Science.gov

Sample records for frequency-dependent stress fiber

  1. Differential frequency-dependent antidromic resonance of the Schaffer collaterals and mossy fibers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis M; Beltrán, Jesús Q; Tapia, Jesús A; Ortiz, Franco; Manjarrez, Elías; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    To better understand information transfer along the hippocampal pathways and its plasticity, here we studied the antidromic responses of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 to activation of the mossy fibers and Schaffer collaterals, respectively, in hippocampal slices from naïve and epileptic rats. We applied trains of 600 electrical stimuli at functionally meaningful frequencies (θ, β/γ and γ). The responses of the DG to θ frequency trains underwent rapid potentiation that lasted about 400 stimuli, after which they progressively returned to control value. At β/γ and γ frequencies, however, the initial potentiation was followed by a strong frequency-dependent depression within the first 50 stimuli. In kindled animals, the initial potentiation was stronger than in control preparations and the resonant phase at θ frequency lasted longer. In contrast, CA3 responses were exponentially depressed at all frequencies, but depression was significantly less intense at θ frequency in epileptic preparations. Failure of fibers to fire action potentials could account for some of the aforementioned characteristics, but waveforms of the intracellular action potentials also changed as the field responses did, i.e., half-duration and time-to-peak increased in both structures along the stimulation trains. Noteworthy, block of glutamate and GABA ionotropic receptors prevented resonance and reduced the depression of antidromic responses to β/γ and γ stimulation recorded in the DG, but not in CA3. We show that the different behavior in the information transfer along these pathways depends on the frequency at which action potentials are generated, excitability history and anatomical features, including myelination and tortuosity. In addition, the mossy fibers are endowed with ionotropic receptors and terminal active properties conferring them their sui generis non-passive antidromic responses. PMID:25665800

  2. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Michael T.; Bertram, John E.A.; Syme, Douglas A.; Hermanson, John W.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5–16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01–0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002–0.05 Wkg−1) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4–7 Hz), SDF (4–5 Hz) and SOL (0.5–1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross‐bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. PMID:25293602

  3. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Michael T; Bertram, John E A; Syme, Douglas A; Hermanson, John W; Chase, P Bryant

    2014-10-01

    The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5-16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01-0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002-0.05 Wkg(-1)) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4-7 Hz), SDF (4-5 Hz) and SOL (0.5-1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross-bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. PMID:25293602

  4. Extended parametric gain range in photonic crystal fibers with strongly frequency-dependent field distributions.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sidsel R; Alkeskjold, Thomas T; Olausson, Christina B; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2014-08-15

    The parametric gain range of a degenerate four-wave mixing process is determined in the undepleted pump regime. The gain range is considered with and without taking the mode field distributions of the four-wave mixing components into account. It is found that the mode field distributions have to be included to evaluate the parametric gain correctly in dispersion-tailored speciality fibers and that mode profile engineering can provide a way to increase the parametric gain range. PMID:25121901

  5. Frequency-dependent response of the vascular endothelium to pulsatile shear stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most cells of the circulatory system are exposed to shear forces that occur at the frequency of the heartbeat. However, as a result of the complicated blood flow patterns that occur at arterial branches, small regions of the arterial wall experience fluctuations in shear stress that are dominated by...

  6. Fiber networks amplify active stress.

    PubMed

    Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase P; Lenz, Martin

    2016-03-15

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. Although these fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. Here we theoretically study force transmission in these networks. We find that collective fiber buckling in the vicinity of a local active unit results in a rectification of stress towards strongly amplified isotropic contraction. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. Our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks and shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue. PMID:26921325

  7. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. While fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. I will present a comprehensive theoretical study of force transmission in these networks. I will show that the linear, small-force response of the networks is remarkably simple, as the macroscopic active stress depends only on the geometry of the force-exerting unit. In contrast, as non-linear buckling occurs around these units, local active forces are rectified towards isotropic contraction and strongly amplified. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. I will show that our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks, and that they shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue.

  8. Stress optic coefficient and stress profile in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Lagakos, N; Mohr, R; El-Bayoumi, O H

    1981-07-01

    The stress optic coefficient and stress profile in optical fibers have been determined photoelastically using a polariscope having good reproducibility and high sensitivity. The results of the work presented in this paper indicate that the photoelastic behavior may be different in fibers and in bulk glasses. The photoelastically determined clad compression in strengthened fibers was found to correlate well with the strengthening observed in these fibers using tensile tests. PMID:20332937

  9. Isolation and Contraction of the Stress Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Kazuo; Kano, Yumiko; Masuda, Michitaka; Onishi, Hirofumi; Fujiwara, Keigi

    1998-01-01

    Stress fibers were isolated from cultured human foreskin fibroblasts and bovine endothelial cells, and their contraction was demonstrated in vitro. Cells in culture dishes were first treated with a low-ionic-strength extraction solution and then further extracted using detergents. With gentle washes by pipetting, the nucleus and the apical part of cells were removed. The material on the culture dish was scraped, and the freed material was forced through a hypodermic needle and fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Isolated, free-floating stress fibers stained brightly with fluorescently labeled phalloidin. When stained with anti-α-actinin or anti-myosin, isolated stress fibers showed banded staining patterns. By electron microscopy, they consisted of bundles of microfilaments, and electron-dense areas were associated with them in a semiperiodic manner. By negative staining, isolated stress fibers often exhibited gentle twisting of microfilament bundles. Focal adhesion–associated proteins were also detected in the isolated stress fiber by both immunocytochemical and biochemical means. In the presence of Mg-ATP, isolated stress fibers shortened, on the average, to 23% of the initial length. The maximum velocity of shortening was several micrometers per second. Polystyrene beads on shortening isolated stress fibers rotated, indicating spiral contraction of stress fibers. Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation was detected in contracting stress fibers, and a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, KT5926, inhibited isolated stress fiber contraction. Our study demonstrates that stress fibers can be isolated with no apparent loss of morphological features and that they are truly contractile organelle. PMID:9658180

  10. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.

  11. Focal adhesions, stress fibers and mechanical tension

    PubMed Central

    Burridge, Keith; Guilluy, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Stress fibers and focal adhesions are complex protein arrays that produce, transmit and sense mechanical tension. Evidence accumulated over many years led to the conclusion that mechanical tension generated within stress fibers contributes to the assembly of both stress fibers themselves and their associated focal adhesions. However, several lines of evidence have recently been presented against this model. Here we discuss the evidence for and against the role of mechanical tension in driving the assembly of these structures. We also consider how their assembly is influenced by the rigidity of the substratum to which cells are adhering. Finally, we discuss the recently identified connections between stress fibers and the nucleus, and the roles that these may play, both in cell migration and regulating nuclear function. PMID:26519907

  12. Triboluminescent Fiber-Optic Sensors Measure Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Triboluminescence exploited in fiber-optic sensor system for measuring changes in pressures, strains, vibrations, and acoustic emissions, in structural members. Sensors embedded in members for in situ monitoring of condition of structure. System passive in sense no source of radiation required to interrogate optical fiber. Technique has potential for wide range of applications in which detection and measurement of structural stress required.

  13. Thermoelastic stresses in composite ceramic fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Filimonov, I.A.; Grigor`ev, Yu. M.

    1995-08-01

    A calculation of stress and deformation fields in ceramic fibers formed by the method of chemical vapor deposition onto a heated substrate is performed within the framework of linear elasticity theory. Optimum parameters for fibers with a homogeneous structure, a layered structure, and a gradient one are sought.

  14. Longitudinal residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method of measuring the longitudinal residual stress distribution in boron fibers is presented. The residual stresses in commercial CVD boron on tungsten fibers of 102, 142, and 203 microns (4, 5.6, and 8 mil) diameters were determined. Results for the three sizes show a compressive stress at the surface 800 to -1400 MN/sq m 120 to -200 ksi), changing monotonically to a region of tensile stress within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile 600 to 1000 MN/sq m(90 to 150 ksi) and then decreases to compressive near the tungsten boride core. The core itself is under a compressive stress of approximately -1300 MN/sq m (-190 ksi). The effects of surface removal on core residual stress and core-initiated fracture are discussed.

  15. Fiber Creep Evaluation by Stress Relaxation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Dicarlo, James A.; Wagner, Timothy

    1991-01-01

    A simple bend stress relaxation (BSR) test has been used to measure the creep related properties of a chemically vapor-deposited SiC fiber. Time, temperature, and strain dependent BSR data were analyzed to ascertain the ability of the stress relaxation results to predict tensile creep as a function of the same parameters. The predictions compared very well to actual creep data obtained by axial measurements, indicating that the BSR test could be used for determining both creep and stress relaxation of polycrystalline ceramic fibers under tensile loading.

  16. Frequency dependence of the magnetoimpedance in nanocrystalline FeCuNbSiB with high transverse stress-induced magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, M.; Kurlyandskaya, G.V.; Garcia-Beneytez, J.M.; Sinnecker, J.P.; Barandiaran, J.M.; Lukshina, V.A.; Potapov, A.P.

    1999-09-01

    Stress-annealed nanocrystalline FeCuNbSiB ribbons show correlation between induced magnetic anisotropy and magnetoimpedance. Two types of crystallization process were used in order to induce a transverse magnetic anisotropy: the first one was performed submitting the original amorphous samples to an applied tensile stress of {sigma} = 150 MPa. In the second one, samples are nanocrystallized in a first stage and submitted to stress annealing at {sigma} = 290 MPa afterwards. The maximum of the magnetoimpedance can be obtained for dc fields larger than the anisotropy field of the sample of close to the irreversibility field. This behavior can be explained based in the simultaneous switching of two different magnetization processes taking place in the samples with high transverse magnetic anisotropy.

  17. Behaviour of a few mode fiber modal pattern under stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model was developed to calculate the interference pattern at the end of a multimode weakly guiding optical fiber under stress. Whenever an optical fiber is under stress, the modal phase in the interference term of the intensity formula changes. Plots of the simulated output of a stressed fiber are presented. For multimode fibers, very complicated patterns result. Under stress, lobes in the pattern are generated, displaced and power is exchanged among them.

  18. Monitoring Fiber Stress During Curing of Single Fiber Glass- and Graphite-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Kosuri, Ranga P.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    The difference in thermal expansion characteristics of epoxy matrices and graphite fibers can produce significant residual stresses in the fibers during curing of composite materials. Tests on single fiber glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite specimens were conducted in which the glass and graphite fibers were preloaded in tension, and the epoxy matrix was cast around the fibers. The fiber tension was monitored while the matrix was placed around the fiber and subjected to the temperature-time curing cycle. Two mechanisms responsible for producing stress in embedded fibers were identified as matrix thermal expansion and contraction and matrix cure shrinkage. A simple analysis based on the change in fiber tension during the curing cycle was conducted to estimate the produced stresses. Experimental results on single fiber glass- and graphite-epoxy composites show that the fiber was subjected to significant tensile stresses when the temperature was raised from the first to the second dwell period. When initial fiber pretension is about 60 percent of the fiber failure load, these curing-induced stresses can cause tensile fracture of the embedded fiber.

  19. Oxidation induced stress-rupture of fiber bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, E.

    1997-03-01

    The effect of oxidation on the stress-rupture behavior of fiber bundles was modeled. It is shown that oxidation-induced fiber strength degradation results in the delayed failure of the associated fiber bundle and that the fiber bundle strength decreases with time as t{sup {minus}1/4}. It is also shown that the temperature dependence of the bundle loss of strength reflects the thermal dependence of the mechanism controlling the oxidation of the fibers. The effect of gauge length on the fiber bundle strength was also analyzed. Numerical examples are presented for the special case of Nicalon{trademark} fibers.

  20. An analysis of fiber-matrix interface failure stresses for a range of ply stress states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H.; Naik, R. A.; Lubowinski, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    A graphite/bismaleimide laminate was prepared without the usual fiber treatment and was tested over a wide range of stress states to measure its ply cracking strength. These tests were conducted using off-axis flexure specimens and produced fiber-matrix interface failure data over a correspondingly wide range of interface stress states. The absence of fiber treatment, weakened the fiber-matrix interfaces and allowed these tests to be conducted at load levels that did not yield the matrix. An elastic micromechanics computer code was used to calculate the fiber-matrix interface stresses at failure. Two different fiber-array models (square and diamond) were used in these calculations to analyze the effects of fiber arrangement as well as stress state on the critical interface stresses at failure. This study showed that both fiber-array models were needed to analyze interface stresses over the range of stress states. A linear equation provided a close fit to these critical stress combinations and, thereby, provided a fiber-matrix interface failure criterion. These results suggest that prediction procedures for laminate ply cracking can be based on micromechanics stress analyses and appropriate fiber-matrix interface failure criteria. However, typical structural laminates may require elastoplastic stress analysis procedures that account for matrix yielding, especially for shear-dominated ply stress states.

  1. Simultaneous Stretching and Contraction of Stress Fibers In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lynda J.; Rajfur, Zenon; Maddox, Amy S.; Freel, Christopher D.; Chen, Yun; Edlund, Magnus; Otey, Carol; Burridge, Keith

    2004-01-01

    To study the dynamics of stress fiber components in cultured fibroblasts, we expressed α-actinin and the myosin II regulatory myosin light chain (MLC) as fusion proteins with green fluorescent protein. Myosin activation was stimulated by treatment with calyculin A, a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor that elevates MLC phosphorylation, or with LPA, another agent that ultimately stimulates phosphorylation of MLC via a RhoA-mediated pathway. The resulting contraction caused stress fiber shortening and allowed observation of changes in the spacing of stress fiber components. We have observed that stress fibers, unlike muscle myofibrils, do not contract uniformly along their lengths. Although peripheral regions shortened, more central regions stretched. We detected higher levels of MLC and phosphorylated MLC in the peripheral region of stress fibers. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed more rapid exchange of myosin and α-actinin in the middle of stress fibers, compared with the periphery. Surprisingly, the widths of the myosin and α-actinin bands in stress fibers also varied in different regions. In the periphery, the banding patterns for both proteins were shorter, whereas in central regions, where stretching occurred, the bands were wider. PMID:15133124

  2. Effects of stress and strain on scintillating and clear fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Margulies, S.

    1995-08-01

    Among the improvements planned for the 1997--98 upgrade of the D0 detector at Fermilab are installation of a scintillating-fiber central tracker and a lead-scintillator central preshower counter read out with wave-shifting fibers. Because of space limitations, fibers in both systems may need to undergo bends with fairly small radii, and the resulting stresses and strains may cause light losses. This paper presents results of a study of the effects of deformation on fiber light transmission. Particular emphasis is placed on the new multiclad fibers developed by Kuraray.

  3. A Multimodular Tensegrity Model of an Actin Stress Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yaozhi; Xu, Xian; Lele, Tanmay; Kumar, Sanjay; Ingber, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Stress fibers are contractile bundles in the cytoskeleton that stabilize cell structure by exerting traction forces on extracellular matrix. Individual stress fibers are molecular bundles composed of parallel actin and myosin filaments linked by various actin-binding proteins, which are organized end-on-end in a sarcomere-like pattern within an elongated three-dimensional network. While measurements of single stress fibers in living cells show that they behave like tensed viscoelastic fibers, precisely how this mechanical behavior arises from this complex supramolecular arrangement of protein components remains unclear. Here we show that computationally modeling a stress fiber as a multi-modular tensegrity network can predict several key behaviors of stress fibers measured in living cells, including viscoelastic retraction, fiber splaying after severing, non-uniform contraction, and elliptical strain of a puncture wound within the fiber. The tensegrity model also can explain how they simultaneously experience passive tension and generate active contraction forces; in contrast, a tensed cable net model predicts some, but not all, of these properties. Thus, tensegrity models may provide a useful link between molecular and cellular scale mechanical behaviors, and represent a new handle on multi-scale modeling of living materials. PMID:18632107

  4. Dynamics of Mechanical Signal Transmission through Prestressed Stress Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yongyun; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of mechanical stimuli through the actin cytoskeleton has been proposed as a mechanism for rapid long-distance mechanotransduction in cells; however, a quantitative understanding of the dynamics of this transmission and the physical factors governing it remains lacking. Two key features of the actin cytoskeleton are its viscoelastic nature and the presence of prestress due to actomyosin motor activity. We develop a model of mechanical signal transmission through prestressed viscoelastic actin stress fibers that directly connect the cell surface to the nucleus. The analysis considers both temporally stationary and oscillatory mechanical signals and accounts for cytosolic drag on the stress fibers. To elucidate the physical parameters that govern mechanical signal transmission, we initially focus on the highly simplified case of a single stress fiber. The results demonstrate that the dynamics of mechanical signal transmission depend on whether the applied force leads to transverse or axial motion of the stress fiber. For transverse motion, mechanical signal transmission is dominated by prestress while fiber elasticity has a negligible effect. Conversely, signal transmission for axial motion is mediated uniquely by elasticity due to the absence of a prestress restoring force. Mechanical signal transmission is significantly delayed by stress fiber material viscosity, while cytosolic damping becomes important only for longer stress fibers. Only transverse motion yields the rapid and long-distance mechanical signal transmission dynamics observed experimentally. For simple networks of stress fibers, mechanical signals are transmitted rapidly to the nucleus when the fibers are oriented largely orthogonal to the applied force, whereas the presence of fibers parallel to the applied force slows down mechanical signal transmission significantly. The present results suggest that cytoskeletal prestress mediates rapid mechanical signal transmission and allows

  5. Creep and stress relaxation modeling of polycrystalline ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1991-01-01

    A variety of high performance polycrystalline ceramic fibers are currently being considered as reinforcement for high temperature ceramic matrix composites. However, under mechanical loading above 800 C, these fibers display creep-related instabilities which can result in detrimental changes in composite dimensions, strength, and internal stress distributions. As a first step toward understanding these effects, this study examines the validity of mechanistic-based empirical model which describes primary stage tensile creep and stress relaxation of polycrystalline ceramic fibers as independent functions of time, temperature, and applied stress or strain. To verify these functional dependencies, a simple bend test is used to measure stress relaxation for four types of commercial ceramic fibers for which direct tensile creep data are available. These fibers include both nonoxide (SCS-6, Nicalon) and oxide (PRD-166, FP) compositions. The results of the bend stress relaxation (BSR) test not only confirm the stress, time, and temperature dependencies predicted by the model but also allow measurement of model empirical parameters for the four fiber types. In addition, comparison of model predictions and BSR test results with the literature tensile creep data show good agreement, supporting both the predictive capability of the model and the use of the BSR test as a simple method for parameter determination for other fibers.

  6. Creep and stress relaxation modeling of polycrystalline ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of high performance polycrystalline ceramic fibers are currently being considered as reinforcement for high temperature ceramic matrix composites. However, under mechanical loading about 800 C, these fibers display creep related instabilities which can result in detrimental changes in composite dimensions, strength, and internal stress distributions. As a first step toward understanding these effects, this study examines the validity of a mechanism-based empirical model which describes primary stage tensile creep and stress relaxation of polycrystalline ceramic fibers as independent functions of time, temperature, and applied stress or strain. To verify these functional dependencies, a simple bend test is used to measure stress relaxation for four types of commercial ceramic fibers for which direct tensile creep data are available. These fibers include both nonoxide (SCS-6, Nicalon) and oxide (PRD-166, FP) compositions. The results of the Bend Stress Relaxation (BSR) test not only confirm the stress, time, and temperature dependencies predicted by the model, but also allow measurement of model empirical parameters for the four fiber types. In addition, comparison of model tensile creep predictions based on the BSR test results with the literature data show good agreement, supporting both the predictive capability of the model and the use of the BSR text as a simple method for parameter determination for other fibers.

  7. Frequency-dependent selection by predators.

    PubMed

    Allen, J A

    1988-07-01

    Sometimes predators tend to concentrate on common varieties of prey and overlook rare ones. Within prey species, this could result in the fitness of each variety being inversely related to its frequency in the population. Such frequency-dependent or 'apostatic' selection by predators hunting by sight could maintain polymorphism for colour pattern, and much of the supporting evidence for this idea has come from work on birds and artificial prey. These and other studies have shown that the strength of the observed selection is affected by prey density, palatability, coloration and conspicuousness. When the prey density is very high, selection becomes 'anti-apostatic': predators preferentially remove rare prey. There is still much to be learned about frequency-dependent selection by predators on artificial prey: work on natural polymorphic prey has hardly begun. PMID:2905488

  8. Analysis of frequency dependent pump light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Matthias; Pflaum, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Simulations have to accurately model thermal lensing in order to help improving resonator design of diode pumped solid state lasers. To this end, a precise description of the pump light absorption is an important prerequisite. In this paper, we discuss the frequency dependency of the pump light absorption in the laser crystal and its influence on the simulated laser performance. The results show that the pump light absorption has to include the spectral overlap of the emitting pump source and the absorbing laser material. This information can either be used for a fully frequency dependent absorption model or, at least in the shown examples, to compute an effective value for an exponential Beer-Lambert law of absorption. This is particularly significant at pump wavelengths coinciding with a peak of absorption. Consequences for laser stability and performance are analyzed for different pump wavelengths in a Nd:YAG laser.

  9. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Mace, Ruth; Tao, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction. PMID:26998333

  10. Two-frequency-dependent Gauss quadrature rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Joong

    2005-02-01

    We construct two-frequency-dependent Gauss quadrature rules which can be applied for approximating the integration of the product of two oscillatory functions with different frequencies [beta]1 and [beta]2 of the forms,yi(x)=fi,1(x) cos([beta]ix)+fi,2(x) sin([beta]ix), i=1,2,where the functions fi,j(x) are smooth. A regularization procedure is presented to avoid the singularity of the Jacobian matrix of nonlinear system of equations which is induced as one frequency approaches the other frequency. We provide numerical results to compare the accuracy of the classical Gauss rule and one- and two-frequency-dependent rules.

  11. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction. PMID:26998333

  12. Efficient computational simulation of actin stress fiber remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ristori, T; Obbink-Huizer, C; Oomens, C W J; Baaijens, F P T; Loerakker, S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding collagen and stress fiber remodeling is essential for the development of engineered tissues with good functionality. These processes are complex, highly interrelated, and occur over different time scales. As a result, excessive computational costs are required to computationally predict the final organization of these fibers in response to dynamic mechanical conditions. In this study, an analytical approximation of a stress fiber remodeling evolution law was derived. A comparison of the developed technique with the direct numerical integration of the evolution law showed relatively small differences in results, and the proposed method is one to two orders of magnitude faster. PMID:26823159

  13. Core stress distribution of phase shifting multimode polymer optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Rei Matsuura, Motoharu; Nagata, Morio; Mishima, Kenji; Inoue, Azusa; Tagaya, Akihiro; Koike, Yasuhiro

    2013-11-18

    Poly-(methyl methacrylate-co-benzyl methacrylate) polarization-maintaining optical fibers are known for their high response to normal stress. In this report, responses to higher stress levels up to 0.45 MPa were investigated. The stress amplitude and direction in the fiber cross section were calculated and analyzed with a coincident mode-field obtained from the near-field pattern. The stress amplitude varies significantly in the horizontal direction and is considered to create multiple phases, explaining the measurement results. To investigate possible permanent deformation, the core yield point profile was analyzed. Although it largely exceeds the average applied stress, the calculated stress distribution indicates that the core could partially experience stress that exceeds the yield point.

  14. A constitutive law for continuous fiber reinforced brittle matrix composites with fiber fragmentation and stress recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumeister, Jonas M.

    1993-08-01

    THE TENSILE BEHAVIOR of a brittle matrix composite is studied for post matrix crack saturation conditions. Scatter of fiber strength following the Weibull distribution as well as the influence of the major microstructural variables is considered. The stress in a fiber is assumed to recover linearly around a failure due to a fiber-matrix interface behavior mainly ruled by friction. The constitutive behavior for such a composite is analysed. Results are given for a simplified and a refined approximate description and compared with an analysis resulting from the exact analytical theory of fiber fragmentation. It is shown that the stress-strain relation for the refined model excellently follows the exact solution and gives the location of the maximum to within 1% in both stress and strain; for most materials the agreement is even better. Also it is shown that all relations can be normalized to depend on only two variables; a stress reference and the Weibull exponent. For systems with low scatter in fiber strength the simplified model is sufficient to determine the stress maximum but not the postcritical behavior. In addition, the simplified model gives explicit analytical expressions for the maximum stress and corresponding strain. None of the models contain any volume dependence or statistical scatter, but the maximum stress given by the stress-strain relation constitutes an upper bound for the ultimate tensile strength of the composite.

  15. Effects of stress and strain on scintillating and clear fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Manho; Margulies, Seymour

    1994-09-01

    Among the improvements planned for the 1997 upgrade of the D0 detector at Fermilab are installation of a new scintillating-fiber central tracker and a new lead-scintillator preshower counter read out with wave-shifting fibers. Because of space limitations, fibers in both systems may need to undergo bends of fairly small radius, and the resulting stresses and strains may cause light losses. This paper presents interim results from a study of the effects of deformation on fiber light transmission. A variety of scintillating, wave-shifting, and clear fibers with diameters near 1 mm have been examined. Particular emphasis was placed on the new, multiclad fibers developed by Kuraray. Light loss was measured by injecting light into one end of a fiber sample and measuring the exiting light before, during, and after controlled deformation of the fiber. The deformations studied include bending, tensile elongation, compression, and torsion. Generally, except for severe bending or considerable compression, light loss was found to be less than a few percent. The effect of bending were investigated using single-turn and multiple-turn loops of various radii. Light loss was found to increase with decreasing radius, but little dependence on either core dopants or diameter was observed. Generally, the light loss, L, in an N-turn loop of radius r could be parameterized by the form L equals A(root)N/rn, where A is a constant and n is near 1.5. Kuraray multiclad fiber was found to be superior to single-clad fiber in that the former can be bent into single- turn loops with radii as small as 1 cm before introducing a light loss of 3%, while the latter produces this loss at a 2 cm radius. Tensile stress for forces up to 1.3 kg for 2-m-long fibers produced less than 1% light loss. On the other hand, compressive stress exerted over a 10-cm- long fiber section could cause a loss of 10%. Finally, a single observation of the effects of torsion indicated no change in light transmission for a

  16. Determining the frequency dependence of elastic properties of fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Benedikt; Renner, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In the brittle crust, rocks often contain joints or faults on various length scales that have a profound effect on fluid flow and heat transport, as well as on the elastic properties of rocks. Improving the understanding of the effect of fractures and the role of stress state and heterogeneity along the fractures on elastic properties of rocks is potentially important for the characterization of deep geothermal reservoirs. Seismic surveys, typically covering a frequency range of about 1 to 1000 Hz, are a valuable tool to investigate fractured rocks but the extraction of fracture properties remains difficult. The elementary frequency-dependent interaction between fractured rock matrix and viscous pore fluids and the resulting effects on wave propagation require well-founded dispersion analyses of heterogeneous rocks. In this laboratory study, we investigate the stress dependence of the effective elastic properties of fractured reservoir rocks over a broad frequency range. To assess the effect of faults on the effective elastic properties, we performed cyclic axial loading tests on intact and fractured samples of Solnhofen limestone and Padang granodiorite. The samples contained an idealized fault, which was created by stacking two sample discs on top of each other that experienced various surface treatments to vary their roughness. The dynamic loading tests were conducted with frequencies up to 10 Hz and amplitudes reaching 10% of the statically applied stress. Simultaneously, P- and S-wave measurements were performed in the ultrasonic frequency range (above 100 kHz) with a total of 16 sensors, whose positioning above and below the samples guarantees a wide range of transmission and reflection angles. Preliminary results of static and dynamic elastic properties of intact Padang granodiorite show a pronounced increase in Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio with increasing axial stress. Stress relaxation is accompanied by a decrease of the modulus and the Poisson

  17. Model of cellular mechanotransduction via actin stress fibers.

    PubMed

    Gouget, Cecile L M; Hwang, Yongyun; Barakat, Abdul I

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical stresses due to blood flow regulate vascular endothelial cell structure and function and play a key role in arterial physiology and pathology. In particular, the development of atherosclerosis has been shown to correlate with regions of disturbed blood flow where endothelial cells are round and have a randomly organized cytoskeleton. Thus, deciphering the relation between the mechanical environment, cell structure, and cell function is a key step toward understanding the early development of atherosclerosis. Recent experiments have demonstrated very rapid ([Formula: see text]100 ms) and long-distance ([Formula: see text]10 [Formula: see text]m) cellular mechanotransduction in which prestressed actin stress fibers play a critical role. Here, we develop a model of mechanical signal transmission within a cell by describing strains in a network of prestressed viscoelastic stress fibers following the application of a force to the cell surface. We find force transmission dynamics that are consistent with experimental results. We also show that the extent of stress fiber alignment and the direction of the applied force relative to this alignment are key determinants of the efficiency of mechanical signal transmission. These results are consistent with the link observed experimentally between cytoskeletal organization, mechanical stress, and cellular responsiveness to stress. Based on these results, we suggest that mechanical strain of actin stress fibers under force constitutes a key link in the mechanotransduction chain. PMID:26081725

  18. Local frequency dependence in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

    PubMed

    White, P J; Clement, G T; Hynynen, K

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of insonation at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of 17 points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. A multiple-frequency insonation with optimized frequencies over the entirety of five skull specimens was found to yield on average a temporally brief 230% increase in the transmitted intensity with an 88% decrease in time-averaged intensity transmission within the focal volume. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission. PMID:16625043

  19. Frequency dependent thermal expansion in binary viscoelasticcomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-01

    The effective thermal expansion coefficient beta* of abinary viscoelastic composite is shown to be frequency dependent even ifthe thermal expansion coefficients beta A and beta B of both constituentsare themselves frequency independent. Exact calculations for binaryviscoelastic systems show that beta* is related to constituent valuesbeta A, beta B, volume fractions, and bulk moduli KA, KB, as well as tothe overall bulk modulus K* of the composite system. Then, beta* isdetermined for isotropic systems by first bounding (or measuring) K* andtherefore beta*. For anisotropic systems with hexagonal symmetry, theprincipal values of the thermal expansion beta*perp and beta*para can bedetermined exactly when the constituents form a layered system. In allthe examples studied, it is shown explicitly that the eigenvectors of thethermoviscoelastic system possess non-negative dissipation -- despite thecomplicated analytical behavior of the frequency dependent thermalexpansivities themselves. Methods presented have a variety ofapplications from fluid-fluid mixtures to fluid-solid suspensions, andfrom fluid-saturated porous media to viscoelastic solid-solidcomposites.

