well as linear and non-linear methods as outcome measures. Results: OMT engendered a statistically significant increase of parasympathetic activity, as shown by High Frequency power (p < 0.001), expressed in normalized and absolute unit, and possibly decrease of sympathetic activity, as revealed by Low Frequency power (p < 0.01); results also showed a reduction of Low Frequency/High Frequency ratio (p < 0.001) and Detrended fluctuation scaling exponent (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Findings suggested that OMT can influence ANS activity increasing

  3. AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, C.F.; Salisbury, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    A control is described for automatically matching the frequency of a resonant cavity to that of a driving oscillator. The driving oscillator is disconnected from the cavity and a secondary oscillator is actuated in which the cavity is the frequency determining element. A low frequency is mixed with the output of the driving oscillator and the resultant lower and upper sidebands are separately derived. The frequencies of the sidebands are compared with the secondary oscillator frequency. deriving a servo control signal to adjust a tuning element in the cavity and matching the cavity frequency to that of the driving oscillator. The driving oscillator may then be connected to the cavity.

  4. Dependence of sandpile avalanche frequency-size distribution on coverage extent and compactness of embedded toppling threshold heterogeneity: implications for the variation of Gutenberg-Richter b value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, L.-Y.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of the spatiotemporal evolution of failure threshold heterogeneity on the dynamics of fault criticality, and thus on regional seismogenesis, have attracted strong interest in the field of regional seismotectonics. The heterogeneity might be a manifestation of the macroscopic distribution and multiscale strength variation of asperities, the distinct regional stress level, and (microscopically) heterogeneous fault surface roughness or friction regimes. In this study, rather than attempting to mimic the complex microscale slipping physics on a fault surface, sandpile cellular automata were implemented with a straightforward toppling rule. The objective is to examine the influence of distinct configurations of the embedded heterogeneous toppling threshold field on the global system avalanche event statistics. The examination results revealed that increasing the coverage extent and decreasing the compactness of the heterogeneous failure threshold, rather than the magnitude, range of contrast, diversity, or the geometric configuration of the threshold heterogeneity, leads to a systematic increase in the scaling exponent of the avalanche event power law statistics, implying the importance of mutual interaction among toppling sites with distinct thresholds. For tectonic provinces with differing stress regimes evolving spatio temporally, it is postulated that the distinct extent and compactness of the heterogeneous failure threshold are critical factors that manifest in the reported dynamic variations of seismicity scaling.

  5. Separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, W. L., III; Dunham, R. E., Jr.; Goodman, W. L.; Howard, F. G.; Margason, R. J.; Rudy, D. H.; Rumsey, C. L.; Stough, H. P., III; Thomas, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview of flow separation phenomena is provided. Langley has many active research programs in flow separation related areas. Three cases are presented which describe specific examples of flow separation research. In each example, a description of the fundamental fluid physics and the complexity of the flow field is presented along with a method of either reducing or controlling the extent of separation. The following examples are discussed: flow over a smooth surface with an adverse pressure gradient; flow over a surface with a geometric discontinuity; and flow with shock-boundary layer interactions. These results will show that improvements are being made in the understanding of flow separation and its control.

  6. Crosstalk in a KID Array Caused by the Thickness Variation of Superconducting Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adane, A.; Boucher, C.; Coiffard, G.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Goupy, J.; Calvo, M.; Hoarau, C.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-07-01

    The work presented in this paper is focused on the improvement of the kinetic detectors used on NIKA2 instrument (New IRAM KID array 2). Based on the simulation and low temperature measurements, it aims at showing how the variations of the superconducting metal corrupt the frequency comb of the kinetic Inductance detectors (KID) in the frequency range (between 1 and 3 GHz), i.e., how the superconducting metal inhomogeneity induces the resonance-to-resonance cross-coupling which deteriorates the homogeneity of the resonance quality factor and the frequency resonance separation. Solutions are then proposed to fight against the effect of these metallic variations when designing the KID array.

  7. Crosstalk in a KID Array Caused by the Thickness Variation of Superconducting Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adane, A.; Boucher, C.; Coiffard, G.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Goupy, J.; Calvo, M.; Hoarau, C.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is focused on the improvement of the kinetic detectors used on NIKA2 instrument (New IRAM KID array 2). Based on the simulation and low temperature measurements, it aims at showing how the variations of the superconducting metal corrupt the frequency comb of the kinetic Inductance detectors (KID) in the frequency range (between 1 and 3 GHz), i.e., how the superconducting metal inhomogeneity induces the resonance-to-resonance cross-coupling which deteriorates the homogeneity of the resonance quality factor and the frequency resonance separation. Solutions are then proposed to fight against the effect of these metallic variations when designing the KID array.

  8. Local time variation of high-frequency gravity wave momentum flux and its relationship with background wind derived from LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agner, R. M.; Liu, A. Z.

    2013-12-01

    Gravity waves and atmospheric tides have strong interactions in the mesopause region and is a major contributor to the large variabilities in this region. How these two large perturbations interact with each other is not well understood. Observational studies of their relationships are needed to help clarify some contradictory results from modeling studies. Due to large differences in temporal and spatial scales between gravity waves and tides, they are not easily observed simultaneously and consistently with extended periods of time. In this work, we use four-hundred hours of Na LIDAR observation at Starfire Optical Range (SOR, 35.0 N, 106.5 W), New Mexico to derive the local time variation of gravity wave momentum flux and corresponding background wind. Their relationship is then examined in detail. The effects of gravity waves on the background wind at the tidal time scale are deduced. These results are explained through gravity wave propagation in a varying background atmosphere.

  9. Amplitude and frequency variations of oscillation modes in the pulsating DB white dwarf star KIC 08626021. The likely signature of nonlinear resonant mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, W.; Charpinet, S.; Vauclair, G.; Giammichele, N.; Van Grootel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The signatures of nonlinear effects affecting stellar oscillations are difficult to observe from ground observatories because of the lack of continuous high-precision photometric data spanning extended enough time baselines. The unprecedented photometric quality and coverage provided by the Kepler spacecraft offers new opportunities to search for these phenomena. Aims: We use the Kepler data accumulated on the pulsating DB white dwarf KIC 08626021 to explore in detail the stability of its oscillation modes, searching, in particular, for evidence of nonlinear behaviors. Methods: We analyze nearly two years of uninterrupted short-cadence data, concentrating on identified triplets that are caused by stellar rotation and that show intriguing behaviors during the course of the observations. Results: We find clear signatures of nonlinear effects that could be attributed to resonant mode coupling mechanisms. These couplings occur between the components of the triplets and can induce different types of behaviors. We first notice that a structure at 3681 μHz, identified as a triplet in previous published studies, is in fact forming a doublet, with the third component being an independent mode. We find that a triplet at 4310 μHz and this doublet at 3681 μHz (most likely the two visible components of an incomplete triplet) have clear periodic frequency and amplitude modulations, which are typical of the so-called intermediate regime of the resonance, with timescales consistent with theoretical expectations. Another triplet at 5073 μHz is likely in a narrow transitory regime in which the amplitudes are modulated while the frequencies are locked. Using nonadiabatic pulsation calculations, based on a model representative of KIC 08626021 to evaluate the linear growth rates of the modes in the triplets, we also provide quantitative information that could be useful for future comparisons with numerical solutions of the amplitude equations. Conclusions: The observed

  10. Prefrontal activity during working memory is modulated by the interaction of variation in CB1 and COX2 coding genes and correlates with frequency of cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Taurisano, Paolo; Antonucci, Linda A; Fazio, Leonardo; Rampino, Antonio; Romano, Raffaella; Porcelli, Annamaria; Masellis, Rita; Colizzi, Marco; Quarto, Tiziana; Torretta, Silvia; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Pergola, Giulio; Bertolino, Alessandro; Blasi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor is targeted in the brain by endocannabinoids under physiological conditions as well as by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol under cannabis use. Furthermore, its signaling appears to affect brain cognitive processing. Recent findings highlight a crucial role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the mechanism of intraneuronal CB1 signaling transduction, while others indicate that two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs1406977 and rs20417) modulate expression of CB1 (CNR1) and COX-2 (PTGS2) coding genes, respectively. Here, our aim was to use fMRI to investigate in healthy humans whether these SNPs interact in modulating prefrontal activity during working memory processing and if this modulation is linked with cannabis use. We recruited 242 healthy subjects genotyped for CNR1 rs1406977 and PTGS2 rs20417 that performed the N-back working memory task during fMRI and were interviewed using the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire (CEQ). We found that the interaction between CNR1 rs1406977 and PTGS2 rs20417 is associated with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity such that specific genotype configurations (CNR1 C carriers/PTGS2 C carriers and CNR1 TT/PTGS2 GG) predict lower cortical response versus others in spite of similar behavioral accuracy. Furthermore, DLPFC activity in the cluster associated with the CNR1 by PTGS2 interaction was negatively correlated with behavioral efficiency and positively correlated with frequency of cannabis use in cannabis users. These results suggest that a genetically modulated balancing of signaling within the CB1-COX-2 pathway may reflect on more or less efficient patterns of prefrontal activity during working memory. Frequency of cannabis use may be a factor for further modulation of CNR1/PTGS2-mediated cortical processing associated with this cognitive process. PMID:27261878

  11. Seasonal variations and profile measurements of photolysis frequencies j(O1D) and j(NO2) at the ECHO forest field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, B.; Koppmann, R.; Rohrer, F.

    2006-06-01

    The Emission and Chemical Transformation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (ECHO) project investigated formation, transport, and photochemistry of biogenic organic compounds in a deciduous forest. Within the project, filterradiometers were used to measure photolysis frequencies j(O1D) (O3 + hv → O2+ O(1D)) and j(NO2) (NO2 + hv → NO + O(3P)) at different levels of a tower set up in a small clearing in a forest at Jülich, Germany. The tower served as a measurement platform for instruments in two photochemistry field campaigns during the summer seasons of 2002 and 2003. Filterradiometer measurements were made throughout a complete vegetation cycle to give an extended characterization of the field site UV radiation conditions. At fully developed foliage, 3-7% of above-forest values of j(O1D) and j(NO2) were obtained close to ground at the tower clearing, dependent on external conditions. In the course of the vegetation period, these ratios remained fairly constant. After fall of leaves, photolysis frequencies increased to about 33% of above-forest values. Profile measurements in undisturbed forest showed a strong decrease of j(NO2) by about 90% within 5 m below canopy top (≈33 m) and a slowed decrease to typically 2% at ground level. At the tower clearing the decrease was more gradual reaching 50% of above-canopy values approximately 10 m below canopy top under overcast conditions. With regard to photochemical conversion of biogenic compounds we estimated that degradation of the major reactive compound isoprene within the forest by OH and O3 was insignificant (<10%) if residence times were less than about 1 hour.

  12. Separation techniques.

    PubMed

    Duke, T

    1998-10-01

    The past two years have seen continued development of capillary electrophoresis methods. The separation performance of flowable sieving media now equals, and in some respects exceeds, that provided by gels. The application of microfabrication techniques to separation science is gaining pace. There is a continuing trend towards miniaturization and integration of separation with preparative or analytical steps. Innovative separation methods based on microfabrication technology include electrophoresis in purpose-designed molecular sieves, dielectric, trapping using microelectrodes, and force-free motion in Brownian ratchets. PMID:9818184

  13. Acoustophoresis separation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for acoustophoresis, i.e., the separation of species via acoustic waves. An ultrasonic transducer applies an acoustic wave to one end of a sample container containing at least two species having different acoustic absorptions. The wave has a frequency tuned to or harmonized with the point of resonance of the species to be separated. This wave causes the species to be driven to an opposite end of the sample container for removal. A second ultrasonic transducer may be provided to apply a second, oppositely directed acoustic wave to prevent undesired streaming. In addition, a radio frequency tuned to the mechanical resonance and coupled with a magnetic field can serve to identify a species in a medium comprising species with similar absorption coefficients, whereby an acoustic wave having a frequency corresponding to this gyrational rate can then be applied to sweep the identified species to one end of the container for removal.

  14. A Mechanism for Frequency Modulation in Songbirds Shared with Humans

    PubMed Central

    Margoliash, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In most animals that vocalize, control of fundamental frequency is a key element for effective communication. In humans, subglottal pressure controls vocal intensity but also influences fundamental frequency during phonation. Given the underlying similarities in the biomechanical mechanisms of vocalization in humans and songbirds, songbirds offer an attractive opportunity to study frequency modulation by pressure. Here, we present a novel technique for dynamic control of subsyringeal pressure in zebra finches. By regulating the opening of a custom-built fast valve connected to the air sac system, we achieved partial or total silencing of specific syllables, and could modify syllabic acoustics through more complex manipulations of air sac pressure. We also observed that more nuanced pressure variations over a limited interval during production of a syllable concomitantly affected the frequency of that syllable segment. These results can be explained in terms of a mathematical model for phonation that incorporates a nonlinear description for the vocal source capable of generating the observed frequency modulations induced by pressure variations. We conclude that the observed interaction between pressure and frequency was a feature of the source, not a result of feedback control. Our results indicate that, beyond regulating phonation or its absence, regulation of pressure is important for control of fundamental frequencies of vocalizations. Thus, although there are separate brainstem pathways for syringeal and respiratory control of song production, both can affect airflow and frequency. We hypothesize that the control of pressure and frequency is combined holistically at higher levels of the vocalization pathways. PMID:23825417

  15. Variations in fire severity and frequency as a driver of changes in succession and long-term patterns of carbon storage in Alaskan boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, J.; Kasischke, E. S.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L.; Chapin, F. S.

    2005-12-01

    Black spruce is the dominant forest cover type in the North American boreal region (they represent some 57 percent of all forests in this region). These spruce forests are a major North American terrestrial carbon reservoir because cold ground temperatures lead to low decomposition rates and the building up of carbon-rich layers of dead organic matter over century and longer time scales. The surface organic layers and living vegetation of these forests contain an estimated 22.6 Gt of carbon, with nearly two-thirds of this amount stored in the surface organic layer lying on top of mineral soil. There has been a significant increase in fire activity the boreal forest region of North America, with annual area burned doubling between the 1960s and 1990s in association with warming climates. This rise in temperature and disturbance from fire brings into question the fate of the large carbon reservoir present in the black spruce forests of this region. Here we present a conceptual framework based on a state-factors model that can be used to examine how variations in the fire regime alter successional pathways and carbon storage in the black spruce forests of Alaska. In particular, we focus on the factors and site conditions that will allow black spruce forests to switch to successional trajectories containing a significant deciduous component. To illustrate the concepts presented in this framework, results from recent research will be presented.

  16. Dosimetry of infant exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields: variation of 99th percentile induced electric field value by posture and skin-to-skin contact.

    PubMed

    Li, Congsheng; Wu, Tongning

    2015-04-01

    Infant exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields from power lines was numerically analyzed in this study. Dosimetric variability due to posture and skin-to-skin contact was evaluated using human anatomical models including a recently developed model of a 12-months-old infant. As proposed by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, the induced E-field strength (99th percentile value, E99 ) for the central nerve systems (E99_CNS ) and peripheral nerve system (E99_PNS ), were used as metrics. Results showed that the single (free of contact with others) infant model has lower E99 (E99_CNS and E99_PNS inclusive) compared with single adult and child models when exposed to the same power-frequency magnetic field. Also, studied postures of sitting, standing, or arm-up, would not change E99 _PNS . However, skin-to-skin contact with other models could significantly raise induced E-field strength in the infant (e.g., contact on 0.93% of the infant's total surface increased E99_PNS by 213%). Simulations with canonical models were conducted to assess different factors contributing to the E99 enhancement. Results indicated the importance of thoroughly investigating the conservativeness of current safety guidelines in the case of skin-to-skin contact, especially with infants. PMID:25708724

  17. Spatial and temporal variations of new particle formation in East Asia using an NPF-explicit WRF-chem model: North-south contrast in new particle formation frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, H.; Koike, Makoto; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Yutaka; Takami, A.; Takamura, T.; Yoon, Soh-joung; Kim, S. W.; Lim, Hyuntae; Fast, Jerome D.

    2013-10-27

    The new particle formation (NPF)-explicit version of the WRF-chem model, which we developed recently, can calculate the growth and sink of nucleated clusters explicitly with 20 aerosol size bins from 1 nm to 10 μm. In this study, the model is used to understand spatial and temporal variations of the frequency of NPF events and the concentrations of aerosols (condensation nuclei, CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) within the boundary layer in East Asia in spring 2009. Model simulations show distinct north-south contrast in the frequency and mechanism of NPF in East Asia. NPF mostly occurred over limited periods and regions between 30° and 45°N, such as northeast China, Korea, and Japan, including regions around active volcanoes (Miyakejima and Sakurajima). At these latitudes, NPF was considerably suppressed by high concentrations of preexisting particles under stagnant air conditions associated with high-pressure systems, while nucleation occurred more extensively on most days during the simulation period. Conversely, neither nucleation nor NPF occurred frequently south of 30°N because of lower SO2 emissions and H2SO4 concentrations. The period-averaged NPF frequency was 3 times higher at latitudes of 30° - 45°N than at latitudes of 20° - 30°N. The north-south contrast of NPF frequency is validated by surface measurements in outflow regions in East Asia. The period- and domain-averaged contribution of secondary particles is estimated to be 44% for CN (> 10 nm) and 26% for CCN at a supersaturation of 1.0% in our simulation, though the contribution is highly sensitive to the magnitudes and size distributions of primary aerosol emissions and the coefficients in the nucleation parameterizations.

