Science.gov

Sample records for frequency stability measurement

  1. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measurements required: Frequency stability. 2... Certification § 2.1055 Measurements required: Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability shall be measured...) Frequency measurements shall be made at the extremes of the specified temperature range and at intervals...

  2. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurements required: Frequency stability. 2.1055 Section 2.1055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization Procedures Certification § 2.1055 Measurements required:...

  3. Time domain measurement of frequency stability: A tutorial introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanier, J.; Tetu, M.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical basis behind the definition of frequency stability in the time domain is outlined. Various types of variances were examined. Their differences and interrelation are pointed out. Systems that are generally used in the measurement of these variances are described.

  4. Precise Frequency Measurements Using a Superconducting Cavity Stabilized Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Yeh, N.-C.; Jiang, W.; Anderson, V. L.; Asplund, N.

    1999-01-01

    Many physics experiments call on improved resolution to better define the experimental results, thus improving tests of theories. Modern microwave technology combined with high-Q resonators can achieve frequency readout and control with resolutions up to a part in 10(exp 18). When the physical quantity in question in the experiment can be converted to a frequency or a change in frequency, a high-stability microwave oscillator can be applied to obtain state-of-the-art precision. In this work we describe the overall physical concepts and the required experimental procedures for optimizing a high-resolution frequency measurement system that employs a high-Q superconducting microwave cavity and a low-noise frequency synthesizer. The basic approach is to resolve the resonant frequencies of a high-Q (Q > 10(exp 10)) cavity to extremely high precision (one part in 10(exp 17)- 10(exp 18)). Techniques for locking the synthesizer frequency to a resonant frequency of the superconducting cavity to form an ultra-stable oscillator are described. We have recently set up an ultra-high-vacuum high-temperature annealing system to process superconducting niobium cavities, and have been able to consistently achieve Q > 10(exp 9). We have integrated high-Q superconducting cavities with a low-noise microwave synthesizer in a phase-locked-loop to verify the frequency stability of the system. Effects that disturb the cavity resonant frequency (such as the temperature fluctuations and mechanical vibrations) and methods to mitigate those effects are also considered. Applicability of these techniques to experiments will be discussed, and our latest experimental progress in achieving high-resolution frequency measurements using the superconducting-cavity-stabilized-oscillator will be presented.

  5. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with variation of ambient temperature as follows: (1) From −30° to +50° centigrade for all equipment...) Frequency measurements shall be made at the extremes of the specified temperature range and at intervals of... components of the oscillator circuit at each temperature level shall be allowed prior to...

  6. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... with variation of ambient temperature as follows: (1) From −30° to +50° centigrade for all equipment...) Frequency measurements shall be made at the extremes of the specified temperature range and at intervals of... components of the oscillator circuit at each temperature level shall be allowed prior to...

  7. Measurement of carrier envelope offset frequency for a 10 GHz etalon-stabilized semiconductor optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbulut, M.; Davila-Rodriguez, J.; Ozdur, I.; Quinlan, F.; Ozharar, S.; Hoghooghi, N.; Delfyett, P. J.

    2011-08-01

    We report Carrier Envelope Offset (CEO) frequency measurements of a 10 GHz harmonically mode-locked, Fabry-Perot etalon-stabilized, semiconductor optical frequency comb source. A modified multi-heterodyne mixing technique with a reference frequency comb was utilized for the measurement. Also, preliminary results from an attempt at f-2f self-referencing measurement are presented. The CEO frequency was found to be ~1.47 GHz for the particular etalon that was used.

  8. Frequency standard stability for Doppler measurements on-board the shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harton, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    The short and long term stability characteristics of crystal and atomic standards are described. Emphasis is placed on crystal oscillators because of the selection which was made for the shuttle baseline and the complexities which are introduced by the shuttle environment. Attention is given, first, to the definitions of stability and the application of these definitions to the shuttle system and its mission. Data from time domain measurements are used to illustrate the definitions. Results of a literature survey to determine environmental effects on frequency reference sources are then presented. Finally, methods of standard frequency dissemination over radio frequency carriers are noted as a possible means of measuring absolute accuracy and long term stability characteristics during on one way Doppler equipment.

  9. Measurement and analysis of the frequency stability of GPS Navstar clocks

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskill, T.B.; Largay, M.M.; Oaks, O.J.

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of the frequency stability of Global Positioning System (GPS) on-orbit Navstar clocks Z`s performed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Clock offsets for each Navstar clock are derived from smoothed pseudorange measurements collected as the Navstar space vehicle passes over the tracking station. The clock offsets are further smoothed and estimated at the time of closest approach (TCA) of the space vehicle over the tracking station. Analysis of more than 50 Navstar clocks by NRL shows that the majority of these clocks provide performance that exceeds the GPS frequency stability specification. This precision measurement technique is capable of determining one-day frequency stabilities of the Navstar GPS clocks to an accuracy of better than 1 x 10-13.

  10. Wavemeter measurements of frequency stability of an injection seeded alexandrite laser for pressure and temperature lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. R.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Korb, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The GSFC pressure-temperature lidar is a differential absorption lidar operating in the oxygen A band absorption region (760 to 770 nm), and utilizes two tunable pulsed alexandrite lasers. For obtaining temperature measurements with an accuracy of less than or = 1 K, it has been determined that the stability of the online laser frequency over a period of time corresponding to a set of measurements, 0.1 to 30 min, has to be better than +/- 0.002/cm. In addition, the requirements on laser spectral bandwidth and spectral purity are less than or = 0.02/cm and greater than or = 99.9 percent, respectively. Injection seeding with a stabilized AlGaAs diode laser was used to achieve the required frequency stability and spectral bandwidth. A high resolution Fizeau wavemeter was employed to determine the frequency stability of the pulsed alexandrite laser and determine its bandwidth, mode structure. We present the results of measurements of the frequency stability and the spectrum of the injection seeded alexandrite laser.

  11. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  12. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  13. The Autonomous Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator: A Reference for Frequency Stability and Phase Noise Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, V.; Grop, S.; Fluhr, C.; Dubois, B.; Kersalé, Y.; Rubiola, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator (CSO) is the microwave oscillator which feature the highest short-term stability. Our best units exhibit Allan deviation σy (τ) of 4.5x10-16 at 1s, ≈ 1.5x10-16 at 100 s ≤ t ≤ 5,000 s (floor), and ≤ 5x10-15 at one day. The use of a Pulse-Tube cryocooler enables full two year operation with virtually no maintenance. Starting with a short history of the CSO in our lab, we go through the architecture and we provide more details about the resonator, the cryostat, the oscillator loop, and the servo electronics. We implemented three similar oscillators, which enable the evaluation of each with the three- cornered hat method, and provide the potential for Allan deviation measurements at parts of 10-17 level. One of our CSOs (ULISS) is transportable, and goes with a small customized truck. The unique feature of ULISS is that its σy (τ) can be validated at destination by measuring before and after the roundtrip. To this extent, ULISS can be regarded as a traveling standard of frequency stability. The CSOs are a part of the Oscillator IMP project, a platform dedicated to the measurement of noise and short-term stability of oscillators and devices in the whole radio spectrum (from MHz to THz), including microwave photonics. The scope spans from routine measurements to the research on new oscillators, components, and measurement methods.

  14. Stability of the translocation frequency following whole-body irradiation measured in rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. N.; Hill, F. S.; Burk, C. E.; Cox, A. B.; Straume, T.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are persistent indicators of prior exposure to ionizing radiation and the development of 'chromosome painting' to efficiently detect translocations has resulted in a powerful biological dosimetry tool for radiation dose reconstruction. However, the actual stability of the translocation frequency with time after exposure must be measured before it can be used reliably to obtain doses for individuals exposed years or decades previously. Human chromosome painting probes were used here to measure reciprocal translocation frequencies in cells from two tissues of 8 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) irradiated almost three decades previously. Six of the monkeys were exposed in 1965 to whole-body (fully penetrating) radiation and two were unexposed controls. The primates were irradiated as juveniles to single doses of 0.56, 1.13, 2.00, or 2.25 Gy. Blood lymphocytes (and skin fibroblasts from one individual) were obtained for cytogenetic analysis in 1993, near the end of the animals' lifespans. Results show identical dose-response relationships 28 y after exposure in vivo and immediately after exposure in vitro. Because chromosome aberrations are induced with identical frequencies in vivo and in vitro, these results demonstrate that the translocation frequencies induced in 1965 have not changed significantly during the almost three decades since exposure. Finally, our emerging biodosimetry data for individual radiation workers are now confirming the utility of reciprocal translocations measured by FISH in radiation dose reconstruction.

  15. Developing Stabilized Lasers, Measuring their Frequencies, demoting the Metre, inventing the Comb, and further consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, John L.

    2010-02-01

    Michelson's 1907 proposal to define the SI Metre in terms of an optical wavelength was realized only in 1960, based on a ^86Krypton discharge lamp. The same year saw the cw HeNe laser arrive and a future redefinition based on laser technology assured. Separation in the late 60's of the laser's gain and spectral-reference-gas functions led to unprecedented levels of laser frequency stability and reproducibility. In addition to HeNe:CH4 system at 3392 nm and HeNe:I2 at 633 nm, systems at 514 nm and 10600 nm were studied. Absolute frequency measurement became the holy grail and some NBS team experiences will be shared. We measured both frequency and wavelength in 1972, and so obtained a speed of light value, improved 100-fold in accuracy. During the next decade, the NBS value of c was confirmed by other national labs, and frequency metrology was extended to the 473 THz (633 nm) Iodine-based wavelength standard. This frequency to ˜10 digit accuracy was obtained in 1983, thus setting the stage for redefining the SI Metre. By consensus choice the value 299 792 458 m/s was adopted for the speed of light, effectively reducing the Metre to a derived SI quantity. Knowledge of the frequency of the particular laser being utilized was controlled by International intercomparisons, but the need for a fast and accurate means to make these laser frequency measurements was obvious. Creative proposals by H"ansch and by Chebotayev were to use ultra-fast repetitive pulses to create an ``Optical Comb,'' but it was years before any technical basis existed to implement their Fourier dreams. Finally, in 1999 the last needed capability was demonstrated -- continuum production at 100 MHz rates and non-destructive power levels. By May 2000 phase-locked combs were operational in both Garching and Boulder, substantially accelerated by their collaborative interactions. Within 18 months all the known proposed ``optical frequency standards'' had been accurately measured via Comb techniques. )

  16. Optical Frequency Stabilization and Optical Phase Locked Loops: Golden Threads of Precision Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.

    2013-07-01

    Stabilization of lasers through locking to optical cavities, atomic transitions, and molecular transitions has enabled the field of precision optical measurement since shortly after the invention of the laser. Recent advances in the field have produced an optical clock that is orders of magnitude more stable than those of just a few years prior. Phase locking of one laser to another, or to a frequency offset from another, formed the basis for linking stable lasers across the optical spectrum, such frequency chains exhibiting progressively finer precision through the years. Phase locking between the modes within a femtosecond pulsed laser has yielded the optical frequency comb, one of the most beautiful and useful instruments of our time. This talk gives an overview of these topics, from early work through to the latest 1E-16 thermal noise-limited precision recently attained for a stable laser, and the ongoing quest for ever finer precision and accuracy. The issues of understanding and measuring line widths and shapes are also studied in some depth, highlighting implications for servo design for sub-Hz line widths.

  17. Laser frequency stabilization for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Guido; McNamara, Paul; Thorpe, Ira; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    The requirement on laser frequency noise in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) depends on the velocity and our knowledge of the position of each spacecraft of the interferometer. Currently it is assumed that the lasers must have a pre-stabilized frequency stability of 30Hz/square root of Hz over LISA'S most sensitive frequency band (3 mHz - 30 mHz). The intrinsic frequency stability of even the most stable com- mercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above this level. Therefore it is necessary to stabilize the laser frequency to an ultra-stable frequency reference which meets the LISA requirements. The baseline frequency reference for the LISA lasers are high finesse optical cavities based on ULE spacers. We measured the stability of two ULE spacer cavities with respect to each other. Our current best results show a noise floor at, or below, 30 Hz/square root of Hz above 3 mHz. In this report we describe the experimental layout of the entire experiment and discuss the limiting noise sources.

  18. Apparatus for using a time interval counter to measure frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the relative stability of two signals is disclosed comprising a means for mixing the two signals down to a beat note sine wave and for producing a beat note square wave whose upcrossings are the same as the sine wave. A source of reference frequency is supplied to a clock divider and interval counter to synchronize them and to generate a picket fence for providing a time reference grid of period shorter than the beat period. An interval counter is employed to make a preliminary measurement between successive upcrossings of the beat note square wave for providing an approximate time interval therebetween as a reference. The beat note square wave and the picket fence are then provided to the interval counter to provide an output consisting of the time difference between the upcrossing of each beat note square wave cycle and the next picket fence pulse such that the counter is ready for each upcrossing and dead time is avoided. A computer containing an algorithm for calculating the exact times of the beat note upcrossings then computes the upcrossing times.

  19. Optical frequency measurements with the global positioning system: tests with an iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser.

    PubMed

    Fox, Richard W; Diddams, Scott A; Bartels, Albrecht; Hollberg, Leo

    2005-01-01

    Global positioning system- (GPS-) referenced optical frequency combs based on mode-locked lasers offer calibrations for length metrology traceable to international length standards through the SI second and the speed of light. The absolute frequency of an iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser [127I2 R(127) 11-5 f component] was measured with a femtosecond comb referenced to a multichannel GPS timing receiver. The expected performance and limitations of GPS-referenced comb measurements are discussed. PMID:15662892

  20. Stabilization and time resolved measurement of the frequency evolution of a modulated diode laser for chirped pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga-Umbrich, K.; Bakos, J. S.; Djotyan, G. P.; Ignácz, P. N.; Ráczkevi, B.; Sörlei, Zs; Szigeti, J.; Kedves, M. Á.

    2016-05-01

    We have developed experimental methods for the generation of chirped laser pulses of controlled frequency evolution in the nanosecond pulse length range for coherent atomic interaction studies. The pulses are sliced from the radiation of a cw external cavity diode laser while its drive current, and consequently its frequency, are sinusoidally modulated. By the proper choice of the modulation parameters, as well as of the timing of pulse slicing, we can produce a wide variety of frequency sweep ranges during the pulse. In order to obtain the required frequency chirp, we need to stabilize the center frequency of the modulated laser and to measure the resulting frequency evolution with appropriate temporal resolution. These tasks have been solved by creating a beat signal with a reference laser locked to an atomic transition frequency. The beat signal is then analyzed, as well as its spectral sideband peaks are fed back to the electronics of the frequency stabilization of the modulated laser. This method is simple and it has the possibility for high speed frequency sweep with narrow linewidth that is appropriate, for example, for selective manipulation of atomic states in a magneto-optical trap.

  1. Measurement of laser quantum frequency fluctuations using a Pound-Drever stabilization system

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.J.; Mussche, P.L.; Siegman, A.E. . Edward L. Ginzton Lab.)

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe a method for measuring the frequency fluctuation spectrum of a laser oscillator, especially the weak noise contributions in the wings of the spectrum, and apply this method to confirm the existence of large excess quantum frequency fluctuations in a laser oscillator using an unstable optical resonator. The measurement apparatus uses the Pound-Drever technique, which employs an RF phase modulator and a Fabry-Perot cavity to produce a sensitive high-speed frequency discrimination signal. The authors show that this signal can also be used to measure the quantum noise contributions to the frequency spectrum of a laser oscillator. Experimental measurements on a miniature diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser using a stable optical cavity closely match the predictions of the usual Schawlow-Townes theory, while the frequency fluctuations in a nearly identical laser employing an unstable optical resonator are approximately 1,300 times larger. These much larger fluctuations arise in part from the larger output coupling and cavity bandwidth of the unstable cavity, but they also appear to confirm a predicted excess spontaneous emission factor (Petermann excess noise factor) of [approx]180 times arising from the nonorthogonal transverse mode properties of the unstable cavity.

  2. Biomechanical evaluation of oversized drilling technique on primary implant stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría-Arrieta, Gorka; Brizuela-Velasco, Aritza; Fernández-González, Felipe J.; Chávarri-Prado, David; Chento-Valiente, Yelko; Solaberrieta, Eneko; Diéguez-Pereira, Markel; Yurrebaso-Asúa, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the influence of implant site preparation depth on primary stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Material and Methods Thirty-two implant sites were prepared in eight veal rib blocks. Sixteen sites were prepared using the conventional drilling sequence recommended by the manufacturer to a working depth of 10mm. The remaining 16 sites were prepared using an oversize drilling technique (overpreparation) to a working depth of 12mm. Bone density was determined using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). The implants were placed and primary stability was measured by two methods: insertion torque (Ncm), and RFA (implant stability quotient [ISQ]). Results The highest torque values were achieved by the conventional drilling technique (10mm). The ANOVA test confirmed that there was a significant correlation between torque and drilling depth (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant differences were obtained between ISQ values at 10 or 12 mm drilling depths (p>0.05) at either measurement direction (cortical and medullar). No statistical relation between torque and ISQ values was identified, or between bone density and primary stability (p >0.05). Conclusions Vertical overpreparation of the implant bed will obtain lower insertion torque values, but does not produce statistically significant differences in ISQ values. Key words:Implant stability quotient, overdrilling, primary stability, resonance frequency analysis, torque. PMID:27398182

  3. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  4. Frequency stabilized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongeon, R. J.; Henschke, R. W.

    1984-08-01

    The document describes a frequency control system for a laser for compensating for thermally-induced laser resonator length changes. The frequency control loop comprises a frequency reference for producing an error signal and electrical means to move a length-controlling transducer in response thereto. The transducer has one of the laser mirrors attached thereto. The effective travel of the transducer is multiplied severalfold by circuitry for sensing when the transducer is running out of extension and in response thereto rapidly moving the transducer and its attached mirror toward its midrange position.

  5. FREQUENCY STABILIZING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.; Anderson, O.A.

    1960-05-01

    An electronic control circuit is described in which a first signal frequency is held in synchronization with a second varying reference signal. The circuit receives the first and second signals as inputs and produces an output signal having an amplitude dependent upon rate of phase change between the two signals and a polarity dependent on direction of the phase change. The output may thus serve as a correction signal for maintaining the desired synchronization. The response of the system is not dependent on relative phase angle between the two compared signals. By having practically no capacitance in the circuit, there is minimum delay between occurrence of a phase shift and a response in the output signal and therefore very fast synchronization is effected.

  6. DSS 13 frequency stability tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1987-01-01

    In a previous article, the results of frequency stability tests at DSS 13 were presented in table form for tau = 1000 s for the test period May 1985 through March 1986. This article is a continuation of that initial report and presents specially selected Allan sigma (square root of variance) plots of each of the subsystem test previously reported. An additional result obtained from tests performed during July 1986 was included for completeness. The Allan sigma plots are useful in that frequency stability information is not only given for tau = 1000 s, but for tau values in the regions of 1, 100, 500, and 2000 s as well.