  20. Local Frequency Dependence in Transcranial Ultrasound Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. J.; Clement, G. T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of sonication at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of seventeen points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  1. Anomalous frequency dependent diamagnetism in metal silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Ashutosh; Gunasekera, Jagat; Harriger, Leland; Singh, David J.; Singh, Deepak K.; Leland Harriger Collaboration

    Discovery of superconductivity in PbO-type FeSe has generated a lot of interest. Among the samples we synthesize with similar structure, NiSi has showed anomalous but very interesting results. Nickel silicides are important electronic materials that have been used as contacts for field effect transistors, as interconnects and in nanoelectronic devices. The magnetic properties of NiSi are not well known, however. In this presentation, we report a highly unusual magnetic phenomenon in NiSi. The ac susceptibility measurements on NiSi reveal strong frequency dependence of static and dynamic susceptibilities that are primarily diamagnetic at room temperature. The static susceptibility is found to exhibit a strong frequency dependence of the diamagnetic response below 100K, while dynamic susceptibility showed peak type feature at 10KHz frequency around 50K. Detailed neutron scattering measurements on high quality powder sample of NiSi on SPINS cold spectrometer further revealed an inelastic peak around 1.5meV, even though no magnetic order is detected. The inelastic peak dissipates above 100K, which is where the static susceptibility starts to diverge with frequency. Research is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Grant No. DE-SC0014461.

  2. Actomyosin stress fiber mechanosensing in 2D and 3D

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stacey; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is the process through which cells survey the mechanical properties of their environment, convert these mechanical inputs into biochemical signals, and modulate their phenotype in response. These mechanical inputs, which may be encoded in the form of extracellular matrix stiffness, dimensionality, and adhesion, all strongly influence cell morphology, migration, and fate decisions. One mechanism through which cells on planar or pseudo-planar matrices exert tensile forces and interrogate microenvironmental mechanics is through stress fibers, which are bundles composed of actin filaments and, in most cases, non-muscle myosin II filaments. Stress fibers form a continuous structural network that is mechanically coupled to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions. Furthermore, myosin-driven contractility plays a central role in the ability of stress fibers to sense matrix mechanics and generate tension. Here, we review the distinct roles that non-muscle myosin II plays in driving mechanosensing and focus specifically on motility. In a closely related discussion, we also describe stress fiber classification schemes and the differing roles of various myosin isoforms in each category. Finally, we briefly highlight recent studies exploring mechanosensing in three-dimensional environments, in which matrix content, structure, and mechanics are often tightly interrelated. Stress fibers and the myosin motors therein represent an intriguing and functionally important biological system in which mechanics, biochemistry, and architecture all converge.

  3. The influence of motion and stress on optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremy D.; Hill, Gary J.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Taylor, Trey; Soukup, Ian; Moreira, Walter; Cornell, Mark E.; Good, John; Anderson, Seth; Fuller, Lindsay; Lee, Hanshin; Kelz, Andreas; Rafal, Marc; Rafferty, Tom; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian

    2012-09-01

    We report on extensive testing carried out on the optical fibers for the VIRUS instrument. The primary result of this work explores how 10+ years of simulated wear on a VIRUS fiber bundle affects both transmission and focal ratio degradation (FRD) of the optical fibers. During the accelerated lifetime tests we continuously monitored the fibers for signs of FRD. We find that transient FRD events were common during the portions of the tests when motion was at telescope slew rates, but dropped to negligible levels during rates of motion typical for science observation. Tests of fiber transmission and FRD conducted both before and after the lifetime tests reveal that while transmission values do not change over the 10+ years of simulated wear, a clear increase in FRD is seen in all 18 fibers tested. This increase in FRD is likely due to microfractures that develop over time from repeated flexure of the fiber bundle, and stands in contrast to the transient FRD events that stem from localized stress and subsequent modal diffusion of light within the fibers. There was no measurable wavelength dependence on the increase in FRD over 350 nm to 600 nm. We also report on bend radius tests conducted on individual fibers and find the 266 μm VIRUS fibers to be immune to bending-induced FRD at bend radii of R 10 cm. Below this bend radius FRD increases slightly with decreasing radius. Lastly, we give details of a degradation seen in the fiber bundle currently deployed on the Mitchell Spectrograph (formally VIRUS-P) at McDonald Observatory. The degradation is shown to be caused by a localized shear in a select number of optical fibers that leads to an explosive form of FRD. In a few fibers, the overall transmission loss through the instrument can exceed 80%. These results are important for the VIRUS instrument, and for both current and proposed instruments that make use of optical fibers, particularly when the fibers are in continual motion during an observation, or experience

  4. Failure mechanics of fiber composite notched charpy specimens. [stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    A finite element stress analysis was performed to determine the stress variation in the vicinity of the notch and far field of fiber composites Charpy specimens (ASTM Standard). NASTRAN was used for the finite element analysis assuming linear behavior and equivalent static load. The unidirectional composites investigated ranged from Thornel 75 Epoxy to S-Glass/Epoxy with the fiber direction parallel to the long dimension of the specimen. The results indicate a biaxial stress state exists in (1) the notch vicinity which is dominated by transverse tensile and interlaminar shear and (2) near the load application point which is dominated by transverse compression and interlaminar shear. The results also lead to the postulation of hypotheses for the predominant failure modes, the fracture initiation, and the fracture process. Finally, the results indicate that the notched Charpy test specimen is not suitable for assessing the impact resistance of nonmetallic fiber composites directly.

  5. Stress-rupture behavior of small diameter polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Goldsby, Jon C.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Continuous length polycrystalline alumina fibers are candidates as reinforcement in high temperature composite materials. Interest therefore exists in characterizing the thermomechanical behavior of these materials, obtaining possible insights into underlying mechanisms, and understanding fiber performance under long term use. Results are reported on the time-temperature dependent strength behavior of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Below 1000 C and 100 hours, Nextel 610 with the smaller grain size had a greater fast fracture and rupture strength than Fiber FP. The time exponents for stress-rupture of these fibers were found to decrease from approximately 13 at 900 C to below 3 near 1050 C, suggesting a transition from slow crack growth to creep rupture as the controlling fracture mechanism. For both fiber types, an effective activation energy of 690 kJ/mol was measured for rupture. This allowed stress-rupture predictions to be made for extended times at use temperatures below 1000 C.

  6. Frequency dependent squeezed light at audio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John

    2015-04-01

    Following successful implementation in the previous generation of instruments, squeezed states of light represent a proven technology for the reduction of quantum noise in ground-based interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. As a result of lower noise and increased circulating power, the current generation of detectors places one further demand on this technique - that the orientation of the squeezed ellipse be rotated as function of frequency. This extension allows previously negligible quantum radiation pressure noise to be mitigated in addition to quantum shot noise. I will present the results of an experiment which performs the appropriate rotation by reflecting the squeezed state from a detuned high-finesse optical cavity, demonstrating frequency dependent squeezing at audio frequencies for the first time and paving the way for broadband quantum noise reduction in Advanced LIGO. Further, I will indicate how a realistic implementation of this approach will impact Advanced LIGO both alone and in combination with other potential upgrades.

  7. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  8. Near infrared frequency dependence of high-order sideband generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaks, Benjamin; Banks, Hunter; Sherwin, Mark; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2013-12-04

    The near infrared frequency dependence of high order sideband generation in InGaAs quantum wells is discussed. The NIR frequency dependence of the sidebands indicates that the HSG phenomenon is excitonic in nature.

  9. Stress analysis of carbon fiber embedded composite material of rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, O.; Taya, M.

    1995-12-31

    Thermo-mechanical properties of a composite of rubber embedded by carbon fill has been studied from the viewpoint of developing an electric device. The objective of the present study is to show stress analysis of carbon fiber embedded composite material of rubber by using a mixed-type finite element method. Based on the condition o plane strain, the geometry of composite material is taken as the two types of orientation of carbon fiber, which are distributed regularly according the specified volume fraction along the horizontal and vertical directions in the base material of rubber. The loading condition is assumed to be the two types of axial and shearing deformations. Through the calculated results of equivalent and mean stress distributions and the load-deflection curve, effects of the geometry size, the carbon fiber orientation and the loading condition are clarified. The results for the typical axial deformation is compared with the experimental results.

  10. Rho-Kinase–Mediated Contraction of Isolated Stress Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Kazuo; Kano, Yumiko; Amano, Mutsuki; Onishi, Hirofumi; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Fujiwara, Keigi

    2001-01-01

    It is widely accepted that actin filaments and the conventional double-headed myosin interact to generate force for many types of nonmuscle cell motility, and that this interaction occurs when the myosin regulatory light chain (MLC) is phosphorylated by MLC kinase (MLCK) together with calmodulin and Ca2+. However, recent studies indicate that Rho-kinase is also involved in regulating the smooth muscle and nonmuscle cell contractility. We have recently isolated reactivatable stress fibers from cultured cells and established them as a model system for actomyosin-based contraction in nonmuscle cells. Here, using isolated stress fibers, we show that Rho-kinase mediates MLC phosphorylation and their contraction in the absence of Ca2+. More rapid and extensive stress fiber contraction was induced by MLCK than was by Rho-kinase. When the activity of Rho-kinase but not MLCK was inhibited, cells not only lost their stress fibers and focal adhesions but also appeared to lose cytoplasmic tension. Our study suggests that actomyosin-based nonmuscle contractility is regulated by two kinase systems: the Ca2+-dependent MLCK and the Rho-kinase systems. We propose that Ca2+ is used to generate rapid contraction, whereas Rho-kinase plays a major role in maintaining sustained contraction in cells. PMID:11331307

  11. Stress transfer of a Kevlar 49 fiber pullout test studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhenkun; Wang, Quan; Qiu, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The interfacial stress transfer behavior of a Kevlar 49 aramid fiber-epoxy matrix was studied with fiber pullout tests, the fibers of which were stretched by a homemade microloading device. Raman spectra on the embedded fiber were recorded by micro-Raman spectroscopy, under different strain levels. Then, the fiber axial stress was obtained by the relationship between the stress and Raman shift of the aramid fiber. Experimental results revealed that the fiber axial stress increased significantly with the load. The shear stress concentration occurred at the fiber entry to the epoxy resin. Thus, interfacial friction stages exist in the debonded fiber segment, and the interfacial friction shear stress is constant within one stage. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical model predictions. PMID:23735244

  12. Stress-displacement relation of fiber for fiber-reinforced ceramic composites during (indentation) loading and unloading

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, C.; Ferber, M.K.; Becher, P.F. )

    1989-11-01

    The stress-displacement relation of the fiber is analyzed for fiber-reinforced ceramic composites during axial compressive loading (indentation) and unloading on the exposed end of an embedded fiber. An unbonded fiber/matrix interface subject to Coulomb friction and residual radial clamping stresses is considered in the present study. The results show that the stress-displacement curves during loading and unloading can be used to evaluate the magnitude of the clamping stress, the coefficient of friction, and the frictional stress distribution at the interface. Specifically, in the absence of Poisson's effect (i.e., when Poisson's ratio of the fiber is zero), the interfacial shear stress is constant, the loading curve is parabolic, and, after complete unloading, the residual fiber displacement equals half of the maximum fiber displacement at the peak loading stress. In the presence of Poisson's effect, the interfacial shear stress is not constant, and, after complete unloading, the residual fiber displacement is less than half of the maximum fiber displacement at the peak loading stress.

  13. The influence of the fiber drawing process on intrinsic stress and the resulting birefringence optimization of PM fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, Florian; Spittel, Ron; Bierlich, Jörg; Grimm, Stephan; Jäger, Matthias; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2015-04-01

    The propagation properties of optical fibers can be significantly influenced by intrinsic stress. These effects are often undesired but in some cases essential for certain applications, e.g. in polarization maintaining (PM) fibers. In this paper, we present systematic studies on the influence of the fiber drawing process on the generated stress and demonstrate an approach to significantly increase the stress induced birefringence of PM-fibers. It is shown that the thermal stress caused by the material composition is superimposed with the mechanical stress caused by the fiber fabrication process. This intrinsic stress has a strong effect on the optical and mechanical properties of the glass and thus influences the fiber stability and modal behavior. By applying a thermal annealing step, the mechanical stress due to the fiber drawing process can be canceled. It is shown that this annealing step compensates the stress reducing influence of the drawing process on the birefringence of PM-fibers with panda structure. The comparison of the intrinsic stress states after fabrication with the state after the additional high temperature annealing step clearly shows that it is possible to improve the overall birefringence of panda fibers using appropriate preparation steps.

  14. AC Magnetic Field Frequency Dependence of Magnetoacoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.; DeNale, R.

    1992-01-01

    Our recent study has proved a strong correlation between the low-frequency AC applied magnetic field amplitude dependence of the asymmetry of the magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) burst and the strength of the domain wall-defect interaction in iron-base ferromagnets. For the present study the AC magnetic field frequency dependence of the asymmetry has been investigated in the range of 1 to 200 Hz. When represented by the third moment of the rectified acoustic emission pulses, the asymmetry becomes a bell-shaped function of frequency with its center located around 25 Hz. This experiment has been performed with low carbon, high yield stress steel specimens of three different levels of domain wall-defect interaction strength. The results show that the increase in the interaction strength causes a vertical down shift of the asymmetry in the entire frequency range investigated.

  15. Optical fiber sensor for measurement of concrete structure stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Barreto da Silva, R.

    1994-09-01

    In this work we describe an optical sensor to determine the stress applied at a concrete structure. The optical sensor is a monomode fiber optic, that is embedded in the concrete. The principle of these sensors is based on photoelastic effect, that produces a birefringence in the optical fiber and induces a rotation on the polarization angle of the guided polarized light. The photoelastic effect is produced due to a controlled applied charge in the center of the concrete structure. The shift of polarization is analyzed by a polaroid analyzer.

  16. Lamination residual stresses in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the magnitude of lamination residual stresses in angle-ply composites and to evaluate their effects on composite structural integrity. The materials investigated were boron/epoxy, boron/polyimide, graphite/low modulus epoxy, graphite/high modulus epoxy, graphite/polyimide and s-glass/epoxy. These materials were fully characterized. Static properties of laminates were also determined. Experimental techniques using embedded strain gages were developed and used to measure residual strains during curing. The extent of relaxation of lamination residual stresses was investigated. It was concluded that the degree of such relaxation is low. The behavior of angle-ply laminates subjected to thermal cycling, tensile load cycling, and combined thermal cycling with tensile load was investigated. In most cases these cycling programs did not have any measurable influence on residual strength and stiffness of the laminates. In the tensile load cycling tests, the graphite/polyimide shows the highest endurance with 10 million cycle runouts at loads up to 90 percent of the static strength.

  17. Increased molecular mobility in humid silk fibers under tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydel, Tilo; Knoll, Wiebke; Greving, Imke; Dicko, Cedric; Koza, Michael M.; Krasnov, Igor; Müller, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Silk fibers are semicrystalline nanocomposite protein fibers with an extraordinary mechanical toughness that changes with humidity. Diffusive or overdamped motion on a molecular level is absent in dry silkworm silk, but present in humid silk at ambient temperature. This microscopic diffusion distinctly depends on the externally applied macroscopic tensile force. Quasielastic and inelastic neutron-scattering data as a function of humidity and of tensile strain on humid silk fibers support the model that both the adsorbed water and parts of the amorphous polymers participate in diffusive motion and are affected by the tensile force. It is notable that the quasielastic linewidth of humid silk at 100% relative humidity increases significantly with the applied force. The effect of the tensile force is discussed in terms of an increasing alignment of the polymer chains in the amorphous fraction with increasing tensile stress which changes the geometrical restrictions of the diffusive motions.

  18. Possible translocation of actin and alpha-actinin along stress fibers.

    PubMed

    McKenna, N M; Wang, Y L

    1986-11-01

    We have employed fluorescent analogue cytochemistry and fluorescence photobleaching to study the mobility of actin and alpha-actin along stress fibers. Rhodamine-labeled actin or alpha-actinin microinjected into embryonic chick cardiac fibroblasts soon became incorporated into stress fibers. A pulse of a laser microbeam was used to photobleach small spots on the fluorescent stress fibers. Images of the bleached fiber were recorded with an intensified image processing system at 2-3 min intervals. The distance between the bleached spot and the terminus of the stress fiber, which remained stationary throughout the experiment, was then measured in the successive images. Movement of bleached spots was detected along stress fibers located in the apparently trailing processes of polygonal fibroblasts, and only occurred in one direction: away from the distal tip of the stress fiber. The rate of movement calculated for alpha-actinin-injected cells was 0.24 +/- 0.12 micron/min, for actin-injected cells, 0.29 +/- 0.11 micron/min. The rate did not seem to be affected by the location of the spot relative to the distal end of the stress fiber unless the spot was located within the most distal 5 microns of the stress fiber. Anti-myosin antibody staining indicated that stress fibers which demonstrated translocation were relatively depleted of myosin. The apparent translocation of proteins along stress fibers, possibly generated by stretching, may be related to the retraction of cell processes during locomotion. PMID:3758212

  19. Frequency-dependent fitness in gynodioecious Lobelia siphilitica.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, L Ruth; Case, Andrea L; Caruso, Christina M

    2015-05-01

    Selection is frequency dependent when an individual's fitness depends on the frequency of its phenotype. Frequency-dependent selection should be common in gynodioecious plants, where individuals are female or hermaphroditic; if the fitness of females is limited by the availability of pollen to fertilize their ovules, then they should have higher fitness when rare than when common. To test whether the fitness of females is frequency dependent, we manipulated the sex ratio in arrays of gynodioecious Lobelia siphilitica. To test whether fitness was frequency dependent because of variation in pollen availability, we compared open-pollinated and supplemental hand-pollinated plants. Open-pollinated females produced more seeds when they were rare than when they were common, as expected if fitness is negatively frequency dependent. However, hand-pollinated females also produced more seeds when they were rare, indicating that variation in pollen availability was not the cause of frequency-dependent fitness. Instead, fitness was frequency dependent because both hand- and open-pollinated females opened more flowers when they were rare than when they were common. This plasticity in the rate of anthesis could cause fitness to be frequency dependent even when reproduction is not pollen limited, and thus expand the conditions under which frequency-dependent selection operates in gynodioecious species. PMID:25824809

  20. Nonlinear stress-strain behavior of carbon nanotube fibers subject to slow sustained strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gengzhi; Wang, Dong; Pang, John H. L.; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Lianxi

    2013-09-01

    Nonlinear stress-strain behavior of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers is studied based on the test data where fiber strength can be modeled by the Weibull distribution. CNT fibers spun from vertically aligned arrays are tensioned at slow sustained strain rate (0.00001 1/s) to study the tensile strength resulting from sliding-to-failure effects. A model is developed to estimate the Weibull modulus which characterizes the dispersion of fiber strengths in terms of the maximum sustained stress and failure strain of the fibers. The results show that the sliding indeed has great influence on the stress-strain relation of CNT fibers at low strain rate.

  1. Cyclic stretch-induced stress fiber dynamics - Dependence on strain rate, Rho-kinase and MLCK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chin-Fu; Haase, Candice; Deguchi, Shinji; Kaunas, Roland

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclic stretch induces stress fiber disassembly, reassembly and fusion perpendicular to the direction of stretch. {yields} Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced at low stretch frequency. {yields} Stretch caused actin fiber formation parallel to stretch in distinct locations in cells treated with Rho-kinase and MLCK inhibitors. -- Abstract: Stress fiber realignment is an important adaptive response to cyclic stretch for nonmuscle cells, but the mechanism by which such reorganization occurs is not known. By analyzing stress fiber dynamics using live cell microscopy, we revealed that stress fiber reorientation perpendicular to the direction of cyclic uniaxial stretching at 1 Hz did not involve disassembly of the stress fiber distal ends located at focal adhesion sites. Instead, these distal ends were often used to assemble new stress fibers oriented progressively further away from the direction of stretch. Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced when the frequency of stretch was decreased to 0.01 Hz, however. Treatment with the Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y27632) reduced stress fibers to thin fibers located in the cell periphery which bundled together to form thick fibers oriented parallel to the direction of stretching at 1 Hz. In contrast, these thin fibers remained diffuse in cells subjected to stretch at 0.01 Hz. Cyclic stretch at 1 Hz also induced actin fiber formation parallel to the direction of stretch in cells treated with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, but these fibers were located centrally rather than peripherally. These results shed new light on the mechanism by which stress fibers reorient in response to cyclic stretch in different regions of the actin cytoskeleton.

  2. Residual stresses in continuous graphite fiber Al metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Hun Sub; Zong, Gui Sheng; Marcus, Harris L.

    1988-01-01

    The residual stresses in graphite fiber reinforced aluminum (Gr/Al) composites with various thermal histories are measured using X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The XRD stress analysis is based on the determination of lattice strains by precise measurements of the interplanar spacings in different directions of the sample. The sample is a plate consisting of two-ply P 100 Gr/Al 6061 precursor wires and Al 6061 overlayers. Prior to XRD measurement, the 6061 overlayers are electrochemically removed. In order to calibrate the relationship between stress magnitude and lattice spacing shift, samples of Al 6061 are loaded at varying stress levels in a three-point bend fixture, while the stresses are simultaneously determined by XRD and surface-attached strain gages. The stresses determined by XRD closely match those determined by the strain gages. Using these calibrations, the longitudinal residual stresses of P 100 Gr/Al 6061 composites are measured for various heat treatments, and the results are presented.

  3. Accelerated stress rupture lifetime assessment for fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, S.E.; DeTeresa, S.J.; Sanchez, R.J.; Zocher, M.A.; Christensen, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    Objective was to develop a theoretical and experimental framework for predicting stress rupture lifetime for fiber polymer composites based on short-term accelerated testing. Originally a 3-year project, it was terminated after the first year, which included stress rupture experiments and viscoelastic material characterization. In principle, higher temperature, stress, and saturated environmental conditions are used to accelerate stress rupture. Two types of specimens were to be subjected to long-term and accelerated static tensile loading at various temperatures, loads in order to quantify both fiber and matrix dominated failures. Also, we were to apply state-of-the-art analytical and experimental characterization techniques developed under a previous DOE/DP CRADA for capturing and tracking incipient degradation mechanisms associated with mechanical performance. Focus was increase our confidence to design, analyze, and build long-term composite structures such as flywheels and hydrogen gas storage vessels; other applications include advanced conventional weapons, infrastructures, marine and offshore systems, and stockpile stewardship and surveillance. Capabilities developed under this project, though not completed or verified, are being applied to NIF, AVLIS, and SSMP programs.

  4. Developing Fiber Specific Promoter-Reporter Transgenic Lines to Study the Effect of Abiotic Stresses on Fiber Development in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junping; Burke, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Cotton is one of the most important cash crops in US agricultural industry. Environmental stresses, such as drought, high temperature and combination of both, not only reduce the overall growth of cotton plants, but also greatly decrease cotton lint yield and fiber quality. The impact of environmental stresses on fiber development is poorly understood due to technical difficulties associated with the study of developing fiber tissues and lack of genetic materials to study fiber development. To address this important question and provide the need for scientific community, we have generated transgenic cotton lines harboring cotton fiber specific promoter (CFSP)-reporter constructs from six cotton fiber specific genes (Expansin, E6, Rac13, CelA1, LTP, and Fb late), representing genes that are expressed at different stages of fiber development. Individual CFSP::GUS or CFSP::GFP construct was introduced into Coker 312 via Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Transgenic cotton lines were evaluated phenotypically and screened for the presence of selectable marker, reporter gene expression, and insertion numbers. Quantitative analysis showed that the patterns of GUS reporter gene activity during fiber development in transgenic cotton lines were similar to those of the native genes. Greenhouse drought and heat stress study showed a correlation between the decrease in promoter activities and decrease in fiber length, increase in micronaire and changes in other fiber quality traits in transgenic lines grown under stressed condition. These newly developed materials provide new molecular tools for studying the effects of abiotic stresses on fiber development and may be used in study of cotton fiber development genes and eventually in the genetic manipulation of fiber quality. PMID:26030401

  5. Noninvasive detection of plant nutrient stress using fiber optic spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.; Liew, Oi Wah; Boey, William S. L.

    2001-05-01

    In a previous paper, we described the use of fiber optic spectrophotometry as a non-destructive and sensitive method to detect early symptoms of plant nutrient deficiency. We report further developments of our work on Brassica chinensis var parachinensis (Bailey) showing reproducibility of our data collected at a different seasonal period. Plants at the mid-log growth phase were subjected to nutrient stress by transferring them to nitrate- and calcium- deficient nutrient solution in a standing aerated hydroponic system. After tracking changes in leaf reflectance by FOSpectr for nine days, the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution and their recovery was monitored for a further nine days. The responses of nutrient stressed plants were compared with those grown under complete nutrient solution over the 18-day trial period. We also compared the sensitivity of FOSpectr detection against plant growth measurements vis-a-vis average leaf number and leaf width and show that the former method gave an indication of nutrient stress much earlier than the latter. In addition, this work indicated that while normal and nutrient-stressed plants could not be distinguished within the first 7 days by tracking plant growth indicators, stressed plants did show a clear decline in average leaf number and leaf width in later stages of growth even after the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution. The results further reinforce the need for early detection of nutrient stress, as late remedial action could not reverse the loss in plant growth in later stages of plant development.

  6. Effect of stress on ultrasonic pulses in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, J. H.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustical-ultrasonic technique was used to demonstrate relationships existing between changes in attenuation of stress waves and tensile stress on an eight ply 0 degree graphite-epoxy fiber reinforced composite. All tests were conducted in the linear range of the material for which no mechanical or macroscopic damage was evident. Changes in attenuation were measured as a function of tensile stress in the frequency domain and in the time domain. Stress wave propagation in these specimens was dispersive, i.e., the wave speed depends on frequency. Wave speeds varied from 267,400 cm/sec to 680,000 cm/sec as the frequency of the signal was varied from 150 kHz to 1.9 MHz which strongly suggests that flexural/lamb wave modes of propagation exist. The magnitude of the attenuation changes depended strongly on tensile stress. It was further observed that the wave speeds increased slightly for all tested frequencies as the stress was increased.

  7. Modeling of stress/strain behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites including stress redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is presented for nonlinear analyses which incorporates microstress redistribution due to progressive fracture in ceramic matrix composites. This procedure facilitates an accurate simulation of the stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites up to failure. The nonlinearity in the material behavior is accounted for at the constituent (fiber/matrix/interphase) level. This computational procedure is a part of recent upgrades to CEMCAN (Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code. The fiber substructuring technique in CEMCAN is used to monitor the damage initiation and progression as the load increases. The room-temperature tensile stress-strain curves for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix unidirectional and angle-ply laminates are simulated and compared with experimentally observed stress-strain behavior. Comparison between the predicted stress/strain behavior and experimental stress/strain curves is good. Collectively the results demonstrate that CEMCAN computer code provides the user with an effective computational tool to simulate the behavior of ceramic matrix composites.