  18. Increased Frequency of De Novo Copy Number Variations in Congenital Heart Disease by Integrative Analysis of SNP Array and Exome Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Murillo, Laura; Fromer, Menachem; Mazaika, Erica; Vardarajan, Badri; Italia, Michael; Leipzig, Jeremy; DePalma, Steven R.; Golhar, Ryan; Sanders, Stephan J.; Yamrom, Boris; Ronemus, Michael; Iossifov, Ivan; Willsey, A. Jeremy; State, Matthew W.; Kaltman, Jonathan R.; White, Peter S.; Shen, Yufeng; Warburton, Dorothy; Brueckner, Martina; Seidman, Christine; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Gelb, Bruce D.; Lifton, Richard; Seidman, Jonathan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chung, Wendy K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Congenital heart disease (CHD) is among the most common birth defects. Most cases are of unknown etiology. Objective To determine the contribution of de novo copy number variants (CNVs) in the etiology of sporadic CHD. Methods and Results We studied 538 CHD trios using genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and/or whole exome sequencing (WES). Results were experimentally validated using digital droplet PCR. We compared validated CNVs in CHD cases to CNVs in 1,301 healthy control trios. The two complementary high-resolution technologies identified 63 validated de novo CNVs in 51 CHD cases. A significant increase in CNV burden was observed when comparing CHD trios with healthy trios, using either SNP array (p=7x10−5, Odds Ratio (OR)=4.6) or WES data (p=6x10−4, OR=3.5) and remained after removing 16% of de novo CNV loci previously reported as pathogenic (p=0.02, OR=2.7). We observed recurrent de novo CNVs on 15q11.2 encompassing CYFIP1, NIPA1, and NIPA2 and single de novo CNVs encompassing DUSP1, JUN, JUP, MED15, MED9, PTPRE SREBF1, TOP2A, and ZEB2, genes that interact with established CHD proteins NKX2-5 and GATA4. Integrating de novo variants in WES and CNV data suggests that ETS1 is the pathogenic gene altered by 11q24.2-q25 deletions in Jacobsen syndrome and that CTBP2 is the pathogenic gene in 10q sub-telomeric deletions. Conclusions We demonstrate a significantly increased frequency of rare de novo CNVs in CHD patients compared with healthy controls and suggest several novel genetic loci for CHD. PMID:25205790

  19. Quantifying the climate change-induced variations in Saskatoon's Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves using stochastic rainfall generators and K-nearest neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabul Alam, Md.; Nazemi, Alireza; Elshorbagy, Amin

    2014-05-01

    Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves are among standard design criteria for various engineering applications, such as storm water management systems. Warming climate, however, changes the extreme rainfall quantiles represented by the IDF curves. This study attempts to construct the future IDF curves under possible climate change scenarios. For this purpose, a stochastic rainfall generator is used to spatially downscale the daily projections of Global Climate Models (GCMs) from coarse grid resolution to the point scale. The stochastically downscaled daily rainfall realizations can be further disaggregated to hourly and sub-hourly rainfall series using a deterministic disaggregation scheme developed based on the K-Nearest Neighbor (K-NN) method. We applied this framework for constructing the future IDF curves in the city of Saskatoon, Canada. As a model development step, the sensitivity of the K-NN disaggregation model to the number of nearest neighbors (i.e. window size) is evaluated during the baseline periods. The optimum window size is assigned based on the performance in reproducing the historical IDF curves. The optimum windows identified for 1-hour and 5-min temporal resolutions are then used to produce the future hourly and consequently, 5-min resolution rainfall based on the K-NN simulations. By using the simulated hourly and sub-hourly rainfall series and the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution future changes in IDF curves and associated uncertainties are quantified using a large ensemble of projections obtained for the CGCM3.1 and HadCM3 based on A1B, A2 and B1 emission scenarios in case of CMIP3 and RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 in case of CMIP5 datasets. The constructed IDF curves for the city of Saskatoon are then compared with corresponding historical relationships at various durations and/or return periods and are discussed based on different models, emission scenarios and/or simulation release (i.e. CMIP3 vs. CMIP5).

  20. Parametric Effects of Word Frequency in Memory for Mixed Frequency Lists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohnas, Lynn J.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The "word frequency paradox" refers to the finding that low frequency words are better recognized than high frequency words yet high frequency words are better recalled than low frequency words. Rather than comparing separate groups of low and high frequency words, we sought to quantify the functional relation between word frequency and…

  1. Char separator

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Francis T.

    1979-01-01

    Particulates removed from the flue gases produced in a fluidized-bed furnace are separated into high-and low-density portions. The low-density portion is predominantly char, and it is returned to the furnace or burned in a separate carbon burnup cell. The high-density portion, which is predominantly limestone products and ash, is discarded or reprocessed. According to another version, the material drained from the bed is separated, the resulting high-and low-density portions being treated in a manner similar to that in which the flue-gas particulates are treated.

  2. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  3. Stereoisomers Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Piotr

    The use of capillary electrophoresis for enantiomer separation and optical purity determination is presented. The contents start with basic information about the nature of stereoizomers and the mechanism of enantioseparation using capillary electrophoresis techniques. The molecules to be separated show identical chemical structure and electrochemical behavior. Therefore, the chiral recognition of enantiomers is possible only by bonding to chiral selector and the separation based on very small differences in complexation energies of diastereomer complexes formed. This method is useful for this purpose due to the fact that different compounds can be used as chiral selectors. The mostly used chiral selectors like cyclodextrins, crown ethers, chiral surfactants, macrocyclic antibiotics, transition metal complexes, natural, and synthetic polymers and their application for this purpose is also discussed. Finally, examples of practical applications of electromigration techniques for enantiomers separation and determination are presented.

  4. Battery separator

    SciTech Connect

    Balouskus, R.A.; Feinberg, S.C.; Lundquist, J.T.; Lundsager, C.B.

    1980-09-23

    A battery separator and a method of forming the same is described. The separator has good electrical conductivity and a high degree of inhibition to dendrite formation, and is in the form of a thin sheet formed from a substantially uniform mixture of a thermoplastic rubber and a filler in a volume ratio of from about 1:0.15 to 1:0.6. The thermoplastic rubber is preferably a styrene/elastomer/styrene block copolymer.

  5. Map Separates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2001-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps are printed using up to six colors (black, blue, green, red, brown, and purple). To prepare your own maps or artwork based on maps, you can order separate black-and-white film positives or negatives for any color printed on a USGS topographic map, or for one or more of the groups of related features printed in the same color on the map (such as drainage and drainage names from the blue plate.) In this document, examples are shown with appropriate ink color to illustrate the various separates. When purchased, separates are black-and-white film negatives or positives. After you receive a film separate or composite from the USGS, you can crop, enlarge or reduce, and edit to add or remove details to suit your special needs. For example, you can adapt the separates for making regional and local planning maps or for doing many kinds of studies or promotions by using the features you select and then printing them in colors of your choice.

  6. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-02-15

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HF heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave approach

  7. Two-photon experiments in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbodji, I.; Olislager, L.; Woodhead, E.; Galmes, B.; Cussey, J.; Furfaro, L.; Emplit, P.; Massar, S.; Phan Huy, K.; Merolla, J.-M.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the study of two-photon interference in the frequency domain. Bell and Hong-Ou-Mandel experiments are investigated. These experiments involve the manipulation of photons in the frequency domain, using off-the-shelf telecommunication components such as electro-optic phase modulators and narrow-band frequency filters. In the first experiment, photon pairs entangled in frequency are created and separated. Each photon is then directed through an independent electro-optic phase modulator. Variation of the radio-frequency parameters of the modulation gives rise to a well-controlled Bessel-shape two-photon interference pattern in the frequency domain. This is efficiently measured with narrow-band frequency filters and superconducting single photon detectors. Experimental measurements exhibit high visibilities (over 99 percent both for net and raw visibilities) and allow the (theoretically proven) optimal violation of a Bell inequality for our setup (by more than 18 standard deviations). The second experiment is a Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment in the frequency domain. We show that a grating (spatial domain) or a phase modulator (temporal domain) can be seen as a frequency beam splitter. A broadband spectrum of photon pairs is divided into two interleaved frequency combs, each one used as an independent input to this acting beam splitter. A theoretical calculation shows clear photon anti-bunching behavior.

  8. Isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  9. ISOTOPE SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, C.G.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

  10. b values and ω−γ seismic source models: Implications for tectonic stress variations along active crustal fault zones and the estimation of high-frequency strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanks, Thomas C.

    1979-01-01

    In this study the tectonic stress along active crustal fault zones is taken to be of the form , where  is the average tectonic stress at depth y and Δσp(x, y) is a seismologically observable, essentially random function of both fault plane coordinates; the stress differences arising in the course of crustal faulting are derived from Δσp(x, y). Empirically known frequency of occurrence statistics, moment-magnitude relationships, and the constancy of earthquake stress drops may be used to infer that the number of earthquakes N of dimension ≥r is of the form N ∼ 1/r2 and that the spectral composition of Δσp(x, y) is of the form , where  is the two-dimensional Fourier transform of Δσp(x, y) expressed in radial wave number k. The γ = 2 model of the far-field shear wave displacement spectrum is consistent with the spectral composition , provided that the number of contributions to the spectral representation of the radiated field at frequency ƒ goes as (k/k0)2, consistent with the quasi-static frequency of occurrence relation N ∼ 1/r2;k0 is a reference wave number associated with the reciprocal source dimension. Separately, a variety of seismologic observations suggests that the γ = 2 model is the one generally, although certainly not always, applicable to the high-frequency spectral decay of the far-field radiation of earthquakes. In this framework, then, b values near 1, the general validity of the γ = 2 model, and the constancy of earthquake stress drops independent of size are all related to the average spectral composition of. Should one of these change as a result of premonitory effects leading to failure, as has been specifically proposed for b values, it seems likely that one or all of the other characteristics will change as well from their normative values. Irrespective of these associations, the far-field, high-frequency shear radiation for the γ = 2 model in the presence of anelastic attenuation may be interpreted as

  11. Encoding voice fundamental frequency into vibrotactile frequency.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, M; Molitor, R D

    1979-10-01

    Measured in this study was the ability of eight hearing and five deaf subjects to identify the stress pattern in a short sentence from the variation in voice fundamental frequency (F0), when presented aurally (for hearing subjects) and when transformed into vibrotactile pulse frequency. Various transformations from F0 to pulse frequency were tested in an attempt to determine an optimum transformation, the amount of F0 information that could be transmitted, and what the limitations in the tactile channel might be. The results indicated that a one- or two-octave reduction of F0 vibrotactile frequency (transmitting every second or third glottal pulse) might result in a significant ability to discriminate the intonation patterns associated with moderate-to-strong patterns of sentence stress in English. However, accurate reception of the details of the intonation pattern may require a slower than normal pronounciation because of an apparent temporal indeterminacy of about 200 ms in the perception of variations in vibrotactile frequency. A performance deficit noted for the two prelingually, profoundly deaf subjects with marginally discriminable encodings offers some support for our previous hypothesis that there is a natural association between auditory pitch and perceived vibrotactile frequency. PMID:159917

  12. SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Stoughton, R.W.

    1961-10-24

    A process for separating tetravalent plutonium from aqueous solutions and from niobium and zirconium by precipitation on lanthanum oxalate is described. The oxalate ions of the precipitate may be decomposed by heating in the presence of an oxidizing agent, forming a plutonium compound readily soluble in acid. (AEC)

  13. Separation Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addington, Jean

    1992-01-01

    Describes eight-week short-term group designed to help separated or divorced men and women move through related adjustment phase in focused group setting. Discusses constructs that form the foundations of this short-term psychoeducational and support group and presents brief overview of psychological difficulties that occur as result of marital…

  14. Frequency, Gradience, and Variation in Consonant Insertion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Young-ran

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the extent to which linguistic behavior can be described in terms of the projection of patterns from existing lexical items, through an investigation of Korean reduplication. Korean has a productive pattern of reduplication in which a consonant is inserted in a vowel-initial base, illustrated by forms such as "alok"--"t…

  15. Spectral Separation of the Turbofan Engine Coherent Combustion Noise Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2008-01-01

    The core noise components of a dual spool turbofan engine (Honeywell TECH977) were separated by the use of a coherence function. A source location technique based on adjusting the time delay between the combustor pressure sensor signal and the far-field microphone signal to maximize the coherence and remove as much variation of the phase angle with frequency as possible was used. While adjusting the time delay to maximize the coherence and minimize the cross spectrum phase angle variation with frequency, the discovery was made that for the 130 microphone a 90.027 ms time shift worked best for the frequency band from 0 to 200 Hz while a 86.975 ms time shift worked best for the frequency band from 200 to 400 Hz. Since the 0 to 200 Hz band signal took more time to travel the same distance, it is slower than the 200 to 400 Hz band signal. This suggests the 0 to 200 Hz coherent cross spectral density band is partly due to indirect combustion noise attributed to hot spots interacting with the turbine. The signal in the 200 to 400 Hz frequency band is attributed mostly to direct combustion noise.

  16. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  17. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  18. Separation system

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Leslie S.

    1986-01-01

    A separation system for dewatering radioactive waste materials includes a disposal container, drive structure for receiving the container, and means for releasably attaching the container to the drive structure. Separation structure disposed in the container adjacent the inner surface of the side wall structure retains solids while allowing passage of liquids. Inlet port structure in the container top wall is normally closed by first valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the inlet port and discharge port structure at the container periphery receives liquid that passes through the separation structure and is normally closed by second valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the discharge ports. The container also includes coupling structure for releasable engagement with the centrifugal drive structure. Centrifugal force produced when the container is driven in rotation by the drive structure opens the valve structures, and radioactive waste material introduced into the container through the open inlet port is dewatered, and the waste is compacted. The ports are automatically closed by the valves when the container drum is not subjected to centrifugal force such that containment effectiveness is enhanced and exposure of personnel to radioactive materials is minimized.

  19. Component separations.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lior; McNichols, Colton H; Ramirez, Oscar M

    2012-02-01

    Component separation is a technique used to provide adequate coverage for midline abdominal wall defects such as a large ventral hernia. This surgical technique is based on subcutaneous lateral dissection, fasciotomy lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle, and dissection on the plane between external and internal oblique muscles with medial advancement of the block that includes the rectus muscle and its fascia. This release allows for medial advancement of the fascia and closure of up to 20-cm wide defects in the midline area. Since its original description, components separation technique underwent multiple modifications with the ultimate goal to decrease the morbidity associated with the traditional procedure. The extensive subcutaneous lateral dissection had been associated with ischemia of the midline skin edges, wound dehiscence, infection, and seroma. Although the current trend is to proceed with minimally invasive component separation and to reinforce the fascia with mesh, the basic principles of the techniques as described by Ramirez et al in 1990 have not changed over the years. Surgeons who deal with the management of abdominal wall defects are highly encouraged to include this technique in their collection of treatment options. PMID:23372455

  20. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  1. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  2. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  3. Artwork Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Under a grant from California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and LACMA (Los Angeles County Museum of Art) used image enhancement techniques to separate x-ray images of paintings when one had been painted on top of another. The technique is derived from computer processing of spacecraft-acquired imagery, and will allow earlier paintings, some of which have been covered for centuries, to be evaluated. JPL developed the program for "subtracting" the top painting and enhancing the bottom one, and believes an even more advanced system is possible.

  4. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  5. The separation procedure.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Edward M; Spitz, Lewis

    2015-10-01

    The various stages of the separation are carefully planned but despite this, variations which will change the schedule of the procedure may exist. In general the operation commences on the opposite side from the main procedure and then the twins are turned for the remainder of the operation. Each type of conjoined twin is different but basically thoracopagus involves the hearts, omphalopagus involves the liver and small intestine and ischiopagus involves the large intestine and genito-urinary system. Our results are presented together with interesting cases from which lessons have been learned. PMID:26382263

  6. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  7. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  8. Battery separator

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannoni, R.T.; Kung, J.K.J.; Choi, W.M.

    1987-10-13

    This patent describes a battery system composed of at least one pair of electrodes of opposite polarity, an electrolyte and a separator positioned between electrodes of opposite polarity. The improvement comprises that the separator is a microporous sheet composed of a substantially uniform composition of A. from 7 to 50 weight percent of a polymer mixture, the mixture formed from (a) from about 95 to about 40 weight percent of polyolefin formed from ethylene, propylene or mixtures thereof or a mixture of the polyolefins having a weight average molecular weight of at least about 3,000,000; and (b) from about 5 to about 60 weight percent of a polymeric blend formed from a polyethylene terpolymer and a vinyl or vinylidene halide polymer in a weight ratio of 19:1 to 1:3, the polyethylene terpolymer formed from (1) ethylene monomer, (2) at least one ethylenically unsaturated organic monomer selected from the group consisting of esters of unsaturated C/sub 3/-C/sub 20/ mono- or dicarboxylic acids, vinyl esters of saturated C/sub 2/-C/sub 18/ carboxylic acids, vinyl alkyl ethers wherein the alkyl group has 1-18 carbon atoms, vinyl or vinylidene halides, acrylonitrile, methacrylonitrile, norbornene, alpha-olefins of 3-12 carbon atoms, and vinyl aromatic compounds, and, (3) an additional monomer selected from the group consisting of ethylenically unsaturated C/sub 3/-C/sub 20/ carboxylic acids, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide; B. from 93 to 50 weight percent of a filler which is substantially inert with respect to the battery electrodes and electrolyte; and C. from 0 to 20 weight percent of plasticizer for at least one of the polymers of the composition.

  9. Analysis of L5 phase variations in GPS IIF satellites by the raw observation PPP approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sha; Becker, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    GPS modernization along with Glonass modernization and the emerging Galileo and Compass system has been highly anticipated by every GNSS user since several years. The third civilian L5 signal transmitted by the modernized GPS satellites brings us to the GNSS multi-frequency era. The first GPS IIF satellite was launched in May 2010, until now there are eight block IIF satellites in service and the remaining four IIF satellites are planned to be launched by 2016. The introduction of the third frequency to GPS and the usage of advanced atomic clocks not only provide the users more possibilities but also enable higher positioning accuracy. Nevertheless phase variations are found on the new L5 observation of GPS SVN62. Further investigations suggest that the variations of this satellite are strongly dependent on the satellite inner temperature variation caused by sun illumination. Besides achieving precise positioning accuracy, PPP is also frequently used as a tool to analyze and evaluate various GNSS errors, for instance, tropospheric delays and receiver clock errors. Other than with differential GNSS, it is possible to separate different errors and to identify the error sources with PPP. Conventional PPP is based on the ionosphere-free linear combination, in order to eliminate the first-order ionospheric delays. However only dual frequencies can be used to build ionosphere-free linear combination, which leads to the waste of the information on the third frequency. Furthermore, the frequency dependent errors can not be separated and traced. A new PPP approach that avoids using any linear combination is proposed recently, which is called the raw observation PPP. One advantage of the raw observation PPP approach is that data of all frequencies and all GNSS systems can be jointly used. In addition, the frequency dependent errors are possible to be separated, identified and analyzed. In this paper the raw observation PPP is utilized to analyze the phase variations on L5

  10. Fluency Variation in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim; Martins, Vanessa De Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    The Speech Fluency Profile of fluent adolescent speakers of Brazilian Portuguese, were examined with respect to gender and neurolinguistic variations. Speech samples of 130 male and female adolescents, aged between 12;0 and 17;11 years were gathered. They were analysed according to type of speech disruption; speech rate; and frequency of speech…

  11. Precision Spectroscopy of Hydrogen and Femtosecond Laser Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udem, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    A femtosecond frequency comb is a simple and compact tool that allows the phase coherent connection of the radio frequency domain (below 100 GHz) with the optical domain (above 200 THz). It greatly simplified high precision optical frequency measurements and provides the long awaited clockwork mechanism for an all-optical atomic clock. We have used such a frequency comb to measure the absolute frequency of the 1S-2S two-photon transition in atomic hydrogen, i.e. comparing it with the Cs ground state hyperfine splitting. By comparing data taken in 2003 with earlier measurements in 1999 we can set an upper limit on the variation of the 1S-2S transition frequency of (-29 ±57) Hz within 44 months. To derive limits on the drift rates of fundamental constant such as the fine structure constant, we combine these measurements with other optical frequency measurements in Hg^+ and in Yb^+ performed at NIST, Boulder/USA and at PTB, Braunschweig/Germany respectively. This combined method gives precise and separate restrictions for the fractional time variation of the fine structure constant and the Cs nuclear magnetic moment measured in Bohr magnetons. The latter is a measure of the drift rate of the strong interaction. We also report on efforts to convert the frequency comb technology to much shorter wavelength. Based on intra cavity high harmonic generation an XUV (up to 60 nm) frequency comb is generated with a repetition rate of more than 100 MHz useful for high resolution laser spectroscopy in this region.

