Sample records for freshwater cyanobacterial species

  1. Cyanobacterial toxins in Canadian freshwaters: A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. G. Kotak; R. W. Zurawell

    2007-01-01

    Cyanobacterial toxins are a serious water quality concern in productive water bodies worldwide. Microcystins (MCs), which are hepatotoxins, are prevalent in Canadian freshwaters while the occurrence of neurotoxins anatoxin-a, anatoxin-a(s) and saxitoxin appears to be much less common. Concentrations of microcystin-LR (MCLR), presumed to be the most common of the more than 70 MC analogues, are highly variable in phytoplankton

  2. CYANOBACTERIAL BIODIVERSITY FROM DIFFERENT FRESHWATER PONDS OF THANJAVUR, TAMILNADU (INDIA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chinnasamy MUTHUKUMAR; Gangatharan MURALITHARAN; Ramasamy VIJAYAKUMAR; Annamalai PANNEERSELVAM; Nooruddin THAJUDDIN

    Cyanobacterial biodiversity from different freshwater ponds of Thanjavur, Tamilnadu (India). Studies on the cyanobacterial biodiversity of 5 different freshwater ponds in and around Thanjavur, Tamilnadu during summer month (June, 2004) has been made and compared their variations among five different ponds. In addition, certain physico-chemical parameters of pond waters such as dissolved oxygen, net productivity, pH, carbonate, bicarbonate, nitrate, nitrite,

  3. Effects of cyanobacterial toxicity and morphology on the population growth of freshwater zooplankton: Meta-analyses of laboratory experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan E. Wilson; Orlando Sarnelle; Angeline R. Tillmanns

    2006-01-01

    We synthesized data from 66 published laboratory studies, representing 597 experimental comparisons, examining the effects of cyanobacterial toxicity and morphology on the population growth rate and survivorship of 17 genera (34 species) of freshwater, herbivorous zooplankton. Two meta-analyses were conducted with these data. The primary analysis compared herbivore population growth rates for grazers fed treatment diets containing cyanobacteria versus control

  4. Secondary metabolite gene expression and interplay of bacterial functions in a tropical freshwater cyanobacterial bloom

    E-print Network

    Penn, Kevin

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) appear to be increasing in frequency on a global scale. The Cyanobacteria in blooms can produce toxic secondary metabolites that make freshwater dangerous for drinking and ...

  5. Elimination of the Cyanobacterial Hepatotoxin Microcystin from the freshwater Pulmonate Snail Lymnaea stagnalis jugularis (SAY)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald W. Zurawell; Charles F. B. Holmes; Ellie E. Prepas

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that little to no microcystin (MC), a cyanobacterial hepatotoxin, accumulates within freshwater pulmonate snails because the toxin is associated primarily with undigested gut contents that are eliminated from the animal via egestion. To test this, Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to MC-containing cyanobacteria were placed into toxin-free environments and sampled over short (24 h at 21° C) and

  6. Sporadic Distribution and Distinctive Variations of Cylindrospermopsin Genes in Cyanobacterial Strains and Environmental Samples from Chinese Freshwater Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yongguang; Xiao, Peng; Yu, Gongliang; Shao, Jihai; Liu, Deming; Azevedo, Sandra M. F. O.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing reports of cylindrospermopsins (CYNs) in freshwater ecosystems have promoted the demand for identifying all of the potential CYN-producing cyanobacterial species. The present study explored the phylogenetic distribution and evolution of cyr genes in cyanobacterial strains and water samples from China. Four Cylindrospermopsis strains and two Raphidiopsis strains were confirmed to produce CYNs. Mutant cyrI and cyrK genes were observed in these strains. Cloned cyr gene sequences from eight water bodies were clustered with cyr genes from Cylindrospermopsis and Raphidiopsis (C/R group) in the phylogenetic trees with high similarities (99%). Four cyrI sequence types and three cyrJ sequence types were observed to have different sequence insertions and repeats. Phylogenetic analysis of the rpoC1 sequences of the C/R group revealed four conserved clades, namely, clade I, clade II, clade III, and clade V. High sequence similarities (>97%) in each clade and a divergent clade IV were observed. Therefore, CYN producers were sporadically distributed in congeneric and paraphyletic C/R group species in Chinese freshwater ecosystems. In the evolution of cyr genes, intragenomic translocations and intergenomic transfer between local Cylindrospermopsis and Raphidiopsis were emphasized and probably mediated by transposases. This research confirms the existence of CYN-producing Cylindrospermopsis in China and reveals the distinctive variations of cyr genes. PMID:24928879

  7. Macroalgal and Cyanobacterial Chemical Defenses in Freshwater Communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank A. Camacho

    Algae and cyanobacteria are important sources of primary production in freshwater systems and they figure prominently in estimates\\u000a of carbon budgets, dissolved oxygen concentration, and nutrient recycling in those habitats (Howarth et al. 1988; Schippers\\u000a et al. 2004). In recent years, these groups have garnered much negative attention as a result of their ability to dominate\\u000a aquatic systems receiving chronic

  8. Competitive exclusion of Cyanobacterial species in the Great Salt Lake.

    PubMed

    Roney, Hillary C; Booth, Gary M; Cox, Paul Alan

    2009-03-01

    The Great Salt Lake is separated into different salinity regimes by rail and vehicular causeways. Cyanobacterial distributions map salinity, with Aphanothece halophytica proliferating in the highly saline northern arm (27% saline), while Nodularia spumigena occurs in the less saline south (6-10%). We sought to test if cyanobacterial species abundant in the north are competitively excluded from the south, and if southern species are excluded by the high salinity of the north. Autoclaved samples from the north and south sides of each causeway were inoculated with water from each area. Aphanothece, Oscillatoria, Phormidium, and Nodularia were identified in the culture flasks using comparative differential interference contrast, fluorescence, and scanning electron microscopy. Aphanothece halophytica occurred in all inocula, but is suppressed in the presence of Nodularia spumigena. N. spumigena was found only in inocula from the less saline waters in the south, and apparently cannot survive the extremely hypersaline waters of the northern arm. These data suggest that both biotic and abiotic factors influence cyanobacterial distributions in the Great Salt Lake. PMID:19129967

  9. UV-induced photochemical heterogeneity of dissolved and attached organic matter associated with cyanobacterial blooms in a eutrophic freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huacheng; Jiang, Helong

    2013-11-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms represent a significant ecological and human health problem worldwide. In aquatic environments, cyanobacterial blooms are actually surrounded by dissolved organic matter (DOM) and attached organic matter (AOM) that bind with algal cells. In this study, DOM and AOM fractionated from blooming cyanobacteria in a eutrophic freshwater lake (Lake Taihu, China) were irradiated with a polychromatic UV lamp, and the photochemical heterogeneity was investigated using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM)-parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis and synchronous fluorescence (SF)-two dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS). It was shown that a 6-day UV irradiation caused more pronounced mineralization for DOM than AOM (59.7% vs. 41.9%). The EEM-PARAFAC analysis identified one tyrosine-, one humic-, and two tryptophan-like components in both DOM and AOM, and high component photodegradation rates were observed for DOM versus AOM (k > 0.554 vs. <0.519). Moreover, SF-2DCOS found that the photodegradation of organic matters followed the sequence of tyrosine-like > humic-like > tryptophan-like substances. Humic-like substances promoted the indirect photochemical reactions, and were responsible for the higher photochemical rate for DOM. The lower photodegradation of AOM benefited the integrality of cells in cyanobacterial blooms against the negative impact of UV irradiation. Therefore, the photochemical behavior of organic matter was related to the adaptation of enhanced-duration cyanobacterial blooms in aquatic environments. PMID:24041526

  10. Diurnal variations in the photosynthesis-respiration activity of a cyanobacterial bloom in a freshwater dam reservoir: an isotopic study.

    PubMed

    Trojanowska, Adriana; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Jedrysek, Mariusz-Orion; Kurasiewicz, Marta; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Izydorczyk, Katarzyna

    2008-06-01

    The stable isotopic analyses of molecular oxygen dissolved in water (delta18O(DO)) and dissolved inorganic carbon (delta13C(DIC)), supplemented with basic chemical measurements, have been carried out on a diurnal basis to better understand the dynamics of photosynthesis and respiration in freshwater systems. Our observations have been carried out in a lowland dam reservoir, the Sulejow Lake (central Poland), during the summer cyanobacterial bloom. All data obtained, isotopic, hydrochemical, and biological, show a high mutual consistency. Namely, the lowest delta18O(DO) values, obtained at 10:00 and 14:00 (16.0 and 15.5 per thousand, respectively), correspond to the highest amount of cyanobacterial cells observed (66 and 63 mg dm(-3), respectively), whereas the minimum delta13C(DIC) (-10.6 per thousand) obtained at 22:00 corresponds to the maximum content of organic matter (110 mg dm(-3)). This evidence suggests that isotopic assays of delta18O(DO) and delta13C(DIC) are a reliable tool for the quantitative study of biochemical processes in freshwater systems. PMID:18569188

  11. Freshwater Cyanobacterial Blooms and Primary Liver Cancer Epidemiological Studies in Serbia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ZORICA SVIR?EV; SVETISLAV KRSTI?; MARICA MILADINOV-MIKOV; VLADIMIR BALTI?; MILKA VIDOVI?

    2009-01-01

    A large part of Central Serbia experiences continual shortage of sufficient ground water resources. For that reason, more than 20 reservoirs serve as drinking water suppliers. Significant and persistent cyanobacterial “blooms” have been recognized in nine of them. Samples for cyanotoxin analyses were taken during and after “blooms” in ?elije Reservoir and from Kruševac town-supplied tap water from that reservoir

  12. Detection of various freshwater cyanobacterial toxins using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oehrle, Stuart A; Southwell, Ben; Westrick, Judy

    2010-05-01

    Several freshwater cyanobacteria species have the capability to produce toxic compounds, frequently referred to as cyanotoxins. The most prevalent of these cyanotoxins is microcystin LR. Recognizing the potential health risk, France, Italy, Poland, Australia, Canada, and Brazil have set either standards or guidelines for the amount of microcystin LR permissible in drinking water based on the World Health Organization guideline of one microg/L of microcystin LR. Recently, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has begun to evaluate the occurrence and health effects of cyanotoxins and their susceptibility to water treatment under the Safe Drinking Water Act through the Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). A recent update of the Contaminant Candidate List focuses research and data collection on the cyanotoxins microcystin LR, anatoxin-a, and cylindrospermopsin. Liquid Chromatography/Tandem-Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is a powerful tool for the analysis of various analytes in a wide variety of matrices because of its sensitivity and selectivity. The use of smaller column media (sub 2 microm particles) was investigated to both improve the speed, sensitivity and resolution, and to quantify the CCL cyanotoxins, in a single analysis, using Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) combined with tandem mass spectrometry. Natural waters and spiked samples were analyzed to show proof-of-performance. The presented method was able to clearly resolve each of the cyanotoxins in less than eight minutes with specificity and high spike recoveries. PMID:19878689

  13. Persistence and degradation of cyanobacterial paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs) in freshwaters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary J. Jones; Andrew P. Negri

    1997-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs) extracted from the cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis persisted for over 90 days when incubated in freshwater. The primary transformation reaction was desulfocarbamoylation of the predominant, low toxicity C-toxins, to the more potent decarbamoylgonyautoxins (dc-GTXs). This transformation caused an initial increase in sample toxicity, in spite of an overall decrease in total toxin concentration (on a molar basis)

  14. Avian vacuolar myelinopathy linked to exotic aquatic plants and a novel cyanobacterial species.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Susan B; Murphy, Thomas M; Hope, Charlotte P; Habrun, Sarah K; Kempton, Jason; Birrenkott, Anna; Wiley, Faith; Bowerman, William W; Lewitus, Alan J

    2005-06-01

    Invasions of exotic species have created environmental havoc through competition and displacement of native plants and animals. The introduction of hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) into the United States in the 1960s has been detrimental to navigation, power generation, water intake, and water quality (McCann et al., 1996). Our field surveys and feeding studies have now implicated exotic hydrilla and associated epiphytic cyanobacterial species as a link to avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM), an emerging avian disease affecting herbivorous waterbirds and their avian predators. AVM, first reported in 1994, has caused the death of at least 100 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and thousands of American coots (Fulica americana) at 11 sites from Texas to North Carolina (Thomas et al., 1998; Rocke et al., 2002). Our working hypothesis is that the agent of this disease is an uncharacterized neurotoxin produced by a novel cyanobacterial epiphyte of the order Stigonematales. This undescribed species covers up to 95% of the surface area of leaves in reservoirs where bird deaths have occurred from the disease. In addition, this species is rare or not found on hydrilla collected at sites where AVM disease has not been diagnosed. Laboratory feeding trials and a sentinel bird study using naturally occurring blooms of cyanobacteria on hydrilla leaves and farm-raised mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) induced the disease experimentally. Since 1994 AVM has been diagnosed in additional sites from Texas to North Carolina. Specific site characteristics that produce the disjunct distribution of AVM are unknown, but it is probable that the incidence of this disease will increase with the introduction of hydrilla and associated cyanobacterial species into additional ponds, lakes, and reservoirs. PMID:15892059

  15. Cyanobacterial toxins: risk management for health protection.

    PubMed

    Codd, Geoffrey A; Morrison, Louise F; Metcalf, James S

    2005-03-15

    This paper reviews the occurrence and properties of cyanobacterial toxins, with reference to the recognition and management of the human health risks which they may present. Mass populations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria in natural and controlled waterbodies include blooms and scums of planktonic species, and mats and biofilms of benthic species. Toxic cyanobacterial populations have been reported in freshwaters in over 45 countries, and in numerous brackish, coastal, and marine environments. The principal toxigenic genera are listed. Known sources of the families of cyanobacterial toxins (hepato-, neuro-, and cytotoxins, irritants, and gastrointestinal toxins) are briefly discussed. Key procedures in the risk management of cyanobacterial toxins and cells are reviewed, including derivations (where sufficient data are available) of tolerable daily intakes (TDIs) and guideline values (GVs) with reference to the toxins in drinking water, and guideline levels for toxigenic cyanobacteria in bathing waters. Uncertainties and some gaps in knowledge are also discussed, including the importance of exposure media (animal and plant foods), in addition to potable and recreational waters. Finally, we present an outline of steps to develop and implement risk management strategies for cyanobacterial cells and toxins in waterbodies, with recent applications and the integration of Hazard Assessment Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles. PMID:15737680

  16. Bacterial Community Composition of Size-Fractioned Aggregates within the Phycosphere of Cyanobacterial Blooms in a Eutrophic Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Haiyuan; Jiang, Helong; Krumholz, Lee R.; Yang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial community composition of different sized aggregates within the Microcystis cyanobacterial phycosphere were determined during summer and fall in Lake Taihu, a eutrophic lake in eastern China. Bloom samples taken in August and September represent healthy bloom biomass, whereas samples from October represent decomposing bloom biomass. To improve our understanding of the complex interior structure in the phycosphere, bloom samples were separated into large (>100 µm), medium (10–100 µm) and small (0.2–10 µm) size aggregates. Species richness and library coverage indicated that pyrosequencing recovered a large bacterial diversity. The community of each size aggregate was highly organized, indicating highly specific conditions within the Microcystis phycosphere. While the communities of medium and small-size aggregates clustered together in August and September samples, large- and medium-size aggregate communities in the October sample were grouped together and distinct from small-size aggregate community. Pronounced changes in the absolute and relative percentages of the dominant genus from the two most important phyla Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were observed among the various size aggregates. Bacterial species on large and small-size aggregates likely have the ability to degrade high and low molecular weight compounds, respectively. Thus, there exists a spatial differentiation of bacterial taxa within the phycosphere, possibly operating in sequence and synergy to catalyze the turnover of complex organic matters. PMID:25144467

  17. Genetic calibration of species diversity among North America's freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    April, Julien; Mayden, Richard L; Hanner, Robert H; Bernatchez, Louis

    2011-06-28

    Freshwater ecosystems are being heavily exploited and degraded by human activities all over the world, including in North America, where fishes and fisheries are strongly affected. Despite centuries of taxonomic inquiry, problems inherent to species identification continue to hamper the conservation of North American freshwater fishes. Indeed, nearly 10% of species diversity is thought to remain undescribed. To provide an independent calibration of taxonomic uncertainty and to establish a more accessible molecular identification key for its application, we generated a standard reference library of mtDNA sequences (DNA barcodes) derived from expert-identified museum specimens for 752 North American freshwater fish species. This study demonstrates that 90% of known species can be delineated using barcodes. Moreover, it reveals numerous genetic discontinuities indicative of independently evolving lineages within described species, which points to the presence of morphologically cryptic diversity. From the 752 species analyzed, our survey flagged 138 named species that represent as many as 347 candidate species, which suggests a 28% increase in species diversity. In contrast, several species of parasitic and nonparasitic lampreys lack such discontinuity and may represent alternative life history strategies within single species. Therefore, it appears that the current North American freshwater fish taxonomy at the species level significantly conceals diversity in some groups, although artificially creating diversity in others. In addition to providing an easily accessible digital identification system, this study identifies 151 fish species for which taxonomic revision is required. PMID:21670289

  18. Patterns of Freshwater Species Richness, Endemism, and Vulnerability in California

    PubMed Central

    Furnish, Joseph; Gardali, Thomas; Grantham, Ted; Katz, Jacob V. E.; Kupferberg, Sarah; McIntyre, Patrick; Moyle, Peter B.; Ode, Peter R.; Peek, Ryan; Quiñones, Rebecca M.; Rehn, Andrew C.; Santos, Nick; Schoenig, Steve; Serpa, Larry; Shedd, Jackson D.; Slusark, Joe; Viers, Joshua H.; Wright, Amber; Morrison, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The ranges and abundances of species that depend on freshwater habitats are declining worldwide. Efforts to counteract those trends are often hampered by a lack of information about species distribution and conservation status and are often strongly biased toward a few well-studied groups. We identified the 3,906 vascular plants, macroinvertebrates, and vertebrates native to California, USA, that depend on fresh water for at least one stage of their life history. We evaluated the conservation status for these taxa using existing government and non-governmental organization assessments (e.g., endangered species act, NatureServe), created a spatial database of locality observations or distribution information from ~400 data sources, and mapped patterns of richness, endemism, and vulnerability. Although nearly half of all taxa with conservation status (n = 1,939) are vulnerable to extinction, only 114 (6%) of those vulnerable taxa have a legal mandate for protection in the form of formal inclusion on a state or federal endangered species list. Endemic taxa are at greater risk than non-endemics, with 90% of the 927 endemic taxa vulnerable to extinction. Records with spatial data were available for a total of 2,276 species (61%). The patterns of species richness differ depending on the taxonomic group analyzed, but are similar across taxonomic level. No particular taxonomic group represents an umbrella for all species, but hotspots of high richness for listed species cover 40% of the hotspots for all other species and 58% of the hotspots for vulnerable freshwater species. By mapping freshwater species hotspots we show locations that represent the top priority for conservation action in the state. This study identifies opportunities to fill gaps in the evaluation of conservation status for freshwater taxa in California, to address the lack of occurrence information for nearly 40% of freshwater taxa and nearly 40% of watersheds in the state, and to implement adequate protections for freshwater taxa where they are currently lacking. PMID:26147215

  19. Diversity of cyanobacterial species and phylotypes in biofilms from the littoral zone of Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Sorokovikova, Ekaterina G; Belykh, Olga I; Gladkikh, Anna S; Kotsar, Oleg V; Tikhonova, Irina V; Timoshkin, Oleg A; Parfenova, Valentina V

    2013-12-01

    The majority of naturally occurring biofilms contain numerous microorganisms that have not yet been cultured. Additionally, there is little information available regarding the genetic structure and species diversity of these communities. Therefore, we characterised the species diversity, structure and metagenome of biofilms grown on stones and steel plates in the littoral zone of Lake Baikal (East Siberia, Russia) by applying three different approaches. First, light microscopy enabled identification of the species diversity of biofilm-forming cyanobacteria on different substrates with the dominance of Rivularia rufescens, Tolypothrix limbata, Chamaesiphon fuscus, Ch. subglobosus, and Heteroleibleinia pusilla. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy was used to show the spatial structure of biofilms. Finally, sequence analysis of 30,660 16S rRNA clones indicated a high diversity within the biofilm communities, with the majority of the microbes being closely related to Cyanobacteria (8-46% sequences), Proteobacteria (14-43%), and Bacteroidetes (10-41%). Rivularia sp., Pseudanabaena sp., and Chamaesiphon spp. were the dominant cyanobacterial phylotypes. PMID:24385352

  20. The cyanobacterial CCM as a source of genes for improving photosynthetic CO2 fixation in crop species.

    PubMed

    Price, G Dean; Pengelly, Jasper J L; Forster, Britta; Du, Jiahui; Whitney, Spencer M; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Badger, Murray R; Howitt, Susan M; Evans, John R

    2013-01-01

    Crop yields need to nearly double over the next 35 years to keep pace with projected population growth. Improving photosynthesis, via a range of genetic engineering strategies, has been identified as a promising target for crop improvement with regard to increased photosynthetic yield and better water-use efficiency (WUE). One approach is based on integrating components of the highly efficient CO(2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM) present in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) into the chloroplasts of key C(3) crop plants, particularly wheat and rice. Four progressive phases towards engineering components of the cyanobacterial CCM into C(3) species can be envisaged. The first phase (1a), and simplest, is to consider the transplantation of cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters to C(3) chloroplasts, by host genomic expression and chloroplast targeting, to raise CO(2) levels in the chloroplast and provide a significant improvement in photosynthetic performance. Mathematical modelling indicates that improvements in photosynthesis as high as 28% could be achieved by introducing both of the single-gene, cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters, known as BicA and SbtA, into C(3) plant chloroplasts. Part of the first phase (1b) includes the more challenging integration of a functional cyanobacterial carboxysome into the chloroplast by chloroplast genome transformation. The later three phases would be progressively more elaborate, taking longer to engineer other functional components of the cyanobacterial CCM into the chloroplast, and targeting photosynthetic and WUE efficiencies typical of C(4) photosynthesis. These later stages would include the addition of NDH-1-type CO(2) pumps and suppression of carbonic anhydrase and C(3) Rubisco in the chloroplast stroma. We include a score card for assessing the success of physiological modifications gained in phase 1a. PMID:23028015

  1. Radurization of commercial freshwater fish species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuaqui-Offermanns, N.; McDougall, T. E.; Sprung, W.; Sullivan, V.

    The effect of radurization on the shelf life of fresh Whitefish obtained through ordinary commercial channels has been determined. Whitefish fillets irradiated at 1.2 kGy and stored at 3°C have a shelf life three times longer than the unirradiated fish. When the fish was irradiated at 0.82 kGy a two fold shelf-life extension was obtained. The shelf life was estimated by sensory, chemical and microbiological evaluations. Sensory evaluation involved organoleptic assessment of raw and cooked samples. Since freshwater fish do not contain trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), alternate tests for freshness were required. It was found the determination of hypoxanthine and total volatile acid number (VAN) are excellent tests for freshness and quality of freshwater fish; thus, these analyses were adopted. The degree of radiation-induced lipid oxidation was measured by the thiobarbituric acid test (TBA). It was found at doses of 0.82 and 1.2 kGy the TBA number remained within acceptable limits in all samples. Microbiological analyses consisted of the total microbial load assessment in the sample, as well as Pseudomonas and total psychrotrophic counts. The estimated shelf lives as determined by the three separate evaluations were in very good agreement.

  2. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species

    E-print Network

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species Zhaohui Abstract Five species of freshwater green algae, including three strains of Botryococcus braunii (two in the algae, including alkadienes, botryococcenes, heptadecenes, fatty acids, and phytadiene, were measured

  3. Status, alert system, and prediction of cyanobacterial bloom in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Asthana, Ravi Kumar; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2015-01-01

    Bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterial genera pose a major ecological problem due to their ability to produce toxins and other bioactive compounds, which can have important implications in illnesses of humans and livestock. Cyanobacteria such as Microcystis, Anabaena, Oscillatoria, Phormidium, and Aphanizomenon species producing microcystins and anatoxin-a have been predominantly documented from most South Korean lakes and reservoirs. With the increase in frequency of such blooms, various monitoring approaches, treatment processes, and prediction models have been developed in due course. In this paper we review the field studies and current knowledge on toxin producing cyanobacterial species and ecological variables that regulate toxin production and bloom formation in major rivers (Han, Geum, Nakdong, and Yeongsan) and reservoirs in South Korea. In addition, development of new, fast, and high-throughput techniques for effective monitoring is also discussed with cyanobacterial bloom advisory practices, current management strategies, and their implications in South Korean freshwater bodies. PMID:25705675

  4. Measurement of cyanobacteria using in-vivo fluoroscopy -- effect of cyanobacterial species, pigments, and colonies.

    PubMed

    Chang, De-Wei; Hobson, Peter; Burch, Michael; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2012-10-15

    The effect of instrument calibration range, algal growth phase, chlorophyll-a and turbidity interference and colony size, on the measurement of phycocyanin by in-vivo fluoroscopy (IVF) was investigated. The cyanobacterial species Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7820, Anabaena circinalis and Planktothricoides raciborskii were used to investigate variation in phycocyanin content in the different cyanobacteria and growth phases. The green alga, Chodatella sp., and Kaolin particles were used as the sources of chlorophyll-a and turbidity respectively to determine how these factors can impact on phycocyanin measurements. Another cyanobacterium, M. aeruginosa PCC 7005, which forms large colonies, was used to investigate the relationships between colony size and phycocyanin concentration measured using IVF. Results showed that chlorophyll-a, turbidity, and the colonial status of the cyanobacteria significantly interfered with the measurement of phycocyanin fluorescence. Models were developed to compensate for the effect of chlorophyll-a, turbidity and colony size on the measurement. The models were successfully used to correct phycocyanin probe data collected from several reservoirs in Taiwan to establish good correlation between measurements made using the phycocyanin probe and microscopic cell counts. PMID:22824675

  5. Ecotoxicological effects of selected cyanobacterial secondary metabolites a short review

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegand, C. [Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: cwiegand@igb-berlin.de; Pflugmacher, S. [Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: pflugmacher@igb-berlin.de

    2005-03-15

    Cyanobacteria are one of the most diverse groups of gram-negative photosynthetic prokaryotes. Many of them are able to produce a wide range of toxic secondary metabolites. These cyanobacterial toxins can be classified in five different groups: hepatotoxins, neurotoxins, cytotoxins, dermatotoxins, and irritant toxins (lipopolysaccharides). Cyanobacterial blooms are hazardous due to this production of secondary metabolites and endotoxins, which could be toxic to animals and plants. Many of the freshwater cyanobacterial blooms include species of the toxigenic genera Microcystis, Anabaena, or Plankthotrix. These compounds differ in mechanisms of uptake, affected organs, and molecular mode of action. In this review, the main focus is the aquatic environment and the effects of these toxins to the organisms living there. Some basic toxic mechanisms will be discussed in comparison to the mammalian system.

  6. [Multifractal analysis of the species structure of freshwater hydrobiocenoses].