  7. Active laser frequency stabilization and resolution enhancement of interferometers for the measurement of gravitational waves in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, Markus

    2005-09-01

    Laser frequency stabilization is notably one of the major challenges on the way to a space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is presently under development in an ESA, NASA collaboration. We present a novel method for active laser stabilization and phase noise suppression in such a gravitational wave detector. The proposed approach is a further evolution of the "arm-locking" method, which in essence consists of using an interferometer arm as an optical cavity, exploiting the extreme long-run stability of the cavity size in the frequency band of interest. We extend this method by using the natural interferometer arm length differences and existing interferometer signals as additional information sources for the reconstruction and active suppression of the quasi-periodic laser frequency noise, enhancing the resolution power of space-borne gravitational wave detectors.

  8. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  9. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  10. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  11. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  12. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  13. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  14. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  15. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  16. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  17. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  18. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  19. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  20. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  1. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  2. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  3. Coupled Resonance Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, Shaun; Uys, Hermann; MAQClab Team

    2013-05-01

    We have demonstrated simultaneous laser frequency stabilization of a UV and IR laser, to the same photodiode signal derived from the UV laser only. For trapping and cooling Yb+ ions, a frequency stabilized laser is required at 369.9 nm to drive the S1/2-P1/2 cooling cycle. Since that cycle is not closed, a repump beam is needed at 935.18 nm to drive the D3/2-D[ 3 / 2 ] transition, which rapidly decays back to the S1/2 state. Our 369 nm laser is locked using Doppler free polarization spectroscopy of Yb+ ions, generated in a hollow cathode discharge lamp. Without pumping, the metastable D3/2 level is only sparsely populated, making direct absorption of 935 nm light difficult to detect. A resonant 369 nm pump laser can populate the D3/2 state, and fast repumping to the S1/2 ground state by on resonant 935 nm light, can be detected via the change in absorption of the 369 nm laser. This is accomplished using lock-in detection on the same photodiode signal to which the 369 nm laser is locked. In this way, simultaneous locking of two frequencies in very different spectral regimes is accomplished, while exploiting only the photodiode signal from one of the lasers. A rate equation model gives good qualitative agreement with experimental observation. This work was partially funded by the South African National Research Foundation.

  4. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  5. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that,...

  6. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that,...

  7. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  8. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that,...

  9. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that,...

  10. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that,...

  11. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  12. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  13. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  14. Acousto-optical spectrometers' frequency performance stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergei I.; Lavrov, Aleksandr P.; Molodyakov, Sergey A.; Saenko, Igor I.

    2004-02-01

    Performance characteristics of the acoutsto-optical spectrometers for some radioastronomical applications are discussed. The main attention is given to the long-term stability of the acousto-optical spectrometer's frequency characteristics. It is shown that a problem of the frequency scale thermal instabilities can be overcome by using the suitable correction, based on the proposed model of the frequency scale drifts. For the acousto-optical spectrometers under consideration a simple method of the frequency scale drifts correction by using the data from measuring of a single reference signal's frequency was developed and applied for correction of molecular lines observations data. More careful procedure for more exigent applications, such as pulsar timing, is considered.

  15. Laser Frequency Stabilization for GRACE-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; deVine, G.; Klipstein, W. M.; McKenzie, K.; Shaddock, D.; Spero, R.; Thompson, R.; Wuchenich, D.; Yu, N.; Stephens, M.; Leitch, J.; Davis, M.; deCino, J.; Pace, C.; Pierce, R.

    2010-01-01

    The GRACE mission monitors changes in the Earth's gravity field by measuring changes in the distance between spacecraft induced by that changing field. The distance variation is measured with a microwave ranging system with sub-micron accuracy. The ranging measurement accuracy is limited by the signal-to-noise ratio and by the frequency stability of the microwave signal referenced to an ultra-stable oscillator (USO). For GRACE-2 a laser ranging system is envisioned with accuracy better than the GRACE microwave ranging system. A laser ranging system easily provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio over the microwave system. Laser frequency stability better than the GRACE USO stability has been demonstrated in several laboratories using thermally stabilized optical cavities. We are developing a space-qualifiable optical cavity and associated optics and electronics for use on GRACE-2 to provide a stable frequency reference for the laser ranging system. Two breadboard units have been developed and tested for performance and ability to survive launch and orbit environments. A prototype unit is being designed using lessons learned from tests of the breadboard units.

  16. Absolute distance measurement by multi-heterodyne interferometry using a frequency comb and a cavity-stabilized tunable laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Liu, Tingyang; Balling, Petr; Qu, Xinghua

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we develop a multi-heterodyne system capable of absolute distance measurement using a frequency comb and a tunable diode laser locked to a Fabry-Perot cavity. In a series of subsequent measurements, numerous beat components can be obtained by downconverting the optical frequency into the RF region with multi-heterodyne interferometry. The distances can be measured via the mode phases with a series of synthetic wavelengths. The comparison with the reference interferometer shows an agreement within 1.5 μm for the averages of five measurements and 2.5 μm for the single measurement, which is at the 10-8 relative precision level. PMID:27411152

  17. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements § 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these...

  18. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  19. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 758-775 and 788-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and...

  20. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  1. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 763-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and...

  2. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements § 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), and (f) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these...

  3. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101...) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. An applicant must propose to use a frequency tolerance that would confine emissions within the band of operation, unless...

  4. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101... Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. Experimental Radio Service licensees shall ensure that transmitted emissions remain within the authorized frequency band under normal operating conditions:...

  5. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101...) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. An applicant must propose to use a frequency tolerance that would confine emissions within the band of operation, unless...

  6. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements § 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these...

  7. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 763-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and...

  8. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 763-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and...

  9. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101...) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. An applicant must propose to use a frequency tolerance that would confine emissions within the band of operation, unless...

  10. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements § 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these...

  11. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101... Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. Experimental Radio Service licensees shall ensure that transmitted emissions remain within the authorized frequency band under normal operating conditions:...

  12. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  13. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 763-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and...

  14. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements § 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these...

  15. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  16. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  17. Operational frequency stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The frequency stabilities under operational conditions of several commercially available rubidium and cesium frequency standards were determined from experimental data for frequency averaging times from 10 to the 7th power s and are presented in table and graph form. For frequency averaging times between 10 to the 5th power and 10 to the 7th power s, the rubidium standards tested have a stability of between 10 to the minus 12th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 12th power, while the cesium standards have a stability of between 2 x 10 to the minus 13th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 13th power.

  18. Providing hydrogen maser timing stability to orbiting VLBI radio telescope observations by post-measurement compensation of linked frequency standard imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springett, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Orbiting VLBI (OVLBI) astronomical observations are based upon measurements acquired simultaneously from ground-based and earth-orbiting radio telescopes. By the mid-1990s, two orbiting VLBI observatories, Russia's Radioastron and Japan's VSOP, will augment the worldwide VLBI network, providing baselines to earth radio telescopes as large as 80,000 km. The challenge for OVLBI is to effectuate space to ground radio telescope data cross-correlation (the observation) to a level of integrity currently achieved between ground radio telescopes. VLBI radio telescopes require ultrastable frequency and timing references in order that long term observations may be made without serious cross-correlation loss due to frequency source drift and phase noise. For this reason, such instruments make use of hydrogen maser frequency standards. Unfortunately, space-qualified hydrogen maser oscillators are currently not available for use on OVLBI satellites. Thus, the necessary long-term stability needed by the orbiting radio telescope may only be obtained by microwave uplinking a ground-based hydrogen maser derived frequency to the satellite. Although the idea of uplinking the frequency standard intrinsically seems simple, there are many 'contaminations' which degrade both the long and short term stability of the transmitted reference. Factors which corrupt frequency and timing accuracy include additive radio and electronic circuit thermal noise, slow or systematic phase migration due to changes of electronic circuit temporal operating conditions (especially temperature), ionosphere and troposphere induced scintillations, residual Doppler-incited components, and microwave signal multipath propagation. What is important, though, is to realize that ultimate stability does not have to be achieved in real-time. Instead, information needed to produce a high degree of coherence in the subsequent cross-correlation operation may be derived from a two-way coherent radio link, recorded and later

  19. Characterization of a partially-stabilized frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold Dahl, M. E.; Erikson, Alex; Woodbury, Daniel; Bergeson, Scott

    2015-05-01

    We present measurements of well-known frequency intervals in Cs, Rb, and Ca. These measurements are used to determine the accuracy of a partially-stabilized ti:sapphire frequency comb. One mode of our frequency comb is offset-locked to a Rb-stabilized diode laser. The comb's repetition rate is counted but not locked. A second laser is used to probe well-known atomic transitions in Cs, Rb, and Ca. We describe our offset locking and scanning techniques and demonstrate a frequency precision of 10 kHz in a 30 second measurement time. The accuracy of our laser frequency interval measurements is approximately 40 kHz. However, cell-based frequency references can be off by several hundred kHz. Research supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. PHY-0969856) and the Air Force (Grant No. FA9950-12-1-0308).

  20. Improved low frequency stability of bolometric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbanks, T.; Devlin, M.; Lange, A. E.; Beeman, J. W.; Sato, S.

    1990-01-01

    An ac bridge readout system has been developed that greatly improves the low-frequency stability of bolometric detectors. The readout can be implemented with a simple circuit appropriate for use in space applications. A matched pair of detectors was used in the readout to achieve system noise within a factor of two of the fundamental noise limit of the detectors at frequencies as low as 10 mHz. The low-frequency stability of the readout system allows slower, more sensitive detectors to be used in many applications, and it facilitates observing strategies that are well suited to spaceborne observations.

  1. High-resolution optical frequency metrology with stabilized femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ronald Jason

    The merging of such seemingly disparate fields as optical frequency metrology and ultrafast physics over the past few years has had a revolutionary impact on both fields. Extensive research over the past several decades has focused on stabilizing cw lasers to atomic and molecular transitions. These transitions in the optical and near-infrared regimes provide some of the highest Q's accessible in spectroscopy due to their high resonant frequencies (Q ≡ nu o/deltanu). Modern experiments have enjoyed increasing levels of precision and accuracy due to such stabilized laser systems. A long standing problem in optical frequency metrology, however, is the difficulty to perform direct frequency measurements in the optical spectrum. Traditional optical frequency chains are complex, costly, and lack flexibility. Recent experiments based on mode-locked femtosecond (fs) lasers promise to eliminate this problem and make optical frequency measurements accessible as a general laboratory tool. The use of fs lasers now enables the direct measurement of optical transitions by simply linking these frequencies to the repetition rate of the fs laser. The ability of the femtosecond laser to link the optical and radio frequency regimes is ultimately limited by its stability. In this dissertation, we present a novel stabilization scheme in which the frequency, phase, and repetition rate of a Kerr-lens mode-locked (KLM) ti:sapphire laser are locked to that of an ultra-stable Fabry-Perot reference cavity. The large signal to noise ratio of the recovered cavity resonance allows the superb short term stability (tau < 1 second) of the passive reference cavity to be transferred to the femtosecond laser. This technique may find future application in any experiment involving the use of femtosecond pulses in which a resonant cavity is employed, such as intracavity studies of light-matter interactions with ultra-short pulses. The short term instability of the cavity stabilized femtosecond laser

  2. Stabilizing Microwave Frequency of a Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong

    2006-01-01

    A scheme for stabilizing the frequency of a microwave signal is proposed that exploits the operational characteristics of a coupled optoelectronic oscillator (COEO) and related optoelectronic equipment. An essential element in the scheme is a fiber mode-locked laser (MLL), the optical frequency of which is locked to an atomic transition. In this scheme, the optical frequency stability of the mode-locked laser is transferred to that of the microwave in the same device. Relative to prior schemes for using wideband optical frequency comb to stabilize microwave signals, this scheme is simpler and lends itself more readily to implementation in relatively compact, rugged equipment. The anticipated development of small, low-power, lightweight, highly stable microwave oscillators based on this scheme would afford great benefits in communication, navigation, metrology, and fundamental sciences. COEOs of various designs, at various stages of development, in some cases called by different names, have been described in a number of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. A COEO is an optoelectronic apparatus that generates both short (picosecond) optical pulses and a steady microwave signal having an ultrahigh degree of spectral purity. The term "coupled optoelectronic" in the full name of such an apparatus signifies that its optical and electronic oscillations are coupled to each other in a single device. The present frequency-stabilization scheme is best described indirectly by describing the laboratory apparatus used to demonstrate it. The apparatus (see figure) includes a COEO that generates a comb-like optical spectrum, the various frequency components of which interfere, producing short optical pulses. This spectrum is centered at a nominal wavelength of 1,560 nm. The spectrum separation of this comb is about 10 GHz, as determined primarily by the length of an optical loop and the bandpass filter in the microwave feedback loop. The optical loop serves as microwave resonator

  3. Laser Frequency Stabilization by Using Arm-Locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Hans Reiner; Gath, Peter F.; Herz, Markus

    2006-11-01

    In order to achieve the required measurement performance on LISA, the laser frequency must be stabilized to approximately 30 Hz/√Hz ×[1+(1mHz/f)4]1/2 in the LISA measurement bandwidth from 0.03 mHz up to 1 Hz for the master laser in the constellation. All other lasers are offset locked to the master laser such that the Doppler shifts are taken into account and beat signals between 3 MHz and 18 MHz are produced on all detectors in the constellation. Ensuring sufficient frequency stability can be established by different methods. A straight forward approach is to use an optical cavity. It turns out that a cavity alone significantly drives the thermal stability requirements at low frequencies. Therefore, different versions of arm-locking are considered in order to provide both, frequency stabilization at low frequencies as well as at high frequencies. While it is obvious how a stable feedback loop at low frequencies can be achieved, a stable control system with noise suppression also at high frequencies can only be achieved when at least two arms are combined in the overall control approach. In the framework of this paper, the Sagnac and the Michelson locking scheme are described and it is shown that the resulting system is stable and achieves significant noise suppression at frequencies up to around 100 Hz. The theoretical results are supported by frequency and time-domain simulations. Results from the time-domain simulation are currently being used for an end-to-end simulation of the LISA measurement data chain that involves the Synthetic LISA simulator, the laser frequency noise generated from the arm-locking simulation, the digital part of the phasemeter, and the TDI data post-processing. This effort will result in a detailed understanding and quantization of additional error sources introduced at the various level of data processing.

  4. Scientific applications of frequency-stabilized laser technology in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumaker, Bonny L.

    1990-01-01

    A synoptic investigation of the uses of frequency-stabilized lasers for scientific applications in space is presented. It begins by summarizing properties of lasers, characterizing their frequency stability, and describing limitations and techniques to achieve certain levels of frequency stability. Limits to precision set by laser frequency stability for various kinds of measurements are investigated and compared with other sources of error. These other sources include photon-counting statistics, scattered laser light, fluctuations in laser power, and intensity distribution across the beam, propagation effects, mechanical and thermal noise, and radiation pressure. Methods are explored to improve the sensitivity of laser-based interferometric and range-rate measurements. Several specific types of science experiments that rely on highly precise measurements made with lasers are analyzed, and anticipated errors and overall performance are discussed. Qualitative descriptions are given of a number of other possible science applications involving frequency-stabilized lasers and related laser technology in space. These applications will warrant more careful analysis as technology develops.

  5. Frequency stability of maser oscillators operated with cavity Q. [hydrogen and rubidium masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetu, M.; Tremblay, P.; Lesage, P.; Petit, P.; Audoin, C.

    1982-01-01

    The short term frequency stability of masers equipped with an external feedback loop to increase the cavity quality factor was studied. The frequency stability of a hydrogen and a rubidium maser were measured and compared with theoretical evaluation. It is shown that the frequency stability passes through an optimum when the cavity Q is varied. Long term fluctuations are discussed and the optimum mid term frequency stability achievably by small size active and passive H-masers is considered.

  6. Laser frequency stabilization using bichromatic crossover spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Taek; Seb Moon, Han

    2015-03-07

    We propose a Doppler-free spectroscopic method named bichromatic crossover spectroscopy (BCS), which we then use for the frequency stabilization of an off-resonant frequency that does not correspond to an atomic transition. The observed BCS in the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition of {sup 87}Rb is related to the hyperfine structure of the conventional saturated absorption spectrum of this transition. Furthermore, the Doppler-free BCS is numerically calculated by considering all of the degenerate magnetic sublevels of the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition in an atomic vapor cell, and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, we successfully achieve modulation-free off-resonant locking at the center frequency between the two 5S{sub 1/2}(F = 1 and 2) → 5P{sub 1/2}(F′ = 1) transitions using a polarization rotation of the BCS. The laser frequency stability was estimated to be the Allan variance of 2.1 × 10{sup −10} at 1 s.

  7. Short-term frequency stability of the Rb-87 maser.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetu, M.; Busca, G.; Vanier, J.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the short-term stability of the Rb-87 maser as a function of the maser power output and the receiver cutoff frequency are reported. The experimental data are compared to theoretical results obtained from an approximate theory. In this theory the transfer function of the maser for thermal noise is derived, and the spectral density of the phase fluctuations is calculated. An analytical expression for the 'Allan variance' is also given. A comparison of the stability of the Rb-87 maser with existing frequency standards shows its superiority for averaging times less than 1 sec.

  8. Design concepts using ring lasers for frequency stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mocker, H.

    1967-01-01

    Laser frequency stabilization methods are based on a frequency discriminant which generates an unambiguous deviation signal used for automatic stabilization. Closed-loop control stabilizes cavity length at a null point. Some systems have a stabilized ring laser using a piezoelectric dither and others use a Doppler gain tube.

  9. Frequency stabilized lasers for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, Mike; Adkins, Mike; Pierce, Robert; Warden, Robert; Wallace, Cynthia; Weimer, Carl

    2014-09-01

    metrology, spectroscopy, atomic clocks and geodesy. This technology will be a key enabler to several proposed NASA science missions. Although lasers such as Q-switched Nd-YAG are now commonly used in space, other types of lasers - especially those with narrow linewidth - are still few in number and more development is required to advance their technology readiness. In this paper we discuss a reconfigurable laser frequency stabilization testbed, and end-to-end modeling to support system development. Two important features enabling testbed flexibility are that the controller, signal processing and interfaces are hosted on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) which has spacequalified equivalent parts, and secondly, fiber optic relay of the beam paths. Given the nonlinear behavior of lasers, FPGA implementation is a key system reliability aspect allowing on-orbit retuning of the control system and initial frequency acquisition. The testbed features a dual sensor system, one based upon a high finesse resonator cavity which provides relative stability through Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) modulation and secondly an absolute frequency reference by dither locking to an acetylene gas cell (GC). To provide for differences between ground and space implementation, we have developed an end-to-end Simulink/ Matlab®-based control system model of the testbed components including the important noise sources. This model is in the process of being correlated to the testbed data which then can be used for trade studies, and estimation of space-based performance and sensitivities. A 1530 nm wavelength semiconductor laser is used for this initial work.

  10. The measurement of optical frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollberg, L.; Diddams, S.; Bartels, A.; Fortier, T.; Kim, K.