  12. Parametric effects of word frequency effect in memory for mixed frequency lists

    PubMed Central

    Lohnas, Lynn J.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The word frequency paradox refers to the finding that low frequency words are better recognized than high frequency words yet high frequency words are better recalled than low frequency words. Rather than comparing separate groups of low and high frequency words, we sought to quantify the functional relation between word frequency and memory performance across the broad range of frequencies typically used in episodic memory experiments. Here we report that both low frequency and high frequency words are better recalled than mid-frequency words. In contrast, we only observe a low frequency advantage when participants were given a subsequent item recognition test. The U-shaped relation between word frequency and recall probability may help to explain inconsistent results in studies using mixed lists with separate groups of high and low frequency words. PMID:23834055

  13. Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    Much of modern research in the field of atomic, molecular, and optical science relies on lasers, which were invented some 50 years ago and perfected in five decades of intense research and development. Today, lasers and photonic technologies impact most fields of science and they have become indispensible in our daily lives. Laser frequency combs were conceived a decade ago as tools for the precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Through the development of optical frequency comb techniques, technique a setup of the size 1 ×1 m2, good for precision measurements of any frequency, and even commercially available, has replaced the elaborate previous frequency-chain schemes for optical frequency measurements, which only worked for selected frequencies. A true revolution in optical frequency measurements has occurred, paving the way for the creation of all-optical clocks clock with a precision that might approach 10-18. A decade later, frequency combs are now common equipment in all frequency metrology-oriented laboratories. They are also becoming enabling tools for an increasing number of applications, from the calibration of astronomical spectrographs to molecular spectroscopy. This chapter first describes the principle of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Some of the key technologies to generate such a frequency comb are then presented. Finally, a non-exhaustive overview of the growing applications is given.

  14. Radioactive-gas separation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, R.; King, K. J.; Nellis, D. O.; Nisson, R. S.; Robling, P.; Womack, W.

    1977-01-01

    Cryogenic technique recovers gases inexpensively. Method uses differences in vapor pressures, melting points, and boiling points of components in gaseous mixture. Series of temperature and pressure variations converts gases independently to solid and liquid states, thereby simplifying separation. Apparatus uses readily available cryogen and does not require expensive refrigeration equipment.

  15. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  16. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  17. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  18. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  19. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  20. 47 CFR 87.287 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.287 Section 87.287... Data Link Land Test Stations § 87.287 Frequencies. (a) The frequencies assignable to aircraft data link..., 136.925 MHz, 136.950 MHz, and 136.975 MHz. Interstitial frequencies separated by 8.33 kilohertz...

  1. Contour Integration across Spatial Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persike, Malte; Olzak, Lynn A.; Meinhardt, Gunter

    2009-01-01

    Association field models of contour integration suggest that local band-pass elements are spatially grouped to global contours within limited bands of spatial frequency (Field, Hayes, & Hess, 1993). While results for local orientation and spacing variation render support for AF models, effects of spatial frequency (SF) have rarely been addressed.…

  2. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.; Kaskey, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

  3. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, G.J.; Kaskey, J.A.

    1992-11-24

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics. 2 figs.

  4. Impulsive Injection for Compressor Stator Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    Flow control using impulsive injection from the suction surface of a stator vane has been applied in a low speed axial compressor. Impulsive injection is shown to significantly reduce separation relative to steady injection for vanes that were induced to separate by an increase in vane stagger angle of 4 degrees. Injected flow was applied to the airfoil suction surface using spanwise slots pitched in the streamwise direction. Injection was limited to the near-hub region, from 10 to 36 percent of span, to affect the dominant loss due to hub leakage flow. Actuation was provided externally using high-speed solenoid valves closely coupled to the vane tip. Variations in injected mass, frequency, and duty cycle are explored. The local corrected total pressure loss across the vane at the lower span region was reduced by over 20 percent. Additionally, low momentum fluid migrating from the hub region toward the tip was effectively suppressed resulting in an overall benefit which reduced corrected area averaged loss through the passage by 4 percent. The injection mass fraction used for impulsive actuation was typically less than 0.1 percent of the compressor through flow.

  5. Chromatic variations suppress suprathreshold brightness variations.

    PubMed

    Kingdom, Frederick A A; Bell, Jason; Gheorghiu, Elena; Malkoc, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Most objects in natural scenes are suprathreshold in both color (chromatic) and luminance contrast. How salient is each dimension? We have developed a novel method employing a stimulus similar to that used by B. C. Regan and J. D. Mollon (1997) who studied the relative saliencies of the two chromatic cardinal directions. Our stimuli consist of left- and right-oblique modulations of color and/or luminance defined within a lattice of circles. In the "separated" condition, the two modulations were presented separately as forced-choice pairs, and the task was to indicate which was more salient. In the "combined" condition, the two orthogonal-in-orientation modulations were added, and the task was to indicate the more salient orientation. The ratio of color to luminance contrast at the PSE was calculated for both conditions. Across color directions, 48% more luminance contrast relative to color contrast was required to achieve a PSE in the "combined" compared to the "separated" condition. A second experiment showed that the PSE difference was due to the luminance being masked by the color, rather than due to superior color grouping. We conclude that suprathreshold brightness variations are masked by suprathreshold color variations. PMID:20884478

  6. Simple sweep frequency generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorov, I.

    1985-01-01

    A sweep frequency generator is described whose center frequency can be varied from 10 kHz to 50 MHz, with seven 1 to 3 and 3 to 10 scales covering the 10 kHz to 30 MHz range and one 3 to 5 scale for the 30 to 50 MHz range. It consists of a tunable pulse generator with output voltage attenuator, a diode mixer for calibration, and a sawtooth voltage generator as a source of frequency deviation. The pulse generator is a multivibrator with two emitter coupled transistors and two diodes in the collector circuit of one. The first diode extends the tuning range and increases the frequency deviation, the second diode provides the necessary base bias to the other transistor. The pulse repetition rate is modulated either directly by the sweep voltage of the calibrating oscilloscope, this voltage being applied to the base of the transistor with the two diodes in its collector circuit through an additional attenuator or a special emitter follower, or by the separate sawtooth voltage generator. The latter is a conventional two transistor multivibrator and produces signals at any constant frequency within the 40 to 60 Hz range. The mixer receives unmodulated signals from a reference frequency source and produces different frequency signals which are sent through an RCR-filter to a calibrating oscilloscope.

  7. Geomagnetic anomaly detected at hydromagnetic wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meloni, A.; Medford, L. V.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1985-04-01

    We report the discovery, in northwestern Illinois, of a geomagnetic anomaly, using hydromagnetic wave frequencies as the source spectrum. Three portable magnetometer stations with computer-compatible digital data acquisition systems were operated in a longitude array at Piano and Ashton, Illinois, and Cascade, Iowa (total separation ˜200 km), in 1981-1982. Analysis of the natural geomagnetic field fluctuations in the hydromagnetic wave regime reveals that the vertical components of the detected fluctuations are essentially 180° out of phase between Plano/Ashton and Cascade for variations with periods ˜30-120 s. The observations can be modeled in terms of a shallow (˜10-20 km) north-south oriented geomagnetic anomaly of enhanced conductivity located between Ashton and Cascade, approximately parallel to the Mississippi River valley.

  8. Shoulder separation - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Separated shoulder - aftercare; Acromioclavicular joint separation - aftercare; A/C separation - aftercare ... Shoulder separation is not an injury to the main shoulder joint itself. It is an injury to the top ...

  9. Shoulder separation - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Separated shoulder - aftercare; Acromioclavicular joint separation - aftercare; A/C separation - aftercare ... Shoulder separation is not an injury to the main shoulder joint itself. It is an injury to ...

  10. Isotope separation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Arnush, Donald; MacKenzie, Kenneth R.; Wuerker, Ralph F.

    1980-01-01

    Isotope separation apparatus consisting of a plurality of cells disposed adjacent to each other in an evacuated container. A common magnetic field is established extending through all of the cells. A source of energetic electrons at one end of the container generates electrons which pass through the cells along the magnetic field lines. Each cell includes an array of collector plates arranged in parallel or in tandem within a common magnetic field. Sets of collector plates are disposed adjacent to each other in each cell. Means are provided for differentially energizing ions of a desired isotope by applying energy at the cyclotron resonant frequency of the desired isotope. As a result, the energized desired ions are preferentially collected by the collector plates.

  11. Feline Calicivirus Can Tolerate Gross Changes of Its Minor Capsid Protein Expression Levels Induced by Changing Translation Reinitiation Frequency or Use of a Separate VP2-Coding mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Caliciviruses use reinitiation of translation governed by a ‘termination upstream ribosomal binding site’ (TURBS) for expression of their minor capsid protein VP2. Mutation analysis allowed to identify sequences surrounding the translational start/stop site of the feline calicivirus (FCV) that fine tune reinitiation frequency. A selection of these changes was introduced into the infectious FCV cDNA clone to check the influence of altered VP2 levels on virus replication. In addition, full length constructs were established that displayed a conformation, in which VP2 expression occurred under control of a duplicated subgenomic promoter. Viable viruses recovered from such constructs revealed a rather broad range of VP2 expression levels but comparable growth kinetics showing that caliciviruses can tolerate gross changes of the VP2 expression level. PMID:25007260

  12. Rectification of low-frequency thermal waves in graded SicGe1 - c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Carlomagno, I.; Cimmelli, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study propagation of low-frequency thermal waves in graded SicGe1-c. We show that in some ranges of stoichiometry variation one obtains rectification of thermal waves, i.e., the system allows the propagation of waves in one direction but not in the opposite one through the graded system, or through a thin graded layer separating two different systems. The rectification of low-frequency thermal waves could be switched by imposing on the graded layer a suitable temperature gradient.

  13. Spatial variation of earthquake ground motion for application to soil-structure interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamson, N. )

    1992-03-01

    The spatial variation of strong ground motion from fifteen earthquakes recorded by the Lotung LSST strong motion array is analyzed. The earthquakes range in magnitude from 3.7 to 7.8 and in source distance from 4 to 80 km. In all a total of 533 station pairs are used with station separations ranging from 60 to 85 meters. The spatial variation of ground motion is divided into two parts: variation in the fourier phase (coherence), and variation in the Fourier amplitude. Empirical functions describing the frequency and separation distance dependence of the coherency and amplitude variation appropriate for use in engineering analyses are derived. Taken together, the spatial variation functions given in this study provide a complete description of the statistical properties of the horizontal components of the seismic wavefield assuming plane wave propagation for the S-wave window. Since the S-waves generally cause the largest shaking, these spatial variation functions are appropriate for use in engineering analyses of large structures.

  14. Spatial variation of earthquake ground motion for application to soil-structure interaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamson, N.

    1992-03-01

    The spatial variation of strong ground motion from fifteen earthquakes recorded by the Lotung LSST strong motion array is analyzed. The earthquakes range in magnitude from 3.7 to 7.8 and in source distance from 4 to 80 km. In all a total of 533 station pairs are used with station separations ranging from 60 to 85 meters. The spatial variation of ground motion is divided into two parts: variation in the fourier phase (coherence), and variation in the Fourier amplitude. Empirical functions describing the frequency and separation distance dependence of the coherency and amplitude variation appropriate for use in engineering analyses are derived. Taken together, the spatial variation functions given in this study provide a complete description of the statistical properties of the horizontal components of the seismic wavefield assuming plane wave propagation for the S-wave window. Since the S-waves generally cause the largest shaking, these spatial variation functions are appropriate for use in engineering analyses of large structures.

  15. Ferrofluid separator for nonferrous scrap separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, R.; Mir, L.

    1974-01-01

    Behavior of nonmagnetic objects within separator is essentially function of density, and independent of size or shape of objects. Results show close agreement between density of object and apparent density of ferrofluid required to float it. Results also demonstrate that very high separation rates are achievable by ferrofluid sink-float separation.

  16. Separability of agricultural crops with airborne scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, N. C.

    1983-01-01

    Backscattering measurements were acquired with airborne scatterometers over a site in Cass County, North Dakota on four days in the 1981 crop growing season. Data were acquired at three frequencies (L-, C- and Ku-bands), two polarizations (like and cross) and ten incidence angles (5 degrees to 50 degrees in 5 degree steps). Crop separability is studied in an hierarchical fashion. A two-class separability measure is defined, which compares within-class to between-class variability, to determine crop separability. The scatterometer channels with the best potential for crop separability are determined, based on this separability measure. Higher frequencies are more useful for discriminating small grains, while lower frequencies tend to separate non-small grains better. Some crops are more separable when row direction is taken into account. The effect of pixel purity is to increase the separability between all crops while not changing the order of useful scatterometer channels. Crude estimates of separability errors are calculated based on these analyses. These results are useful in selecting the parameters of active microwave systems in agricultural remote sensing.

  17. Analysis of frequency shifting in seismic signals using Gabor-Wigner transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Roshan; Sumathi, P.; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-12-01

    A hybrid time-frequency method known as Gabor-Wigner transform (GWT) is introduced in this paper for examining the time-frequency patterns of earthquake damaged buildings. GWT is developed by combining the Gabor transform (GT) and Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD). GT and WVD have been used separately on synthetic and recorded earthquake data to identify frequency shifting due to earthquake damages, but GT is prone to windowing effect and WVD involves ambiguity function. Hence to obtain better clarity and to remove the cross terms (frequency interference), GT and WVD are judiciously combined and the resultant GWT used to identify frequency shifting. Synthetic seismic response of an instrumented building and real-time earthquake data recorded on the building were investigated using GWT. It is found that GWT offers good accuracy for even slow variations in frequency, good time-frequency resolution, and localized response. Presented results confirm the efficacy of GWT when compared with GT and WVD used separately. Simulation results were quantified by the Renyi entropy measures and GWT shown to be an adequate technique in identifying localized response for structural damage detection.

  18. Challenges in the separation and analysis of scattered waves in angle-beam wavefield data

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2015-03-31

    The measurement of ultrasonic signals on a 2-D rectilinear grid resulting from a fixed source, referred to as wavefield imaging, is a powerful tool for visualizing wave propagation and scattering. Wavefield imaging provides a more complete picture of wave propagation than conventional single-point measurements, but creates more challenges for analysis. This work considers the development of wavefield-based methods for analyzing angle-beam wave propagation and scattering in plates. Methods of analysis focus on the separation of scattered waves from the total wavefield with the eventual goal of quantitative scatterer characterization in a laboratory environment. Two methods for wave separation are considered: frequency-wavenumber filtering and wavefield baseline subtraction. Frequency-wavenumber filtering is applied to wavefield data that are finely sampled in both space and time, whereas baseline subtraction is a technique that has typically been applied to individual signals recorded from fixed transducers rather than to full wavefield data. Baseline subtraction of wavefields, particularly for the frequency range considered here, is sensitive to both specimen alignment and temperature variations, whereas frequency-wavenumber methods are limited in their ability to separate waves traveling in the same direction. Results are shown for both methods with a focus on investigating and overcoming the challenges to full wavefield baseline subtraction.

  19. Numerical modeling of active separation control by synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aram, Shawn

    oriented slot is a pair of strong counter-rotating streamwise vortices and these are missing in the spanwise oriented slot configuration. A variety of flow statistics are computed that indicate that despite the smaller overall blockage represented by the streamwise oriented slot, it is more effective in increasing the momentum of the boundary layer and therefore is expected to be more effective in separation control. For further investigation, the effect of slot orientation at different operational conditions (jet velocity and frequency) on a separated flow over a wall-mounted hump is examined in the third part of this work. Comparison of various instantaneous integral quantities, time average aerodynamic parameters and separation bubble size between two slot configurations shows that the streamwise oriented slot provides better performance in all jet velocities and most forcing frequencies of the range of study. In the fourth and final part of the study, a canonical separated flow configuration is used to explore the rich flow physics and nonlinear dynamics of separated flows in a systematic manner and to establish a flow-physics based understanding of effective forcing schemes. This configuration consists of a three dimensional 9.5% thick flat plate with an elliptical leading edge and a blunt trailing edge with separation induced through the application of blowing and suction on the top boundary of the computational domain. The key aspect of this approach is that the separation bubble can be located in any position along the suction side of the plate with desired size along with separate control on the Reynolds number which is not possible by variation of angle of attack and/or free-stream velocity for an airfoil. This study shows that even this simple canonical separated flow is dominated by nonlinear interactions between the shear layer, separation bubble, and wake instabilities in a manner that is representative of more complex airfoil separation. The simple boundary

  20. Comparison of JPL-AIRSAR and DLR E-SAR images from the MAC Europe 1991 campaign over testsite Oberpfaffenhofen: Frequency and polarization dependent backscatter variations from agricultural fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmullius, C.; Nithack, J.

    1992-01-01

    On July 12, the MAC Europe '91 (Multi-Sensor Airborne Campaign) took place over test site Oberpfaffenhofen. The DLR Institute of Radio-Frequency Technology participated with its C-VV, X-VV, and X-HH Experimental Synthetic Aperture Radar (E-SAR). The high resolution E-SAR images with a pixel size between 1 and 2 m and the polarimetric AIRSAR images were analyzed. Using both sensors in combination is a unique opportunity to evaluate SAR images in a frequency range from P- to X-band and to investigate polarimetric information.