  8. The tension mounts: Stress fibers as force-generating mechanotransducers

    PubMed Central

    Wittchen, Erika S.

    2013-01-01

    Stress fibers (SFs) are often the most prominent cytoskeletal structures in cells growing in tissue culture. Composed of actin filaments, myosin II, and many other proteins, SFs are force-generating and tension-bearing structures that respond to the surrounding physical environment. New work is shedding light on the mechanosensitive properties of SFs, including that these structures can respond to mechanical tension by rapid reinforcement and that there are mechanisms to repair strain-induced damage. Although SFs are superficially similar in organization to the sarcomeres of striated muscle, there are intriguing differences in their organization and behavior, indicating that much still needs to be learned about these structures. PMID:23295347

  9. Importance of residual stresses in the Brillouin gain spectrum of single mode optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Mamdem, Y Sikali; Burov, E; de Montmorillon, L-A; Jaouën, Y; Moreau, G; Gabet, R; Taillade, F

    2012-01-16

    Residual stresses inside optical fibers can impact significantly on Brillouin spectrum properties. We have analyzed the importance of internal stresses on the Brillouin Gain Spectrum (BGS) for a conventional G.652 fiber and compared modeling results to measurements. Then the residual internal stresses have been investigated for a set of trench-assisted fibers: fibers are coming from a single preform with different draw tensions. Numerical modeling based on measured internal stresses profiles are compared with corresponding BGS experimental results. Clearly, Brillouin spectrum is shifted linearly versus draw tension with a coefficient of -20MHz/100g and its linewidth increases. PMID:22274523

  10. Characterization of the stress and refractive-index distributions in optical fibers and fiber-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutsel, Michael R.

    2011-07-01

    Optical fiber technology continues to advance rapidly as a result of the increasing demands on communication systems and the expanding use of fiber-based sensing. New optical fiber types and fiber-based communications components are required to permit higher data rates, an increased number of channels, and more flexible installation requirements. Fiber-based sensors are continually being developed for a broad range of sensing applications, including environmental, medical, structural, industrial, and military. As optical fibers and fiber-based devices continue to advance, the need to understand their fundamental physical properties increases. The residual-stress distribution (RSD) and the refractive-index distribution (RID) play fundamental roles in the operation and performance of optical fibers. Custom RIDs are used to tailor the transmission properties of fibers used for long-distance transmission and to enable fiber-based devices such as long-period fiber gratings (LPFGs). The introduction and modification of RSDs enable specialty fibers, such as polarization-maintaining fiber, and contribute to the operation of fiber-based devices. Furthermore, the RSD and the RID are inherently linked through the photoelastic effect. Therefore, both the RSD and the RID need to be characterized because these fundamental properties are coupled and affect the fabrication, operation, and performance of fibers and fiber-based devices. To characterize effectively the physical properties of optical fibers, the RSD and the RID must be measured without perturbing or destroying the optical fiber. Furthermore, the techniques used must not be limited in detecting small variations and asymmetries in all directions through the fiber. Finally, the RSD and the RID must be characterized concurrently without moving the fiber to enable the analysis of the relationship between the RSD and the RID. Although many techniques exist for characterizing the residual stress and the refractive index in

  11. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT ABSORPTION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC ENERGY IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The frequency-dependent absorption of electromagnetic energy in biological tissue is illustrated by use of the Debye equations, model calculations for different irradiation conditions, and measured electrical properties (conductivity and permittivity) of different tissues. Four s...

  12. Frequency-dependent FDTD methods using Z transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Dennis M.

    1992-01-01

    While the frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain, or (FD)2TD, method can correctly calculate EM propagation through media whose dielectric properties are frequency-dependent, more elaborate applications lead to greater (FD)2TD complexity. Z-transform theory is presently used to develop the mathematical bases of the (FD)2TD method, simultaneously obtaining a clearer formulation and allowing researchers to draw on the existing literature of systems analysis and signal-processing.

  13. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Thompson G; Urbatish, Todd J

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  14. Characterization of the stress and refractive-index distributions in optical fibers and fiber-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutsel, Michael R.

    2011-07-01

    Optical fiber technology continues to advance rapidly as a result of the increasing demands on communication systems and the expanding use of fiber-based sensing. New optical fiber types and fiber-based communications components are required to permit higher data rates, an increased number of channels, and more flexible installation requirements. Fiber-based sensors are continually being developed for a broad range of sensing applications, including environmental, medical, structural, industrial, and military. As optical fibers and fiber-based devices continue to advance, the need to understand their fundamental physical properties increases. The residual-stress distribution (RSD) and the refractive-index distribution (RID) play fundamental roles in the operation and performance of optical fibers. Custom RIDs are used to tailor the transmission properties of fibers used for long-distance transmission and to enable fiber-based devices such as long-period fiber gratings (LPFGs). The introduction and modification of RSDs enable specialty fibers, such as polarization-maintaining fiber, and contribute to the operation of fiber-based devices. Furthermore, the RSD and the RID are inherently linked through the photoelastic effect. Therefore, both the RSD and the RID need to be characterized because these fundamental properties are coupled and affect the fabrication, operation, and performance of fibers and fiber-based devices. To characterize effectively the physical properties of optical fibers, the RSD and the RID must be measured without perturbing or destroying the optical fiber. Furthermore, the techniques used must not be limited in detecting small variations and asymmetries in all directions through the fiber. Finally, the RSD and the RID must be characterized concurrently without moving the fiber to enable the analysis of the relationship between the RSD and the RID. Although many techniques exist for characterizing the residual stress and the refractive index in

  15. Residual stress effects on the impact resistance and strength of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Equations have been derived to predict degradation effects of microresidual stresses on impact resistance of unidirectional fiber composites. Equations also predict lamination residual stresses in multilayered angle ply composites.

  16. Thermal dependence of stress-induced birefringence in single mode optical fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, J. W., III; Thompson, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of the change in stress-induced birefringence with temperature in single mode optical fibers are reported. The fibers examined include those with low residual stress birefringence that have circular and elliptical cores. A section of each fiber was placed under constant load with weights and heated inside a furnace. Polarized light was coupled into and out of the fiber ends outside the furnace. Two mutually perpendicular polarization components were analyzed and detected at the fiber output end. Changes in the detected signal levels were monitored as a function of the temperature of the single mode fiber stressed under constant load. Discussion of results and applications to localized stress measurements at high temperatures are presented.

  17. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faqi; Song, Dan; Zeng, Deping; Lin, Zhou; He, Min; Lei, Guangrong; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Zhibiao

    2015-12-01

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  18. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; He, Min; Wang, Zhibiao E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Song, Dan; Lei, Guangrong; Lin, Zhou; Zhang, Dong E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Wu, Junru

    2015-12-15

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  19. Analysis of stress distributions in metal-matrix composites with variations in fiber spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancey, Robert Neil

    1997-09-01

    Results of micromechanical and finite element analyses are presented to quantify the effects of fiber spacing in unidirectional metal-matrix composites (MMC's). Computed tomography (CT) data of unidirectional metal-matrix composite samples provide information on fiber locations for the analysis of the fiber distribution within the composite. Image processing methods are developed to extract fiber centers from the CT data. A micromechanical model, based on the Generalized Method of Cells (GMC), is developed to include interface and crack elements and model the stress variations in a representative unit cell containing two half fibers. The minimum, average, and maximum distance between fibers, as measured from the CT data, is used as input to the model. The model results show that the stress between fibers increases as they get closer together. The CT data are also processed to produce a rectangular grid of finite elements which model the composite cross-section and where the stiffness matrix for each element is based on the local fiber volume fraction. The finite element results show that in some cases, stresses in the composite can be as high as 56% greater than the average stress and thereby set up stress concentrations which can initiate yielding and/or damage at loads well below those that would be calculated using average stress considerations only.

  20. Simplified micromechanical equations for thermal residual stress analysis of coated fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    The fabrication of metal matrix composites poses unique problems to the materials engineer. The large thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the fiber and matrix leads to high tensile residual stresses at the fiber/matrix interface which could lead to premature matrix cracking during cooldown. Fiber coating could be used to reduce thermal residual stresses. A simple closed-form analysis, based on a three-phase composite cylinder model, was developed to calculate thermal residual stresses in a fiber/interface/matrix system. Guidelines, in the form of simple equations, for the selection of appropriate material properties of the fiber coating, were also derived to minimize thermal residual stresses in the matrix during fabrication.

  1. Multi-Stress Monitoring System with Fiber-Optic Mandrels and Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors in a Sagnac Loop.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjin; Sampath, Umesh; Song, Minho

    2015-01-01

    Fiber Bragg grating sensors are placed in a fiber-optic Sagnac loop to combine the grating temperature sensors and the fiber-optic mandrel acoustic emission sensors in single optical circuit. A wavelength-scanning fiber-optic laser is used as a common light source for both sensors. A fiber-optic attenuator is placed at a specific position in the Sagnac loop in order to separate buried Bragg wavelengths from the Sagnac interferometer output. The Bragg wavelength shifts are measured with scanning band-pass filter demodulation and the mandrel output is analyzed by applying a fast Fourier transform to the interference signal. This hybrid-scheme could greatly reduce the size and the complexity of optical circuitry and signal processing unit, making it suitable for low cost multi-stress monitoring of large scale power systems. PMID:26230700

  2. Multi-Stress Monitoring System with Fiber-Optic Mandrels and Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors in a Sagnac Loop

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Sampath, Umesh; Song, Minho

    2015-01-01

    Fiber Bragg grating sensors are placed in a fiber-optic Sagnac loop to combine the grating temperature sensors and the fiber-optic mandrel acoustic emission sensors in single optical circuit. A wavelength-scanning fiber-optic laser is used as a common light source for both sensors. A fiber-optic attenuator is placed at a specific position in the Sagnac loop in order to separate buried Bragg wavelengths from the Sagnac interferometer output. The Bragg wavelength shifts are measured with scanning band-pass filter demodulation and the mandrel output is analyzed by applying a fast Fourier transform to the interference signal. This hybrid-scheme could greatly reduce the size and the complexity of optical circuitry and signal processing unit, making it suitable for low cost multi-stress monitoring of large scale power systems. PMID:26230700

  3. Frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion for interstratified dispersive elastic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2016-08-01

    The elastic impedance equation is extended to frequency dependent elastic impedance equation by taking partial derivative to frequency. With this equation as the forward solver, a practical frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion approach is presented to implement the estimation of the interstratified dispersive elastic parameters which makes full use of the frequency information of elastic impedances. Three main steps are included in this approach. Firstly, the elastic Bayesian inversion is implemented for the estimation of elastic impedances from different incident angle. Secondly, with those estimated elastic impedances, their variations are used to estimate P-wave velocity and S-wave velocity. Finally, with the prior elastic impedance and P-wave and S-wave velocity information, the frequency dependent elastic variation with incident angle inversion is presented for the estimation of the interstratified elastic parameters. With this approach, the interstratified elastic parameters rather than the interface information can be estimated, making easier the interpretation of frequency dependent seismic attributes. The model examples illustrate the feasibility and stability of the proposed method in P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion estimation. The field data example validates the possibility and efficiency in hydrocarbon indication of the estimated P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion.

  4. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in short-fiber reinforced plastics by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tokoro, Syouhei; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Egami, Noboru

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray diffraction method is used to measure the residual stress in injection-molded plates of short-fiber reinforced plastics (SFRP) made of crystalline thermoplastics, polyphenylene sulphide (PPS), reinforced by carbon fibers with 30 mass%. Based on the orientation of carbon fibers, injection molded plates can be modeled as three-layered lamella where the core layer is sandwiched by skin layers. The stress in the matrix in the skin layer was measured using Cr-Kα radiation with the sin2Ψ method. Since the X-ray penetration depth is shallow, the state of stresses measured by X-rays in FRP can be assumed to be plane stress. The X-ray measurement of stress in carbon fibers was not possible because of high texture. A new method was proposed to evaluate the macrostress in SFRP from the measurement of the matrix stress. According to micromechanics analysis of SFRP, the matrix stresses in the fiber direction, σ1m, and perpendicular to the fiber direction, σ2m, and shear stress τ12m can be expressed as the functions of the applied (macro-) stresses, σ1A, σ2A , τ12A as follows: σ1m = α11σ1A +α12σ2A, σ2m = α21σ1A + α22σ2A, τ12m = α66τ12A, where α11 ,α12, α21, α22, α66 are stress-partitioning coefficients. Using skin-layer strips cut parallel, perpendicular and 45° to the molding direction, the stress in the matrix was measured under the uniaxial applied stress and the stress-partitioning coefficients of the above equations were determined. Once these relations are established, the macrostress in SFRP can be determined from the measurements of the matrix stresses by X-rays.

  5. Stresses in a three-dimensional unidirectional composite containing broken fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.; Gross, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    An approximate solution is developed for the determination of the interlaminar normal and shear stresses in the vicinity of a crack in a three dimensional composite containing unidirectional linearly elastic fibers in an infinite linearly elastic matrix. In order to reduce the complexity of the formulation, certain assumptions are made as to the physically significant stresses to be retained. These simplifications reduce the partial differential equations of elasticity to differential-difference equations which are tractable using Fourier transform techniques. This 'material modeling' approach is in contrast with solutions developed by considering each lamina as a homogeneous, orthotropic layer. The resulting solution does not contain the classical singular stress field for the fibers and the influence of broken fibers on unbroken fibers is felt by a change in stress concentration factors. The matrix stresses however, are unbounded as the fiber spacing vanishes and an equivalent fiber-matrix geometry is proposed which gives the correct singular behavior. The numerical solution is considered in detail and several specific examples are presented. The potential for damaged or debonded zones to be generated by an embedded crack is discussed, and stress concentration factors for fibers near the crack are given. Detailed comparisons are made between the present solution, the analogous two-dimensional problem, and corresponding shear-lag models.

  6. Arc-discharge effects on residual stress and refractive index in single-mode optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Jenkins, Micah H; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2016-03-20

    Arc-discharge effects on the residual stress and refractive index in single-mode optical fibers are investigated using a previously developed three-dimensional concurrent stress-index measurement method. Using commercial optical fibers and a commercial fusion splicer, the residual stress and refractive index perturbations caused by weak electrical arc discharges in single-mode fibers were measured. Refractive index changes greater than 10-4 and longitudinal perturbation lengths of less than 500 μm were shown to be possible. The subsequent prospects for arc-induced long-period fiber gratings are analyzed, and a typical transmission resonance is predicted to have a depth of 56 dB and a bandwidth of 0.08 nm at a wavelength of 1585 nm. The results of this investigation will be useful in modeling device performance and optimization of arc-induced long-period fiber grating fabrication. PMID:27140587

  7. Augmented stress fiber arrays after cytopharmacologic disassembly of microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Godman, G.C.; Tannenbaum, J.; Brett, J.B.

    1986-03-01

    Disruption of microtubules (mt) of bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells, and normal and transformed fibroblasts, by exposure to 2.5 ..mu..M colchicine; 12 ..mu..M vinblastine; or 1 ..mu..M nocodazole, for 5 or 20 hrs results in aggregation of vimentin-intermediate filament (IF) and the development of markedly augmented stress fiber (SF) arrays. After disassembly of mt, confluent BAE, with circumferential marginal microfilament bands and few central SF, develop dense ribbon-like SF arrays, and spontaneously transformed fibroblasts (tHmf-e), which before treatment are apolar or epithelioid and have few or no SF, acquire extensive organized SF arrays. The axially oriented SF span the entire cell length and terminate in vinculin-containing adhesion plaques, polarizing these cells. The visible increase in SF associated actin is not accompanied by an increase either in actin synthesis (determined from electropherograms after pulse labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine), or content (DNAse I assay for total cell actin). The reorganization of actin into SF and the development of vinculin adhesion plaques is independent of protein synthesis and occurs in the presence of cycloheximide (10 ..mu..g/ml). These results suggest a role for mt and IF in the regulation of the organizational state of the actin-based cytoskeleton.

  8. Dynamic changes in stress fiber expression in rat uterine vein endothelial cells associated with pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sago, H; Sugimoto, K; Fujii, S; Iinuma, K; Yamashita, K; Kitagawa, M; Terashima, Y

    1993-09-01

    En face endothelial preparations of rat uterine vein were stained with rhodamine-phalloidin to investigate the dynamics of stress fiber expression during pregnancy. In prepregnant animals, somewhat plump, spindle-like endothelial cells of the uterine vein had only a few short stress fibers. With the progress of pregnancy, however, many long stress fibers appeared within the elongated endothelial cells. Within 2 hr after delivery, these stress fibers became dramatically decreased in number as the cells reverted from an elongated to a plump shape and returned to the prepregnancy level by 14 days postpartum. The uterine vein showed a significant increase in length during pregnancy and quickly shortened after delivery. Thus, expression of stress fibers in endothelial cells of the uterine vein seems to be related to the tension loaded on this vessel during its elongation in parallel with the marked growth of the uterine body during pregnancy. This study shows that stress fibers are dynamic structures that may serve to maintain endothelial cell integrity during the exertion of tensile stress on the vessel wall. PMID:8246817

  9. Optical fiber sensors and their application in monitoring stress build-up in dental resin cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Fernandez Fernandez, A.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.

    2005-09-01

    The field of optical fiber sensing is highly diverse and this diversity is perceived as a great advantage over more conventional sensors in that an optical sensor can be tailored to measure any of a myriad of physical parameters. In this paper we present a niche application for optical fiber sensors in the domain of biophotonics, namely the monitoring of stress build-up during the curing process of dental resin cements. We discuss the origin of this stress build-up and the problems it can cause when treating patients. Optical fiber sensors aim at excelling in two kind of applications: firstly to perform quality control on batch produced dental cements and measure their total material shrinkage, secondly to monitor the hardening of the cement during in-vivo measurements resulting in the dynamic measurement of the shrinkage and to control the stress in a facing based restoration. We therefore investigated two types of optical fiber sensors as alternatives to conventional measurement techniques; namely polarimetric optical fiber sensors and fiber Bragg gratings written in polarization maintaining fibers. After discussing the results obtained with both optical fiber sensors, we will conclude with a critical assessment of the suitability of the two proposed sensing configurations for multi-parameter stress monitoring.

  10. Multi-port frequency dependent network equivalents for the EMTP

    SciTech Connect

    Morched, A.S.; Ottevangers, J.H.; Marti, L. )

    1993-07-01

    A method is developed to reduce large power systems to single and multi-port frequency dependent equivalents. These equivalents consist of simple RLC modules that faithfully reproduce the frequency characteristics of the network. The method is implemented in the EMTP and has been extensively tested at Ontario Hydro. The implementation involves a pre-processor program to generate the model: the Frequency Dependent Equivalent (FDNE), and a EMTP time step loop module to calculate the transient response. The use of the FDNE results in major reductions in computer time and is especially beneficial for multi-case statistical EMTP studies. An example showing the accuracy and efficiency of the FDNE when used to reduce a large 500 kV network is presented.

  11. Functional analyses of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) immature fiber (im) mutant infer that fiber cell wall development is associated with stress responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cotton fiber maturity is an important factor for determining the commercial value of cotton. How fiber cell wall development affects fiber maturity is not well understood. A comparison of fiber cross-sections showed that an immature fiber (im) mutant had lower fiber maturity than its near isogenic wild type, Texas marker-1 (TM-1). The availability of the im mutant and TM-1 provides a unique way to determine molecular mechanisms regulating cotton fiber maturity. Results Transcriptome analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the im mutant fibers grown under normal stress conditions were similar to those in wild type cotton fibers grown under severe stress conditions. The majority of these DEGs in the im mutant were related to stress responses and cellular respiration. Stress is known to reduce the activity of a classical respiration pathway responsible for energy production and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Both energy productions and ROS levels in the im mutant fibers are expected to be reduced if the im mutant is associated with stress responses. In accord with the prediction, the transcriptome profiles of the im mutant showed the same alteration of transcriptional regulation that happened in energy deprived plants in which expressions of genes associated with cell growth processes were reduced whereas expressions of genes associated with recycling and transporting processes were elevated. We confirmed that ROS production in developing fibers from the im mutant was lower than that from the wild type. The lower production of ROS in the im mutant fibers might result from the elevated levels of alternative respiration induced by stress. Conclusion The low degree of fiber cell wall thickness of the im mutant fibers is associated with deregulation of the genes involved in stress responses and cellular respiration. The reduction of ROS levels and up-regulation of the genes involved in alternative respirations suggest that

  12. Frequency-dependent effective hydraulic conductivity of strongly heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Caspari, E; Gurevich, B; Müller, T M

    2013-10-01

    The determination of the transport properties of heterogeneous porous rocks, such as an effective hydraulic conductivity, arises in a range of geoscience problems, from groundwater flow analysis to hydrocarbon reservoir modeling. In the presence of formation-scale heterogeneities, nonstationary flows, induced by pumping tests or propagating elastic waves, entail localized pressure diffusion processes with a characteristic frequency depending on the pressure diffusivity and size of the heterogeneity. Then, on a macroscale, a homogeneous equivalent medium exists, which has a frequency-dependent effective conductivity. The frequency dependence of the conductivity can be analyzed with Biot's equations of poroelasticity. In the quasistatic frequency regime of this framework, the slow compressional wave is a proxy for pressure diffusion processes. This slow compressional wave is associated with the out-of-phase motion of the fluid and solid phase, thereby creating a relative fluid-solid displacement vector field. Decoupling of the poroelasticity equations gives a diffusion equation for the fluid-solid displacement field valid in a poroelastic medium with spatial fluctuations in hydraulic conductivity. Then, an effective conductivity is found by a Green's function approach followed by a strong-contrast perturbation theory suggested earlier in the context of random dielectrics. This theory leads to closed-form expressions for the frequency-dependent effective conductivity as a function of the one- and two-point probability functions of the conductivity fluctuations. In one dimension, these expressions are consistent with exact solutions in both low- and high-frequency limits for arbitrary conductivity contrast. In 3D, the low-frequency limit depends on the details of the microstructure. However, the derived approximation for the effective conductivity is consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. PMID:24229128

  13. Frequency Dependent Microwave Impedance Microscopy of Ferroelectric Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Scott; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    ABO3 ferroelectrics are known to exhibit domain wall conductivity which is of great fundamental and technological interest. Microwave Impedance Microscopy is a near field measurement technique which allows local, non-contact measurement of AC conductivity and permittivity. In this work, Microwave Impedance Microscopy over a wide frequency range is used to probe the electrical properties of domain walls in ABO3 ferroelectrics. An unexpected, strong frequency dependence in the microwave dissipation near domain walls is observed.

  14. Stress-and-Strain Analysis Of Hot Metal/Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    Macroscopic mechanical properties derived from micromechanics. Stress-and-strain equations developed to express microscopic and macroscopic mechanical properties of metals reinforced by unidirectional fibers, over range of temperatures. New equations reduce computational load by providing approximate, closed-form expressions for microscopic and pseudohomogeneous anisotropic properties of single ply reinforced by unidirectional fibers. Typical application is calculation of residual stress in newly manufactured article.

  15. Developing fiber specific promoter-reporter transgenic lines to study the effect of abiotic stresses on fiber development in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is one of the most important cash crops in US agricultural industry. Environmental stresses, such as drought, high temperature and combination of both, not only reduce the overall growth of cotton plants, but also greatly decrease cotton lint yield and fiber quality. The impact of environment...

  16. Species coexistence and pathogens with frequency-dependent transmission.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Antonovics, Janis

    2005-07-01

    Pathogens that infect multiple hosts are commonly transmitted by vectors, and their transmission rate is often thought to depend on the proportion of hosts or vectors infected (i.e., frequency dependence). A model of a two-host, one-pathogen system with frequency-dependent transmission is used to investigate how sharing a pathogen with an alternative host influences pathogen-mediated extinction. The results show that if there is frequency-dependent transmission, a host can be rescued from pathogen-mediated extinction by the presence of a second host with which it shares a pathogen. The study provides an important conceptual counterexample to the idea that shared pathogens necessarily result in apparent competition by showing that shared pathogens can mediate apparent mutualism. We distinguish two types of dilution effect (pathogen reduction with increasing host diversity), each resulting from different underlying pathogen transmission processes and host density effects. These results have important consequences for understanding the role of pathogens in species interactions and in maintaining host species diversity. PMID:15937794

  17. Frequency-dependent force fields for QMMM calculations.

    PubMed

    Harczuk, Ignat; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans

    2015-03-28

    We outline the construction of frequency-dependent polarizable force fields. The force fields are derived from analytic response theory for different frequencies using a generalization of the LoProp algorithm giving a decomposition of a molecular dynamical polarizability to localized atomic dynamical polarizabilities. These force fields can enter in a variety of applications - we focus on two such applications in this work: firstly, they can be incorporated in a physical, straightforward, way for current existing methods that use polarizable embeddings, and we can show, for the first time, the effect of the frequency dispersion within the classical environment of a quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QMMM) method. Our methodology is here evaluated for some test cases comprising water clusters and organic residues. Secondly, together with a modified Silberstein-Applequist procedure for interacting inducible point-dipoles, these frequency-dependent polarizable force fields can be used for a classical determination of frequency-dependent cluster polarizabilities. We evaluate this methodology by comparing with the corresponding results obtained from quantum mechanics or QMMM where the absolute mean [small alpha, Greek, macron] is determined with respect to the size of the QM and MM parts of the total system. PMID:25714984

  18. In situ stress measurement of fiber reinforced composite in low temperature state by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masayuki; Jing, Tian; Muslih, M. Refai; Doi, Taisei; Matsue, Tatsuya; Hanabusa, Takao

    2015-03-01

    The tungsten fiber reinforced titanium composite (W/Ti) was produced by the spot welding method. The internal stress alteration of the W/Ti composite was measured by the neutron diffractometer, DN1, which had been installed at beam port #6 in National Nuclear Energy Agency Indonesia. The two-dimensional detector and cryostat system were mounted on the DN1 diffractometer, and the residual stress alterations were measured by the in situ neutron stress measurement technique under the cooling cycles from 300 K to 10 K. Residual stresses in tungsten fiber were investigated at several temperatures. In the longitudinal fiber direction, the thermal residual stresses of tungsten fiber became a large compressive state and represented the maximum value is about -950 MPa. The calculated results of the simple elastic model agreed with the experimental results of the in situ thermal stress measurement qualitatively. It is assumed that the stresses in the fiber longitudinal direction are the dominant stresses in the W/Ti composite.

  19. Simplified micromechanical equations for thermal residual stress analysis of coated fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The fabrication of metal matrix composites poses unique problems to the materials engineer. The large thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) mismatch between the fiber and matrix leads to high tensile residual stresses at the fiber/matrix (F/M) interface which could lead to premature matrix cracking during cooldown. Fiber coatings could be used to reduce thermal residual stresses. A simple closed form analysis, based on a three phase composite cylinder model, was developed to calculate thermal residual stresses in a fiber/interphase/matrix system. Parametric studies showed that the tensile thermal residual stresses at the F/M interface were very sensitive to the CTE and thickness of the interphase layer. The modulus of the layer had only a moderate effect on tensile residual stresses. For a silicon carbide titanium aluminide composite, the tangential stresses were 20 to 30 pct. larger than the axial stresses, over a wide range of interphase layer properties, indicating a tendency to form radial matrix cracks during cooldown. Guidelines for the selection of appropriate material properties of the fiber coating were also derived in order to minimize thermal residual stresses in the matrix during fabrication.