    2005-06-01

    Surprising as it might seem, it is possible to phase-coherently track, synthesize, count and divide optical frequencies of visible laser sources. In essence, the technologies described here now allow direct connection of basically any frequency from DC to 1000 THz. Modern 'self-referenced' femtosecond mode-locked lasers have enormously simplified the required technology. These revolutionary new systems build on a long history of optical frequency metrology that spans from the early days of the laser. The latest systems rely heavily on technologies previously developed for laser frequency stabilization, optical phase-locked-loops, nonlinear mixing, ultra-fast optics and precision opto-electronic metrology. Using examples we summarize some of the heroic efforts that led to the successful development of harmonic optical frequency chains. Those systems played critical roles in defining the speed of light and in redefining the metre. We then describe the present state-of-the-art technology in femtosecond laser frequency combs, their extraordinary performance capabilities and some of the latest results.

  11. Stabilized Fiber-Optic Distribution of Reference Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Malcolm; Tjoelker, Robert; Diener, William; Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi; Kirk, Albert

    2003-01-01

    An optoelectronic system distributes a reference signal of low noise and highly stabilized phase and frequency (100 MHz) from an atomic frequency standard to a remote facility at a distance up to tens of kilometers. The reference signal is transmitted to the remote station as amplitude modulation of an optical carrier signal propagating in an optical fiber. The stabilization scheme implemented in this system is intended particularly to suppress phase and frequency fluctuations caused by vibrations and by expansion and contraction of the optical fiber and other components in diurnal and seasonal heating and cooling cycles. The system (see figure) comprises several subsystems, the main one being (1) a hydrogen-maser or linear-ion-trap frequency standard in an environmentally controlled room in a signal-processing center (SPC), (2) a stabilized fiber-optic distribution assembly (SFODA), (3) a compensated sapphire oscillator (CSO) in an environmentally controlled room in the remote facility, (4) thermally stabilized distribution amplifiers and cabling from the environmentally controlled room to end users, and (5) performance- measuring equipment.

  12. Frequency stability of a wavelength meter and applications to laser frequency stabilization.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Khaldoun; Millo, Jacques; Didier, Alexandre; Kersalé, Yann; Lacroûte, Clément

    2015-11-10

    Interferometric wavelength meters have attained frequency resolutions down to the megahertz range. In particular, Fizeau interferometers, which have no moving parts, are becoming a popular tool for laser characterization and stabilization. In this paper, we characterize such a wavelength meter using an ultrastable laser in terms of relative frequency instability σ(y)(τ) and demonstrate that it can achieve a short-term instability σ(y)(1s)≈2×10(-10) and a frequency drift of order 10 MHz/day. We use this apparatus to demonstrate frequency control of a near-infrared laser, where a frequency instability below 3×10(-10) from 1 to 2000 s is achieved. Such performance is, for example, adequate for ion trapping and atom cooling experiments. PMID:26560771

  13. Charge storage: stability measures in implantable electrodes.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Nathalia; Jackson, Kassandra; Samiyi, Raamin; Minnikanti, Saugandhika

    2009-01-01

    Here we report on long-term (300 to 600 hours) stability measures for implantable stimulating electrodes. We have considered several measures of stability as they refer to reliability of charge carrying capacity in implantable electrodes. We have designed and manufactured coatings for large area (1 to 2mm(2)) stainless steel substrates. Materials tested were electrodeposited iridium oxide films, multi-walled carbon nanotube mesh, and PEDOT:PSS. Traditional characterization techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy cover a small fraction of the characterization framework needed for ensuring the safety and performance of electrodes designed for long-term implants. The stability measures suggested here rely on continuous low frequency cycling and evaluation of cathodic charge storage capacity during cycling. We experimentally show, in this paper, that the stability may be measured and is relevant for long-term applications of such coatings. PMID:19963977

  14. Physics characterization and frequency stability of the pulsed rubidium maser

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo; Calosso, Claudio

    2006-10-15

    In this paper we report the theoretical and experimental characterization of a pulsed optically pumped vapor-cell frequency standard based on the detection of the free-induction decay microwave signal. The features that make this standard similar to a pulsed passive maser are presented. In order to predict and optimize the frequency stability, thermal and shot noise sources are analyzed, as well as the conversions of the laser and microwave fluctuations into the output frequency. The experimental results obtained with a clock prototype based on {sup 87}Rb in buffer gas are compared with the theoretical predictions, showing the practical possibility to implement a frequency standard limited in the medium term only by thermal drift. The achieved frequency stability is {sigma}{sub y}({tau})=1.2x10{sup -12}{tau}{sup -1/2} for measurement times up to {tau}{approx_equal}10{sup 5} s. It represents one of the best results reported in literature for gas cell frequency standards and is compliant with the present day requirements for on board space applications.

  15. Measurement of dimensional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, S. F.; Berthold, J. W., III; Norton, M.

    1975-01-01

    A technique was developed for measuring, with a precision of one part 10 to the 9th power, changes in physical dimensions delta L/L. Measurements have commenced on five materials: Heraeus-Schott Homosil (vitreous silica), Corning 7940 (vitreous silica), Corning ULE 7971 (titanium silicate), Schott Zero-Dur, and Owens-Illinois Cer-Vit C-101. The study was extended to include Universal Cyclops Invar LR-35 and Simonds-Saw Superinvar.

  16. Long-term laser frequency stabilization using fiber interferometers.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jia; Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Mitchell, Morgan W

    2015-07-01

    We report long-term laser frequency stabilization using only the target laser and a pair of 5 m fiber interferometers, one as a frequency reference and the second as a sensitive thermometer to stabilize the frequency reference. When used to stabilize a distributed feedback laser at 795 nm, the frequency Allan deviation at 1000 s drops from 5.6 × 10(-8) to 6.9 × 10(-10). The performance equals that of an offset lock employing a second, atom-stabilized laser in the temperature control. PMID:26233353

  17. Long-term laser frequency stabilization using fiber interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Jia; Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2015-07-15

    We report long-term laser frequency stabilization using only the target laser and a pair of 5 m fiber interferometers, one as a frequency reference and the second as a sensitive thermometer to stabilize the frequency reference. When used to stabilize a distributed feedback laser at 795 nm, the frequency Allan deviation at 1000 s drops from 5.6 × 10{sup −8} to 6.9 × 10{sup −10}. The performance equals that of an offset lock employing a second, atom-stabilized laser in the temperature control.

  18. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  19. Diode laser frequency stabilization using a low cost, low finesse Fabry-Perot cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Hannah; Jaber, Noura B.; Piatt, Georgia; Gregoric, Vincent C.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-05-01

    Our lab employs low cost, low finesse Fabry-Perot cavities to stabilize the frequency of diode lasers used in ultra-cold Rydberg atom experiments. To characterize the stability of this technique, we perform a self-heterodyne linewidth measurement. For comparison, we also measure the linewidth when using a saturated absorption spectrometer to provide frequency stability. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1205895 and No. 1205897.

  20. The JPL Hg(sup +) Extended Linear Ion Trap Frequency Standard: Status, Stability, and Accuracy Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    Microwave frequency standards based on room temperature (sup 199)Hg(sup +) ions in a Linear Ion Trap (LITS) presently achieve a Signal to Noise and line Q inferred short frequency stability. Long term stability has been measured for averaging intervals up to 5 months with apparent sensitivity to variations in ion number/temperature limiting the flicker floor.

  1. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  2. Better Stability with Measurement Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argun, Aykut; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    Often it is desirable to stabilize a system around an optimal state. This can be effectively accomplished using feedback control, where the system deviation from the desired state is measured in order to determine the magnitude of the restoring force to be applied. Contrary to conventional wisdom, i.e. that a more precise measurement is expected to improve the system stability, here we demonstrate that a certain degree of measurement error can improve the system stability. We exemplify the implications of this finding with numerical examples drawn from various fields, such as the operation of a temperature controller, the confinement of a microscopic particle, the localization of a target by a microswimmer, and the control of a population.

  3. Better Stability with Measurement Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argun, Aykut; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Often it is desirable to stabilize a system around an optimal state. This can be effectively accomplished using feedback control, where the system deviation from the desired state is measured in order to determine the magnitude of the restoring force to be applied. Contrary to conventional wisdom, i.e. that a more precise measurement is expected to improve the system stability, here we demonstrate that a certain degree of measurement error can improve the system stability. We exemplify the implications of this finding with numerical examples drawn from various fields, such as the operation of a temperature controller, the confinement of a microscopic particle, the localization of a target by a microswimmer, and the control of a population.

  4. Stability measures in arid ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosshi, M. I.; Brunsell, N. A.; Koerner, S.

    2015-12-01

    Stability, the capacity of ecosystems to persist in the face of change, has proven its relevance as a fundamental component of ecological theory. Here, we would like to explore meaningful and quantifiable metrics to define stability, with a focus on highly variable arid and semi-arid savanna ecosystems. Recognizing the importance of a characteristic timescale to any definition of stability, our metrics will be focused scales from annual to multi-annual, capturing different aspects of stability. Our three measures of stability, in increasing order of temporal scale, are: (1) Ecosystem resistance, quantified as the degree to which the system maintains its mean state in response to a perturbation (drought), based on inter-annual variability in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). (2) An optimization approach, relevant to arid systems with pulse dynamics, that models vegetation structure and function based on a trade off between the ability to respond to resource availability and avoid stress. (3) Community resilience, measured as species turnover rate (β diversity). Understanding the nature of stability in structurally-diverse arid ecosystems, which are highly variable, yields theoretical insight which has practical implications.

  5. Methods and apparatus for broadband frequency comb stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Jonathan A; Kaertner, Franz X

    2015-03-17

    Feedback loops can be used to shift and stabilize the carrier-envelope phase of a frequency comb from a mode-locked fibers laser or other optical source. Compared to other frequency shifting and stabilization techniques, feedback-based techniques provide a wideband closed-loop servo bandwidth without optical filtering, beam pointing errors, or group velocity dispersion. It also enables phase locking to a stable reference, such as a Ti:Sapphire laser, continuous-wave microwave or optical source, or self-referencing interferometer, e.g., to within 200 mrad rms from DC to 5 MHz. In addition, stabilized frequency combs can be coherently combined with other stable signals, including other stabilized frequency combs, to synthesize optical pulse trains with pulse durations of as little as a single optical cycle. Such a coherent combination can be achieved via orthogonal control, using balanced optical cross-correlation for timing stabilization and balanced homodyne detection for phase stabilization.

  6. Frequency response characteristics of the fuzzy polar power system stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Ortmeyer, T.H.; Hiyama, Takashi

    1995-06-01

    The fuzzy polar power system stabilizer (FPPSS) which has been recently developed is analyzed using frequency domain methods. the frequency domain approach allows the PSS designer to compare the new FPPSS with more conventional controllers. The significance of the three FPPSS design parameters are readily seen from the frequency response data, and their relationship to the conventional lead-lag design approach can be evaluated. Furthermore, the frequency response data for the FPPSS allows an alternate design approach for this stabilizer, and can be used to develop information concerning the small signal stability of the resulting system.

  7. Small displacement measurements with subatomic resolution by beat frequency measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cíp, O.; Petrů, F.; Buchta, Z.; Lazar, J.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper a novel method for high-resolution measurement of displacements with sub-atomic resolution is described. With this method, a length change of an optical resonator is directly transformed to a radio-frequency signal. A tunable He-Ne laser is locked to a mode of the resonator using a digital signal processing technique. Heterodyne mixing of this locked laser with an iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser converts the frequency of the laser locked to the cavity into the radio-frequency region. A HF counter measures the beat frequency from which the displacement can be derived directly. This method delivers inherent linearity and sub-nanometre resolution of the displacement over a range of several micrometres. An example of the capabilities of this system is given in this paper, where it is used for checking periodic deviations of a laser interferometer system. Emphasis is put on the construction of the optical resonator, on how its narrow resonance line-width is achieved, and how the required mechanical stability is achieved. The measurement range and the scale linearity are discussed in detail. Possible applications of this method are the calibration of nano-position systems based on PZT transducers, as well as inductive and capacitive sensors.

  8. Optical Frequency Metrology of an Iodine-Stabilized He-Ne Laser Using the Frequency Comb of a Quantum-Interference-Stabilized Mode-Locked Laser

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan P.; Roos, Peter A.; Wahlstrand, Jared K.; Pipis, Jessica A.; Rivas, Maria Belmonte; Cundiff, Steven T.

    2007-01-01

    We perform optical frequency metrology of an iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser frequency comb that is stabilized using quantum interference of photocurrents in a semiconductor. Using this technique, we demonstrate carrier-envelope offset frequency fluctuations of less than 5 mHz using a 1 s gate time. With the resulting stable frequency comb, we measure the optical frequency of the iodine transition [127I2 R(127) 11-5 i component] to be 473 612 214 712.96 ± 0.66 kHz, well within the uncertainty of the CIPM recommended value. The stability of the quantum interference technique is high enough such that it does not limit the measurements. PMID:27110472

  9. The High Frequency Stabilization of a Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirdyashev, K.

    2004-10-01

    Experimental data on the high-frequency stabilization of the MPD thruster and the suppression of low-frequency oscillations in the frequency range from 20 to 100 kHz are presented. Conditions for the stabilizing effect of a high-frequency magnetic field at the frequency of 40 MHz on the plasma jet produced by the thruster are determined, and the efficiency of this action is evaluated. The action of high frequency field on the MPD thruster consists in the contention of two processes - the stabilization of the plasma drift instability by the magnetic component of high frequency field and the energy conversion of natural plasma oscillations excited by the external field to the ion-sound wave energy.

  10. Stabilized frequency comb with a self-referenced femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Washburn, B R; Wilpers, G; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L; Newbury, N R; Diddams, S A; Nicholson, J W; Yan, M F

    2005-04-15

    A frequency comb is generated with a Cr:forsterite femtosecond laser, spectrally broadened through a highly nonlinear optical fiber to span from 1.0 to 2.2 ,m, and stabilized using the f-to-2f self-referencing technique. The repetition rate and the carrier-envelope offset frequency are stabilized to a hydrogen maser, calibrated by a cesium atomic fountain clock. Simultaneous frequency measurement of a 657-nm cw laser by use of the stabilized frequency combs from this Cr:forsterite system and a Ti:sapphire laser agree at the 10(-13) level. The frequency noise of the comb components is observed at 1064, 1314, and 1550 nm by comparing the measured beat frequencies between cw lasers and the supercontinuum frequency combs. PMID:15865403

  11. Effects of increased anterior-posterior voluntary sway frequency on mechanical and perceived postural stability.

    PubMed

    Martin Lorenzo, Teresa; Vanrenterghem, Jos

    2015-02-01

    Despite a substantial number of studies, the interaction between mechanical indicators of stability and perception of instability remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sway frequency and verbal restraint on mechanical and perceived postural stability. Fourteen participants underwent a series of standing voluntary anterior-posterior swaying trials at three frequencies (20, 40, and 60bpm) and two levels of restraint (non restraint and verbally restraint to swaying at the ankle). Repeated measures ANOVA tests revealed greater mechanical stability defined though the margin of stability, and greater horizontal ground reaction forces, while the center of pressure excursions remained unchanged with increasing frequency. Furthermore, ground reaction forces were greater in the non-restraint condition. Moreover, a tendency toward greater perceived instability with increasing voluntary sway frequency was observed. Our results indicate that variations in sway frequency and verbal restraint resulted in noticeable alterations in mechanical indicators of stability, with no clear effect on perceived instability. PMID:25498287

  12. Time, Frequency and Physical Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellwig, Helmut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes several developments in atomic clocks and frequency standards pointing out the feasibility and practicality in adopting a unified standard of time and frequency to replace other base standards of length, mass, and temperature. (GA)

  13. Frequency-tunable Pre-stabilized Lasers for LISA via Sideband-locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Thorpe, James I.; Numata, Kenji; Mitryk, Shawn; Mueller, Guido; Wand, Vinzenz

    2008-01-01

    Laser frequency noise mitigation is one of the most challenging aspects of the LISA interferometric measurement system. The unstabilized frequency fluctuations must be suppressed by roughly twelve orders of magnitude in order to achieve stability sufficient for gravitational wave detection. This enormous suppression will be achieved through a combination of stabilization and common-mode rejection. The stabilization component will itself be achieved in two stages: pre-stabilization to a local optical cavity followed by arm-locking to some combination of the inter-spacecraft distances. In order for these two stabilization stages to work simultaneously, the lock-point of the pre-stabilization loop must be frequency tunable. The current baseline stabilization technique, locking to an optical cavity, does not provide tunability between cavity resonances, which are typically spaced by 100s of MHz. Here we present a modification to the traditional Pound-Drever-Hall cavity locking technique that allows the laser to be locked to a cavity resonance with an adjustable frequency offset. This technique requires no modifications to the optical cavity itself, thus preserving the stability of the frequency reference. We present measurements of the system performance and demonstrate that we can meet implement the first two stages of stabilization.

  14. Gyrotron Frequency Stabilization by a Weak Reflected Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Denisov, G. G.; Kulygin, M. L.; Mel'nikova, M. M.; Novozhilova, Yu. V.; Ryskin, N. M.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of reducing the radiation frequency fluctuations by a factor of 3-5 using a nonresonant or highly resonant weakly reflecting load for the gyrotrons employed in controlled-fusion facilities is shown. The ranges of system parameters where the frequency stabilization is most effective were identified both analytically and numerically.

  15. Laser frequency stabilization and shifting by using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Wu, Bin; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The stabilizing and shifting of laser frequency are very important for the interaction between the laser and atoms. The modulation transfer spectroscopy for the 87Rb atom with D2 line transition F = 2 → F' = 3 is used for stabilizing and shifting the frequency of the external cavity grating feedback diode laser. The resonant phase modulator with electro—optical effect is used to generate frequency sideband to lock the laser frequency. In the locking scheme, circularly polarized pump- and probe-beams are used. By optimizing the temperature of the vapor, the pump- and probe-beam intensity, the laser linewidth of 280 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the magnetic field generated by a solenoid is added into the system. Therefore the system can achieve the frequency locking at any point in a range of hundreds of megahertz frequency shifting with very low power loss.

  16. Third-order chromatic dispersion stabilizes Kerr frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rivas, Pedro; Gomila, Damià; Leo, François; Coen, Stéphane; Gelens, Lendert

    2014-05-15

    Using numerical simulations of an extended Lugiato-Lefever equation we analyze the stability and nonlinear dynamics of Kerr frequency combs generated in microresonators and fiber resonators, taking into account third-order dispersion effects. We show that cavity solitons underlying Kerr frequency combs, normally sensitive to oscillatory and chaotic instabilities, are stabilized in a wide range of parameter space by third-order dispersion. Moreover, we demonstrate how the snaking structure organizing compound states of multiple cavity solitons is qualitatively changed by third-order dispersion, promoting an increased stability of Kerr combs underlined by a single cavity soliton. PMID:24978250

  17. Fast scanning cavity offset lock for laser frequency drift stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Smith, Nicolas; Blythe, Peter; Keller, Matthias; Lange, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    We have implemented a compact setup for long-term laser frequency stabilization. Light from a stable reference laser and several slave lasers is coupled into a confocal Fabry-Pérot resonator. By stabilizing the position of the transmission peaks of the slave lasers relative to successive peaks of the master laser as the length of the cavity is scanned over one free spectral range, the long-term stability of the master laser is transferred to the slave lasers. By using fast analog peak detection and low-latency microcontroller-based digital feedback, with a scanning frequency of 3 kHz, we obtain a feedback bandwidth of 380 Hz and a relative stability of better than 10 kHz at timescales longer than 1 s, a significant improvement on previous scanning-cavity stabilization systems.