    PubMed

    Gelashvili, D B; Iudin, D I; Iakimov, V N; Solntsev, L A; Rozenberg, G S; Shurganova, G V; Okhapkin, A G; Startseva, N A; Pukhnarevich, D A; Snegireva, M S

    2012-01-01

    The principles and methods of fractal analysis of the species structure of freshwater phytoplankton, zooplankton, and macrozoobenthos communities of plain water reservoirs and urban waterbodies are discussed. The theoretical foundation and experimental verification are provided for the authors' concept of self-similar (quasi-fractal) nature of the species structure of communities. According to this concept, the adequate mathematical image of species richness accumulation with growing sampling effort is quasi-monofractals, while the generalized geometric image of the species structure of the community is a multifractal spectrum. PMID:22834317

  7. Nitrogen Forms Influence Microcystin Concentration and Composition via Changes in Cyanobacterial Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Monchamp, Marie-Eve; Pick, Frances R.; Beisner, Beatrix E.; Maranger, Roxane

    2014-01-01

    The eutrophication of freshwaters is a global health concern as lakes with excess nutrients are often subject to toxic cyanobacterial blooms. Although phosphorus is considered the main element regulating cyanobacterial biomass, nitrogen (N) concentration and more specifically the availability of different N forms may influence the overall toxicity of blooms. In this study of three eutrophic lakes prone to cyanobacterial blooms, we examined the effects of nitrogen species and concentrations and other environmental factors in influencing cyanobacterial community structure, microcystin (MC) concentrations and MC congener composition. The identification of specific MC congeners was of particular interest as they vary widely in toxicity. Different nitrogen forms appeared to influence cyanobacterial community structure leading to corresponding effects on MC concentrations and composition. Total MC concentrations across the lakes were largely explained by a combination of abiotic factors: dissolved organic nitrogen, water temperature and ammonium, but Microcystis spp. biomass was overall the best predictor of MC concentrations. Environmental factors did not appear to affect MC congener composition directly but there were significant associations between specific MC congeners and particular species. Based on redundancy analyses (RDA), the relative biomass of Microcystis aeruginosa was associated with MC-RR, M. wesenbergii with MC-LA and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae with MC-YR. The latter two species are not generally considered capable of MC production. Total nitrogen, water temperature, ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen influenced the cyanobacterial community structure, which in turn resulted in differences in the dominant MC congener and the overall toxicity. PMID:24427318

  8. Supplementary Information Species Optimal N:P Freshwater/ Taxon Source

    E-print Network

    Cyanobacterium 8 Heterosigma akashiwo 13.1 Marine Rhaphydophyte 9 Anabaena solitaria 14.0 Freshwater Coccolithophorid 11 Oscillatoria redekei 17.1 Freshwater Cyanobacterium 8 Anabaena flos-aquae 17.7 Freshwater

  9. Natural xenobiotics to prevent cyanobacterial and algal growth in freshwater: contrasting efficacy of tannic acid, gallic acid, and gramine.

    PubMed

    Laue, Pauline; Bährs, Hanno; Chakrabarti, Shumon; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2014-06-01

    Allelochemical action against planktonic phototrophs is one central issue in freshwater ecology and quality management. To determine some basic mechanisms of this toxic action, we exposed the coccal green alga, Desmodesmus armatus, and the coccal cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa, in a batch culture well-supplied with carbon dioxide to increasing concentrations of the polyphenols tannic acid and gallic acid and the alkaloid gramine. The phototrophs were checked after 2d and at the end of the culture for biomass-based growth rates, cell volume, maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (?PSIImax), chlorophyll a content (chla) after 2d and at the end of the culture, and lipid peroxidation only at the end of the culture. During the culture, the pH rose from 7.64 to 10.95, a pH characteristic of eutrophic freshwater bodies during nuisance algal blooms. All xenobiotics reduced the growth rate, ?PSIImax, and chla during the first 2d with M. aeruginosa being more sensitive to the polyphenols than D. armatus. The efficacy of the polyphenols declined with increasing pH, indicating potential polymerization and corresponding reduced bioavailability of the polyphenols. In contrast to the polyphenols, gramine increased its toxic action over time, independent of the prevailing pH. All exposures caused slight to severe lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the phototrophs. Hence, one mechanism of growth inhibition may be oxidative stress-mediated reduction in photosynthesis. The presented results suggest that in successful field trials with leachate, the prevailing environmental conditions may inactivate polyphenols and xenobiotics other than polyphenols may be more effective. PMID:24332729

  10. Rare and endangered species: freshwater gastropods of southern New England

    SciTech Connect

    Jokinen, E.H.; Pondick, J.

    1981-01-01

    The rare and endangered species of freshwater gastropods of southern New England are reported on based upon data collected over the past four years. Field sampling was concentrated in Connecticut but included parts of southern Massachusetts east to Cape Code (69 55 W to 73 45'W, 40 00'N). Water chemistry data were collected along with the snails. Collection methods and water analysis techniques have been described elsewhere by Jokinen (The Nautilus 92:156-160, 1978). Voucher specimens have been placed in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, The Florida State Museum, and the Museum of Zoology, the University of Michigan. Acid rain poses a threat to poorly buffered habitats. 6 references, 1 table.

  11. Extensive allozyme monomorphism in a threatened species of freshwater mussel, Margaritifera hembeli Conrad (Bivalvia: Margaritiferidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason P. Curole; David W. Foltz; Kenneth M. Brown

    2004-01-01

    A threatened but under-studied component offreshwater biodiversity in North America is thenative freshwater mussels (Bivalvia:Unionoidea: Margaritiferidae and Unionidae). Genetic data suggest that these mussel speciesgenerally exhibit levels of variability similarto other invertebrates. We surveyed allozymevariation in the Louisiana Pearlshell, Margaritifera hembeli (Margaritiferidae), athreatened freshwater mussel. Five examinedpopulations are monomorphic for 25 allozymeloci, the first report of a native freshwatermussel species

  12. Complex hydraulic and substrate variables limit freshwater mussel species richness and abundance

    E-print Network

    Vaughn, Caryn

    Complex hydraulic and substrate variables limit freshwater mussel species richness and abundance. We examined how substrate and complex hydraulic variables limit the distribution of freshwater mussels. We sampled mussels and measured substrate and hydraulic variables (at low and high flows) at 6

  13. Toxic cyanobacterial cells containing microcystins induce oxidative stress in exposed tilapia fish (Oreochromis sp.) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Jos, Angeles; Pichardo, Silvia; Prieto, Ana I; Repetto, Guillermo; Vázquez, Carmen M; Moreno, Isabel; Cameán, Ana M

    2005-04-30

    The effects of microcystins from cyanobacterial cells on various oxidative stress biomarkers in liver, kidney and gill tissues in freshwater tilapia fish (Oreochromis sp.) were investigated under laboratory conditions. Microcystins are a family of cyclic peptide toxins produced by species of freshwater cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). Fish were exposed to the cyanobacterial cells in two ways: mixed with a commercial fish food or crushed into a commercial fish food so that the toxins were released. Two different exposure times were studied: 14 and 21 days. The oxidative status of fish was evaluated by analyzing the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR). The findings of the present investigation show that microcystins induce oxidative stress in a time-dependent manner and that the type of administration of the cyanobacterial cells influences the extent of these effects. Thus, the crushed cyanobacterial cells (released toxins) induced the antioxidant defences studied and increased the LPO level to a greater extent than the non-crushed cells. The liver was the most affected organ followed by kidney and gills. These results together with reports that fish can accumulate microcystins mean that cyanobacterial blooms are an important health, environmental and economic problem. PMID:15820106

  14. Hepatotoxic Cyanobacteria: A Review of the Biological Importance of Microcystins in Freshwater Environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald W. Zurawell; Huirong Chen; Janice M. Burke; Ellie E. Prepas

    2005-01-01

    Cyanobacteria possess many adaptations to develop population maxima or “blooms” in lakes and reservoirs. A potential consequence of freshwater blooms of many cyanobacterial species is the production of potent toxins, including the cyclic hepatotoxins, microcystins (MCs). Approximately 70 MC variants have been isolated. Their toxicity to humans and other animals is well studied, because of public health concerns. This review

  15. Predicting impact of freshwater exotic species on native biodiversity: Challenges in spatial scaling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID M. LODGE; ROY A. STEIN; KENNETH M. BROWN; ALAN P. COVICH; CHRISTER BRONMARK; JAMES E. GARVEY; STEVEN P. KLOSIEWSKT

    1998-01-01

    Global homogenization of biota is underway through worldwide introduction and establishment of nonindigenous (exotic) species. Freshwater ecologists should devote more attention to exotic species for two reasons. First, exotics provide an opportunity to test hypotheses about what characteristics of species or habitats are related to successful establishment or invasibility, respectively. Second, predicting which species will cause large ecological change is

  16. Three new Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) species from freshwater fishes in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Moravec, F; Salgado-Maldonado, G; Caspeta-Mandujano, J

    2000-02-01

    The following 3 new species of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) are described from the intestines of freshwater fishes in Mexico, all belonging to the morphological group characterized by the presence of wide caudal alae, 3 pairs of subventral preanal papillae, and unequal spicules in the male: Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) jaliscensis n. sp. (type host: Agonostomus monticola) and Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) gobiomori n. sp. (hosts: Gobiomorus maculatus [type host], Gobiomorus polylepis and Eleotris picta) from 2 rivers in Jalisco State, western Mexico, and Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) mexicanus n. sp. (type host: Cichlasoma geddesi) from Xalapa District, Veracruz State (Gulf of Mexico region), southeastern Mexico. Procamallanus jaliscensis is characterized by the length of the spicules (606-900 microm and 282-354 microm), number (15-16) of spiral ridges in the buccal capsule, and the digit-like protrusion with 1 terminal cuticular spike on the female tail; P. mexicanus by the length of the spicules (456-480 microm and 231-233 microm), number (10-12) of spiral ridges in the capsule, and the shape of the female tail (conical with a suddenly narrowed distal part, without any terminal spikes); and P. gobiomori by the length of spicules (318-348 microm and 156-192 microm), number (8-10) of spiral ridges and by the digit-like protrusion with 2 terminal cuticular spikes on the female tail. PMID:10701574

  17. Freshwater availability and coastal wetland foundation species: ecological transitions along a rainfall gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osland, Michael; Enwright, Nicholas; Stagg, Camille La Fosse

    2014-01-01

    Climate gradient-focused ecological research can provide a foundation for better understanding critical ecological transition points and nonlinear climate-ecological relationships, which is information that can be used to better understand, predict, and manage ecological responses to climate change. In this study, we examined the influence of freshwater availability upon the coverage of foundation plant species in coastal wetlands along a northwestern Gulf of Mexico rainfall gradient. Our research addresses the following three questions: (1) what are the region-scale relationships between measures of freshwater availability (e.g., rainfall, aridity, freshwater inflow, salinity) and the relative abundance of foundation plant species in tidal wetlands; (2) How vulnerable are foundation plant species in tidal wetlands to future changes in freshwater availability; and (3) What is the potential future relative abundance of tidal wetland foundation plant species under alternative climate change scenarios? We developed simple freshwater availability-based models to predict the relative abundance (i.e., coverage) of tidal wetland foundation plant species using climate data (1970-2000), estuarine freshwater inflow-focused data, and coastal wetland habitat data. Our results identify regional ecological thresholds and nonlinear relationships between measures of freshwater availability and the relative abundance of foundation plant species in tidal wetlands. In drier coastal zones, relatively small changes in rainfall could produce comparatively large landscape-scale changes in foundation plant species abundance which would affect some ecosystem good and services. Whereas a drier future would result in a decrease in the coverage of foundation plant species, a wetter future would result in an increase in foundation plant species coverage. In many ways, the freshwater-dependent coastal wetland ecological transitions we observed are analogous to those present in dryland terrestrial ecosystems.

  18. CONDITIONS FOR COEXISTENCE OF FRESHWATER MUSSEL SPECIES VIA PARTITIONING OF FISH HOST RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riverine freshwater mussel species can be found in highly diverse communities where many similar species coexist. Mussel species potentially compete for food and space as adults, and for fish host resources during the larval (glochidial) stage. Resource partitioning at the larv...

  19. Liquid chromatographic determination of the cyanobacterial toxin beta-n-methylamino-L-alanine in algae food supplements, freshwater fish, and bottled water.

    PubMed

    Scott, Peter M; Niedzwiadek, Barbara; Rawn, Dorothea F K; Lau, Ben P-Y

    2009-08-01

    Beta-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin originally found in cycad seeds and now known to be produced by many species of freshwater and marine cyanobacteria. We developed a method for its determination in blue-green algae (BGA) food supplements, freshwater fish, and bottled water by using a strong cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction column for cleanup after 0.3 M trichloroacetic acid extraction of BGA supplements and fish. Bottled water was applied directly onto the solid-phase extraction column. For analysis of carbonated water, sonication and pH adjustment to 1.5 were needed. To determine protein-bound BMAA, the protein pellet left after extraction of the BGA supplement and fish was hydrolyzed by boiling with 6 M hydrochloric acid; BMAA was cleaned up on a C18 column and a strong cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction column. Determination of BMAA was by liquid chromatography of the fluorescent derivative formed with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate. The method was validated by recovery experiments using spiking levels of 1.0 to 10 microg/g for BGA supplements, 0.5 to 5.0 microg/g for fish, and 0.002 microg/g for bottled water; mean recoveries were in the range of 67 to 89% for BGA supplements and fish, and 59 to 92% for bottled water. Recoveries of BMAA from spiked extracts of hydrolyzed protein from BGA supplements and fish ranged from 66 to 83%. The cleanup developed provides a useful method for surveying foods and supplements for BMAA and protein-bound BMAA. PMID:19722418

  20. Why are there so few freshwater fish species in most estuaries?

    PubMed

    Whitfield, A K

    2015-04-01

    The freshwater fish assemblage in most estuaries is not as species rich as the marine assemblage in the same systems. Coupled with this differential richness is an apparent inability by most freshwater fish species to penetrate estuarine zones that are mesohaline (salinity: 5·0-17·9), polyhaline (salinity: 18·0-29·9) or euhaline (salinity: 30·0-39·9). The reason why mesohaline waters are avoided by most freshwater fishes is difficult to explain from a physiological perspective as many of these species would be isosmotic within this salinity range. Perhaps, a key to the poor penetration of estuarine waters by freshwater taxa is an inability to develop chloride cells in gill filament epithelia, as well as a lack of other osmoregulatory adaptations present in euryhaline fishes. Only a few freshwater fish species, especially some of those belonging to the family Cichlidae, have become fully euryhaline and have successfully occupied a wide range of estuaries, sometimes even dominating in hyperhaline systems (salinity 40+). Indeed, this review found that there are few fish species that can be termed holohaline (i.e. capable of occupying waters with a salinity range of 0-100+) and, of these taxa, there is a disproportionally high number of freshwater species (e.g. Cyprinodon variegatus, Oreochromis mossambicus and Sarotherodon melanotheron). Factors such as increased competition for food and higher predation rates by piscivorous fishes and birds may also play an important role in the low species richness and abundance of freshwater taxa in estuaries. Added to this is the relatively low species richness of freshwater fishes in river catchments when compared with the normally higher diversity of marine fish species for potential estuarine colonization from the adjacent coastal waters. The almost complete absence of freshwater fish larvae from the estuarine ichthyoplankton further reinforces the poor representation of this guild within these systems. An explanation as to why more freshwater fish species have not become euryhaline and occupied a wide range of estuaries similar to their marine counterparts is probably due to a combination of the above described factors, with physiological restrictions pertaining to limited salinity tolerances probably playing the most important role. PMID:25739335

  1. Gasification of cyanobacterial in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiwen; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Zhirong; Gong, Miao

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial collected from eutrophic freshwater lakes constituted intractable waste with a rich algae biomass content. Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) was proposed to treat the cyanobacterial and to produce hydrogen for energy. The H 2 yield reached 2.92 mol/kg at reaction conditions of 500 °C, 30 min and 22 MPa; this yield accounted for 26% of the total gaseous products. Abundant ammonia and dissolved reactive phosphorous were concentrated in the liquid product, which could be recovered and used as a liquid fertilizer. Solid residue, which accounted only for about 1% of the wet weight, was mainly composed of coke and ash. The efficiency of H 2 production was better than that from other biomass, because of the abundant organic matter in cyanobacterial. Thus, cyanobacterial are an ideal biomass feedstock for H 2 production from SCWG. PMID:25176482

  2. The freshwater snails (Gastropoda) of Iran, with descriptions of two new genera and eight new species

    PubMed Central

    Glöer, Peter; Peši?, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Using published records and original data from recent field work and revision of Iranian material of certain species deposited in the collections of the Natural History Museum Basel, the Zoological Museum Berlin, and Natural History Museum Vienna, a checklist of the freshwater gastropod fauna of Iran was compiled. This checklist contains 73 species from 34 genera and 14 families of freshwater snails; 27 of these species (37%) are endemic to Iran. Two new genera, Kaskakia and Sarkhia, and eight species, i.e., Bithynia forcarti, Bithynia starmuehlneri, Bithynia mazandaranensis, Pseudamnicola georgievi, Kaskakia khorrasanensis, Sarkhia sarabensis, Valvata nowsharensis and Acroloxus pseudolacustris are described as new to science; Ecrobia grimmi (Clessin & Dybowski, 1888), Heleobia dalmatica (Radoman, 1974) and Hippeutis complanatus (Linnaeus, 1758) are reported for the first time from Iran. Additional field work is highly desirable for a more appropriate evaluation of the extant freshwater snail biodiversity in Iran. PMID:22977349

  3. Filtration rate capacities in 6 species of European freshwater bivalves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jakob Kryger; Hans Ulrik Riisgård

    1988-01-01

    Filtration rate capacities in undisturbed freshwater bivalves were determined by means of two different methods (indirect “clearance” and “suction” methods) in Anodonta anatina (L.), Unio tumidus Philipsson, Unio pictorum (L.), Unio crassus Philipsson, Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas) and Sphaerium corneum (L.). In A. anatina, D. polymorpha, and S. corneum the filtration rate (FR, 1 h-1) at 19–20°C as a function of

  4. Cyanobacterial chemical warfare affects zooplankton community composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LARS-ANDERS HANSSON; SUSANNE GUSTAFSSON; KARIN RENGEFORS; LINA BOMARK

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. Toxic algal blooms widely affect our use of water resources both with respect to drinking water and recreation. However, it is not only humans, but also organisms living in freshwater and marine ecosystems that may be affected by algal toxins. 2. In order to assess if cyanobacterial toxins affect the composition of natural zooplankton communities, we quantified the

  5. Avian vacuolar myelinopathy linked to exotic aquatic plants and a novel cyanobacterial species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan B. Wilde; Thomas M. Murphy; Charlotte P. Hope; Sarah K. Habrun; Jason Kempton; Anna Birrenkott; Faith Wiley; William W. Bowerman; Alan J. Lewitus

    2005-01-01

    Invasions of exotic species have created environmental havoc through competition and dis- placement of native plants and animals. The introduction of hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) into the United States in the 1960s has been detrimental to navigation, power generation, water intake, and water quality (McCann et al., 1996). Our field surveys and feeding studies have now implicated exotic hydrilla and asso-

  6. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF FLUORANTHENE TO FRESHWATER AND SALTWATER SPECIES UNDER FLUORESCENT AND ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute and chronic toxicity of fluoranthene was determined for a diverse group of freshwater and saltwater species under both standard laboratory fluorescent light and ultraviolet (UV) light test conditions. Acute tests with 21 species demonstrated that fluoranthene was not le...

  7. A revision of the species of Bothriocephalus Rudolphi, 1808 (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea) parasitic in American freshwater fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TomᚠScholz

    1997-01-01

    The species of the pseudophyllidean genus Bothriocephalus Rudolphi, 1808 parasitising freshwater fishes in America are revised, based on the examination of type and voucher specimens of seven taxa. There are five valid species: Bothriocephalus claviceps (Goeze, 1782), B. cuspidatus Cooper, 1917, B. formosus Mueller & Van Cleave, 1932, B. acheilognathi Yamaguti, 1934, and B. pearsei Scholz, Vargas-Vázquez & Moravec, 1996.

  8. Regulation of gene expression in diverse cyanobacterial species by using theophylline-responsive riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Ma, Amy T; Schmidt, Calvin M; Golden, James W

    2014-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic bacteria that are currently being developed as biological production platforms. They derive energy from light and carbon from atmospheric carbon dioxide, and some species can fix atmospheric nitrogen. One advantage of developing cyanobacteria for renewable production of biofuels and other biological products is that they are amenable to genetic manipulation, facilitating bioengineering and synthetic biology. To expand the currently available genetic toolkit, we have demonstrated the utility of synthetic theophylline-responsive riboswitches for effective regulation of gene expression in four diverse species of cyanobacteria, including two recent isolates. We evaluated a set of six riboswitches driving the expression of a yellow fluorescent protein reporter in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, Leptolyngbya sp. strain BL0902, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, and Synechocystis sp. strain WHSyn. We demonstrated that riboswitches can offer regulation of gene expression superior to that of the commonly used isopropyl-?-d-thiogalactopyranoside induction of a lacI(q)-Ptrc promoter system. We also showed that expression of the toxic protein SacB can be effectively regulated, demonstrating utility for riboswitch regulation of proteins that are detrimental to biomass accumulation. Taken together, the results of this work demonstrate the utility and ease of use of riboswitches in the context of genetic engineering and synthetic biology in diverse cyanobacteria, which will facilitate the development of algal biotechnology. PMID:25149516

  9. A PRELIMINARY RESEARCH ON MOLLUSCA SPECIES OF SOME FRESHWATERS OF S?NOP AND BAFRA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmet ÖKTENER

    The aim of this work was to investigate mollusc fauna of some freshwater ecosystems in Sinop and Bafra. The samples were obtained from littoral zones (0.5-1.5 m) by using handle dredge, spatula, handle oar. As a result of this study, 12 species belonging to Gastropoda and 6 species belonging to Bivalvia, totally 18 Mollusca species were determined. Valvata pulchella Studer,1820,

  10. Species Richness, Distribution and Relative Abundance of Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) of the Strawberry River, Arkansas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sujata Poudel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the species richness, distribution and abundance of fresh water mussels, address whether there are distinct communities in the Strawberry River and assess if any environmental variables are associated with mussel distributions. The Strawberry River watershed (1500 km2) is located within the North-central Arkansas. Freshwater mussels were surveyed from the headwater to mouth

  11. SHORT-TERM TOXICITY OF FIVE OIL S TO FOUR FRESHWATER SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Short-term lethality tests were conducted with five (waste oil, No. 1 fuel oil, No. 2 fuel oil, mixed blend sweet crude oil, Lloydminister crude oil) oils and four freshwater species. The oils were tested as floating layers, emulsions, and as the water-soluble fraction of 10% oil...

  12. Allelopathy in freshwater cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leão, Pedro N; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D; Vasconcelos, Vítor M

    2009-01-01

    Freshwater cyanobacteria produce several bioactive secondary metabolites with diverse chemical structure, which may achieve high concentrations in the aquatic medium when cyanobacterial blooms occur. Some of the compounds released by cyanobacteria have allelopathic properties, influencing the biological processes of other phytoplankton or aquatic plants. These kinds of interactions are more easily detectable under laboratory studies; however their ecological relevance is often debated. Recent research has discovered new allelopathic properties in some cyanobacteria species, new allelochemicals and elucidated some of the allelopathic mechanisms. Ecosystem-level approaches have shed some light on the factors that influence allelopathic interactions, as well as how cyanobacteria may be able to modulate their surrounding environment by means of allelochemical release. Nevertheless, the role of allelopathy in cyanobacteria ecology is still not well understood, and its clarification should benefit from carefully designed field studies, chemical characterization of allelochemicals and new methodological approaches at the "omics" level. PMID:19863381

  13. Macrophyte Species Drive the Variation of Bacterioplankton Community Composition in a Shallow Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin; Bian, Yuanqi; Xing, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Macrophytes play an important role in structuring aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we explored whether macrophyte species are involved in determining the bacterioplankton community composition (BCC) in shallow freshwater lakes. The BCC in field areas dominated by different macrophyte species in Taihu Lake, a large, shallow freshwater lake, was investigated over a 1-year period. Subsequently, microcosm experiments were conducted to determine if single species of different types of macrophytes in an isolated environment would alter the BCC. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), followed by cloning and sequence analysis of selected samples, was employed to analyze the BCC. The DGGE results of the field investigations indicated that the BCC changed significantly from season to season and that the presence of different macrophyte species resulted in lower BCC similarities in the summer and fall. LIBSHUFF analysis of selected clone libraries from the summer demonstrated different BCCs in the water column surrounding different macrophytes. Relative to the field observations, the microcosm studies indicated that the BCC differed more pronouncedly when associated with different species of macrophytes, which was also supported by LIBSHUFF analysis of the selected clone libraries. Overall, this study suggested that macrophyte species might be an important factor in determining the composition of bacterial communities in this shallow freshwater lake and that the species-specific influence of macrophytes on BCC is variable with the season and distance. PMID:22038598

  14. Impact of resource availability on species composition and diversity in freshwater nematodes.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Iris C; Traunspurger, Walter

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the long-term effects of resource availability in a freshwater nematode community. We carried out a mesocosm experiment where natural nematode communities were exposed to nutrient addition/depletion over 2 years. Compared to the nutrient-addition treatment, species richness and diversity were strongly reduced upon nutrient depletion. The functional group of bacterial feeders particularly suffered severely from nutrient depletion. The decrease in diversity of bacterial feeders was linked to reduced species richness and diversity of large omnivorous species, as predicted by trophic-dynamic models. Tilman's (1976) statement, that under low nutrient levels the best competitor dominates the system, was applicable in our system. Upon nutrient depletion, resource depletion led to a monoculture of 1 small bacterial feeder, but even after 2 years of resource depletion, up to 16 species still coexisted. Our results provide strong evidence that freshwater nematode systems can be regulated by nutrient competition. PMID:15365809

  15. First report of saxitoxin production by a species of the freshwater benthic cyanobacterium, Scytonema Agardh

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francine M. J. Smith; Susanna A. Wood; Roel van Ginkel; Paul A. Broady; Sally Gaw

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxins or paralytic shellfish poisons (PSP) are neurotoxins produced by some species of freshwater cyanobacteria and marine dinoflagellates. Samples collected from the metaphyton of a drinking-water supply’s pre-treatment reservoir and a small eutrophic lake in New Zealand returned positive results when screened using a Jellett PSP Rapid Test Kit. The dominant species in the sample was identified as Scytonema cf.

  16. Using remote underwater video to estimate freshwater fish species richness.

    PubMed

    Ebner, B C; Morgan, D L

    2013-05-01

    Species richness records from replicated deployments of baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVS) and unbaited remote underwater video stations (UBRUVS) in shallow (<1 m) and deep (>1 m) water were compared with those obtained from using fyke nets, gillnets and beach seines. Maximum species richness (14 species) was achieved through a combination of conventional netting and camera-based techniques. Chanos chanos was the only species not recorded on camera, whereas Lutjanus argentimaculatus, Selenotoca multifasciata and Gerres filamentosus were recorded on camera in all three waterholes but were not detected by netting. BRUVSs and UBRUVSs provided versatile techniques that were effective at a range of depths and microhabitats. It is concluded that cameras warrant application in aquatic areas of high conservation value with high visibility. Non-extractive video methods are particularly desirable where threatened species are a focus of monitoring or might be encountered as by-catch in net meshes. PMID:23639156

  17. Novel Cyanobacterial Biosensor for Detection of Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Shao, C. Y.; Howe, C. J.; Porter, A. J. R.; Glover, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to generate a cyanobacterial biosensor that could be used to detect herbicides and other environmental pollutants. A representative freshwater cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803, was chromosomally marked with the luciferase gene luc (from the firefly Photinus pyralis) to create a novel bioluminescent cyanobacterial strain. Successful expression of the luc gene during growth of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 cultures was characterized by measuring optical density and bioluminescence. Bioluminescence was optimized with regard to uptake of the luciferase substrate, luciferin, and the physiology of the cyanobacterium. Bioassays demonstrated that a novel luminescent cyanobacterial biosensor has been developed which responded to a range of compounds including different herbicide types and other toxins. This biosensor is expected to provide new opportunities for the rapid screening of environmental samples or for the investigation of potential environmental damage. PMID:12324353

  18. An Overview of the Interagency, International Symposium on Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms (ISOC-HAB): Advancing the Scientific Understanding of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Kenneth Hudnell; Quay Dortch; Harold Zenick

    There is growing evidence that the spatial and temporal incidence of harmful algal blooms is increasing, posing potential\\u000a risks to human health and ecosystem sustainability. Currently there are no US Federal guidelines, Water Quality Criteria and\\u000a Standards, or regulations concerning the management of harmful algal blooms. Algal blooms in freshwater are predominantly\\u000a cyanobacteria, some of which produce highly potent cyanotoxins.