  1. Theory of low frequency noise transmission through turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matta, R. K.; Mani, R.

    1979-01-01

    Improvements of the existing theory of low frequency noise transmission through turbines and development of a working prediction tool are described. The existing actuator-disk model and a new finite-chord model were utilized in an analytical study. The interactive effect of adjacent blade rows, higher order spinning modes, blade-passage shocks, and duct area variations were considered separately. The improved theory was validated using the data acquired in an earlier NASA program. Computer programs incorporating the improved theory were produced for transmission loss prediction purposes. The programs were exercised parametrically and charts constructed to define approximately the low frequency noise transfer through turbines. The loss through the exhaust nozzle and flow(s) was also considered.

  2. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    DOEpatents

    Karlicek, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices.

  3. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    DOEpatents

    Karlicek, R.F.

    1982-08-10

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices. 11 figs.

  4. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  5. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Separation Anxiety KidsHealth > For Parents > Separation Anxiety Print A A ... both of you get through it. How Separation Anxiety Develops Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. ...

  6. Tailoring surface properties of polyethylene separator by low pressure 13.56 MHz RF oxygen plasma glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun; Liang, Chia-Han; Huang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Low-pressure plasma surface modification in a radio-frequency capacitively coupled glow discharge of oxygen gas was carried out to induce polar functional groups onto polyethylene membrane separator surfaces to enhance its hydrophilicity. The surface changes in surface free energy were monitored by static contact angle measurement. A significant increase in the surface energy of polyethylene membrane separators caused by the oxygen gas plasma modifications was observed. The static water contact angle of the plasma-modified membrane separator significantly decreased with the increase in treatment duration and plasma power. An obvious increase in the surface energy of the membrane separators owing to the oxidative effect of oxygen-gas-plasma modifications was also observed. Optical emission spectroscopy was carried out to analyze the chemical species generated by oxygen gas plasma surface modification. The variations in the surface morphology and chemical structure of the separators were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS showed significantly higher surface concentrations of oxygen functional groups in the oxygen-gas-plasma-modified polymeric separator surfaces than in the unmodified polymeric separator surface. The experimental results show the important role of chemical species in the interaction between oxygen gas plasmas and the separator surface, which can be controlled by surface modification to tailor the hydrophilicity of the separator.

  7. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  8. Variations of P2 in subpulse drifting pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, R.; Melrose, D. B.; Samsuddin, M. A.; Tu, Z. Y.; Han, X. H.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a model for subpulse separation period, P2, taking into account both the apparent motion of the visible point as a function of pulsar phase, ψ, and the possibility of abrupt jumps between different rotation states in non-corotating pulsar magnetospheres. We identify three frequencies: (i) the spin frequency of the star, (ii) the drift frequency of the magnetospheric plasma in the source region and (iii) the angular frequency of the visible point around its trajectory. We show how the last of these, which is neglected in traditional models by implicitly assuming the line of sight through the centre of the star, affects the interpretation of P2. We attribute the subpulse structure to emission from m antinodes distributed uniformly in azimuthal angle about the magnetic axis. We show that variations of P2 as a function of rotational phase or observing frequency arise naturally when the motion of the visible point is taken into account. We discuss possible application of our model in signifying overall field-line distortion at the emitting region. Abrupt changes in P2 can occur during state switching in the magnetosphere. We demonstrate that the unique value of P2 in each rotation state can be used, in principle, to relate the rotation state of the magnetospheres to subpulse drifting.

  9. Control of flow separation in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjeong; Choi, Sangho; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    Towards the development of successful control methods for separation delay in a turbulent boundary layer, we adopt a model flow field, in which a turbulent separation occurs above a flat plate (Na and Moin 1998 JFM), and apply controls to this flow for reducing the size of the separation bubble and investigating the interaction between the forcing and flow near the separation bubble. We provide a single-frequency forcing with zero net mass flow rate at the upstream of the separation bubble. At low forcing frequencies, spanwise vortices are generated and travel downstream, bringing high momentum toward the wall and reducing the size of the separation bubble. Also, these vortices cause the separation and reattachment points to travel downstream. On the other hand, at high forcing frequencies, the size of the separation bubble becomes smaller and larger in time, respectively, due to the pressure gradient alternating favorably and adversely in time. Supported by NRF-2011-0028032 and 2014048162.

  10. Controlling Separation in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Simon; Himmel, Christoph; Power, Bronwyn; Wakelam, Christian; Xu, Liping; Hynes, Tom; Hodson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Four examples of flow control: 1) Passive control of LP turbine blades (Laminar separation control). 2) Aspiration of a conventional axial compressor blade (Turbulent separation control). 3) Compressor blade designed for aspiration (Turbulent separation control). 4.Control of intakes in crosswinds (Turbulent separation control).

  11. Path Separability of Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, Emilie; Gavoille, Cyril

    In this paper we investigate the structural properties of k-path separable graphs, that are the graphs that can be separated by a set of k shortest paths. We identify several graph families having such path separability, and we show that this property is closed under minor taking. In particular we establish a list of forbidden minors for 1-path separable graphs.

  12. Coupling and tuning of modal frequencies in direct current biased microelectromechanical systems arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kambali, Prashant N.; Swain, Gyanadutta; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Buks, Eyal; Gottlieb, Oded

    2015-08-10

    Understanding the coupling of different modal frequencies and their tuning mechanisms has become essential to design multi-frequency MEMS devices. In this work, we fabricate a MEMS beam with fixed boundaries separated from two side electrodes and a bottom electrode. Subsequently, we perform experiments to obtain the frequency variation of in-plane and out-of-plane mechanical modes of the microbeam with respect to both DC bias and laser heating. We show that the frequencies of the two modes coincide at a certain DC bias, which in turn can also be varied due to temperature. Subsequently, we develop a theoretical model to predict the variation of the two modes and their coupling due to a variable gap between the microbeam and electrodes, initial tension, and fringing field coefficients. Finally, we discuss the influence of frequency tuning parameters in arrays of 3, 33, and 40 microbeams, respectively. It is also found that the frequency bandwidth of a microbeam array can be increased to as high as 25 kHz for a 40 microbeam array with a DC bias of 80 V.

  13. Coupling and tuning of modal frequencies in direct current biased microelectromechanical systems arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambali, Prashant N.; Swain, Gyanadutta; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Buks, Eyal; Gottlieb, Oded

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the coupling of different modal frequencies and their tuning mechanisms has become essential to design multi-frequency MEMS devices. In this work, we fabricate a MEMS beam with fixed boundaries separated from two side electrodes and a bottom electrode. Subsequently, we perform experiments to obtain the frequency variation of in-plane and out-of-plane mechanical modes of the microbeam with respect to both DC bias and laser heating. We show that the frequencies of the two modes coincide at a certain DC bias, which in turn can also be varied due to temperature. Subsequently, we develop a theoretical model to predict the variation of the two modes and their coupling due to a variable gap between the microbeam and electrodes, initial tension, and fringing field coefficients. Finally, we discuss the influence of frequency tuning parameters in arrays of 3, 33, and 40 microbeams, respectively. It is also found that the frequency bandwidth of a microbeam array can be increased to as high as 25 kHz for a 40 microbeam array with a DC bias of 80 V.

  14. Robust adiabatic sum frequency conversion.

    PubMed

    Suchowski, Haim; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav; Oron, Dan; Arie, Ady; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-07-20

    We discuss theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the robustness of the adiabatic sum frequency conversion method. This technique, borrowed from an analogous scheme of robust population transfer in atomic physics and nuclear magnetic resonance, enables the achievement of nearly full frequency conversion in a sum frequency generation process for a bandwidth up to two orders of magnitude wider than in conventional conversion schemes. We show that this scheme is robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and of the incoming light. These include the crystal temperature, the frequency of the incoming field, the pump intensity, the crystal length and the angle of incidence. Also, we show that this extremely broad bandwidth can be tuned to higher or lower central wavelengths by changing either the pump frequency or the crystal temperature. The detailed study of the properties of this converter is done using the Landau-Zener theory dealing with the adiabatic transitions in two level systems. PMID:19654679

  15. Magnetic Separation Dynamics of Colloidal Magnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, M.; Huijin Zhang,; You Qiang,

    2013-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are appealing candidates for analytical separation of heavy metal ions from waste water and separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. This work studies the separation dynamics and investigates the appropriate magnetic-field gradients. A dynamic study of colloidal MNPs was performed for steady-state flow. Measurements were conducted to record the separation time of particles as a function of magnetic field gradient. The drag and magnetic forces play a significant role on the separation time. A drop in saturation magnetization and variation of particle size occurs after surface functionalization of the MNPs; these are the primary factors that affect the separation time and velocity of the MNPs. The experimental results are correlated to a theoretical one-dimensional model.

  16. A New Device for Step-Down Inhibitory Avoidance Task—Effects of Low and High Frequency in a Novel Device for Passive Inhibitory Avoidance Task That Avoids Bioimpedance Variations

    PubMed Central

    Borba Filho, Gilvan Luiz; Zenki, Kamila Cagliari; Kalinine, Eduardo; Baggio, Suelen; Pettenuzzo, Letícia; Zimmer, Eduardo Rigon; Weis, Simone Nardin; Calcagnotto, Maria Elisa; Onofre de Souza, Diogo

    2015-01-01

    Background Step-down inhibitory avoidance task has been widely used to evaluate aversive memory, but crucial parameters inherent to traditional devices that may influence the behavior analysis (as stimulus frequency, animal’s bioimpedance) are frequently neglected. New Method We developed a new device for step-down inhibitory avoidance task by modifying the shape and distribution of the stainless steel bars in the box floor where the stimuli are applied. The bars are 2mm wide, with rectangular shape, arranged in pairs at intervals of 1cm from the next pairs. Each pair makes an electrical dipole where the polarity inverts after each pulse. This device also presents a component that acquires and records the exact current received by the animal foot and precisely controls the frequency of stimulus applied during the entire experiment. Result Different from conventional devices, this new apparatus increases the contact surface with bars and animal´s paws, allowing the electric current pass through the animal´s paws only, drastically reducing the influence of animal’s bioimpedance. The analysis of recorded data showed that the current received by the animal was practically the same as applied, independent of the animal´s body composition. Importantly, the aversive memory was observed at specific stimuli intensity and frequency (0.35 or 0.5 mA at 62 and 125Hz but not at 0.20 mA or 20 Hz). Moreover, with this device it was possible to observe the well-known step-down inhibitory avoidance task memory impairment induced by guanosine. Conclusion This new device offers a substantial improvement for behavioral analysis in step-down inhibitory avoidance task and allows us to precisely compare data from different animals with distinct body composition. PMID:25706879

  17. Automatic oscillator frequency control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A frequency control system makes an initial correction of the frequency of its own timing circuit after comparison against a frequency of known accuracy and then sequentially checks and corrects the frequencies of several voltage controlled local oscillator circuits. The timing circuit initiates the machine cycles of a central processing unit which applies a frequency index to an input register in a modulo-sum frequency divider stage and enables a multiplexer to clock an accumulator register in the divider stage with a cyclical signal derived from the oscillator circuit being checked. Upon expiration of the interval, the processing unit compares the remainder held as the contents of the accumulator against a stored zero error constant and applies an appropriate correction word to a correction stage to shift the frequency of the oscillator being checked. A signal from the accumulator register may be used to drive a phase plane ROM and, with periodic shifts in the applied frequency index, to provide frequency shift keying of the resultant output signal. Interposition of a phase adder between the accumulator register and phase plane ROM permits phase shift keying of the output signal by periodic variation in the value of a phase index applied to one input of the phase adder.

  18. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Liqiu, Wei E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-07

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  19. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liqiu, Wei; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-01

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  20. Study of a novel rotary cyclone gas-solid separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zhiguang; Deng, Xingyong

    2003-08-01

    Based on the analytical study of the characteristics of fine particle motion in swirling flow, a new design idea on flow organization and construction aimed at increasing the positive radial flow in the separation chamber of the rotary cyclone separator (PRV type) was proposed. Experimental verification including the test of variation of separation efficiency and pressure loss with the first and secondary flow ratio show that this new type separator has higher and more stable separation efficiency in broad flow ratio range while the pressure loss is far below the conventional rotary cyclone separator and even comparable with that of simple cyclone separator

  1. Optimal Control of Airfoil Flow Separation using Fluidic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Arireza F.

    as well as F+ were evaluated and discussed. The computational model predictions showed good agreement with the experimental data. It was observed that different angles of attack and flap angles have different requirements for the minimum value of the momentum coefficient, Cμ, in order for the SJA to be effective for control of separation. It was also found that the variation of F + noticeably affects the lift and drag forces acting on the airfoil. The optimum values of parameters during open loop control simulations have been applied in order to introduce the optimal open loop control outcome. An innovative approach has been implemented to formulate optimal frequencies and momentum ratios of vortex shedding which depends on angle of attack and static pressure of the separation zone in the upper chord. Optimal open loop results have been compared with the optimal closed loop results. Cumulative case studies in the matter of angle of attacks, flap angles, Re, Cμ and F+ provide a convincing collection of evidence to the following conclusion. An improvement of a direct closed loop control was demonstrated, and an analytical formula describing the properties of a separated flow and vortex shedding was proposed. Best AFC solutions are offered by providing optimal frequencies and momentum ratios at a variety of flow conditions.

  2. Self-assembly of amorphous biophotonic nanostructures by phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Eric R.; Noh, Heeso; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Cao, Hui; Prum, Richard O.

    2009-04-23

    Some of the most vivid colors in the animal kingdom are created not by pigments, but by wavelength-selective scattering of light from nanostructures. Here we investigate quasi-ordered nanostructures of avian feather barbs which produce vivid non-iridescent colors. These {beta}-keratin and air nanostructures are found in two basic morphologies: tortuous channels and amorphous packings of spheres. Each class of nanostructure is isotropic and has a pronounced characteristic length scale of variation in composition. These local structural correlations lead to strong backscattering over a narrow range of optical frequencies and little variation with angle of incidence. Such optical properties play important roles in social and sexual communication. To be effective, birds need to precisely control the development of these nanoscale structures, yet little is known about how they grow. We hypothesize that multiple lineages of birds have convergently evolved to exploit phase separation and kinetic arrest to self-assemble spongy color-producing nanostructures in feather barbs. Observed avian nanostructures are strikingly similar to those self-assembled during the phase separation of fluid mixtures; the channel and sphere morphologies are characteristic of phase separation by spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth, respectively. These unstable structures are locked-in by the kinetic arrest of the {beta}-keratin matrix, likely through the entanglement or cross-linking of supermolecular {beta}-keratin fibers. Using the power of self-assembly, birds can robustly realize a diverse range of nanoscopic morphologies with relatively small physical and chemical changes during feather development.

  3. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  4. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Sounding for Planetary Volatiles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    EM sounding is divided by loss tangent << 1 (surface-penetrating radars) and >> 1 (inductive methods). The former have high resolution and responses dominated by dielectric permittivity. They have been useful for sounding the polar caps of Mars and are very promising to image the shells of icy satellites as well as the uppermost crusts of silicate bodies. The latter have poorer resolution but greater penetration depth, responses dominated by electrical conductivity, and are the subject of this talk. Low-frequency inductive methods are further divided by comparing the source-receiver separation to the skin depth. Large separations are parametric in frequency so that the variation of EM response with frequency is translated to change in conductivity with depth. Parametric soundings can exploit natural sources from the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, or atmosphere. Small source-sensor separations are geometric with transmitter-receiver positions: both conductivity and permittivity can be recovered as a function of frequency (a dielectric spectrum), but at greater resource requirements. Subsurface liquid water is an optimal low-frequency EM target because even small quantities of dissolved ions make it a powerful electrical conductor compared to dry, resistive, silicate crusts. Water at kms or even tens of kms can be detected using the magnetotelluric, geomagnetic-depth sounding, or wave-tilt methods: these are all natural-source soundings using different combinations of field components and receiver geometries. If natural sources are weak or absent, a transmitter can be used to obtain high SNR; the time-domain EM (TDEM) method has been used extensively for terrestrial groundwater exploration. Using a ballistically deployed 200-m diameter transmitter loop, TDEM can detect groundwater at depths of several km. If landed in a region of strong local crustal magnetism, the characteristic Larmor frequency of liquid water can be detected with a TDEM-like setup using

  5. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  6. Chaotic attractors with separated scrolls

    SciTech Connect

    Bouallegue, Kais

    2015-07-15

    This paper proposes a new behavior of chaotic attractors with separated scrolls while combining Julia's process with Chua's attractor and Lorenz's attractor. The main motivation of this work is the ability to generate a set of separated scrolls with different behaviors, which in turn allows us to choose one or many scrolls combined with modulation (amplitude and frequency) for secure communication or synchronization. This set seems a new class of hyperchaos because each element of this set looks like a simple chaotic attractor with one positive Lyapunov exponent, so the cardinal of this set is greater than one. This new approach could be used to generate more general higher-dimensional hyperchaotic attractor for more potential application. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results.

  7. Chaotic attractors with separated scrolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouallegue, Kais

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a new behavior of chaotic attractors with separated scrolls while combining Julia's process with Chua's attractor and Lorenz's attractor. The main motivation of this work is the ability to generate a set of separated scrolls with different behaviors, which in turn allows us to choose one or many scrolls combined with modulation (amplitude and frequency) for secure communication or synchronization. This set seems a new class of hyperchaos because each element of this set looks like a simple chaotic attractor with one positive Lyapunov exponent, so the cardinal of this set is greater than one. This new approach could be used to generate more general higher-dimensional hyperchaotic attractor for more potential application. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results.

  8. Separation Control using Lorentz Force Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.; Tucker, A.; Thomas, S.

    2003-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of Lorentz force actuators for separation control, flow visualization experiments were conducted in a low-speed water tunnel. Salt was added to the tunnel to yield an electrical conductivity of one half of seawater. The setup consisted of a 1.3 m long flat plate followed by a 15^o ramp. The boundary layer was tripped near the flat plate leading edge, resulting in a fully turbulent 2D boundary layer. The Lorentz force actuator had 3 mm wide surface mounted electrodes and permanent magnets. The actuator, which was placed just upstream of the ramp, could be used to produce forces in the streamwise or spanwise direction. To reduce electrolysis and subsequent corrosion, the input power was modulated thus producing pulsatile forcing. The Reynolds number based on the freestream velocity and ramp length was ˜ 10^4. The flow separated shortly after the ramp and vortex shedding at a dimensionless frequency of ˜ 2 was observed. Although both streamwise and spanwise forcing were successful in reducing the separated region, the latter was much more effective. The spanwise forcing was most effective at frequencies 10 to 20 times the natural shedding frequency, whereas the streamwise forcing was effective at frequencies closer to the natural shedding frequency. The effectiveness of spanwise forcing is attributed to the generation of streamwise vorticity. Forcing in the direction opposite to the freestream resulted in complete separation at the start of the ramp.