  18. Frequency-Tunable Pre-stabilized lasers for LISA via Stabilized Lasers for LISA via Sideband Locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey; Thorpe, James Ira; Numata, K.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses a major potential source of noise for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) that is the laser frequency noise and the proposed mechanism to suppress the unstabilized frequency fluctuations. These fluctuations must be suppresed by about 12 orders of magnitude to achieve a stability that is sufficient for the detection of gravitational waves. This presentation reviews present a modification to the traditional cavity locking technique that allows the laser to be locked to a cavity resonance with an adjustable frequency offset. This presentation also discusses measurements of the system stability, demonstrating that the pre-stabilization level satisfies LISA requirements and a demonstration of a phase-lock loop which utilizes the tunable sideband locking technique as a pre-stabilization stage.

  19. Advanced two-way satellite frequency transfer by carrier-phase and carrier-frequency measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Miho; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Amagai, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Carrier-phase measurement is one of the ways to improve the measurement resolution of two-way satellite frequency transfer. We introduce two possible methods for carrier-phase measurement: direct carrier-phase detection identified by Two-Way Carrier-Phase (TWCP) and the use of carrier-frequency information identified by Two-Way Carrier Frequency (TWCF). We performed the former using an arbitrary waveform generator and an analog-to-digital sampler and the latter using a conventional modem. The TWCF measurement using the modem had a resolution of 10-13 and the result agreed with that obtained by GPS carrier-phase frequency transfer in a 1500 km baseline. The measurement accuracy may have been limited by the poor frequency resolution of the modem; however, the TWCF measurement was able to improve the stability of conventional two-way satellite frequency transfer. Additionally, we show that the TWCP measurement system has the potential to achieve a frequency stability of 10-17.

  20. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Mishra, S; Behera, R; Poornima; Dasgupta, K

    2015-06-01

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz(1/2) @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity. PMID:26133825

  1. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S. E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K.; Mishra, S.; Behera, R.

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  2. Precise Stabilization of the Optical Frequency of WGMRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Matsko, Andrey; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Crystalline whispering gallery mode resonators (CWGMRs) made of crystals with axial symmetry have ordinary and extraordinary families of optical modes. These modes have substantially different thermo-refractive constants. This results in a very sharp dependence of differential detuning of optical frequency on effective temperature. This frequency difference compared with clock gives an error signal for precise compensation of the random fluctuations of optical frequency. Certain crystals, like MgF2, have turnover points where the thermo-refractive effect is completely nullified. An advantage for applications using WGMRs for frequency stabilization is in the possibility of manufacturing resonators out of practically any optically transparent crystal. It is known that there are crystals with negative and zero thermal expansion at some specific temperatures. Doping changes properties of the crystals and it is possible to create an optically transparent crystal with zero thermal expansion at room temperature. With this innovation s stabilization technique, the resultant WGMR will have absolute frequency stability The expansion of the resonator s body can be completely compensated for by nonlinear elements. This results in compensation of linear thermal expansion (see figure). In three-mode, the MgF2 resonator, if tuned at the turnover thermal point, can compensate for all types of random thermal-related frequency drift. Simplified dual-mode method is also available. This creates miniature optical resonators with good short- and long-term stability for passive secondary frequency ethalon and an active resonator for active secondary frequency standard (a narrowband laser with long-term stability).

  3. Frequency stabilization of laser diodes in an aggressive thermal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minch, J. R.; Walther, F. G.; Savage, S.; Plante, A.; Scalesse, V.

    2015-03-01

    Mobile free-space laser communication systems must reconcile the requirements of low size, weight, and power with the ability to both survive and operate in harsh thermal and mechanical environments. In order to minimize the aperture size and amplifier power requirements of such systems, communication links must exhibit performance near theoretical limits. Such performance requires laser transmitters and receiver filters and interferometers to maintain frequency accuracy to within a couple hundred MHz of the design frequency. We demonstrate an approach to achieving high frequency stability over wide temperature ranges by using conventional DFB lasers, tuned with TEC and current settings, referenced to an HCN molecular frequency standard. A HCN cell absorption line is scanned across the TEC set-point to adjust the DFB laser frequency. Once the center of the line is determined, the TEC set-point is offset as required to obtain frequency agility. To obtain large frequency offsets from an HCN absorption line, as well as continuous laser source operation, a second laser is offset from the reference laser and the resulting beat tone is detected in a photoreceiver and set to the desired offset using a digital frequency-locked loop. Using this arrangement we have demonstrated frequency accuracy and stability of better than 8 MHz RMS over an operational temperature range of 0ºC to 50º C, with operation within minutes following 8 hour soaks at -40º C and 70º C.

  4. Frequency-Tuneable Pre-Stabilized Lasers for LISA via Sideband Locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira; Numata, Kenji; Livas, jeffery

    2008-01-01

    Laser frequency noise mitigation is one of the most challenging aspects of the LISA interferometric measurement system. The unstabilized frequency fluctuations must be suppressed by roughly twelve orders of magnitude in order to achieve a stability sufficient for gravitational wave detection. This enormous suppression will be achieved through a combination of stabilization and common-mode rejection. The stabilization component will itself be achieved in two stages: pre-stabilization to a local optical cavity followed by arm-locking to some combination of the inter-spacecraft distances. In order for these two stabilization stages to work simultaneously, the lock-point of the pre-stabilization loop must be frequency tunable. The current baseline stabilization technique, locking to an optical cavity, does not provide tunability between cavity resonance, which are typically spaced by 100s of MHz. Here we present a modification to the traditional Pound-Drever-Hall cavity locking technique that allows the laser to be locked to a cavity resonance with an adjustable frequency offset. This technique requires no modifications to the optical cavity itself, thus preserving the stability of the frequency reference. We present measurements of the system stability, demonstrating that the pre-stabilization level satisfies LISA requirements. We also present a demonstration of a phase-lock loop which utilizes the tunable sideband locking technique as a pre-stabilizations tage. The performance of the pre-stabilized phase-lock-loop indicates that the tunable sideband technique will meet the requirements as an actuator for arm-locking in LISA.

  5. Frequency stabilized optical comb source with high finesse intracavity etalon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdur, Ibrahim; Ozharar, Sarper; Akbulut, Mehmetcan; Mandridis, Dimitrios; Quinlan, Franklyn; Delfyett, Peter J.

    2009-05-01

    Mode-locked lasers have applications in signal processing and communications such as analog to digital conversion, arbitrary waveform generation and wavelength division multiplexing. For such applications low noise and phase coherent frequency stabilized optical combs are needed. In this work we report a low noise, Pound-Drever Hall frequency stabilized, semiconductor mode-locked laser at 10.287GHz centered at 1550nm with 1000-Finesse sealed, ultralow insertion loss intracavity etalon. The output optical power of the mode locked laser is ~5mW.

  6. Heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Johnson, Michael A.; Globig, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system is disclosed. The system utilizes heterodyning of a pulsed laser beam with a continuous wave laser beam to form a beat signal. The beat signal is processed by a controller or computer which determines both the average frequency of the laser pulse and any changes or chirp of the frequency during the pulse.

  7. Heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Johnson, Michael A.; Globig, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system is disclosed. The system utilizes heterodyning of a pulsed laser beam with a continuous wave laser beam to form a beat signal. The beat signal is processed by a controller or computer which determines both the average frequency of the laser pulse and any changes or chirp of th frequency during the pulse.

  8. Stabilized Lasers and Precision Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Traces the development of stabilized lasers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology passive-stabilization experiments of the early 1960s up through the current epoch of highly stabilized helium-neon and carbon dioxide and continuous wave dye lasers. (Author/HM)

  9. Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Illian, Howard F.

    2010-12-20

    Frequency control is an essential requirement of reliable electric power system operations. Determination of frequency control depends on frequency measurement and the practices based on these measurements that dictate acceptable frequency management. This report chronicles the evolution of these measurements and practices. As technology progresses from analog to digital for calculation, communication, and control, the technical basis for frequency control measurement and practices to determine acceptable performance continues to improve. Before the introduction of digital computing, practices were determined largely by prior experience. In anticipation of mandatory reliability rules, practices evolved from a focus primarily on commercial and equity issues to an increased focus on reliability. This evolution is expected to continue and place increased requirements for more precise measurements and a stronger scientific basis for future frequency management practices in support of reliability.

  10. Diode-laser frequency stabilization based on the resonant Faraday effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present the results of a method for frequency stabilizing laser diodes based on the resonant Faraday effects. A Faraday cell in conjunction with a polarizer crossed with respect to the polarization of the laser diode comprises the intracavity frequency selective element. In this arrangement, a laser pull-in range of 9 A was measured, and the laser operated at a single frequency with a linewidth less than 6 MHz.

  11. Review of the frequency stabilization of TEA CO2 laser oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willetts, David V.

    1987-01-01

    Most applications of TEA CO2 lasers in heterodyne radar systems require that the transmitter has a high degree of frequency stability. This ensures good Doppler resolution and maximizes receiver sensitivity. However, the environment within the device is far from benign with fast acoustic and electrical transients being present. Consequently the phenomena which govern the frequency stability of pulsed lasers are quite different from those operative in their CW counterparts. This review concentrates on the mechanisms of chirping within the output pulse; pulse to pulse frequency drift may be eliminated by frequency measurement and correction on successive pulses. It emerges that good stability hinges on correct cavity design. The energy-dependent laser-induced frequency sweep falls dramatically as mode diameter is increased. Thus, it is necessary to construct resonators with good selectivity for single mode operation while having a large spot size.

  12. A long-term frequency stabilized deep ultraviolet laser for Mg+ ions trapping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yuan, W. H.; Deng, K.; Deng, A.; Xu, Z. T.; Qin, C. B.; Lu, Z. H.; Luo, J.

    2013-12-01

    As many precision laser spectroscopy experiments require frequency stabilized lasers, development of long-term stabilized lasers is of great interest. In this work, we report long-term frequency stabilization of a 280 nm deep ultraviolet laser to a high precision wavemeter with digital servo control such that the long-term drift of the laser frequency was greatly reduced. Long-term laser frequency drift was measured with a fiber frequency comb system over 8 h. After locking, the maximum drift rate of the 280 nm laser was lowered from 576 MHz/h to 6.4 MHz/h. With proper environment control of the wavemeter, the maximum drift rate of the 280 nm laser was further lowered to less than 480 kHz/h. The locked laser system was successfully used in a Mg+ ions trapping experiment, which was also discussed in this work.

  13. Laser frequency stabilization using regenerative spectral hole burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, N. M.; Sellin, P. B.; Sun, Y.; Carlsten, J. L.; Cone, R. L.

    2000-07-01

    We demonstrate laser frequency stabilization using a continuously regenerated transient spectral hole in an inhomogeneously broadened resonance of a solid. Regenerative transient holes provide extreme stabilization for time scales appropriate for spectroscopy, signal processing, ranging, and interferometry. Stabilization to 20 Hz on a 10-ms time scale using spectral holes at 793 nm in Tm3+:Y3Al5O12 gives substantial improvement in the reliability of stimulated photon echoes in the same material and enables the observation of a third population storage mechanism for hole burning in Tm3+:Y3Al5O12.

  14. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  15. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A...

  16. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A...

  17. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A...

  18. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A...

  19. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A...

  20. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  1. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  2. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  3. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  4. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  5. Precision frequency measurement of visible intercombination lines of strontium.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Cancio, P; Drullinger, R; Giusfredi, G; Poli, N; Prevedelli, M; Toninelli, C; Tino, G M

    2003-12-12

    We report the direct frequency measurement of the visible 5s(2) 1S0-5s5p 3P1 intercombination line of strontium that is considered a possible candidate for a future optical-frequency standard. The frequency of a cavity-stabilized laser is locked to the saturated fluorescence in a thermal Sr atomic beam and is measured with an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through a global positioning system signal. The 88Sr transition is measured to be at 434 829 121 311 (10) kHz. We measure also the 88Sr-86Sr isotope shift to be 163 817.4 (0.2) kHz. PMID:14683113

  6. A compact laser head with high-frequency stability for Rb atomic clocks and optical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2005-07-15

    We present a compact and frequency-stabilized laser head based on an extended-cavity diode laser. The laser head occupies a volume of 200 cm{sup 3} and includes frequency stabilization to Doppler-free saturated absorption resonances on the hyperfine components of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 2} lines at 780 nm, obtained from a simple and compact spectroscopic setup using a 2 cm{sup 3} vapor cell. The measured frequency stability is {<=}2x10{sup -12} over integration times from 1 s to 1 day and shows the potential to reach 2x10{sup -13} over 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s. Compact laser sources with these performances are of great interest for applications in gas-cell atomic frequency standards, atomic magnetometers, interferometers and other instruments requiring stable and narrow-band optical sources.

  7. Frequency stability of InP HBT over 0.2 to 220 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijiang, Zhou; Kun, Ren; Jun, Liu; Wei, Cheng; Haiyan, Lu; Lingling, Sun

    2015-02-01

    The frequency stabilities of InP DHBTs in a broadband over 1 to 220 GHz are investigated. A hybrid π-topology small-signal model is used to accurately capture the parasitics of devices. The model parameters are extracted from measurements analytically. The investigation results show that the excellent agreement between the measured and simulated data is obtained in the frequency range 200 MHz to 220 GHz. The dominant parameters of the π-topology model, bias conditions and emitter area have significant effects on the stability factor K. The HBT model can be unconditionally stable by reasonable selection of the proper bias condition and the physical layout of the device.

  8. Metrology with AN Optical Feedback Frequency Stabilized Crds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassi, Samir; Burkart, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    We will present a metrological application of our recently developed Optical Feedback Frequency Stabilized - Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (OFFS-CRDS). This instrument, which ideally fits with an optical frequency comb for absolute frequency calibration, relies on the robust lock of a steady cavity ring down resonator against a highly stable, radiofrequency tuned optical source. At 1.6 μm, over 7 nm, we demonstrate Lamb dip spectroscopy of CO_2 with line frequency retrieval at the kHz level, a dynamic in excess of 700,000 on the absorption scale and a detectivity of 4x10-13cm-1Hz-1/2. Such an instrument nicely meets the requirements for the most demanding spectroscopy spanning from accurate isotopic ratio determination and very precise lineshape recordings to Boltzmann constant redefinition.

  9. Confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer for frequency stabilization of laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, H.-J.; Ruan, P.; Wang, H.-W.; Li, F.

    2011-02-01

    The frequency shift of laser source of Doppler lidar is required in the range of a few megahertzs. To satisfy this demand, a confocal Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer was manufactured as the frequency standard for frequency stabilization. After analyzing and contrasting the center frequency shift of confocal Fabry-Perot interferometers that are made of three different types of material with the change of temperature, the zerodur material was selected to fabricate the interferometer, and the cavity mirrors were optically contacted onto the end of spacer. The confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer was situated within a double-walled chamber, and the change of temperature in the chamber was less than 0.01 K. The experimental results indicate that the free spectral range is 500 MHz, the full-width at half maximum is 3.33 MHz, and the finesse is 150.

  10. Low Frequency Vibration Energy Harvesting using Diamagnetically Stabilized Magnet Levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palagummi, Sri Vikram

    Over the last decade, vibration-based energy harvesting has provided a technology push on the feasibility of self-powered portable small electronic devices and wireless sensor nodes. Vibration energy harvesters in general transduce energy by damping out the environmentally induced relative emotion through either a cantilever beam or an equivalent suspension mechanism with one of the transduction mechanisms, like, piezoelectric, electrostatic, electromagnetic or magnetostrictive. Two major challenges face the present harvesters in literature, one, they suffer from the unavoidable mechanical damping due to internal friction present in the systems, second, they cannot operate efficiently in the low frequency range (< 10 Hz), when most of the ambient vibrational energy is in this low frequency broadband range. Passive and friction free diamagnetically stabilized magnet levitation mechanisms which can work efficiently as a vibration energy harvester in the low frequency range are discussed in this work. First, a mono-stable vertical diamagnetic levitation (VDL) based vibration energy harvester (VEH) is discussed. The harvester consists of a lifting magnet (LM), a floating magnet (FM) and two diamagnetic plates (DPs). The LM balances out the weight of the FM and stability is brought about by the repulsive effect of the DPs, made of pyrolytic graphite. Two thick cylindrical coils, placed in grooves which are engraved in the DPs, are used to convert the mechanical energy into electrical energy. Experimental frequency response of the system is validated by the theoretical analysis which showed that the VEH works in a low frequency range but sufficient levitation gap was not achieved and the frequency response characteristic of the system was effectively linear. To overcome these challenges, the influence of the geometry of the FM, the LM, and the DP were parametrically studied to assess their effects on the levitation gap, size of the system and the natural frequency. For

  11. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  12. Optical Frequency Measurements Relying on a Mid-Infrared Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovera, G. Daniele; Acef, Ouali

    Only a small number of groups are capable of measuring optical frequencies throughout the world. In this contribution we present some of the underlying philosophy of such frequency measurement systems, including some important theoretical hints. In particular, we concentrate on the approach that has been used with the BNM-LPTF frequency chain, where a separate secondary frequency standard in the mid-infrared has been used. The low-frequency section of the chain is characterized by a measurement of the phase noise spectral density Sφ at 716GHz.Most of the significant measurements performed in the last decade are briefly presented, together with a report on the actual stability and reproducibility of the CO2/ OsO4 frequency standard.Measuring the frequency of an optical frequency standard by direct comparison with the signal available at the output of a primary frequency standard (usually between 5MHz and 100MHz) requires a multiplication factor greater than 107. A number of possible configurations, using harmonic generation, sum or difference frequency generation, have been proposed and realized in the past [1,2,3,4,5,6] and in more recent times [7]. A new technique, employing a femtosecond laser, is presently giving its first impressive results [8].All of the classical frequency chains require a large amount of manpower, together with a great deal of simultaneously operating hardware. This has the consequence that only a very few systems are actually in an operating condition throughout the world.

  13. Frequency resolving power measured by rippled noise.

    PubMed

    Supin AYa; Popov, V V; Milekhina, O N; Tarakanov, M B

    1994-07-01

    Frequency resolving power (FRP) was measured in normal humans using rippled noise with a phase-reversal test. The principle of the test was to find the highest ripple density at which an interchange of mutual peak and trough position (the phase reversal) in the rippled spectrum is detectable. In the frequency range below 0.5 kHz FRP was found to be about 21 ripples per kHz when tested by both broad-band and narrow-band rippled noise. In the frequency range above 2 kHz, FRP measured by the narrow-band rippled noise was 22 to 23 relative units (relation of the noise central frequency to the ripple frequency spacing). PMID:7961175

  14. Frequency stabilized near-IR laser system for optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Růžička, B.; Číp, O.; Lazar, J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a design of a stabilized laser system, an etalon of the optical frequency at the 1.5 μm band following the demands of the telecommunication industry in the Czech Republic. Our laser system employs a DFB laser diode in a two stage stabilizing scheme. The linear absorption arrangement with an acetylene filled absorption cell of a pressure about 1 kPa is used to lock the laser to the Doppler-broadened lines. To achieve a reliable and robust stabilization of the laser frequency we arranged a two-loop digital servo-system overcoming the problem of a narrow locking range of the detected transition. The wavelength of the laser is modulated by current and the servo-control and tuning is performed by a fast and precise thermal control. To achieve the resolution of the weak sub-Doppler transitions we assembled a locking scheme via frequency-modulation spectroscopy to the high finesse cavity. The system is assembled using predominantly fibre-optic components. A technology of acetylene absorption cells with AR coated windows is presented as well.