  19. Toxins produced in cyanobacterial water blooms – toxicity and risks

    PubMed Central

    Bláha, Lud?k; Babica, Pavel; Maršálek, Blahoslav

    2009-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters represent a major ecological and human health problem worldwide. This paper briefly summarizes information on major cyanobacterial toxins (hepatotoxins, neurotoxins etc.) with special attention to microcystins-cyclic heptapeptides with high acute and chronic toxicities. Besides discussion of human health risks, microcystin ecotoxicology and consequent ecological risks are also highlighted. Although significant research attention has been paid to microcystins, cyanobacteria produce a wide range of currently unknown toxins, which will require research attention. Further research should also address possible additive, synergistic or antagonistic effects among different classes of cyanobacterial metabolites, as well as interactions with other toxic stressors such as metals or persistent organic pollutants. PMID:21217843

  20. Challenges and opportunities in implementing managed relocation for conservation of freshwater species.

    PubMed

    Olden, Julian D; Kennard, Mark J; Lawler, Joshua J; Poff, N Leroy

    2011-02-01

    The rapidity of climate change is predicted to exceed the ability of many species to adapt or to disperse to more climatically favorable surroundings. Conservation of these species may require managed relocation (also called assisted migration or assisted colonization) of individuals to locations where the probability of their future persistence may be higher. The history of non-native species throughout the world suggests managed relocation may not be applicable universally. Given the constrained existence of freshwater organisms within highly dendritic networks containing isolated ponds, lakes, and rivers, managed relocation may represent a useful conservation strategy. Yet, these same distinctive properties of freshwater ecosystems may increase the probability of unintended ecological consequences. We explored whether managed relocation is an ecologically sound conservation strategy for freshwater systems and provided guidelines for identifying candidates and localities for managed relocation. A comparison of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater animals associated with high probabilities of extirpation and invasion suggests that it is possible to select species for managed relocation to minimize the likelihood of unintended effects to recipient ecosystems. We recommend that translocations occur within the species' historical range and optimally within the same major river basin and that lacustrine and riverine species be translocated to physically isolated seepage lakes and upstream of natural or artificial barriers, respectively, to lower the risk of secondary spread across the landscape. We provide five core recommendations to enhance the scientific basis of guidelines for managed relocation in freshwater environments: adopt the term managed translocation to reflect the fact that individuals will not always be reintroduced within their historical native range; examine the trade-off between facilitation of individual movement and the probability of range expansion of non-native species; determine which species and locations might be immediately considered for managed translocation; adopt a hypothetico-deductive framework by conducting experimental trials to introduce species of conservation concern into new areas within their historical range; build on previous research associated with species reintroductions through communication and synthesis of case studies. PMID:20666802

  1. Laboratory growth rates of six species of freshwater Gymnamoebia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. M. Baldock; J. H. Baker; M. A. Sleigh

    1980-01-01

    Laboratory growth rates of six species of Gymnamoebia, isolated from English chalk streams and cultured on bacteria, have been determined at four different temperatures. Generation times ranged from 4.46 to 33.3 h. A linear relationship between log10 specific growth rate and the reciprocal of the absolute temperature was demonstrated for four species. A significant regression of log10 generation time on

  2. Cross-Cordillera exchange mediated by the Panama Canal increased the species richness of local freshwater fish assemblages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott A. Smith; Graham Bell; Eldredge Bermingham

    2004-01-01

    Completion of the Panama Canal in 1914 breached the continental divide and set into motion a natural experiment of unprecedented magnitude by bringing previously isolated freshwater fish communities into contact. The construction of a freshwater corridor connecting evolutionarily isolated communities in Pacific and Caribbean watersheds dramatically increased the rate of dispersal, without directly affecting species interactions. Here, we report that

  3. Importance of hybridization between indigenous and nonindigenous freshwater species: an overlooked threat to North American biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Perry, William L; Lodge, David M; Feder, Jeffrey L

    2002-04-01

    Biodiversity of North American freshwaters is among the greatest in the world. However, due to extensive habitat degradation, pollution, and introductions of nonindigenous species, this biodiversity is also among the most endangered. Unlike habitat degradation and pollution, nonindigenous species represent a permanent loss of biodiversity because their removal or control is often impossible. Most species introduced into nonnative North American ranges, however, are not from Eurasia but have been introduced from geographically isolated regions within North America. Although the ecological effects of introduced species have been widely documented, the effects of hybridization, especially between closely related species, represents an equally serious mechanism of extinction but is much less studied. Identification of which species are likely to hybridize after contact is of critical importance to prevent the further loss of native species. Molecular phylogenetics serves as a powerful tool to identify freshwater species at risk of introgression, if we can assume that genetic distance is a good predictor of the potential for hybridization. Although not a thorough review of all cases of hybridization, this article documents the extent and effects of hybridization in fishes, crayfishes, mussels, and other invertebrates in light of the currently accepted phylogenetic relationships. We suggest this approach may be the first step in addressing the potential threat of hybridization between many of the closely related species in North American fresh waters. PMID:12028732

  4. Past climate change drives current genetic structure of an endangered freshwater mussel species.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kentaro; Lang, Brian K; Berg, David J

    2015-04-01

    Historical-to-recent climate change and anthropogenic disturbance affect species distributions and genetic structure. The Rio Grande watershed of the United States and Mexico encompasses ecosystems that are intensively exploited, resulting in substantial degradation of aquatic habitats. While significant anthropogenic disturbances in the Rio Grande are recent, inhospitable conditions for freshwater organisms likely existed prior to such disturbances. A combination of anthropogenic and past climate factors may contribute to current distributions of aquatic fauna in the Rio Grande basin. We used mitochondrial DNA and 18 microsatellite loci to infer evolutionary history and genetic structure of an endangered freshwater mussel, Popenaias popeii, throughout the Rio Grande drainage. We estimated spatial connectivity and gene flow across extant populations of P. popeii and used ecological niche models (ENMs) and approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to infer its evolutionary history during the Pleistocene. structure results recovered regional and local population clusters in the Rio Grande. ENMs predicted drastic reductions in suitable habitat during the last glacial maximum. ABC analyses suggested that regional population structure likely arose in this species during the mid-to-late Pleistocene and was followed by a late Pleistocene population bottleneck in New Mexico populations. The local population structure arose relatively recently, perhaps due to anthropogenic factors. Popenaias popeii, one of the few freshwater mussel species native to the Rio Grande basin, is a case study for understanding how both geological and anthropogenic factors shape current population genetic structure. Conservation strategies for this species should account for the fragmented nature of contemporary populations. PMID:25782031

  5. Comparison of tropical and temperate freshwater animal species' acute sensitivities to chemicals: implications for deriving safe extrapolation factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin WH Kwok; Kenneth MY Leung; Gilbert SG Lui; Vincent KH Chu; Paul KS Lam; David Morritt; Lorraine Maltby; Theo CM Brock; Brink van den P. J; Michael St J Warne; Mark Crane

    2007-01-01

    Toxicity data for tropical species are often lacking for ecological risk assessment. Consequently, tropical and subtropical countries use water quality criteria (WQC) derived from temperate species (e.g., United States, Canada, or Europe) to assess ecological risks in their aquatic systems, leaving an unknown margin of uncertainty. To address this issue, we use species sensitivity distributions of freshwater animal species to

  6. Differential UVB?sensitivities of five New Zealand freshwater zooplankton species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dirk Ludwig Wübben; Ekkehard Vareschi; Ian Hawes; Greg Bodeker

    2001-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity of five species of freshwater zooplankton (three Cladocera, two Copepoda) were investigated. The animals were exposed to varying levels of UV?radiation in a sunshine?simulator and the UV doses for 10 and 50% mortality (LD10, LD50) were estimated using a dose?response model. To place these doses in context they were compared with modelled clear?sky surface UV irradiances

  7. Physiologic and environmental factors influencing the calcium-to-tissue ratio in populations of three species of freshwater pulmonate snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Douglas Hunter; Wendy W. Lull

    1977-01-01

    A study of three species of freshwater pulmonate snails, Physa gyrina (11 populations), Physa integra (17 populations), and Helisoma anceps (18 populations) was carried out from 1973 to 1976, primarily in Michigan.

  8. SIMULTANEOUS MULTIPLE SPECIES TESTING: ACUTE TOXICITY OF 13 CHEMICALS TO 12 DIVERSE FRESHWATER AMPHIBIAN, FISH, AND INVERTEBRATE FAMILIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The test series developed methods for testing a compliment of aquatic organisms in a single test that satisfies the freshwater acute toxicity requirements for setting water quality criteria. Species tested included fathead minnows Pimephales promelas, rainbow trout Salmo gairdner...

  9. Chemical analysis of endolymph and the growing otolith: fractionation of metals in freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Melancon, Sonia; Fryer, Brian J; Markham, James L

    2009-06-01

    The fractionation of metals from water to otolith is an area of research that has received relatively limited attention, especially in freshwater systems. The objectives of the present research were to study the metal partitioning between otolith and endolymph of two freshwater species: Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and burbot (Lota lota). We also included the chemical analyses of water and blood from fish of the same species collected in the same area but during different years. These results provide insight regarding the partition of metals between water and fish. This is one of the first studies to provide a range of trace metal concentrations for endolymph and the growing otolith (both aragonite and vaterite) and to directly measure otolith-endolymph partition coefficients for freshwater fish. The trace elements (Mg, Sr, and Ba) most often used as otolith elemental tracers were the ones with the lowest uptake from water to blood. We found that endolymph and whole blood had similar metal concentrations, with Mg and Fe being the only elements enriched in whole blood. Results showed few significant differences in trace metal content between wild lake trout and burbot endolymph (except for K, Mg, and Ba), but significant differences existed between their aragonitic otoliths. These results suggest two different crystallization processes in these species or the presence of different proteins (and/or organic matrices) that would selectively influence elemental incorporation in the otoliths. PMID:19154085

  10. Toxic Cyanobacterial Bloom Triggers in Missisquoi Bay, Lake Champlain, as Determined by Next-Generation Sequencing and Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Nathalie; Munoz-Ramos, Valentina; Bird, David; Lévesque, Benoît; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Missisquoi Bay (MB) is a temperate eutrophic freshwater lake that frequently experiences toxic Microcystis-dominated cyanobacterial blooms. Non-point sources are responsible for the high concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen in the bay. This study combined data from environmental parameters, E. coli counts, high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, quantitative PCR (16S rRNA and mcyD genes) and toxin analyses to identify the main bloom-promoting factors. In 2009, nutrient concentrations correlated with E. coli counts, abundance of total cyanobacterial cells, Microcystis 16S rRNA and mcyD genes and intracellular microcystin. Total and dissolved phosphorus also correlated significantly with rainfall. The major cyanobacterial taxa were members of the orders Chroococcales and Nostocales. The genus Microcystis was the main mcyD-carrier and main microcystin producer. Our results suggested that increasing nutrient concentrations and total nitrogen:total phosphorus (TN:TP) ratios approaching 11:1, coupled with an increase in temperature, promoted Microcystis-dominated toxic blooms. Although the importance of nutrient ratios and absolute concentrations on cyanobacterial and Microcystis dynamics have been documented in other laboratories, an optimum TN:TP ratio for Microcystis dominance has not been previously observed in situ. This observation provides further support that nutrient ratios are an important determinant of species composition in natural phytoplankton assemblages. PMID:25984732

  11. Toxic cyanobacterial bloom triggers in missisquoi bay, lake champlain, as determined by next-generation sequencing and quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Nathalie; Munoz-Ramos, Valentina; Bird, David; Lévesque, Benoît; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2015-01-01

    Missisquoi Bay (MB) is a temperate eutrophic freshwater lake that frequently experiences toxic Microcystis-dominated cyanobacterial blooms. Non-point sources are responsible for the high concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen in the bay. This study combined data from environmental parameters, E. coli counts, high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, quantitative PCR (16S rRNA and mcyD genes) and toxin analyses to identify the main bloom-promoting factors. In 2009, nutrient concentrations correlated with E. coli counts, abundance of total cyanobacterial cells, Microcystis 16S rRNA and mcyD genes and intracellular microcystin. Total and dissolved phosphorus also correlated significantly with rainfall. The major cyanobacterial taxa were members of the orders Chroococcales and Nostocales. The genus Microcystis was the main mcyD-carrier and main microcystin producer. Our results suggested that increasing nutrient concentrations and total nitrogen:total phosphorus (TN:TP) ratios approaching 11:1, coupled with an increase in temperature, promoted Microcystis-dominated toxic blooms. Although the importance of nutrient ratios and absolute concentrations on cyanobacterial and Microcystis dynamics have been documented in other laboratories, an optimum TN:TP ratio for Microcystis dominance has not been previously observed in situ. This observation provides further support that nutrient ratios are an important determinant of species composition in natural phytoplankton assemblages. PMID:25984732

  12. Acute toxicity and effects analysis of endosulfan sulfate to freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Carriger, John F; Hoang, Tham C; Rand, Gary M; Gardinali, Piero R; Castro, Joffre

    2011-02-01

    Endosulfan sulfate is a persistent environmental metabolite of endosulfan, an organochlorine insecticide-acaricide presently registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. There is, however, limited acute fish toxicity data for endosulfan sulfate. This study determines the acute toxicity (LC??s and LC??s) of endosulfan sulfate to three inland Florida native fish species (mosquitofish [Gambusia affinis]; least killifish [Heterandria formosa]; and sailfin mollies [Poecilia latipinna]) as well as fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Ninety-six-h acute toxicity tests were conducted with each fish species under flow-through conditions. For all of the above-mentioned fish species, 96-h LC?? estimates ranged from 2.1 to 3.5 ?g/L endosulfan sulfate. The 96-h LC?? estimates ranged from 0.8 to 2.1 ?g/L endosulfan sulfate. Of all of the fish tested, the least killifish appeared to be the most sensitive to endosulfan sulfate exposure. The above-mentioned data were combined with previous acute toxicity data for endosulfan sulfate and freshwater fish for an effects analysis. The effects analysis estimated hazardous concentrations expected to exceed 5, 10, and 50% of the fish species' acute LC?? or LC?? values (HC?, HC??, and HC??). The endosulfan sulfate freshwater-fish acute tests were also compared with the available freshwater-fish acute toxicity data for technical endosulfan. Technical endosulfan is a mixture of ?- and ?-endosulfan. The LC??s had a wider range for technical endosulfan, and their distribution produced a lower HC?? than for endosulfan sulfate. The number of freshwater-fish LC??s for endosulfan sulfate is much smaller than the number available for technical endosulfan, reflecting priorities in examining the toxicity of the parent compounds of pesticides. The toxicity test results and effects analyses provided acute effect values for endosulfan sulfate and freshwater fish that might be applied in future screening level ecologic risk assessments. The effects analyses also discussed several deficiencies in conventional methods for setting water-quality criteria and determining ecologic effects from acute toxicity tests. PMID:21127850

  13. Synopsis of valid species-group taxa for freshwater Gastropoda recorded from the European Neogene

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Thomas A.; Kroh, Andreas; Harzhauser, Mathias; Georgopoulou, Elisavet; Mandic, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Here we present a complete list of all valid species-group taxa of freshwater gastropods reported from Miocene and Pliocene deposits in Europe. The last comparable work dates back to the 1920s and covered about 1,600 names. The extensive literature research underlying the present work revealed considerable changes in the taxonomic and systematic frameworks of Neogene freshwater gastropods and yielded a total number of 2,156 accepted taxa. Each taxon is accompanied by a full citation of its first description; where the information is available, page number and illustration reference are provided. First descriptions available as open-access full-text sources on the web were linked via hyperlink to the first page of the publication. PMID:25152683

  14. Accumulation and elimination of chromium by freshwater species exposed to spiked sediments.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Mercedes; Gagneten, Ana M; Parma, María J; Pavé, Paola J

    2008-11-01

    The bioaccumulation and elimination capacity of chromium were examined in four freshwater species: the submersed aquatic plant Ceratophyllum demersum (Ceratophyllaceae), the oligochaete Limnodrilus udekemianus (Tubificidae), the crab Zilchiopsis collastinensis (Decapoda), and the fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Poeciliidae). All of the species were exposed simultaneously to sediments spiked with Cr (K(2)Cr(2)O(7)) at different concentrations for 28 days, followed by 7 days without Cr to evaluate the concentration of residual Cr. We found that Cr accumulated in the tissues of all four species. The highest bioconcentration factor obtained for each species is as follows: C. demersum, 718.66 (+/-272.91); L. udekemianus, 172.55 (+/-80.8), Z. collastinensis, 67.72 (+/-35.4); C. decemmaculatus, 23.11 (+/-12.82), all at 28 days of exposure. PMID:18274820

  15. Toxin production in cyanobacterial mats from ponds on the McMurdo ice shelf, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Hitzfeld, B C; Lampert, C S; Spaeth, N; Mountfort, D; Kaspar, H; Dietrich, D R

    2000-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are known to produce hepatotoxic substances, the functional and ecological role of these toxins, however, remains largely unclear. Toxic properties of cyanobacteria collected in Antarctica were investigated to determine whether toxin-producing species can also be found under these environmental conditions. Samples were collected from meltwater ponds on the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica in the summers of 1997 to 1999. These ponds are colonized by benthic algae and cyanobacterial mats. Oscillatoriales, Nodularia sp., and Nostoc sp. constituted the major taxa in freshwater ponds, while Nostoc sp. was missing from brackish and saline ponds. Samples were taken from either floating, submerged or benthic mats, and extracted for in vitro toxicity testing. The presence of toxins was determined by the phosphatase-inhibition assay and by high performance liquid chromatography. The cytotoxic properties of the extracts were investigated in hepatocytes determining 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide metabolism and trypan blue dye exclusion. The results show that all cyanobacterial extracts display phosphatase-inhibiting activity, of which approximately half had significantly greater than 50% inhibiting activity. The presence of nodularin and microcystin-LR was established by high performance liquid chromatography. Cytotoxic properties, independent of the phosphatase inhibiting activity, were also detected. Toxic strains of cyanobacteria can therefore also be found in Antarctica and this finding may lead to further insight into potential ecological roles of cyanobacterial phosphatase inhibiting toxins. PMID:10858513

  16. The relationship of oocyte diameter and incubation temperature to incubation time in temperate freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Teletchea, F; Gardeur, J-N; Kamler, E; Fontaine, P

    2009-02-01

    Based on the analysis of six egg variables and incubation temperature of 65 temperate freshwater fish species, the possible relationships between oocyte diameter, incubation time and incubation temperature were reassessed and compared to the results obtained from marine fishes. Most freshwater species have eggs (mean +/-s.d. 2.19 +/- 1.52 mm) larger than marine species, that are chiefly demersal and develop stuck to various substrata, such as plants or rocks. A strong negative relationship was found between incubation time (t, days) and incubation temperature (T, degrees C): t = 186.23e(-0.197T) (r(2)= 0.87). A strong dependence of incubation time on oocyte diameter (Ø, mm) and incubation temperature was also found and was defined as: log(10)t= 3.002 + 0.599 log(10)Ø - 1.91 log(10) (T + 2), which explained 92% of the variance of the data set. Five major groups of species were defined based on the principal component analysis (PCA) of four quantitative variables. There were two distinct groups of salmonids, displaying demersal and non-adhesive eggs with a long incubation time at low temperature, the eggs of which required a high number of degree-days. There was a large group of species possessing small, mostly demersal and adhesive eggs developing at high temperature during a short period of time, and requiring a low number of degree-days. Between these two extremes, there was a fourth group displaying intermediate values and a fifth group including three species with large, adhesive and demersal eggs incubating at high temperatures during a short period of time. The burbot Lota lota displayed an unusual combination of variables compared to the remaining species in the data set. PMID:20735585

  17. Heterogeneity of alkane chain length in freshwater and marine cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Tabinda; Fatma, Zia; Fatma, Tasneem; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-01-01

    The potential utilization of cyanobacteria for the biological production of alkanes represents an exceptional system for the next generation of biofuels. Here, we analyzed a diverse group of freshwater and marine cyanobacterial isolates from Indian culture collections for their ability to produce both alkanes and alkenes. Among the 50 cyanobacterial isolates screened, 32 isolates; 14 freshwater and 18 marine isolates; produced predominantly alkanes. The GC-MS/MS profiles revealed a higher percentage of pentadecane and heptadecane production for marine and freshwater strains, respectively. Oscillatoria species were found to be the highest producers of alkanes. Among the freshwater isolates, Oscillatoria CCC305 produced the maximum alkane level with 0.43??g/mg dry cell weight, while Oscillatoria formosa BDU30603 was the highest producer among the marine isolates with 0.13??g/mg dry cell weight. Culturing these strains under different media compositions showed that the alkane chain length was not influenced by the growth medium but was rather an inherent property of the strains. Analysis of the cellular fatty acid content indicated the presence of predominantly C16 chain length fatty acids in marine strains, while the proportion of C18 chain length fatty acids increased in the majority of freshwater strains. These results correlated with alkane chain length specificity of marine and freshwater isolates indicating that alkane chain lengths may be primarily determined by the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of pentadecane-producing marine strains that was distinct from heptadecane-producing freshwater strains strongly suggesting a close association between alkane chain length and the cyanobacteria habitat. PMID:25853127

  18. Two new species of bucephalids (Digenea: Bucephalidae) parasitic in freshwater fishes of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lunaschi, Lía I

    2004-09-01

    Two new species of bucephalids (Digenea: Bucephalidae) were found parasitizing freshwater fishes of Argentina. Prosorhynchoides cambapuntaensis sp. n. from Salminus maxillosus (Characidae) is characterised by the tegument covered with two kinds of spines, scale-like spines anteriorly and fine spines posteriorly; uterine loops reaching the vitelline arch in the pre-oral region; and the Laurer's canal short, opening dorsally immediately posterior to the ovary. Rhipidocotyle santanaensis sp. n. from Acestrorhynchus pantaneiro (Acestrorhynchidae) is characterised by the rhynchus with two lateral projections; the testes arranged in tandem or slightly diagonal; and the vitelline follicles forming an arch in the pre-oral region. PMID:15468530

  19. Effect of glyphosate on growth of four freshwater species of phytoplankton: a microplate bioassay.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, E; Ferraz, D Gómez de Barreda; Sabater, C; Carrasco, J M

    2009-05-01

    The acute toxicity of glyphosate herbicide was tested on the four species of freshwater phytoplankton, Scenedesmus acutus, Scenedesmus subspicatus, Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella saccharophila. Herbicide concentrations eliciting a 50% growth reduction over 72 h (EC(50)) ranged from 24.5 to 41.7 mg L(-1), whilst a 10% growth inhibition is achieved by herbicide concentrations ranging from 1.6 to 3.0 mg L(-1), difficult to find neither in paddy fields (it is not used in rice) nor in the lake of the Albufera Natural Park. Chorella species are less sensitive to the herbicide than Scenedesmus species. It can be concluded that glyphosate has a low potential risk for the tested organisms. PMID:19266135

  20. The potential use of bacterium strain R219 for controlling of the bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwater lake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongqin RenPing; Ping Zhang; Changhong Liu; Yarong Xue; Bin Lian

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms become a serious environmental threat to the freshwater ecosystem, and several physical and chemical\\u000a methods have been developed for controlling the blooms. In order to develop a biocontrol agent for controlling the blooms,\\u000a we isolated a bacterial strain R219 that exhibited strong algicidal activity against the dominant bloom-forming species of\\u000a Microcystis aeruginosa from Lake Tai in China. Based

  1. Belize, a country rich in natural resources and diverse wildlife, is home to nine species of freshwater

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    Belize, a country rich in natural resources and diverse wildlife, is home to nine species. However, little is known about Belize's unique turtle species. We hope that this guide will help people is the largest freshwater turtle in Belize and can weigh over 25 pounds. Its grayish-green shell is smooth

  2. Acute Toxicity of Six Freshwater Mussel Species (Glochidia) to Six Chemicals: Implications for Daphnids and Utterbackia imbecillis as Surrogates for Protection of Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. D. Milam; J. L. Farris; F. J. Dwyer; D. K. Hardesty

    2005-01-01

    Acute (24-h) toxicity tests were used in this study to compare lethality responses in early life stages (glochidia) of six freshwater mussel species, Leptodea fragilis, U. imbecillis, Lampsilis cardium, Lampsilis siliquoidea, Megalonaias nervosa, and Ligumia subrostrata, and two standard test organisms, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna. Concentrations of carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, permethrin, and 2,4-D were used in acute exposures

  3. Diversity and Distribution of Freshwater Amphipod Species in Switzerland (Crustacea: Amphipoda)

    PubMed Central

    Altermatt, Florian; Alther, Roman; Fišer, Cene; Jokela, Jukka; Konec, Marjeta; Küry, Daniel; Mächler, Elvira; Stucki, Pascal; Westram, Anja Marie

    2014-01-01

    Amphipods are key organisms in many freshwater systems and contribute substantially to the diversity and functioning of macroinvertebrate communities. Furthermore, they are commonly used as bioindicators and for ecotoxicological tests. For many areas, however, diversity and distribution of amphipods is inadequately known, which limits their use in ecological and ecotoxicological studies and handicaps conservation initiatives. We studied the diversity and distribution of amphipods in Switzerland (Central Europe), covering four major drainage basins, an altitudinal gradient of>2,500 m, and various habitats (rivers, streams, lakes and groundwater). We provide the first provisional checklist and detailed information on the distribution and diversity of all amphipod species from Switzerland. In total, we found 29 amphipod species. This includes 16 native and 13 non-native species, one of the latter (Orchestia cavimana) reported here for the first time for Switzerland. The diversity is compared to neighboring countries. We specifically discuss species of the genus Niphargus, which are often receiving less attention. We also found evidence of an even higher level of hidden diversity, and the potential occurrence of further cryptic species. This diversity reflects the biogeographic past of Switzerland, and suggests that amphipods are ideally suited to address questions on endemism and adaptive radiations, post-glaciation re-colonization and invasion dynamics as well as biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in aquatic systems. PMID:25354099

  4. Reproductive investment compromises maternal health in three species of freshwater turtle.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Anthony R; Scheelings, T Franciscus; Foley, Laura J; Johnstone, Christopher P; Reina, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that a trade-off in the allocation of resources between different physiological systems exists because resources are finite. As a result, females investing heavily in reproduction may compromise their future health. We used hematology, serum biochemistry, mass, and morphometric measurements as indicators of physiological health state to investigate whether reproductive investment altered subsequent maternal health in three Australian freshwater turtles: the oblong turtle (Chelodina oblonga; n = 12), the Macquarie turtle (Emydura macquarii; n = 9), and the eastern long-necked turtle (Chelodina longicollis; n = 8). Maternal health was impaired in turtles that produced larger and heavier eggs and clutches. In C. oblonga and E. macquarii, increased reproductive investment generally resulted in negative changes to the hematology and serum biochemistry profile of maternal blood. Generally, increases in heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, aspartate transaminase, creatine kinase, calcium/phosphorus ratio, and albumin/globulin ratio were observed following reproduction, in addition to a decrease in glucose and total protein. These findings agree with the physiological constraint hypothesis and highlight the connection between life-history evolution and animal physiology by documenting, for the first time, how measures of physiological health state relate to reproductive investment in Australian freshwater turtles. Additionally, our findings suggest that body condition, a readily used morphological biomarker, is a poor predictor of health in turtles. Our results emphasize the need to investigate how maternal health is influenced by the reproductive process in different species. PMID:24769705

  5. Cross-Cordillera exchange mediated by the Panama Canal increased the species richness of local freshwater fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott A; Bell, Graham; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2004-09-22

    Completion of the Panama Canal in 1914 breached the continental divide and set into motion a natural experiment of unprecedented magnitude by bringing previously isolated freshwater fish communities into contact. The construction of a freshwater corridor connecting evolutionarily isolated communities in Pacific and Caribbean watersheds dramatically increased the rate of dispersal, without directly affecting species interactions. Here, we report that a large fraction of species have been able to establish themselves on the other side of the continental divide, whereas no species have become extinct, leading to a local increase in species richness. Our results suggest that communities are not saturated and that competitive exclusion does not occur over the time-scale previously envisioned. Moreover, the results of this unintentional experiment demonstrate that community composition and species richness were regulated by the regional process of dispersal, rather than by local processes such as competition and predation. PMID:15347510

  6. Neurotoxic cyanobacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Molgó, Jordi; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole

    2010-10-01

    Worldwide development of cyanobacterial blooms has significantly increased in marine and continental waters in the last century due to water eutrophication. This phenomenon is favoured by the ability of planktonic cyanobacteria to synthesize gas vesicles that allow them to float in the water column. Besides, benthic cyanobacteria that proliferate at the bottom of lakes, rivers and costal waters form dense mats near the shore. Cyanobacterial massive proliferation is of public concern regarding the capacity of certain cyanobacterial strains to produce hepatotoxic and neurotoxic compounds that can affect public health, human activities and wild and stock animals. The cholinergic synapses and voltage-gated sodium channels constitute the targets of choice of cyanobacterial neurotoxins. Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Anatoxin-a(s) is an irreversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase. Saxitoxin, kalkitoxin and jamaicamide are blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels, whereas antillatoxin is an activator of such channels. Moreover the neurotoxic amino acid l-beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine was shown to be produced by diverse cyanobacterial taxa. Although controversial, increasing in vivo and in vitro evidence suggest a link between the ingestion of l-beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine and the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism-dementia complex, a neurodegenerative disease. This paper reviews the occurrence of cyanobacterial neurotoxins, their chemical properties, mode of action and biosynthetic pathways. PMID:19660486

  7. Acute toxicity of six freshwater mussel species (Glochidia) to six chemicals: implications for Daphnids and Utterbackia imbecillis as surrogates for protection of freshwater mussels (Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Milam, C D; Farris, J L; Dwyer, F J; Hardesty, D K

    2005-02-01

    Acute (24-h) toxicity tests were used in this study to compare lethality responses in early life stages (glochidia) of six freshwater mussel species, Leptodea fragilis, U. imbecillis, Lampsilis cardium, Lampsilis siliquoidea, Megalonaias nervosa, and Ligumia subrostrata, and two standard test organisms, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna. Concentrations of carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, permethrin, and 2,4-D were used in acute exposures to represent different chemical classes and modes of action. The relative sensitivities of species were evaluated by ranking their LC50 values for each chemical. We used these ranks to determine the extent to which U. imbecillis (one of the most commonly used unionids in toxicity tests) was representative of the tolerances of other mussels. We also calculated geometric mean LC50s for the families Unionidae and Daphnidae. Rankings of these data were used to assess the extent to which Daphnidae can be used as surrogates for freshwater mussels relative to chemical sensitivity. While no single chemical elicited consistently high or low toxicity estimates, carbaryl and 2,4-D were generally the least toxic to all species tested. No species was always the most sensitive, and Daphnidae were generally protective of Unionidae. Utterbackia imbecillis, while often proposed as a standard unionid mussel test species, did not always qualify as a sufficient surrogate (i.e., a substitute organism that often elicits similar sensitivity responses to the same contaminant exposure) for other species of mussels, since it was usually one of the more tolerant species in our rankings. U. imbecillis should be used as a surrogate species only with this caution on its relative insensitivity. PMID:15772883

  8. Acute toxicity of six freshwater mussel species (Glochidia) to six chemicals: Implications for daphnids and Utterbackia imbecillis as surrogates for protection of freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milam, C.D.; Farris, J.L.; Dwyer, F.J.; Hardesty, D.K.