  9. Separating Pumping and Other Influences on Groundwater Head Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoori, V.; Western, A. W.; Peterson, T. J.; Costelloe, J.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamics of unconfined groundwater levels are usually the result of numerous and interacting factors, such as land cover change, climate variability and groundwater pumping. Estimating the impact from pumping is highly significant for resource management but also very challenging. A variety of methods are used to model water-table dynamics influenced by pumping, ranging from spatially explicit, numerical models to stochastic approaches. Transfer function noise (TFN) modelling can be used to model the dynamic behaviour of a wide range of hydrologic variables, including time series of groundwater head. Recently, TFN models have been developed to better link water table dynamics with different types of individual stresses, including pumping (Von Asmuth et al. 2002). Peterson & Western (2011) advanced the transfer function noise model of Von Asmuth et al. (2002) to account for non-linear hydrological processes by inclusion of a parsimonious vertically lumped soil moisture storage(SMS). Shapoori et al. (2011) proposed an improved time series formulation for estimation of the impacts of pumping. That study undertook a synthetic assessment of the ability of a range of time series models to represent the impacts of pumping by applying them to groundwater head time series from a synthetic aquifer. This paper further expands the Shapoori at al. (2011) time series method for quantifying the impact of groundwater pumping within unconfined sedimentary aquifers by applying it to real data and by taking account of a surface water body. The study area is the Clydebank groundwater subregion located in Victoria Australia. Nine salinity control pumping bores are used in some of the worst salinity areas to lower the groundwater table and consequently reduce soil salinity. The method has been applied to 43 observation bores and the results show that the model has good predictive performance with mean and minimum coefficient efficiency values of 0.7 and 0.5 respectively. In addition to estimating the pumping effect on head, preliminary work indicates that the volume of extraction from the surface body due to pumping and the transmissivity and storativity of the aquifer can be estimated. The latter are very consistent with pumping test results. This method could efficiently provide important information for management of coupled surface-groundwater systems and for characterising aquifer properties from observation and pumping data only. Moreover, the time series parameters have a reasonable spatial correlation. Future work will use this to develop multi-site groundwater time series methods. Reference Peterson ,T.J. and Western A.W.(2011). Time-series modelling of groundwater head and its de-composition to historic climate periods, 34th IAHR World Congress, Brisbane, Australia Shapoori, V., T. J. Peterson , A. W. Western and J. Costelloe (2011). Quantifying the impact of pumping on groundwater heads using observation data and advanced time series analysis. International Congress On Modelling and Simulation (MODSIM) Perth, Australia Von asmuth, J. R., Bierkens, M. F. P. and Maas, K.(2002). Transfer function-noise modeling in continuous time using predefined impulse reponse functions, Water Resources Research 46(1), 30-40

  10. Ionene membrane battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moacanin, J.; Tom, H. Y.

    1969-01-01

    Ionic transport characteristics of ionenes, insoluble membranes from soluble polyelectrolyte compositions, are studied for possible application in a battery separator. Effectiveness of the thin film of separator membrane essentially determines battery lifetime.

  11. Magnetic separation of algae

    DOEpatents

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  12. Method for isotope separation by photodeflection

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1977-01-01

    In the method of separating isotopes wherein a desired isotope species is selectively deflected out of a beam of mixed isotopes by irradiating the beam with a directed beam of light of narrowly defined frequency which is selectively absorbed by the desired species, the improvement comprising irradiating the deflected beam with light from other light sources whose frequencies are selected to cause the depopulation of any metastable excited states.

  13. Assessing the value of multi-receiver low-frequency electromagnetic-induction (EMI) measurement for assessing variation in soil moisture content in field experiments with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Peter; Binley, Andrew; Dodd, Ian; Whalley, Richard; Watts, Chris; Ashton, Rhys; Ober, Eric

    2014-05-01

    In large plant breeding field trials with multiple genotypes, measuring soil water status (an indicator of crop water uptake) by conventional techniques (e.g. core extraction and penetration resistance) is limited by the cost and effort needed to achieve sufficient replication to apply robust statistical analysis. Geophysical methods may provide a more cost-effective means of more assessing valuable information about soil water status for such studies. We present here results from a field experiment using geophysical techniques for remote mapping of soil water content on sandy loam and silt loam soils in spring/summer 2013 in the UK. The aim of the study was to assess electromagnetic-induction (EMI) conductivity measurements for sensitivity to variations in shallow soil electrical properties and the spatial and temporal mapping of soil water. The CMD Mini-Explorer (GF Instruments) operates with three receiver coils at fixed distances from a transmitter coil (0.32 m, 0.71 m, 1.2 m). Measurement of magnetic field quadrature in horizontal coplanar (HC) and vertical coplanar (VC) of the three receiver coils provides six depths of investigation for the given coil spacing cumulative sensitivities. At the two field sites the instrument was applied to measuring apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) below 7.0 x 1.8 m plots consisting of 23 rain fed winter wheat cultivars and bare soil fallow control plots. These plots were sown in March 2013 and organised into a randomised block design. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys along 15 m transects were also conducted at the two sites in order to compare EMI measured ECa. Our results show that progressive soil drying at both sites due to crop uptake significantly decreased (p<0.05) soil ECa. The difference in soil ECa as a result of water uptake between cultivars was found to be significant (p<0.05) from one of the coil configurations (coil spacing 1.8m in HC mode), and only at the silty loam site (no significant

  14. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  15. Meniscus membranes for separations

    DOEpatents

    Dye, Robert C.; Jorgensen, Betty; Pesiri, David R.

    2004-01-27

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  16. Meniscus Membranes For Separation

    DOEpatents

    Dye, Robert C.; Jorgensen, Betty; Pesiri, David R.

    2005-09-20

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  17. Zirconium isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Siddall, M.B.

    1984-12-11

    A method of separating zirconium isotopes by converting the zirconium to its iodide salt prior to separation by usual isotope methods is disclosed. After separation the desired isotopes are converted from the salt to the metal by the van Arkel-de Boer iodide process.

  18. Space Shuttle separation mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, W. F.

    1979-01-01

    The development of space shuttle separation devices is reviewed to illustrate the mechanisms involved in separating the orbiter from the Boeing 747 carrier aircraft and from the externally mounted propellant tank. Other aspects of the separation device development discussed include design evolution, operational experience during the orbiter approach and landing tests, and the work to be accomplished before an operational system becomes a reality.

  19. Space shuttle separation mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The development of space shuttle separation devices is reviewed to illustrate the mechanisms involved in separating the Orbiter from the Boeing 747 carrier aircraft and from the externally mounted propellant tank. Other aspects of the separation device development discussed include design evolution, operational experience during the orbiter approach and landing tests, and the work required to produce an operational system.

  20. Low-frequency magnetic fluctuation spectra in the magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Richard E.; Gary, S. Peter; Anderson, Brian J.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Hudson, Mary K.

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations have delineated several different kinds of enhanced magnetic fluctuation spectra below the proton cyclotron frequency in the terrestrial magnetosheath. A model is presented that represents the variation of plasma parameters across the plasma depletion layer and into the magnetosheath proper. Using this model, we find that many of the properties of the observed spectra follow directly from the predictions of linear Vlasov instability theory. The observed progression of spectral features is a natural progression from mirror mode to merged (in frequency range) proton and He(2+) cyclotron modes to bifurcated (in frequency range) cyclotron modes as plasma convects earthward in the magnetosheath. The necessary change in dispersion surface topology from separated proton and He(2+) cyclotron surfaces at low beta to merged surfaces at high beta is described.

  1. Geographic variation in animal colour polymorphisms and its role in speciation.

    PubMed

    McLean, Claire A; Stuart-Fox, Devi

    2014-11-01

    Polymorphic species, in which multiple variants coexist within a population, are often used as model systems in evolutionary biology. Recent research has been dominated by the hypothesis that polymorphism can be a precursor to speciation. To date, the majority of research regarding polymorphism and speciation has focused on whether polymorphism is maintained within a population or whether morphs within populations may diverge to form separate species (sympatric speciation); however, the geographical context of speciation in polymorphic systems is likely to be both diverse and complex. In this review, we draw attention to the geographic variation in morph composition and frequencies that characterises many, if not most polymorphic species. Recent theoretical and empirical developments suggest that such variation in the number, type and frequency of morphs present among populations can increase the probability of speciation. Thus, the geographical context of a polymorphism requires a greater research focus. Here, we review the prevalence, causes and evolutionary consequences of geographic variation in polymorphism in colour-polymorphic animal species. The prevalence and nature of geographic variation in polymorphism suggests that polymorphism may be a precursor to and facilitate speciation more commonly than appreciated previously. We argue that a better understanding of the processes generating geographic variation in polymorphism is vital to understanding how polymorphism can promote speciation. PMID:24528520

  2. Safety shutdown separators

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Steven Allen; Anakor, Ifenna Kingsley; Farrell, Greg Robert

    2015-06-30

    The present invention pertains to electrochemical cells which comprise (a) an anode; (b) a cathode; (c) a solid porous separator, such as a polyolefin, xerogel, or inorganic oxide separator; and (d) a nonaqueous electrolyte, wherein the separator comprises a porous membrane having a microporous coating comprising polymer particles which have not coalesced to form a continuous film. This microporous coating on the separator acts as a safety shutdown layer that rapidly increases the internal resistivity and shuts the cell down upon heating to an elevated temperature, such as 110.degree. C. Also provided are methods for increasing the safety of an electrochemical cell by utilizing such separators with a safety shutdown layer.

  3. Operating Frequencies for Educational Satellite Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Jai P.

    Part of a continuing study of application of communication satellites for helping to meet educational needs, this memorandum discusses operating frequencies for educational satellite services. Each of the factors affecting choice of transmission frequencies is identified and discussed in a separate section. Included among these factors are…

  4. Transform domain steganography with blind source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouny, Ismail

    2015-05-01

    This paper applies blind source separation or independent component analysis for images that may contain mixtures of text, audio, or other images for steganography purposes. The paper focuses on separating mixtures in the transform domain such as Fourier domain or the Wavelet domain. The study addresses the effectiveness of steganography when using linear mixtures of multimedia components and the ability of standard blind sources separation techniques to discern hidden multimedia messages. Mixing in the space, frequency, and wavelet (scale) domains is compared. Effectiveness is measured using mean square error rate between original and recovered images.

  5. Linear capacitive displacement sensor with frequency readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    A simple, inherently linear technique for measuring changes in the separation of the mirrors of an optical cavity is reported. The capacitor, made up of the reflective metallic coatings, is part of a feedback loop which adjusts the frequency of an oscillator to be proportional to the mirror separation. A linearity of 0.2 percent full scale was achieved for separations up to 0.5 mm with a resolution of 10 nm.

  6. Dielectrophoretic separation of bioparticles in microdevices: a review.

    PubMed

    Jubery, Talukder Z; Srivastava, Soumya K; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, dielectrophoretic force has been used to manipulate colloids, inert particles, and biological microparticles, such as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, cancer cells, bacteria, yeast, microorganisms, proteins, DNA, etc. This specific electrokinetic technique has been used for trapping, sorting, focusing, filtration, patterning, assembly, and separating biological entities/particles suspended in a buffer medium. Dielectrophoretic forces acting on particles depend on various parameters, for example, charge of the particle, geometry of the device, dielectric constant of the medium and particle, and physiology of the particle. Therefore, to design an effective micro-/nanofluidic separation platform, it is necessary to understand the role of the aforementioned parameters on particle motion. In this paper, we review studies particularly related to dielectrophoretic separation in microfluidic devices. Both experimental and theoretical works by several researchers are highlighted in this article covering AC and DC DEP. In addition, AC/DC DEP, which uses a combination of low frequency AC and DC voltage to manipulate bioparticles, has been discussed briefly. Contactless DEP, a variation of DC DEP in which electrodes do not come in contact with particles, has also been reviewed. Moreover, dielectrophoretic force-based field flow fractionations are featured to demonstrate the bioparticle separation in microfluidic device. In numerical front, a comprehensive review is provided starting from the most simplified effective moment Stokes-drag (EMSD) method to the most advanced interface resolved method. Unlike EMSD method, recently developed advanced numerical methods consider the size and shape of the particle in the electric and flow field calculations, and these methods provide much more accurate results than the EMSD method for microparticles. PMID:24338825

  7. Aptamers in Affinity Separations: Stationary Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelet, Corinne; Peyrin, Eric

    The use of DNA or RNA aptamers as tools in analytical chemistry is a very promising field of research because of their capabilities to bind specifically the target molecules with an affinity similar to that of antibodies. Notably, they appear to be of great interest as target-specific ligands for the separation and capture of various analytes in affinity chromatography and related affinity-based methods such as magnetic bead technology. In this chapter, the recent developments of these aptamer-based separation/capture approaches are addressed.

  8. Two-frequency Ramsey interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, D.; Muga, J. G.

    2007-02-15

    We investigate Ramsey interferometry for two separated fields oscillating with different frequencies. It is shown that the interplay between average and relative detuning leads to interference effects not present in the standard, single-frequency setup. For a large free-flight time of ground-state atoms before entering the first field region, the Ramsey fringes with respect to the relative detuning become much narrower than the usual ones. The stability of these effects with respect to phase or velocity fluctuations is discussed.

  9. High frequency intensity fluctuations: Comparison of theory with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Steven D.; Bradley, David L.; Culver, R. Lee

    2003-10-01

    Amplitude fluctuations were measured during August 2002 near San Diego using 20 and 40 kHz cw and fm signals. Source-receiver separation was 1 km; source depths were 10 m to 67 m; receiver hydrophone depths were 44 m to 217 m. A 15-element chain of CTD sensors was towed to measure horizontal temperature and salinity variation with 1m resolution. Theory exists explaining the relationship between amplitude fluctuations and acoustic frequency, source-receiver separation, and index of refraction patch size in the ocean [e.g., Flatte et al., Sound Transmission Through a Fluctuating Ocean (Cambridge Press, 1979); Uscinsky et al., ``Intensity Fluctuations. Part 1: Theory,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 74 (1983)]. However, the amplitude fluctuations we observe are much lower than that predicted by theory [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113, 2333 (2003)]. Our frequencies are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those used in the experiments upon which the theory is based and our propagation ranges are considerable shorter 1 km versus many km. Results will be discussed from a more detailed analysis of the ray path locations within the water column activity (Langmuir cell formation and internal wave passage).

  10. Active management of naturally separated flow over a solid surface. Part 2. The separation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, A.; Wygnanski, I.

    2004-07-01

    The controlled separation of flow from an inclined straight flap at high inclination angles was investigated experimentally. The separation process was initiated by an abrupt change in the excitation emanating from a slot at the flap shoulder. A complete cessation of the actuation resulted in formation of a large vortex above the flap akin to the familiar ‘dynamic stall vortex’ (DSV) seen over oscillating airfoils in pitch. The DSV temporarily increased the aerodynamic load over the flap before it dropped to its low separated value. The duration of this overload decreased as the flap inclination increased. The use of periodic excitation during separation slowed down the rate of separation and changed its character depending on the amplitude and the frequency used. Forcing separation by switching the excitation to a high frequency (3 {<} F(+} {<) 8) reduced or even eliminated the increase in flap loading that is associated with the DSV. A switch to low frequencies (F(+} {<) 1) extended the duration of separation and increased the transient overload during the initial stage of the process.

  11. Can accelerometers detect mass variations in Amazonian trees?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Gentine, Pierre; Guerin, Marceau; Hut, Rolf; Oliveira, Rafael; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The mass of trees is influenced by physiological processes within the tree (e.g. transpiration and root water uptake), as well as external loads (e.g. intercepted precipitation). Recent studies have found diurnal variations in radar backscatter over vegetated areas, which might be attributed to mass changes of the vegetation layer. Field measurements are required to study the driving processes. This study aims to use measured three-dimensional displacement and acceleration of trees, to detect and quantify their diurnal (bio)mass variations. Accelerometers and dendrometers were installed on seven different tree species in the Amazon rainforest. Trees were selected to cover a broad range of wood density. Using spectral analysis, the governing frequencies in the acceleration time series were found. The governing frequencies showed a diurnal pattern, as well as a change during precipitation events. Our results suggest that we can separate and potentially quantify tree mass changes due to (1) internal water redistribution and (2) intercepted precipitation. This will allow further investigation of the effect of precipitation and water stress on tree dynamics in forest canopies.

  12. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

  13. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, K.S.

    1975-10-03

    A photochromatographic method for isotope separation is described. An isotopically mixed molecular species is adsorbed on an adsorptive surface, and the adsorbed molecules are irradiated with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thus separate them from the undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes. (BLM)

  14. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  15. Contributions of 18 Additional DNA Sequence Variations in the Gene Encoding Apolipoprotein E to Explaining Variation in Quantitative Measures of Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Stengård, Jari H.; Clark, Andrew G.; Weiss, Kenneth M.; Kardia, Sharon; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ehnholm, Christian; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is a major constituent of many lipoprotein particles. Previous genetic studies have focused on six genotypes defined by three alleles, denoted ε2, ε3, and ε4, encoded by two variable exonic sites that segregate in most populations. We have reported studies of the distribution of alleles of 20 biallelic variable sites in the gene encoding the ApoE molecule within and among samples, ascertained without regard to health, from each of three populations: African Americans from Jackson, Miss.; Europeans from North Karelia, Finland; and non-Hispanic European Americans from Rochester, Minn. Here we ask (1) how much variation in blood levels of ApoE (lnApoE), of total cholesterol (TC), of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and of triglyceride (lnTG) is statistically explained by variation among APOE genotypes defined by the ε2, ε3, and ε4 alleles; (2) how much additional variation in these traits is explained by genotypes defined by combining the two variable sites that define these three alleles with one or more additional variable sites; and (3) what are the locations and relative allele frequencies of the sites that define multisite genotypes that significantly improve the statistical explanation of variation beyond that provided by the genotypes defined by the ε2, ε3, and ε4 alleles, separately for each of the six gender-population strata. This study establishes that the use of only genotypes defined by the ε2, ε3, and ε4 alleles gives an incomplete picture of the contribution that the variation in the APOE gene makes to the statistical explanation of interindividual variation in blood measurements of lipid metabolism. The addition of variable sites to the genotype definition significantly improved the ability to explain variation in lnApoE and in TC and resulted in the explanation of variation in HDL-C and in lnTG. The combination of additional sites that explained the greatest amount of trait variation was different for

  16. HILIC separation mechanisms of tetracyclines on amino bonded silica column

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of mobile phase variations on the chromatographic separation on amino bonded silica column in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) were investigated for four zwitterionic tetracyclines (TCs): oxytetracycline, doxycycline, chlortetracycline and tetracycline. A mixed-mode retention m...