  15. B-chromosome frequency stability in Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae).

    PubMed

    Voltolin, Tatiana Aparecida; Senhorini, José Augusto; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto; Bortolozzi, Jehud; Porto-Foresti, Fabio

    2010-03-01

    The genus Prochilodus includes individuals ranging in size from medium to large, being highly relevant for commercial and subsistence fishing. Prochilodus species have a diploid number of 2n = 54 chromosomes and up to seven supernumerary (B) microchromosomes. Previous research has shown that B frequency increased drastically in the Mogi-Guaçu river population of Prochilodus lineatus in the early 1980s, whereas it remained about constant in the 1990s. Here we analyses B frequency in this population during the 2003-2007 period and have found that frequency has not changed significantly since 1987, and that these B chromosomes do not show the intra-individual variation in number that characterized them in the 1980s. This indicates that these B chromosomes have been neutralized, after their invasion, through their mitotic stabilization. PMID:19882308

  16. Laser frequency stabilization using folded cavity and mirror reflectivity tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Cassou, K.; Chiche, R.; Dupraz, K.; Favier, P.; Flaminio, R.; Honda, Y.; Huang, W. H.; Martens, A.; Michel, C.; Pinard, L.; Sassolas, B.; Soskov, V.; Tang, C. X.; Zomer, F.

    2016-06-01

    A new method of laser frequency stabilization using polarization property of an optical cavity is proposed. In a standard Fabry-Perot cavity, the coating layers thickness of cavity mirrors is calculated to obtain the same phase shift for s- and p-wave but a slight detuning from the nominal thickness can produce s- and p-wave phase detuning. As a result, each wave accumulates a different round-trip phase shift and resonates at a different frequency. Using this polarization property, an error signal is generated by a simple setup consisting of a quarter wave-plate rotated at 45°, a polarizing beam splitter and two photodiodes. This method exhibits similar error signal as the Pound-Drever-Hall technique but without need for any frequency modulation. Lock theory and experimental results are presented in this paper.

  17. A high-performance frequency stability compact CPT clock based on a Cs-Ne microcell.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Liu, Xiaochi; Abbé, Philippe; Chutani, Ravinder; Passilly, Nicolas; Galliou, Serge; Gorecki, Christophe; Giordano, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on a compact table-top Cs clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) with advanced frequency stability performance. The heart of the clock is a single buffer gas Cs-Ne microfabricated cell. Using a distributed feedback (DFB) laser resonant with the Cs D1 line, the contrast of the CPT signal is found to be maximized around 80°C, a value for which the temperature dependence of the Cs clock frequency is canceled. Advanced techniques are implemented to actively stabilize the clock operation on a zero-light-shift point. The clock frequency stability is measured to be 3.8 × 10(-11) at 1 s and well below 10(-11) until 50,000 s. These results demonstrate the possibility to develop high-performance chip-scale atomic clocks using vapor cells containing a single buffer gas. PMID:23192824

  18. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber. PMID:25167146

  19. Nonlinear Trivelpiece-Gould Waves: Frequency, Functional Form, and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2015-11-01

    This poster considers the frequency, spatial form, and stability, of nonlinear Trivelpiece- Gould (TG) waves on a cylindrical plasma column of length L and radius rp, treating both traveling and standing waves, and focussing on the regime of experimental interest in which L/rp >> 1. In this regime TG waves are weakly dispersive, allowing strong mode-coupling between Fourier harmonics. The mode coupling implies that linear theory for such waves is a poor approximation even at fairly small amplitudes, and nonlinear theories that include only a small number of harmonics (such as 3-wave parametric resonance theory) fail to fully capture the stability properties of the system. We find that nonlinear standing waves suffer jumps in their functional form as their amplitude is varied continuously. The jumps are caused by nonlinear resonances between the standing wave and nearly linear waves whose frequencies and wave numbers are harmonics of the standing wave. Also, the standing waves are found to be unstable to a multi-wave version of 3-wave parametric resonance, with an amplitude required for instability onset that is much larger than expected from three wave theory. For traveling wave, linearly stability is found for all amplitudes that could be studied, in contradiction to 3-wave theory. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1414570, Department of Energy Grants DE-SC0002451and DE-SC0008693.

  20. A model for the synchronous machine using frequency response measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bacalao, N.J.; Arizon, P. de; Sanchez L., R.O.

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents new techniques to improve the accuracy and velocity for the modeling of synchronous machines in stability and transient studies. The proposed model uses frequency responses as input data, obtained either directly from measurements or calculated from the available data. The new model is flexible as it allows changes in the detail in which the machine can be represented, and it is possible to partly compensate for the numerical errors incurred when using large integration time steps. The model can be used in transient stability and electromagnetic transient studies as secondary arc evaluation, load rejections and sub-synchronous resonance.

  1. Comparison of Implant Stability Using Resonance Frequency Analysis: Osteotome Versus Conventional Drilling

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Rokhsareh; Miremadi, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Implant primary stability is one of the important factors in achieving implant success. The osteotome technique may improve primary stability in patients with poor bone quality. The aim of this study was to compare implant stability using two different techniques namely osteotome versus conventional drilling in the posterior maxilla. Materials and Methods: In this controlled randomized clinical trial, 54 dental implants were placed in 32 patients; 29 implants were placed in the osteotome group and 25 in the conventional drilling group. Implant stability was assessed at four time intervals namely at baseline, one, two and three months after implant placement using resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Results: Primary stability based on implant stability quotient (ISQ) units was 71.4±7 for the osteotome group and 67.4±10 for the control group. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in implant stability at any of the measurement times. In each group, changes in implant stability from baseline to one month and also from two months to three months post-operatively were not significant but from one month to two months after implant placement, implant stability showed a significant increase in both groups. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that in both techniques, good implant stability was achieved and osteotome technique did not have any advantage compared to conventional drilling in this regard. PMID:27148375

  2. Characterizing DSN System Frequency Stability with Spacecraft Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, T.; Machuzak, R.; Bedrossian, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a recent effort in characterizing frequency stability performance of the ground system in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). Unlike the traditional approach where performance is obtained from special calibration sessions that are both time consuming and require manual setup, the new method taps into the daily spacecraft tracking data. This method significantly increases the amount of data available for analysis, roughly by two orders of magnitude; making it possible to conduct trend analysis with reasonable confidence. Since the system is monitored daily, any significant variation in performance can be detected timely. This helps the DSN maintain its performance commitment to customers.

  3. Frequency stabilization in nonlinear MEMS and NEMS oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Omar Daniel; Antonio, Dario

    2014-09-16

    An illustrative system includes an amplifier operably connected to a phase shifter. The amplifier is configured to amplify a voltage from an oscillator. The phase shifter is operably connected to a driving amplitude control, wherein the phase shifter is configured to phase shift the amplified voltage and is configured to set an amplitude of the phase shifted voltage. The oscillator is operably connected to the driving amplitude control. The phase shifted voltage drives the oscillator. The oscillator is at an internal resonance condition, based at least on the amplitude of the phase shifted voltage, that stabilizes frequency oscillations in the oscillator.

  4. Improvement in the control aspect of laser frequency stabilization for SUNLITE project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zia, Omar

    1992-01-01

    Flight Electronics Division of Langley Research Center is developing a spaceflight experiment called the Stanford University and NASA Laser In-Space Technology (SUNLITE). The objective of the project is to explore the fundamental limits on frequency stability using an FM laser locking technique on a Nd:YAG non-planar ring (free-running linewidth of 5 KHz) oscillator in the vibration free, microgravity environment of space. Compact and automated actively stabilized terahertz laser oscillators will operate in space with an expected linewidth of less than 3 Hz. To implement and verify this experiment, NASA engineers have designed and built a state of the art, space qualified high speed data acquisition system for measuring the linewidth and stability limits of a laser oscillator. In order to achieve greater stability and better performance, an active frequency control scheme requiring the use of a feedback control loop has been applied. In the summer of 1991, the application of control theory in active frequency control as a frequency stabilization technique was investigated. The results and findings were presented in 1992 at the American Control Conference in Chicago, and have been published in Conference Proceedings. The main focus was to seek further improvement in the overall performance of the system by replacing the analogue controller by a digital algorithm.

  5. Frequency Stability of 1X10(sup -13) in a compensated Saphirre Oscillator Operating Above 77K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Santiago, David G.; Wang, Rabi T.

    1996-01-01

    We report on tests of a compensated saphirre oscillator (CS) which shows frequency-stable operation at temperatures above 77k.The frequency stability for this oscillator shows an apparent flicker floor of 7.5X10(sup -14) for measuring times between 3 and 10 seconds, and stability is better than 2X10(sup -13) for all measuring times between 10 and 100 seconds... Frequency sensitivities os the microwave sapphire resonator to temperature and temperature rate have been characterized, and a careful analysis of several aspects of the ac frequency-lock.

  6. Dynamics of microresonator frequency comb generation: models and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Microresonator frequency combs hold promise for enabling a new class of light sources that are simultaneously both broadband and coherent, and that could allow for a profusion of potential applications. In this article, we review various theoretical models for describing the temporal dynamics and formation of optical frequency combs. These models form the basis for performing numerical simulations that can be used in order to better understand the comb generation process, for example helping to identify the universal combcharacteristics and their different associated physical phenomena. Moreover, models allow for the study, design and optimization of comb properties prior to the fabrication of actual devices. We consider and derive theoretical formalisms based on the Ikeda map, the modal expansion approach, and the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We further discuss the generation of frequency combs in silicon resonators featuring multiphoton absorption and free-carrier effects. Additionally, we review comb stability properties and consider the role of modulational instability as well as of parametric instabilities due to the boundary conditions of the cavity. These instability mechanisms are the basis for comprehending the process of frequency comb formation, for identifying the different dynamical regimes and the associated dependence on the comb parameters. Finally, we also discuss the phenomena of continuous wave bi- and multistability and its relation to the observation of mode-locked cavity solitons.

  7. Stability and noise spectra of relative Loran-C frequency comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proverbio, E.; Quesada, V.; Simoncini, A.

    1973-01-01

    Relative comparisons of Loran-C frequency transmissions between the master station of Catanzaro (Simeri Crichi) and the X, Z slave stations of Estartit (Spain) and Lampedusa (Italy) are carrying out by the GG LORSTA monitor station of the Mediterranean Sea Loran-C chain. These comparisons are able to emphasize the relative and, under certain conditions, the absolute rate of the emitting standard frequencies of the slave stations and some relevant statistical properties of the Loran-C Method for frequency transmission and time synchronization. The stability of each Loran-C frequency standard transmission is subject to perturbations, more or less known, due to the propagation medium and other causes. Following the Allan (1966) method for data processing, the performance of the relative rate of frequency of the transmissions of the X, Z slave stations are described calculating the standard deviation of a set of N frequency measurements from its mean averaged during sampling times. This standard deviation is designated as the measure of the stability of the Loran-C frequency transmission.

  8. Fast phase stabilization of a low frequency beat note for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, E.; Horne, R. A.; Sackett, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    Atom interferometry experiments rely on the ability to obtain a stable signal that corresponds to an atomic phase. For interferometers that use laser beams to manipulate the atoms, noise in the lasers can lead to errors in the atomic measurement. In particular, it is often necessary to actively stabilize the optical phase between two frequency components of the beams. Typically this is achieved using a time-domain measurement of a beat note between the two frequencies. This becomes challenging when the frequency difference is small and the phase measurement must be made quickly. The method presented here instead uses a spatial interference detection to rapidly measure the optical phase for arbitrary frequency differences. A feedback system operating at a bandwidth of about 10 MHz could then correct the phase in about 3 μs. This time is short enough that the phase correction could be applied at the start of a laser pulse without appreciably degrading the fidelity of the atom interferometer operation. The phase stabilization system was demonstrated in a simple atom interferometer measurement of the 87Rb recoil frequency.

  9. Fast phase stabilization of a low frequency beat note for atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Oh, E; Horne, R A; Sackett, C A

    2016-06-01

    Atom interferometry experiments rely on the ability to obtain a stable signal that corresponds to an atomic phase. For interferometers that use laser beams to manipulate the atoms, noise in the lasers can lead to errors in the atomic measurement. In particular, it is often necessary to actively stabilize the optical phase between two frequency components of the beams. Typically this is achieved using a time-domain measurement of a beat note between the two frequencies. This becomes challenging when the frequency difference is small and the phase measurement must be made quickly. The method presented here instead uses a spatial interference detection to rapidly measure the optical phase for arbitrary frequency differences. A feedback system operating at a bandwidth of about 10 MHz could then correct the phase in about 3 μs. This time is short enough that the phase correction could be applied at the start of a laser pulse without appreciably degrading the fidelity of the atom interferometer operation. The phase stabilization system was demonstrated in a simple atom interferometer measurement of the (87)Rb recoil frequency. PMID:27370424

  10. Spiral resonators for on-chip laser frequency stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hansuek; Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Chen, Tong; Li, Jiang; Diddams, Scott A.; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency references are indispensable to radio, microwave and time keeping systems, with far reaching applications in navigation, communication, remote sensing and basic science. Over the past decade, there has been an optical revolution in time keeping and microwave generation that promises to ultimately impact all of these areas. Indeed, the most precise clocks and lowest noise microwave signals are now based on a laser with short-term stability derived from a reference cavity. In spite of the tremendous progress, these systems remain essentially laboratory devices and there is interest in their miniaturization, even towards on-chip systems. Here we describe a chip-based optical reference cavity that uses spatial averaging of thermorefractive noise to enhance resonator stability. Stabilized fibre lasers exhibit relative Allan deviation of 3.9 × 10−13 at 400 μs averaging time and an effective linewidth <100 Hz by achieving over 26 dB of phase-noise reduction. PMID:24043134

  11. Spiral resonators for on-chip laser frequency stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hansuek; Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Chen, Tong; Li, Jiang; Diddams, Scott A.; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2013-09-01

    Frequency references are indispensable to radio, microwave and time keeping systems, with far reaching applications in navigation, communication, remote sensing and basic science. Over the past decade, there has been an optical revolution in time keeping and microwave generation that promises to ultimately impact all of these areas. Indeed, the most precise clocks and lowest noise microwave signals are now based on a laser with short-term stability derived from a reference cavity. In spite of the tremendous progress, these systems remain essentially laboratory devices and there is interest in their miniaturization, even towards on-chip systems. Here we describe a chip-based optical reference cavity that uses spatial averaging of thermorefractive noise to enhance resonator stability. Stabilized fibre lasers exhibit relative Allan deviation of 3.9 × 10-13 at 400 μs averaging time and an effective linewidth <100 Hz by achieving over 26 dB of phase-noise reduction.

  12. Single frequency and wavelength stabilized near infrared laser source for water vapor DIAL remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti; Walters, Brooke; Shuman, Tim; Losee, Andrew; Schum, Tom; Puffenberger, Kent; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-02-01

    Fibertek has demonstrated a single frequency, wavelength stabilized near infrared laser transmitter for NASA airborne water vapor DIAL application. The application required a single-frequency laser transmitter operating at 935 nm near infrared (NIR) region of the water vapor absorption spectrum, capable of being wavelength seeded and locked to a reference laser source and being tuned at least 100 pm across the water absorption spectrum for DIAL on/off measurements. Fibertek is building a laser transmitter system based on the demonstrated results. The laser system will be deployed in a high altitude aircraft (ER-2 or UAV) to autonomously perform remote, long duration and high altitude water vapor measurements.

  13. Border effect-based precise measurement of any frequency signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Li-Na; Ye, Bo; Xuan, Mei-Na; Jin, Yu-Zhen; Zhou, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Limited detection resolution leads to fuzzy areas during the measurement, and the discrimination of the border of a fuzzy area helps to use the resolution stability. In this way, measurement precision is greatly improved, hence this phenomenon is named the border effect. The resolution fuzzy area and its application should be studied to realize high-resolution measurement. During the measurement of any frequency signal, the fuzzy areas of phase-coincidence detection are always discrete and irregular. In this paper the difficulty in capturing the border information of discrete fuzzy areas is overcome and extra-high resolution measurement is implemented. Measurement precision of any frequency-signal can easily reach better than 1 × 10-11/s in a wide range of frequencies, showing the great importance of the border effect. An in-depth study of this issue has great significance for frequency standard comparison, signal processing, telecommunication, and fundamental subjects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10978017 and 61201288), the Natural Science Foundation of Research Plan Projects of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM2-6128), and the Sino-Poland Science and Technology Cooperation Projects (Grant No. 36-33).

  14. Self-Stabilizing Measurement of Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinjanampathy, Sai

    2014-05-01

    Measuring phase accurately constitutes one of the most important task in precision measurement science. Such measurements can be deployed to measure everything from fundamental constants to measuring detuning and tunneling rates of atoms more precisely. Quantum mechanics enhances the ultimate bounds on the precision of such measurements possible, and exploit coherence and entanglement to reduce the phase uncertainty. In this work, we will describe a method to stabilize a decohering two-level atom and use the stabilizing measurements to learn the unknown phase acquired by the atom. Such measurements will employ a Bayesian learner to do active feedback control on the atom. We will discuss some ultimate bounds employed in precision metrology and an experimental proposal for the implementation of this scheme. Financial support from Ministry of Education, Singapore.

  15. Frequency stability of an RF oscillator with an MEMS-based encapsulated resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohua, Peng; Wei, Luo; Jicong, Zhao; Quan, Yuan; Jinling, Yang; Fuhua, Yang

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a high-Q RF MEMS oscillator consisting of a micro-disk resonator and low noise feedback circuits. The oscillator has high frequency stability and low phase noise. The two-port resonator was hermetically encapsulated using low-cost Sn-rich Au-Sn solder bonding, which significantly improves the frequency stability. A low noise oscillator circuit was designed with a two-stage amplifying architecture which effectively improves both the frequency stability and phase noise performance. The measured phase noise is -96 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -128 dBc/Hz at far-from-carrier offsets. Moreover, the medium-term frequency stability and Allan deviation of the oscillator are ±4 ppm and 10 ppb, respectively. The oscillator is a promising component in future wireless communication application. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61234007, 61404136) and the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Nos. 2011CB933102, 2013YQ16055103).