    2005-01-01

    Acute (24-h) toxicity tests were used in this study to compare lethality responses in early life stages (glochidia) of six freshwater mussel species, Leptodea fragilis, U. imbecillis, Lampsilis cardium, Lampsilis siliquoidea, Megalonaias nervosa, and Ligumia subrostrata, and two standard test organisms, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna. Concentrations of carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, permethrin, and 2,4-D were used in acute exposures to represent different chemical classes and modes of action. The relative sensitivities of species were evaluated by ranking their LC 50 values for each chemical. We used these ranks to determine the extent to which U. imbecillis (one of the most commonly used unionids in toxicity tests) was representative of the tolerances of other mussels. We also calculated geometric mean LC50s for the families Unionidae and Daphnidae. Rankings of these data were used to assess the extent to which Daphnidae can be used as surrogates for freshwater mussels relative to chemical sensitivity. While no single chemical elicited consistently high or low toxicity estimates, carbaryl and 2,4-D were generally the least toxic to all species tested. No species was always the most sensitive, and Daphnidae were generally protective of Unionidae. Utterbackia imbecillis, while often proposed as a standard unionid mussel test species, did not always qualify as a sufficient surrogate (i.e., a substitute organism that often elicits similar sensitivity responses to the same contaminant exposure) for other species of mussels, since it was usually one of the more tolerant species in our rankings. U. imbecillis should be used as a surrogate species only with this caution on its relative insensitivity. ?? 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  9. Freshwater ascomycetes: Alascospora evergladensis, a new genus and species from the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Raja, Huzefa A; Violi, Helen A; Shearer, Carol A

    2010-01-01

    Alascospora evergladensis, a freshwater ascomycete collected from submerged dead petioles of Nymphaea odorata during a survey of aquatic fungi along a phosphorus gradient in the Florida Everglades, is described and illustrated as a new genus and species in the Pleosporales (Pleosporomycetidae, Dothideomycetes). The new fungus is unique among genera in the Pleosporales based on a combination of morphological characters that include light brown, translucent, membranous, ostiolate ascomata with dark, amorphous material irregularly deposited on the peridium, especially around the ostiole; globose, fissitunicate, thick-walled asci; septate pseudoparaphyses; and 1-septate ascospores that are hyaline when young, and surrounded by a hyaline gelatinous sheath that is wing-shaped in outline on each side of the ascospore. The sheath is distinctive in that it first expands in water and is translucent, then condenses and darkens around older ascospores, giving them a dark brown, verruculose appearance. PMID:20120226

  10. Analysis of rDNA Regions of Five Freshwater Unionid Mussel Species in Presque Isle Bay, Southeastern Lake Erie

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Trevor J. Manendo; Michael A. Campbell; Herbert H. Gilroy; Edwin C. Masteller

    2008-01-01

    Population structure and fecundity of freshwater mussels can be difficult to assess due to the benthic habitat and complex life cycles of these organisms. However, rapid and reliable classification of unionids can be accomplished with polymerase chain reaction if species-specific DNA primers are established. In this report we describe the sequence analysis of the ITS1 and ITS2 regions from five

  11. Freshwater ascomycetes: Minutisphaera (Dothideomycetes) revisited, including one new species from Japan.

    PubMed

    Raja, Huzefa A; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Figueroa, Mario; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Hirayama, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Akira; Miller, Andrew N; Zelski, Steven E; Shearer, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    During investigations of freshwater ascomycetes we found one interesting taxon from Aomori (Japan), as well as three additional taxa from North Carolina (USA), which were morphologically similar to Minutisphaera, a recently described freshwater fungus in the Dothideomycetes. The ascomata of all the collections bore dark hair-like structures around the ostiolar region, obovoid to obclavate bitunicate asci, and one to three septate hyaline to brown ascospores with a sheath (in material from Japan), and with both sheath and appendages (in material from the USA). The apothecial ascomata of these taxa, however, differ from those of the type species of the genus, which are perithecial. Two collections of Minutisphaera-like fungi from the USA were morphologically quite similar but differed in ascospore size. To assess the phylogenetic affinities of Minutisphaera-like taxa with the type species, M. fimbriatispora, we sequenced 18S and 28S nrDNA of five newly collected strains of Minutisphaera. We also sequenced the nrDNA for the entire internal transcribed spacer region of 10 strains to assess interspecific and intraspecific variation with M. fimbriatispora. Additionally we examined the secondary metabolite profiles of two strains from USA. Based on maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of combined 18S and 28S, and separate ITS sequences, as well as examination of morphology, we describe and illustrate a new species, M. japonica. One collection from North Carolina is confirmed as M. fimbriatispora, while two other collections are Minutisphaera-like fungi that had a number of similar diagnostic morphological characters but differed only slightly in ascospore sizes. The phylogeny inferred from the internal transcribed spacer region suggested that two out of the three North Carolina collections may be novel and perhaps cryptic species within Minutisphaera. Organic extracts of Minutisphaera from USA, M. fimbriatispora (G155-1) and Minutisphaera-like taxon (G156-1), revealed the presence of palmitic acid and (E)-hexadec-9-en-1-ol as major chemical constituents. We discuss the placement of the Minutisphaera clade within the Dothideomycetes. The description of the genus Minutisphaera is emended to accommodate M. japonica within Minutisphaera. PMID:23709484

  12. Biochemical composition of three algal species proposed as food for captive freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gatenby, C.M.; Orcutt, D.M.; Kreeger, D.A.; Parker, B.C.; Jones, V.A.; Neves, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    To identify potential diets for rearing captive freshwater mussels, the protein, carbohydrate (CHO), and lipid contents of two green algae, Neochloris oleoabundans, Bracteacoccus grandis, and one diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, were compared at different growth stages. The fatty acid and sterol composition were also identified. Protein was greatest (55-70%) for all species at late log growth stage (LL), and declined in late stationary (LS) growth. CHO was greatest at LS stage for all species (33.9-56.4% dry wt). No significant change in lipid levels occurred with growth stage, but tended to increase in N. oleoabundans. Mean lipid content differed significantly in the order: N. oleoabundans > P. tricornutum > B. grandis. Total fatty acids (TFA) were higher at LS stage compared to other stages in the two green algae, and stationary stage in the diatom. Mean unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) as %TFA was significantly higher in N. oleoabundans than the other species. The green algae contained high percentages of C-18 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), while the diatom was abundant in C-16 saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids and C-20 PUFA fatty acids. Growth stage had no effect on sterol concentration of any species. B. grandis showed significantly higher sterol levels than the other species except P. tricornutum at S stage. B. grandis was characterized by predominantly ??5, C-29 sterols, while N. oleoabundans synthesized ??5,7, ??5,7,22, and ??7, C-28 sterols. P. tricornutum produced primarily a ??5,22, C-28 sterol, and a small amount of a ??7,22, C-28 sterol.

  13. A new species of †Notogoneus (Teleostei: Gonorynchidae) from the Upper Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation of Montana, and the poor Cretaceous record of freshwater fishes from North America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lance Grande; Terry Grande

    1999-01-01

    †Notogoneus montanensis, sp. nov. (Teleostei: Ostariophysi: Gonorynchidae) is described from Late Cretaceous freshwater deposits of the Two Medicine Formation of Montana. The species is represented by one articulated skeleton and a partial trunk region of a second individual. Articulated freshwater fish fossils are almost unknown in Early Cretaceous through Middle Paleocene age deposits of North America. Localities such as the

  14. Unraveling the genome structure of cyanobacterial podovirus A-4L with long direct terminal repeats.

    PubMed

    Ou, Tong; Liao, Xiang-Yong; Gao, Xiao-Chan; Xu, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2015-05-01

    The freshwater cyanobacterial virus (cyanophage) A-4L, a podovirus, can infect the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 resulting in a high burst size and forming concentric plaques on its lawns. The complete genome sequence of A-4L was determined by the combination of high-throughput sequencing, terminal transferase-mediated polymerase chain reaction and restriction mapping. It contains 41,750bp with 810bp direct terminal repeats and 38 potential open reading frames. As compared with other cyanobacterial podoviruses in diverse ecosystems, the A-4L has the longest terminal repeat and shares similar genome organizations with freshwater members. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated sequences of eight core proteins indicated that freshwater cyanobacterial podoviruses were clustered together and distinct from marine counterparts, suggesting a clear divergence in the cyanobacterial podovirus lineage between freshwater and marine ecosystems. Our findings uncover the unique genome structure of A-4L which contains long direct terminal repeats, and create the first model system to address knowledge gaps in understanding cyanobacterial virus-host interactions at the molecular level. PMID:25836275

  15. Effect of postmining waters on cyanobacterial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Medová, Hana; P?ikryl, Ivo; Zapomn?lová, Eliška; Pechar, Libor

    2015-02-01

    New waterbodies have been created in a postmining area of the brown-coal basin in Sokolov, Czech Republic. The former open-cast quarry, Medard, has been filling with water from a local river, the surrounding catchment spoil heaps, and acid mine drainages. The effect of acidic (pH down to 2.5) and high-conductivity water (up to 1400 mS/m) on selected cyanobacteria and the possibility of cyanobacterial water bloom in the newly formed Lake Medard were studied by means of chlorophyll fluorometry (actual photosystem II [PSII] quantum yield, ?F/Fm', and relative electron transport rate, rETR). The acidic spoil-heap waters caused a decrease in cyanobacterial photosynthetic activity of 52 to 100% of the initial ?F/Fm' value. The Dolichospermum strains were about 10 times more sensitive than Microcystis viridis. The high concentration of dissolved ions appeared to have less effect on cyanobacterial PSII. Although the bottom meta- and hypolimnion layers were proven to negatively influence the cyanobacteria, the perennial stratification of the lake does not enable the water characteristics of the upper layers to change extensively and thus possibly suppresses the undesirable cyanobacterial bloom. The response of cyanobacteria to spoil-heap waters appears to be species-specific and can promote selection of those resistant to postmining environments. PMID:25790520

  16. The freshwater cyanobacterium Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea produces compounds toxic to mice and to mammalian and fish cells.

    PubMed

    Teneva, Ivanka; Asparuhova, Dafinka; Dzhambazov, Balik; Mladenov, Rumen; Schirmer, Kristin

    2003-02-01

    Despite a growing awareness of the presence of cyanobacterial toxins, knowledge about the ability of specific species to produce toxic compounds is still rather limited. It was the overall goal of the current work to investigate if probes derived from the freshwater species Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea (Kutz.) Gomont, a cyanobacterium frequently found in southern Europe and not previously investigated for the presence of bioactive compounds, were capable of eliciting in vivo and in vitro toxicity. The cyanobacterial extract revealed signs of neuro- as well as hepatotoxicity in mice, although these signs could not be explained by the well-known respective cyanobacterial neuro- and hepatotoxins saxitoxin and microcystin. Cytotoxicity was elicited by the cyanobacterial extract in all mammalian cell lines tested. As well, the rainbow trout liver cell line, RTL-W1, was found to be susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of the extract, although the cytotoxicity was dependent on temperature. In contrast, the cyanobacterial growth medium elicited cytotoxicity independent of temperature, leading to morphological changes indicative of alterations to the cytoskeleton. Overall, the results suggest that Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea is an important cyanobacterium to be considered for its potential to cause health risks on environmental exposure of it to mammals and fish. Applying a combination of mammalian and piscine cell line bioassays is a unique approach that, combined with chemical analysis, could be used in the future to identify the structure and cellular mechanisms of the as-yet-unknown toxic Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea metabolites in particular and to screen cyanobacterial extracts for their toxicity in general. PMID:12539139

  17. Where Are All the Fish: Potential of Biogeographical Maps to Project Current and Future Distribution Patterns of Freshwater Species

    PubMed Central

    Markovic, Danijela; Freyhof, Jörg; Wolter, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The dendritic structure of river networks is commonly argued against use of species atlas data for modeling freshwater species distributions, but little has been done to test the potential of grid-based data in predictive species mapping. Using four different niche-based models and three different climate change projections for the middle of the 21st century merged pairwise as well as within a consensus modeling framework, we studied the variability in current and future distribution patterns of 38 freshwater fish species across Germany. We used grid-based (11×11 km) fish distribution maps and numerous climatic, topographic, hydromorphologic, and anthropogenic factors derived from environmental maps at a finer scale resolution (250 m–1 km). Apart from the explicit predictor selection, our modeling framework included uncertainty estimation for all phases of the modeling process. We found that the predictive performance of some niche-based models is excellent independent of the predictor data set used, emphasizing the importance of a well-grounded predictor selection process. Though important, climate was not a primary key factor for any of the studied fish species groups, in contrast to substrate preferences, hierarchical river structure, and topography. Generally, distribution ranges of cold-water and warm-water species are expected to change significantly in the future; however, the extent of changes is highly uncertain. Finally, we show that the mismatch between the current and future ranges of climatic variables of more than 90% is the most limiting factor regarding reliability of our future estimates. Our study highlighted the underestimated potential of grid cell information in biogeographical modeling of freshwater species and provides a comprehensive modeling framework for predictive mapping of species distributions and evaluation of the associated uncertainties. PMID:22792361

  18. Bacterial community structure in freshwater springs infested with the invasive plant species Hydrilla verticillata

    PubMed Central

    Gordon-Bradley, N.; Li, N.

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic composition and physiological profiles of bacterial communities in freshwater springs were evaluated during the blooming and non-blooming stages of the invasive plant species, Hydrilla verticillata. Community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs) and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons were used to study potential Hydrilla mediated shifts in the physiological potential and phylogenetic composition of the bacterial community in infested systems. The results of CLPP revealed that the microbes in the Hydrilla invaded sites utilized less substrates during blooming periods than during nonblooming periods of the plant. Spearman’s rank correlation analysis showed some relationships between the relative abundances of bacterial taxa and the Biolog substrate utilization pattern. The relative abundance of the identified taxa showed some striking differences based on the blooming status of Hydrilla and to a lesser extent on site variation. The relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes, and Verrucomicrobia was generally higher during Hydrilla blooms, while Deltaproteobacteria was generally higher during non-blooming stages of Hydrilla. The detected genera also varied based on the blooming stages of the plant. Based on the findings, it appears that Hydrilla alters the phylogenetic composition and structure of the bacterial community during the blooming stage.

  19. Complementary nontargeted and targeted mass spectrometry techniques to determine bioaccumulation of halogenated contaminants in freshwater species.

    PubMed

    Myers, Anne L; Watson-Leung, Trudy; Jobst, Karl J; Shen, Li; Besevic, Sladjana; Organtini, Kari; Dorman, Frank L; Mabury, Scott A; Reiner, Eric J

    2014-12-01

    Assessing the toxicological significance of complex environmental mixtures is challenging due to the large number of unidentified contaminants. Nontargeted analytical techniques may serve to identify bioaccumulative contaminants within complex contaminant mixtures without the use of analytical standards. This study exposed three freshwater organisms (Lumbriculus variegatus, Hexagenia spp., and Pimephales promelas) to a highly contaminated soil collected from a recycling plant fire site. Biota extracts were analyzed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and mass defect filtering to identify bioaccumulative halogenated contaminants. Specific bioaccumulative isomers were identified by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-HRToF). Targeted analysis of mixed brominated/chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PXDD/PXDFs, X = Br and Cl) was performed by atmospheric pressure gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS). Relative sediment and biota instrument responses were used to estimate biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs). Bioaccumulating contaminants varied among species and included polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), chlorinated and mixed brominated/chlorinated anthracenes/phenanthrenes, and pyrenes/fluoranthenes (Cl-PAHs and X-PAHs, X = Br and Cl), as well as PXDD/PXDFs. Bioaccumulation potential among isomers also varied. This study demonstrates how complementary high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques identify persistent and bioaccumulative contaminants (and specific isomers) of environmental concern. PMID:25365627

  20. Feeding kinematics of freshwater turtles: what advantage do invasive species possess?

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Hideaki; Tabata, Runa; Hori, Tomoya; Mitamura, Hiromich; Arai, Nobuaki

    2014-10-01

    The red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta) is an invasive turtle species that is displacing the populations of native freshwater turtles in many countries. However, the mechanism that makes red-eared sliders superior competitors has been less well studied. In this study, we compare the feeding kinematics of the red-eared slider with those of Reeves' pond turtle (Mauremys reevesii), a turtle native to East Asia, and offer an explanation as to why red-eared sliders are superior in food competition. Reeves' pond turtles sympatric to red-eared sliders have been reported to have a mainly durophagous diet in contrast to the preference for a soft diet in areas of allopatry to red-eared sliders, indicating the dietary shift resulted from food competition. Maximum neck extension and retraction speed are considered to be indicators of striking ability, but were not found to be superior in red-eared sliders. In fact, maximum neck extension speed was significantly higher in Reeves' pond turtles, though this advantage may be counteracted by the longer neck of Reeves' pond turtles, resulting in similar neck extension times. On the other hand, red-eared sliders had a significantly shorter gape cycle time and neck retraction time, indicating that they can complete feeding in a short time. Therefore, red-eared sliders are suggested to be superior in food competition not due to their striking ability, but due to exploiting preferable food in a shorter time. PMID:25156933

  1. Metagenomic Study of Iron Homeostasis in Iron Depositing Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I.; Franklin H.; Tringe, S. G.; Klatt, C. G.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Guevara, M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: It is not clear how an iron-rich thermal hydrosphere could be hospitable to cyanobacteria, since reduced iron appears to stimulate oxidative stress in all domains of life and particularly in oxygenic phototrophs. Therefore, metagenomic study of cyanobacterial community in iron-depositing hot springs may help elucidate how oxygenic prokaryotes can withstand the extremely high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by interaction between environmental Fe2+ and O2. Method: Anchor proteins from various species of cyanobacteria and some anoxygenic phototrophs were selected on the basis of their hypothetical role in Fe homeostasis and the suppression of oxidative stress and were BLASTed against the metagenomes of iron-depositing Chocolate Pots and freshwater Mushroom hot springs. Results: BLASTing proteins hypothesized to be involved in Fe homeostasis against the microbiomes from the two springs revealed that iron-depositing hot spring has a greater abundance of defensive proteins such as bacterioferritin comigratory protein (Bcp) and DNA-binding Ferritin like protein (Dps) than a fresh-water hot spring. One may speculate that the abundance of Bcp and Dps in an iron-depositing hot spring is connected to the need to suppress oxidative stress in bacteria inhabiting environments with high Fe2+ concnetration. In both springs, Bcp and Dps are concentrated within the cyanobacterial fractions of the microbial community (regardless of abundance). Fe3+ siderophore transport (from the transport system permease protein query) may be less essential to the microbial community of CP because of the high [Fe]. Conclusion: Further research is needed to confirm that these proteins are unique to photoautotrophs such as those living in iron-depositing hot spring.

  2. Variation in cyanobacterial hepatotoxin (microcystin) content of water samples and two species of fishes collected from a shallow lake in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Amrani, Amina; Nasri, Hichem; Azzouz, Amina; Kadi, Yacine; Bouaïcha, Noureddine

    2014-04-01

    Microcystins (MCs) produced from cyanobacteria can accumulate in freshwater fish tissues. In this study, variations in these toxins content were examined monthly in water samples and two species of fish in Lake Oubeira, Algeria, from April 2010 to March 2011. During the study period, MCs were analyzed using protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) inhibition assay. In lake water, total (dissolved and intracellular toxins) MC concentrations by PP2A ranged from 0.028 to 13.4 ?g equivalent MC-LR/l, with a peak in September 2010. MC-LR was the dominant variant (90 % of the total) in water samples, followed by MC-YR and MC-(H4)YR. The highest MC concentration in the omnivorous common carp (Cyprinus carpio) was found in the order intestine > hepatopancreas > muscle; however, in the carnivorous European eel (Anguilla anguilla) the order was liver > intestine > muscle. Highest MC concentrations in the intestine tissue of the common carp were found between August and November 2010 where high MC concentrations were detected in water samples, whereas high levels of MCs in the liver of the European eel were found later between January and February 2011. During the entire period of study, the World Health Organization (WHO) lifetime limit for tolerable daily intake was exceeded only in common carp muscle. PMID:24445842

  3. Variation of Microcystins, Cyanobacterial Hepatotoxins, in Anabaena spp. as a Function of Growth Stimuli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JARKKO RAPALA; KAARINA SIVONEN; CHRISTINA LYRA; SEPPO I. NIEMELA

    1997-01-01

    Cyanobacterial hepatotoxins, microcystins, are specific inhibitors of serine\\/threonine protein phosphatases and potent tumor promoters. They have caused several poisonings of animals and also pose a health hazard for humans through the use of water for drinking and recreation. Different strains of the same cyanobacterial species may variously be nontoxic, be neurotoxic, or produce several microcystin variants. It is poorly under-

  4. Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy and chemometrics as a tool for the discrimination of cyanobacterial strains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mustafa Kansiz; Philip Heraud; Bayden Wood; Frank Burden; John Beardall; Don McNaughton

    1999-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, in combination with chemometrics, was investigated as a novel method to discriminate between cyanobacterial strains. In total, 810 absorbance spectra were recorded from one eukaryotic and five cyanobacterial taxa spanning three genera and including two strains of one species, Microcystis aeruginosa. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based classification techniques such as Soft Independent Modelling of Class

  5. Cyanobacterial hydrogen production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Datta Madamwar; Nikki Garg; Vishal Shah

    2000-01-01

    With the global attention and research now being focussed on looking for an alternative to fossil fuel, hydrogen is the hope\\u000a of future. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganisms for biological photohydrogen production. The review highlights\\u000a the advancement in the biology of cyanobacterial hydrogen production in recent years. It discusses the enzymes involved in\\u000a hydrogen production, viz. hydrogenases and nitrogenases, various

  6. The Freshwater Sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis Harbours Diverse Pseudomonas Species (Gammaproteobacteria, Pseudomonadales) with Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Keller-Costa, Tina; Jousset, Alexandre; van Overbeek, Leo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Costa, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria are believed to play an important role in the fitness and biochemistry of sponges (Porifera). Pseudomonas species (Gammaproteobacteria, Pseudomonadales) are capable of colonizing a broad range of eukaryotic hosts, but knowledge of their diversity and function in freshwater invertebrates is rudimentary. We assessed the diversity, structure and antimicrobial activities of Pseudomonas spp. in the freshwater sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis. Polymerase Chain Reaction – Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints of the global regulator gene gacA revealed distinct structures between sponge-associated and free-living Pseudomonas communities, unveiling previously unsuspected diversity of these assemblages in freshwater. Community structures varied across E. fluviatilis specimens, yet specific gacA phylotypes could be detected by PCR-DGGE in almost all sponge individuals sampled over two consecutive years. By means of whole-genome fingerprinting, 39 distinct genotypes were found within 90 fluorescent Pseudomonas isolates retrieved from E. fluviatilis. High frequency of in vitro antibacterial (49%), antiprotozoan (35%) and anti-oomycetal (32%) activities was found among these isolates, contrasting less-pronounced basidiomycetal (17%) and ascomycetal (8%) antagonism. Culture extracts of highly predation-resistant isolates rapidly caused complete immobility or lysis of cells of the protozoan Colpoda steinii. Isolates tentatively identified as P. jessenii, P. protegens and P. oryzihabitans showed conspicuous inhibitory traits and correspondence with dominant sponge-associated phylotypes registered by cultivation-independent analysis. Our findings suggest that E. fluviatilis hosts both transient and persistent Pseudomonas symbionts displaying antimicrobial activities of potential ecological and biotechnological value. PMID:24533086

  7. The freshwater planarian Polycelis felina as a sensitive species to assess the long-term toxicity of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Alvaro; Camargo, Julio A

    2011-07-01

    Behavioural endpoints are a good link between physiological and ecological effects. However long-term behavioural endpoints are not uniformly studied over all different organism groups. For example behaviour has been scarcely studied in planarians. Unionized ammonia (NH(3)) is one of the most widespread pollutants in developed countries, and is known to alter animal behaviour. In this study a long-term (30 d) bioassay was conducted to assess the effect of this pollutant on survival and behavioural activity (e.g. locomotion activity) of the freshwater planarian Polycelis felina. One control and three environmentally-realistic concentrations of unionized ammonia (treatments of 0.02, 0.05, and 0.09 mg N-NH(3) L(-1)) were used in quintuplicate. The behaviour of planarians was measured after 0, 10, 20 and 30 d of ammonia exposure. Mortality was recorded every 2 d. Unionized ammonia increased mortality in the two highest NH(3) concentrations and the locomotory activity was depressed in all treatments after 20 d of exposure. Behavioural effect was observed at concentrations 20 times lower than the short-term LC50 for this species. Previous studies proposed safe concentrations of unionized ammonia of 0.01-0.10 mg N-NH(3) L(-1) to aquatic ecosystems, but our study has shown that these concentrations will affect planarians. Because planarians play a key role in streams (as predator/scavenger), safe concentrations should be below 0.02 mg N-NH(3) L(-1) to protect this species in the freshwater community. Our results can contribute to improve the knowledge about ammonia toxicity to freshwater ecosystems, we recommend that safe concentrations of unionized ammonia should be based on very sensitive species. PMID:21546058

  8. Simultaneous multiple species testing: Acute toxicity of 13 chemicals to 12 diverse freshwater amphibian, fish, and invertebrate families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary W. Holcombe; Gary L. Phipps; Abdul H. Sulaiman; Alex D. Hoffman

    1987-01-01

    This test series developed methods for testing a compliment of aquatic organisms in a single test that satisfies the freshwater acute toxicity requirements for setting water quality criteria. Species tested included fathead minnowsPimephales promelas, rainbow troutSalmo gairdneri, bluegillLepomis macrochirus, channel catfishIctalurus punctatus, goldfishCarassius auratus, white suckerCatostomus commersoni, daphnidDaphnia magna, midgeTanytarsus dissimilis, crayfishOrconectes immunis, snailAplexa hypnorum, tadpoleXenopus laevis, and leechNephelopsis obscura.