  20. Frequency-dependent Lg Q within the continental United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, D.; McNamara, D.E.; Benz, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Frequency-dependent crustal attenuation (1/Q) is determined for seven distinct physiographic/tectonic regions of the continental United States using high-quality Lg waveforms recorded on broadband stations in the frequency band 0.5 to 16 Hz. Lg attenuation is determined from time-domain amplitude measurements in one-octave frequency bands centered on the frequencies 0.75, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 Hz. Modeling errors are determined using a delete-j jackknife resampling technique. The frequency-dependent quality factor is modeled in the form of Q = Q0f??. Regions were initially selected based on tectonic provinces but were eventually limited and adjusted to maximize ray path coverage in each area. Earthquake data was recorded on several different networks and constrained to events occurring within the crust (<40 km depth) and at least mb 3.5 in size. A singular value decomposition inversion technique was applied to the data to simultaneously solve for source and receiver terms along with Q for each region at specific frequencies. The lowest crustal Q was observed in northern and southern California where Q is described by the functions Q = 152(?? 37)f0.72(??0.16) and Q = 105(??26) f0.67(??0.16), respectively. The Basin and Range Province, Pacific Northwest, and Rocky Mountain states also display lower Q and a strong frequency dependence characterized by the functions Q = 200(??40)f0.68(??0.12), Q = 152(??49) f0.76(??0.18), and Q = 166(??37) f0.61(??0.14), respectively. In contrast, in the central and northeast United States Q functions are Q = 640(?? 225) f0.344(??0.22) and Q = 650(??143) f0.36(??0.14), respectively, show a high crustal Q and a weaker frequency dependence. These results improve upon previous Lg modeling by subdividing the United States into smaller, distinct tectonic regions and using significantly more data that provide improved constraints on frequency-dependent attenuation and errors. A detailed attenuation map of the continental United States can

  1. Shear stress sensing with Bragg grating-based sensors in microstructured optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Sulejmani, Sanne; Sonnenfeld, Camille; Geernaert, Thomas; Luyckx, Geert; Van Hemelrijck, Danny; Mergo, Pawel; Urbanczyk, Waclaw; Chah, Karima; Caucheteur, Christophe; Mégret, Patrice; Thienpont, Hugo; Berghmans, Francis

    2013-08-26

    We demonstrate shear stress sensing with a Bragg grating-based microstructured optical fiber sensor embedded in a single lap adhesive joint. We achieved an unprecedented shear stress sensitivity of 59.8 pm/MPa when the joint is loaded in tension. This corresponds to a shear strain sensitivity of 0.01 pm/µε. We verified these results with 2D and 3D finite element modeling. A comparative FEM study with conventional highly birefringent side-hole and bow-tie fibers shows that our dedicated fiber design yields a fourfold sensitivity improvement. PMID:24105585

  2. Correlation of fiber composite tensile strength with the ultrasonic stress wave factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A 'stress wave factor' was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), (0 deg/+ or - 45 deg/0) symmetrical, and (+ or - 45 deg) symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  3. Correlation of Fiber Composite Tensile Strength with the Ultrasonic Stress Wave Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A stress wave factor was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), 0 deg + or - 45 deg/0 deg symmetrical, and + or - 45 deg] symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  4. Nucleation and Crystallization as Induced by Bending Stress in Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reis, Signo T.; Kim, Cheol W.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    Glass Fibers of Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2) and Li2O.1.6SiO2 (LS1.6) compositions were heated near, but below, the glass transition temperature for different times while subjected to a constant bending stress of about 1.2 GPa. The nucleation density and the crystallization tendency estimated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) of a glass sample in the vicinity of the maximum of the bending stress increased relative to that of stress-free glass fibers. LS2 glass fibers were found more resistant to nucleation and crystallization than the Ls1.6 glass fibers. These results are discussed in regards to shear thinning effects on glass stability.

  5. Deformation, Stress Relaxation, and Crystallization of Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers Below the Glass Transition Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Brow, Richard K.; Kim, Cheol W.; Reis, Signo T.

    2004-01-01

    The deformation and crystallization of Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 2SiO2 and Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 1.6SiO2 glass fibers subjected to a bending stress were measured as a function of time over the temperature range -50 to -150 C below the glass transition temperature (Tg). The glass fibers can be permanently deformed at temperatures about 100 C below T (sub)g, and they crystallize significantly at temperatures close to, but below T,, about 150 C lower than the onset temperature for crystallization for these glasses in the no-stress condition. The crystallization was found to occur only on the surface of the glass fibers with no detectable difference in the extent of crystallization in tensile and compressive stress regions. The relaxation mechanism for fiber deformation can be best described by a stretched exponential (Kohlrausch-Williams-Watt (KWW) approximation), rather than a single exponential model.The activation energy for stress relaxation, Es, for the glass fibers ranges between 175 and 195 kJ/mol, which is considerably smaller than the activation energy for viscous flow, E, (about 400 kJ/mol) near T, for these glasses at normal, stress-free condition. It is suspected that a viscosity relaxation mechanism could be responsible for permanent deformation and crystallization of the glass fibers below T,

  6. Stress-induced birefringence and fabrication of in-fiber polarization devices by controlled femtosecond laser irradiations.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Cheng, Baokai; Huang, Jie; Liu, Jie; Wang, Hanzheng; Lan, Xinwei; Xiao, Hai

    2016-01-25

    Optical birefringence was created in a single-mode fiber by introducing a series of symmetric cuboid stress rods on both sides of the fiber core along the fiber axis using a femtosecond laser. The stress-induced birefringence was estimated to be 2.4 × 10(-4) at the wavelength of 1550 nm. By adding the desired numbers of stressed rods, an in-fiber quarter waveplate was fabricated with a insertion loss of 0.19 dB. The stress-induced birefringence was further explored to fabricate in-fiber polarizers based on the polarization-dependent long-period fiber grating (LPFG) structure. A polarization extinction ratio of more than 20 dB was observed at the resonant wavelength of 1523.9 nm. The in-fiber polarization devices may be useful in optical communications and fiber optic sensing applications. PMID:26832490

  7. Stress-Rupture of New Tyranno Si-C-O-Zr Fiber Reinforced Minicomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    1999-01-01

    Minicomposites consisting of two varieties of Zr containing SiC-based fibers from Ube (Tyranno) with BN interphases and CVI SiC matrices were studied. The two fiber-types were the ZMI and ZE fiber-types that contain approximately 8 and 2% oxygen, respectively. The minicomposites were precracked and tested under constant load testing at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1200 C. The data were then compared to the rupture behavior of Hi- Nicalon (TM) fiber reinforced minicomposites tested under identical conditions. It was found that the Ube fiber-types had stress rupture life equivalent to Hi- Nicalon (TM) over the entire temperature range. A potential benefit of the ZMI fiber-type is that it offers rupture properties almost as good as Hi-Nicalon (TM) at the cost of ceramic grade Nicalon (TM).

  8. Frequency dependence and partitioning of respiratory impedance in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kappos, A D; Rodarte, J R; Lai-Fook, S J

    1981-09-01

    Total pulmonary resistance (Rt) and reactance (Xt) from 1 to 30 Hz were determined by time series analysis in open-chest vagotomized dogs. Rt and Xt were partitioned by retrograde catheter into central airway resistance (Rc) and reactance (Xc) and peripheral resistance (Rp) and reactance (Xp). Rt, Rc, or Rp did not change with transpulmonary pressure (Pst) from 5 to 15 cmH2O, although Rc tended to decrease and Rp to increase. Vagal stimulation (Vs) and intravenous histamine (H) increased all resistances (R) at all lung volumes (V) and produced an inverse relationship between R and V. The increases in Rt produced by H and Vs were not significantly different at any volume, but H predominantly increased Rp and Vs predominantly increased Rc. In the control (vagotomized) dogs at Pst of 5 cmH2O, Rp/Rt was 0.41 +/- 0.03 (SE). Rp/Rt was significantly increased by H but not by Vs. Control Rt decreased slightly from 5 to 10 Hz and increased from 15 to 30 Hz. The increase of Rt at higher frequencies caused by the frequency dependence of Rc was not changed by H but was augmented by Vs. The slope of Xt and Xc vs. frequency was increased by Vs but not by H. The frequency dependence of Rt and Xt above 10 Hz appears to be caused by inertial losses proximal to the 2-mm airways. Thus central and peripheral bronchoconstriction caused by Vs and H, respectively, could be differentiated by increased frequency dependence of Rt and Xt above 15 Hz. PMID:7327963

  9. Divergences in the vacuum energy for frequency-dependent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevich, D. V.

    2009-03-15

    We propose a method for determining ultraviolet divergences in the vacuum energy for systems whose spectrum of perturbations is defined through a nonlinear spectrum problem, i.e., when the fluctuation operator itself depends on the frequency. The method is applied to the plasma shell model, which describes some properties of the interaction of electromagnetic field with fullerenes. We formulate a scalar model, which simplifies the matrix structure, but keeps the frequency dependence of the plasma shell, and calculate the ultraviolet divergences in the case when the plasma sheet is slightly curved. The divergent terms are expressed in terms of surface integrals of corresponding invariants.

  10. In-situ Frequency Dependent Dielectric Sensing of Cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, David E.

    1996-01-01

    With the expanding use of polymeric materials as composite matrices, adhesives, coatings and films, the need to develop low cost, automated fabrication processes to produce consistently high quality parts is critical. Essential to the development of reliable, automated, intelligent processing is the ability to continuously monitor the changing state of the polymeric resin in-situ in the fabrication tool. This final report discusses work done on developing dielectric sensing to monitor polymeric material cure and which provides a fundamental understanding of the underlying science for the use of frequency dependent dielectri sensors to monitor the cure process.

  11. Frequency-dependent Lg-wave attenuation in northern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2015-11-01

    Frequency-dependent attenuation (Q- 1) in the crust of northern Morocco is estimated from Lg-wave spectral amplitude measurements every quarter octave in the frequency band 0.8 to 8 Hz. This study takes advantage of the improved broadband data coverage in the region provided by the deployment of the IberArray seismic network. Earthquake data consist of 71 crustal events with magnitudes 4 ≤ mb ≤ 5.5 recorded on 110 permanent and temporary seismic stations between January 2008 and December 2013 with hypocentral distances between 100 and 900 km. 1274 high-quality Lg waveforms provide dense path coverage of northern Morocco, crossing a region with a complex structure and heterogeneous tectonic setting as a result of continuous interactions between the African and Eurasian plates. We use two different methods: the coda normalization (CN) analysis, that allows removal of the source and site effects from the Lg spectra, and the spectral amplitude decay (SAD) method, that simultaneously inverts for source, site, and path attenuation terms. The CN and SAD methods return similar results, indicating that the Lg Q models are robust to differences in the methodologies. Larger errors and no significant frequency dependence are observed for frequencies lower than 1.5 Hz. For distances up to 400 km and the frequency band 1.5 ≤ ƒ (Hz) ≤ 4.5, the model functions Q(f) = (529- 22+ 23)(f/1.5)0.23 ± 0.06 and Q(f) = (457- 7+ 7)(f/1.5)0.44 ± 0.02 are obtained using the CN and SAD methods, respectively. A change in the frequency dependence is observed above 4.5 Hz for both methods which may be related to the influence of the Sn energy on the Lg window. The frequency-dependent Q- 1 estimates represent an average attenuation beneath a broad region including the Rif and Tell mountains, the Moroccan and Algerian mesetas, the Atlas Mountains and the Sahara Platform structural domains, and correlate well with areas of moderate seismicity where intermediate Q values have been obtained.

  12. Bond stress-slip mechanisms in high-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero Z., Aydee Patricia

    This research covers integrated experimental and analytical investigations of the mechanisms that influence the fiber pull-out versus slip response of typical fibers used in the production of fiber reinforced cementitious composites, in order to improve their mechanical performance. The fibers investigated include smooth steel fibers, hooked steel fibers, Torex twisted steel fibers and PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) fibers. Torex is a newly developed steel fiber, of general polygonal shape, that is twisted along its longitudinal axis to improve the mechanical component of bond. PVA fibers, currently used as replacement for asbestos fibers, have good mechanical properties and are believed to develop an adhesive or chemical bond component with cement matrices. Matrix parameters investigated comprised four different additives (fly ash, metakaolin, PVA polymer and latex) and the fineness of the sand. The experimental program included two types of tests, a single fiber pull-out test and a tensile test on notched prisms, considered an indirect test to measure bond. The first test was used when the fiber diameter exceeded 200 microns. The second test was primarily carried out for PVA fibers with a diameter in the range of 11 to 50 microns. Closed-loop control was used in the notched prism tests where the rate of crack opening at the notch controlled the machine displacement. Also in these tests, three different volume fractions of fibers were investigated for each parameter in order to back-calculate the bond strength. The analytical program includes three parts: (1) a study to model the contribution of the hook to the mechanical component of bond in hooked steel fibers, (2) a study to back-calculate adhesive-frictional bond of fine PVA fibers from the stress versus crack opening response of notched tensile prisms, and (3) a study to model the effect of twisting on the mechanical contribution of bond in Torex steel fibers. This last model utilizes a finite element code (based on

  13. Bend stress relaxation and tensile primary creep of a polycrystalline alpha-SiC fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hee Man, Yun; Goldsby, Jon C.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the thermomechanical behavior (creep and stress relaxation) of ceramic fibers is of both practical and basic interest. On the practical level, ceramic fibers are the reinforcement for ceramic matrix composites which are being developed for use in high temperature applications. It is important to understand and model the total creep of fibers at low strain levels where creep is predominantly in the primary stage. In addition, there are many applications where the component will only be subjected to thermal strains. Therefore, the stress relaxation of composite consituents in such circumstances will be an important factor in composite design and performance. The objective of this paper is to compare and analyze bend stress relaxation and tensile creep data for alpha-SiC fibers produced by the Carborundum Co. (Niagara Falls, NY). This fiber is of current technical interest and is similar in composition to bulk alpha-SiC which has been studied under compressive creep conditions. The temperature, time, and stress dependences will be discussed for the stress relaxation and creep results. In addition, some creep and relaxation recovery experiments were performed in order to understand the complete viscoelastic behavior, i.e. both recoverable and nonrecoverable creep components of these materials. The data will be presented in order to model the deformation behavior and compare relaxation and/or creep behavior for relatively low deformation strain conditions of practical concern. Where applicable, the tensile creep results will be compared to bend stress relaxation data.

  14. High extensibility of stress fibers revealed by in vitro micromanipulation with fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Tsubasa S.; Sato, Masaaki; Deguchi, Shinji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •We isolate contractile stress fibers from vascular smooth muscle cells. •We measure the extensibility of individual stress fibers. •We present the first direct evidence that individual stress fibers are highly extensible. •We quantitatively determine the local strain along the length of stress fibers. •The high extensibility we found is beyond that explained by a conventional model. -- Abstract: Stress fibers (SFs), subcellular bundles of actin and myosin filaments, are physically connected at their ends to cell adhesions. The intracellular force transmitted via SFs plays an essential role in cell adhesion regulation and downstream signaling. However, biophysical properties intrinsic to individual SFs remain poorly understood partly because SFs are surrounded by other cytoplasmic components that restrict the deformation of the embedded materials. To characterize their inherent properties independent of other structural components, we isolated SFs from vascular smooth muscle cells and mechanically stretched them by in vitro manipulation while visualizing strain with fluorescent quantum dots attached along their length. SFs were elongated along their entire length, with the length being approximately 4-fold of the stress-free length. This surprisingly high extensibility was beyond that explained by the tandem connection of actin filaments and myosin II bipolar filaments present in SFs, thus suggesting the involvement of other structural components in their passive biophysical properties.

  15. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Space simulated thermally induced deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites were investigated with a micromechanics analysis. The investigation focused on two primary areas. First, available explicit expressions for predicting the effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) for a composite were compared with each other, and with a finite element (FE) analysis, developed specifically for this study. Analytical comparisons were made for a wide range of fiber/matrix systems, and predicted values were compared with experimental data. The second area of investigation focused on the determination of thermally induced stress fields in the individual constituents. Stresses predicted from the FE analysis were compared to those predicted from a closed-form solution to the composite cylinder (CC) model, for two carbon fiber/epoxy composites. A global-local formulation, combining laminated plate theory and FE analysis, was used to determine the stresses in multidirectional laminates. Thermally induced damage initiation predictions were also made.

  16. Research on the fiber Bragg grating sensor for the shock stress measurement

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiangyang; Chen, Guanghua; Peng, Qixian; Li, Zeren; Meng, Jianhua; Liu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor with an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer for the shock stress measurement is proposed and demonstrated. An analysis relationship between the shock stress and the central reflection wavelength shift of the FBG is firstly derived. In this sensor, the optical path difference of the unbalanced Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer is ∼3.1 mm and the length of the FBG is 2 mm. An arctangent function reduction method, which can avoid sine function's insensitive zone where the shock stress measurement has a reduced accuracy, is presented. A shock stress measurement of water driven by one stage gun (up to 1.4 GPa), with good theoretical accuracy (∼10%), is launched. PMID:22047282

  17. Fiber optic stress-independent helical torsion sensor.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luís A; Grenier, Jason R; Aitchison, J Stewart; Herman, Peter R

    2015-02-15

    Femtosecond laser-fabricated waveguides have been formed into helical paths throughout the cladding of single-mode optical fibers to demonstrate a strain-independent fiber torsion sensor. A comparison between a Bragg grating sensor and a Mach-Zehnder based on helical waveguides (HWs) showed a much weaker twist sensitivity of 1.5 pm/(rad/m) for the grating in contrast with a value of 261 pm/(rad/m) for the interferometer. The HW geometry provided an unambiguous determination of the rotational direction of the twist while facilitating a convenient and efficient means for optical coupling into the single-mode core of the fiber. The flexible three-dimensional writing by the femtosecond laser fabrication method enabled the direct inscription of compact and robust optical cladding devices without the need for combining or splicing multiple-fiber segments. PMID:25680174

  18. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C; Bex, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  19. Frequency-dependent conductivity in bismuth-vanadate glassy semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aswini

    1990-01-01

    The first measurements are reported for the frequency-dependent (ac) conductivity (real as well as imaginary parts) for various compositions of the bismuth-vanadate glassy semiconductors in the frequency range 102-105 Hz and in the temperature range 77-420 K. The behavior of the ac conductivity is broadly similar to what has been observed previously in many other types of amorphous semiconductors, namely, nearly linear frequency dependence and weak temperature dependence. The experimental results are analyzed with reference to various theoretical models based on quantum-mechanical tunneling and classical hopping over barriers. The analysis shows that the temperature dependence of the ac conductivity is consistent with the simple quantum-mechanical tunneling model at low temperatures; however, this model completely fails to predict the observed temperature dependence of the frequency exponent. The overlapping-large-polaron tunneling model can explain the temperature dependence of the frequency exponent at low temperatures. Fitting of this model to the low-temperature data yields a reasonable value of the wave-function decay constant. However, this model predicts the temperature dependence of the ac conductivity much higher than what actual data showed. The correlated barrier hopping model is consistent with the temperature dependence of both the ac conductivity and its frequency exponent. This model provides reasonable values of the maximum barrier heights but higher values of characteristic relaxation times.

  20. Reversible frequency-dependent switches in male mate choice.

    PubMed

    van Gossum, H; Stoks, R; De Bruyn, L

    2001-01-01

    Current sexual-selection theories predict that mating should occur preferentially with the highest-quality partner, and assume that for distinguishing among potential mates the choosy sex applies an internal representation of the characteristics of the desired mate, i.e. a template. Binary choice experiments were performed to test male mate choice between two different female colour morphs in the damselfly Ischnura elegans. Choice experiments were conducted before and after an habituation period, during which males were exposed to only one female colour morph. Given the choice between the two female morphs, males did exhibit a choice for the most recently experienced female morph. This is the first evidence for a reversible switch in mate choice in a frequency-dependent way. In contrast with previous studies on mate choice, template formation in male I. elegans seems not to be based on quality. Switching mate choice in a frequency-dependent manner, choosing the most common morph, probably allows males to minimize their search efforts and to maximize fitness. PMID:12123302

  1. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  2. Spatial frequency dependence of target signature for infrared performance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Bosq, Todd; Olson, Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    The standard model used to describe the performance of infrared imagers is the U.S. Army imaging system target acquisition model, based on the targeting task performance metric. The model is characterized by the resolution and sensitivity of the sensor as well as the contrast and task difficulty of the target set. The contrast of the target is defined as a spatial average contrast. The model treats the contrast of the target set as spatially white, or constant, over the bandlimit of the sensor. Previous experiments have shown that this assumption is valid under normal conditions and typical target sets. However, outside of these conditions, the treatment of target signature can become the limiting factor affecting model performance accuracy. This paper examines target signature more carefully. The spatial frequency dependence of the standard U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision 12 and 8 tracked vehicle target sets is described. The results of human perception experiments are modeled and evaluated using both frequency dependent and independent target signature definitions. Finally the function of task difficulty and its relationship to a target set is discussed.

  3. Dissecting Regional Variations in Stress Fiber Mechanics in Living Cells with Laser Nanosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Kandice; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J; Kumar, Sanjay

    2010-03-02

    The ability of a cell to distribute contractile stresses across the extracellular matrix in a spatially heterogeneous fashion underlies many cellular behaviors, including motility and tissue assembly. Here we investigate the biophysical basis of this phenomenon by using femtosecond laser nanosurgery to measure the viscoelastic recoil and cell-shape contributions of contractile stress fibers (SFs) located in specific compartments of living cells. Upon photodisruption and recoil, myosin light chain kinase-dependent SFs located along the cell periphery display much lower effective elasticities and higher plateau retraction distances than Rho-associated kinase-dependent SFs located in the cell center, with severing of peripheral fibers uniquely triggering a dramatic contraction of the entire cell within minutes of fiber irradiation. Image correlation spectroscopy reveals that when one population of SFs is pharmacologically dissipated, actin density flows toward the other population. Furthermore, dissipation of peripheral fibers reduces the elasticity and increases the plateau retraction distance of central fibers, and severing central fibers under these conditions triggers cellular contraction. Together, these findings show that SFs regulated by different myosin activators exhibit different mechanical properties and cell shape contributions. They also suggest that some fibers can absorb components and assume mechanical roles of other fibers to stabilize cell shape.

  4. Reduction of thermal stresses in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites with interface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of using interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion of fiber and matrix has been investigated. It was found that compliant layers, with properties of readily available materials, do not have the potential to reduce thermal stresses significantly. However, interface layers with high coefficient of thermal expansion can compensate for the mismatch and reduce thermal stresses in the matrix significantly.

  5. Reduction of thermal stresses in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites with interface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    The potential of using an interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion of fiber and matrix was investigated. It was found that compliant layers, with properties of readily available materials, do not have the potential to reduce thermal stresses significantly. However, interface layers with high coefficient of thermal expansion can compensate for the mismatch and reduce thermal stresses in the matrix significantly.

  6. Neural tuning matches frequency-dependent time differences between the ears.

    PubMed

    Benichoux, Victor; Fontaine, Bertrand; Franken, Tom P; Karino, Shotaro; Joris, Philip X; Brette, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The time it takes a sound to travel from source to ear differs between the ears and creates an interaural delay. It varies systematically with spatial direction and is generally modeled as a pure time delay, independent of frequency. In acoustical recordings, we found that interaural delay varies with frequency at a fine scale. In physiological recordings of midbrain neurons sensitive to interaural delay, we found that preferred delay also varies with sound frequency. Similar observations reported earlier were not incorporated in a functional framework. We find that the frequency dependence of acoustical and physiological interaural delays are matched in key respects. This suggests that binaural neurons are tuned to acoustical features of ecological environments, rather than to fixed interaural delays. Using recordings from the nerve and brainstem we show that this tuning may emerge from neurons detecting coincidences between input fibers that are mistuned in frequency. PMID:25915620

  7. Relationship between cell stiffness and stress fiber amount, assessed by simultaneous atomic force microscopy and live-cell fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S

    2016-06-01

    Actomyosin stress fibers, one of the main components of the cell's cytoskeleton, provide mechanical stability to adherent cells by applying and transmitting tensile forces onto the extracellular matrix (ECM) at the sites of cell-ECM adhesion. While it is widely accepted that changes in spatial and temporal distribution of stress fibers affect the cell's mechanical properties, there is no quantitative knowledge on how stress fiber amount and organization directly modulate cell stiffness. We address this key open question by combining atomic force microscopy with simultaneous fluorescence imaging of living cells, and combine for the first time reliable quantitative parameters obtained from both techniques. We show that the amount of myosin and (to a lesser extent) actin assembled in stress fibers directly modulates cell stiffness in adherent mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3). In addition, the spatial distribution of stress fibers has a second-order modulatory effect. In particular, the presence of either fibers located in the cell periphery, aligned fibers or thicker fibers gives rise to reinforced cell stiffness. Our results provide basic and significant information that will help design optimal protocols to regulate the mechanical properties of adherent cells via pharmacological interventions that alter stress fiber assembly or via micropatterning techniques that restrict stress fiber spatial organization. PMID:26206449

  8. A frequency dependent preconditioned wavelet method for atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudytskiy, Mykhaylo; Helin, Tapio; Ramlau, Ronny

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric tomography, i.e. the reconstruction of the turbulence in the atmosphere, is a main task for the adaptive optics systems of the next generation telescopes. For extremely large telescopes, such as the European Extremely Large Telescope, this problem becomes overly complex and an efficient algorithm is needed to reduce numerical costs. Recently, a conjugate gradient method based on wavelet parametrization of turbulence layers was introduced [5]. An iterative algorithm can only be numerically efficient when the number of iterations required for a sufficient reconstruction is low. A way to achieve this is to design an efficient preconditioner. In this paper we propose a new frequency-dependent preconditioner for the wavelet method. In the context of a multi conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system simulated on the official end-to-end simulation tool OCTOPUS of the European Southern Observatory we demonstrate robustness and speed of the preconditioned algorithm. We show that three iterations are sufficient for a good reconstruction.

  9. Frequency-dependent viability in mutant strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Curtsinger, J W; Sheen, F M

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the effects of genotypic frequencies on egg-to-adult viabilities in pairwise combinations of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The experiments involved mixture of a total of 42,000 eggs in varying proportions under controlled densities and observation of surviving adults. Viabilities were found to depend on frequencies in several genotypic combinations. In the most extreme case, the absolute viability of cn;bw females increased monotonically from 54% when common to 70% when rare. The results illustrate several statistical and methodological problems that might explain why some experiments have failed to detect frequency-dependent viabilities. These problems include heterogeneity between replications, sex differences in susceptibility to competition, and strong dependence of the experimental outcome on the choice of competitor genotypes. PMID:1901577

  10. Frequency-dependent complex modulus of the uterus: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Miklos Z.; Hobson, Maritza A.; Varghese, Tomy; Harter, Josephine; Kliewer, Mark A.; Hartenbach, Ellen M.; Zagzebski, James A.

    2006-08-01

    The frequency-dependent complex moduli of human uterine tissue have been characterized. Quantification of the modulus is required for developing uterine ultrasound elastography as a viable imaging modality for diagnosing and monitoring causes for abnormal uterine bleeding and enlargement, as well assessing the integrity of uterine and cervical tissue. The complex modulus was measured in samples from hysterectomies of 24 patients ranging in age from 31 to 79 years. Measurements were done under small compressions of either 1 or 2%, at low pre-compression values (either 1 or 2%), and over a frequency range of 0.1-100 Hz. Modulus values of cervical tissue monotonically increased from approximately 30-90 kPa over the frequency range. Normal uterine tissue possessed modulus values over the same range, while leiomyomas, or uterine fibroids, exhibited values ranging from approximately 60-220 kPa.

  11. Fixation probabilities of random mutants under frequency dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weini; Traulsen, Arne

    2010-03-21

    Evolutionary game dynamics describes frequency dependent selection in asexual, haploid populations. It typically considers predefined strategies and fixed payoff matrices. Mutations occur between these known types only. Here, we consider a situation in which a mutation has produced an entirely new type which is characterized by a random payoff matrix that does not change during the fixation or extinction of the mutant. Based on the probability distribution underlying the payoff values, we address the fixation probability of the new mutant. It turns out that for weak selection, only the first moments of the distribution matter. For strong selection, the probability that a new payoff entry is larger than the wild type's payoff against itself is the crucial quantity. PMID:19995564

  12. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartin, Miguel; Notari, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10-3, due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  13. Drive frequency dependent phase imaging in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bo Huifeng; Kan Yi; Lu Xiaomei; Liu Yunfei; Peng Song; Wang Xiaofei; Cai Wei; Xue Ruoshi; Zhu Jinsong

    2010-08-15

    The drive frequency dependent piezoresponse (PR) phase signal in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals is studied by piezoresponse force microscopy. It is clearly shown that the local and nonlocal electrostatic forces have a great contribution to the PR phase signal. The significant PR phase difference of the antiparallel domains are observed at the contact resonances, which is related to the electrostatic dominated electromechanical interactions of the cantilever and tip-sample system. Moreover, the modulation voltage induced frequency shift at higher eigenmodes could be attributed to the change of indention force depending on the modulation amplitude with a piezoelectric origin. The PR phase of the silicon wafer is also measured for comparison. It is certificated that the electrostatic interactions are universal in voltage modulated scanning probe microscopy and could be extended to other phase imaging techniques.