  16. The correction of vibration in frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system for dynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Absolute distance measurement systems are of significant interest in the field of metrology, which could improve the manufacturing efficiency and accuracy of large assemblies in fields such as aircraft construction, automotive engineering, and the production of modern windmill blades. Frequency scanning interferometry demonstrates noticeable advantages as an absolute distance measurement system which has a high precision and doesn't depend on a cooperative target. In this paper , the influence of inevitable vibration in the frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system is analyzed. The distance spectrum is broadened as the existence of Doppler effect caused by vibration, which will bring in a measurement error more than 103 times bigger than the changes of optical path difference. In order to decrease the influence of vibration, the changes of the optical path difference are monitored by a frequency stabilized laser, which runs parallel to the frequency scanning interferometry. The experiment has verified the effectiveness of this method.

  17. SHORT COMMUNICATION: Time measurement device with four femtosecond stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan

    2010-10-01

    We present the experimental results of extremely precise timing in the sense of time-of-arrival measurements in a local time scale. The timing device designed and constructed in our laboratory is based on a new concept using a surface acoustic wave filter as a time interpolator. Construction of the device is briefly described. The experiments described were focused on evaluating the timing precision and stability. Low-jitter test pulses with a repetition frequency of 763 Hz were generated synchronously to the local time base and their times of arrival were measured. The resulting precision of a single measurement was typically 900 fs RMS, and a timing stability TDEV of 4 fs was achieved for time intervals in the range from 300 s to 2 h. To our knowledge this is the best value reported to date for the stability of a timing device. The experimental results are discussed and possible improvements are proposed.

  18. Precision measurements and applications of femtosecond frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. Jason

    2002-05-01

    The merging of femtosecond (fs) laser physics with the field of optical f requency metrology over recent years has had a profound impact on both di sciplines. Precision control of the broad frequency bandwidth from fs la sers has enabled new areas of exploration in ultrafast physics and revolu tionized optical frequency measurement and precision spectroscopy. Most recently, the transition frequency of the length standard at 514.7 nm,^ 127I2 P(13) 43-0 a3 has been measured in our lab with an improvement of more than 100 times in precision. Interesting molecular dynamics and s tructure are being explored using absolute frequency map of molecular tra nsitions over a large wavelength range. The iodine transition at 532 nm h as been used to establish an optical atomic clock with a fs comb providin g both an RF standard with stability comparable to the best atomic clocks and millions of optical frequencies across the visible and near IR spect rum, each stable to the Hz level. Work is presently underway to directly compare the iodine optical clocks at JILA with the Hg and Ca optical cloc ks currently being refined at NIST via a direct optical fiber link. A wi dely tunable single frequency laser in combination with a fs comb has bee n employed to realize an optical frequency synthesizer. Frequency combs of two independent ultrafast lasers have been coherently locked, enablin g several different avenues of application such as synthesis of arbitrary waveforms, coherent control of quantum systems, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. This talk will review these recent accompl ishments from our lab and discuss plans for further improving the control and precision of fs laser based measurements. te

  19. Development of a transfer function method for dynamic stability measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    Flutter testing method based on transfer function measurements is developed. The error statistics of several dynamic stability measurement methods are reviewed. It is shown that the transfer function measurement controls the error level by averaging the data and correlating the input and output. The method also gives a direct estimate of the error in the response measurement. An algorithm is developed for obtaining the natural frequency and damping ratio of low damped modes of the system, using integrals of the transfer function in the vicinity of a resonant peak. Guidelines are given for selecting the parameters in the transfer function measurement. Finally, the dynamic stability measurement technique is applied to data from a wind tunnel test of a proprotor and wing model.

  20. A discussion of dynamic stability measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the measurement of the dynamic stability of linear systems are discussed. Particular attention is given to an analysis of the errors in the procedures, and to methods for calculating the system damping from the data. The techniques discussed include: transient decay, moving block analysis, spectral analysis, random decrement signatures, transfer function analysis, and parameter identification methods. The special problems of rotorcraft dynamic stability testing are discussed.

  1. High Precision Noise Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Eugene; Tobar, Michael

    2009-04-23

    We describe microwave noise measurement system capable of detecting the phase fluctuations of rms amplitude of 2{center_dot}10{sup -11} rad/{radical}(Hz). Such resolution allows the study of intrinsic fluctuations in various microwave components and materials, as well as precise tests of fundamental physics. Employing this system we discovered a previously unknown phenomenon of down-conversion of pump oscillator phase noise into the low-frequency voltage fluctuations.

  2. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on. PMID:26725688

  3. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on. PMID:26725688

  4. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on.

  5. 47 CFR 73.1540 - Carrier frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carrier frequency measurements. 73.1540 Section... measurements. (a) The carrier frequency of each AM and FM station and the visual carrier frequency and the... departure limits. (c) The primary standard of frequency for radio frequency measurements is the...

  6. 47 CFR 73.1540 - Carrier frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carrier frequency measurements. 73.1540 Section... measurements. (a) The carrier frequency of each AM and FM station and the visual carrier frequency and the... departure limits. (c) The primary standard of frequency for radio frequency measurements is the...

  7. Local vs. global redundancy - trade-offs between resilience against cascading failures and frequency stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plietzsch, A.; Schultz, P.; Heitzig, J.; Kurths, J.

    2016-05-01

    When designing or extending electricity grids, both frequency stability and resilience against cascading failures have to be considered amongst other aspects of energy security and economics such as construction costs due to total line length. Here, we compare an improved simulation model for cascading failures with state-of-the-art simulation models for short-term grid dynamics. Random ensembles of realistic power grid topologies are generated using a recent model that allows for a tuning of global vs local redundancy. The former can be measured by the algebraic connectivity of the network, whereas the latter can be measured by the networks transitivity. We show that, while frequency stability of an electricity grid benefits from a global form of redundancy, resilience against cascading failures rather requires a more local form of redundancy and further analyse the corresponding trade-off.

  8. Theory and measurement of OPEC stability

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsen, A.L.

    1980-07-01

    The theory of cartel behavior admits the possibility of either stability or disintegration and provides some guidance in seeking empirical measures of stability. Every cartel must devise some basis for limiting total output and sharing the limited total among participants. Sacrifice ratios provide a framework for appraising the stability of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to see if it is gaining or losing strength. It appears that OPEC is becoming more cohesive with respect to production shares, capacity, and reserves. The author says the split-level price increase of 1976 was divisive at the time, but has led to greater stability within the ranks of OPEC. He feels that the future of OPEC now appears more secure than at any time since its inception. 18 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-01-01

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  10. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-11-30

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  11. Femtosecond frequency comb measurement of absolute frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants in cesium vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Stalnaker, Jason E.; Mbele, Vela; Gerginov, Vladislav; Fortier, Tara M.; Diddams, Scott A.; Hollberg, Leo; Tanner, Carol E.

    2010-04-15

    We report measurements of absolute transition frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants for the 8S{sub 1/2}, 9S{sub 1/2}, 7D{sub 3/2}, and 7D{sub 5/2} states in {sup 133}Cs vapor. The stepwise excitation through either the 6P{sub 1/2} or 6P{sub 3/2} intermediate state is performed directly with broadband laser light from a stabilized femtosecond laser optical-frequency comb. The laser beam is split, counterpropagated, and focused into a room-temperature Cs vapor cell. The repetition rate of the frequency comb is scanned and we detect the fluorescence on the 7P{sub 1/2,3/2{yields}}6S{sub 1/2} branches of the decay of the excited states. The excitations to the different states are isolated by the introduction of narrow-bandwidth interference filters in the laser beam paths. Using a nonlinear least-squares method we find measurements of transition frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants that are in agreement with other recent measurements for the 8S state and provide improvement by 2 orders of magnitude over previously published results for the 9S and 7D states.

  12. Operational stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards. [analysis of equipment performance at NASA tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    In the course of testing various rubidium and cesium frequency standards under operational conditions for use in NASA tracking stations, about 55 unit-years of relative frequency measurements for averaging times from 10 to 10 to the 7th power have been accumulated at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Statistics on the behavior of rubidium and cesium standards under controlled laboratory conditions have been published, but it was not known to what extent the lesser controlled environments of NASA tracking stations affected the performance of the standards. The purpose of this report is to present estimates of the frequency stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards under operational conditions based on the data accumulated at GSFC.

  13. Engineering stabilizer measurements in circuit QED: I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Kevin; Blumoff, Jacob; Reagor, M.; Axline, C.; Brierley, R.; Nigg, S.; Reinhold, P.; Heeres, R.; Wang, C.; Sliwa, K.; Narla, A.; Hatridge, M.; Jiang, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoekopf, R. J.

    Quantum error correction based on stabilizer codes has emerged as an attractive approach towards building a practical quantum information processor. One requirement for such a device is the ability to perform hardware efficient measurements on registers of qubits. We demonstrate a new protocol to realize such multi-qubit measurements. A key feature of our approach is that it enables arbitrary stabilizer measurements to be selected in software, and requires a relatively small number of buses, ancillae, and control lines. This allows for a minimally complex sample realizing a simple dispersive hamiltonian while maintaining a high degree of decoupling between our fixed-tuned qubits. We experimentally implement these measurements in 3D circuit QED using transmon qubits coupled to a common bus resonator. In this first of two talks, we introduce our 3D cQED system and describe the protocol for measuring n-qubit parities of a three qubit register. We acknowledge funding from ARO.

  14. Extreme low frequency acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  15. Stabilization of a self-referenced, prism-based, Cr:forsterite laser frequency comb using an intracavity prism

    SciTech Connect

    Tillman, Karl A.; Thapa, Rajesh; Knabe, Kevin; Wu Shun; Lim, Jinkang; Washburn, Brian R.; Corwin, Kristan L.

    2009-12-20

    The frequency comb from a prism-based Cr:forsterite laser has been frequency stabilized using intracavity prism insertion and pump power modulation. Absolute frequency measurements of a CW fiber laser stabilized to the P(13) transition of acetylene demonstrate a fractional instability of {approx}2x10{sup -11} at a 1 s gate time, limited by a commercial Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined rubidium oscillator. Additionally, absolute frequency measurements made simultaneously using a second frequency comb indicate relative instabilities of 3x10{sup -12} for both combs for a 1 s gate time. Estimations of the carrier-envelope offset frequency linewidth based on relative intensity noise and the response dynamics of the carrier-envelope offset to pump power changes confirm the observed linewidths.

  16. 47 CFR 18.309 - Frequency range of measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency range of measurements. 18.309 Section... MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.309 Frequency range of measurements. (a) For field strength measurements: Frequency band in which device operates (MHz) Range of frequency measurements Lowest...

  17. Design of Pound-Drever-Hall laser frequency stabilization system without phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Juan; Jiao, Mingxing; Xing, Junhong; Li, Zhe

    2015-02-01

    The Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) laser frequency stabilization is a wide spread adopted technique for narrow linewidth and ultra-stable lasers, and a phase shifter is an important part in a traditional PDH frequency stabilization system. A PDH laser frequency stabilization system without phase shifter was proposed, in which quadrature coherent detection method was used to extract the frequency drifts. Orthogonal reference signals are generated using direct digital frequency synthesizer (DDS) and mixed with the output of a photo-detector. Over-sampling technique and cumulative average algorithm were used to improve the detection resolution and SNR, orthogonal phase sensitive detection algorithm was adopted to obtain the frequency drifts. Both the quadrature demodulation system structure and the signal processing methods were adopted, the systematic detection error is reduced, the anti-noise performance is raised and long term frequency stability is improved with the PDH laser frequency stabilization system without phase shifter.

  18. Estimating Gait Stability: Asymmetrical Loading Effects Measured Using Margin of Stability and Local Dynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Worden, Timothy A; Beaudette, Shawn M; Brown, Stephen H M; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2016-01-01

    Changes to intersegmental locomotor control patterns may affect body stability. Our study aimed to (a) characterize upper body dynamic stability in response to the unilateral addition of mass to the lower extremity and (b) evaluate the efficacy of 2 different stability measures commonly used in the literature to detect resulting symmetrical step pattern modifications across the weighted segments (spatial) and between epochs of the gait cycle (temporal). Young adults walked on a treadmill while unloaded or with weights applied unilaterally to their foot, shank, or thigh. Both margin of stability and local dynamic stability (LDS) estimates detected similar trends of distal segment weighting resulting in more unstable upper body movement compared to proximal weighting; however only LDS detected anteroposterior changes in upper body stability over time. PMID:27253774

  19. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Hornung, Steven D.; Baker, Dave L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with nontoxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because hydrogen peroxide is sensitive to contaminants and materials interactions, stability and shelf life are issues. A relatively new, ultrasensitive heat measurement technique, isothermal microcalorimetry, is being used at the White Sands Test Facility to monitor the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at near ambient temperatures. Isothermal microcalorimetry measures the beat flow from a reaction vessel into a surrounding heat sink. In these applications, microcalorimetry is approximately 1,000 times more sensitive than accelerating rate calorimetry or differential scanning calorimetry for measuring thermal events. Experimental procedures have been developed for the microcalorimetric measurement of the ultra-small beat effects caused by incompatible interactions of hydrogen peroxide. The decomposition rates of hydrogen peroxide at the picomole/sec/gram level have been measured showing the effects of stabilizers and peroxide concentration. Typical measurements are carried out at 40 C over a 24-hour period, This paper describes a method for the conversion of the heat flow measurements to chemical reaction rates based on thermochemical considerations. The reaction rates are used in a study of the effects of stabilizer levels on the decomposition of propellant grade hydrogen peroxide.

  20. NBS frequency measurement system from a user's viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, S.R.; Jones, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    During 1983, the National Bureau of Standards announced the availability of a new Frequency Measurement Service for standard oscillators of high stability. Two standards laboratories at Sandia National Laboratories have subscribed to that service, and as a result have been supplied by the National Bureau of Standards with hardware, software, consultation, and a continuing program of standard oscillator evaluation. This paper discusses the motivation for subscribing to the new service, experience in setting up the systems at Sandia, system reliability, some preliminary observations about accuracy, and possible system enhancements. All of the material is presented from the viewpoint of a new user of the service.

  1. Engineering stabilizer measurements in circuit QED: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumoff, Jacob; Chou, Kevin; Reagor, M.; Axline, C.; Brierly, R.; Nigg, S.; Reinhold, P.; Heeres, R.; Wang, C.; Sliwa, K.; Narla, A.; Hatridge, M.; Jiang, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    Quantum error correction based on stabilizer codes has emerged as an attractive approach towards building a practical quantum information processor. One requirement for such a device is the ability to perform hardware efficient measurements on registers of qubits. We demonstrate a new protocol to realize such multi-qubit measurements. A key feature of our approach is that it enables arbitrary stabilizer measurements to be selected in software, and requires a relatively small number of buses, ancillae, and control lines. This allows for a minimally complex sample realizing a simple dispersive hamiltonian while maintaining a high degree of decoupling between our fixed-tuned qubits. We experimentally implement these measurements in 3D circuit QED using transmon qubits coupled to a common bus resonator. In the second of two talks, we present a full characterization of the algorithm describing the outcome dependent projections via quantum process tomography. We acknowledge funding from ARO.

  2. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  3. Frequency conversion in field stabilization system for application in SC cavity of linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipek, Tomasz A.

    2005-09-01

    The paper concerns frequency conversion circuits of electromagnetic field stabilization system in superconductive cavity of linear accelerator. The stabilization system consists of digital part (based on FPGA) and analog part (frequency conversions, ADC/DAC, filters). Frequency conversion circuit is analyzed. The main problem in the frequency conversion for the stabilization system are: linearity of conversion and stability. Also, second order problems are subject of analysis: control of local oscillator parameters and fluctuation of actuated signal (exposing conversion). The following work was done: analysis of individual stage parameters on field stability and external influence, simulation. The work was closed with conclusions of the major frequency conversion parameters for field stabilization. The results have been applied for field stabilization system (RF Feedback System) in TESLA Test Facility 2 and preliminary research on X-Ray Free Electron Laser.

  4. Mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor for low frequency seismic noise measurement.

    PubMed

    Acernese, Fausto; Giordano, Gerardo; Romano, Rocco; De Rosa, Rosario; Barone, Fabrizio

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric discharge machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation makes it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2007), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a laser optical lever and a new laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, evaluated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result is the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument of 70 mHz with a Q=140 in air without thermal stabilization. This result demonstrates the feasibility of a monolithic folded pendulum sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of millihertz with a more refined mechanical tuning. PMID:18681722

  5. Maximum likelihood method for estimating airplane stability and control parameters from flight data in frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.

    1980-01-01

    A frequency domain maximum likelihood method is developed for the estimation of airplane stability and control parameters from measured data. The model of an airplane is represented by a discrete-type steady state Kalman filter with time variables replaced by their Fourier series expansions. The likelihood function of innovations is formulated, and by its maximization with respect to unknown parameters the estimation algorithm is obtained. This algorithm is then simplified to the output error estimation method with the data in the form of transformed time histories, frequency response curves, or spectral and cross-spectral densities. The development is followed by a discussion on the equivalence of the cost function in the time and frequency domains, and on advantages and disadvantages of the frequency domain approach. The algorithm developed is applied in four examples to the estimation of longitudinal parameters of a general aviation airplane using computer generated and measured data in turbulent and still air. The cost functions in the time and frequency domains are shown to be equivalent; therefore, both approaches are complementary and not contradictory. Despite some computational advantages of parameter estimation in the frequency domain, this approach is limited to linear equations of motion with constant coefficients.

  6. Measurement of microresonator frequency comb coherence by spectral interferometry.

    PubMed

    Webb, K E; Jang, J K; Anthony, J; Coen, S; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2016-01-15

    We experimentally investigate the spectral coherence of microresonator optical frequency combs. Specifically, we use a spectral interference method, typically used in the context of supercontinuum generation, to explore the variation of the magnitude of the complex degree of first-order coherence across the full comb bandwidth. We measure the coherence of two different frequency combs and observe wholly different coherence characteristics. In particular, we find that the observed dynamical regimes are similar to the stable and unstable modulation instability regimes reported in previous theoretical studies. Results from numerical simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations. In addition to demonstrating a new technique to assess comb stability, our results provide strong experimental support for previous theoretical analyses. PMID:26766693

  7. Ionospheric calibration for single frequency altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, William S.; Born, George H.