  9. Susceptibility of various Japanese freshwater fish species to an isolate of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVb.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takafumi; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2013-11-25

    Genotype IVb of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) was isolated for the first time in the Great Lakes basin in 2003, where it spread and caused mass mortalities in several wild fish species throughout the basin. In order to prevent further spreading of the disease and to assess risks of new genotypes invading new watersheds, basic microbiological information such as pathogenicity studies are essential. In this study, experimental infections were conducted on 7 indigenous freshwater fish species from Japan by immersion with a VHSV genotype IVb isolate. In Expt 1, cumulative mortalities in bluegill Lepomis macrochirus used as positive controls, Japanese fluvial sculpin Cottus pollux, and iwana Salvelinus leucomaenis pluvius were 50, 80 and 0%, respectively. In Expt 2, cumulative mortalities of 100, 100 and 10% were observed in Japanese fluvial sculpin C. pollux, Japanese rice fish Oryzias latipes and yoshinobori Rhinogobius sp., respectively. No mortality was observed in honmoroko Gnathopogon caerulescens, akaza Liobagrus reini or Japanese striped loach Cobitis biwae. VHSV was detected by RT-PCR from samples of kidney, spleen, and brain from all dead fish, and virus re-isolation by cell culture was successful from all dead fish. We detected the virus in the brain from a few surviving bluegill 50 d post exposure by both cell culture and RT-PCR. These results revealed that VHSV IVb could become a serious threat to wild freshwater fish species in Japan, and that some surviving fish might become healthy carriers of the virus. PMID:24270018

  10. Histopathological effects of larval trematodes on the digestive gland of freshwater snail species, Vivipara bengalensis and Lymnaea acuminata.

    PubMed

    Choubisa, S L; Sheikh, Zulfiya; Jaroli, V J

    2012-10-01

    Comparative histopathological effects were observed on the digestive glands (hepatopancreas) of freshwater snail species, Vivipara bengalensis and Lymnaea acuminata infected with single (furcocercous cercariae) and double infection of digenean trematode larvae (gymnocephalous cercariae + metacercariae), respectively. Digestive glands of both the snail species revealed degenerative changes in their digestive gland tubules. The latter became irregular in shape, reduced in size with enlarged lumen and inter-tubular space besides rupturing of digestive tubules. These changes were correlated with the size and types of trematode larvae, single or double infection and degree of parasitemia. Autolytic necrosis of numerous tubules was found in digestive glands infected with double and very severe single infection. None of the tubules was found to be invaded by sporocyst, redia and cercaria. However, metacercariae were seen to invade digestive tubules of Lymnaea species. PMID:24082545

  11. HABITAT USE OF TWENTY-FIVE COMMON SPECIES OF OREGON FRESHWATER FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study had two objectives. he first was to determine the use of the physical habitat by the 25 most common native freshwater fishes of Oregon, and the second was to evaluate the use of a large computer database of museum records in the determination. he database encompasses 2...

  12. Community Structure of Bacteria Associated with Sheaths of Freshwater and Brackish Thioploca Species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hisaya Kojima; Yoshikazu Koizumi; Manabu Fukui

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial communities associated with sheaths of Thioploca spp. from two freshwater lakes (Lake Biwa, Japan, and Lake Constance, Germany) and one brackish lake (Lake Ogawara, Japan) were analyzed with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene fragments. The comparison between the DGGE band patterns of bulk sediment and Thioploca filaments of Lake Biwa suggested the presence of specific

  13. Susceptibility to freshwater acidification by two species of loon: Red-throated Loon (Gavia stellata) and Arctic Loon (Gavia arctica) in southwest Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mats O. G. Eriksson

    1994-01-01

    In southwest Sweden, the two species of loon, Gavia stellata and G. arctica, have shown different trends in population size and production of young during the last decades. Both species fish in oligotrophic freshwaters, susceptible to acidification. The number of breeding sites occupied by G. stellata has been reduced by almost 50% during the last 40–50 years. For G. arctica,

  14. A new species of freshwater crab of the genus Microthelphusa Pretzmann, 1968 (Crustacea: Brachyura: Pseudothelphusidae) from the Amazon region of Guyana.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Manuel; Tavares, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    A new species of freshwater crab, Microthelphusa furcifer, is described and illustrated from the Potaro-Siparuni Kuribrong River in the Guyana Shield (Amazon region of Guyana). The new species can be easily separated from its congeners by the morphology of the first gonopod. The first gonopod of Microthelphusa meansi Cumberlidge, 2007, is illustrated to clarify some aspects of its morphology.  PMID:25112338

  15. Coexistence of two freshwater turtle species along a Mediterranean stream: The role of spatial and temporal heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segurado, Pedro; Figueiredo, Diogo

    2007-09-01

    In the Iberian Peninsula the European pond turtle ( Emys orbicularis) and the Mediterranean pond turtle ( Mauremys leprosa) share many freshwater habitats, in particular Mediterranean streams. Whether and how these two species divide space within those habitats is poorly known in part due to the very low abundance of E. orbicularis at most syntopic sites. The spatial coexistence of these two species was studied along a 1.3 km reach of a typical Mediterranean stream based on data from trapping sessions and basking counts. The effect of the hydrological regime on differences in space use between species was also assessed. Spatial associations between species and between each species and microhabitat descriptors were estimated using a permutation procedure to account for spatial autocorrelation. Differences in the use of space were also estimated using a resample technique to account for the small sample sizes of E. orbicularis. Results indicate that E. orbicularis shows a preference for temporary, shallow, well vegetated and sandy reaches, while M. leprosa is less selective regarding microhabitat. Differences between E. orbicularis and juveniles of M. leprosa were less obvious. The high spatial heterogeneity of Mediterranean streams may be responsible for the persistence of viable populations of E. orbicularis as well as favouring the coexistence of the two turtle species. Therefore, stream habitat management and conservation plans for E. orbicularis should give priority to the maintenance of high levels of heterogeneity along Mediterranean streams.

  16. Molecular analysis of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersii (Decapoda, Palaemonidae) supports the existence of a single species throughout its distribution.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Natália; Mantelatto, Fernando Luis

    2013-01-01

    Macrobrachium olfersii is an amphidromous freshwater prawn, widespread along the eastern coasts of the Americas. This species shows great morphological modifications during ontogenesis, and several studies have verified the existence of a wide intraspecific variation. Because of this condition, the species is often misidentified, and several synonyms have been documented. To elucidate these aspects, individuals of M. olfersii from different populations along its range of distribution were investigated. The taxonomic limit was established, and the degree of genetic variability of this species was described. We extracted DNA from 53 specimens of M. olfersii, M. americanum, M. digueti and M. faustinum, which resulted in 84 new sequences (22 of 16S mtDNA, 45 of Cythocrome Oxidase I (COI) mtDNA, and 17 of Histone (H3) nDNA). Sequences of three genes (single and concatenated) from these species were used in the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic analyses and COI sequences from M. olfersii were used in population analysis. The genetic variation was evaluated through the alignment of 554 bp from the 16S, 638 bp from the COI, and 338 bp from the H3. The rates of genetic divergence among populations were lower at the intraspecific level. This was confirmed by the haplotype net, which showed a continuous gene flow among populations. Although a wide distribution and high morphological intraspecific variation often suggest the existence of more than one species, genetic similarity of Caribbean and Brazilian populations of M. olfersii supported them as a single species. PMID:23382941

  17. Temporal shifts in cyanobacterial communities at different sites on the Nakdong River in Korea.

    PubMed

    Hur, Moonsuk; Lee, Injung; Tak, Bo-Mi; Lee, Hae Jin; Yu, Jae Jeong; Cheon, Se Uk; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2013-12-01

    The studies of cyanobacterial blooms resulting from eutrophication or climate change and investigation of changes in the cyanobacterial community in freshwater environments are critical for the management of drinking water. Therefore, we investigated the cyanobacterial communities at 6 sites along the Nakdong River in South Korea from May 2012 to October 2012 by using high-throughput sequencing techniques and studied their relationship with various geochemical factors at sampling sites. Diverse genera (total of 175 genera) were detected within the cyanobacteria, and changes in their compositions were analyzed. The genus Prochlorococcus predominated in the May samples, especially in those obtained from the upstream part of the river, whereas the relative abundance of Microcystis and Anabaena increased with increase in water temperature. The relationship between the cyanobacterial community and environmental factors was analyzed by canonical correlation analysis, and the correlation between harmful cyanobacteria and chemical factors was analyzed by nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination. Various environmental factors such as dissolved oxygen, pH, electric conductivity, temperature were found to affect the cyanobacterial communities in the river. The results of this study could help in the management of freshwater environments and in maintenance of drinking water quality. PMID:24169512

  18. A new species of freshwater mussel (Bivalvia: Unionidae), Pleurobema athearni, from the Coosa River Drainage of Alabama, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gangloff, M.M.; Williams, J.D.; Feminella, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The Mobile Basin historically supported one of the most diverse freshwater mussel (Bivalvia: Unionidae) assemblages in North America. More than 65 species of mussels are known from the Basin, but it is difficult to determine how many species were present historically. The drainage's unique physical habitat was largely destroyed between the late 1800s and mid-1900s by impoundment and channel modifications of most of the larger rivers. Many species that were once common are now restricted to small headwater rivers and mid-sized tributaries. Recent Coosa River tributary surveys revealed a new, undescribed species of Pleurobema. This new species, Pleurobema athearni, is distinctive in outward appearance, shell morphometry and reproductive morphology, and can be distinguished from other Coosa River drainage unionids. Our analysis indicates that P. athearni is morphologically different from other similar taxa. It differs both in shell width/length and width/height ratios and thus provides a simple, quantitative means to differentiate this species from P. georgianum (Lea, 1841) Fusconaia barnesiana (Lea, 1838), and F. cerina (Conrad, 1838), which it superficially resembles and that also occur in the area. Our morphological diagnosis of this species is supported by recent molecular analyses that suggest this species is a Pleurobema and one closely related to other endemic Coosa River drainage unionids. The discovery of a new species of large, long-lived macroinvertebrate from a relatively well-sampled drainage in a populated region of the southeast United States underscores the need for more detailed surveys in isolated stretches of tributary streams. It should also serve as a reminder that almost 40 species of aquatic mollusks have been extirpated from the Mobile Basin before anything could be learned about their habitat or life history requirements. Copyright ?? 2006 Magnolia Press.

  19. [Freshwater macroinvertebrates from Cocos Island, Costa Rica: species and comparison with other islands of the Eastern Tropical Pacific].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fonseca, Pablo E; Ramírez, Alonso; Umaña, Gerardo; Springer, Monika

    2013-06-01

    Freshwater macroinvertebrates from Cocos Island, Costa Rica: species and comparison with other islands of the Eastern Tropical Pacific. Cocos Island is an oceanic island in the Eastern Pacific, at 496km from Cabo Blanco, Costa Rica. This 24 km2 island is surrounded by a protected marine area of 9640 km2. it was declared National Park in 1978 and a World Heritage by UNESCO in 1997. Freshwater macroinvertebrate fauna was collected in 20 sites covering three rivers (Genio, Chatam and Sucio) and two creeks (Minuto and an unnamed creek behind the park rangers' house). Tank bromeliads or phytotelmata were also examined for aquatic macroinvertebrates. Physicochemical parameters were determined in 13 study sites. Additionally, a comparison with other islands in the Eastern Tropical Pacific was conducted to determine the most important factors controlling the diversity in Tropical Pacific islands. A total of 455 individuals were collected belonging to 20 taxa (mostly identified to genus level) from 15 families of aquatic insects. Other macroinvertebrates such as Palaemonid shrimps, Hidrachnida and Oligochaeta were also collected. The family Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) was the most abundant, followed by Chironomidae (Diptera). Diptera was the order of insects with the highest taxonomic richness. A relationship between distance and the number of families was observed supporting the premises of the Theory of island Biogeography. This relationship was improved by correcting area by island elevation, indicating that mountainous islands had the richest faunas, potentially due to high cloud interception that feeds freshwater environments favoring the establishment of aquatic fauna. Physicochemical variables were similar in all sites, possibly due to the geology and the absence of significant sources of pollution on the island. PMID:23885581

  20. Long-term culture at elevated atmospheric CO2 fails to evoke specific adaptation in seven freshwater phytoplankton species

    PubMed Central

    Low-Décarie, Etienne; Jewell, Mark D.; Fussmann, Gregor F.; Bell, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere is expected to double by the end of the century. Experiments have shown that this will have important effects on the physiology and ecology of photosynthetic organisms, but it is still unclear if elevated CO2 will elicit an evolutionary response in primary producers that causes changes in physiological and ecological attributes. In this study, we cultured lines of seven species of freshwater phytoplankton from three major groups at current (approx. 380 ppm CO2) and predicted future conditions (1000 ppm CO2) for over 750 generations. We grew the phytoplankton under three culture regimes: nutrient-replete liquid medium, nutrient-poor liquid medium and solid agar medium. We then performed reciprocal transplant assays to test for specific adaptation to elevated CO2 in these lines. We found no evidence for evolutionary change. We conclude that the physiology of carbon utilization may be conserved in natural freshwater phytoplankton communities experiencing rising atmospheric CO2 levels, without substantial evolutionary change. PMID:23303540

  1. Major ion toxicity of six produced waters to three freshwater species: Application of ion toxicity models and TIE procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Tietge, J.E.; Hockett, J.R. [ENSR Consulting and Engineering, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Evans, J.M. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Previous research to characterize the acute toxicity of major ions to freshwater organisms resulted in the development of statistical toxicity models for three freshwater species (Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, and Daphnia magna). These ion toxicity models estimate the toxicity of seven major ions utilizing logistic regression. In this study, the ion toxicity models were used in conjunction with Phase 1 toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedures to evaluate the contribution of major ion toxicity to the total toxicity of six produced water samples ranging in total salinity from 1.7 to 58.1 g/L. Initial toxicities of all six samples were compared to the model predictions. Four produced waters were found to have toxicity consistent with toxicity attributable to major ion concentrations only. Two produced waters were found to exhibit more toxicity than expected from ion concentrations alone. These samples were subjected to Phase 1 TIE procedures. Toxicities were reduced by specific Phase 1 TIE manipulations to those predicted by the ion toxicity models. Mock effluents were used to verify the results. The combination of the ion toxicity models with Phase 1 TIE procedures successfully quantified the toxicity due to major ions in six produced water samples.

  2. Conserving Madagascar's Freshwater Biodiversity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    JONATHAN P. BENSTEAD, PATRICK H. DE RHAM, JEAN-LUC GATTOLLIAT, FRANÃ?OIS-MARIE GIBON, PAUL V. LOISELLE, MICHEL SARTORI, JOHN S. SPARKS, and MELANIE L. J. STIASSNY (; )

    2003-11-01

    This peer-reviewed article from BioScience is about conserving freshwater diversity in Madagascar. The island nation of Madagascar, an international conservation priority, is now also recognized as a global hotspot for freshwater biodiversity. Three emerging characteristics of Madagascar's threatened freshwater biota deserve increased attention from the scientific and conservation communities. First, species richness is not low, as was once assumed for both the freshwater fishes and the invertebrates. Second, many species are restricted to a specific region or even to single river basins. Often these species are also limited to streams or rivers draining primary forest habitat. Finally, many of the island's freshwater fishes are basal taxa, having diverged earlier than any other extant members of their clade. As such, these taxa assume disproportional phylogenetic importance. In the face of ongoing environmental threats, links among microendemism, forest stream specialization, and basal phylogenetic position highlight the importance and vulnerability of these species and provide a powerful incentive for immediate conservation action.

  3. Use of chemical communication in the management of freshwater aquatic species that are vectors of human diseases or are invasive.

    PubMed

    Corkum, Lynda D; Belanger, Rachelle M

    2007-01-01

    Chemical communication occurs when both originator (signaller) and one or more receiver(s) possess specializations for chemical exchange of information. Chemical information can be used by a wide variety of species to locate food and mates, avoid predators and engage in social interactions. In this review, we focus on chemical signalling between mates or cues from nest sites or hosts by selected aquatic pest species and indicate how chemical information can be used to manage pests. The pests are vectors of disease (blood-sucking insects) or invasive species (crayfishes and fishes) that have exhibited detrimental effects on indigenous species. Pheromones released by females attract and stimulate males in some taxa (insects, crayfish, goldfish, and crucian carp), whereas pheromones released by males attract females in others (round goby, sea lamprey). Other chemicals (e.g., habitat odours or odours given off by developmental stages of conspecifics) can affect oviposition decisions of pest species. In areas of aquatic environments where other cues may be limited (e.g., visual), freshwater organisms may rely solely on chemical signals or in concert with environmental cues for reproduction. Once the chemical structure of odour attractants are identified and shown to lure conspecifics to traps, odorants or their blends can be used to control the aquatic pests. There is promise for the application of pheromone traps to control the malarian vector (Anopheles gambiae) or invasive species such as signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) by disrupting the reproductive behaviours of these species. PMID:17367788

  4. Organochlorine pesticide residues in 12 freshwater Egyptian fish species with special emphasis on Aguilla vulgaris and Mugil cephalus.

    PubMed

    Hilmy, A M; Badawi, H K; Shabana, M B

    1983-01-01

    Determination of DDT and endrin concentrations was carried out in fishes of Nozha hydrodrome to elucidate reasons for variations in the values, since little seems to be known about pesticide residues in Egyptian freshwater fishes. This study documents and examines the accumulation and biotransformation of water-borne pesticides by the gills, liver, gonads, muscle and heart of fishes tested. The response of eel and mullet to concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 ppb DDT and endrin varied among organs, the residues were highest in the liver, intermediate in the gonads and low to non-detectable in muscles and heart for both species. PMID:6139245

  5. Heavy Metal Distribution in Tissues of Six Fish Species Included in Human Diet, Inhabiting Freshwaters of the Nature Park “Hutovo Blato” (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeta Has-Schön; Ivan Bogut; Valentina Rajkovi?; Stjepan Bogut; Milan ?a?i?; Janja Horvati?

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify heavy metal (mercury, lead, cadmium, and arsenic) concentration in tissues (muscles,\\u000a liver, kidney, gills, and gonads) of six fish species (carp: Cyprinus carpio, tench: Tinca tinca, pumpkinseed: Lepomis gibosus, prussian carp: Carassius auratus gibelio, hasselquist: Salmo dentex, eel: Anguilla anguilla) from the freshwaters of the Nature Park Hutovo Blato, Bosnia and Herzegovina,

  6. Impact on indigenous species biodiversity caused by the globalisation of alien recreational freshwater fisheries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Cambray

    2003-01-01

    One of the most insidious threats to fish conservation around the world is deliberate or accidental introduction of fish species. The impact of alien invasive sport fish is for the most part unpredictable in time and space, with the introduction of relatively few species having resulted in many extirpations of indigenous fish species worldwide. More nations need to quantify biodiversity

  7. Primary structures of decapod crustacean metallothioneins with special emphasis on freshwater and semi-terrestrial species.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, S N; Pedersen, K L; Højrup, P; Depledge, M H; Knudsen, J

    1996-11-01

    Cadmium injections induced only a single form of metallothionein (MT) in the midgut gland of Potamon potamios, whereas the same treatment induced two isoforms in Astacus astacus. The only difference between the two latter isoforms was that one had an extra N-terminal methionine residue. MT from P. potamios showed structural differences from other decapod crustacean MTs. It contained a Gly-Thr motif at positions 8 and 8a, which had previously been found only in certain vertebrate and molluscan MTs. Furthermore P. potamios MT contained two to three times as many glutamic acid residues as normally found in decapod crustacean MT. The primary structure of MT from the freshwater crayfish A. astacus showed a high degree of sequence identity with MT from other decapod crustaceans, especially the marine astacidean Homarus americanus, although two valine residues were unexpectedly found at positions 8 and 21, where lysine residues are normally found. PMID:8921011

  8. Phylogeny and biogeography of highly diverged freshwater fish species (Leuciscinae, Cyprinidae, Teleostei) inferred from mitochondrial genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Imoto, Junichi M; Saitoh, Kenji; Sasaki, Takeshi; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Adachi, Jun; Kartavtsev, Yuri P; Miya, Masaki; Nishida, Mutsumi; Hanzawa, Naoto

    2013-02-10

    The distribution of freshwater taxa is a good biogeographic model to study pattern and process of vicariance and dispersal. The subfamily Leuciscinae (Cyprinidae, Teleostei) consists of many species distributed widely in Eurasia and North America. Leuciscinae have been divided into two phyletic groups, leuciscin and phoxinin. The phylogenetic relationships between major clades within the subfamily are poorly understood, largely because of the overwhelming diversity of the group. The origin of the Far Eastern phoxinin is an interesting question regarding the evolutionary history of Leuciscinae. Here we present phylogenetic analysis of 31 species of Leuciscinae and outgroups based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences to clarify the phylogenetic relationships and to infer the evolutionary history of the subfamily. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the Far Eastern phoxinin species comprised the monophyletic clades Tribolodon, Pseudaspius, Oreoleuciscus and Far Eastern Phoxinus. The Far Eastern phoxinin clade was independent of other Leuciscinae lineages and was closer to North American phoxinins than European leuciscins. All of our analysis also suggested that leuciscins and phoxinins each constituted monophyletic groups. Divergence time estimation suggested that Leuciscinae species diverged from outgroups such as Tincinae to be 83.3 million years ago (Mya) in the Late Cretaceous and leuciscin and phoxinin shared a common ancestor 70.7 Mya. Radiation of Leuciscinae lineages occurred during the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene. This period also witnessed the radiation of tetrapods. Reconstruction of ancestral areas indicates Leuciscinae species originated within Europe. Leuciscin species evolved in Europe and the ancestor of phoxinin was distributed in North America. The Far Eastern phoxinins would have dispersed from North America to Far East across the Beringia land bridge. The present study suggests important roles for the continental rearrangements during the Late Cretaceous to form the present-day distribution of organisms. Furthermore, the Late Cretaceous biotic turnover influenced for the modern terrestrial biodiversity. PMID:23174367

  9. Changes in some components of the muscle lipids of three freshwater fish species under natural extreme cold and temperate conditions.

    PubMed

    Uysal, K; Bülbül, M; Dönmez, M; Seçkin, A K

    2008-12-01

    Fatty acid composition, conjugated linoleic acid and cholesterol contents in the muscles of three freshwater fish species (Barbus plebejus escherichi, Capoeta capoeta capoeta and Rutilus rutilus) were determined under natural extreme temperate (July) and cold (January) conditions. The aim of the study was to determine whether there were differences in these components of the muscle lipids among these three fish species under extreme natural conditions. Samples were analyzed using gas chromatography. Palmitic, oleic, docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids were the predominant fatty acids in all fish in both months. The percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids, n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, n - 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and eicosapentaenoic + docosahexaenoic acids in the muscle of B. plebejus escherichi and C. capoeta capoeta were significantly higher in January (P < 0.05) than in July. The ratio of n - 6 to n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was lower than 0.60 in all fish species, with C. capoeta capoeta showing the lowest ratio in January (0.36). The levels of cholesterol and conjugated linoleic acid ranged from 103.46 to 150.10 mg/100 g oil and from 16.27 to 35.45 mg/100 g oil, respectively, for all samples in both months. There were no statistical differences in cholesterol levels among the three fish species in July and January. Conjugated linoleic acid contents were significantly higher in January in B. plebejus escherichi and C. capoeta capoeta. Of the three species tested, the extreme temperate and cold conditions affected B. plebejus escherichi the most. PMID:18958602

  10. Shifts in Cyanobacterial Strain Dominance during the Onset of Harmful Algal Blooms in Florida Bay, USA.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dianna L; Goleski, Jennifer A; Koch, Florian; Wall, Charles C; Peterson, Bradley J; Anderson, O Roger; Gobler, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Cyanobacteria are fundamental components of aquatic phytoplankton communities and some taxa can cause harmful blooms in coastal ecosystems. Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are typically comprised of multiple strains of a single genus or species that cannot be resolved microscopically. Florida Bay, USA, has experienced harmful cyanobacterial blooms that have been associated with the loss of eelgrass, spiny lobsters, and general food web disruption for more than two decades. To identify the strain or strains of cyanobacteria forming blooms in Florida Bay, samples were collected across the system over an annual cycle and analyzed via DNA sequencing using cyanobacterial-specific 16S rRNA gene primers, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy. Analyses demonstrated that the onset of blooms in Florida Bay was coincident with a transformation of the cyanobacterial populations. When blooms were absent, the cyanobacterial population in Florida Bay was dominated by phycoerythrin-containing Synechococcus cells that were most similar to strains within Clade III. As blooms developed, the cyanobacterial community transitioned to dominance by phycocyanin-containing Synechococcus cells that were coated with mucilage, chain-forming, and genetically most similar to the coastal strains within Clade VIII. Clade VIII strains of Synechococcus are known to grow rapidly, utilize organic nutrients, and resist top-down control by protozoan grazers and viruses, all characteristics consistent with observations of cyanobacterial blooms in Florida Bay. Further, the strains of Synechococcus blooming in this system are genetically distinct from the species previously thought to cause blooms in Florida Bay, Synechococcus elongatus. Collectively, this study identified the causative organism of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in Florida Bay, demonstrates the dynamic nature of cyanobacterial stains within genera in an estuary, and affirms factors promoting Synechococcus blooms. PMID:25661475

  11. Nutrient partitioning in the upper Canning River, Western Australia, and implications for the control of cyanobacterial blooms using salinity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilma J Vincent

    2001-01-01

    The partitioning of N and P is examined between the submerged macrophytes, sediment and phytoplankton in a eutrophic freshwater impoundment on the Canning River, Western Australia. The importance of the macrophytes as a nutrient sink, and the effect of salinity increase on their growth were assessed. Summer cyanobacterial blooms in this system have led to a proposal to increase the

  12. ERPOBDELLA LAHONTANA (ANNELIDA: HIRUDINEA: ARHYNCHOBDELLIDA: ERPOBDELLIDAE), A NEW SPECIES OF FRESHWATER LEECH FROM NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    New species of a leech, Erpobdella lahontana, is described from the Lahontan Basin in California and Nevada of the western United States. This species has four pairs of eyes, the preatrial loops of male paired ducts extend to ganglion XI, and the male and female gonopores are loc...

  13. Quantitative Estimation of Phytoplankton Species in Freshwater by Two Step Linear Regression Analysis Using Spectral Absorption Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokuhewage, Asha Udayamali M.; Naiki, Yasuhiro; Toyooka, Satoru

    We proposed a passive method to distinguish and to estimate density of the Cyanobacteria (Cyanophyceae) in a mixed population by measuring the spectral absorption of sample waters, based on two step linear regression analysis. Natural freshwater usually contains a few species of algae and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In the experiment, we picked out four typical algal groups characterized by their own colors, Cyanophycaeae or blue-green alga, Chlorophyceae or green alga, and Bacillariophyceae and Dinophyceae or brown algae. In the first step, for each of the pure sample waters which contained only one of these elemental substances, dependence of spectral characteristic on its density was determined using simple linear regression analysis. Resultant spectral characteristics which we call gradient vectors were used to estimate spectral absorption of mixed sample waters containing the four elementary algae and DOC by multiple linear regression analysis. This method offers new perspectives for identification and estimation of density of blue-green algae and other unialgal species in a mixed population.