  14. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. L.; Wang, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = Aν{sup μ} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, η = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have η < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ≤η ≤ 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have η > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  15. Thermal Stress-Induced Depolarization Loss in Conventional and Panda-Shaped Photonic Crystal Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Laleh; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    We report on the modeling of the depolarization loss in the conventional and panda-shaped photonic crystal fiber lasers (PCFLs) due to the self-heating of the fiber, which we call it thermal stress-induced depolarization loss (TSIDL). We first calculated the temperature distribution over the fiber cross sections and then calculated the thermal stresses/strains as a function of heat load per meter. Thermal stress-induced birefringence (TSIB), which is defined as |n x - n y |, in the core and cladding regions was calculated. Finally, TSIDL was calculated for the conventional and panda-shaped PCFLs as a function of fiber length and, respectively, saturated values of 22 and 25 % were obtained which were independent of heat load per meter. For panda-shaped PCFLs, prior to being saturated, an oscillating and damping behavior against the fiber length was seen where in some lengths reached 35 %. The results are close to an experimental value of 30 % reported for a pulsed PCFL (Limpert et al., Opt Express 12:1313-1319, 2004) where the authors reported a degree of polarization of 70 % (i.e., a depolarization of 30 %). The most important result of this work is a saturation behavior of TSIDL at long-enough lengths of the fiber laser which is independent of heat load per meter. To our knowledge, this the first report of TSIBL for PCFLs.

  16. Analysis of shear stress distribution in pushout process of fiber-reinforced ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Kouichi; Kagawa, Yutaka

    1995-04-01

    The interfacial shear stress distribution of a thin specimen of SiC fiber-reinforced glass matrix composite (fiber volume fraction of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.7) during a fiber pushout process was subjected to finite element analysis using a three concentric axisymmetrical model which consisted of fiber, matrix, and composite. A stress criterion was used to determine interface debonding. Effects of thermally-induced stress and a post debond sliding process at the interface were also included in the analysis. The analytical result showed that shear stress near the specimen surface was introduced during the specimen preparation process. Before the interfacial debonding, the distribution of shear stress during the pushout test was affected by the existence of thermally-induced stress in the specimen. The interfacial shear debonding initiated {approximately}30 {mu}m below the pushing surface and the sliding at the debonded interface proceeded in the direction of both the pushing surface and back surface from the peak shear position; the debonding from the back surface initiated just before the complete debonding of the interface. The pushout load-displacement curve near the origin was straight, however, after the existence of interface sliding at the debonded interface, the curve exhibited non-linearity with the increase in applied load up to the complete debonding at the interface. This debonding process was essentially independent of the fiber volume fraction. The results indicate that the total of thermally-induced stress in the specimen and shear stress distribution generated by applied load are important for the initiation of debonding and the frictional sliding process of the thin specimen pushout test.

  17. Effect of Simultaneous Water Deficit Stress and Meloidogyne incognita Infection on Cotton Yield and Fiber Quality

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R. F.; Earl, H. J.; Timper, P.

    2014-01-01

    Both water deficit stress and Meloidogyne incognita infection can reduce cotton growth and yield, and drought can affect fiber quality, but the effect of nematodes on fiber quality is not well documented. To determine whether nematode parasitism affects fiber quality and whether the combined effects of nematode and drought stress on yield and quality are additive (independent effects), synergistic, or antagonistic, we conducted a study for 7 yr in a field infested with M. incognita. A split-plot design was used with the main plot factor as one of three irrigation treatments (low [nonirrigated], moderate irrigation, and high irrigation [water-replete]) and the subplot factor as 0 or 56 l/ha 1,3-dichloropropene. We prevented water deficit stress in plots designated as water-replete by supplementing rainfall with irrigation. Plots receiving moderate irrigation received half the water applied to the water-replete treatment. The severity of root galling was greater in nonfumigated plots and in plots receiving the least irrigation, but the amount of irrigation did not influence the effect of fumigation on root galling (no irrigation × fumigation interaction). The weights of lint and seed harvested were reduced in nonfumigated plots and also decreased as the level of irrigation decreased, but fumigation did not influence the effect of irrigation. Nematodes affected fiber quality by increasing micronaire readings but typically had little or no effect on percent lint, fiber length (measured by HVI), uniformity, strength, elongation, length (based on weight or number measured by AFIS), upper quartile length, or short fiber content (based on weight or number). Micronaire also was increased by water deficit stress, but the effects from nematodes and water stress were independent. We conclude that the detrimental effects caused to cotton yield and quality by nematode parasitism and water deficit stress are independent and therefore additive. PMID:24987162

  18. Effect of Simultaneous Water Deficit Stress and Meloidogyne incognita Infection on Cotton Yield and Fiber Quality.

    PubMed

    Davis, R F; Earl, H J; Timper, P

    2014-06-01

    Both water deficit stress and Meloidogyne incognita infection can reduce cotton growth and yield, and drought can affect fiber quality, but the effect of nematodes on fiber quality is not well documented. To determine whether nematode parasitism affects fiber quality and whether the combined effects of nematode and drought stress on yield and quality are additive (independent effects), synergistic, or antagonistic, we conducted a study for 7 yr in a field infested with M. incognita. A split-plot design was used with the main plot factor as one of three irrigation treatments (low [nonirrigated], moderate irrigation, and high irrigation [water-replete]) and the subplot factor as 0 or 56 l/ha 1,3-dichloropropene. We prevented water deficit stress in plots designated as water-replete by supplementing rainfall with irrigation. Plots receiving moderate irrigation received half the water applied to the water-replete treatment. The severity of root galling was greater in nonfumigated plots and in plots receiving the least irrigation, but the amount of irrigation did not influence the effect of fumigation on root galling (no irrigation × fumigation interaction). The weights of lint and seed harvested were reduced in nonfumigated plots and also decreased as the level of irrigation decreased, but fumigation did not influence the effect of irrigation. Nematodes affected fiber quality by increasing micronaire readings but typically had little or no effect on percent lint, fiber length (measured by HVI), uniformity, strength, elongation, length (based on weight or number measured by AFIS), upper quartile length, or short fiber content (based on weight or number). Micronaire also was increased by water deficit stress, but the effects from nematodes and water stress were independent. We conclude that the detrimental effects caused to cotton yield and quality by nematode parasitism and water deficit stress are independent and therefore additive. PMID:24987162

  19. Tensile Creep and Stress-rupture Behavior of Polymer Derived Sic Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on polymer derived Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon, and SiC/BN-coated Nicalon SiC fibers. Test conditions were temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C, stresses from 100 to 1600 MPa, stress application times up to 200 hours, and air, argon, and vacuum test environments. For all fibers, creep occurred predominantly in the primary stage. Hi-Nicalon had much higher 0.2 and 1 percent creep strengths than as-produced as well as-coated Nicalon fibers. The stress-rupture strength of Hi-Nicalon up to 100 hours was also higher than that of the coated and as-produced Nicalon fibers. SiC/BN coating on Nicalon increased only the short-term low-temperature rupture strength. Limited testing in argon and vacuum suggests that for all fiber types, creep and rupture resistances are reduced in comparison to the results in air. Possible mechanisms for the observed behavior are discussed.

  20. Fiber-matrix interface effects in the presence of thermally induced residual stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmer, R.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The mechanics of transversely loaded high-temperature composites with a thermally induced residual stress field and a vanishingly weak fiber-matrix interface strength was investigated using two analytical models. In particular, the effects of several physical properties defining the performance of the constituent fiber, matrix, and interface are examined relative to their effect on composite's behavior. Both models demonstrate that, if there is a thermally induced residual stress field in the composite, the initial transverse modulus for the composite will be the same regardless of whether there is a well-bonded or an unbonded interface. 10 refs.

  1. Closed-form analysis of fiber-matrix interface stresses under thermo-mechanical loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Crews, John H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Closed form techniques for calculating fiber matrix (FM) interface stresses, using repeating square and diamond regular arrays, were presented for a unidirectional composite under thermo-mechanical loadings. An Airy's stress function micromechanics approach from the literature, developed for calculating overall composite moduli, was extended in the present study to compute FM interface stresses for a unidirectional graphite/epoxy (AS4/3501-6) composite under thermal, longitudinal, transverse, transverse shear, and longitudinal shear loadings. Comparison with finite element results indicate excellent agreement of the FM interface stresses for the square array. Under thermal and longitudinal loading, the square array has the same FM peak stresses as the diamond array. The square array predicted higher stress concentrations under transverse normal and longitudinal shear loadings than the diamond array. Under transverse shear loading, the square array had a higher stress concentration while the diamond array had a higher radial stress concentration. Stress concentration factors under transverse shear and longitudinal shear loadings were very sensitive to fiber volume fraction. The present analysis provides a simple way to calculate accurate FM interface stresses for both the square and diamond array configurations.

  2. Evaluation of the Fiber Stress Distribution in Aramid/Epoxy Model Composite Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and FEM Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuto; Minoshima, Kohji; Yamada, Hideo

    A single-fiber pull-out model composite for an aramid/epoxy system was specially designed to measure the stress distribution of the aramid fiber embedded in the matrix using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The stress transfer length of the fiber obtained was about 400-500 μm, which was equal to the result of FEM analysis. Just after the initiation and propagation of the fiber/matrix interfacial debonding, the fiber was broken, and the fiber in the matrix had the axial tensile residual stress. The tensile residual axial stress showed the maximum at around the tip of the interfacial debonding. The stress was reduced after the specimen was kept in air at 80°C for 44h, and it became almost equal to zero after being immersed in deionized water at 80°C for 44h. This behavior agreed with the result of FEM analysis, in which the friction coefficient was introduced in the fiber/matrix interface. The axial residual stress was caused by the friction between the fiber and matrix, due to the compressive stress acting between the resin and the fiber, which was caused by the difference of the coefficient of thermal expansion.

  3. Yeh-Stratton Criterion for Stress Concentrations on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hsien-Yang; Richards, W. Lance

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the Yeh-Stratton Failure Criterion with the stress concentrations on fiber-reinforced composites materials under tensile stresses. The Yeh-Stratton Failure Criterion was developed from the initial yielding of materials based on macromechanics. To investigate this criterion, the influence of the materials anisotropic properties and far field loading on the composite materials with central hole and normal crack were studied. Special emphasis was placed on defining the crack tip stress fields and their applications. The study of Yeh-Stratton criterion for damage zone stress fields on fiber-reinforced composites under tensile loading was compared with several fracture criteria; Tsai-Wu Theory, Hoffman Theory, Fischer Theory, and Cowin Theory. Theoretical predictions from these criteria are examined using experimental results.

  4. Microsurgery-aided in-situ force probing reveals extensibility and viscoelastic properties of individual stress fibers

    PubMed Central

    Labouesse, Céline; Gabella, Chiara; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Vianay, Benoît; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Actin-myosin filament bundles (stress fibers) are critical for tension generation and cell shape, but their mechanical properties are difficult to access. Here we propose a novel approach to probe individual peripheral stress fibers in living cells through a microsurgically generated opening in the cytoplasm. By applying large deformations with a soft cantilever we were able to fully characterize the mechanical response of the fibers and evaluate their tension, extensibility, elastic and viscous properties. PMID:27025817

  5. Matrix cracking initiation stress in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kangutkar, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    One of the important design parameters in CMC's is the matrix cracking initiation stress (MCIS) which corresponds to the stress at which first matrix cracks are observed. Above the MCIS, the fibers will be exposed to the oxidizing environment which may degrade the mechanical property of the fibers and thus of the composite. In this thesis, a systematic study to explore the effects of matrix toughness and inherent strength, fiber diameter, stiffness and volume fraction, temperature and interfacial bonding on the MCIS was carried out. Composites were fabricated using three different matrices - borosilicate glass, aluminosilicate glass and polycrystalline zirconium silicate (or zircon), and two different reinforcing fibers - an SiC monofilament (140 {mu}m diameter) and an SiC yarn (16 {mu}m diameter). In-situ observations during 3-point bend test inside the SEM indicate that matrix cracking is a local phenomenon and occurs first in the matrix between widest spaced fibers. In all composites the MCIS was found to increase with fiber additions and scaled with the monolithic strength.

  6. The relationship between stress and temperature distribution during tension test of GFRP by fiber orientation variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Seung-Chul

    2013-12-01

    This study was investigated what affect strength and temperature distribution by fiber orientation variation under tension test of GFRP. Temperature distribution was proposed through IR thermography camera. Lock-in method, which is one of technique in IR thermography camera to measure minute change in temperature, was utilized to monitor temperature distribution and change during crack propagation. At the maximum stress point, temperature was significantly increased. As shown previously, specimen with shorter fracture time showed abrupt increment of temperature at the maximum stress point. Specimen with longer fracture time displayed increment of temperature after the maximum stress point. In this study, tension strength of 0° direction of GFRP increased being proportional the fiber content and fiber orientation function as change from isotropy (J=0) to anisotropy (J=1). But, tensile strength of 90° direction by separation of fiber filament decreased when tensile load is imposed for width direction of reinforcement fiber length direction. And, method to analyze of temperature distribution via IR thermography camera was suggested. The correlation of the tension strength and the temperature distribution was investigated.

  7. Frequency-dependent loudness balancing in bimodal cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Veugen, Lidwien C E; Chalupper, Josef; Snik, Ad F M; van Opstal, A John; Mens, Lucas H M

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion In users of a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in contralateral ears, frequency-dependent loudness balancing between devices did, on average, not lead to improved speech understanding as compared to broadband balancing. However, nine out of 15 bimodal subjects showed significantly better speech understanding with either one of the fittings. Objectives Sub-optimal fittings and mismatches in loudness are possible explanations for the large individual differences seen in listeners using bimodal stimulation. Methods HA gain was adjusted for soft and loud input sounds in three frequency bands (0-548, 548-1000, and >1000 Hz) to match loudness with the CI. This procedure was compared to a simple broadband balancing procedure that reflected current clinical practice. In a three-visit cross-over design with 4 weeks between sessions, speech understanding was tested in quiet and in noise and questionnaires were administered to assess benefit in real world. Results Both procedures resulted in comparable HA gains. For speech in noise, a marginal bimodal benefit of 0.3 ± 4 dB was found, with large differences between subjects and spatial configurations. Speech understanding in quiet and in noise did not differ between the two loudness balancing procedures. PMID:26986743

  8. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  9. Frequency-dependent alterations in regional homogeneity in major depression.

    PubMed

    Xue, Song; Wang, Xu; Wang, Wanqian; Liu, Jia; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have found abnormal spontaneous neural activity in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Yet, the frequency-dependent neural activity in MDD is largely unknown. Here, we used resting-state fMRI and regional homogeneity (ReHo) methods to investigate spontaneous neural activity in specific frequency bands of 31 MDD patients and 31 age-, gender- and education-matched healthy controls. We examined spontaneous neural activity in three frequency bands: slow-4 (0.027-0.073Hz), slow-5 (0.010-0.027Hz), and the typical band (0.01-0.08Hz). Compared to controls, MDD patients showed increased ReHo in the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) and decreased ReHo in the fusiform and postcentral gyrus at the typical band. Importantly, MDD patients showed increased ReHo in the middle occipital gyrus (MOG) and decreased ReHo in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and the bilateral thalamus in the slow-4 band, while they showed increased ReHo in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in the slow-5 band. Our results suggest that the abnormality of ReHo in MDD is associated with the frequency band and that future studies should take frequency band effect into account when examining spontaneous neural activity. PMID:26968135

  10. Frequency-Dependent Gating of Hippocampal-Neocortical Interactions.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Andrea; Morris, Richard G M; Canals, Santiago

    2016-05-01

    How and where hippocampal-neocortical interactions required for memory formation take place is a major issue of current research. Using a combined in vivo functional magnetic resonance imaging/electrophysiology approach, we have investigated whether specific frequencies of CA3 neuronal activation, inducing different forms of short-term plasticity at CA1 synapses, contribute to differential activity propagation in brain-wide networks connected to the hippocampus. We report that localized activation of CA3 neurons in dorsal hippocampus produced activity propagation within the hippocampal formation, including the subiculum and entorhinal cortex, which increased monotonically with frequency to a maximum at 20-40 Hz. However, robust extrahippocampal propagation was seen specifically at theta-beta frequencies (10-20 Hz), reaching a network of midline neocortical and mesolimbic structures. Activation in those regions correlated with a frequency-dependent facilitation of spiking activity recorded in CA1. These results provide a mechanistic link between the dynamic properties of short-term plasticity in the efferent synapses of CA3 neurons in CA1 and activity propagation in brain-wide networks, and identify polysynaptic information channels segregated in the frequency domain. PMID:25761637

  11. Frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyaadi, Hassan; Askari Farsangi, Mohammad Amin

    2015-11-01

    This paper is focused on presenting an accurate framework to describe frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs). Modeling strategy incorporates the phenomenological constitutive model developed formerly together with the magnetic diffusion equation. A hyperbolic hardening function is employed to define reorientation-induced strain hardening in the material, and the diffusion equation is used to add dynamic effects to the model. The MSMA prismatic specimen is surrounded by a pickup coil, and the induced voltage during martensite-variant reorientation is investigated with the help of Faraday’s law of magnetic field induction. It has been shown that, in order to harvest the maximum RMS voltage in the MSMA-based energy harvester, an optimum value of bias magnetic field exists, which is the corresponding magnetic field for the start of pseudoelasticity behavior. In addition, to achieve a more compact energy harvester with higher energy density, a specimen with a lower aspect ratio can be chosen. As the main novelty of the paper, it is found that the dynamic effects play a major role in determining the harvested voltage and power, especially for high excitation frequency or specimen thickness.

  12. Frequency-dependent selection at rough expanding fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Jan-Timm; Stark, Holger

    2015-10-01

    Microbial colonies are experimental model systems for studying the colonization of new territory by biological species through range expansion. We study a generalization of the two-species Eden model, which incorporates local frequency-dependent selection, in order to analyze how social interactions between two species influence surface roughness of growing microbial colonies. The model includes several classical scenarios from game theory. We then concentrate on an expanding public goods game, where either cooperators or defectors take over the front depending on the system parameters. We analyze in detail the critical behavior of the nonequilibrium phase transition between global cooperation and defection and thereby identify a new universality class of phase transitions dealing with absorbing states. At the transition, the number of boundaries separating sectors decays with a novel power law in time and their superdiffusive motion crosses over from Eden scaling to a nearly ballistic regime. In parallel, the width of the front initially obeys Eden roughening and, at later times, passes over to selective roughening.

  13. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  14. Interplay between Solo and keratin filaments is crucial for mechanical force–induced stress fiber reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Sachiko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mashiko, Toshiya; Kondo, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical force–induced cytoskeletal reorganization is essential for cell and tissue remodeling and homeostasis; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain elusive. Solo (ARHGEF40) is a RhoA-targeting guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) involved in cyclical stretch–induced human endothelial cell reorientation and convergent extension cell movement in zebrafish gastrula. In this study, we show that Solo binds to keratin-8/keratin-18 (K8/K18) intermediate filaments through multiple sites. Solo overexpression promotes the formation of thick actin stress fibers and keratin bundles, whereas knockdown of Solo, expression of a GEF-inactive mutant of Solo, or inhibition of ROCK suppresses stress fiber formation and leads to disorganized keratin networks, indicating that the Solo-RhoA-ROCK pathway serves to precisely organize keratin networks, as well as to promote stress fibers. Of importance, knockdown of Solo or K18 or overexpression of GEF-inactive or deletion mutants of Solo suppresses tensile force–induced stress fiber reinforcement. Furthermore, knockdown of Solo or K18 suppresses tensile force-induced RhoA activation. These results strongly suggest that the interplay between Solo and K8/K18 filaments plays a crucial role in tensile force–induced RhoA activation and consequent actin cytoskeletal reinforcement. PMID:26823019

  15. Interplay between Solo and keratin filaments is crucial for mechanical force-induced stress fiber reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Sachiko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mashiko, Toshiya; Kondo, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2016-03-15

    Mechanical force-induced cytoskeletal reorganization is essential for cell and tissue remodeling and homeostasis; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain elusive. Solo (ARHGEF40) is a RhoA-targeting guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) involved in cyclical stretch-induced human endothelial cell reorientation and convergent extension cell movement in zebrafish gastrula. In this study, we show that Solo binds to keratin-8/keratin-18 (K8/K18) intermediate filaments through multiple sites. Solo overexpression promotes the formation of thick actin stress fibers and keratin bundles, whereas knockdown of Solo, expression of a GEF-inactive mutant of Solo, or inhibition of ROCK suppresses stress fiber formation and leads to disorganized keratin networks, indicating that the Solo-RhoA-ROCK pathway serves to precisely organize keratin networks, as well as to promote stress fibers. Of importance, knockdown of Solo or K18 or overexpression of GEF-inactive or deletion mutants of Solo suppresses tensile force-induced stress fiber reinforcement. Furthermore, knockdown of Solo or K18 suppresses tensile force-induced RhoA activation. These results strongly suggest that the interplay between Solo and K8/K18 filaments plays a crucial role in tensile force-induced RhoA activation and consequent actin cytoskeletal reinforcement. PMID:26823019

  16. A model for cell density effect on stress fiber alignment and collective directional migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeddoust, Mohammad; Shamloo, Amir

    2015-12-01

    In this study, numerical simulation of collective cell migration is presented in order to mimic the group migration of endothelial cells subjected to the concentration gradients of a biochemical factor. The developed 2D model incorporates basic elements of the cell, including both the cell membrane and the cell cytoskeleton, based on a viscoelastic cell mechanic model. Various cell processes—including cell random walk, cell-cell interactions, cell chemotaxis, and cellular cytoskeleton rearrangements—are considered and analyzed in our developed model. After validating the model by using available experimental data, the model is used to investigate various important parameters during collective cell chemotaxis, such as cell density, cytoskeleton organization, stress fiber reorientations, and intracellular forces. The results suggest that increasing the cell density causes the cell-cell interactions to affect the orientation of stress fibers throughout the cytoskeleton and makes the stress fibers more aligned in the direction of the imposed concentration gradient. This improved alignment of the stress fibers correlates with the intensification of the intracellular forces transferred in the gradient direction; this improves the cell group migration. Comparison of the obtained results with available experimental observations of collective chemotaxis of endothelial cells shows an interesting agreement.

  17. Neural correlates of stimulus spatial frequency-dependent contrast detection

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jianjun; Liu, Ruilong; Wang, Ke; Hua, Tianmiao; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Xi, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    Psychophysical studies on human and non-human vertebrate species have shown that visual contrast sensitivity function (CSF) peaks at a certain stimulus spatial frequency and declines in both lower and higher spatial frequencies. The underlying neural substrate and mechanisms remain in debate. Here, we investigated the role of primary visual cortex (V1: area 17) in spatial frequency-dependent contrast detection in cats. Perceptual CSFs of three cats were measured using a two-alternative forced choice task. The responses of V1 neurons to their optimal visual stimuli in a range of luminance contrast levels (from 0 to 1.0) were recorded subsequently using in vivo extracellular single-unit recording techniques. The contrast sensitivity of each neuron was determined. The neuronal CSF for each cat was constructed from the mean contrast sensitivity of neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies. Results (1) The perceptual and neuronal CSFs of each of the three cats exhibited a similar shape with peak amplitude near 0.4 c/deg. (2) The neuronal CSF of each cat was highly correlated with its perceptual CSF. (3) V1 neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies had different contrast gains. Conclusion (1) Contrast detection of visual stimuli with different spatial frequencies may likely involve population coding of V1 neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies. (2) Difference in contrast-gain may underlie the observed contrast sensitivity variation of V1 neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies, possibly from either evolution or postnatal visual experiences. PMID:23314692

  18. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  19. Fibers in the Extracellular Matrix Enable Long-Range Stress Transmission between Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoyue; Schickel, Maureen E.; Stevenson, Mark D.; Sarang-Sieminski, Alisha L.; Gooch, Keith J.; Ghadiali, Samir N.; Hart, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Cells can sense, signal, and organize via mechanical forces. The ability of cells to mechanically sense and respond to the presence of other cells over relatively long distances (e.g., ∼100 μm, or ∼10 cell-diameters) across extracellular matrix (ECM) has been attributed to the strain-hardening behavior of the ECM. In this study, we explore an alternative hypothesis: the fibrous nature of the ECM makes long-range stress transmission possible and provides an important mechanism for long-range cell-cell mechanical signaling. To test this hypothesis, confocal reflectance microscopy was used to develop image-based finite-element models of stress transmission within fibroblast-seeded collagen gels. Models that account for the gel’s fibrous nature were compared with homogenous linear-elastic and strain-hardening models to investigate the mechanisms of stress propagation. Experimentally, cells were observed to compact the collagen gel and align collagen fibers between neighboring cells within 24 h. Finite-element analysis revealed that stresses generated by a centripetally contracting cell boundary are concentrated in the relatively stiff ECM fibers and are propagated farther in a fibrous matrix as compared to homogeneous linear elastic or strain-hardening materials. These results support the hypothesis that ECM fibers, especially aligned ones, play an important role in long-range stress transmission. PMID:23561517

  20. Fibers in the extracellular matrix enable long-range stress transmission between cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyue; Schickel, Maureen E; Stevenson, Mark D; Sarang-Sieminski, Alisha L; Gooch, Keith J; Ghadiali, Samir N; Hart, Richard T

    2013-04-01

    Cells can sense, signal, and organize via mechanical forces. The ability of cells to mechanically sense and respond to the presence of other cells over relatively long distances (e.g., ∼100 μm, or ∼10 cell-diameters) across extracellular matrix (ECM) has been attributed to the strain-hardening behavior of the ECM. In this study, we explore an alternative hypothesis: the fibrous nature of the ECM makes long-range stress transmission possible and provides an important mechanism for long-range cell-cell mechanical signaling. To test this hypothesis, confocal reflectance microscopy was used to develop image-based finite-element models of stress transmission within fibroblast-seeded collagen gels. Models that account for the gel's fibrous nature were compared with homogenous linear-elastic and strain-hardening models to investigate the mechanisms of stress propagation. Experimentally, cells were observed to compact the collagen gel and align collagen fibers between neighboring cells within 24 h. Finite-element analysis revealed that stresses generated by a centripetally contracting cell boundary are concentrated in the relatively stiff ECM fibers and are propagated farther in a fibrous matrix as compared to homogeneous linear elastic or strain-hardening materials. These results support the hypothesis that ECM fibers, especially aligned ones, play an important role in long-range stress transmission. PMID:23561517

  1. Fracture strength and stress distributions of pulpless premolars restored with fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yu; Huang, Shih-Hao; Takeda, Yuko; Fok, Alex; Hayashi, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of glass fiber posts on increasing the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. Extracted upper premolars with two canals in a root were divided into three groups according to the number of posts they were restored with: none, one, or two. All teeth were endodontically treated, crown-sectioned, and restored with a composite core and a metallic crown. A static oblique load was applied to the restored tooth until fracture, and the fracture pattern was recorded. Stress distributions were examined by finite element analysis (FEA). Teeth with glass fiber post(s) showed significantly higher fracture loads compared with those without posts. In the premolars without posts, von Mises and maximum principal stresses were found on the root surface alone; in premolars restored with posts, stresses were distributed on both root and post surfaces. Risk of root dentin fracture was significantly lowest in teeth restored with two posts. PMID:25483385

  2. Smart carbon nanotube/fiber and PVA fiber-reinforced composites for stress sensing and chloride ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoheneder, Joshua

    Fiber reinforced composites (FRC) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers and carbon nanofibers (CNF) had an excellent flexural strength in excess of 18.5 MPa compared to reference samples of 15.8 MPa. It was found that the developed, depending on applied stress and exposure to chloride solutions, composites exhibit some electrical conductivity, from 4.20×10 -4 (Ω-1m-1 to 4.13×10 -4 Ω-1m-1. These dependences can be characterized by piezioresistive and chemoresistive coefficients demonstrating that the material possesses self-sensing capabilities. The sensitivity to stain and chloride solutions can be enhanced by incorporating small amounts of carbon nanofibers (CNF) or carbon nanotube (CNT) into composite structure. Conducted research has demonstrated a strong dependency of electrical properties of composite on crack formation in moist environments. The developed procedure is scalable for industrial application in concrete structures that require nondestructive stress monitoring, integrity under high service loads and stability in harsh environments.

  3. Effect of stress and temperature on the optical phonons of aramid fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollas, D.; Parthenios, J.; Galiotis, C.

    2006-03-01

    The wave-number dependence upon stress and/or strain and temperature of two adjacent optical phonons of aramid fibers has been investigated. The results showed that both phonons soften considerably under axial tension. Experiments at various temperatures under fixed strain conditions have demonstrated that one of the phonons (ν1=1611cm-1) is moderately anharmonic whereas the adjacent phonon (ν2=1648cm-1) exhibits harmonic behavior. By modeling the fibers as one-dimensional molecular wires very good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained for the phonon temperature dependence under isostress conditions.