    1993-01-01

    This report investigates the potential of using Global Positioning System (GPS) data and a model of the ionosphere to supply a measure of the sub-satellite Total Electron Current (TEC) of the required accuracy (10 TECU rms) for the purpose of calibrating single frequency radar altimeter measurements. Since climatological (monthly mean) models are known to be in error by as much as 50 percent, this work focused on the Parameterized Real-Time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM) which has the capability to improve model accuracy by ingesting (adjusting to) in situ ionospheric measurements. A set of globally distributed TEC measurements were generated using GPS data and were used as input to improve the accuracy of the PRISM model. The adjusted PRISM TEC values were compared to TOPEX dual frequency TEC measurements (which are considered truth) for a number of TOPEX sub-satellite tracks. The adjusted PRISM values generally compared to the TOPEX measurements within the 10 TECU accuracy requirements when the sub-satellite track passed within 300 to 400 km of the GPS TEC data or when the track passed through a night time ionosphere. However, when the sub-satellite points were greater than 300 to 400 km away from the GPS TEC data or when a local noon ionosphere was sampled, the adjusted PRISM values generally differed by greater than 10 TECU rms with data excursions from the TOPEX TEC measurements of as much as 40 TECU (an 8 cm path delay error at K band). Therefore, it can be concluded from this analysis that an unrealistically large number of GPS stations would be needed to predict sub-satellite TEC at the 10 TECU level in the day time ionosphere using a model such as PRISM. However, a technique currently being studied at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) may provide a means of supplying adequate TEC data to meet the 10 TECU ionospheric correction accuracy when using a realistic number of ionospheric stations. This method involves using global GPS TEC data to

  8. Absolute Frequency Measurements of the D1 and D2 Transitions in Aatomic Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheets, Donal; Almaguer, Jose; Baron, Jacob; Elgee, Peter; Rowan, Michael; Stalnaker, Jason

    2014-05-01

    We present preliminary results from our measurements of the D1 and D2 transitions in Li. The data were obtained from a collimated atomic beam excited by light from an extended cavity diode laser. The frequency of the diode laser was stabilized to an optical frequency comb, providing absolute frequency measurement and control of the excitation laser frequency. These measurements will provide a stringent test of atomic structure calculations and yield information about the nuclear structure. We also discuss plans to extend the technique to other high-lying states in lithium. Funded by the NIST Precision Measurements Grant and NSF Award #1305591.

  9. Linear frequency modulation multi-beam laser heterodyne measurement for the glass thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Chao, Li; Yi-Qiao, Wang; Chun-Yu, Liu; Jiu-Ru, Yang; Qun, Ding

    2016-02-01

    This paper uses the combination of laser heterodyne technology with linear frequency modulation technology to load thickness of plate glass to the heterodyne signal frequency. By researching on the theoretical models of heterodyne signal for measuring thickness of plate glass, the direct intensity detection can be replaced by heterodyne signal frequency detection and the effects of light source power stability and environmental perturbation can be removed. The measuring accuracy of electrostriction coefficient can be further improved by using the frequency demodulation to obtain thickness of plate glass. This method is used to measure the thickness of plate glass, and simulation results show that the maximum relative measurement error is 0.01 %.

  10. 47 CFR 74.162 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... frequency of the station is within the allowed tolerance. The date and time of each frequency check, the frequency as measured, and a description or identification of the method employed shall be entered in...

  11. 47 CFR 73.1540 - Carrier frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... measurements. (a) The carrier frequency of each AM and FM station and the visual carrier frequency and the difference between the visual carrier and the aural carrier or center frequency of each TV and Class A...

  12. Are gait variability and stability measures influenced by directional changes?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many gait variability and stability measures have been proposed in the literature, with the aim to quantify gait impairment, degree of neuro-motor control and balance disorders in healthy and pathological subjects. These measures are often obtained from lower trunk acceleration data, typically acquired during rectilinear gait, but relevant experimental protocols and data processing techniques lack in standardization. Since directional changes represent an essential aspect of gait, the assessment of their influence on such measures is essential for standardization. In addition, their investigation is needed to evaluate the applicability of these measures in laboratory trials and in daily life activity analysis. A further methodological aspect to be standardized concerns the assessment of the sampling frequency, which could affect stability measures. The aim of the present study was hence to assess if gait variability and stability measures are affected by directional changes, and to evaluate the influence of sampling frequency of trunk acceleration data on the results. Methods Fifty-one healthy young adults performed a 6-minute walk test along a 30 m straight pathway, turning by 180 deg at each end of the pathway. Nine variability and stability measures (Standard deviation, Coefficient of variation, Poincaré plots, maximum Floquet multipliers, short-term Lyapunov exponents, Recurrence quantification analysis, Multiscale entropy, Harmonic ratio and Index of harmonicity) were calculated on stride duration and trunk acceleration data (acquired at 100 Hz and 200 Hz) coming from straight walking windows and from windows including both straight walking and the directional change. Results Harmonic ratio was the only measure that resulted to be affected by directional changes and sampling frequency, decreasing with the presence of a directional change task. HR was affected in the AP and V directions for the 200 Hz, but only in AP direction for the 100 Hz group

  13. Long term frequency stability analysis of the GPS NAVSTAR 6 Cesium clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaskill, T. B.; Stebbins, S.; Carson, C.; Buisson, J.

    1982-01-01

    Time domain measurements, taken between the NAVSTAR 6 Spacecraft Vehicle (SV) and the Vandenberg Global Positioning System (GPS) Monitor Site, by a pseudo random noise receiver, were collected over an extended period of time and analyzed to estimate the long term frequency stability of the NAVSTAR 6 onboard frequency standard, referenced to the Vandenberg MS frequency standard. The technique employed separates the clock offset from the composite signal by first applying corrections for equipment delays, ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay, Earth rotation and the relativistic effect. The data are edited and smoothed using the predicted SV ephemeris to calculate the geometric delay. Then all available passes from each of the four GPS monitor stations, are collected at 1-week intervals and used to calculate the NAVSTAR orbital elements. The procedure is then completed by subtracting the corrections and the geometric delay, using the final orbital elements, from the composite signal, thus leaving the clock offset and random error.

  14. A tunable Doppler-free dichroic lock for laser frequency stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vivek; Tiwari, V. B.; Mishra, S. R.; Rawat, H. S.

    2016-08-01

    We propose and demonstrate a laser frequency stabilization scheme which generates a dispersion-like tunable Doppler-free dichroic lock (TDFDL) signal. This signal offers a wide tuning range for lock point (i.e. zero-crossing) without compromising on the slope of the locking signal. The method involves measurement of magnetically induced dichroism in an atomic vapour for a weak probe laser beam in the presence of a counter-propagating strong pump laser beam. A simple model is presented to explain the basic principles of this method to generate the TDFDL signal. The spectral shift in the locking signal is achieved by tuning the frequency of the pump beam. The TDFDL signal is shown to be useful for locking the frequency of a cooling laser used for magneto-optical trap (MOT) for 87 Rb atoms.

  15. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible bymore » simply extending the data acquisition time.« less

  16. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time.

  17. Frequency Stabilization of High-Power 3.3 μm CW Laser with a Frequency Comb System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuma, Susumu; Momose, Takamasa

    2010-06-01

    %TEXT OF YOUR ABSTRACT The development of optical frequency combs has enabled a broad range of lasers to be stabilized. In this study, we have developed a system to stabilize high-power CW mid-infrared (MIR) radiation at 3.3 μm using a NIR-VIS frequency comb. The mid-infrared radiation at 3.3 μm were generated as an idler of a CW OPO laser pumped by a 1.064 μm fibre laser. To stabilize the MIR radiation with a frequency comb system in 450 nm to 1.25 μm range, the pump frequency at 1.064 μm and the sum frequency of the MIR radiation and the pump radiation were locked simultaneously to the comb laser. The sum frequency of the MIR and pump radiations was generated in a PPLN crystal. With this technique, we have successfully obtained a width of better than 50 kHz at 3.3 μm with a power of more than 1 W. The stability is currently limited by the response of the PZT in an OPO cavity. Further improvement is underway. The stabilized MIR radiation at 3.3 μm can be used as a source for ultra-high-resolution spectroscopy of vibration-rotation transitions of molecules. Especially, it may be used to decrease the frequency uncertainty of the ν_3 F_2(2) component of the P(7) transition of CH_4, which is one of the optical frequency standards recommended by CIPM. Another application of frequency stabilized MIR radiation is to build-up MIR radiation in a cavity for optical manipulation and trapping of cold molecules we have proposed in New. J. Phys. 11. 055023 (2009).

  18. Ionospheric calibration for single frequency altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, William S.; Born, George H.; Markin, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    This study is a preliminary analysis of the effectiveness (in terms of altimeter calibration accuracy) of various ionosphere models and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to calibrate single frequency altimeter height measurements for ionospheric path delay. In particular, the research focused on ingesting GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) data into the physical Parameterized Real-Time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM), which estimates the composition of the ionosphere using independent empirical and physical models and has the capability of adjusting to additional ionospheric measurements. Two types of GPS data were used to adjust the PRISM model: GPS receiver station data mapped from line-of-sight observations to the vertical at the point of interest and a grid map (generated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) of GPS derived TEC in a sun-fixed longitude frame. The adjusted PRISM TEC values, as well as predictions by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-90), a climatological (monthly mean) model of the ionosphere, were compared to TOPEX dual-frequency TEC measurements (considered as truth) for a number of TOPEX sub-satellite tracks. For a 13.6 GHz altimeter, a Total Electron Content (TEC) of 1 TECU 10(exp 16) electrons/sq m corresponds to approximately 0.218 centimeters of range delay. A maximum expected TEC (at solar maximum or during solar storms) of 10(exp 18) electrons/sq m will create 22 centimeters of range delay. Compared with the TOPEX data, the PRISM predictions were generally accurate within the TECU when the sub-satellite track of interest passed within 300 to 400 km of the GPS TEC data or when the track passed through a night-time ionosphere. If neither was the case, in particular if the track passed through a local noon ionosphere, the PRISM values differed by more than 10 TECU and by as much as 40 TECU. The IRI-90 model, with no current ability to unseat GPS data, predicted TEC to a slightly higher error of 12 TECU. The performance of

  19. Absolute frequency measurement of the neutral 40Ca optical frequency standard at 657 nm based on microkelvin atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilpers, G.; Oates, C. W.; Diddams, S. A.; Bartels, A.; Fortier, T. M.; Oskay, W. H.; Bergquist, J. C.; Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Parker, T. E.; Hollberg, L.

    2007-04-01

    We report an absolute frequency measurement of the optical clock transition at 657 nm in 40Ca with a relative uncertainty of 7.5 × 10-15, one of the most accurate frequency measurements of a neutral atom optical transition to date. The frequency (455 986 240 494 135.8 ± 3.4) Hz was measured by stabilizing a diode laser system to a spectroscopic signal derived from an ensemble of 106 atoms cooled in two stages to a temperature of 10 µK. The measurement used a femtosecond-laser-based frequency comb to compare the Ca transition frequency with that of the single-ion 199Hg+ optical frequency standard at NIST. The Hg+ frequency was simultaneously calibrated relative to the NIST Cs fountain via the NIST time scale to yield an absolute value for the Ca transition frequency. The relative fractional instability between the two optical standards was 2 × 10-15 for 10 s of averaging time and 2 × 10-16 for 2000 s.

  20. Long-path atmospheric measurements using dual frequency comb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, Eleanor; Cossel, Kevin; Truong, Gar-Wing; Giorgetta, Fabrizio; Swann, William; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    The dual frequency comb spectrometer is a new tool for performing atmospheric trace gas measurements. This instrument is capable of measuring carbon dioxide, methane, and water with extremely high resolution in the region between 1.5 and 2.1 microns in the near-IR. It combines the high resolution of a laboratory-based FTIR instrument with the portability of a long-path DOAS system. We operate this instrument at path lengths of a few kilometers, thus bridging the spatial resolution of in-situ point sensors and the tens of square kilometer footprints of satellites. This spatial resolution is ideal for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from cities. Here we present initial long-path integrated column measurements of the greenhouse gases water, carbon dioxide, and methane in an urban environment. We present a time series with 5 minute time resolution over a 2 kilometer path in Boulder, Colorado at the urban-rural interface. We validate this data via a comparison with an in-situ greenhouse gas monitor co-located along the measurement path and show that we agree well on the baseline concentration but that we are significantly less sensitive to local point source emission that have high temporal variability, making this instrument ideal for measurements of average city-wide emissions. We additionally present progress towards measurements over an 11 kilometer path over downtown Boulder to measure the diurnal flux of greenhouse gases across the city.

  1. Chronic alcohol self-administration in monkeys shows long-term quantity/frequency categorical stability

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erich J.; Farro, Jonathan; Gonzales, Steven; Helms, Christa; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The current criteria for alcohol use disorders (AUD) do not include consumption (quantity/frequency) measures of alcohol intake, in part due to the difficulty of these measures in humans. Animal models of ethanol self-administration have been fundamental in advancing our understanding of the neurobiological basis of (AUD) and can address quantity/frequency measures with accurate measurements over prolonged periods of time. The non-human primate (NHP) model of voluntary oral alcohol self-administration has documented both binge drinking and drinking to dependence and can be used to test the stability of consumption measures over time. Methods and Results Here, an extensive set of alcohol intakes (g/kg/day) was analyzed from a large multi-cohort population of Rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys (n=31). Daily ethanol intake was uniformly distributed over chronic (12 months) access for all animals. Underlying this distribution of intakes were subpopulations of monkeys that exhibited distinctive clustering of drinking patterns, allowing us to categorically define very heavy drinking (VHD), heavy drinking (HD), binge drinking (BD), and low drinking (LD). These categories were stable across the 12-month assessed by the protocol, but exhibited fluctuations when examined at shorter intervals. Conclusions The establishment of persistent drinking categories based on quantity/frequency suggests that consumption variables can be used to track long-term changes in behavioral, molecular or physiochemical mechanisms related to our understanding of diagnosis, prevention, intervention and treatment efficacies. PMID:25421519

  2. 47 CFR 74.562 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 74.562... Auxiliary Stations § 74.562 Frequency monitors and measurements. The licensee shall ensure that the STL, ICR... accomplished by appropriate frequency measurement techniques and consideration of the transmitter emissions....

  3. 47 CFR 74.562 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 74.562... Auxiliary Stations § 74.562 Frequency monitors and measurements. The licensee shall ensure that the STL, ICR... accomplished by appropriate frequency measurement techniques and consideration of the transmitter emissions....

  4. Experimental Investigation of Hexagon Stability in Two Frequency Forced Faraday Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yu; Umbanhowar, Paul

    2003-03-01

    We have conducted experiments on a deep layer of silicone oil vertically oscillated with an acceleration a(t) = Am sin(m ω t + φ_m) + An sin(n ω t + φ_n). The stability of hexagonal surface wave patterns is investigated as a function of the overall acceleration, the ratio m:n, and the phase of the two rationally related driving frequencies. When the ratio A_m/An is chosen so the system is near a co-dimension two point, the stability of hexagons above onset is determined by the acceleration amplitude and the relative phase. Recent results by Porter and Silver (J. Porter and M. Silber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 084501, 2002) predicts that the range of pattern stability above onset as a function of acceleration is determined by cos(Φ), where Φ = π/4 - m φn / 2- n φm /2. We have tested this prediction for a number of m:n ratios and for various values of the dimensionless damping coefficient γ. We find that the patterns exhibit the predicted functional dependence on s(Φ) but with an additional phase offset. We measure the phase offset as a function of m:n and γ for varying frequency ω and fluid viscosity 5 cS <= ν <= 30 cS.

  5. Frequency stabilization of a 2.05 μm laser using hollow-core fiber CO2 frequency reference cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meras, Patrick; Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2010-04-01

    We have designed and built a hollow-core fiber frequency reference cell, filled it with CO2, and used it to demonstrate frequency stabilization of a 2.05 μm Tm:Ho:YLF laser using frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy technique. The frequency reference cell is housed in a compact and robust hermetic package that contains a several meter long hollow-core photonic crystal fiber optically coupled to index-guiding fibers with a fusion splice on one end and a mechanical splice on the other end. The package has connectorized fiber pigtails and a valve used to evacuate, refill it, or adjust the gas pressure. We have demonstrated laser frequency standard deviation decreasing from >450MHz (free-running) to <2.4MHz (stabilized). The 2.05 μm laser wavelength is of particular interest for spectroscopic instruments due to the presence of many CO2 and H20 absorption lines in its vicinity. To our knowledge, this is the first reported demonstration of laser frequency stabilization at this wavelength using a hollow-core fiber reference cell. This approach enables all-fiber implementation of the optical portion of laser frequency stabilization system, thus making it dramatically more lightweight, compact, and robust than the traditional free-space version that utilizes glass or metal gas cells. It can also provide much longer interaction length of light with gas and does not require any alignment. The demonstrated frequency reference cell is particularly attractive for use in aircraft and space coherent lidar instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 profile.

  6. Sexual Frequency and the Stability of Marital and Cohabiting Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yabiku, Scott T.; Gager, Constance T.

    2009-01-01

    Prior research found that lower sexual frequency and satisfaction were associated with higher rates of divorce, but little research had examined the role of sexual activity in the dissolution of cohabiting unions. We drew upon social exchange theory to hypothesize why sexual frequency is more important in cohabitation: (a) cohabitors' lower costs…

  7. Radial period extraction method employing frequency measurement for quantitative collimation testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sikun; Wang, Xiangzhao

    2016-01-01

    A radial period extraction method employing frequency measurement is proposed for quantitative collimation testing using spiral gratings. The radial period of the difference-frequency fringe is treated as a measure of the collimation condition. A frequency measurement technique based on wavelet transform and a statistical approach is presented to extract the radial period directly from the amplitude-transmittance spiral fringe. A basic constraint to set the parameters of the wavelet is introduced. Strict mathematical demonstration is given. The method outperforms methods employing phase measurement in terms of precision, stability and noise immune ability.

  8. On-chip multi spectral frequency standard replication by stabilizing a microring resonator to a molecular line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zektzer, Roy; Stern, Liron; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-07-01

    Stabilized laser lines are highly desired for myriad of applications ranging from precise measurements to optical communications. While stabilization can be obtained by using molecular or atomic absorption references, these are limited to specific frequencies. On the other hand, resonators can be used as wide band frequency references. Unfortunately, such resonators are unstable and inaccurate. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a chip-scale multispectral frequency standard replication operating in the spectral range of the near IR. This is obtained by frequency locking a microring resonator (MRR) to an acetylene absorption line. The MRR consists of a Si3N4 waveguides with microheater on top of it. The thermo-optic effect is utilized to lock one of the MRR resonances to an acetylene line. This locked MRR is then used to stabilize other laser sources at 980 nm and 1550 nm wavelength. By beating the stabilized laser to another stabilized laser, we obtained frequency instability floor of 4 ×10-9 at around 100 s in terms of Allan deviation. Such stable and accurate chip scale sources are expected to serve as important building block in diverse fields such as communication and metrology.

  9. Heterodyne laser frequency stabilization for long baseline optical interferometry in space-based gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichholz, Johannes; Tanner, David B.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-07-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) selected the gravitational universe as the science theme for L3, a large space mission with a planned launch in 2034. NASA expressed a strong interest in joining ESA as a junior partner. The goal of the mission is the detection of gravitational waves of frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 0.1 Hz, where many long-lived sources are expected to be steady emitters of gravitational waves. Most likely, the mission design will evolve out of the earlier Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) concept. The interferometric heterodyne phase readout in LISA is performed by phase meters developed specifically to handle the low light powers and Doppler-drift of laser frequencies that appear as complications in the mission baseline. LISA requires the frequency noise of its seed lasers to be below 300 Hz /√{Hz } throughout the measurement band due to uncertainties in the absolute interferometer arm lengths. We have developed and successfully demonstrated Heterodyne Stabilization (HS), a novel cavity-laser frequency stabilization method that integrates well into the LISA mission baseline due to similar component demand. The cavities for the test setup were assembled with Clearceram-Z spacers, an ultralow thermal expansion coefficient material with potential applicability in interferometric space missions. Using HS, we were able to suppress the frequency noise of two lasers in a bench-top experiment to a level that meets the LISA requirement, suggesting both HS and Clearceram-Z can be considered in future mission concepts.