  14. ACCURACY ASSESSMENTS OF AIRBORNE HYSPERSPECTRAL DATA FOR MAPPING OPPORTUNISTIC PLANT SPECIES IN FRESHWATER COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airbome hyperspectral data were used to detect dense patches of Phragmites australis, a native opportunist plant species, at the Pointe Mouillee coastal wetland complex (Wayne and Monroe Counties, Michigan). This study provides initial results from one of thirteen coastal wetland...

  15. Benthic fish exhibit more plastic crypsis than non-benthic species in a freshwater spring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Serena Cox; Sondra Chandler; Caroline Barron; Kirsten Work

    2009-01-01

    Cryptic coloration reduces the ability of predators to detect prey, but the plasticity of this defense varies. Some organisms\\u000a possess static and permanent cryptic coloration, whereas in other species color changes may be induced. Depending upon the\\u000a species, induced color changes may be reversible or irreversible. In this study, we examined a subtle, rapid, and reversible\\u000a crypsis in which small

  16. Toxicity of ammonia to nine native New Zealand freshwater invertebrate species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. W. Hickey; M. L. Vickers

    1994-01-01

    The toxic concentration for un-ionized ammonia (NH3) was assessed for nine native New Zealand invertebrate species. The 96-h EC50 values at 15°C and pH 7.6 and pH 8.2 ranged from 0.18 to >0.8 g\\/m3 NH3. The rank of species sensitivity was: shrimp (Paratya curvirostris) (least) ˜ mayfly (Zephlebia dentata) ˜ stonefly (Zealandobius furcillatus) < Oligochaeta (Lumbriculus variegatus) < fingernail clam

  17. Spatial Distribution of Cryptic Species Diversity in European Freshwater Amphipods (Gammarus fossarum) as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Westram, Anja Marie; Jokela, Jukka; Baumgartner, Caroline; Keller, Irene

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand and protect ecosystems, local gene pools need to be evaluated with respect to their uniqueness. Cryptic species present a challenge in this context because their presence, if unrecognized, may lead to serious misjudgement of the distribution of evolutionarily distinct genetic entities. In this study, we describe the current geographical distribution of cryptic species of the ecologically important stream amphipod Gammarus fossarum (types A, B and C). We use a novel pyrosequencing assay for molecular species identification and survey 62 populations in Switzerland, plus several populations in Germany and eastern France. In addition, we compile data from previous publications (mainly Germany). A clear transition is observed from type A in the east (Danube and Po drainages) to types B and, more rarely, C in the west (Meuse, Rhone, and four smaller French river systems). Within the Rhine drainage, the cryptic species meet in a contact zone which spans the entire G. fossarum distribution range from north to south. This large-scale geographical sorting indicates that types A and B persisted in separate refugia during Pleistocene glaciations. Within the contact zone, the species rarely co-occur at the same site, suggesting that ecological processes may preclude long-term coexistence. The clear phylogeographical signal observed in this study implies that, in many parts of Europe, only one of the cryptic species is present. PMID:21909373

  18. Haemogregarine infections of three species of aquatic freshwater turtles from two sites in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Rossow, John A.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Sumner, Scarlett M.; Altman, Bridget R.; Crider, Caroline G.; Gammage, Mallory B.; Segal, Kristy M.; Yabsley, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-five black river turtles (Rhinoclemmys funerea) and eight white-lipped mud turtles (Kinosternon leucostomum) from Selva Verde, Costa Rica were examined for haemoparasites. Leeches identified as Placobdella multilineata were detected on individuals from both species. All turtles sampled were positive for intraerythrocytic haemogregarines (Apicomplexa:Adeleorina) and the average parasitemia of black river turtles (0.34% ± 0.07) was significantly higher compared to white-lipped mud turtles (0.05% ± 0.006). No correlation was found between parasitemia and relative body mass of either species or between black river turtles from the two habitats. In addition, one scorpion mud turtle (Kinosternon scorpioides) examined from La Pacifica, Costa Rica, was positive for haemogregarines (0.01% parasitemia). Interestingly, parasites of the scorpion mud turtle were significantly smaller than those from the other two species and did not displace the erythrocyte nucleus, whereas parasites from the other two species consistently displaced host cell nuclei and often distorted size and shape of erythrocytes. This is the first report of haemogregarines in turtles from Central America and of haemogregarines in K. leucostomum, K. scorpioides, and any Rhinoclemmys species. Additional studies are needed to better characterise and understand the ecology of these parasites. PMID:24533326

  19. Host tropism of infectious salmon anaemia virus in marine and freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Aamelfot, M; Dale, O B; McBeath, A; Falk, K

    2015-08-01

    The aquatic orthomyxovirus infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) causes a severe disease in farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L. Although some ISA outbreaks are caused by horizontal transmission of virus between farms, the source and reservoir of the virus is largely unknown and a wild host has been hypothesized. Atlantic salmon are farmed in open net-pens, allowing transmission of pathogens from wild fish and the surrounding environment to the farmed fish. In this study, a large number of fish species were investigated for ISAV host potential. For orthomyxoviruses, a specific receptor binding is the first requirement for infection; thus, the fish species were investigated for the presence of the ISAV receptor. The receptor was found to be widely distributed across the fish species. All salmonids expressed the receptor. However, only some of the cod-like and perch-like fish did, and all flat fish were negative. In the majority of the positive species, the receptor was found on endothelial cells and/or on red blood cells. The study forms a basis for further investigations and opens up the possibility for screening species to determine whether a wild host of ISAV exists. PMID:25048819

  20. Effects of pH on Dissolved Organic Matter From Freshwater Algal Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehret, Y.; Gueguen, C.

    2009-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in all natural waters. The nature and composition of aquatic DOM depends on its origin (autochthonous vs. allochthonous) and the physical chemical conditions (pH) of the system. It is clear that autochthonous DOM of algal origin is an important contributor to the DOM pool in most aquatic systems. Little is known on its nature and composition. In this study, algal monocultures of S. acutus and F. crotonensis were grown at two different pHs (pH 7 and 5). The production of exudates was monitored over time and characterized by dissolved organic carbon content, absorbance and synchronous fluorescence. Results indicate a significant difference in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) formed per species. The ratio of DOC to chlorophyll a is ten times greater in S. acutus than F. crotonensis. In terms of composition, the production of humic-like compounds varies between species with F. crotonensis producing up to four fold more at natural pH. At lower pH, the production of algal DOM is less but there were more proteins and humic materials generated by both species under decreasing pH, with a significant increase in the S. acutus species. Therefore, the concentration and composition of DOM depends not only on algal species but also on the physical chemical condition (pH level) indicating that water acidification would have a major impact on DOM composition.

  1. The identity of the Sarawak freshwater crab Parathelphusa oxygona Nobili, 1901, with description of a new species, Parathelphusa nobilii, from Western Kalimantan, Indonesia, Borneo (Crustacea: Brachyura: Gecarcinucidae).

    PubMed

    Ng, Peter K L

    2014-01-01

    The identity of the common lowland freshwater crab in western Sarawak, Borneo, East Malaysia, Parathelphusa oxygona Nobili, 1901 (family Gecarcinucidae), is clarified. The species is redescribed and figured, and its taxonomy discussed. Specimens from western Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia, which have been referred to P. oxygona are here referred to a new species, Parathelphusa nobilii. The new species can be differentiated from congeners by its relatively more swollen branchial regions of the carapace, wider and lower external orbital tooth, relatively more slender male abdomen and a straight male first gonopod.  PMID:24871403

  2. The effect of environmental parameters and cyanobacterial blooms on phytoplankton dynamics of a Portuguese temperate Lake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniela R. de Figueiredo; Ana S. S. P. Reboleira; Sara C. Antunes; Nelson Abrantes; Ulisses Azeiteiro; Fernando Gonçalves; Mário J. Pereira

    2006-01-01

    The increasing occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters is of great concern due to the ability of many cyanobacteria\\u000a to produce cyanotoxins. In the present work, the eutrophied Vela Lake (Central Portugal), used for recreational purposes and\\u000a as a water source for agriculture, was monitored every fortnight between 2000 and 2001. Phytoplankton diversity and densities\\u000a were measured and correlated to

  3. METAL TOXICITY TO EMBRYOS AND LARVAE OF EIGHT SPECIES OF FRESHWATER FISH--II: COPPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish larvae and early juveniles of all species tested (brook trout, rainbow trout, brown trout, lake trout, northern pike, white sucker, herring and smallmouth bass) were more sensitive to copper than the embryos. Embryo survival was affected only at the higher concentrations tes...

  4. Survey of parasitic fauna of different ornamental freshwater fish species in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Adel, Milad; Ghasempour, Fatemeh; Azizi, Hamid Reza; Shateri, Mohamad Hadi; Safian, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic diseases are harmful and limiting factors in breeding and rearing ornamental fish industry. In this study, 400 apparently healthy ornamental fishes from five species (each species 80 specimens) including: Goldfish (Carassius auratus), guppy (Poecilia reticulate), angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare), discus (Symphsodon discus) and sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna) was obtained from a local ornamental fish farm in the north of Iran during 2011 to 2012. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the parasitic infections of aquarium fish in Iran. For this purpose, fish were first examined for ectoparasites using wet mount under a light microscope. Then, the alimentary ducts of fish were observed under light and stereo microscope. In survey of different infection rates for different parasitic infections in examining fish: Dactylogyrus sp., Gyrodactylus sp., Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Trichodina reticulata, Capillaria sp. and Lernaea cyprinacea were collected from five species. All five fish species had Monogenea (Gyrodactylidae and Dactylogyridae) in their skins and gills, the highest prevalence was observed in C. auratus and the lowest was in P. scalare and S. discus. Also, Capillaria sp. was reported as a first record from the abdominal cavity of P. scalare in Iran. Our findings revealed that the protozoal infections are very common among aquarium fishes. Although, no gross pathology was observed among infected fishes, but it is likely that in case of any changes in the environment, then parasitic infections could be harmful. PMID:25992255

  5. Survey of parasitic fauna of different ornamental freshwater fish species in Iran.

    PubMed

    Adel, Milad; Ghasempour, Fatemeh; Azizi, Hamid Reza; Shateri, Mohamad Hadi; Safian, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic diseases are harmful and limiting factors in breeding and rearing ornamental fish industry. In this study, 400 apparently healthy ornamental fishes from five species (each species 80 specimens) including: Goldfish (Carassius auratus), guppy (Poecilia reticulate), angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare), discus (Symphsodon discus) and sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna) was obtained from a local ornamental fish farm in the north of Iran during 2011 to 2012. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the parasitic infections of aquarium fish in Iran. For this purpose, fish were first examined for ectoparasites using wet mount under a light microscope. Then, the alimentary ducts of fish were observed under light and stereo microscope. In survey of different infection rates for different parasitic infections in examining fish: Dactylogyrus sp., Gyrodactylus sp., Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Trichodina reticulata, Capillaria sp. and Lernaea cyprinacea were collected from five species. All five fish species had Monogenea (Gyrodactylidae and Dactylogyridae) in their skins and gills, the highest prevalence was observed in C. auratus and the lowest was in P. scalare and S. discus. Also, Capillaria sp. was reported as a first record from the abdominal cavity of P. scalare in Iran. Our findings revealed that the protozoal infections are very common among aquarium fishes. Although, no gross pathology was observed among infected fishes, but it is likely that in case of any changes in the environment, then parasitic infections could be harmful. PMID:25992255

  6. Decomposition and nutrient dynamics of litter from four species of freshwater emergent macrophytes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James T. Morris; Kate Lajtha

    1986-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations and mass remaining were followed for 30 months in decomposing litter of the perennial macrophytes Typha latifolia L., Carex lacustris Willd., Calamagrostis canadensis (Michx.) Nutt., and the annual Zizania aquatica L. in a fresh water tidal marsh in Massachusetts. Step-wise decreases in the mass remaining that corresponded to seasonal temperature changes were observed for all species.

  7. Pomphorhynchidae and quadrigyridae (Acanthocephala), including a new genus and species (Pallisentinae), from freshwater fishes, Cobitidae and Cyprinodontidae, in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Smales, Lesley R; Aydogdu, Ali; Emre, Yilmaz

    2012-09-01

    During a survey of freshwater fishes from Turkey two species of Acanthocephala, one of them new, were found. Pomphorhynchus tereticollis (Pomphorhynchidae) is reported at 24% prevalence in 37 Cobitis bilseli (Cobitidae) from Lake Beysehir, Konya, for the first time. The eoacanthoacaphalan Triaspiron aphanii gen. n. et sp. n. (Quadrigyridae), at a prevalence of 90%, is described from 29 Aphanius mento (Cyprinodontidae), from Kirkgöz Springs, Antalya. The new genus most closely resembles Raosentis Datta, 1947, both having a small spindle shaped trunk, and Acanthogyrus Thapar, 1927, both having a proboscis armature of three circles of hooks. Triaspiron differs from Raosentis in proboscis shape, cylindrical not globular, proboscis armature, three circles, a total of 16 hooks in all, not four circles, a total of 26-30 hooks in all, and trunk spination, two fields of spines in the anterior field with spines arranged in up to 40 circular rows, not a single field with 9-17 rows of spines. Triaspiron differs from Acanthogyrus in having fewer proboscis hooks, 16 compared with 18-24, arranged in three circles, one anterior and two posteriorly placed, with an unarmed region between, not three circles of hooks evenly spaced, and two fields of trunk spines, not one. PMID:23136795

  8. Levels, Distribution, and Health Risks of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Four Freshwater Edible Fish Species from the Beijing Market

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Jing; Qin, Ning; He, Wei; He, Qi-Shuang; Ouyang, Hui-Ling; Xu, Fu-Liu

    2012-01-01

    We first estimated the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the brain, liver, bladder, roe, and muscle of four species of edible freshwater fish from the Beijing market. The distribution characteristics of PAHs in these tissues and organs were analyzed to determine their health risks to humans. The results showed that the residual levels of wet weight and lipid-normalized weight ?PAHs in various tissues of these fish ranged from 0.51?ng·g?1 to 28.78?ng·g?1 and from 93.62?ng·g?1 to 8203.43?ng·g?1, respectively. The wet weight contents of ?PAHs were relatively higher in the brain and lower in the liver and muscle. But the differences were not significant. And the differences of lipid-normalized weight PAHs were significant, which in the bighead carp were found significantly the highest, followed in crucian carp, and the lowest in grass carp and carp. The contents of ?PAHs were the highest in the liver and the lowest in the brain. In the tissues with a higher lipid content, higher residual levels of PAHs were found. The carcinogenic risks for humans from residual ?PAHs in the various fish tissues were far below 10?5. PMID:23365511

  9. Variable survival across low pH gradients in freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Jellyman, P G; Harding, J S

    2014-11-01

    A series of 14 day experiments was conducted on five common New Zealand fish species (redfin bully Gobiomorphus huttoni, inanga Galaxias maculatus, brown trout Salmo trutta, longfin eel Anguilla dieffenbachii and koaro Galaxias brevipinnis) to assess the effect of pH on survival and changes in body mass. No species survived in water of pH <4 although there was 100% survival of all adults at pH 4.5, G. maculatus larvae were also tested and had high mortality at this pH. Results suggest that adults are tolerant of low-pH waters; however, successful remediation of anthropogenically acidified streams will require an understanding of the susceptibility to low pH on different life cycle stages. PMID:25230112

  10. Acute Toxicity and Effects Analysis of Endosulfan Sulfate to Freshwater Fish Species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John F. Carriger; Tham C. Hoang; Gary M. Rand; Piero R. Gardinali; Joffre Castro

    2011-01-01

    Endosulfan sulfate is a persistent environmental metabolite of endosulfan, an organochlorine insecticide–acaricide presently\\u000a registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. There is, however, limited acute fish toxicity data for endosulfan\\u000a sulfate. This study determines the acute toxicity (LC50s and LC10s) of endosulfan sulfate to three inland Florida native fish species (mosquitofish [Gambusia affinis]; least killifish [Heterandria formosa]; and sailfin

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Hepatic Tissue of Cyprinus carpio L. Exposed to Cyanobacterial Blooms in Lake Taihu, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinlin; Wang, Xiaorong; Shan, Zhengjun; Yang, Liuyan; Zhou, Junying; Bu, Yuanqin

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of industry and agriculture and associated pollution, the cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Taihu have become a major threat to aquatic wildlife and human health. In this study, the ecotoxicological effects of cyanobacterial blooms on cage-cultured carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) in Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu were investigated. Microcystins (MCs), major cyanobacterial toxins, have been detected in carp cultured at different experimental sites of Meiliang Bay. We observed that the accumulation of MCs in carp was closely associated with several environmental factors, including temperature, pH value, and density of cyanobacterial blooms. The proteomic profile of carp liver exposed to cyanobacterial blooms was analyzed using two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry. The toxic effects of cyanobacterial blooms on carp liver were similar to changes caused by MCs. MCs were transported into liver cells and induced the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). MCs and ROS inhibited protein phosphatase and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), directly or indirectly resulting in oxidative stress and disruption of the cytoskeleton. These effects further interfered with metabolic pathways in the liver through the regulation of series of related proteins. The results of this study indicated that cyanobacterial blooms pose a major threat to aquatic wildlife in Meiliang Bay in Lake Taihu. These results provided evidence of the molecular mechanisms underlying liver damage in carp exposed to cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:24558380

  12. A New Cryptic Species of South American Freshwater Pufferfish of the Genus Colomesus (Tetraodontidae), Based on Both Morphology and DNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Cesar R. L.; Brito, Paulo M.; Silva, Dayse A.; Carvalho, Elizeu F.

    2013-01-01

    The Tetraodontidae are an Acantomorpha fish family with circumglobal distribution composed of 189 species grouped in 19 genera, occurring in seas, estuaries, and rivers between the tropical and temperate regions. Of these, the genus Colomesus is confined to South America, with what have been up to now considered only two species. C. asellus is spread over the entire Amazon, Tocantins-Araguaia drainages, and coastal environments from the Amazon mouth to Venezuela, and is the only freshwater puffers on that continent. C. psittacus is found in coastal marine and brackish water environments from Cuba to the northern coast of South America as far south as to Sergipe in Brazil. In the present contribution we used morphological data along with molecular systematics techniques to investigate the phylogeny and phylogeography of the freshwater pufferfishes of the genus Colomesus. The molecular part is based on a cytochrome C oxidase subunit I dataset constructed from both previously published and newly determined sequences, obtained from specimens collected from three distinct localities in South America. Our results from both molecular and morphological approaches enable us to identify and describe a new Colomesus species from the Tocantins River. We also discuss aspects of the historical biogeography and phylogeography of the South American freshwater pufferfishes, suggesting that it could be more recent than previously expected. PMID:24040239

  13. ESTIMATION OF TOXICITY TO MARINE SPECIES WITH STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY MODELS DEVELOPED TO ESTIMATE TOXICITY TO FRESHWATER FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-activity models which were developed to estimate toxicity of chemicals to freshwater fish were tested for use with an estuarine fish (Cyprinodon variegatus) and mysids (Mysidopsis bahia). Significant linear and polunomial relationships that correlated well existed betwe...

  14. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 1. Ecological distinctions among, and homogeneity within, putative ecotypes of Synechococcus inhabiting the cyanobacterial mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park

    PubMed Central

    Becraft, Eric D.; Wood, Jason M.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Kühl, Michael; Jensen, Sheila I.; Bryant, Donald A.; Roberts, David W.; Cohan, Frederick M.; Ward, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Stable Ecotype Model, evolution leads to the divergence of ecologically distinct populations (e.g., with different niches and/or behaviors) of ecologically interchangeable membership. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to provide deep sequence coverage of Synechococcus psaA genes and transcripts over a large number of habitat types in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat. Putative ecological species [putative ecotypes (PEs)], which were predicted by an evolutionary simulation based on the Stable Ecotype Model (Ecotype Simulation), exhibited distinct distributions relative to temperature-defined positions in the effluent channel and vertical position in the upper 1 mm-thick mat layer. Importantly, in most cases variants predicted to belong to the same PE formed unique clusters relative to temperature and depth in the mat in canonical correspondence analysis, supporting the hypothesis that while the PEs are ecologically distinct, the members of each ecotype are ecologically homogeneous. PEs responded differently to experimental perturbations of temperature and light, but the genetic variation within each PE was maintained as the relative abundances of PEs changed, further indicating that each population responded as a set of ecologically interchangeable individuals. Compared to PEs that predominate deeper within the mat photic zone, the timing of transcript abundances for selected genes differed for PEs that predominate in microenvironments closer to upper surface of the mat with spatiotemporal differences in light and O2 concentration. All of these findings are consistent with the hypotheses that Synechococcus species in hot spring mats are sets of ecologically interchangeable individuals that are differently adapted, that these adaptations control their distributions, and that the resulting distributions constrain the activities of the species in space and time. PMID:26157420

  15. Bioaccumulation of phenol, guaiacol and some chlorophenols by selected freshwater species of leeches.

    PubMed

    Grzelak, Bo?ena; Micha?owicz, Jaromir; Dukowska, Ma?gorzata

    2012-06-01

    In the recent study, the bioaccumulation ability of phenolic substances was determined with field-collected specimens of three leech species, i.e., Erpobdella octoculata (Linnaeus), Theromyzon tessulatum (O. F. M?ller) and Glossiphonia complanata (Linneaus). It was found that the examined leeches bioaccumulated phenol (0.03-27.10 mg/kg), 4-methylphenol (0.09-1.83 mg/kg), chlorophenols (0.03-14.90 mg/kg), guaiacol (0.22-2,941 mg/kg), tetrachloroguaiacol (0.06-1.98 mg/kg), 3-chlorosyringol (0.04-15.28 mg/kg) and chlorocatechols (0.33-23.24 mg/kg) present in the water (0.03-25.23 ?g/L) and in the bottom sediments (0.75-760.5 ?g/kg) of three ecosystems that were characterized by different contamination levels. Analysis of both the external mucous coat of the leeches and the tissue of the dermato-muscular sac showed that substantial quantities of the phenolic compounds may be accumulated in both the mucous (0.03-2,941 mg/kg) and the tissue (0.03-1,189.8 mg/kg). PMID:22476255

  16. Gut content weight and clearance rate for three species of freshwater invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, L.T.; Ankley, G.T.; Call, D.J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Superior, WI (United States). Lake Superior Research Inst.; Cook, P.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecology Div.

    1996-02-01

    There is concern for potential error in the accurate estimation of chemical bioaccumulation in benthic organisms due to xenobiotics associated with gut contents (sediments). In this study the benthic macroinvertebrates Hexagenia limbata, Chironomus tentans, and Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed to five sediments from the Lower Fox River/Green Bay area of Wisconsin to determine the percentage of their weight due to gut contents and the rate at which guts were emptied when the animals were held in clean water. Upon removal from the test sediments, inorganic gut contents in H. limbata, C. tentans, and L. variegatus represented approximately 9, 10, and 10% of their whole body dry weights, respectively. Depuration rates were relatively rapid, with mayflies, midges, and oligochaetes losing approximately 75, 90, and 100% of their gut contents during the first 12 h of depuration. This suggests that a 12--24-h holding period in clean water at the conclusion of sediment bioaccumulation tests with the three species should be sufficient to eliminate potential bias in tissue residue concentrations due to gut contents.

  17. Capture, adaptation and artificial control of reproduction of Lophiosilurus alexandri: A carnivorous freshwater species.

    PubMed

    Costa, Deliane Cristina; de Souza E Silva, Walisson; Melillo Filho, Reinaldo; Miranda Filho, Kleber Campos; Epaminondas Dos Santos, José Claudio; Kennedy Luz, Ronald

    2015-08-01

    The present study describes the capture adaptation and reproduction of wild Lophiosilurus alexandri broodstock in laboratory conditions. There were two periods when capturing was performed in natural habitats. The animals were placed in four tanks of 5m(3) with water temperatures at 28°C with two tanks having sand bottoms. Thirty days after the temperature increased (during the winter) the first spawning occurred naturally, but only in tanks with sand on the bottom. During the breeding season, there were 24 spawning bouts with egg mass collections occurring as a result of the spawning bouts that occurred in the tanks. The hatching rates for eggs varied from 0% to 95%. The spawning bouts were mainly at night and on weekends. In the second reproductive period, the animals were sexed by cannulation and distributed in four tanks with all animals being maintained in tanks with sand on the bottom at 28°C. During this phase, there were 36 spawning bouts. Findings in the present study contribute to the understanding of the reproductive biology of this endangered species during captivity. PMID:26112799

  18. Drivers of cyanobacterial diversity and community composition in mangrove soils in south-east Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rigonato, Janaina; Kent, Angela D; Alvarenga, Danillo O; Andreote, Fernando D; Beirigo, Raphael M; Vidal-Torrado, Pablo; Fiore, Marli F

    2013-04-01

    Cyanobacteria act as primary producers of carbon and nitrogen in nutrient-poor ecosystems such as mangroves. This important group of microorganisms plays a critical role in sustaining the productivity of mangrove ecosystems, but the structure and function of cyanobacteria assemblages can be perturbed by anthropogenic influences. The aim of this work was to assess the community structure and ecological drivers that influence the cyanobacterial community harboured in two Brazilian mangrove soils, and examine the long-term effects of oil contamination on these keystone species. Community fingerprinting results showed that, although cyanobacterial communities are distinct between the two mangroves, the structure and diversity of the assemblages exhibit similar responses to environmental gradients. In each ecosystem, cyanobacteria occupying near-shore areas were similar in composition, indicating importance of marine influences for structuring the community. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences revealed the presence of diverse cyanobacterial communities in mangrove sediments, with clear differences among mangrove habitats along a transect from shore to forest. While near-shore sites in both mangroves were mainly occupied by Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus genera, sequences retrieved from other mangrove niches were mainly affiliated with uncultured cyanobacterial 16S rRNA. The most intriguing finding was the large number of potentially novel cyanobacteria 16S rRNA sequences obtained from a previously oil-contaminated site. The abundance of cyanobacterial 16S rRNA sequences observed in sites with a history of oil contamination was significantly lower than in the unimpacted areas. This study emphasized the role of environmental drivers in determining the structure of cyanobacterial communities in mangrove soils, and suggests that anthropogenic impacts may also act as ecological filters that select cyanobacterial taxa. These results are an important contribution to our understanding of the composition and relative abundance of previously poorly described cyanobacterial assemblages in mangrove ecosystems. PMID:22816485

  19. The Role of Nitrogen Fixation in Cyanobacterial Bloom Toxicity in a Temperate, Eutrophic Lake

    PubMed Central

    Beversdorf, Lucas J.; Miller, Todd R.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms threaten freshwaters worldwide but have proven difficult to predict because the mechanisms of bloom formation and toxin production are unknown, especially on weekly time scales. Water quality management continues to focus on aggregated metrics, such as chlorophyll and total nutrients, which may not be sufficient to explain complex community changes and functions such as toxin production. For example, nitrogen (N) speciation and cycling play an important role, on daily time scales, in shaping cyanobacterial communities because declining N has been shown to select for N fixers. In addition, subsequent N pulses from N2 fixation may stimulate and sustain toxic cyanobacterial growth. Herein, we describe how rapid early summer declines in N followed by bursts of N fixation have shaped cyanobacterial communities in a eutrophic lake (Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, USA), possibly driving toxic Microcystis blooms throughout the growing season. On weekly time scales in 2010 and 2011, we monitored the cyanobacterial community in a eutrophic lake using the phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) region to determine population dynamics. In parallel, we measured microcystin concentrations, N2 fixation rates, and potential environmental drivers that contribute to structuring the community. In both years, cyanobacterial community change was strongly correlated with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations, and Aphanizomenon and Microcystis alternated dominance throughout the pre-toxic, toxic, and post-toxic phases of the lake. Microcystin concentrations increased a few days after the first significant N2 fixation rates were observed. Then, following large early summer N2 fixation events, Microcystis increased and became most abundant. Maximum microcystin concentrations coincided with Microcystis dominance. In both years, DIN concentrations dropped again in late summer, and N2 fixation rates and Aphanizomenon abundance increased before the lake mixed in the fall. Estimated N inputs from N2 fixation were large enough to supplement, or even support, the toxic Microcystis blooms. PMID:23405255

  20. Sigma Factors for Cyanobacterial Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Sousuke; Asayama, Munehiko

    2009-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthesizing microorganisms that can be used as a model for analyzing gene expression. The expression of genes involves transcription and translation. Transcription is performed by the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme, comprising a core enzyme and a sigma (?) factor which confers promoter selectivity. The unique structure, expression, and function of cyanobacterial ? factors (and RNAP core subunits) are summarized here based on studies, reported previously. The types of promoter recognized by the ? factors are also discussed with regard to transcriptional regulation. PMID:19838335

  1. Cyanobacterial diversity in the phyllosphere of a mangrove forest.

    PubMed

    Rigonato, Janaina; Alvarenga, Danillo Oliveira; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Melo, Itamar Soares; Kent, Angela; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2012-05-01

    The cyanobacterial community colonizing phyllosphere in a well-preserved Brazilian mangrove ecosystem was assessed using cultivation-independent molecular approaches. Leaves of trees that occupy this environment (Rhizophora mangle,Avicennia schaueriana and Laguncularia racemosa) were collected along a transect beginning at the margin of the bay and extending upland. The results demonstrated that the phyllosphere of R. mangle and L. racemosa harbor similar assemblages of cyanobacteria at each point along the transect. A. schaueriana, found only in the coastal portions of the transect, was colonized by assemblages with lower richness than the other trees. However, the results indicated that spatial location was a stronger driver of cyanobacterial community composition than plant species. Distinct cyanobacterial communities were observed at each location along the coast-to-upland transect. Clone library analysis allowed identification of 19 genera of cyanobacteria and demonstrated the presence of several uncultivated taxa. A predominance of sequences affiliated with the orders Nostocales and Oscillatoriales was observed, with a remarkable number of sequences similar to genera Symphyonemopsis/Brasilonema (order Nostocales). The results demonstrated that phyllosphere cyanobacteria in this mangrove forest ecosystem are influenced by environmental conditions as the primary driver at the ecosystem scale, with tree species exerting some effect on community structure at the local scale. PMID:22611551

  2. Freshwater Macroinvertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalepa, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of freshwater biology particularly freshwater macroinvertebrates and their effect on water pollution, covering publications of 1976-77. A list of 158 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. UNEP: Freshwater

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

    This searchable site, from The United Nations Environment Programme, is a clearinghouse for information about freshwater around the globe. The site provides links to UN reports, background guides on key freshwater issues, and many other resources.