  4. Influence of pressure, temperature, and pore fluid on the frequency-dependent attenuation of elastic waves in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'hara, Stephen G.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of pore fluid, effective stress, pore fluid pressure, and temperature on the frequency dependence of elastic wave attenuation in Berea sandstone are interrelated in a series of systematic experiments. The attenuation of both the extensional and torsional modes of cylindrical samples of the sandstone is measured on the frequency range 3-30 kHz. To simulate conditions within the earth, the sandstone is subjected to confining stress to 70.0 MPa and temperature from 24.0 °C to 120.0 °C. Confining pressure and pore fluid pressure are varied independently. Data for two different pore fluids, brine and n-heptane, suggest that a scaling law exists for the pressure and temperature dependence of the attenuation in terms of the pore fluid. The logarithmic decrement of the sandstone is almost frequency independent in a vacuum evacuated sample, but shows a linear frequency dependence, once the sample is saturated. Extrapolation of this linear trend to low frequencies suggests that the decrement in fluid-filled sandstone is effectively frequency independent at seismic frequencies (<100 Hz). The frequency dependence becomes more pronounced as either the effective stress or the temperature is decreased. When the difference between the external stress on the sandstone and the pore fluid pressure is large, the attenuation depends only on the effective stress and is relatively temperature independent. But at low effective stress, the attenuation increases linearly with increasing pore fluid pressure and decreases linearly with increasing temperature. While a specific model is lacking, the attenuation process is apparently influenced most strongly by chemical processes at the pore fluid-matrix interface accompanied by subtle changes in the sandstone matrix dimensions.

  5. Intermediate Temperature Stress Rupture of Woven SiC Fiber, BN Interphase, SiC Matrix Composites in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tensile stress-rupture experiments were performed on woven Hi-Nicalon reinforced SiC matrix composites with BN interphases in air. Modal acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the damage accumulation in the composites during the tests and microstructural analysis was performed to determine the amount of matrix cracking that occurred for each sample. Fiber fractograph), was also performed for individual fiber failures at the specimen fracture surface to determine the strengths at which fibers failed. The rupture strengths were significantly worse than what would have been expected front the inherent degradation of the fibers themselves when subjected to similar rupture conditions. At higher applied stresses the rate of rupture "?as larger than at lower applied stresses. It was observed that the change in rupture rate corresponded to the onset of through-thickness cracking in the composites themselves. The primary cause of the sen,ere degradation was the ease with which fibers would bond to one another at their closest separation distances, less than 100 nanometers, when exposed to the environment. The near fiber-to-fiber contact in the woven tows enabled premature fiber failure over large areas of matrix cracks due to the stress-concentrations created b), fibers bonded to one another after one or a few fibers fail. i.e. the loss of global load sharing. An@, improvement in fiber-to-fiber separation of this composite system should result in improved stress- rupture properties. A model was den,eloped in order to predict the rupture life-time for these composites based on the probabilistic nature of indin,idual fiber failure at temperature. the matrix cracking state during the rupture test, and the rate of oxidation into a matrix crack. Also incorporated into the model were estimates of the stress-concentration that would occur between the outer rim of fibers in a load-bearing bundle and the unbridged region of a matrix crack after Xia et al. For the lower stresses

  6. Stress and strength analysis of fiber reinforced plastic pipe tees with reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Z.; Widera, G.E.O.; Xue, M.

    1996-12-01

    In this paper, a stress and strength analysis of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) pipe tees with reinforcement by use of 3-D finite element method is presented. Wilson`s incompatible elements and the 16-node 3-D element with relative degrees of freedom have been employed to carry out the analysis. The reliability of the program is also investigated. Two reinforcing methods, pad and compact reinforcement, are investigated. The fact that the properties and principal directions of the materials of the two intersecting pipes and the reinforcement are different has been taken into account in the analysis. The continuity of stress and strain fields at the intersecting surface of two different materials is considered in the post processing of the FEM results. The results show that the stress concentration in a FRP pipe intersection without reinforcement (r/R = 0.4--0.7) is significant. A reasonable design can be obtained by considering both stress fields and the orthotropic strength parameters of the materials. The in-plane shear stress may be the controlling factor because of the relatively low shear strength of most composites. Use of either reinforcing method does not change the location of the maximum tensile stress and the maximum shear stress, and both alleviate the stress concentration at the intersection. It is shown that the compact reinforcing method is more effective than the pad one. The larger the reinforcing area of the compact reinforcing method, the smaller the stress concentration factor, but the lower the rate of reduction.

  7. Stressed-Oxidation Lifetime of Different SiC Fiber, CVI Matrix SiC Minicomposites in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Martinez-Fernandez, Julian

    1998-01-01

    The stressed-oxidation lifetime properties of several minicomposites composed of single fiber tows with a CVI SiC matrix were compared. The minicomposites were made up of Nicalon(Tm) and Hi-Nicalon(Tm) SiC fibers with carbon or BN interphases. Constant load stress-rupture tests were performed between 600 and 13000 C in air for all of the minicomposite systems. Cyclic load testing was performed on the Hi-Nicalon minicomposite systems. The factors controlling the different lifetime behaviors: fiber rupture properties, interphase oxidation, fiber degradation, and fiber-matrix bonding, are discussed in light of different minicomposite constituents. All of the systems were subject to intermediate temperature embrittlement. The Hi-Nicalon fiber, BN interphase system, performed the best for constant load conditions. For cyclic load conditions, both the BN- interphase and C-interphase minicomposites displayed poor, but different failure behavior.

  8. Optical fiber fatigue behavior over very extended periods at low stress levels in the field and in laboratory tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, David J.; Mayhew, Andi J.

    1999-12-01

    The reliability of optical fiber exposed to relatively high static strains (> 2%) has been extensively modelled and investigated by experiment. Fatigue `knees' have been demonstrated predicting the premature fracture of fiber particularly where elevated temperatures and relatively large volumes of water have been used to soak the samples. The cause has been attributed to simultaneous stress- assisted and stress-free corrosion of the fiber surface. In this paper we show that, a t more moderate strains (1 to 2%) and using a limited volume of water, there is evidence of a strength recovery caused either by a healing process or the observance of some form of lower strain threshold. The expected strength reduction of the fiber, from contemporary models is contrasted to that observed. The unusually high strength retention shown by the test fiber in water is shown to have important implications for optical cable design and for the bending of fiber within joint housings.

  9. Optical measurements on overhead optical fiber cables for stresses and damage identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravet, Fabien L.; Heens, Bernard; Daniaux, D.; Froidure, Jean-Christophe; Blondel, Michel; Dascotte, M.; Lots, P.

    1998-12-01

    This paper concerns the characterization of various trunks of an OPGW based network. No strong fiber aging has been observed but combined OTDR and PMD measurements have pointed out strong cable clamping at suspension pylon. Large local losses have been measured at both 1.55 micrometers and 1.6 micrometers and stress induced birefringent behavior have been experienced. PMD temporal evolution has also been studied. A correlation between temperature variation and PMD evolution has been observed.

  10. Combined-load stress-strain relationship for advanced fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    It was demonstrated experimentally that only one test specimen is required to determine the combined-load stress-strain relationships of a given fiber composite system. These relationships were determined using a thin angle-plied laminate tube and subjecting it to a number of combined-loading conditions. The measured data obtained are compared with theoretical predictions. Some important considerations associated with such a test are identified, and the significance of combined-load stress-strain relationships in certain practical designs are discussed.

  11. Calculation of Stress Intensity Factors for Interfacial Cracks in Fiber Metal Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for interfacial cracks in Fiber Metal Laminates (FML) are computed by using the displacement ratio method recently developed by Sun and Qian (1997, Int. J. Solids. Struct. 34, 2595-2609). Various FML configurations with single and multiple delaminations subjected to different loading conditions are investigated. The displacement ratio method requires the total energy release rate, bimaterial parameters, and relative crack surface displacements as input. Details of generating the energy release rates, defining bimaterial parameters with anisotropic elasticity, and selecting proper crack surface locations for obtaining relative crack surface displacements are discussed in the paper. Even though the individual energy release rates are nonconvergent, mesh-size-independent stress intensity factors can be obtained. This study also finds that the selection of reference length can affect the magnitudes and the mode mixity angles of the stress intensity factors; thus, it is important to report the reference length used with the calculated stress intensity factors.

  12. Stress generated by customized glass fiber posts and other types by photoelastic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bosso, Kátia; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Lopes, Murilo Baena

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic posts are necessary to provide adequate retention and support when no sufficient remaining structure is available to retain the core. There are different materials and techniques to construct post-and-core, but there is no consensus about which one promotes better stress distribution on the remaining tooth structure. This study aimed to quantify and evaluate the distribution of stress in the root produced by customized glass fiber posts compared to different endodontic posts. Twenty-five simulated roots from photoelastic resin were made and divided into 5 groups: CPC, cast post-and-core; SP, screw post; CF, carbon fiber post; GF, glass fiber post; and CGF, customized glass fiber post. After cementing CPC and SP posts with zinc phosphate cement, and CF, GF and CGF posts with resin cement, resin cores were made for groups 2-5. Specimens were evaluated with vertical or 45° oblique loading. To analyze the fringes, the root was divided into 6 parts: palatal cervical, palatal middle, palatal apical, vestibular cervical, vestibular middle, and vestibular apical. The formed fringes were photographed and quantified. Data were recorded and subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). SP (1.95±0.60) showed higher stress (p<0.05) compared to the others (CPC-0.52±0.74; CF-0.50±0.75, GF-0.23±0.48 and CGF-0.45±0.83). All posts showed high stress in apical third (CPC-1.40±0.65; SP-2.30±0.44, CF-1.80±0.45, GF-1.20±0.45, CGF-1.70±1.03) Low stress was found in cervical third (CPC-0.20±0.45; CF-0.00±0.00, GF-0.00±0.00, CGF-0.00±0.00), except by SP (1.90±0.65), which showed statistical difference (p<0.05). Customized post showed high stress concentration at the root and conventional glass fiber posts showed more favorable biomechanical behavior. PMID:26200144

  13. Impact damage characterization in cross-plied carbon fiber/thermoplastic composites using thermoelastic stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Uenoya, T.; Miyamoto, H.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon fiber (CF)-plastic composites are expected from the view point of light weighting vehicle structures. The CF/thermoset plastic laminates have low damage resistance to out-of-plane impact as a problem to be solved, because they behave as a low strength inter-laminar as compared with high-strength in fiber direction. Accordingly it is strongly desired to develop CF-composite materials based thermoplastics that have higher toughness than thermoset, for vehicle use. The present paper describes investigation of impact damages through thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA). Lowvelocity impact test using drop weight was conducted on stitched non-crimp-fabric CF/NY6 composite specimens. Stress distribution of the specimens under impact loading was monitored by a lock-in thermography system from the opposite side of the impact direction. The instrumentation system, which had a focal plane array detector, provided a succession of thermoelastic stress information as a sequence of TSA images at a high rate. The measured stress distribution agreed well with a theoretical. And also, selecting a contour feature of the stress distribution determined with a suitable level conformed approximately to the internal damage image that was processed from the TSA images obtained before and after impact.

  14. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated. PMID:9390960

  15. A Critique of a Phenomenological Fiber Breakage Model for Stress Rupture of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Stress rupture is not a critical failure mode for most composite structures, but there are a few applications where it can be critical. One application where stress rupture can be a critical design issue is in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV's), where the composite material is highly and uniformly loaded for long periods of time and where very high reliability is required. COPV's are normally required to be proof loaded before being put into service to insure strength, but it is feared that the proof load may cause damage that reduces the stress rupture reliability. Recently, a fiber breakage model was proposed specifically to estimate a reduced reliability due to proof loading. The fiber breakage model attempts to model physics believed to occur at the microscopic scale, but validation of the model has not occurred. In this paper, the fiber breakage model is re-derived while highlighting assumptions that were made during the derivation. Some of the assumptions are examined to assess their effect on the final predicted reliability.

  16. Development of In-Fiber Reflective Bragg Gratings as Shear Stress Monitors in Aerodynamic Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Singh, Jag J.

    1998-01-01

    Bragg gratings centered at nominal wavelengths of 1290 nm and 1300 run were inscribed in a 9/125 microns germano-silicate optical fiber, using continuous wave frequency doubled Ar+ laser radiation at 244 nm. Such gratings have been used extensively as temperature and strain monitors in smart structures. They have, however, never been used for measuring aerodynamic shear stresses. As a test of their sensitivity as shear stress monitors, a Bragg fiber attached to a metal plate was subjected to laminar flows in a glass pipe. An easily measurable large flow-induced wavelength shift (Delta Lambda(sub B)) was observed in the Bragg reflected wavelength. Thereafter, the grating was calibrated by making one time, simultaneous measurements of Delta Lambda(sub B) and the coefficient of skin friction (C(sub f)) with a skin friction balance, as a function of flow rates in a subsonic wind tunnel. Onset of fan-induced transition in the tunnel flow provided a unique flow rate for correlating Delta Lambda(sub B) and (C(sub f) values needed for computing effective modulus of rigidity (N(sub eff)) of the fiber attached to the metal plate. This value Of N(sub eff) is expected to remain constant throughout the elastic stress range expected during the Bragg grating aerodynamic tests. It has been used for calculating the value of Cf at various tunnel speeds, on the basis of measured values of Bragg wavelength shifts at those speeds.

  17. Stress distribution of oval and circular fiber posts in amandibular premolar: a three-dimensional finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Kerem; Esim, Emir; Aslan, Tugrul; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Yildirim, Sahin

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of posts with different morphologies on stress distribution in an endodontically treated mandibular premolar by using finite element models (FEMs). MATERIALS AND METHODS A mandibular premolar was modeled using the ANSYS software program. Two models were created to represent circular and oval fiber posts in this tooth model. An oblique force of 300 N was applied at an angle of 45° to the occlusal plane and oriented toward the buccal side. von Mises stress was measured in three regions each for oval and circular fiber posts. RESULTS FEM analysis showed that the von Mises stress of the circular fiber post (426.81 MPa) was greater than that of the oval fiber post (346.34 MPa). The maximum distribution of von Mises stress was in the luting agent in both groups. Additionally, von Mises stresses accumulated in the coronal third of root dentin, close to the post space in both groups. CONCLUSION Oval fiber posts are preferable to circular fiber posts in oval-shaped canals given the stress distribution at the post-dentin interface. PMID:24353882

  18. An in-fiber Bragg grating sensor for contact force and stress measurements in articular joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Christopher R.; Wild, Peter M.; Wilson, David R.; Gilbart, Michael K.

    2010-11-01

    We present an in-fiber Bragg grating-based sensor (240 µm diameter) for contact force/stress measurements in articular joints. The contact force sensor and another Bragg grating-based pressure sensor (400 µm diameter) are used to conduct the first simultaneous measurements of contact force/stress and fluid pressure in intact cadaveric human hips. The contact force/stress sensor addresses limitations associated with stress-sensitive films, the current standard tools for contact measurements in joints, including cartilage modulus-dependent sensitivity of films and the necessity to remove biomechanically relevant anatomy to implant the films. Because stress-sensitive films require removal of anatomy, it has been impossible to validate the mechanical rationale underlying preventive or corrective surgeries, which repair these anatomies, by conducting simultaneous stress and pressure measurements in intact hips. Methods are presented to insert the Bragg grating-based sensors into the joint, while relevant anatomy is left largely intact. Sensor performance is predicted using numerical models and the predicted sensitivity is verified through experimental calibrations. Contact force/stress and pressure measurements in cadaveric joints exhibited repeatability. With further validation, the Bragg grating-based sensors could be used to study the currently unknown relationships between contact forces and pressures in both healthy and degenerated joints.

  19. Effects of stress ratio and fiber orientation on fatigue crack growth behavior in APAL

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.W.; Park, W.J.; Yoon, H.K.; Lee, K.G.; Cho, J.M.; Lee, K.B.

    1993-12-31

    A new hybrid composite (APAL; Aramid Patched Aluminum Alloy), consisting of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy plate sandwiched between aramid/epoxy prepregs (HK 285/RS 1222), was developed. Fatigue crack growth behavior was examined at stress ratios of R = 0.2, 0.5 using two kinds of APAL with different fiber orientation (0{degree}/90{degree} and {+-} 45{degree} for crack direction). The APAL showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance, which may be attributed to the crack bridging effect imposed by the intact fibers in the crack wave. The magnitude of crack bridging was estimated quantitatively and determined by a new technique on the basis of the compliances of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy and APAL specimens. The crack growth rate of the APAL specimens was reduced significantly as comparison to the monolithic aluminum alloy and was not adequately correlated with the conventional stress intensity factor range ({Delta}K). It was found that the crack growth rate was successfully correlated with the effective stress intensity factor range ( {Delta}K{sub eff} = K{sub br} {minus} K{sub cl}) allowing for the crack closure and the crack bridging. The relation between da/dN and {Delta}K{sub eff} was plotted within a narrow scatter band regardless at loading line of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, two kinds of the APAL (APAL 0{degree}/90{degree}, APAL {+-} 45{degree}) and two kinds of stress ratios (R = 0.2, 0.5).

  20. The frequency dependence of demagnetizing factor of a Fe-based amorphous ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmetko, D. N.; Troschenkov, Yu. N.; Matsura, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    The frequency dependence of total and internal demagnetizing factors has been investigated. A minimum of the demagnetizing factor at optimal frequency of magnetization reversal is revealed. The influence of the demagnetizing factor on the frequency dependence of magnetic properties of amorphous ribbon is studied.

  1. Modeling for Fatigue Hysteresis Loops of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites under Multiple Loading Stress Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the fatigue hysteresis loops of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple loading stress levels considering interface wear has been investigated using micromechanical approach. Under fatigue loading, the fiber/matrix interface shear stress decreases with the increase of cycle number due to interface wear. Upon increasing of fatigue peak stress, the interface debonded length would propagate along the fiber/matrix interface. The difference of interface shear stress existed in the new and original debonded region would affect the interface debonding and interface frictional slipping between the fiber and the matrix. Based on the fatigue damage mechanism of fiber slipping relative to matrix in the interface debonded region upon unloading and subsequent reloading, the interface slip lengths, i.e., the interface debonded length, interface counter-slip length and interface new-slip length, are determined by fracture mechanics approach. The fatigue hysteresis loops models under multiple loading stress levels have been developed. The effects of single/multiple loading stress levels and different loading sequences on fatigue hysteresis loops have been investigated. The fatigue hysteresis loops of unidirectional C/SiC composite under multiple loading stress levels have been predicted.

  2. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution in composite resin cores with fiber posts of varying diameters.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kazuhiko; Ino, Teruno; Iwase, Naoki; Shimizu, Eitaroh; Suzuki, Megumi; Satoh, Goh; Ohkawa, Shuji; Fujisawa, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA), stress distributions in the remaining radicular tooth structure were investigated under the condition of varying diameters of fiber post for fiber post-reinforced composite resin cores (fiber post and core) in maxillary central incisors. Four 3D-FEA models were constructed: (1) fiber post (ø1.2, ø1.4, and ø1.6 mm) and composite resin core; and (2) gold-cast post and core. Maximum stresses in the tooth structure for fiber post and core were higher than that for gold-cast post and core. In the former models, stresses in the tooth structure as well as in the composite resin were slightly reduced with increase in fiber post diameter. These results thus suggested that to reduce stress in the remaining radicular tooth with a large coronal defect, it is recommended to accompany a composite resin core with a fiber post of a large diameter. PMID:18309611

  3. The Role of Stress Fibers in the Shape Determination Mechanism of Fish Keratocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Takako; Okimura, Chika; Mizuno, Takafumi; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-19

    Crawling cells have characteristic shapes that are a function of their cell types. How their different shapes are determined is an interesting question. Fish epithelial keratocytes are an ideal material for investigating cell shape determination, because they maintain a nearly constant fan shape during their crawling locomotion. We compared the shape and related molecular mechanisms in keratocytes from different fish species to elucidate the key mechanisms that determine cell shape. Wide keratocytes from cichlids applied large traction forces at the rear due to large focal adhesions, and showed a spatially loose gradient associated with actin retrograde flow rate, whereas round keratocytes from black tetra applied low traction forces at the rear small focal adhesions and showed a spatially steep gradient of actin retrograde flow rate. Laser ablation of stress fibers (contractile fibers connected to rear focal adhesions) in wide keratocytes from cichlids increased the actin retrograde flow rate and led to slowed leading-edge extension near the ablated region. Thus, stress fibers might play an important role in the mechanism of maintaining cell shape by regulating the actin retrograde flow rate. PMID:26789770

  4. Prediction of the Elastic-Plastic Stress/Strain Response for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba N.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay H; TuckerIII, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a model to predict the elastic-plastic response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber orientation was predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model recently developed for LFTs. An incremental procedure using Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and the Mori-Tanaka assumption is proposed to compute the overall stress increment resulting from an overall strain increment for an aligned-fiber composite that contains the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite. The incremental response of the latter is then obtained from the solution for the aligned-fiber composite by averaging over all fiber orientations. Failure during incremental loading is predicted using the Van Hattum-Bernado model. The model is validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  5. Prediction of the Elastic-Plastic Stress/Strain Response for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2009-01-26

    This paper proposes a model to predict the elastic-plastic response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber orientation was predicted using the anisotropic rotary diffusion model recently developed by Phelps and Tucker for LFTs. An incremental procedure using the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method and the Mori-Tanaka model is proposed to compute the overall stress increment resulting from an overall strain increment for an aligned fiber composite that contains the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite. The incremental response of the later is then obtained from the solution for the aligned fiber composite that is averaged over all possible fiber orientations using the orientation averaging method. Failure during incremental loading is predicted using the Van Hattum-Bernado model. The elastic-plastic and strength prediction model for LFTs was validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long glass fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  6. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. I - Stress singularities and solution structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    The fundamental mechanics of delamination in fiber composite laminates is studied. Mathematical formulation of the problem is based on laminate anisotropic elasticity theory and interlaminar fracture mechanics concepts. Stress singularities and complete solution structures associated with general composite delaminations are determined. For a fully open delamination with traction-free surfaces, oscillatory stress singularities always appear, leading to physically inadmissible field solutions. A refined model is introduced by considering a partially closed delamination with crack surfaces in finite-length contact. Stress singularities associated with a partially closed delamination having frictional crack-surface contact are determined, and are found to be different from the inverse square-root one of the frictionless-contact case. In the case of a delamination with very small area of crack closure, a simplified model having a square-root stress singularity is employed by taking the limit of the partially closed delamination. The possible presence of logarithmic-type stress singularity is examined; no logarithmic singularity of any kind is found in the composite delamination problem. Numerical examples of dominant stress singularities are shown for delaminations having crack-tip closure with different frictional coefficients between general (1) and (2) graphite-epoxy composites. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13221

  7. The effect of stress on ultrasonic pulses in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, J. H.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1983-01-01

    An acoustical-ultrasonic technique was used to demonstrate relationships existing between changes in attenuation of stress waves and tensile stress for an eight ply 0 degree graphite-epoxy fiber reinforced composite. All tests were conducted in the linear range of the material for which no mechanical or macroscopic damage was evident. Changes in attenuation were measured as a function of tensile stress in the frequency domain and in the time domain. Stress wave propagation in these specimens was dispersive, i.e., the wave speed depends on frequency. Wave speeds varied from 267 400 cm/sec to 680 000 cm/sec as the frequency of the signal was varied from 150 kHz to 1.9 MHz which strongly suggests that flexural/lamb wave modes of propagation exist. The magnitude of the attenuation changes depended strongly on tensile stress. It was further observed that the wave speeds increased slightly for all tested frequencies as the stress was increased.

  8. Stress- and polarization-induced stimulated Raman scattering in optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yong; Cai, Hongxing; Sun, Xiuping; Gao, Xun; Zhang, Xihe

    2013-04-01

    In this letter, the dependence of stimulated Raman scattering spectra on external pressure levels of tens of kPa and the polarized pump light is investigated in optical fibers. The Raman peaks show blueshift under a lower external pressure because of the self-phase modulation. But under a higher external pressure, the Raman peaks begin to redshift, because the change of the inter-tetrahedral angle of the glassy AX2 systems plays a more important role. Moreover, the shifts of an elliptically polarized pump beam are smaller than the those of a linearly polarized pump beam under external pressure. These results could provide new applications for silica fibers as optical frequency generators or stress sensors.

  9. Stress Distribution in Roots Restored with Fiber Posts and An Experimental Dentin Post: 3D-FEA.

    PubMed

    Diana, Hugo Henrique; Oliveira, Juliana Santos; Ferro, Mariana Carolina de Lara; Silva-Sousa, Yara T Corrêa; Gomes, Érica Alves

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the stress distribution in radicular dentin of a maxillary canine restored with either a glass fiber post, carbon fiber post or an experimental dentin post using finite element analysis (3D-FEA). Three 3D virtual models of a maxillary canine restored with a metal-ceramic crown and glass fiber post (GFP), carbon fiber post (CFP), and experimental dentin post (DP) were obtained based on micro-CT images. A total of 180 N was applied on the lingual surface of the incisal third of each tooth at 45 degrees. The models were supported by the periodontal ligament fixed in three axes (x=y=z=0). The von Mises stress (VMS) of radicular dentin and the intracanal posts was calculated. The structures of all groups showed similar values (MPa) and distribution of maximum von Mises stress. Higher stress was found in the apical third of dentin while the posts presented homogeneous stress distribution along the axis. The fiber and dentin posts exhibited similar stress values and distribution. Thus, the experimental dentin post is a promising restorative material. PMID:27058388

  10. Viscoelastic Retraction of Single Living Stress Fibers and Its Impact on Cell Shape, Cytoskeletal Organization, and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjay; Maxwell, Iva Z.; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Polte, Thomas R.; Lele, Tanmay P.; Salanga, Matthew; Mazur, Eric; Ingber, Donald E.

    2006-01-01

    Cells change their form and function by assembling actin stress fibers at their base and exerting traction forces on their extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions. Individual stress fibers are thought to be actively tensed by the action of actomyosin motors and to function as elastic cables that structurally reinforce the basal portion of the cytoskeleton; however, these principles have not been directly tested in living cells, and their significance for overall cell shape control is poorly understood. Here we combine a laser nanoscissor, traction force microscopy, and fluorescence photobleaching methods to confirm that stress fibers in living cells behave as viscoelastic cables that are tensed through the action of actomyosin motors, to quantify their retraction kinetics in situ, and to explore their contribution to overall mechanical stability of the cell and interconnected ECM. These studies reveal that viscoelastic recoil of individual stress fibers after laser severing is partially slowed by inhibition of Rho-associated kinase and virtually abolished by direct inhibition of myosin light chain kinase. Importantly, cells cultured on stiff ECM substrates can tolerate disruption of multiple stress fibers with negligible overall change in cell shape, whereas disruption of a single stress fiber in cells anchored to compliant ECM substrates compromises the entire cellular force balance, induces cytoskeletal rearrangements, and produces ECM retraction many microns away from the site of incision; this results in large-scale changes of cell shape (> 5% elongation). In addition to revealing fundamental insight into the mechanical properties and cell shape contributions of individual stress fibers and confirming that the ECM is effectively a physical extension of the cell and cytoskeleton, the technologies described here offer a novel approach to spatially map the cytoskeletal mechanics of living cells on the nanoscale. PMID:16500961

  11. Frequency-dependent seismic attenuation in shales: experimental results and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Piane, Claudio; Sarout, Joel; Madonna, Claudio; Saenger, Erik H.; Dewhurst, David N.; Raven, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Samples of shales from the Ordovician Bongabinni and Goldwyer source rock formations were recovered from the Canning Basin (Western Australia). Attenuation was experimentally measured on preserved plugs from these formations in the frequency range between 10-2 and 102 Hz. Samples cored with different orientations with respect to the sedimentary bedding were prepared and tested in their native saturated state and after drying in the oven at 105 °C for 24 hr to assess the effect of fluids and of the sediment anisotropy on attenuation. To aid the interpretation of the experimental results, the clay-rich samples were characterized in terms of mineralogy, water content, porosity, permeability and microstructure. The two shales have significantly different quality factors; and this is seen to be dependent on both the saturation state of the samples and the propagation direction of the oscillatory signal. The attenuation coefficient for compression/extension parallel to bedding is less than that vertical to bedding in both the preserved and partially dehydrated situations. No frequency dependency is observed in the preserved samples within the range of frequencies explored in this study. On the other hand partially saturated samples show peaks in attenuation at around 40 Hz when the stress perturbation is transmitted normal to the macroscopic bedding. The interpretation of the attenuation measurements in terms of well-established theoretical models is discussed in view of the physical characteristics and microstructure of the tested rocks.