  10. Phase Stabilization of a Frequency Comb using Multipulse Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadarso, Andrea; Mur-Petit, Jordi; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2014-02-01

    From the interaction between a frequency comb and an atomic qubit, we derive quantum protocols for the determination of the carrier-envelope offset phase, using the qubit coherence as a reference, and without the need of frequency doubling or an octave spanning comb. Compared with a trivial interference protocol, the multipulse protocol results in a polynomial enhancement of the sensitivity O(N-2) with the number N of laser pulses involved. We specialize the protocols using optical or hyperfine qubits, Λ schemes, and Raman transitions, and introduce methods where the reference is another phase-stable cw laser or frequency comb.

  11. Phase stabilization of a frequency comb using multipulse quantum interferometry.

    PubMed

    Cadarso, Andrea; Mur-Petit, Jordi; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2014-02-21

    From the interaction between a frequency comb and an atomic qubit, we derive quantum protocols for the determination of the carrier-envelope offset phase, using the qubit coherence as a reference, and without the need of frequency doubling or an octave spanning comb. Compared with a trivial interference protocol, the multipulse protocol results in a polynomial enhancement of the sensitivity O(N-2) with the number N of laser pulses involved. We specialize the protocols using optical or hyperfine qubits, Λ schemes, and Raman transitions, and introduce methods where the reference is another phase-stable cw laser or frequency comb. PMID:24579598

  12. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency range of radiated measurements. 15.33 Section 15.33 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES General § 15.33 Frequency range of radiated measurements. (a) For an intentional radiator, the spectrum shall be investigated from the lowest...

  13. A digital frequency stabilization system of external cavity diode laser based on LabVIEW FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuohuan; Hu, Zhaohui; Qi, Lu; Wang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Frequency stabilization for external cavity diode laser has played an important role in physics research. Many laser frequency locking solutions have been proposed by researchers. Traditionally, the locking process was accomplished by analog system, which has fast feedback control response speed. However, analog system is susceptible to the effects of environment. In order to improve the automation level and reliability of the frequency stabilization system, we take a grating-feedback external cavity diode laser as the laser source and set up a digital frequency stabilization system based on National Instrument's FPGA (NI FPGA). The system consists of a saturated absorption frequency stabilization of beam path, a differential photoelectric detector, a NI FPGA board and a host computer. Many functions, such as piezoelectric transducer (PZT) sweeping, atomic saturation absorption signal acquisition, signal peak identification, error signal obtaining and laser PZT voltage feedback controlling, are totally completed by LabVIEW FPGA program. Compared with the analog system, the system built by the logic gate circuits, performs stable and reliable. User interface programmed by LabVIEW is friendly. Besides, benefited from the characteristics of reconfiguration, the LabVIEW program is good at transplanting in other NI FPGA boards. Most of all, the system periodically checks the error signal. Once the abnormal error signal is detected, FPGA will restart frequency stabilization process without manual control. Through detecting the fluctuation of error signal of the atomic saturation absorption spectrum line in the frequency locking state, we can infer that the laser frequency stability can reach 1MHz.

  14. System and method for tuning adjusting the central frequency of a laser while maintaining frequency stabilization to an external reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey (Inventor); Thorpe, James I. (Inventor); Numata, Kenji (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method and system for stabilizing a laser to a frequency reference with an adjustable offset. The method locks a sideband signal generated by passing an incoming laser beam through the phase modulator to a frequency reference, and adjusts a carrier frequency relative to the locked sideband signal by changing a phase modulation frequency input to the phase modulator. The sideband signal can be a single sideband (SSB), dual sideband (DSB), or an electronic sideband (ESB) signal. Two separate electro-optic modulators can produce the DSB signal. The two electro-optic modulators can be a broadband modulator and a resonant modulator. With a DSB signal, the method can introduce two sinusoidal phase modulations at the phase modulator. With ESB signals, the method can further drive the optical phase modulator with an electrical signal with nominal frequency OMEGA(sub 1) that is phase modulated at a frequency OMEGA(sub 2)

  15. Photonic radio-frequency dissemination via optical fiber with high-phase stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaocheng; Liu, Zhangweiyi; Wang, Siwei; Sun, Dongning; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a photonic radio-frequency transmission system via optical fiber. Optical radio-frequency signal is generated utilizing a Mach-Zehnder modulator based on double-side-band with carrier suppression modulation scheme. The phase error induced by optical fiber transmission is transferred to an intermediate frequency signal by the dual-heterodyne phase error transfer scheme, and then canceled by a phase locked loop. With precise phase compensation, a radio frequency with high-phase stability can be obtained at the remote end. We performed 20.07-GHz radio-frequency transfer over 100-km optical fiber, and achieved residual phase noise of -65  dBc/Hz at 1-Hz offset frequency, and the RMS timing jitter in the frequency range from 0.01 Hz to 1 MHz reaches 110 fs. The long-term frequency stability also achieves 8×10(-17) at 10,000 s averaging time. PMID:26030572

  16. Characterizing Far-infrared Laser Emissions and the Measurement of Their Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael; Zink, Lyndon R

    2015-01-01

    The generation and subsequent measurement of far-infrared radiation has found numerous applications in high-resolution spectroscopy, radio astronomy, and Terahertz imaging. For about 45 years, the generation of coherent, far-infrared radiation has been accomplished using the optically pumped molecular laser. Once far-infrared laser radiation is detected, the frequencies of these laser emissions are measured using a three-laser heterodyne technique. With this technique, the unknown frequency from the optically pumped molecular laser is mixed with the difference frequency between two stabilized, infrared reference frequencies. These reference frequencies are generated by independent carbon dioxide lasers, each stabilized using the fluorescence signal from an external, low pressure reference cell. The resulting beat between the known and unknown laser frequencies is monitored by a metal-insulator-metal point contact diode detector whose output is observed on a spectrum analyzer. The beat frequency between these laser emissions is subsequently measured and combined with the known reference frequencies to extrapolate the unknown far-infrared laser frequency. The resulting one-sigma fractional uncertainty for laser frequencies measured with this technique is ± 5 parts in 10(7). Accurately determining the frequency of far-infrared laser emissions is critical as they are often used as a reference for other measurements, as in the high-resolution spectroscopic investigations of free radicals using laser magnetic resonance. As part of this investigation, difluoromethane, CH2F2, was used as the far-infrared laser medium. In all, eight far-infrared laser frequencies were measured for the first time with frequencies ranging from 0.359 to 1.273 THz. Three of these laser emissions were discovered during this investigation and are reported with their optimal operating pressure, polarization with respect to the CO2 pump laser, and strength. PMID:26709957

  17. Thermal-noise limit in the frequency stabilization of lasers with rigid cavities.

    PubMed

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2004-12-17

    We evaluate thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with the direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency-reference cavity of order 1 Hz/ square root Hz (0.01 Hz/ square root Hz) at 10 mHz (100 Hz) at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results. PMID:15697887

  18. Limiting amplifier for instantaneous frequency measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askew, R. E.

    1984-12-01

    The microwave integrated-circuit limiting amplifier (LA) described in this article was designed to provide a constant output signal level over a wide (8 to 11 GHz) frequency band while the input signal level varies over the range of -50 to 0 dBm. A salient feature of the LA is the slope of the output power versus frequency response. This slope allows the LA to function as a wide-band limiter/discriminator when a suitable detector is added to the output.

  19. A frequency-stabilized Yb:KYW femtosecond laser frequency comb and its application to low-phase-noise microwave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Stephanie A.; Fortier, Tara M.; Lecomte, Steve; Diddams, Scott A.

    2013-09-01

    We present an optically stabilized Yb:KYW fs-laser frequency comb. We use an f-2 f nonlinear interferometer to measure the carrier envelope offset frequency ( f 0) and the heterodyne beatnote between the comb and a stable CW laser at 1068 nm to detect fluctuations in the comb repetition rate (). Both of these degrees of freedom of the comb are then controlled using phase-locked loops. As a demonstration of the frequency-stabilized comb, we generate low-phase-noise 10 GHz microwaves through detection of the pulse train on a high bandwidth photodiode. The phase noise of the resulting 10 GHz microwaves was -99 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz and the corresponding Allen deviation was <2.6 × 10-15 at 1 s, measured by comparison to an independently stabilized Ti:sapphire frequency comb. This room-temperature, optically based source of microwaves has close-to-carrier phase noise comparable to the very best cryogenic microwave oscillators.

  20. Monolithic device for modelocking and stabilization of frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-C; Hayashi, Y; Silverman, K L; Feldman, A; Harvey, T; Mirin, R P; Schibli, T R

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate a device that integrates a III-V semiconductor saturable absorber mirror with a graphene electro-optic modulator, which provides a monolithic solution to modelocking and noise suppression in a frequency comb. The device offers a pure loss modulation bandwidth exceeding 5 MHz and only requires a low voltage driver. This hybrid device provides not only compactness and simplicity in laser cavity design, but also small insertion loss, compared to the previous metallic-mirror-based modulators. We believe this work paves the way to portable and fieldable phase-coherent frequency combs. PMID:26831973

  1. Stabilization of Gyrotron Frequency by PID Feedback Control on the Acceleration Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-12-01

    The results of frequency stabilization by proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback control of acceleration voltage in the 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) are presented. The experiment was organized on the basis of the frequency modulation by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The frequency stabilization during 10 h experiment was better than 10-6, which is compared with the results of the frequency deviation in free-running gyrotron operation.

  2. Laser frequency stabilization using a dispersive line shape induced by Doppler Effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Qi, Xianghui; Liu, Shuyong; Yu, Jiachen; Chen, Xuzong

    2015-02-01

    We report a simple and robust Doppler-free spectroscopic technique to stabilize a laser frequency to the atomic transition. By employing Doppler Effect on the atomic beam, we obtained a very stable dispersive signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio and no Doppler-background, which served as an error signal to electronically stabilize a laser frequency without modulation. For validating the performance of this technique, we locked a DFB laser to the (133)Cs D2 line and observed an efficient suppression of the frequency noise and a long-term reduction of the frequency drifts in a laboratory environment. PMID:25836158

  3. Terahertz spectrum analyzer based on frequency and power measurement.

    PubMed

    Yee, Dae-Su; Jang, Yudong; Kim, Youngchan; Seo, Dae-Cheol

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate a terahertz (THz) spectrum analyzer based on frequency and power measurement. A power spectrum of a continuous THz wave is measured through optical heterodyne detection using an electromagnetic THz frequency comb and a bolometer and power measurement using a bolometer with a calibrated responsivity. The THz spectrum analyzer has a frequency precision of 1x10(-11), a frequency resolution of 1Hz, a frequency band up to 1.7THz, and an optical noise equivalent power of approximately 1 pW/Hz(1/2). PMID:20680048

  4. Emulsification by high frequency ultrasound using piezoelectric transducer: formation and stability of emulsifier free emulsion.

    PubMed

    Kaci, Messaouda; Meziani, Smail; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira; Gillet, Guillaume; Desjardins-Lavisse, Isabelle; Desobry, Stephane

    2014-05-01

    Emulsifier free emulsion was developed with a new patented technique for food and cosmetic applications. This emulsification process dispersed oil droplets in water without any emulsifier. Emulsions were prepared with different vegetable oil ratios 5%, 10% and 15% (v/v) using high frequency ultrasounds generated by piezoelectric ceramic transducer vibrating at 1.7 MHz. The emulsion was prepared with various emulsification times between 0 and 10h. Oil droplets size was measured by laser granulometry. The pH variation was monitored; electrophoretic mobility and conductivity variation were measured using Zêtasizer equipment during emulsification process. The results revealed that oil droplets average size decreased significantly (p<0.05) during the first 6h of emulsification process and that from 160 to 1 μm for emulsions with 5%, 10% and from 400 to 29 μm for emulsion with 15% of initial oil ratio. For all tested oil ratios, pH measurement showed significant decrease and negative electrophoretic mobility showed the accumulation of OH(-) at oil/water interface leading to droplets stability in the emulsion. The conductivity of emulsions showed a decrease of the ions quantity in solution, which indicated formation of positive charge layer around OH(-) structure. They constitute a double ionic layer around oil particles providing emulsion stability. This study showed a strong correlation between turbidity measurement and proportion of emulsified oil. PMID:24315670

  5. Fixation Stability Measurement Using Two Types of Microperimetry Devices

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongting; Bittencourt, Millena G.; Sophie, Raafay; Sepah, Yasir J.; Hanout, Mostafa; Rentiya, Zubir; Annam, Rachel; Scholl, Hendrik P. N.; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared the fixation stability measurements obtained with two microperimeters, the Micro Perimeter 1 (MP-1) and the Spectral OCT/SLO (OCT/SLO), in subjects with and without maculopathies. Methods A total of 41 eyes with no known ocular diseases and 45 eyes with maculopathies were enrolled in the study. Both eyes of each participant had a 20-second fixation test using the MP-1 and OCT/SLO. The bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA) was used for fixation stability evaluation. Results In the normal group, BCEA was 2.93 ± 0.32 log minarc2 on OCT/SLO and 2.89 ± 0.30 log minarc2 on MP-1. In the maculopathy group, BCEA was 3.05 ± 0.41 log minarc2 on OCT/SLO and 3.15 ± 0.46 log minarc2 on MP-1. There was no statistically significant difference between the BCEA measured by OCT/SLO and by MP-1 in both groups. A moderate correlation was found between the two devices (r = 0.45, P < 0.001). The sample size during the fixation test was 535.5 ± 14.6 pairs of coordinates in the normal group and 530.7 ± 14.9 pairs in the maculopathy group with MP-1, while it was 72.3 ± 6.9 and 59.9 ± 10.1, respectively, with OCT/SLO. This was due to different tracking frequencies between the two microperimeters. Conclusion Fixation stability assessment yields similar results using the OCT/SLO and MP-1. A major difference in sampling rate between the two microperimeters does not significantly affect BCEA measurements. Translational Relevance Fixation stability assessments are comparable and interchangeable between the OCT/SLO and the MP-1. PMID:25774329

  6. Stability improvement of an operational two-way satellite time and frequency transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jiun; Fujieda, Miho; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Tseng, Wen-Hung; Tsao, Hen-Wai

    2016-04-01

    To keep national time accurately coherent with coordinated universal time, many national metrology institutes (NMIs) use two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) to continuously measure the time difference with other NMIs over an international baseline. Some NMIs have ultra-stable clocks with stability better than 10-16. However, current operational TWSTFT can only provide frequency uncertainty of 10-15 and time uncertainty of 1 ns, which is inadequate. The uncertainty is dominated by the short-term stability and the diurnals, i.e. the measurement variation with a period of one day. The aim of this work is to improve the stability of operational TWSTFT systems without additional transmission, bandwidth or increase in signal power. A software-defined receiver (SDR) comprising a high-resolution correlator and successive interference cancellation associated with open-loop configuration as the TWSTFT receiver reduces the time deviation from 140 ps to 73 ps at averaging time of 1 h, and occasionally suppresses diurnals. To study the source of the diurnals, TWSTFT is performed using a 2  ×  2 earth station (ES) array. Consequently, some ESs sensitive to temperature variation are identified, and the diurnals are significantly reduced by employing insensitive ESs. Hence, the operational TWSTFT using the proposed SDR with insensitive ESs achieves time deviation to 41 ps at 1 h, and 80 ps for averaging times from 1 h to 20 h.

  7. Total Variance: A Progress Report on a New Frequency Stability Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, D. A.; Greenhall, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    We give results of recent work on a newly developed frequency stability characterization, called Total variance, whose main advantages are improved confidence at and near the longest averaging time of half the data duration, and lower sensitivity to drift removal.

  8. Diode-pumped Yb:KYW femtosecond laser frequency comb with stabilized carrier-envelope offset frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S. A.; Squier, J. A.; Diddams, S. A.

    2008-06-01

    We describe the detection and stabilization of the carrier envelope offset (CEO) frequency of a diode-pumped Yb:KYW (ytterbium-doped potassium yttrium tungstate) femtosecond oscillator that is spectrally centered at 1033 nm. The system consists of a diode-pumped, passively mode-locked femtosecond laser that produces 290 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 160 MHz. These pulses are first amplified, spectrally broadened and temporally compressed to 80 fs, and then launched into microstructured fiber to produce an octave-spanning spectrum. An f-2f nonlinear interferometer is employed with the broadened spectrum to detect and stabilize the CEO frequency through feedback to the pump laser current. These results demonstrate that such a Yb-doped tungstate laser can provide an efficient, compact, high-repetition-rate optical frequency comb with coverage from 650-1450 nm.

  9. Implant stability evaluation by resonance frequency analysis in the fit lock technique. A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Falisi, Giovanni; Galli, Massimo; Velasquez, Pedro Vittorini; Rivera, Juan Carlos Gallegos; Di Paolo, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Surgical procedures for the application of implants in the lateral-superior sectors are affected by the availability of the residual bone. When this condition is lower than 5 mm it is recommended that techniques involving two therapeutic phases, a reconstructive and an applicative one, as reported in the international literature, are adopted. The authors propose here a new method with the potential to apply implants simultaneously with the reconstructive phase. The aim of this longitudinal retrospective study was to evaluate the stability of implants applied with the fit lock technique in the upper maxillarys in us with bone availability lower than 4 mm by measuring resonance frequency at different follow-up periods The seme as urements, carried out on 30 implants, were analysed with specific statistical procedures. The results indicate that the stability of the implants inserted with the fit lock method increases progressively over time in a statistically significant manner. The stability recorded after one year from the insertion (ISQ T2) is significantly higher than that recorded after six months (ISQ T1), and this is significantly higher than that recorded at the time of implant placement (ISQ T0). The implants inserted in the maxillary zones with scarce bone availability and applied with this technique showed a similar stability as reported with other techniques. In light of the results, the authors confirm that the primary stability represents the basic requirement to guarantee a correct healing of the implant and demonstrate that the fit lock technique also all ows reaching this condition when bone availability is minimal. PMID:23991271

  10. Elimination of frequency noise from groundwater measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.M.; Bryce, R.W.; Strait, S.R.; Yeatman, R.A.

    1986-04-01

    Groundwater response to atmospheric fluctuation can be effectively removed from downhole-pressure records using the systematic approach. The technique is not as successful for removal of earth tides, due to a probable discrepancy between the actual earth tide and the theoretical earth tide. The advantage of the systematic technique is that a causative relationship is established for each component of the pressure response removed. This concept of data reduction is easily understood and well accepted. The disadvantage is that a record of the stress causing the pressure fluctuation must be obtained. This may be done by monitoring or synthesizing the stress. Frequency analysis offers a simpler way to eliminate the undesirable hydrologic fluctuations from the downhole pressure. Frequency analysis may prove to be impractical if the fluctuations being removed have broadband characteristics. A combination of the two techniques, such as eliminating the atmospheric effect with the systematic method and the earth-tide fluctuations with the frequency method, is the most effective and efficient approach.