  17. Laser-frequency multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    A high quality mode locked pulse train was obtained at 9.55 micrometers, the CO2 wavelength chosen for frequency doubling into the atmospheric window at 4.8 micrometers. The pulse train consists of a 3 micro sec burst of 1.5 nsec pulses separated by 40 nsec, in a TEM(00) mode and with a total energy of 100 mJ. The pulse intensity without focussing is about 3 MW/sq.cm., already quite close to the target intensity of 10 MW/sq.cm. for frequency doubling in a AgGaSe2 crystal. The mode-locked train is obtained by intracavity modulation at 12.5 MHz using a germanium crystal driven with a power of about 30 Watts. Line selection is achieved firstly by the use of a 0.92 mm thick CaF2 plate at the Brewster angle within the cavity, which completely suppresses 10.6 micrometer band radiation. Secondly, a particular rotational line, the P20 at 9.55 micrometers, is selected by the injection of a continuous beam is mode-matched to the pulsed laser cavity using a long focal length lens, and for best line-locking it is necessary to fine tune the length of the pulsed laser resonator. Injection causes substantial depression of the gain switched spike.

  18. Variational Approach to SAW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlatsky, Sergei F.; Reinhardt, S.; Lach; Ovchinnikov, Yu.

    1996-03-01

    A new variational technique is used to analyze both analytically and numerically the scaling behavior of Self Avoiding Walks. We present a set of lower bounds for the survival provability (the ratio of total number of self avoiding paths to total number of random paths) which is based on Jensen inequality. This set is generated by the hierarchy of different trial hamiltonians which correspond to: unconstrained random walk, mean field approximation, original Flory model and to a new approach which allows to vary independently the scales of fluctuations, corresponding to different path length scales. The D=2, D=3, and Darrow 4, cases are analyzed separately. The results of analytical variational procedure reproduce classical mean field exponents for small scales and Flory - type critical exponents for large scales, and present new estimates for the chemical potential of SAW. Possible generalizations to branching self avoiding paths are discussed. The numerical algorithm which is based on proposed trial hamiltonian might increase the efficiency with which the chemical potential and scaling properties of chain molecules with a finite number of discrete conformations can be computed. This work was supported in part by ONR Grant N00014-94-0647.

  19. The separation of adult separation anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Gordon, Robert; Abelli, Marianna; Pini, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) categorization of mental disorders places "separation anxiety disorder" within the broad group of anxiety disorders, and its diagnosis no longer rests on establishing an onset during childhood or adolescence. In previous editions of DSM, it was included within the disorders usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescence, with the requirement for an onset of symptoms before the age of 18 years: symptomatic adults could only receive a retrospective diagnosis, based on establishing this early onset. The new position of separation anxiety disorder is based upon the findings of epidemiological studies that revealed the unexpectedly high prevalence of the condition in adults, often in individuals with an onset of symptoms after the teenage years; its prominent place within the DSM-5 group of anxiety disorders should encourage further research into its epidemiology, etiology, and treatment. This review examines the clinical features and boundaries of the condition, and offers guidance on how it can be distinguished from other anxiety disorders and other mental disorders in which "separation anxiety" may be apparent. PMID:27503572

  20. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  1. Long-term variation of the typhoon trajectory pattern estimated from the typhoon best track data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, S.; Ito, K.; Ueno, G.

    2014-12-01

    The long-term change of the typhoon trajectory pattern has been estimated based on the typhoon best track data for these 50 years. Typhoons are intense tropical cyclones forming in the north-western part of the Pacific Ocean. The long-term changes of the typhoon intensity and occurrence frequency have been examined by many studies. On the other hand, the present study focuses on the the long-term change of the typhoon trajectories. Since the typhoon trajectory pattern may affect the risks of typhoon hazards in a particular region, its long-term change is important in planning actions to reduce the risk of typhoon hazards. We estimated the variation of a typical pattern of typhoon trajectories from the typhoon best track data by using the Gaussian process regression technique. In order to exclude the effect of a seasonal variation, a variation on a longer time scale than an annual variation was considered separately from a seasonal variation. The result indicates north-south shifts of the typhoon trajectory pattern on a 5 year or longer time scale, which is discriminable from the seasonal variation.

  2. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

    1959-03-10

    The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

  3. Method for separating isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  4. Adventures in maceral separation

    SciTech Connect

    Dyrkacz, G.R.

    1994-02-01

    Progress has been made in recent years in the science of maceral separation. However, there are many areas that can be improved and new areas investigated. Power of density gradient centrifugation to physically resolve macerals and submaceral species coupled with other instrumental techniques is attractive for defining the limits of coal heterogeneity as well as investigating the ability of other separation methods.

  5. Translating Mouse Vocalizations: Prosody and Frequency Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Lahvis, Garet P.; Alleva, Enrico; Scattoni, Maria Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Mental illness can include impaired abilities to express emotions or respond to the emotions of others. Speech provides a mechanism for expressing emotions, by both what words are spoken and by the melody or intonation of speech (prosody). Through the perception of variations in prosody, an individual can detect changes in another's emotional state. Prosodic features of mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), indicated by changes in frequency and amplitude, also convey information. Dams retrieve pups that emit separation calls, females approach males emitting solicitous calls, and mice can become fearful of a cue associated with the vocalizations of a distressed conspecific. Since acoustic features of mouse USVs respond to drugs and genetic manipulations that influence reward circuits, USV analysis can be employed to examine how genes influence social motivation, affect regulation, and communication. The purpose of this review is to discuss how genetic and developmental factors influence aspects of the mouse vocal repertoire and how mice respond to the vocalizations of their conspecifics. To generate falsifiable hypotheses about the emotional content of particular calls, this review addresses USV analysis within the framework of affective neuroscience (e.g. measures of motivated behavior such as conditioned place preference tests, brain activity, and systemic physiology). Suggested future studies include employment of an expanded array of physiological and statistical approaches to identify the salient acoustic features of mouse vocalizations. We are particularly interested in rearing environments that incorporate sufficient spatial and temporal complexity to familiarize developing mice with a broader array of affective states. PMID:20497235

  6. Variational integrators for electric circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Ober-Blöbaum, Sina; Tao, Molei; Cheng, Mulin; Owhadi, Houman; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2013-06-01

    In this contribution, we develop a variational integrator for the simulation of (stochastic and multiscale) electric circuits. When considering the dynamics of an electric circuit, one is faced with three special situations: 1. The system involves external (control) forcing through external (controlled) voltage sources and resistors. 2. The system is constrained via the Kirchhoff current (KCL) and voltage laws (KVL). 3. The Lagrangian is degenerate. Based on a geometric setting, an appropriate variational formulation is presented to model the circuit from which the equations of motion are derived. A time-discrete variational formulation provides an iteration scheme for the simulation of the electric circuit. Dependent on the discretization, the intrinsic degeneracy of the system can be canceled for the discrete variational scheme. In this way, a variational integrator is constructed that gains several advantages compared to standard integration tools for circuits; in particular, a comparison to BDF methods (which are usually the method of choice for the simulation of electric circuits) shows that even for simple LCR circuits, a better energy behavior and frequency spectrum preservation can be observed using the developed variational integrator.

  7. Indecision on decisional separability.

    PubMed

    Mack, Michael L; Richler, Jennifer J; Gauthier, Isabel; Palmeri, Thomas J

    2011-02-01

    The theoretical framework of General Recognition Theory (GRT; Ashby & Townsend, Psychological Review, 93, 154-179, 1986) coupled with the empirical analysis tools of Multidimensional Signal Detection Analysis (MSDA; Kadlec & Townsend, Multidimensional models of perception and recognition, pp. 181-228, 1992) have become one important method for assessing dimensional interactions in perceptual decision-making. In this article, we critically examine MSDA and characterize cases where it is unable to discriminate two kinds of dimensional interactions: perceptual separability and decisional separability. We performed simulations with known instances of violations of perceptual or decisional separability, applied MSDA to the data generated by these simulations, and evaluated MSDA on its ability to accurately characterize the perceptual versus decisional source of these simulated dimensional interactions. Critical cases of violations of perceptual separability are often mischaracterized by MSDA as violations of decisional separability. PMID:21327365

  8. Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, Ingo; Morisato, Atsushi

    1998-01-13

    A separation membrane useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is chosen from the group consisting of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R.sub.2 is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) ›PMP!. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations.

  9. Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, I.; Morisato, Atsushi

    1998-01-13

    A separation membrane is described which is useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula shown in the accompanying diagram, wherein R{sub 1} is chosen from the group consisting of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R{sub 2} is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP]. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations. 4 figs.

  10. Membrane separation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Stookey, D.J.; Patton, C.J.; Malcolm, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    Membrane separations of interest here are not to be confused with barrier separations of the type employed in the uranium enrichment plant at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. There isotopes of uranium hexafluoride were separated by the free-molecular or Knudsen flow of the gas mixture through the pores and orifices created within a porous nickel media which was sometimes referred to as a membrane. In barrier separation, an enrichment of gases of differing molecular weights is accomplished by the differing gaseous diffusion rates within the porous media. By contrast the membranes of interest here are thin, dense, continuous films, typically formed from polymers. The separation of species is accomplished by the dissolution of the gases in the polymer and their diffusion across the solid film thickness under a concentration gradient according to Fick's law. This process is commonly referred to as membrane permeation.

  11. Isothermal separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.

    1982-01-01

    The isothermal processes of membrane separation, supercritical extraction and chromatography were examined using availability analysis. The general approach was to derive equations that identified where energy is consumed in these processes and how they compare with conventional separation methods. These separation methods are characterized by pure work inputs, chiefly in the form of a pressure drop which supplies the required energy. Equations were derived for the energy requirement in terms of regular solution theory. This approach is believed to accurately predict the work of separation in terms of the heat of solution and the entropy of mixing. It can form the basis of a convenient calculation method for optimizing membrane and solvent properties for particular applications. Calculations were made on the energy requirements for a membrane process separating air into its components.

  12. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

  13. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.C.

    1998-07-07

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors. 10 figs.

  14. Patterned variation in prehistoric chiefdoms

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Robert D.; Peterson, Christian E.

    2006-01-01

    Comparative study of early complex societies (chiefdoms) conjures visions of a cultural evolutionary emphasis on similarities and societal typology. Variation within the group has not been as systematically examined but offers an even more productive avenue of approach to fundamental principles of organization and change. Three widely separated trajectories of early chiefdom development are compared here: the Valley of Oaxaca (Mexico), the Alto Magdalena (Colombia), and Northeast China. Archaeological data from all three regions are analyzed with the same tools to reveal variation in human activities, relationships, and interactions as these change in the emergence of chiefly communities. Patterning in this variation suggests the operation of underlying general principles, which are offered as hypotheses that merit further investigation and evaluation in comparative study of a much larger number of cases. PMID:16473941

  15. The cellular basis for parallel neural transmission of a high-frequency stimulus and its low-frequency envelope

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Jason W.; Longtin, André; Benda, Jan; Maler, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    Sensory stimuli often have rich temporal and spatial structure. One class of stimuli that are common to visual and auditory systems and, as we show, the electrosensory system are signals that contain power in a narrow range of temporal (or spatial) frequencies. Characteristic of this class of signals is a slower variation in their amplitude, otherwise known as an envelope. There is evidence suggesting that, in the visual cortex, both narrowband stimuli and their envelopes are coded for in separate and parallel streams. The implementation of this parallel transmission is not well understood at the cellular level. We have identified the cellular basis for the parallel transmission of signal and envelope in the electrosensory system: a two-cell network consisting of an interneuron connected to a pyramidal cell by means of a slow synapse. This circuit could, in principle, be implemented in the auditory or visual cortex by the previously identified biophysics of cortical interneurons. PMID:16983081

  16. Dynamic separation of pulmonary and cardiac changes in electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Deibele, J M; Luepschen, H; Leonhardt, S

    2008-06-01

    In spontaneously breathing or ventilated subjects, it is difficult to image cardiac-related conductivity changes using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) due to the high amplitude of the ventilation component. Previous attempts to separate these components included either electrocardiogram-gated averaging, frequency domain filtering or holding the breath while performing the measurements. However, such methods are either not able to produce continuous real-time images or to fully separate cardiac and pulmonary changes. The aim of this work was to develop a new dynamic filtering method for the online separation of pulmonary and cardiac changes avoiding the drawbacks of the previous attempts. The approach is based on estimating template functions for the pulmonary and cardiac components by means of principal component analysis and frequency domain filtering. Then, these templates are fitted into the input signals. The new method enables an observer to examine the variation of the cardiac signal beat-by-beat after a one-time setup period of 20 s. Preliminary in vivo results of two healthy subjects are presented. The results are superior to frequency domain filtering and in good agreement with signals averaged over several cardiac cycles. The method does not depend on ECG or other a priori knowledge. The apparent validity of the method's ability to separate cardiac and pulmonary changes in EIT images was shown and has to be confirmed in future studies. The algorithm opens up new possibilities for future clinical trials on continuous monitoring by means of EIT and for the examination of the relation between the cardiac component and lung perfusion. PMID:18544813

  17. Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, Robert L.; Rea, Alan; Asquith, William H.

    1999-01-01

    A regional frequency analysis was conducted to estimate the depth-duration frequency of precipitation for 12 durations in Oklahoma (15, 30, and 60 minutes; 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours; and 1, 3, and 7 days). Seven selected frequencies, expressed as recurrence intervals, were investigated (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years). L-moment statistics were used to summarize depth-duration data and to determine the appropriate statistical distributions. Three different rain-gage networks provided the data (15minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). The 60-minute, and 1-hour; and the 24-hour, and 1-day durations were analyzed separately. Data were used from rain-gage stations with at least 10-years of record and within Oklahoma or about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the data for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. The L-moment statistics for depths for all durations were calculated for each station using unbiased L-mo-ment estimators for the mean, L-scale, L-coefficient of variation, L-skew, and L-kur-tosis. The relation between L-skew and L-kurtosis (L-moment ratio diagram) and goodness-of-fit measures were used to select the frequency distributions. The three-parameter generalized logistic distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 15-, 30-, and 60-minute annual maxima; and the three-parameter generalized extreme-value distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 1-hour to 7-day annual maxima. The mean for each station and duration was corrected for the bias associated with fixed interval recording of precipitation amounts. The L-scale and spatially averaged L-skew statistics were used to compute the location, scale, and shape parameters of the selected distribution for each station and duration. The three parameters were used to calculate the depth-duration-frequency relations for each station. The precipitation depths for selected frequencies were contoured from weighted depth

  18. High frequency gyrokinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, R. A.; Lee, W. W.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.

    2007-07-15

    The gyrokinetic approach for arbitrary frequency dynamics in magnetized plasmas is explored, using the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory. Contrary to low-frequency gyrokinetics, which views each particle as a rigid charged ring, arbitrary frequency response of a particle is described by a quickly changing Kruskal ring. This approach allows the separation of gyrocenter and gyrophase responses and thus allows for, in many situations, larger time steps for the gyrocenter push than for the gyrophase push. The gyrophase response which determines the shape of Kruskal rings can be described by a Fourier series in gyrophase for some problems, thus allowing control over the cyclotron harmonics at which the plasma responds. A computational algorithm for particle-in-cell simulation based on this concept has been developed. An example of the ion Bernstein wave is used to illustrate its numerical properties, and comparison with a direct Lorentz-force approach is presented.

  19. Relationship between the transition frequency of local fluid flow and the peak frequency of attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cheng-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Bing; Pan, Yi-Xin; Teng, Xin-Bao

    2016-03-01

    Local fluid flow (LFF) at the mesoscopic scale is the main dissipation mechanism of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous media within the seismic frequency band. LFF is easily influenced by the structure and boundary conditions of the porous media, which leads to different behaviors of the peak frequency of attenuation. The associated transition frequency can provide detailed information about the trend of LFF; therefore, research on the transition frequency of LFF and its relationship with the peak frequency of the corresponding attenuation (i.e., inverse of quality factor) facilitates the detailed understanding of the effect of inner structures and boundary conditions in porous media. In this study, we firstly obtain the transition frequency of fluid flux based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and the fast Fourier transform algorithm in a sample containing one repeating unit cell (RUC). We then analyze changes of these two frequencies in porous media with different porous properties. Finally, we extend our analysis to the influence of the undrained boundary condition on the transition frequency and peak frequency in porous media with multiple RUCs. This setup can facilitate the understanding of the effect from the undrained boundary condition. Results demonstrate that these two frequencies have the same trend at low water saturation, but amplitude variations differ between the frequencies as the amount of saturation increases. However, for cases of high water saturation, both the trend and the amplitude variation of these two frequencies fit well with each other.

  20. A Joint Viterbi Algorithm to Separate Cochannel FM Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a method for separating cochannel FM signals. We show that the Viterbi algorithm, traditionally limited to estimation of digital quantities, can jointly track analog FM signals by quantizing the derivative of their instantaneous frequencies.

  1. High frequency noise studies at the Hartousov mofette area (CZE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Andreas; Flores-Estrella, Hortencia; Pommerencke, Julia; Umlauft, Josefine

    2014-05-01

    Ambient noise analysis has been used as a reliable tool to investigate sub-surface structures at seismological quiet regions with none or less specific seismic events. Here, we consider the acoustic signals from a single mofette at the Hartoušov area (CZE) as a noise-like high frequency source caused by multiple near surface degassing processes in a restricted location. From this assumption we have used different array geometries for recording at least one hour of continuous noise. We installed triangular arrays with 3 component geophones: the first deployment consisted on two co-centric triangles with side length of 30 and 50 m with the mofette in the center; the second deployment consisted on two triangular arrays, both with side length of 30 m, co-directional to the mofette. Furthermore, we also installed profiles with 24 channels and vertical geophones locating them in different positions with respect to the mofette. In this work, we present preliminary results from the data analysis dependent on the geometry, to show the characteristics of the noise wave-field referring to frequency content and propagation features, such as directionality and surface wave velocity. The spectral analysis shows that the energy is concentrated in a frequency band among 10 and 40 Hz. However, in this interval there is no evidence of any exclusive fundamental frequencies. From this, man-induced influences can be identified as intermittent signal peaks in narrow frequency bands and can be separated to receive the revised mofette wave-field record. The inversion of dispersive surface waves, that were detected by interferometric methods, provides a velocity model down to 12 m with an S-wave velocity between 160 and 180 m/s on the uppermost layer. Furthermore, the interferometric signal properties indicate that it is not possible to characterize the mofette as a punctual source, but rather as a conglomerate of multiple sources with time and location variations.