  4. The semi-aquatic freshwater earthworms of the genus Glyphidrilus Horst, 1889 from Thailand (Oligochaeta, Almidae) with re-descriptions of several species.

    PubMed

    Chanabun, Ratmanee; Sutcharit, Chirasak; Tongkerd, Piyoros; Panha, Somsak

    2013-01-01

    The semi-aquatic freshwater earthworm genus Glyphidrilus Horst, 1889 from Thailand was investigated based on extensive recent collecting. The species in this genus were characterized by their external and internal morphological characters of the location of wings, genital openings, genital organ structures and their locations, as well as the dimensions of body length and number of segments. Several type specimens were compared with both previous and newly collected materials. Ten new species are described from several river systems in Thailand; as Glyphidrilus borealis sp. n., Glyphidrilus chaophraya sp. n., Glyphidrilus chiensis sp. n., Glyphidrilus huailuangensis sp. n., Glyphidrilus kratuensis sp. n., Glyphidrilus quadratus sp. n., Glyphidrilus trangensis sp. n., Glyphidrilus wararamensis sp. n., Glyphidrilus vangthongensis sp. n. and Glyphidrilus vesper sp. n. Each species is endemic to a single river system. All 26 previously described species are re-described, and eight lectotypes have been designated. An identification key and a morphological comparison summary are provided. PMID:23653518

  5. Occurrence of arsenic species in algae and freshwater plants of an extreme arid region in northern Chile, the Loa River Basin.

    PubMed

    Pell, Albert; Márquez, Anna; López-Sánchez, José Fermín; Rubio, Roser; Barbero, Mercedes; Stegen, Susana; Queirolo, Fabrizio; Díaz-Palma, Paula

    2013-01-01

    This study reports data on arsenic speciation in two green algae species (Cladophora sp. and Chara sp.) and in five aquatic plants (Azolla sp., Myriophyllum aquaticum, Phylloscirpus cf. desserticola, Potamogeton pectinatus, Ruppia filifolia and Zannichellia palustris) from the Loa River Basin in the Atacama Desert (northern Chile). Arsenic content was measured by Mass spectrometry coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP-MS), after acidic digestion. Liquid chromatography coupled to ICP-MS was used for arsenic speciation, using both anionic and cationic chromatographic exchange systems. Inorganic arsenic compounds were the main arsenic species measured in all samples. The main arsenic species in the extracts of freshwater algae and plants were arsenite and arsenate, whereas glycerol-arsenosugar (gly-sug), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and methylarsonic acid (MA) were present only as minor constituents. Of the samples studied, algae species accumulated more arsenic than aquatic plants. Total arsenic content ranged from 182 to 11100 and from 20 to 248 mg As kg(-1) (d.w.) in algae and freshwater plants, respectively. In comparison with As concentration in water samples, there was hyper-accumulation (>0.1% d.w.) in Cladophora sp. PMID:22981629

  6. ECOSYSTEM EFFECTS OF CYANOBACTERIAL HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harmful cyanobacterial blooms represent one of the most serious ecological stressors in lakes, rivers, estuaries and marine environments. When there are persistent or frequent blooms with high biomass of cyanobacterial cells, colonies or filaments in the water, a wide range of i...

  7. A pair of chiral flavonolignans as novel anti-cyanobacterial allelochemicals derived from barley straw (Hordeum vulgare): characterization and comparison of their anti-cyanobacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xi; Huang, Haomin; Ge, Zhiwei; Rounge, Trine B; Shi, Jiyan; Xu, Xinhua; Li, Ruobing; Chen, Yingxu

    2014-05-01

    The inhibitory effect of barley straw (Hordeum vulgare) on cyanobacteria has been observed in many field and laboratory studies for over 30 years, although the compounds responsible for this anti-cyanobacterial effect have remained unknown. In this study, a pair of chiral flavonolignans were isolated from barley straw extract using a bioassay-guided isolation procedure against Microcystis sp. The structures of the allelopathic compounds were elucidated by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) and HPLC-MS (high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry), and turned out to be salcolin A and B. The enantiomers differ in their anti-cyanobacterial abilities. Both enantiomers exhibited inhibitory effects on Microcystis sp., and the EC50 (concentration for 50% of maximal effect) of salcolin A and B were 6.02?×?10(-5) and 9.60?×?10(-5?) mol?l(-1) , respectively. Furthermore, the modes of actions of the enantiomers were investigated and compared at a single cell level by flow cytometry. Salcolin A was found to induce an increase on cyanobacterial intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels and to inhibit esterase activity, whereas salcolin B caused leakages of cyanobacterial cytoplasms. Thus, salcolin A was more 'algistatic', and salcolin B was more 'algicidal'. This study suggests that salcolin is the key allelochemical in barley straw's inhibitory effect on cyanobacteria and could be used as an agent in the future control of cyanobacterial harmful algae blooms. PMID:24034604

  8. Rapid screening for freshwater bacterial groups by using reverse line blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Gabriel; van Hannen, Erik J; Kamst-van Agterveld, Miranda P; Van der Gucht, Katleen; Lindström, Eva S; Van Wichelen, Jeroen; Lauridsen, Torben; Crump, Byron C; Han, Suk-Kyun; Declerck, Steven

    2003-10-01

    The identification of phylogenetic clusters of bacteria that are common in freshwater has provided a basis for probe design to target important freshwater groups. We present a set of 16S ribosomal RNA gene-based oligonucleotide probes specific for 15 of these freshwater clusters. The probes were applied in reverse line blot hybridization, a simple method that enables the rapid screening of PCR products from many samples against an array of probes. The optimized assay was made stringent to discriminate at approximately the single-mismatch level. This made 10 of the probes highly specific, with at least two mismatches to the closest noncluster member in the global database. Screening of PCR products from bacterioplankton of 81 diverse lakes from Belgium, The Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, and Norway showed that the respective probes were reactive against 5 to 100% of the lake samples. Positive reactivity of six highly specific probes showed that bacteria from actinobacterial clusters ACK-M1 and Sta2-30 and from verrucomicrobial cluster CLO-14 occurred in at least 90% of the investigated lakes. Furthermore, bacteria from alpha-proteobacterial cluster LD12 (closely related to the marine SAR11 cluster), beta-proteobacterial cluster LD28 and cyanobacterial cluster Synechococcus 6b occurred in more than 70% of the lakes. Reverse line blot hybridization is a new tool in microbial ecology that will facilitate research on distribution and habitat specificity of target species at relatively low costs. PMID:14532039

  9. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might determine the degree of growth reduction in D. magna in the presence of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors. The rapid response of Daphnia to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors supports the assumption that dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors exert a strong selection pressure on Daphnia proteases themselves. PMID:20441581

  10. Cyanobacterial Oxygenic Photosynthesis is Protected by Flavodiiron Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Isojärvi, Janne; Zhang, Pengpeng; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-01-01

    Flavodiiron proteins (FDPs, also called flavoproteins, Flvs) are modular enzymes widely present in Bacteria and Archaea. The evolution of cyanobacteria and oxygenic photosynthesis occurred in concert with the modulation of typical bacterial FDPs. Present cyanobacterial FDPs are composed of three domains, the ?-lactamase-like, flavodoxin-like and flavin-reductase like domains. Cyanobacterial FDPs function as hetero- and homodimers and are involved in the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. Whilst Flv2 and Flv4 proteins are limited to specific cyanobacterial species (?-cyanobacteria) and function in photoprotection of Photosystem II, Flv1 and Flv3 proteins, functioning in the “Mehler-like” reaction and safeguarding Photosystem I under fluctuating light conditions, occur in nearly all cyanobacteria and additionally in green algae, mosses and lycophytes. Filamentous cyanobacteria have additional FDPs in heterocyst cells, ensuring a microaerobic environment for the function of the nitrogenase enzyme under the light. Here, the evolution, occurrence and functional mechanisms of various FDPs in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are discussed. PMID:25761262

  11. Cyanobacterial Oxygenic Photosynthesis is Protected by Flavodiiron Proteins.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Isojärvi, Janne; Zhang, Pengpeng; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-01-01

    Flavodiiron proteins (FDPs, also called flavoproteins, Flvs) are modular enzymes widely present in Bacteria and Archaea. The evolution of cyanobacteria and oxygenic photosynthesis occurred in concert with the modulation of typical bacterial FDPs. Present cyanobacterial FDPs are composed of three domains, the ?-lactamase-like, flavodoxin-like and flavin-reductase like domains. Cyanobacterial FDPs function as hetero- and homodimers and are involved in the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. Whilst Flv2 and Flv4 proteins are limited to specific cyanobacterial species (?-cyanobacteria) and function in photoprotection of Photosystem II, Flv1 and Flv3 proteins, functioning in the "Mehler-like" reaction and safeguarding Photosystem I under fluctuating light conditions, occur in nearly all cyanobacteria and additionally in green algae, mosses and lycophytes. Filamentous cyanobacteria have additional FDPs in heterocyst cells, ensuring a microaerobic environment for the function of the nitrogenase enzyme under the light. Here, the evolution, occurrence and functional mechanisms of various FDPs in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are discussed. PMID:25761262

  12. Integrative taxonomy of a new species of planarian from the Lake Ohrid basin, including an analysis of biogeographical patterns in freshwater triclads from the Ohrid region (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Dugesiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Stocchino, Giacinta Angela; Sluys, Ronald; Deri, Paolo; Manconi, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the genus Dugesia is described from the Lake Ohrid region in the western part of the Balkan Peninsula, forming the first fully documented species description for this genus in the Ohrid area. The morphological species delimitation is supported by complementary molecular, karyological, and cytogenetic data available from the literature. Therefore, species delineation is based on a truly integrative approach. Further, a short account on the degree of freshwater planarian endemicity in the Ohrid region is provided. PMID:23840163

  13. Oligopeptides as Biomarkers of Cyanobacterial Subpopulations. Toward an Understanding of Their Biological Role

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Ramsy; Quesada, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial oligopeptides comprise a wide range of bioactive and/or toxic compounds. While current research is strongly focused on exploring new oligopeptide variants and their bioactive properties, the biological role of these compounds remains elusive. Oligopeptides production abilities show a remarkably patchy distribution among conspecific strains. This observation has prompted alternative approaches to unveil their adaptive value, based on the use of cellular oligopeptide compositions as biomarkers of intraspecific subpopulations or chemotypes in freshwater cyanobacteria. Studies addressing the diversity, distribution, and dynamics of chemotypes in natural systems have provided important insights into the structure and ecology of cyanobacterial populations and the adaptive value of oligopeptides. This review presents an overview of the fundamentals of this emerging approach and its most relevant findings, and discusses our current understanding of the role of oligopeptides in the ecology of cyanobacteria. PMID:24960202

  14. The Anguillidae, or the Freshwater Eels

    E-print Network

    Limburg, Karin E.

    1 The Anguillidae, or the Freshwater Eels K. Limburg, Fisheries Science Lecture Notes FishBase.org Anguillids, or freshwater eels 1 genus (Anguilla), 15 species European eel, Anguilla anguilla American eel, ABase.org Tesch, 1977 In contrast with salmons, freshwater eels are catadromous - although not all of them

  15. Transcriptomic profiling of differential responses to drought in two freshwater mussel species, the giant floater Pyganodon grandis and the pondhorn Uniomerus tetralasmus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yupeng; Li, Chao; Landis, Andrew Gascho; Wang, Guiling; Stoeckel, James; Peatman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The southeastern US has experienced recurrent drought during recent decades. Increasing demand for water, as precipitation decreases, exacerbates stress on the aquatic biota of the Southeast: a global hotspot for freshwater mussel, crayfish, and fish diversity. Freshwater unionid mussels are ideal candidates to study linkages between ecophysiological and behavioral responses to drought. Previous work on co-occurring mussel species suggests a coupling of physiology and behavior along a gradient ranging from intolerant species such as Pyganodon grandis (giant floater) that track receding waters and rarely burrow in the substrates to tolerant species such as Uniomerus tetralasmus (pondhorn) that rarely track receding waters, but readily burrow into the drying sediments. We utilized a next-generation sequencing-based RNA-Seq approach to examine heat/desiccation-induced transcriptomic profiles of these two species in order to identify linkages between patterns of gene expression, physiology and behavior. Sequencing produced over 425 million 100 bp reads. Using the de novo assembly package Trinity, we assembled the short reads into 321,250 contigs from giant floater (average length 835 bp) and 385,735 contigs from pondhorn (average length 929 bp). BLAST-based annotation and gene expression analysis revealed 2,832 differentially expressed genes in giant floater and 2,758 differentially expressed genes in pondhorn. Trancriptomic responses included changes in molecular chaperones, oxidative stress profiles, cell cycling, energy metabolism, immunity, and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Comparative analyses between species indicated significantly higher induction of molecular chaperones and cytoskeletal elements in the intolerant P. grandis as well as important differences in genes regulating apoptosis and immunity. PMID:24586812

  16. Transcriptomic Profiling of Differential Responses to Drought in Two Freshwater Mussel Species, the Giant Floater Pyganodon grandis and the Pondhorn Uniomerus tetralasmus

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Andrew Gascho; Wang, Guiling; Stoeckel, James; Peatman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The southeastern US has experienced recurrent drought during recent decades. Increasing demand for water, as precipitation decreases, exacerbates stress on the aquatic biota of the Southeast: a global hotspot for freshwater mussel, crayfish, and fish diversity. Freshwater unionid mussels are ideal candidates to study linkages between ecophysiological and behavioral responses to drought. Previous work on co-occurring mussel species suggests a coupling of physiology and behavior along a gradient ranging from intolerant species such as Pyganodon grandis (giant floater) that track receding waters and rarely burrow in the substrates to tolerant species such as Uniomerus tetralasmus (pondhorn) that rarely track receding waters, but readily burrow into the drying sediments. We utilized a next-generation sequencing-based RNA-Seq approach to examine heat/desiccation-induced transcriptomic profiles of these two species in order to identify linkages between patterns of gene expression, physiology and behavior. Sequencing produced over 425 million 100 bp reads. Using the de novo assembly package Trinity, we assembled the short reads into 321,250 contigs from giant floater (average length 835 bp) and 385,735 contigs from pondhorn (average length 929 bp). BLAST-based annotation and gene expression analysis revealed 2,832 differentially expressed genes in giant floater and 2,758 differentially expressed genes in pondhorn. Trancriptomic responses included changes in molecular chaperones, oxidative stress profiles, cell cycling, energy metabolism, immunity, and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Comparative analyses between species indicated significantly higher induction of molecular chaperones and cytoskeletal elements in the intolerant P. grandis as well as important differences in genes regulating apoptosis and immunity. PMID:24586812

  17. Determining the native/non-native status of newly discovered terrestrial and freshwater species in Antarctica - current knowledge, methodology and management action.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Kevin A; Convey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Continental Antarctic terrestrial and freshwater environments currently have few established non-native species compared to the sub-Antarctic islands and other terrestrial ecosystems on Earth. This is due to a unique combination of factors including Antarctica's remoteness, harsh climate, physical geography and brief history of human activity. However, recent increases in national operator and tourism activities increase the risk of non-native propagules reaching Antarctica, while climate change may make successful establishment more likely. The frequency and probability of human-assisted transfer mechanisms appear to far outweigh those of natural propagule introductions by wind, water, birds and marine mammals. A dilemma for scientists and environmental managers, which is exacerbated by a poor baseline knowledge of Antarctic biodiversity, is how to determine the native/non-native status of a newly discovered species which could be (a) a previously undiscovered long-term native species, (b) a recent natural colonist or (c) a human-mediated introduction. A correct diagnosis is crucial as the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty dictates dramatically different management responses depending on native/non-native status: native species and recent natural colonists should be protected and conserved, while non-native introductions should be eradicated or controlled. We review current knowledge on how available evidence should be used to differentiate between native and non-native species, and discuss and recommend issues that should be considered by scientists and managers upon discovery of a species apparently new to the Antarctic region. PMID:22054571

  18. Influence of species and sex on metal residues in freshwater mussels (Family Unionidae) from the St. Lawrence River, with implications for biomonitoring programs

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe-Smith, J.L. (Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario (Canada). Rivers Research Branch)

    1994-09-01

    The implementation of freshwater mussel watch programs has been hindered by a lack of information on biological factors affecting the levels of contaminants accumulated by these organisms. This study investigated the influence of species and sex on metal residues in Elliptio complanata and Lampsilis radiata radiata (Family Unionidae) from the St. Lawrence River. Mussels were collected from sites representing a wide range of types and degrees of metal pollution. Composite samples of five specimens (males and females combined) per species per site and five specimens per sex per species per site were analyzed for residues of 12 metals in the soft tissues to determine the effects of species and sex, respectively, on variability in the data. Interspecific differences in bioaccumulation were observed for most metals; however, concentrations were frequently correlated between species and the differences could therefore be quantified. Elliptio complanata demonstrated a broader response range to the same exposures than Lampsilis radiata radiata for most metals, suggesting that it may be more sensitive to changes in pollution status. Differences in metal uptake between the sexes were less pronounced than differences between species, and male specimens displayed less variability than females. Consideration of these factors in mussel biomonitoring programs should greatly improve sensitivity and precision.

  19. Siderophores: The special ingredient to cyanobacterial blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xue; Creed, Irena; Trick, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Freshwater lakes provide a number of significant ecological services including clean drinking water, habitat for aquatic biota, and economic benefits. The provision of these ecological services, as well as the health of these aquatic systems, is threatened by the excessive growth of algae, specifically, cyanobacteria. Historically, blooms have been linked to eutrophication but recent occurrences indicate that there are less dramatic changes that induce these blooms. Iron is an essential micronutrient required for specific essential metabolic pathways; however, the amount of biologically available iron in naturally occurring lake ranges from saturation to much lower than cell transport affinities. To assist in the modulation of iron availabilities, cyanobacteria in culture produce low molecular weight compounds that function in an iron binding and acquisition system; nevertheless, this has yet to be confirmed in naturally occurring lakes. This project explored the relationship of P, N and in particular, Fe, in the promotion of cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms in 30 natural freshwater lakes located in and around the Elk Island National Park, Alberta. It is hypothesized that cyanobacteria produce and utilize iron chelators called siderophores in low Fe and nitrogen (N) conditions, creating a competitive advantage over other algae in freshwater lakes. Lakes were selected to represent a range of iron availability to explore the nutrient composition of lakes that propagated cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (cHABs) compared to lakes that did not. Lake water was analyzed for nutrients, microbial composition, siderophore concentration, and toxin concentration. Modifications were made to optimize the Czaky and Arnow tests for hydroxamate- and catecholate-type siderophores, respectively, for field conditions. Preliminary results indicate the presence of iron-binding ligands (0.11-2.34 mg/L) in freshwater lakes characterized by widely ranging Fe regimes (0.04-2.74 mg/L). Furthermore, the concentration of iron-binding ligands was found to have a positive correlation to presence of cyanobacteria concentration, indicating a potential relationship between Fe, siderophores, and cyanobacteria. This project works to improve the understanding of freshwater cyanobacteria growth dynamics by investigating the physiological and biochemical processes leading to cHABs. The importance of this project lies in the understanding of elementary nutrient requirements in all algae and how cyanobacteria are able to access low concentration pools and subsequently bloom over other algal species. Investigating the nutrient regimes that stimulate siderophore production and the subsequent production of potentially toxic cyanobacteria blooms is important for lake management and preservation, specifically in the eutrophic and hypereutrophic freshwater lakes of Alberta.

  20. Cyanobacterial Blooms: Toxins, Tastes, and Odors

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ;Hepatotoxins Neurotoxins Dermatoxins Taste/Odor CYL MC ANA SAX GEOS MIB Anabaena X X X X X X ? Aphanizomenon X courtesy of A. St. Amand Anabaena Aphanizomenon PlanktothrixMicrocystis Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms

  1. Cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharides and human health – a review

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Schluter, Philip J; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharide/s (LPS) are frequently cited in the cyanobacteria literature as toxins responsible for a variety of heath effects in humans, from skin rashes to gastrointestinal, respiratory and allergic reactions. The attribution of toxic properties to cyanobacterial LPS dates from the 1970s, when it was thought that lipid A, the toxic moiety of LPS, was structurally and functionally conserved across all Gram-negative bacteria. However, more recent research has shown that this is not the case, and lipid A structures are now known to be very different, expressing properties ranging from LPS agonists, through weak endotoxicity to LPS antagonists. Although cyanobacterial LPS is widely cited as a putative toxin, most of the small number of formal research reports describe cyanobacterial LPS as weakly toxic compared to LPS from the Enterobacteriaceae. We systematically reviewed the literature on cyanobacterial LPS, and also examined the much lager body of literature relating to heterotrophic bacterial LPS and the atypical lipid A structures of some photosynthetic bacteria. While the literature on the biological activity of heterotrophic bacterial LPS is overwhelmingly large and therefore difficult to review for the purposes of exclusion, we were unable to find a convincing body of evidence to suggest that heterotrophic bacterial LPS, in the absence of other virulence factors, is responsible for acute gastrointestinal, dermatological or allergic reactions via natural exposure routes in humans. There is a danger that initial speculation about cyanobacterial LPS may evolve into orthodoxy without basis in research findings. No cyanobacterial lipid A structures have been described and published to date, so a recommendation is made that cyanobacteriologists should not continue to attribute such a diverse range of clinical symptoms to cyanobacterial LPS without research confirmation. PMID:16563160

  2. Generation and isolation of cyanobacterial inside-out thylakoid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, F; Simpson, D J; Stewart, A C; Andersson, B

    1988-09-01

    A method has been designed to prepare inside-out thylakoid vesicles from a cyanobacterial species (Phormidium laminosum). Everted thylakoid vesicles could be generated by Yeda press treatment after induced membrane pairing. Membrane pairing was induced either by addition of high concentrations of Mg2+ ions or by lowering the pH of the fragmentation media. The inside-out vesicles were isolated by aqueous polymer two-phase partition. The membrane orientation was determined by proton translocation studies and freeze-fracture electron microscopy. PMID:3138947

  3. Freshwater Blooms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

    This Bigelow Laboratory "Special Topics" page discusses freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs). The interactive web page describes the features of a freshwater HAB with a focus on location, organisms affected, human symptoms, toxins (neurotoxins and hepatotoxins), and causative organisms. Links are provided to other pages within the Toxic and Harmful Algal Blooms collection.

  4. Appendages of the cyanobacterial cell.

    PubMed

    Schuergers, Nils; Wilde, Annegret

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular non-flagellar appendages, called pili or fimbriae, are widespread in gram-negative bacteria. They are involved in many different functions, including motility, adhesion, biofilm formation, and uptake of DNA. Sequencing data for a large number of cyanobacterial genomes revealed that most of them contain genes for pili synthesis. However, only for a very few cyanobacteria structure and function of these appendages have been analyzed. Here, we review the structure and function of type IV pili in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and analyze the distribution of type IV pili associated genes in other cyanobacteria. Further, we discuss the role of the RNA-chaperone Hfq in pilus function and the presence of genes for the chaperone-usher pathway of pilus assembly in cyanobacteria. PMID:25749611

  5. Appendages of the Cyanobacterial Cell

    PubMed Central

    Schuergers, Nils; Wilde, Annegret

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular non-flagellar appendages, called pili or fimbriae, are widespread in gram-negative bacteria. They are involved in many different functions, including motility, adhesion, biofilm formation, and uptake of DNA. Sequencing data for a large number of cyanobacterial genomes revealed that most of them contain genes for pili synthesis. However, only for a very few cyanobacteria structure and function of these appendages have been analyzed. Here, we review the structure and function of type IV pili in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and analyze the distribution of type IV pili associated genes in other cyanobacteria. Further, we discuss the role of the RNA-chaperone Hfq in pilus function and the presence of genes for the chaperone-usher pathway of pilus assembly in cyanobacteria. PMID:25749611

  6. Removal of cyanobacterial toxins (microcystins) and cyanobacterial cells from drinking water using domestic water filters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda A. Lawton; Benjamin J. P. A. Cornish; Andrew W. R. MacDonald

    1998-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacteria are increasingly found in drinking water reservoirs, with cells and\\/or dissolved toxins entering the potable water supply. The most commonly observed group of cyanobacterial toxins is the microcystins, and concern about their impact on human health has prompted investigations into remedial treatment methods. This study investigates the ability of domestic water filters to remove cyanobacterial cells and microcystins

  7. First report about saxitoxins in freshwater fish Hoplias malabaricus through trophic exposure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cesar A. da Silva; Eliane T. Oba; Wanessa A. Ramsdorf; Valéria F. Magalhães; Marta M. Cestari; Ciro Alberto Oliveira Ribeiro; Helena C. Silva de Assis

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacterial waterblooms, such as the saxitoxin (STX) producer Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, have been a worldwide concern in environmental health. However, the bioaccumulation of this neurotoxin in the trophic chain is not completely known. The aim of the present work was to evaluate STX bioaccumulation through chemical analyses and the toxic and trophic effects using biomarkers in the tropical freshwater fish Hoplias

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A HUMAN BIOMARKER FOR CYANOBACTERIAL TOXINS- MICROCYSTINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasingly, cyanobacterial blooms are being reported worldwide due to several factors: eutrophication, climate change, and potentially greater scientific awareness and detection. During 1996, an outbreak of fatal cyanobacterial toxin intoxications occurred among a group of dia...