  12. Cdc42 deficiency induces podocyte apoptosis by inhibiting the Nwasp/stress fibers/YAP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z; Zhang, L; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhang, Q; Li, R; Ma, J; Li, Z; Yu, C; Lai, Y; Lin, T; Zhao, X; Zhang, B; Ye, Z; Liu, S; Wang, W; Liang, X; Liao, R; Shi, W

    2016-01-01

    Podocyte apoptosis is a major mechanism that leads to proteinuria in many chronic kidney diseases. However, the concert mechanisms that cause podocyte apoptosis in these kidney diseases are not fully understood. The Rho family of small GTPases has been shown to be required in maintaining podocyte structure and function. Recent studies have indicated that podocyte-specific deletion of Cdc42 in vivo, but not of RhoA or Rac1, leads to congenital nephrotic syndrome and glomerulosclerosis. However, the underlying cellular events in podocyte controlled by Cdc42 remain unclear. Here, we assessed the cellular mechanisms by which Cdc42 regulates podocyte apoptosis. We found that the expression of Cdc42 and its activity were significantly decreased in high glucose-, lipopolysaccharide- or adriamycin-injured podocytes. Reduced Cdc42 expression in vitro and in vivo by small interfering RNA and selective Cdc42 inhibitor ML-141, respectively, caused podocyte apoptosis and proteinuria. Our results further demonstrated that insufficient Cdc42 or Nwasp, its downstream effector, could decrease the mRNA and protein expression of YAP, which had been regarded as an anti-apoptosis protein in podocyte. Moreover, our data indicated that the loss of stress fibers caused by Cdc42/Nwasp deficiency also decreased Yes-associated protein (YAP) mRNA and protein expression, and induced podocyte apoptosis. Podocyte apoptosis induced by Cdc42/Nwasp/stress fiber deficiency was significantly inhibited by overexpressing-active YAP. Thus, the Cdc42/Nwasp/stress fibers/YAP signal pathway may potentially play an important role in regulating podocyte apoptosis. Maintaining necessary Cdc42 would be one potent way to prevent proteinuria kidney diseases. PMID:26986510

  13. Relation between left ventricular cavity pressure and volume and systolic fiber stress and strain in the wall.

    PubMed Central

    Arts, T; Bovendeerd, P H; Prinzen, F W; Reneman, R S

    1991-01-01

    Pumping power as delivered by the heart is generated by the cells in the myocardial wall. In the present model study global left-ventricular pump function as expressed in terms of cavity pressure and volume is related to local wall tissue function as expressed in terms of myocardial fiber stress and strain. On the basis of earlier studies in our laboratory, it may be concluded that in the normal left ventricle muscle fiber stress and strain are homogeneously distributed. So, fiber stress and strain may be approximated by single values, being valid for the whole wall. When assuming rotational symmetry and homogeneity of mechanical load in the wall, the dimensionless ratio of muscle fiber stress (sigma f) to left-ventricular pressure (Plv) appears to depend mainly on the dimensionless ratio of cavity volume (Vlv) to wall volume (Vw) and is quite independent of other geometric parameters. A good (+/- 10%) and simple approximation of this relation is sigma f/Plv = 1 + 3 Vlv/Vw. Natural fiber strain is defined by ef = In (lf/lf,ref), where lf,ref indicates fiber length (lf) in a reference situation. Using the principle of conservation of energy for a change in ef, it holds delta ef = (1/3)delta In (1 + 3Vlv/Vw). PMID:2015392

  14. Interface resistance in copper coated carbon determined by frequency dependent photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijamnajsuk, P.; Giuliani, F.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Gibkes, J.; Chotikaprakhan, S.; Bein, B. K.; Pelzl, J.

    2010-03-01

    The heat transfer in copper-carbon flat model systems was studied by frequency dependent photothermal radiometry. A novel approach which relies on the frequency dependence of the photothermal signal phase and amplitude at intermediate frequencies was introduced to determine the thermal interface resistance between the Cu-film and the substrate. The frequency dependent amplitude and phase of the photothermal signals were analyzed in the frame of a model of a one- dimensional heat flow perpendicular to the film plane. The interface resistance of the investigated CuC-sample with a Ti-bonding layer was found to increase by a factor two on heat treatment.

  15. Investigation on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Practical and inexpensive testing methods were developed to investigate stress-rupture properties of a polymeric composite with chopped glass fiber reinforcement for automotive applications. The material was tested in representative automotive environments to generate experimental data. The results indicate that environments have substantial effects on the stress-rupture behavior. The data were analyzed and developed into stress-rupture design criteria to address one of the durability aspects of the material for automotive structural applications.

  16. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... broccoli, spinach, and artichokes legumes (split peas, soy, lentils, etc.) almonds Look for the fiber content of ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to your favorite soups. ...

  17. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... short period of time can cause intestinal gas ( flatulence ), bloating , and abdominal cramps . This problem often goes ... 213. National Research Council. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and ...

  18. Dynamic stress analysis of smooth and notched fiber composite flexural specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the dynamic stress field in smooth and notched fiber composite (Charpy-type) specimens is reported in this paper. The analysis is performed with the aid of the direct transient response analysis solution sequence of MSC/NASTRAN. Three unidirectional composites were chosen for the study. They are S-Glass/Epoxy, Kevlar/Epoxy and T-300/Epoxy composite systems. The specimens are subjected to an impact load which is modeled as a triangular impulse with a maximum of 2000 lb and a duration of 1 ms. The results are compared with those of static analysis of the specimens subjected to a peak load of 2000 lb. For the geometry and type of materials studied, the static analysis results gave close conservative estimates for the dynamic stresses. Another interesting inference from the study is that the impact induced effects are felt by S-Glass/Epoxy specimens sooner than Kevlar/Epoxy or T-300/Epoxy specimens.

  19. Dynamic stress analysis of smooth and notched fiber composite flexural specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the dynamic stress field in smooth and notched fiber composite (Charpy-type) specimens is reported in this paper. The analysis is performed with the aid of the direct transient response analysis solution sequence of MSC/NASTRAN. Three unidirectional composites were chosen for the study. They are S-Glass/Epoxy, Kevlar/Epoxy and T-300/Epoxy composite systems. The specimens are subjected to an impact load which is modeled as a triangular impulse with a maximum of 2000 lb and a duration of 1 ms. The results are compared with those of static analysis of the specimens subjected to a peak load of 2000 lb. For the geometry and type of materials studied, the static analysis results gave close conservative estimates for the dynamic stresses. Another interesting inference from the study is that the impact induced effects are felt by S-Glass/Epoxy specimens sooner than Kevlar/Epoxy or T-300/Epoxy specimens.

  20. Fatigue surviving, fracture resistance, shear stress and finite element analysis of glass fiber posts with different diameters.

    PubMed

    Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; de Oliveira, Ariele Freitas; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Souto Borges, Alexandre Luiz; Limberguer, Inácio da Fontoura; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the shear stress presented in glass fiber posts with parallel fiber (0°) and different coronal diameters under fatigue, fracture resistance and FEA. 160 glass-fiber posts (N=160) with eight different coronal diameters were used (DT=double tapered, number of the post=coronal diameter and W=Wider - fiber post with coronal diameter wider than the conventional): DT1.4; DT1.8W; DT1.6; DT2W; DT1.8; DT2.2W; DT2; DT2.2. Eighty posts were submitted to mechanical cycling (3×10(6) cycles; inclination: 45°; load: 50N; frequency: 4Hz; temperature: 37°C) to assess the surviving under intermittent loading and other eighty posts were submitted to fracture resistance testing (resistance [N] and shear-stress [MPa] values were obtained). The eight posts types were 3D modeled (Rhinoceros 4.0) and the shear-stress (MPa) evaluated using FEA (Ansys 13.0). One-way ANOVA showed statistically differences to fracture resistance (DT2.2W and DT2.2 showed higher values) and shear stress values (DT1.4 showed lower values). Only the DT1.4 fiber posts failed after mechanical cycling. FEA showed similar values of shear stress between the groups and these values were similar to those obtained by shear stress testing. The failure analysis showed that 95% of specimens failed by shear. Posts with parallel fiber (0°) may suffer fractures when an oblique shear load is applied on the structure; except the thinner group, greater coronal diameters promoted the same shear stresses. PMID:25553557

  1. Method for Forming Fiber Reinforced Composite Bodies with Graded Composition and Stress Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Smialek, James A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A near-net, complex shaped ceramic fiber reinforced silicon carbide based composite bodies with graded compositions and stress zones is disclosed. To provide the composite a fiber preform is first fabricated and an interphase is applied by chemical vapor infiltration, sol-gel or polymer processes. This first body is further infiltrated with a polymer mixture containing carbon, and/or silicon carbide, and additional oxide, carbide, or nitride phases forming a second body. One side of the second body is spray coated or infiltrated with slurries containing high thermal expansion and oxidation resistant. crack sealant phases and the other side of this second body is coated with low expansion phase materials to form a third body. This third body consisting of porous carbonaceous matrix surrounding the previously applied interphase materials, is then infiltrated with molten silicon or molten silicon-refractory metal alloys to form a fourth body. The resulting fourth body comprises dense composites consisting of fibers with the desired interphase which are surrounded by silicon carbide and other second phases materials at the outer and inner surfaces comprising material of silicon, germanium, refractory metal suicides, borides, carbides, oxides, and combinations thereof The resulting composite fourth body has different compositional patterns from one side to the other.

  2. Seismic dynamic monitoring in CO2 flooding based on characterization of frequency-dependent velocity factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Hua; Li, Jun; Xiao, Wen; Tan, Ming-You; Zhang, Yun-Ying; Cui, Shi-Ling; Qu, Zhi-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The phase velocity of seismic waves varies with the propagation frequency, and thus frequency-dependent phenomena appear when CO2 gas is injected into a reservoir. By dynamically considering these phenomena with reservoir conditions it is thus feasible to extract the frequency-dependent velocity factor with the aim of monitoring changes in the reservoir both before and after CO2 injection. In the paper, we derive a quantitative expression for the frequency-dependent factor based on the Robinson seismic convolution model. In addition, an inversion equation with a frequency-dependent velocity factor is constructed, and a procedure is implemented using the following four processing steps: decomposition of the spectrum by generalized S transform, wavelet extraction of cross-well seismic traces, spectrum equalization processing, and an extraction method for frequency-dependent velocity factor based on the damped least-square algorithm. An attenuation layered model is then established based on changes in the Q value of the viscoelastic medium, and spectra of migration profiles from forward modeling are obtained and analyzed. Frequency-dependent factors are extracted and compared, and the effectiveness of the method is then verified using a synthetic data. The frequency-dependent velocity factor is finally applied to target processing and oil displacement monitoring based on real seismic data obtained before and after CO2 injection in the G89 well block within Shengli oilfield. Profiles and slices of the frequency-dependent factor determine its ability to indicate differences in CO2 flooding, and the predicting results are highly consistent with those of practical investigations within the well block.

  3. Velocity form of the Kohn-Sham frequency-dependent polarizability equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolotti, L.J.

    1987-11-01

    A single equation is derived for the determination of the first-order correction to the frequency-dependent density, due to the perturbation of a time-varying electric field. This new expression for the first-order correction to the frequency-dependent Kohn-Sham amplitudes depends explicitly upon the velocity form of the dipole-moment operator and the square of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian.

  4. Strain measurement during stress rupture of composite over-wrapped pressure vessel with fiber Bragg gratings sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-03-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPV liner.

  5. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  6. Strain Measurement during Stress Rupture of Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessel with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPY liner.

  7. A versatile micro-mechanical tester for actin stress fibers isolated from cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Tsubasa S; Deguchi, Shinji; Sakamoto, Naoya; Ohashi, Toshiro; Sato, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    Conventional atomic force microscopy is one of the major techniques to evaluate mechanical properties of cells and subcellular components. The use of a cantilever probe for sample manipulation within the vertical plane often makes absolute positioning of the probe, subject to thermal drift, difficult. In addition, the vertical test is unable to observe changes in the sample structure responsible for mechanical behavior detected by the probe. In the present study, an alternative mechanical tester was developed that incorporated a pair of micro-needles to manipulate a sample in a project plane, allowing acquisition of the accurate probe position and entire sample image. Using a vision-based feedback control, a micro-needle driven by a piezo actuator is moved to give user-defined displacements or forces to sample. To show its usefulness and versatility, three types of viscoelastic measurements on actin stress fibers isolated from smooth muscle cells were demonstrated: strain rate-controlled tensile tests, relaxation tests and creep tests. Fluorescence imaging of the stress fibers using Qdots over the course of the measurements, obtained through multiple image detectors, was also carried out. The technique described here is useful for examining the quantitative relationship between mechanical behavior and related structural changes of biomaterials. PMID:19940356

  8. WAXS studies of heat - mechanically modified amorphous PET fibers. Role of the tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velev, V.; Popov, A.; Kyurkchiev, P.; Veleva, L.; Pencheva, M.

    2014-12-01

    The present work is devoted to the investigation of the structure developments in as- spun amorphous poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) filaments occurred as a result of heat mechanically modification. The degree of crystallinity of the untreated samples was 1,7 %. The thermal deformation experiments were carried out under isothermal conditions. PET yarn was annealed during 10 min at constant temperature of 80°C after which the sample is subjected to a well-defined constant tensile stress for 120 s at the same temperature. The mechanical load is gravitationally in the range from 0 MPa to 30 MPa and with increment step of 3 MPa. Using of wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) were investigated the structural rearrangements in the studied samples caused by the fibers treatments. Dependences between the strain force values and the running in the specimen's structure development are established. And in particular, it was found that a small increase of the tensile stress from 3 MPa to 6 MPa leads to a massive increase in the fibers degree of crystallinity with more than 33%.

  9. Characterization of Palladin, a Novel Protein Localized to Stress Fibers and Cell Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Parast, Mana M.; Otey, Carol A.

    2000-01-01

    Here, we describe the identification of a novel phosphoprotein named palladin, which colocalizes with α-actinin in the stress fibers, focal adhesions, cell–cell junctions, and embryonic Z-lines. Palladin is expressed as a 90–92-kD doublet in fibroblasts and coimmunoprecipitates in a complex with α-actinin in fibroblast lysates. A cDNA encoding palladin was isolated by screening a mouse embryo library with mAbs. Palladin has a proline-rich region in the NH2-terminal half of the molecule and three tandem Ig C2 domains in the COOH-terminal half. In Northern and Western blots of chick and mouse tissues, multiple isoforms of palladin were detected. Palladin expression is ubiquitous in embryonic tissues, and is downregulated in certain adult tissues in the mouse. To probe the function of palladin in cultured cells, the Rcho-1 trophoblast model was used. Palladin expression was observed to increase in Rcho-1 cells when they began to assemble stress fibers. Antisense constructs were used to attenuate expression of palladin in Rcho-1 cells and fibroblasts, and disruption of the cytoskeleton was observed in both cell types. At longer times after antisense treatment, fibroblasts became fully rounded. These results suggest that palladin is required for the normal organization of the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions. PMID:10931874

  10. ADF and Cofilin1 Control Actin Stress Fibers, Nuclear Integrity, and Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kanellos, Georgios; Zhou, Jing; Patel, Hitesh; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Huels, David; Gurniak, Christine B.; Sandilands, Emma; Carragher, Neil O.; Sansom, Owen J.; Witke, Walter; Brunton, Valerie G.; Frame, Margaret C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genetic co-depletion of the actin-severing proteins ADF and CFL1 triggers catastrophic loss of adult homeostasis in multiple tissues. There is impaired cell-cell adhesion in skin keratinocytes with dysregulation of E-cadherin, hyperproliferation of differentiated cells, and ultimately apoptosis. Mechanistically, the primary consequence of depleting both ADF and CFL1 is uncontrolled accumulation of contractile actin stress fibers associated with enlarged focal adhesions at the plasma membrane, as well as reduced rates of membrane protrusions. This generates increased intracellular acto-myosin tension that promotes nuclear deformation and physical disruption of the nuclear lamina via the LINC complex that normally connects regulated actin filaments to the nuclear envelope. We therefore describe a pathway involving the actin-severing proteins ADF and CFL1 in regulating the dynamic turnover of contractile actin stress fibers, and this is vital to prevent the nucleus from being damaged by actin contractility, in turn preserving cell survival and tissue homeostasis. PMID:26655907

  11. Modeling of the cooling rate effect on the residual stress formation in the cantala fiber/recycled HDPE composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probotinanto, Yosafat C.; Raharjo, Wijang W.; Budiana, Eko P.

    2016-03-01

    Residual stress has great influence on the mechanical properties of polymer composites. Therefore, its formation during the manufacturing process needs to be investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the influences of cooling rate on the residual stress distribution of the cantala/rHDPE composite by simulation. The simulation was done by using a SOLID227 element type of ANSYS. The cooling rates that used in this study are 0.5°C/minute, 1°C/minute, and 60°C/minute. The values of the residual stress correspond to the increasing of the cooling rate are 1171.31 kPa, 1171.42 kPa, 1172.36 kPa. In the radial direction, the residual stress was tensile inside the fibers, while in the longitudinal direction, the tensile residual stress occurred in the matrix zones and compressive in the fiber zones.

  12. Carbon fiber based composites stress analysis. Experimental and computer comparative studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Buchacz, A.; Grabowski, Ł.; Majzner, M.

    2015-11-01

    Composite materials used nowadays for the production of composites are the result of advanced research. This allows assuming that they are among the most elaborate tech products of our century. That fact is evidenced by the widespread use of them in the most demanding industries like aerospace and space industry. But the heterogeneous materials and their advantages have been known to mankind in ancient times and they have been used by nature for millions of years. Among the fibers used in the industry most commonly used are nylon, polyester, polypropylene, boron, metal, glass, carbon and aramid. Thanks to their physical properties last three fiber types deserve special attention. High strength to weight ratio allow the use of many industrial solutions. Composites based on carbon and glass fibers are widely used in the automotive. Aramid fibers ideal for the fashion industry where the fabric made from the fibers used to produce the protective clothing. In the paper presented issues of stress analysis of composite materials have been presented. The components of composite materials and principles of composition have been discussed. Particular attention was paid to the epoxy resins and the fabrics made from carbon fibers. The article also includes basic information about strain measurements performed on with a resistance strain gauge method. For the purpose of the laboratory tests a series of carbon - epoxy composite samples were made. For this purpose plain carbon textile was used with a weight of 200 g/mm2 and epoxy resin LG730. During laboratory strain tests described in the paper Tenmex's delta type strain gauge rosettes were used. They were arranged in specific locations on the surface of the samples. Data acquisition preceded using HBM measurement equipment, which included measuring amplifier and measuring head. Data acquisition was performed using the Easy Catman. In order to verify the results of laboratory tests numerical studies were carried out in a

  13. HIPPOCAMPAL MOSSY FIBER LEU-ENKEPHALIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN FEMALE RATS IS SIGNIFICANTLY ALTERED FOLLOWING BOTH ACUTE AND CHRONIC STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Joseph P.; Kelter, David T.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Waters, Elizabeth M.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that responses to stress are sexually dimorphic, particularly in regard to learning and memory processes: while males display impaired cognitive performance and hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cell dendritic remodeling following chronic stress, females exhibit enhanced performance and no remodeling. Leu-enkephalin, an endogenous opioid peptide found in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway, plays a critical role in mediating synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapse. Estrogen is known to influence the expression of leu-enkephalin in the mossy fibers of females, with leu-enkephalin levels being highest at proestrus and estrus, when estrogen levels are elevated. Since stress is also known to alter the expression of leu-enkephalin in various brain regions, this study was designed to determine whether acute or chronic stress had an effect on mossy fiber leu-enkephalin levels in females or males, through the application of correlated quantitative light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. Both acute and chronic stress eliminated the estrogen-dependence of leu-enkephalin levels across the estrous cycle in females, but had no effect on male levels. However, following acute stress leu-enkephalin levels in females were consistently lowered to values comparable to the lowest control values, while following chronic stress they were consistently elevated to values comparable to the highest control values. Ultrastructural changes in leu-enkephalin labeled dense core vesicles paralleled light microscopic observations, with acute stress inducing a decrease in leu-enkephalin labeled dense core vesicles, and chronic stress inducing an increase in leu-enkephalin labeled dense-core vesicles in females. These findings suggest that alterations in leu-enkephalin levels following stress could play an important role in the sex-specific responses that females display in learning processes, including those important in addiction. PMID:24275289

  14. Thermal stress modification in regenerated fiber Bragg grating via manipulation of glass transition temperature based on CO₂-laser annealing.

    PubMed

    Lai, Man-Hong; Lim, Kok-Sing; Gunawardena, Dinusha S; Yang, Hang-Zhou; Chong, Wu-Yi; Ahmad, Harith

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated thermal stress relaxation in regenerated fiber Bragg gratings (RFBGs) by using direct CO₂-laser annealing technique. After the isothermal annealing and slow cooling process, the Bragg wavelength of the RFBG has been red-shifted. This modification is reversible by re-annealing and rapid cooling. It is repeatable with different cooling process in the subsequent annealing treatments. This phenomenon can be attributed to the thermal stress modification in the fiber core by means of manipulation of glass transition temperature with different cooling rates. This finding in this investigation is important for accurate temperature measurement of RFBG in dynamic environment. PMID:25723423

  15. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  16. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Creep and Stress-Rupture Behavior of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers at 1200 and 1400 C in argon and air. Examined were as-received fibers as well as fibers annealed from 1400 to 1800 C for 1 hour in argon before testing. The creep and rupture results for these annealed fibers were compared to those of the as-received fibers to determine the effects of annealing temperature, test temperature, and test environment. Argon anneals up to 1500 C degrade room temperature strength of Hi-Nicalon fibers, but improve fiber creep resistance in argon or air by as much as 100% with no significant degradation in rupture strength. Argon anneals above 1500 C continue to improve fiber creep resistance when tested in argon, but significantly degrade creep resistance and rupture strength when tested in air. Decrease in creep resistance in air is greater at 1200 C than at 1400 C. Mechanisms are suggested for the observed behavior.

  17. Role of stress fibers and focal adhesions as a mediator for mechano-signal transduction in endothelial cells in situ

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Kazuo; Kano, Yumiko; Ookawara, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    Fluid shear stress is the mechanical force generated by the blood flow which is applied over the apical surface of endothelial cells in situ. The findings of a recent study suggest that stress fibers and its associated focal adhesions play roles in mechano-signal transduction mechanism. Stress fibers are present along the apical and the basal portion of the endothelial cells. Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress and change their morphological characteristics in both their cell shape and cytoskeletal organization. Atherosclerosis is a common disease of the arteries and it occurs in areas around the branching site of blood vessels where the cells are exposed to low fluid shear stress. The organization of stress fibers and focal adhesions are strongly influenced by shear stress, and therefore the generation of atherosclerotic lesions seem to be associated with the cytoskeletal components of endothelial cells. This review describes the possible role of the cytoskeleton as a mechano-transducer in endothelial cells in situ. PMID:19337541

  18. Frequency-dependent seismic attenuation in shales: Experimental results and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Piane, C.; Madonna, C.; Sarout, J.; Saenger, E. H.; Dewhurst, D.

    2012-12-01

    Shale samples of from the Ordovician Bongabinni and Goldwyer source rock formations (Canning Basin, Western Australia) were characterized in terms of mineralogy, water content, porosity, permeability and microstructure. Additionally attenuation was experimentally measured in the frequency range between 10-2-102 Hz. Preserved samples cored with different orientation with respect to the bedding were prepared and tested in their native saturated state and after drying at 105°C for 24 hours to assess the effect of fluids and of the sediment anisotropy on attenuation. The two shales have significantly different quality factors; and this is seen to be dependent on both the saturation state of the samples and the propagation direction of the oscillatory signal. The attenuation coefficient parallel to bedding is less than that vertical to bedding in both the saturated and partially dehydrated situations. No frequency dependency is observed in the fully saturated samples within the range of frequencies explored in this study. On the other hand partially saturated samples show peaks in attenuation at around 40 Hz when the stress perturbation is transmitted normal to the macroscopic bedding. Through theroetical models we interpret this behavior to be due to fluid motion at the meso- and microscale; i.e. a combination of squirt flow between compliant pores (aspect ratio ≈ 10-3) and fluid motion within saturated portions of the samples with characteristic size ≈ 10-4m . This interpretation is compatible with microstructural investigation by SEM, mercury injection porosimetry and synchrotron micro-tomographic images revealing both quantitative and qualitative information on the pore geometry and size within the two shales.

  19. Effect of inelastic shear stress at the interfaces in the material with a unidirectional fibrous structure on the SIF for a crack in the fiber and the energy absorbed at fiber fracture.

    PubMed

    Borovik, Alexandra V; Borovik, Valery G

    2014-06-01

    The paper suggests considering the presence of inelastic shear mechanisms in the direction of the maximum tensile stress and the absence of these mechanisms in the other directions as the main feature of a structural material of biological origin. A "cracked fiber in tube" model is used for the study of the effect of interface cohesive strength on the stress intensity factor (SIF) for a crack in the fiber and on the energy absorbed under inelastic shear at the interface of fibers at their fracture. The values of the cohesive strength of the interface between the fibers and the distance between the cracks in the fiber at which the maximum energy is absorbed at material fracture at the stage of the crack growth in the fibers are obtained. This stage precedes the pullout process of the completely fractured fibers. PMID:24566378

  20. Portable polarimetric fiber stress sensor system for visco-elastic and biomimetic material analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Mark C.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2015-05-01

    Non-destructive materials characterization methods have significantly changed our fundamental understanding of material behavior and have enabled predictive models to be developed. However, the majority of these efforts have focused on crystalline and metallic materials, and transitioning to biomaterials, such as tissue samples, is non-trivial, as there are strict sample handling requirements and environmental controls which prevent the use of conventional equipment. Additionally, the samples are smaller and more complex in composition. Therefore, more advanced sample analysis methods capable of operating in these environments are needed. In the present work, we demonstrate an all-fiber-based material analysis system based on optical polarimetry. Unlike previous polarimetric systems which relied on free-space components, our method combines an in-line polarizer, polarization-maintaining fiber, and a polarimeter to measure the arbitrary polarization state of the output, eliminating all free-space elements. Additionally, we develop a more generalized theoretical analysis which allows more information about the polarization state to be obtained via the polarimeter. We experimentally verify our system using a series of elastomer samples made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a commonly used biomimetic material. By adjusting the base:curing agent ratio of the PDMS, we controllably tune the Young's modulus of the samples to span over an order of magnitude. The measured results are in good agreement with those obtained using a conventional load-frame system. Our fiber-based polarimetric stress sensor shows promise for use as a simple research tool that is portable and suitable for a wide variety of applications.

  1. Image Analysis for the Quantitative Comparison of Stress Fibers and Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Jorge-Peñas, Alvaro; Moreno-Arotzena, Oihana; Oregi, Amaia; Lasa, Marta; García-Aznar, José Manuel; De Juan-Pardo, Elena M.; Aldabe, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Actin stress fibers (SFs) detect and transmit forces to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and molecules in this pathway determine cellular behavior. Here, we designed two different computational tools to quantify actin SFs and the distribution of actin cytoskeletal proteins within a normalized cellular morphology. Moreover, a systematic cell response comparison between the control cells and those with impaired actin cytoskeleton polymerization was performed to demonstrate the reliability of the tools. Indeed, a variety of proteins that were present within the string beginning at the focal adhesions (vinculin) up to the actin SFs contraction (non-muscle myosin II (NMMII)) were analyzed. Finally, the software used allows for the quantification of the SFs based on the relative positions of FAs. Therefore, it provides a better insight into the cell mechanics and broadens the knowledge of the nature of SFs. PMID:25269086

  2. Mathematical modeling of the dynamic mechanical behavior of neighboring sarcomeres in actin stress fibers

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, L.M.; Edgar, L.T.; Blankman, E.; Beckerle, M.C.; Shiu, Y T

    2014-01-01

    Actin stress fibers (SFs) in live cells consist of series of dynamic individual sarcomeric units. Within a group of consecutive SF sarcomeres, individual sarcomeres can spontaneously shorten or lengthen without changing the overall length of this group, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We used a computational model to test our hypothesis that this dynamic behavior is inherent to the heterogeneous mechanical properties of the sarcomeres and the cytoplasmic viscosity. Each sarcomere was modeled as a discrete element consisting of an elastic spring, a viscous dashpot and an active contractile unit all connected in parallel, and experiences forces as a result of actin filament elastic stiffness, myosin II contractility, internal viscoelasticity, or cytoplasmic drag. When all four types of forces are considered, the simulated dynamic behavior closely resembles the experimental observations, which include a low-frequency fluctuation in individual sarcomere length and compensatory lengthening and shortening of adjacent sarcomeres. Our results suggest that heterogeneous stiffness and viscoelasticity of actin fibers, heterogeneous myosin II contractility, and the cytoplasmic drag are sufficient to cause spontaneous fluctuations in SF sarcomere length. Our results shed new light to the dynamic behavior of SF and help design experiments to further our understanding of SF dynamics. PMID:25110525

  3. Implementation of thermal residual stresses in the analysis of fiber bridged matrix crack growth in titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1994-01-01

    In this research, thermal residual stresses were incorporated in an analysis of fiber-bridged matrix cracks in unidirectional and cross-ply titanium matrix composites (TMC) containing center holes or center notches. Two TMC were investigated, namely, SCS-6/Timelal-21S laminates. Experimentally, matrix crack initiation and growth were monitored during tension-tension fatigue tests conducted at room temperature and at an elevated temperature of 200 C. Analytically, thermal residual stresses were included in a fiber bridging (FB) model. The local R-ratio and stress-intensity factor in the matrix due to thermal and mechanical loadings were calculated and used to evaluate the matrix crack growth behavior in the two materials studied. The frictional shear stress term, tau, assumed in this model was used as a curve-fitting parameter to matrix crack growth data. The scatter band in the values of tau used to fit the matrix crack growth data was significantly reduced when thermal residual stresses were included in the fiber bridging analysis. For a given material system, lay-up and temperature, a single value of tau was sufficient to analyze the crack growth data. It was revealed in this study that thermal residual stresses are an important factor overlooked in the original FB models.