  2. Process for phase separation

    DOEpatents

    Comolli, Alfred G.

    1979-01-01

    This invention provides a continuous process for separating a gaseous phase from a hydrocarbon liquid containing carbonaceous particulates and gases. The liquid is fed to a cylindrical separator, with the gaseous phase being removed therefrom as an overhead product, whereas the hydrocarbon liquid and the particulates are withdrawn as a bottoms product. By feeding the liquid tangentially to the separator and maintaining a particulate-liquid slurry downward velocity of from about 0.01 to about 0.25 fps in the separator, a total solids weight percent in the slurry of from about 0.1 to about 30%, a slurry temperature of from about 550.degree. to about 900.degree. F., a slurry residence time in the separator of from about 30 to about 360 seconds, and a length/diameter ratio for the separator of from about 20/1 to about 50/1, so that the characterization factor, .alpha., defined as ##STR1## DOES NOT EXCEED ABOUT 48 (.degree.R sec.sup.2)/ft, the deposit of carbonaceous materials on the interior surface of the separator may be substantially eliminated.

  3. Novel Separation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Mariella, R

    2011-02-17

    The separation of actinides and other elements of interest for nuclear forensics and threat reduction is currently performed using decades-old chemistries and ion-exchange columns. We propose to determine the technical feasibility of a novel method for separating actinide ions in solution. This method is based upon isotachophoresis (ITP), which has been applied in the purification of pharmaceuticals and other biochemical applications. This technique has the potential to separate inorganic ions more effectively than existing methods, which is key to analyzing very small samples. We will perform a quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of specific isotachophoretic approaches including predicting the physical and chemical properties, such as ion mobility, of inorganic ions under specific solvent conditions using a combination of ab initio calculations and semi-empirical methods. We expect to obtain a thorough understanding of the analytical systems parameters under which ITP is most effective for the separation of inorganic samples, including the influence of the double layer surrounding actinide ions, the Debye length for different ions and ion complexes, and Debye-Hueckel limits. Inorganic separations are key to nuclear forensics for countering terrorism and nuclear proliferation. If found to be feasible and potentially superior to currently used separation approaches, ITP could provide the conceptual basis for an improved means to separate samples of nuclear explosion debris for nuclear forensic analysis, in support of the Laboratory's missions in homeland and national security.

  4. Enhance separations with electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhara, H.S.

    1994-05-01

    To satisfy growing environmental regulations, control energy costs, or just to stay competitive, one must improve existing separation technologies and make them more efficient. New challenges in food processing and requirements for novel purification technologies in the biotech industry also will require more efficient separation techniques. This paper discusses some enhanced separation processes based on the application of an electric field in the combined-fields approach. In a combined-fields approach, the emphasis is on the generation of additional driving forces to work simultaneously with the conventional driving force of the process. Here the authors concentrate on the application of an electric field to generate the additional driving force.

  5. Unconventional cyclone separators

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, P. )

    1993-01-01

    Conventional cyclone separators are seldom suitable for dust removal from gases according to present standards. The reason is the presence of secondary currents within the cyclone body, which disturb the process of separation as predicted by elementary cyclone theory. Interference can be avoided by special design of the cyclone, including the geometry of the separation chamber, the position of openings, use of flow guides within the cyclone, the dimension and the geometry of the hopper, bleeding and bypassing of the gas, use of multicyclones, and means for dust agglomeration.

  6. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, F.T.

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu/sub 5/ type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo/sub 4/ and CaNi/sub 5/, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen cn produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  7. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  8. Rotary drum separator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barone, Michael R. (Inventor); Murdoch, Karen (Inventor); Scull, Timothy D. (Inventor); Fort, James H. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A rotary phase separator system generally includes a step-shaped rotary drum separator (RDS) and a motor assembly. The aspect ratio of the stepped drum minimizes power for both the accumulating and pumping functions. The accumulator section of the RDS has a relatively small diameter to minimize power losses within an axial length to define significant volume for accumulation. The pumping section of the RDS has a larger diameter to increase pumping head but has a shorter axial length to minimize power losses. The motor assembly drives the RDS at a low speed for separating and accumulating and a higher speed for pumping.

  9. Materials separation by dielectrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagar, A. D.; Rose, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of vacuum dielectrophoresis as a method for particulate materials separation in a microgravity environment was investigated. Particle separations were performed in a specially constructed miniature drop-tower with a residence time of about 0.3 sec. Particle motion in such a system is independent of size and based only on density and dielectric constant, for a given electric field. The observed separations and deflections exceeded the theoretical predictions, probably due to multiparticle effects. In any case, this approach should work well in microgravity for many classes of materials, with relatively simple apparatus and low weight and power requirements.

  10. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto- optical modulators and forward propagating Brillouin scattering appear in the spectrum. PMID:23546253

  11. Autistic Children's Responses to Separation and Reunion with Their Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissanayake, Cheryl; Crossley, Stella A.

    1997-01-01

    A study of 16 children with autism, 16 typical children, and 16 children with Downs syndrome (ages 3-6) investigated children's responses to separation and reunion with their mothers. No differences were found between groups; however, the children with disabilities showed more individual variation in separation and reunion patterns. (Author/CR)

  12. Rotating speed isolation and its application to rolling element bearing fault diagnosis under large speed variation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Dan; Jiang, Kuosheng

    2015-07-01

    During the past decades, the conventional envelope analysis has been one of the main approaches in vibration signal processing. However, the envelope analysis is based on stationary assumption, thus it is not applicable to the fault diagnosis of bearings under rotating speed variation conditions. This constraint limits the bearing diagnosis in industrial applications significantly. In order to extend the conventional diagnosis technique to speed variation cases, a rotating speed isolation method is proposed. This method consists of four main steps: (a) a low-pass filter is used to separate the rotating speed components and the resonance frequency band from the original signal; (b) the trend line of instantaneous rotating frequency (IRF) is extracted by ridge detection from the short-time spectrum of the low-pass filtered signal; (c) the envelope signal is obtained by fast kurtogram based resonance demodulation; (d) the trend line of instantaneous fault characteristic frequency (IFCF) is extracted by ridge detection from the short-time spectrum of the envelope signal; (e) the rotating speed is isolated and the instantaneous fault characteristic order (FCO), which is obtained by simply dividing the IFCF by IRF, can be used to identify the fault type. By rotating speed isolation, the bearing faults under speed variation conditions can be detected without additional tachometers. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been validated by both simulated and experimental bearing vibration signals. The results show that the proposed method outperforms the conventional envelope analysis method and is effective in bearing diagnosis under speed variation conditions.

  13. Physical origin of the frequency shifts in cesium beam frequency standards: Related environmental sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, Claude; Dimarcq, N.; Giordano, V.; Viennet, J.

    1990-01-01

    When observed in a cesium beam frequency standard, the hyperfine transition frequency of the atoms differs slightly from the invariant transition frequency of the unperturbed atoms at rest. The various physical and technical origins of the frequency offsets are stated. They relate to fundamental physical effects, to the method of probing the atomic resonance and to the frequency control of the slaved oscillator. The variation of the frequency offsets under a change of the value of the internal operating characteristics is considered. The sensitivity to a change of the magnetic induction, the microwave power, and the temperature is given. A comparison is made of the sensitivity of cesium beam frequency standards of the commercially available type, making use of magnetic state selection, and of devices under study, in which the state preparation and detection is accomplished optically. The pathways between the external stimuli and the physical origin of the frequency offsets are specified.

  14. Gas-separation process

    DOEpatents

    Toy, Lora G.; Pinnau, Ingo; Baker, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A process for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material.

  15. Laser-Beam Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermid, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Train of prisms and optical stop separate fundamental beam of laser from second and higher order harmonics of beam produced in certain crystals and by stimulated Raman scattering in gases and liquids.

  16. Particle separation by dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Vykoukal, Jody

    2009-01-01

    The application of dielectrophoresis to particle discrimination, separation, and fractionation is reviewed, some advantages and disadvantages of currently available approaches are considered, and some caveats are noted. PMID:12210248

  17. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  18. Separator for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. W.; Pfluger, H. L.

    1968-01-01

    Separator compositions have been tested as components of three-plate silver-zinc oxide cells in a standard cycling test. Six materials meet imposed requirements, giving cycling performance superior to cellophane.

  19. Microsystem capillary separations

    DOEpatents

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Whyatt, Greg A [West Richland, WA; Stenkamp, Victoria S [Richland, WA; Gauglitz, Phillip A [Richland, WA

    2003-12-23

    Laminated, multiphase separators and contactors having wicking structures and gas flow channels are described. Some preferred embodiments are combined with microchannel heat exchange. Integrated systems containing these components are also part of the present invention.

  20. Reduction criterion for separability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerf, N. J.; Adami, C.; Gingrich, R. M.

    1999-08-01

    We introduce a separability criterion based on the positive map Γ:ρ-->(Tr ρ)-ρ, where ρ is a trace-class Hermitian operator. Any separable state is mapped by the tensor product of Γ and the identity into a non-negative operator, which provides a simple necessary condition for separability. This condition is generally not sufficient because it is vulnerable to the dilution of entanglement. In the special case where one subsystem is a quantum bit, Γ reduces to time reversal, so that this separability condition is equivalent to partial transposition. It is therefore also sufficient for 2×2 and 2×3 systems. Finally, a simple connection between this map for two qubits and complex conjugation in the ``magic'' basis [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 5022 (1997)] is displayed.

  1. Inorganic separator technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smatko, J. S.; Weaver, R. D.; Kalhammer, F. R.

    1973-01-01

    Testing and failure analyses of silver zinc cells with largely inorganic separators were performed. The results showed that the wet stand and cycle life objective of the silver-zinc cell development program were essentially accomplished and led to recommendations for cell composition, design, and operation that should yield further improvement in wet and cycle life. A series of advanced inorganic materials was successfully developed and formulated into rigid and semiflexible separator samples. Suitable screening tests for evaluation of largely inorganic separators were selected and modified for application to the separator materials. The results showed that many of these formulations are potentially superior to previously used materials and permitted selection of three promising materials for further evaluation in silver-zinc cells.

  2. Kinematic separation of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldshtik, M.; Husain, H.S.; Hussain, F. )

    1992-06-15

    A phenomenon of spontaneous separation of components in an initially uniform fluid mixture is found experimentally. A qualitative explanation of the effect is proposed in terms of nonparallel streamlines in the medium.

  3. Booster separation motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, testing, evaluation and flight qualification of the space shuttle booster separation motor is discussed. Delivery of flight hardware to support the research and development flights of the space shuttle is discussed.

  4. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

  5. Monitored separation device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, George William (Inventor); Willson, Richard Coale (Inventor); Fox, George Edward (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A device for separating and purifying useful quantities of particles comprises: a. an anolyte reservoir connected to an anode, the anolyte reservoir containing an electrophoresis buffer; b. a catholyte reservoir connected to a cathode, the catholyte reservoir also containing the electrophoresis buffer; c. a power supply connected to the anode and to the cathode; d. a column having a first end inserted into the anolyte reservoir, a second end inserted into the catholyte reservoir, and containing a separation medium; e. a light source; f. a first optical fiber having a first fiber end inserted into the separation medium, and having a second fiber end connected to the light source; g. a photo detector; h. a second optical fiber having a third fiber end inserted into the separation medium, and having a fourth fiber end connected to the photo detector; and i. an ion-exchange membrane in the anolyte reservoir.

  6. Separable Arrowhead Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Leonard Y.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Hypodermic needles cause pain and bleeding, produce biohazardous sharp waste and require trained personnel. To address these issues, we introduce separable arrowhead microneedles that rapidly and painlessly deliver drugs and vaccines to the skin. These needles are featured by micron-size sharp tips mounted on blunt shafts. Upon insertion in the skin, the sharp-tipped polymer arrowheads encapsulating drug separate from their metal shafts and remain embedded in the skin for subsequent dissolution and drug release. The blunt metal shafts can then be discarded. Due to rapid separation of the arrowhead tips from the shafts within seconds, administration using arrowhead microneedles can be carried out rapidly, while drug release kinetics can be independently controlled based on separable arrowhead formulation. Thus, drug and vaccine delivery using arrowhead microneedles are designed to offer a quick, convenient, safe and potentially self-administered method of drug delivery as an alternative to hypodermic needles. PMID:21047538

  7. SEPARATIONS BY ELECTRODIALYSIS

    DOEpatents

    Webb, W.H.; Vie, J.D.

    1962-06-12

    A method is given for separating cesium, cerium, zirconium, and uranyl ions frora a common solution by electrodialysis. An anion exchange membrane and a cation exchange membrane are placed on either side of the feed solution compartment; the former is in electrolytic contact with an anode and the latter with cathode. On acidification of the feed solution to a critical value of 0.5 N and passage of a current from the anode to the cathode, the desired separations tske place. (AEC)

  8. Hydrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  9. Unsteady Aerodynamic Response of a Linear Cascade of Airfoils in Separated Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capece, Vincent R.; Ford, Christopher; Bone, Christopher; Li, Rui

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to investigate methods to modify the leading edge separation region, which could lead to an improvement in aeroelastic stability of advanced airfoil designs. The airfoil section used is representative of current low aspect ratio fan blade tip sections. The experimental potion of this study investigated separated zone boundary layer from removal through suction slots. Suction applied to a cavity in the vicinity of the separation onset point was found to be the most effective location. The computational study looked into the influence of front camber on flutter stability. To assess the influence of the change in airfoil shape on stability the work-per-cycle was evaluated for torsion mode oscillations. It was shown that the front camberline shape can be an important factor for stabilizing the predicted work-per-cycle and reducing the predicted extent of the separation zone. In addition, data analysis procedures are discussed for reducing data acquired in experiments that involve periodic unsteady data. This work was conducted in support of experiments being conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Flutter Cascade. The spectral block averaging method is presented. This method is shown to be able to account for variations in airfoil oscillation frequency that can occur in experiments that force oscillate the airfoils to simulate flutter.

  10. INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE FREQUENCY OF SPERM ANEUPLOIDY IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To examine interindividual differences in sperm chromosome aneuploidy, repeated semen specimens were obtained from a group of ten healthy men, aged 20-21 at the start of the study, and analyzed by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis to determine the fre...

  11. Impact of atmospheric tides simulated in a chemistryclimate model on sub-diurnal variations in UT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadow, C.; Dobslaw, H.; Matthes, K.; Thomas, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sub-diurnal variations in Earth rotation parameters as obtained from time-series of space geodetic observations contain substantial variability even after correcting for the effects of oceanic tides. These residuals are in particular apparent at frequencies of 1, 2 and 3 cycles per solar day, where atmospheric tides, principally excited by water vapor absorption and ozone heating in the middle atmosphere, are known to occur. By means of hourly data of the chemistry-climate model WACCM, the potential of atmospheric tides on the excitation of UT1 variations is re-assessed. Tidal signals are separated into migrating and non-migrating zonal waves for individual height levels. Only standing waves of wavenumber zero are found to be effective in exciting UT1 variations, which are subsequently discussed in terms of their characteristic surface pressure and vertically varying wind amplitudes.

  12. Microflotation performance for algal separation.

    PubMed

    Hanotu, James; Bandulasena, H C Hemaka; Zimmerman, William B

    2012-07-01

    The performance of microflotation, dispersed air flotation with microbubble clouds with bubble size about 50 µm, for algae separation using fluidic oscillation for microbubble generation is investigated. This fluidic oscillator converts continuous air supply into oscillatory flow with a regular frequency to generate bubbles of the scale of the exit pore. Bubble characterization results showed that average bubble size generated under oscillatory air flow state was 86 µm, approximately twice the size of the diffuser pore size of 38 µm. In contrast, continuous air flow at the same rate through the same diffusers yielded an average bubble size of 1,059 µm, 28 times larger than the pore size. Following microbubble generation, the separation of algal cells under fluidic oscillator generated microbubbles was investigated by varying metallic coagulant types, concentration and pH. Best performances were recorded at the highest coagulant dose (150 mg/L) applied under acidic conditions (pH 5). Amongst the three metallic coagulants studied, ferric chloride yielded the overall best result of 99.2% under the optimum conditions followed closely by ferric sulfate (98.1%) and aluminum sulfate with 95.2%. This compares well with conventional dissolved air flotation (DAF) benchmarks, but has a highly turbulent flow, whereas microflotation is laminar with several orders of magnitude lower energy density. PMID:22290221

  13. Cluster analysis of word frequency dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu S.; Bochkarev, V. V.; Belashova, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and modelling of word usage frequency time series. During one of previous studies, an assumption was put forward that all word usage frequencies have uniform dynamics approaching the shape of a Gaussian function. This assumption can be checked using the frequency dictionaries of the Google Books Ngram database. This database includes 5.2 million books published between 1500 and 2008. The corpus contains over 500 billion words in American English, British English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Hebrew, and Chinese. We clustered time series of word usage frequencies using a Kohonen neural network. The similarity between input vectors was estimated using several algorithms. As a result of the neural network training procedure, more than ten different forms of time series were found. They describe the dynamics of word usage frequencies from birth to death of individual words. Different groups of word forms were found to have different dynamics of word usage frequency variations.

  14. 21 CFR 1301.12 - Separate registrations for separate locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Separate registrations for separate locations. 1301.12 Section 1301.12 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... Separate registrations for separate locations. (a) A separate registration is required for each...

  15. 21 CFR 1309.23 - Separate registration for separate locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Separate registration for separate locations. 1309.23 Section 1309.23 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REGISTRATION... Registration § 1309.23 Separate registration for separate locations. (a) A separate registration is...

  16. Phase-separation inhibitors and prevention of selenite cataract.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J I; Steele, J E

    1992-01-01

    The variation of the phase-separation temperature (Tc) was studied in lenses during formation of cataracts induced by a subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite. In normal control animals, the Tc decreased monotonically with increasing age. Approximately 2 days after administration of the selenite the Tc decreased sharply to a minimum, and then at day 4 the Tc increased dramatically toward body temperature. Mature irreversible cataracts formed approximately 6 days after injection of the selenite. Intraperitoneal administration of WR-77913, a phase-separation inhibitor, prevented the abnormal variation of Tc in vivo. When injected into control animals without selenite, WR-77913 produced no abnormal variation in Tc. The results confirm that Tc is a sensitive measure of early changes in the lens and that opacification associated with abnormal variation in Tc can be prevented in vivo by using a phase-separation inhibitor. Images PMID:1311849

  17. Neandertal origin of genetic variation at the cluster of OAS immunity genes.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Fernando L; Watkins, Joseph C; Hammer, Michael F

    2013-04-01

    Analyses of ancient DNA from extinct humans reveal signals of at least two independent hybridization events in the history of non-African populations. To date, there are very few examples of specific genetic variants that have been rigorously identified as introgressive. Here, we survey DNA sequence variation in the OAS gene cluster on chromosome 12 and provide strong evidence that a haplotype extending for ~185 kb introgressed from Neandertals. This haplotype is nearly restricted to Eurasians and is estimated to have diverged from the Neandertal sequence ~125 kya. Despite the potential for novel functional variation, the observed frequency of this haplotype is consistent with neutral introgression. This is the second locus in the human genome, after STAT2, carrying distinct haplotypes that appear to have introgressed separately from both Neandertals and Denisova. PMID:23315957

  18. Round-Trip System Available to Measure Path Length Variation in Korea VLBI System for Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Hongjong; Kondo, Tetsuro; Lee, Jinoo; Kim, Tuhwan; Kim, Myungho; Kim, Suchul; Park, Jinsik; Ju, Hyunhee

    2010-01-01

    The construction project of Korea Geodetic VLBI officially started in October 2008. The construction of all systems will be completed by the end of 2011. The project was named Korea VLBI system for Geodesy (KVG), and its main purpose is to maintain the Korea Geodetic Datum. In case of the KVG system, an observation room with an H-maser frequency standard is located in a building separated from the antenna by several tens of meters. Therefore KVG system will adopt a so-called round-trip system to transmit reference signals to the antenna with reduction of the effect of path length variations. KVG s round-trip system is designed not only to use either metal or optical fiber cables, but also to measure path length variations directly. We present this unique round trip system for KVG.

  19. Three-dimensional ray tracing of the Jovian magnetosphere in the low-frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Green, J. L.; Gulkis, S.; Six, F.

    1984-01-01

    Three-dimensional ray tracing of the Jovian DAM emission has been performed utilizing the O-4 magnetic field model (Acuna and Ness, 1979) and a realistic plasma model. Minimal assumptions about the emission mechanism have been made that include radiation in the right-hand extraordinary mode, propagating nearly perpendicular to the field line at source points located just above the RX cutoff frequency along Io flux tubes. Ray tracing has been performed in the frequency range from 2-35 MHz from successive Io flux tubes separated by ten degrees of central meridian longitude for a full circumference of northern hemisphere sources. The results show unusual complexity in model arc spectra that is displayed in a constant Io phase format with many similarities to the Voyager PRA data. The results suggest much of the variation in observed DAM spectral features is a result of propagation effects rather than emission process differences.

  20. Stratospheric conductivity variations over thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; Norville, K. W.; Kintner, P. M.; Powell, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the first in-situ observation of variations in the electrical conductivity over thunderstorms at 26 km altitude. The vector electric field, positive and negative polar conductivity, and optical lightning power/flash were measured by payloads on superpressure balloons in the Southern Hemisphere in early 1984. It is found that in 72 percent of the thunderstorm periods observed (or in 23 of 32 periods) there were clear cases of conductivity variations while the balloons were over the thunderstorms. Examples from two separate balloons at widely separated dates and locations showing both daytime and nighttime events are presented. The conductivity measurements are made with the relaxation technique, and the vector field measurements are based on the double Langmuir probe high-impedance method. It is found that the positive and negative conductivity measurements vary independently and have a different temporal profile than the dc electric field. The polar conductivity variations can exceed a factor of 2 at this altitude. In seven of the nine most intense thunderstorm events the total conductivity increased, while in only one of these nine events did it decrease (one event had no change). Implications of these observations for global current patterns are discussed.

  1. Hydrodynamic gas mixture separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarov, A.A.

    1982-02-10

    The separation of gas mixtures is the basis of many chemical, petrochemical, and gas processes. Classical separation methods (absorption, adsorption, condensation, and freezing) require cumbersome and complex equipment. No adequate solution is provided by the cheapening and simplification of gas-processing apparatus and separation methods by hydration and diffusion. For example, an apparatus for extracting helium from natural gas by diffusion has a throughput of gas containing 0.45% helium of 117,000 m/sup 3//h and in the first stage has teflon membranes working at a pressure difference of 63.3x10/sup 5/ Pa of area 79,000 m/sup 2/, and the specific cost of the apparatus was 8500 dollars per m/sup 3//h of helium. Therefore, vigorous studies are being conducted on new ways of efficient separation of gas mixtures that are cheaper and simpler. Here we consider a novel method of physically essentially reversible separation of gas mixtures, which involves some features of single-phase supersonic flows.

  2. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  3. Fiber-Optic Frequency-Transfer Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primas, L. E.; Sydnor, R. L.; Lutes, G. F.

    1990-01-01

    System for distribution of 100-MHz reference signal features transmission through optical fiber to station 22 km away and stabilization of frequency by radio frequency phase-conjugation method. Compensates for variations in phase (caused mostly by changes in temperature along optical fiber) of signal arriving at remote station. Involves measurement and control of phases of transmitted and reflected signals at reference station to obtain reference phase at remote station.

  4. The calculation of molecular Eigen-frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindemann, F. A.

    1984-01-01

    A method of determining molecular eigen-frequencies based on the function of Einstein expressing the variation of the atomic heat of various elements is proposed. It is shown that the same equation can be utilized to calculate both atomic heat and optically identifiably eigen-frequencies - at least to an order of magnitude - suggesting that in both cases the same oscillating structure is responsible.

  5. Survey of the high resolution frequency structure of the fast magnetosonic mode and proton energy diffusion associated with these waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardsen, S. A.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.; Santolik, O.; Wygant, J. R.; MacDonald, E.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Kurth, W. S.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2015-12-01

    The fast magnetosonic mode, also referred to as equatorial noise, occurs at frequencies mainly between the proton cyclotron frequency (fcp) and the lower hybrid frequency. The wave properties of this mode are characterized by a strong magnetic compressional component. These waves are observed around the magnetic equator in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. Case studies of the spectra of these waves have found the emissions to be composed of 1) harmonics, usually with spacing near the local fcp, 2) broad band hiss-like structure, or 3) a superposition of the two spectral types. No statistical studies of the frequency structure of these waves have been made. Using ~600,000 burst mode wave captures from the EMFISIS Wave Form Receiver and the EFW instrument on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft this mode will be identified in the high resolution frequency spectra and its frequency structure will be characterized. The variation of the frequency structure will be investigated as a function of normalized frequency, location, and geomagnetic conditions, and with spacecraft separation. The frequency structure will be compared with path integrated gain using proton ring distributions as the wave source. Recently the modulation of the fast magnetosonic mode has been reported, with modulation periods in the range of 30s to 240s. It has been proposed that frequency drift observed during each modulation is due to strong inward diffusion in energy of the proton ring distributions that generate these waves. As the inner edge of the ring distribution diffuses towards lower energies the band of unstable harmonics increases in frequency. If in the source region, for modulations with periods greater than say 100s, the inward energy diffusion should be observable in the HOPE proton data which has a cycle time of 24s.

  6. Turbulent transition behavior in a separated and attached-flow low pressure turbine passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memory, Curtis L.

    Various time accurate numerical simulations were conducted on the aft-loaded L1A low pressure turbine airfoil operating at Reynolds numbers presenting with fully-stalled, non-reattaching laminar separation. The numerical solver TURBO was modified from its annular gas turbine simulation configuration to conduct simulations based on a linear cascade wind tunnel facility. Simulation results for the fully separated flow fields revealed various turbulent decay mechanisms. Separated shear layer decay, in the form of vortices forming between the shear layer and the blade wall, was shown to agree with experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) data in terms of decay vortex size and core vorticity levels. These vortical structures eventually mix into a large recirculation zone which dominates the blade wake. Turbulent wake ex- tent and time-averaged velocity distributions agreed with PIV data. Steady-blowing vortex generating jet (VGJ) flow control was then applied to the flow fields. VGJ-induced streamwise vorticity was only present at blowing ratios above 1.5. VGJs actuated at the point of flow separation on the blade wall were more effective than those actuated downstream, within the separation zone. Pulsed-blowing VGJs at the upstream blade wall position were then actuated at various pulsing frequencies, duty cycles, and blowing ratios. These condition variations yielded differing levels of separation zone mitigation. Pulsed VGJs were shown to be more effective than steady blowing VGJs at conditions of high blowing ratio, high frequency, or high duty cycle, where blowing ratio had the highest level of influence on pulsed jet efficacy. The characteristic "calm zone" following the end of a given VGJ pulse was observed in simulations exhibiting high levels of separation zone mitigation. Numerical velocity fields near the blade wall during this calm zone was shown to be similar to velocity fields observed in PIV data. Instantaneous numerical vorticity fields indicated

  7. Partial differential equation transform — Variational formulation and Fourier analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) models are established approaches for image/signal processing, data analysis and surface construction. Most previous geometric PDEs are utilized as low-pass filters which give rise to image trend information. In an earlier work, we introduced mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs), which behave like high-pass filters and are able to systematically provide intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of signals and images. Due to their tunable time-frequency localization and perfect reconstruction, the operation of MoDEEs is called a PDE transform. By appropriate selection of PDE transform parameters, we can tune IMFs into trends, edges, textures, noise etc., which can be further utilized in the secondary processing for various purposes. This work introduces the variational formulation, performs the Fourier analysis, and conducts biomedical and biological applications of the proposed PDE transform. The variational formulation offers an algorithm to incorporate two image functions and two sets of low-pass PDE operators in the total energy functional. Two low-pass PDE operators have different signs, leading to energy disparity, while a coupling term, acting as a relative fidelity of two image functions, is introduced to reduce the disparity of two energy components. We construct variational PDE transforms by using Euler-Lagrange equation and artificial time propagation. Fourier analysis of a simplified PDE transform is presented to shed light on the filter properties of high order PDE transforms. Such an analysis also offers insight on the parameter selection of the PDE transform. The proposed PDE transform algorithm is validated by numerous benchmark tests. In one selected challenging example, we illustrate the ability of PDE transform to separate two adjacent frequencies of sin(x) and sin(1.1x). Such an ability is due to PDE transform’s controllable frequency localization obtained by adjusting the order of PDEs. The

  8. Dielectrophoretic Separation of Cancer Cells from Blood

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Huang, Ying; Becker, Frederick F.

    2009-01-01

    Recent measurements have demonstrated that the dielectric properties of cells depend on their type and physiological status. For example, MDA-231 human breast cancer cells were found to have a mean plasma membrane specific capacitance of 26 mF/m2, more than double the value (11 mF/m2) observed for resting T-lymphocytes. When an inhomogeneous ac electric field is applied to a particle, a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force arises that depends on the particle dielectric properties. Therefore, cells having different dielectric characteristics will experience differential DEP forces when subjected to such a field. In this article, we demonstrate the use of differential DEP forces for the separation of several different cancerous cell types from blood in a dielectric affinity column. These separations were accomplished using thin, flat chambers having microelectrode arrays on the bottom wall. DEP forces generated by the application of ac fields to the electrodes were used to influence the rate of elution of cells from the chamber by hydrodynamic forces within a parabolic fluid flow profile. Electrorotation measurements were first made on the various cell types found within cell mixtures to be separated, and theoretical modeling was used to derive the cell dielectric parameters. Optimum separation conditions were then predicted from the frequency and suspension conductivity dependencies of cell DEP responses defined by these parameters. Cell separations were then undertaken for various ratios of cancerous to normal cells at different concentrations. Eluted cells were characterized in terms of separation efficiency, cell viability, and separation speed. For example, 100% efficiency was achieved for purging MDA-231 cells from blood at the tumor to normal cell ratio 1:1 × 105 or 1:3 × 105, cell viability was not compromised, and separation rates were at least 103 cells/s. Theoretical and experimental criteria for the design and operation of such separators are presented. PMID

  9. Mass Separation by Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Being able to manipulate mass flow is critically important in a variety of physical processes in chemical and biomolecular science. For example, separation and catalytic systems, which requires precise control of mass diffusion, are crucial in the manufacturing of chemicals, crystal growth of semiconductors, waste recovery of biological solutes or chemicals, and production of artificial kidneys. Coordinate transformations and metamaterials are powerful methods to achieve precise manipulation of molecular diffusion. Here, we introduce a novel approach to obtain mass separation based on metamaterials that can sort chemical and biomolecular species by cloaking one compound while concentrating the other. A design strategy to realize such metamaterial using homogeneous isotropic materials is proposed. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen is manipulated using a metamaterial that cloaks nitrogen and concentrates oxygen. This work lays the foundation for molecular mass separation in biophysical and chemical systems through metamaterial devices. PMID:26912419

  10. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  11. Variables Separation in Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Valery

    2004-12-01

    To solve the problem of exact integration of the field equations or equations of motion of matter in curved spacetimes one can use a class of Riemannian metrics for which the simplest equations of motion can be integrated by the complete separation of variables method. Here, we consider the particular case of the class of Stäckel metrics. These metrics admit integration of the Hamilton Jacobi equation for test particle by the complete separation of variables method. It appears that the other important equations of motion (Klein Gordon Fock, Dirac,Weyl) in curved spacetimes can be integrated by complete separation of variables method only for the metrics, belonging to the class of Stäckel spaces.

  12. Flow separation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateer, G. C.; Brosh, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An arrangement for sensing the fluid separation along a surface which employs a thermally insulating element having a continuous surface blending into and forming a part of the fluid flow surface is described. A sudden decrease in the temperature of the downstream sensor conductor and concomitant increase in the temperature of the upstream sensor conductor is an indication of the separation. When the temperatures are returned to the state achieved during normal flow, the indicator thereby indicates the normal, attached fluid flow. The conductors may be, for example, wires or thin films, and should be within the viscous sub-layer of the expected fluid flow. A single heater and several pairs of sensors and corresponding sensor conductors may be used to detect not only the fluid flow and the separation, but the direction of the fluid flow, over the fluid flow surface.

  13. Mass Separation by Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Being able to manipulate mass flow is critically important in a variety of physical processes in chemical and biomolecular science. For example, separation and catalytic systems, which requires precise control of mass diffusion, are crucial in the manufacturing of chemicals, crystal growth of semiconductors, waste recovery of biological solutes or chemicals, and production of artificial kidneys. Coordinate transformations and metamaterials are powerful methods to achieve precise manipulation of molecular diffusion. Here, we introduce a novel approach to obtain mass separation based on metamaterials that can sort chemical and biomolecular species by cloaking one compound while concentrating the other. A design strategy to realize such metamaterial using homogeneous isotropic materials is proposed. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen is manipulated using a metamaterial that cloaks nitrogen and concentrates oxygen. This work lays the foundation for molecular mass separation in biophysical and chemical systems through metamaterial devices. PMID:26912419

  14. Mass Separation by Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Being able to manipulate mass flow is critically important in a variety of physical processes in chemical and biomolecular science. For example, separation and catalytic systems, which requires precise control of mass diffusion, are crucial in the manufacturing of chemicals, crystal growth of semiconductors, waste recovery of biological solutes or chemicals, and production of artificial kidneys. Coordinate transformations and metamaterials are powerful methods to achieve precise manipulation of molecular diffusion. Here, we introduce a novel approach to obtain mass separation based on metamaterials that can sort chemical and biomolecular species by cloaking one compound while concentrating the other. A design strategy to realize such metamaterial using homogeneous isotropic materials is proposed. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen is manipulated using a metamaterial that cloaks nitrogen and concentrates oxygen. This work lays the foundation for molecular mass separation in biophysical and chemical systems through metamaterial devices.

  15. Spiral Flow Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed liquid-separating device relies on centrifugal force in liquid/liquid or liquid/solid mixture in spiral path. Operates in continuous flow at relatively high rates. Spiral tubes joined in sequence, with outlet tubes connected to joints. Cross-sectional areas of successive spiral tubes decreases by cross-sectional areas of outlet tubes. Centrifugal force pushes denser particles or liquids to outer edge of spiral, where removed from flow. Principle exploited to separate solids from wastewater, oil from fresh or salt water, or contaminants from salt water before evaporation. Also used to extract such valuable materials as precious metals from slurries.

  16. Spiral fluid separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A fluid separator for separating particulate matter such as contaminates is provided which includes a series of spiral tubes of progressively decreasing cross sectional area connected in series. Each tube has an outlet on the outer curvature of the spiral. As fluid spirals down a tube, centrifugal force acts to force the heavier particulate matter to the outer wall of the tube, where it exits through the outlet. The remaining, and now cleaner, fluid reaches the next tube, which is smaller in cross sectional area, where the process is repeated. The fluid which comes out the final tube is diminished of particulate matter.

  17. SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

    1958-10-28

    An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

  18. WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-11-25

    The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

  19. SULFIDE METHOD PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium solutions. Such a solution is first treated with a soluble sullide, causing precipitation of the plutoniunn and uraniunn values present, along with those impurities which form insoluble sulfides. The precipitate is then treated with a solution of carbonate ions, which will dissolve the uranium and plutonium present while the fission product sulfides remain unaffected. After separation from the residue, this solution may then be treated by any of the usual methods, such as formation of a lanthanum fluoride precipitate, to effect separation of plutoniunn from uranium.

  20. Gas separation membranes

    DOEpatents

    Schell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    A dry, fabric supported, polymeric gas separation membrane, such as cellulose acetate, is prepared by casting a solution of the polymer onto a shrinkable fabric preferably formed of synthetic polymers such as polyester or polyamide filaments before washing, stretching or calendering (so called griege goods). The supported membrane is then subjected to gelling, annealing, and drying by solvent exchange. During the processing steps, both the fabric support and the membrane shrink a preselected, controlled amount which prevents curling, wrinkling or cracking of the membrane in flat form or when spirally wound into a gas separation element.