  4. Fiber-based polarimetric stress sensor for measuring the Young's modulus of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Mark C.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2015-03-01

    Polarimetric optical fiber-based stress and pressure sensors have proven to be a robust tool for measuring and detecting changes in the Young's modulus (E) of materials in response to external stimuli, including the real-time monitoring of the structural integrity of bridges and buildings. These sensors typically work by using a pair of polarizers before and after the sensing region of the fiber, and often require precise alignment to achieve high sensitivity. The ability to perform similar measurements in natural and in engineered biomaterials could provide significant insights and enable research advancement and preventative healthcare. However, in order for this approach to be successful, it is necessary to reduce the complexity of the system by removing free-space components and the need for alignment. As the first step in this path, we have developed a new route for performing these measurements. By generalizing and expanding established theoretical analyses for these types of sensors, we have developed a predictive theoretical model. Additionally, by replacing the conventional free space components and polarization filters with a polarimeter, we have constructed a sensor system with higher sensitivity and which is semi-portable. In initial experiments, a series of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples with several base:curing agent ratios ranging from 5:1 up to 30:1 were prepared to simulate tissues with different stiffnesses. By simultaneously producing stress-strain curves using a load frame and monitoring the polarization change of light traveling through the samples, we verified the accuracy of our theoretical model.

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Characterization of frequency-dependent glass transition temperature by Vogel-Fulcher relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yu; Jin, Li

    2008-08-01

    The complex mechanical modulus of polymer and polymer based composite materials showed a frequency-dependent behaviour during glass transition relaxation, which was historically modelled by the Arrhenius equation. However, this might not be true in a broad frequency domain based on the experience from the frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity, which resulted from the same glass transition relaxation as for the complex mechanical modulus. Considering a good correspondence between dielectric and mechanical relaxation during glass transition, the Vogel-Fulcher relationship, previously proposed for the frequency dependence of dielectric permittivity, is introduced for that of the mechanical modulus; and the corresponding static glass transition temperature (Tf) was first determined for polymer and polymer based composite materials.

  6. Stabilizing soliton-based multichannel transmission with frequency dependent linear gain-loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debananda; Peleg, Avner; Nguyen, Quan M.

    2016-07-01

    We report several major theoretical steps towards realizing stable long-distance multichannel soliton transmission in Kerr nonlinear waveguide loops. We find that transmission destabilization in a single waveguide is caused by resonant formation of radiative sidebands and investigate the possibility to increase transmission stability by optimization with respect to the Kerr nonlinearity coefficient γ. Moreover, we develop a general method for transmission stabilization, based on frequency dependent linear gain-loss in Kerr nonlinear waveguide couplers, and implement it in two-channel and three-channel transmission. We show that the introduction of frequency dependent loss leads to significant enhancement of transmission stability even for non-optimal γ values via decay of radiative sidebands, which takes place as a dynamic phase transition. For waveguide couplers with frequency dependent linear gain-loss, we observe stable oscillations of soliton amplitudes due to decay and regeneration of the radiative sidebands.

  7. A kinetic model for the frequency dependence of cholinergic modulation at hippocampal GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Stone, Emily; Haario, Heikki; Lawrence, J Josh

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we use a simple model of presynaptic neuromodulation of GABA signaling to decipher paired whole-cell recordings of frequency dependent cholinergic neuromodulation at CA1 parvalbumin-containing basket cell (PV BC)-pyramidal cell synapses. Variance-mean analysis is employed to normalize the data, which is then used to estimate parameters in the mathematical model. Various parameterizations and hidden parameter dependencies are investigated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) parameter estimation techniques. This analysis reveals that frequency dependence of cholinergic modulation requires both calcium-dependent recovery from depression and mAChR-induced inhibition of presynaptic calcium entry. A reduction in calcium entry into the presynaptic terminal in the kinetic model accounted for the frequency-dependent effects of mAChR activation. PMID:25445738

  8. On the modal decoupling of linear mechanical systems with frequency-dependent viscoelastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroddi, Franco; Calore, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Linear Multi-Degree of Freedom (MDOF) mechanical systems having frequency-dependent viscoelastic behaviors are often studied and modelled in frequency or Laplace domains. Indeed, once this modelling process is carried out, it is not generally possible to reduce the obtained MDOF damped mechanical system to a set of uncoupled damped modal oscillators apart from some special cases. In this paper a general procedure has been proposed to transform a coupled linear mechanical system having frequency-dependent viscoelastic characteristics to a set of independent damped modal oscillators. The procedure is based on a linear co-ordinate transformation procedure using matrices in real field only. The approach is exact and based on the solution of one associated eigenproblem for the case of linearly viscous damping. In the general case of frequency-dependent viscoelastic materials, the approach includes an iterative procedure solving local eigenproblems.Some numerical results are reported to show the capabilities of the proposed approach.

  9. A kinetic model for the frequency dependence of cholinergic modulation at hippocampal GABAergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Emily; Haario, Heikki; Lawrence, J. Josh

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we use a simple model of presynaptic neuromodulation of GABA signalling to decipher paired whole-cell recordings of frequency dependent cholinergic neuromodulation at CA1 parvalbumin-containing basket cell (PV BC)-pyramidal cell synapses. Variance-mean analysis is employed to normalize the data, which is then used to estimate parameters in the mathematical model. Various parameterizations and hidden parameter dependencies are investigated using Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) parameter estimation techniques. This analysis reveals that frequency dependence of cholinergic modulation requires both calcium-dependent recovery from depression and mAChR-induced inhibition of presynaptic calcium entry. A reduction in calcium entry into the presynaptic terminal in the kinetic model accounted for the frequency-dependent effects of mAChR activation. PMID:25445738

  10. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by glass fibers on human alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Ledda, Caterina; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Renis, Marcella; Ferrante, Margherita; Cardile, Venera

    2015-04-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers have been widely used as insulation material as asbestos substitutes; however their morphology and composition raises concerns. In 1988 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified fiberglass, rock wool, slag wool, and ceramic fibers as Group 2B, i.e. possibly carcinogenic to humans. In 2002 it reassigned fiberglass, rock and slag wool, and continuous glass filaments to Group 3, not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to verify the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and oxidative stress production induced by in vitro exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells A549 to glass fibers with a predominant diameter <3 μm (97%) and length >5 μm (93%). A549 cells were incubated with 5, 50, or 100 μg/ml (2.1, 21, and 42 μg/cm(2), respectively) of glass fibers for 72 h. Cytotoxicity and DNA damage were tested by the MTT and the Comet assay, respectively. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blotting, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent, and concentration of reactive oxygen species by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that glass fiber exposure significantly reduced cell viability and increased DNA damage and oxidative stress production in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that glass fibers exert cytotoxic and genotoxic effects related to increased oxidative stress on the human alveolar cell line A549. PMID:25620604

  11. Modelling the vibration of sandwich beams using frequency-dependent parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backström, D.; Nilsson, A. C.

    2007-03-01

    Various types of sandwich beams with foam or honeycomb cores are currently used in the industry, indicating the need for simple methods describing the dynamics of these complex structures. By implementing frequency-dependent parameters, the vibration of sandwich composite beams can be approximated using simple fourth-order beam theory. A higher-order sandwich beam model is utilized in order to obtain estimates of the frequency-dependent bending stiffness and shear modulus of the equivalent Bernoulli-Euler and Timoshenko models. The resulting predicted eigenfrequencies and transfer accellerance functions are compared to the data obtained from the higher-order model and from measurements.

  12. Thermal stress and Ca-independent contractile activation in mammalian skeletal muscle fibers at high temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W

    1994-01-01

    Temperature dependence of the isometric tension was examined in chemically skinned, glycerinated, rabbit Psoas, muscle fibers immersed in relaxing solution (pH approximately 7.1 at 20 degrees C, pCa approximately 8, ionic strength 200 mM); the average rate of heating/cooling was 0.5-1 degree C/s. The resting tension increased reversibly with temperature (5-42 degrees C); the tension increase was slight in warming to approximately 25 degrees C (a linear thermal contraction, -alpha, of approximately 0.1%/degree C) but became more pronounced above approximately 30 degrees C (similar behavior was seen in intact rat muscle fibers). The extra tension rise at the high temperatures was depressed in acidic pH and in the presence of 10 mM inorganic phosphate; it was absent in rigor fibers in which the tension decreased with heating (a linear thermal expansion, alpha, of approximately 4 x 10(-5)/degree C). Below approximately 20 degrees C, the tension response after a approximately 1% length increase (complete < 0.5 ms) consisted of a fast decay (approximately 150.s-1 at 20 degrees C) and a slow decay (approximately 10.s-1) of tension. The rate of fast decay increased with temperature (Q10 approximately 2.4); at 35-40 degrees C, it was approximately 800.s-1, and it was followed by a delayed tension rise (stretch-activation) at 30-40.s-1. The linear rise of passive tension in warming to approximately 25 degrees C may be due to increase of thermal stress in titin (connectin)-myosin composite filament, whereas the extra tension above approximately 30 degrees C may arise from cycling cross-bridges; based on previous findings from regulated actomyosin in solution (Fuchs, 1975), it is suggested that heating reversibly inactivates the troponin-tropomyosin control mechanism and leads to Ca-independent thin filament activation at high temperatures. Additionally, we propose that the heating-induced increase of endo-sarcomeric stress within titin-myosin composite filament makes the

  13. Creep and Stress-strain Behavior After Creep from Sic Fiber Reinforced, Melt-infiltrated Sic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (Hi-Nicalon Type S, Nippon Carbon) reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites containing melt-infiltrated Si were subjected to creep at 1315 C for a number of different stress conditions, This study is aimed at understanding the time-dependent creep behavior of CMCs for desired use-conditions, and also more importantly, how the stress-strain response changes as a result of the time-temperature-stress history of the crept material. For the specimens that did not rupture, fast fracture experiments were performed at 1315 C or at room temperature immediately following tensile creep. In many cases, the stress-strain response and the resulting matrix cracking stress of the composite change due to stress-redistribution between composite constituents during tensile creep. The paper will discuss these results and its implications on applications of these materials for turbine engine components.

  14. Sialylation of vitronectin regulates stress fiber formation and cell spreading of dermal fibroblasts via a heparin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yasunori; Tanabe, Mio; Date, Kimie; Sakuda, Kanoko; Sano, Kotone; Ogawa, Haruko

    2016-04-01

    Vitronectin (VN) plays an important role in tissue regeneration. We previously reported that VN from partial hepatectomized (PH) rats results in a decrease of sialylation of VN and de-sialylation of VN decreases the cell spreading of hepatic stellate cells. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism how sialylation of VN regulates the properties of mouse primary cultured dermal fibroblasts (MDF) and a dermal fibroblast cell line, Swiss 3T3 cells. At first, we confirmed that VN from PH rats or de-sialylated VN also decreased cell spreading in MDF and Swiss 3T3 cells. The de-sialylation suppressed stress fiber formation in Swiss 3T3 cells. Next, we analyzed the effect of the de-sialylation of VN on stress fiber formation in Swiss 3T3 cells. RGD peptide, an inhibitor for a cell binding site of VN, did not affect the cell attachment of Swiss 3T3 cells on untreated VN but significantly decreased it on de-sialylated VN, suggesting that the de-sialylation attenuates the binding activity of an RGD-independent binding site in VN. To analyze a candidate RGD-independent binding site, an inhibition experiment of stress fiber formation for a heparin binding site was performed. The addition of heparin and treatment of cells with heparinase decreased stress fiber formation in Swiss 3T3 cells. Furthermore, de-sialylation increased the binding activity of VN to heparin, as detected by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). These results demonstrate that sialylation of VN glycans regulates stress fiber formation and cell spreading of dermal fibroblast cells via a heparin binding site. PMID:26979432

  15. Stress-intensity factors of r-cracks in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. H.; Schmauder, S.

    1993-02-01

    The plane stress/plane strain problem of radial matrix cracking in fiber-reinforced composites, due to thermal mismatch and externally applied stress is solved numerically in the framework of linear elasticity, using Erdogan's integral equation technique. It is shown that, in order to obtain the results of the combined loading case, the solutions of purely thermal and purely mechanical loading can simply be superimposed. Stress-intensity factors are calculated for various lengths and distances of the crack from the interface for each of these loading conditions.

  16. Dynamic characterization of short duration stress pulses generated by a magnetic flyer plate in carbon-fiber/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Bruck, H.A.; Epstein, J.S.; Perry, K.E. Jr.; Abdallah, M.G.

    1995-11-01

    There is a great deal of interest in characterizing the dynamic mechanical behavior of laminated carbon-fiber/epoxy composites for military and aerospace applications. Current research efforts have been directed at measuring the strength lost because of accumulated damage. Very little work has been done to determine how this damage is accumulated during dynamic mechanical loading. Of particular interest is the effect of short duration (< 1 {micro}s) stress pulses on mechanical behavior such as delamination. In this paper, a magnetic flyer plate apparatus is presented for generating a short duration stress pulse in a unidirectional carbon-fiber/epoxy laminated composite. The stress pulse is characterized using a dynamic moire interferometer.

  17. Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-rupture properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C tensile and stress-rupture strength of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C. The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-rupture at 1093 C. Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C. The stress-rupture properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C ultimate tensile strength of the composites.

  18. Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-rupture properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C (2000 F) tensile and stress-rupture strength of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C (2000 F). The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-rupture at 1093 C (2000 F). Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C (2000 F). The stress-rupture properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C (2000 F) ultimate tensile strength of the composites.

  19. Effects of mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distribution in fiber-reinforced composite adhesive fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Using finite element analysis (FEA), this study investigated the effects of the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distributions in fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC) adhesive fixed partial dentures (AFPDs). Two adhesive resin cements were compared: Super-Bond C&B and Panavia Fluoro Cement. The AFPD consisted of a pontic to replace a maxillary right lateral incisor and retainers on a maxillary central incisor and canine. FRC framework was made of isotropic, continuous, unidirectional E-glass fibers. Maximum principal stresses were calculated using finite element method (FEM). Test results revealed that differences in the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements led to different stress distributions at the cement interfaces between AFPD and abutment teeth. Clinical implication of these findings suggested that the safety and longevity of an AFPD depended on choosing an adhesive resin cement with the appropriate mechanical properties. PMID:22447051

  20. Assessing the utility of frequency dependent nudging for reducing biases in biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagman, Karl B.; Fennel, Katja; Thompson, Keith R.; Bianucci, Laura

    2014-09-01

    Bias errors, resulting from inaccurate boundary and forcing conditions, incorrect model parameterization, etc. are a common problem in environmental models including biogeochemical ocean models. While it is important to correct bias errors wherever possible, it is unlikely that any environmental model will ever be entirely free of such errors. Hence, methods for bias reduction are necessary. A widely used technique for online bias reduction is nudging, where simulated fields are continuously forced toward observations or a climatology. Nudging is robust and easy to implement, but suppresses high-frequency variability and introduces artificial phase shifts. As a solution to this problem Thompson et al. (2006) introduced frequency dependent nudging where nudging occurs only in prescribed frequency bands, typically centered on the mean and the annual cycle. They showed this method to be effective for eddy resolving ocean circulation models. Here we add a stability term to the previous form of frequency dependent nudging which makes the method more robust for non-linear biological models. Then we assess the utility of frequency dependent nudging for biological models by first applying the method to a simple predator-prey model and then to a 1D ocean biogeochemical model. In both cases we only nudge in two frequency bands centered on the mean and the annual cycle, and then assess how well the variability in higher frequency bands is recovered. We evaluate the effectiveness of frequency dependent nudging in comparison to conventional nudging and find significant improvements with the former.

  1. Negative frequency-dependent selection between Pasteuria penetrans and its host Meloidogyne arenaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In negative frequency-dependant selection (NFDS), parasite genotypes capable of infecting the numerically dominant host genotype are favored, while host genotypes resistant to the dominant parasite genotype are favored, creating a cyclical pattern of resistant genotypes in the host population and, a...

  2. Colour polymorphism torn apart by opposing positive frequency-dependent selection, yet maintained in space.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Swanne P; Kokko, Hanna; Rojas, Bibiana; Nokelainen, Ossi; Mappes, Johanna

    2015-11-01

    Polymorphic warning signals in aposematic species are enigmatic because predator learning and discrimination should select for the most common coloration, resulting in positive frequency-dependent survival selection. Here, we investigated whether differential mating success could create sufficiently strong negative frequency-dependent selection for rare morphs to explain polymorphic (white and yellow) warning coloration in male wood tiger moths (Parasemia plantaginis). We conducted an experiment in semi-natural conditions where we estimated mating success for both white and yellow male moths under three different morph frequencies. Contrary to expectations, mating success was positively frequency-dependent: white morph males had high relative fitness when common, likewise yellow morph males had high relative fitness when instead they were common. We hence built a model parameterized with our data to examine whether polymorphism can be maintained despite two sources of positive frequency dependence. The model includes known spatial variation in the survival advantage enjoyed by the yellow morph and assumes that relative mating success follows our experimentally derived values. It predicts that polymorphism is possible under migration for up to approximately 20% exchange of individuals between subpopulations in each generation. Our results suggest that differential mating success combined with spatial variation in predator communities may operate as a selection mosaic that prevents complete fixation of either morph. PMID:26114930

  3. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES. X. Wang1 *, D.E. Housel *, J. Page2, C.F. Blackmanl. 1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711 USA, 2Oakland, California USA
    ...

  4. Stress-intensity factors of r-cracks in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. H.; Schmauder, S.

    1993-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of the calculation of stress-intensity factors at the tips of radial matrix cracks (r-cracks) in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and/or transverse uniaxial or biaxial mechanical loading. The crack is either located in the immediate vicinity of a single fiber or it terminates at the interface between the fiber and the matrix. The problem is stated and solved numerically within the framework of linear elasticity using Erdogan's integral equation technique. It is shown that the solutions for purely thermal and purely mechanical loading can simply be superimposed in order to obtain the results of the combined loading case. Stress-intensity factors (SIFs) are calculated for various lengths and distances of the crack from the interface for each of these loading conditions. The behavior of the SIFs for cracks growing towards or away from the interface is examined. The role of the elastic mismatch between the fibers and the matrix is emphasized and studied extensively using the so-called Dundurs' parameters. It is shown that an r-crack, which is remotely located from the fiber, can either be stabilized or destabilized depending on both the elastic as well as the thermal mismatch of the fibrous composite. Furthermore, Dundurs' parameters are used to predict the exponent of the singularity of the crack tip elastic field and the behavior of the corresponding SIFs for cracks which terminate at the interface. An analytical solution for the SIFs is derived for all three loading conditions under the assumption that the elastic constants of the matrix and the fiber are equal. It is shown that the analytical solution is in good agreement with the corresponding numerical results. Moreover, another analytical solution from the literature, which is based upon Paris' equation for the calculation of stress-intensity factors, is compared with the numerical results and it is shown to be valid only for extremely short r-cracks touching the

  5. Phase-Shifted Based Numerical Method for Modeling Frequency-Dependent Effects on Seismic Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Qi, Yingkai; He, Xilei; He, Zhenhua; Chen, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The significant velocity dispersion and attenuation has often been observed when seismic waves propagate in fluid-saturated porous rocks. Both the magnitude and variation features of the velocity dispersion and attenuation are frequency-dependent and related closely to the physical properties of the fluid-saturated porous rocks. To explore the effects of frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation on the seismic responses, in this work, we present a numerical method for seismic data modeling based on the diffusive and viscous wave equation (DVWE), which introduces the poroelastic theory and takes into account diffusive and viscous attenuation in diffusive-viscous-theory. We derive a phase-shift wave extrapolation algorithm in frequencywavenumber domain for implementing the DVWE-based simulation method that can handle the simultaneous lateral variations in velocity, diffusive coefficient and viscosity. Then, we design a distributary channels model in which a hydrocarbon-saturated sand reservoir is embedded in one of the channels. Next, we calculated the synthetic seismic data to analytically and comparatively illustrate the seismic frequency-dependent behaviors related to the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir, by employing DVWE-based and conventional acoustic wave equation (AWE) based method, respectively. The results of the synthetic seismic data delineate the intrinsic energy loss, phase delay, lower instantaneous dominant frequency and narrower bandwidth due to the frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation when seismic wave travels through the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir. The numerical modeling method is expected to contribute to improve the understanding of the features and mechanism of the seismic frequency-dependent effects resulted from the hydrocarbon-saturated porous rocks.

  6. Phase-Shifted Based Numerical Method for Modeling Frequency-Dependent Effects on Seismic Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Qi, Yingkai; He, Xilei; He, Zhenhua; Chen, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The significant velocity dispersion and attenuation has often been observed when seismic waves propagate in fluid-saturated porous rocks. Both the magnitude and variation features of the velocity dispersion and attenuation are frequency-dependent and related closely to the physical properties of the fluid-saturated porous rocks. To explore the effects of frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation on the seismic responses, in this work, we present a numerical method for seismic data modeling based on the diffusive and viscous wave equation (DVWE), which introduces the poroelastic theory and takes into account diffusive and viscous attenuation in diffusive-viscous-theory. We derive a phase-shift wave extrapolation algorithm in frequencywavenumber domain for implementing the DVWE-based simulation method that can handle the simultaneous lateral variations in velocity, diffusive coefficient and viscosity. Then, we design a distributary channels model in which a hydrocarbon-saturated sand reservoir is embedded in one of the channels. Next, we calculated the synthetic seismic data to analytically and comparatively illustrate the seismic frequency-dependent behaviors related to the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir, by employing DVWE-based and conventional acoustic wave equation (AWE) based method, respectively. The results of the synthetic seismic data delineate the intrinsic energy loss, phase delay, lower instantaneous dominant frequency and narrower bandwidth due to the frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation when seismic wave travels through the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir. The numerical modeling method is expected to contribute to improve the understanding of the features and mechanism of the seismic frequency-dependent effects resulted from the hydrocarbon-saturated porous rocks.

  7. Finite element analysis of stress concentration in three popular brands of fiber posts systems used for maxillary central incisor teeth

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Shalini; Garg, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To study the stress concentrations in endodontically treated maxillary central incisor teeth restored with 3 different fiber post systems subjected to various oblique occlusal loads. Materials and Methods: FEM analysis was used to analyze stress concentrations generated in maxillary anterior teeth. Computer aided designing was used to create a 2-D model of an upper central incisor. Post systems analyzed were the DT Light Post (RDT, Bisco), Luscent Anchor (Dentatus) & RelyX (3M-ESPE). The entire design assembly was subjected to analysis by ANSYS for oblique loading forces of 25N, 80N & 125 N Results: The resultant data showed that the RelyX generated the least amount of stress concentration. Conclusions: Minimal stress buildups contribute to the longevity of the restorations. Thus RelyX by virtue of judicious stress distribution is the better option for restoration of grossly decayed teeth. PMID:22025836

  8. Effect of preconditioning and stress relaxation on local collagen fiber re-alignment: inhomogeneous properties of rat supraspinatus tendon.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kristin S; Edelstein, Lena; Connizzo, Brianne K; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2012-03-01

    Repeatedly and consistently measuring the mechanical properties of tendon is important but presents a challenge. Preconditioning can provide tendons with a consistent loading history to make comparisons between groups from mechanical testing experiments. However, the specific mechanisms occurring during preconditioning are unknown. Previous studies have suggested that microstructural changes, such as collagen fiber re-alignment, may be a result of preconditioning. Local collagen fiber re-alignment is quantified throughout tensile mechanical testing using a testing system integrated with a polarized light setup, consisting of a backlight, 90 deg-offset rotating polarizer sheets on each side of the test sample, and a digital camera, in a rat supraspinatus tendon model, and corresponding mechanical properties are measured. Local circular variance values are compared throughout the mechanical test to determine if and where collagen fiber re-alignment occurred. The inhomogeneity of the tendon is examined by comparing local circular variance values, optical moduli and optical transition strain values. Although the largest amount of collagen fiber re-alignment was found during preconditioning, significant re-alignment was also demonstrated in the toe and linear regions of the mechanical test. No significant changes in re-alignment were seen during stress relaxation. The insertion site of the supraspinatus tendon demonstrated a lower linear modulus and a more disorganized collagen fiber distribution throughout all mechanical testing points compared to the tendon midsubstance. This study identified a correlation between collagen fiber re-alignment and preconditioning and suggests that collagen fiber re-alignment may be a potential mechanism of preconditioning and merits further investigation. In particular, the conditions necessary for collagen fibers to re-orient away from the direction of loading and the dependency of collagen reorganization on its initial distribution

  9. Free radical activity of industrial fibers: role of iron in oxidative stress and activation of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, P S; Brown, D M; Beswick, P H; MacNee, W; Rahman, I; Donaldson, K

    1997-01-01

    We studied asbestos, vitreous fiber (MMVF10), and refractory ceramic fiber (RCF1) from the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers' Association fiber repository regarding the following: free radical damage to plasmid DNA, iron release, ability to deplete glutathione (GSH), and activate redox-sensitive transcription factors in macrophages. Asbestos had much more free radical activity than any of the man-made vitreous fibers. More Fe3+ was released than Fe2+ and more of both was released at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.2. Release of iron from the different fibers was generally not a good correlate of ability to cause free radical injury to the plasmid DNA. All fiber types caused some degree of oxidative stress, as revealed by depletion of intracellular GSH. Amosite asbestos upregulated nuclear binding of activator protein 1 transcription factor to a greater level than MMVF10 and RCF1; long-fiber amosite was the only fiber to enhance activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B). The use of cysteine methyl ester and buthionine sulfoximine to modulate GSH suggested that GSH homeostasis was important in leading to activation of transcription factors. We conclude that the intrinsic free radical activity is the major determinant of transcription factor activation and therefore gene expression in alveolar macrophages. Although this was not related to iron release or ability to deplete macrophage GSH at 4 hr, GSH does play a role in activation of NF kappa B. Images Figure 1. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 6. A Figure 6. B PMID:9400744

  10. The Evolution of Interfacial Sliding Stresses During Cyclic Push-in Testing of C- and BN-Coated Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced CMCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bansal, N. P.; Bhatt, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    Interfacial debond cracks and fiber/matrix sliding stresses in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) can evolve under cyclic fatigue conditions as well as with changes in the environment, strongly affecting the crack growth behavior, and therefore, the useful service lifetime of the composite. In this study, room temperature cyclic fiber push-in testing was applied to monitor the evolution of frictional sliding stresses and fiber sliding distances with continued cycling in both C- and BN-coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber-reinforced CMCs. A SiC matrix composite reinforced with C-coated Hi-Nical on fibers as well as barium strontium aluminosilicate (BSAS) matrix composites reinforced with BN-coated (four different deposition processes compared) Hi-Nicalon fibers were examined. For failure at a C interface, test results indicated progressive increases in fiber sliding distances during cycling in room air but not in nitrogen. These results suggest the presence of moisture will promote crack growth when interfacial failure occurs at a C interface. While short-term testing environmental effects were not apparent for failure at the BN interfaces, long-term exposure of partially debonded BN-coated fibers to humid air resulted in large increases in fiber sliding distances and decreases in interfacial sliding stresses for all the BN coatings, presumably due to moisture attack. A wide variation was observed in debond and frictional sliding stresses among the different BN coatings.