  9. Identifying freshwater mussels (Unionoida) and parasitic glochidia larvae from host fish gills: a molecular key to the North and Central European species

    PubMed Central

    Zieritz, Alexandra; Gum, Bernhard; Kuehn, Ralph; Geist, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater mussels (order Unionoida) represent one of the most severely endangered groups of animals due to habitat destruction, introduction of nonnative species, and loss of host fishes, which their larvae (glochidia) are obligate parasites on. Conservation efforts such as habitat restoration or restocking of host populations are currently hampered by difficulties in unionoid species identification by morphological means. Here we present the first complete molecular identification key for all seven indigenous North and Central European unionoid species and the nonnative Sinanodonta woodiana, facilitating quick, low-cost, and reliable identification of adult and larval specimens. Application of this restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) key resulted in 100% accurate assignment of 90 adult specimens from across the region by digestion of partial ITS-1 (where ITS is internal transcribed spacer) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products in two to four single digestions with five restriction endonucleases. In addition, we provide protocols for quick and reliable extraction and amplification of larval mussel DNA from complete host fish gill arches. Our results indicate that this new method can be applied on infection rates as low as three glochidia per gill arch and enables, for the first time, comprehensive, large-scale assessments of the relative importance of different host species for given unionoid populations. PMID:22837823

  10. Evaluation of a method for determining concentrations of isoeugenol, an AQUI-S residue, in fillet tissue from freshwater fish species.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, J.R.; Schreier, T.M.; Bernardy, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    AQUI-S is a fish anesthetic/sedative that is approved for use in a number of countries throughout the world and has the potential for use in the United States. The active ingredient in AQUI-S is isoeugenol. A method for determining isoeugenol concentrations in edible fillet tissue is needed for regulatory purposes, including surveillance and potential use in studies fulfilling human food safety data requirements if U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval is pursued. A method was developed and evaluated for determining isoeugenol concentrations in fillet tissue using relatively common procedures and equipment. The method produced accurate and precise results with fillet tissue from 10 freshwater fish species. The percentage of isoeugenol recovered from samples fortified with isoeugenol at nominal concentrations of 1, 50, and 100 microg/g for all species was always >80 and <97%. Within-day precision for samples fortified at those same concentrations was < or =10%, and day-to-day precision was < or =4.0%. Method precision with fillet tissue containing biologically incurred isoeugenol was < or =8.1%. There were no or minimal chromatographic interferences in control fillet tissue extracts from 9 of the 10 species. The method detection limits for all but one species ranged from 0.004 to 0.014 microg/g, and the quantitation limits ranged from 0.012 to 0.048 microg/g.

  11. Replacement names and nomenclatural comments for problematic species-group names in Europe's Neogene freshwater Gastropoda. Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Thomas A.; Harzhauser, Mathias; Kroh, Andreas; Elisavet, Georgopoulou; Mandic, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the course of a new database project on Miocene to Recent freshwater gastropods of Europe, a great many of primary and secondary homonyms were revealed. Such nomenclatural issues need clarification in order to avoid misunderstandings and wrong statements about geographical distributions and temporal ranges. The following 16 new names are introduced to replace existing homonyms: Theodoxus militaris jurisicpolsakae nom. n., Viviparus stevanovici nom. n., Melanopsis haueri ripanjensis nom. n., Melanopsis wolfgangfischeri nom. n., Micromelania ramacanensis nom. n., Pseudamnicola welterschultesi nom. n., Muellerpalia haszprunari nom. n., Muellerpalia pseudovalvatoides nom. n., Lithoglyphus gozhiki nom. n., Valvata heidemariae willmanni nom. n., Radix macaleti nom. n., Gyraulus okrugljakensis nom. n., Gyraulus rasseri nom. n., Gyraulus vrapceanus nom. n., Planorbarius halavatsi nom. n., and Segmentina mosbachensis nom. n. Additionally, six cases of homonyms are discussed that are not replaced by new names, because they are considered junior synonyms. PMID:25147468

  12. A holistic approach to taxonomic evaluation of two closely related endangered freshwater mussel species, the oyster mussel Epioblasma capsaeformis and tan riffleshell Epioblasma florentina walkeri (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.; Neves, R.J.; Ahlstedt, S.A.; Hallerman, E.M.

    2006-01-01

    Species in the genus Epioblasma have specialized life history requirements and represent the most endangered genus of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in the world. A genetic characterization of extant populations of the oyster mussel E. capsaeformis and tan riffleshell E. florentina walkeri sensu late was conducted to assess taxonomic validity and to resolve conservation issues for recovery planning. These mussel species exhibit pronounced phenotypic variation, but were difficult to characterize phylogenetically using DNA sequences. Monophyletic lineages, congruent with phenotypic variation among species, were obtained only after extensive analysis of combined mitochondrial (1396 bp of 16S, cytochrome-b, and ND1) and nuclear (515 bp of ITS-1) DNA sequences. In contrast, analysis of variation at 10 hypervariable DNA microsatellite loci showed moderately to highly diverged populations based on FST and R ST values, which ranged from 0.12 to 0.39 and 0.15 to 0.71, respectively. Quantitative variation between species was observed in fish-host specificity, with transformation success of glochidia of E. capsaeformis significantly greater (P<0.05) on greenside darter Etheostoma blennioides, and that of E. f. walkeri significantly greater (P<0.05) on fantail darter Etheostoma flabellare. Lengths of glochidia differed significantly (P<0.001) among species and populations, with mean sizes ranging from 241 to 272 ??m. The texture and colour of the mantle-pad of E. capsaeformis sensu stricto is smooth and bluish-white, whereas that of E. f. walkeri is pustuled and brown, with tan mottling. Based on extensive molecular, morphological and life history data, the population of E. capsaeformis from the Duck River, Tennessee, USA is proposed as a separate species, and the population of E. f. walkeri from Indian Creek, upper Clinch River, Virginia, USA is proposed as a distinct subspecies.

  13. Cyanobacterial defense mechanisms against foreign DNA transfer and their impact on genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Stucken, Karina; Koch, Robin; Dagan, Tal

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria display a large diversity of cellular forms ranging from unicellular to complex multicellular filaments or aggregates. Species in the group present a wide range of metabolic characteristics including the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, resistance to extreme environments, production of hydrogen, secondary metabolites and exopolysaccharides. These characteristics led to the growing interest in cyanobacteria across the fields of ecology, evolution, cell biology and biotechnology. The number of available cyanobacterial genome sequences has increased considerably in recent years, with more than 140 fully sequenced genomes to date. Genetic engineering of cyanobacteria is widely applied to the model unicellular strains Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. However the establishment of transformation protocols in many other cyanobacterial strains is challenging. One obstacle to the development of these novel model organisms is that many species have doubling times of 48 h or more, much longer than the bacterial models E. coli or B. subtilis. Furthermore, cyanobacterial defense mechanisms against foreign DNA pose a physical and biochemical barrier to DNA insertion in most strains. Here we review the various barriers to DNA uptake in the context of lateral gene transfer among microbes and the various mechanisms for DNA acquisition within the prokaryotic domain. Understanding the cyanobacterial defense mechanisms is expected to assist in the development and establishment of novel transformation protocols that are specifically suitable for this group. PMID:24510140

  14. Redescription of Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) golvani Salgado-Maldonado, 1978 (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) and description of a new species from freshwater cichlids (Teleostei: Cichlidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo

    2013-05-01

    A redescription of Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) golvani Salgado-Maldonado (An Inst Biol Univ Nal Autón Méx, Ser Zool 49:35-47, 1978) is presented, based on adult specimens collected from the type host Paraneetroplus fenestratus from the type location, the Lago de Catemaco lake, Veracruz state, Mexico, and its presence is recorded in other cichlids. Detailed studies of N. (N.) golvani using light microscopy revealed some taxonomically important, previously unreported features, such as the size and shape of fully developed adult males and females, and the structure of the eggs. Morphological variability in N. (N.) golvani is described. Based on these data, the geographic distribution of this species is documented. Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) panucensis n. sp. is described from Herichthys labridens (Pellegrin), Amatitlania nigrofasciata (Günther), and Herichthys cyanoguttatus Baird and Girard (all of them Cichlidae), collected in the Río Atlapexco, a tributary to the upper Río Panuco basin, Hidalgo State, Mexico. This new species stand up alone because of its minute proboscis (? 50?×?60, ? 42-55 (48.5)?×?48-63 (57.7)) and anterior hooks (? 27-30 (28.8)?×?3-5 (4), ? 28-32 (30)?×?5 (5)). A key to the species of Neoechinorhynchus recorded from freshwater fishes in Central and South America is included. PMID:23532542

  15. The Gyrodactylus (Monogenea, Gyrodactylidae) parasite fauna of freshwater sand gobies (Teleostei, Gobioidei) in their centre of endemism, with description of seven new species.

    PubMed

    Vanhove, Maarten P M; Economou, Alcibiades N; Zogaris, Stamatis; Giakoumi, Sofia; Zanella, Davor; Volckaert, Filip A M; Huyse, Tine

    2014-02-01

    While Gobioidei comprises showcases of (adaptive) radiation, the scientific interest they yielded did not ensure full understanding of goby biodiversity. Even in a well-studied region like Europe, wide knowledge gaps remain. Sand gobies represent one of the few clades whose monogenean parasites have been thoroughly studied. However, in the Balkans, part of the sand gobies' centre of endemism, these parasites were unstudied. We focus on Greek and Croatian freshwater gobies. From five sand goby species, the first parasites are reported, describing seven new Gyrodactylus species. Economidichthys pygmaeus harbours Gyrodactylus benedeni sp. n. and Gyrodactylus dorlodoti sp. n. Its congener E. trichonis hosts G. meelkopae sp. n. Knipowitschia milleri was found to host G. charon sp. n., K. thessala is infected by G. bios sp. n., and K. croatica by G. douglasadamsi sp. n. and G. hellemansi sp. n. Gyrodactylus bubyri was found on its type host K. caucasica. A diverse parasite fauna is expected for a region known for its biodiversity and endemism. The contribution of parasites to species richness in such hotspots is overlooked. The observed species richness per host is rather low compared to the better-studied eastern Atlantic sand gobies. Host vicariance is considered to mediate parasite specificity in this fauna. Some new flatworm species display unique morphological features, such as the remarkable size of the marginal hook sickle proper compared to its foot in the Economidichthys parasites, or a characteristically kinked marginal hook sickle in G. douglasadamsi sp. n. These features reflect their hosts' endemism in the Balkans. PMID:24288050

  16. Lifestyle Evolution in Cyanobacterial Symbionts of Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Burgsdorf, Ilia; Slaby, Beate M.; Handley, Kim M.; Haber, Markus; Blom, Jochen; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Hentschel, Ute

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The “Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum” group includes different clades of cyanobacteria with high 16S rRNA sequence identity (~99%) and is the most abundant and widespread cyanobacterial symbiont of marine sponges. The first draft genome of a “Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum” group member was recently published, providing evidence of genome reduction by loss of genes involved in several nonessential functions. However, “Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum” includes a variety of clades that may differ widely in genomic repertoire and consequently in physiology and symbiotic function. Here, we present three additional draft genomes of “Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum,” each from a different clade. By comparing all four symbiont genomes to those of free-living cyanobacteria, we revealed general adaptations to life inside sponges and specific adaptations of each phylotype. Symbiont genomes shared about half of their total number of coding genes. Common traits of “Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum” members were a high abundance of DNA modification and recombination genes and a reduction in genes involved in inorganic ion transport and metabolism, cell wall biogenesis, and signal transduction mechanisms. Moreover, these symbionts were characterized by a reduced number of antioxidant enzymes and low-weight peptides of photosystem II compared to their free-living relatives. Variability within the “Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum” group was mostly related to immune system features, potential for siderophore-mediated iron transport, and dependency on methionine from external sources. The common absence of genes involved in synthesis of residues, typical of the O antigen of free-living Synechococcus species, suggests a novel mechanism utilized by these symbionts to avoid sponge predation and phage attack. PMID:26037118

  17. Long-Term Satellite Observations of Microcystin Concentrations in Lake Taihu during Cyanobacterial Bloom Periods.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Zhang, Yunlin; Xu, Hai; Zhu, Guangwei; Qin, Boqiang; Huang, Changchun; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhou, Yongqiang; Lv, Heng

    2015-06-01

    Microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria pose a serious threat to public health. Intelligence on MCs distributions in freshwater is therefore critical for environmental agencies, water authorities, and public health organizations. We developed and validated an empirical model to quantify MCs in Lake Taihu during cyanobacterial bloom periods using the atmospherically Rayleigh-corrected moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS-Aqua) (Rrc) products and in situ data by means of chlorophyll a concentrations (Chla). First, robust relationships were constructed between MCs and Chla (r = 0.91; p < 0.001; t-test) and between Chla and a spectral index derived from Rrc (r = -0.86; p < 0.05; t-test). Then, a regional algorithm to analyze MCs in Lake Taihu was constructed by combining the two relationships. The model was validated and then applied to an 11-year series of MODIS-Aqua data to investigate the spatial and temporal distributions of MCs. MCs in the lake were markedly variable both spatially and temporally. Cyanobacterial bloom scums, temperature, wind, and light conditions probably affected the temporal and spatial distribution of MCs in Lake Taihu. The findings demonstrate that remote sensing reconnaissance in conjunction with in situ monitoring can greatly aid MCs assessment in freshwater. PMID:25936388

  18. Cyanobacterial Cyclopeptides as Lead Compounds to Novel Targeted Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sainis, Ioannis; Fokas, Demosthenes; Vareli, Katerina; Tzakos, Andreas G.; Kounnis, Valentinos; Briasoulis, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacterial cyclopeptides, including microcystins and nodularins, are considered a health hazard to humans due to the possible toxic effects of high consumption. From a pharmacological standpoint, microcystins are stable hydrophilic cyclic heptapeptides with a potential to cause cellular damage following uptake via organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP). Their intracellular biological effects involve inhibition of catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and PP2, glutathione depletion and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, certain OATPs are prominently expressed in cancers as compared to normal tissues, qualifying MC as potential candidates for cancer drug development. In the era of targeted cancer therapy, cyanotoxins comprise a rich source of natural cytotoxic compounds with a potential to target cancers expressing specific uptake transporters. Moreover, their structure offers opportunities for combinatorial engineering to enhance the therapeutic index and resolve organ-specific toxicity issues. In this article, we revisit cyanobacterial cyclopeptides as potential novel targets for anticancer drugs by summarizing existing biomedical evidence, presenting structure-activity data and discussing developmental perspectives. PMID:20411119

  19. Cyanobacterial Community Structure In Lithifying Mats of A Yellowstone Hotspring-Implications for Precambrian Stromatolite Biocomplexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Evan; Nash, C. Z.; Vogler, D. R.; Cullings, K.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences was used to investigate the molecular biodiversity of cyanobacterial communities inhabiting various lithified morpho-structures in two hotsprings of Yellowstone National Park. These morpho-structures - flat-topped columns, columnar cones, and ridged cones - resemble ancient stromatolites, which are possibly biogenic in origin. The top, middle and bottom sections of these lithified morpho-structures, as well as surrounding non-lithified mats were analyzed to determine the vertical and spatial distribution of cyanobacterial communities. Results from DGGE indicate that the cyanobacterial community composition of lithified morpho-structures (flat-topped columns, columnar cones, and ridged cones) were largely similar in vertical distribution as well as among the morpho-structures being studied. Preliminary results indicate that the cyanobacterial communities in these lithified morpho-structures were significantly different from communities in surrounding non-lithified mats. These results provide additional support to the theory that certain Phormidium/Leptolyngbya species are involved in the morphogenesis of lithifying morpho-structures in hotsprings and may have played a role in the formation of ancient stromatolites.

  20. Harmful freshwater algal blooms, with an emphasis on cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Paerl, H W; Fulton, R S; Moisander, P H; Dyble, J

    2001-04-01

    Suspended algae, or phytoplankton, are the prime source of organic matter supporting food webs in freshwater ecosystems. Phytoplankton productivity is reliant on adequate nutrient supplies; however, increasing rates of nutrient supply, much of it manmade, fuels accelerating primary production or eutrophication. An obvious and problematic symptom of eutrophication is rapid growth and accumulations of phytoplankton, leading to discoloration of affected waters. These events are termed blooms. Blooms are a prime agent of water quality deterioration, including foul odors and tastes, deoxygenation of bottom waters (hypoxia and anoxia), toxicity, fish kills, and food web alterations. Toxins produced by blooms can adversely affect animal (including human) health in waters used for recreational and drinking purposes. Numerous freshwater genera within the diverse phyla comprising the phytoplankton are capable of forming blooms; however, the blue-green algae (or cyanobacteria) are the most notorious bloom formers. This is especially true for harmful toxic, surface-dwelling, scum-forming genera (e.g., Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Nodularia, Microcystis) and some subsurface bloom-formers (Cylindrospermopsis, Oscillatoria) that are adept at exploiting nutrient-enriched conditions. They thrive in highly productive waters by being able to rapidly migrate between radiance-rich surface waters and nutrient-rich bottom waters. Furthermore, many harmful species are tolerant of extreme environmental conditions, including very high light levels, high temperatures, various degrees of desiccation, and periodic nutrient deprivation. Some of the most noxious cyanobacterial bloom genera (e.g., Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Cylindrospermopsis, Nodularia) are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen (N2), enabling them to periodically dominate under nitrogen-limited conditions. Cyanobacteria produce a range of organic compounds, including those that are toxic to higher-ranked consumers, from zooplankton to further up the food chain. Both N2- and non-N2-fixing genera participate in mutualistic and symbiotic associations with microorganisms, higher plants, and animals. These associations appear to be of great benefit to their survival and periodic dominance. In this review, we address the ecological impacts and environmental controls of harmful blooms, with an emphasis on the ecology, physiology, and management of cyanobacterial bloom taxa. Combinations of physical, chemical, and biotic features of natural waters function in a synergistic fashion to determine the sensitivity of water bodies. In waters susceptible to blooms, human activities in water- and airsheds have been linked to the extent and magnitudes of blooms. Control and management of cyanobacterial and other phytoplankton blooms invariably includes nutrient input constraints, most often focused on nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P). The types and amount of nutrient input constraints depend on hydrologic, climatic, geographic, and geologic factors, which interact with anthropogenic and natural nutrient input regimes. While single nutrient input constraints may be effective in some water bodies, dual N and P input reductions are usually required for effective long-term control and management of harmful blooms. In some systems where hydrologic manipulations (i.e., plentiful water supplies) are possible, reducing the water residence time by enhanced flushing and artificial mixing (in conjunction with nutrient input constraints) can be particularly effective alternatives. Implications of various management strategies, based on combined ecophysiological and environmental considerations, are discussed. PMID:12805693

  1. Freshwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  2. Are cyanobacterial blooms trophic dead ends?

    PubMed

    Perga, Marie-Elodie; Domaizon, Isabelle; Guillard, Jean; Hamelet, Valérie; Anneville, Orlane

    2013-06-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms induce significant costs that are expected to increase in the near future. Cyanobacterial resistance to zooplankton grazing is one factor thought to promote bloom events. Yet, numerous studies on zooplankton ability to graze upon cyanobacteria have been producing contradictory results and such a puzzle might arise from the lack of direct observations in situ. Our objective was to track, using fatty acid (FA) and fatty acid stable isotope analyses (FA-SIA), the fate of cyanobacterial organic matter in the food web of a lake subjected to summer blooms of Planktothrix rubescens. A metalimnetic bloom of P. rubescens occurred in Lake Bourget (France) during the study period (May-November 2009). The bloom was especially rich in ?-linolenic acid, 18:3(n-3), but none of the considered zooplankton taxa exhibited spiking content in this particular FA. FA-SIA revealed, however, that over a quarter of 18:3(n-3) in small zooplankton (<500 ?m) was provided by P. rubescens while large cladocerans (>500 ?m) did not benefit from it. P. rubescens 18:3(n-3) could be tracked up to perch (Perca fluviatilis) young of the year (YOY) to which it contributed to ~15 % of total 18:3(n-3). Although transferred with a much lower efficiency than micro-algal organic matter, the P. rubescens bloom supported a significant share of the pelagic secondary production and did not constitute, sensu stricto, a 'trophic dead end'. The cyanobacterial bloom also provided perch YOY with components of high nutritional values at a season when these are critical for their recruitment. This cyanobacterial bloom might thus be regarded as a significant dietary bonus for juvenile fish. PMID:23129401

  3. Phylogeography of the Italian vairone (Telestes muticellus, Bonaparte 1837) inferred by microsatellite markers: evolutionary history of a freshwater fish species with a restricted and fragmented distribution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Flavio Marchetto; Serena Zaccara; Frauke M Muenzel; Walter Salzburger

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Owing to its independence from the main Central European drainage systems, the Italian freshwater fauna is characterized by a high degree of endemicity. Three main ichthyogeographic districts have been proposed in Italy. Yet, the validity of these regions has not been confirmed by phylogenetic and population genetic analyses and a phylogeographic scenario for Italy's primary freshwater fish fauna is

  4. Morphological variation in Echinorhynchustruttae Schrank, 1788 and the Echinorhynchusbothniensis Zdzitowiecki & Valtonen, 1987 species complex from freshwater fishes of northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Wayland, Matthew T

    2013-01-01

    Echinorhynchustruttae and the Echinorhynchusbothniensis species complex are common parasites of salmoniform and other fishes in northern Europe. Echinorhynchusbothniensis and its sibling species Echinorhynchus 'bothniensis' are thought to be closely related to the Nearctic Echinorhynchusleidyi Van Cleave, 1924 based on morphological similarity and common usage of a mysid intermediate host. This study provides the first analysis of morphological and meristic variation in Echinorhynchustruttae and expands our knowledge of anatomical variability in the Echinorhynchusbothniensis group. Morphological variability in Echinorhynchustruttae was found to be far greater than previously reported, with part of the variance attributable to sexual dimorphism. Echinorhynchustruttae, the two species of the Echinorhynchusbothniensis group and Echinorhynchusleidyi displayed considerable interspecific overlap in the ranges of all conventional morphological characters. However, Proboscis profiler, a tool for detecting acanthocephalan morphotypes using multivariate analysis of hook morphometrics, successfully separated Echinorhynchustruttae from the other taxa. The Echinorhynchusbothniensis species group could not be reliably distinguished from Echinorhynchusleidyi (or each other), providing further evidence of the affinity of these taxa. Observations on the distribution of Echinorhynchustruttae in its definitive host population are also reported. PMID:24723769

  5. Photorepair activity and protective compounds in two freshwater zooplankton species (Daphnia menucoensis and Metacyclops mendocinus) from Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rodrigo J; Villafañe, Virginia E; Helblingh, E Walter

    2002-12-01

    The impact of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-315 nm) on the cladoceran Daphnia menucoensis Paggi and the copepod Metacyclops mendocinus (Wierzejski) was determined in experiments designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the photorepair mechanism and the role of UV-absorbing compounds. In both species UV-B caused significant mortality at doses of approximately 40 kJ m(- 2) or higher. At lower UV-B doses, however, no significant mortality was detected in M. mendocinus; moreover, this species seems to have a threshold below which no UV-B induced mortality is determined. D. menucoensis, on the other hand, was very sensitive to UV-B, and significant mortality of 15% (p < 0.05) was observed when doses were as low as 10 kJ m(-2). Both species showed high efficiency for photorepairing UV-B-induced damage to the DNA molecule, with a significant decrease of mortality when the species were exposed to visible radiation, PAR (55 W m(-2)), in addition to UV-B. The higher resistance of M. mendocinus to UV-B as compared to that of D. menucoensis might be also related to the presence of mycosporine-like amino acids, MAAs (i.e., shinorine and porphyra-334), and carotenoids, which would add an adaptive advantage to the copepod. PMID:12661597

  6. Temporal variation in community composition, pigmentation, and Fv/Fm of desert cyanobacterial soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Reed, S.C.; Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    Summers on the Colorado Plateau (USA) are typified by harsh conditions such as high temperatures, brief soil hydration periods, and high UV and visible radiation. We investigated whether community composition, physiological status, and pigmentation might vary in biological soil crusts as a result of such conditions. Representative surface cores were sampled at the ENE, WSW, and top microaspects of 20 individual soil crust pedicels at a single site in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, in spring and fall of 1999. Frequency of cyanobacterial taxa, pigment concentrations, and dark adapted quantum yield (Fv/Fm) were measured for each core. The frequency of major cyanobacterial taxa was lower in the fall compared to spring. The less-pigmented cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus showed significant mortality when not in the presence of Nostoc spp. and Scytonema myochrous (Dillw.) Agardh. (both synthesizers of UV radiation-linked pigments) but had little or no mortality when these species were abundant. We hypothesize that the sunscreen pigments produced by Nostoc and Scytonema in the surface of crusts protect other, less-pigmented taxa. When fall and spring samples were compared, overall cyanobacterial frequency was lower in fall, while sunscreen pigment concentrations, chlorophyll a concentration, and Fv/Fm were higher in fall. The ratio of cyanobacterial frequency/chlorophyll a concentrations was 2-3 times lower in fall than spring. Because chlorophyll a is commonly used as a surrogate measure of soil cyanobacterial biomass, these results indicate that seasonality needs to be taken into consideration. In the fall sample, most pigments associated with UV radiation protection or repair were at their highest concentrations on pedicel tops and WSW microaspects, and at their lowest concentrations on ENE microaspects. We suggest that differential pigment concentrations between microaspects are induced by varying UV radiation dosage at the soil surface on these different microaspects.

  7. Freshwater bryozoans (Bryozoa) of Norway V: review and comparative discussion of the distribution and ecology of the 10 species recorded

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan Økland; Karen Anna Økland

    2005-01-01

    The paper is based on material presented in five contributions [Hydrobiologia 421:1–24, 2000; 459: 103–123, 2001; 479: 11–22, 2002; 501: 179–198, 2003; Archives de lInstitut grand-ducal de Luxembourg. Section des Sciences naturelles, physiques et mathématiques, Nouvelle Série 44: 127–143, 2002]. Nine species of Bryozoa were collected during field studies of 601 lakes and other surface water types in Norway. Five

  8. Nitrate (NO 3?N) toxicity to aquatic life: A proposal of safe concentrations for two species of nearctic freshwater invertebrates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Camargo; J. V. Ward

    1995-01-01

    Safe concentrations (SCs) of nitrate (NO3?N) for early and last instar larvae of two species of Nearctic net-spinning caddisflies, Cheumatopsyche pettiti and Hydropsyche occidentalis, are estimated from short-term toxicity bioassays using an innovative methodology, the multifactor probit analysis (MPA) software. Toxicity bioassays were conducted in soft water (average hardness value of 42.7 ppm CaCO3). Larvae were exposed to five different

  9. Global diversity of amphibians (Amphibia) in freshwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miguel Vences; Jörn Köhler

    2008-01-01

    This article present a review of species numbers, biogeographic patterns and evolutionary trends of amphibians in freshwater.\\u000a Although most amphibians live in freshwater in at least their larval phase, many species have evolved different degrees of\\u000a independence from water including direct terrestrial development and viviparity. Of a total of 5,828 amphibian species considered\\u000a here, 4,117 are aquatic in that they

  10. Global diversity of amphibians (Amphibia) in freshwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miguel Vences; Jörn Köhler

    This article present a review of species numbers, biogeographic patterns and evolutionary trends of amphibians in freshwater.\\u000a Although most amphibians live in freshwater in at least their larval phase, many species have evolved different degrees of\\u000a independence from water including direct terrestrial development and viviparity. Of a total of 5,828 amphibian species considered\\u000a here, 4,117 are aquatic in that they

  11. Phylogenetic Characterization and Prevalence of “Spirobacillus cienkowskii,” a Red-Pigmented, Spiral-Shaped Bacterial Pathogen of Freshwater Daphnia Species?

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jorge L. M.; Duffy, Meghan A.; Tessier, Alan J.; Ebert, Dieter; Mouton, Laurence; Schmidt, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Microscopic examination of the hemolymph from diseased daphniids in 17 lakes in southwestern Michigan and five rock pools in southern Finland revealed the presence of tightly coiled bacteria that bore striking similarities to the drawings of a morphologically unique pathogen, “Spirobacillus cienkowskii,” first described by Elya Metchnikoff more than 100 years ago. The uncultivated microbe was identified as a deeply branching member of the Deltaproteobacteria through phylogenetic analyses of two conserved genes: the 16S rRNA-encoding gene (rrs) and the ?-subunit of topoisomerase (gyrB). Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed that the rRNA gene sequence originated from bacteria with the tightly coiled morphology. Microscopy and PCR amplification with pathogen-specific primers confirmed infections by this bacterium in four species of Daphnia: Daphnia dentifera, D. magna, D. pulicaria, and D. retrocurva. Extensive field surveys reveal that this bacterium is widespread geographically and able to infect many different cladoceran species. In a survey of populations of D. dentifera in lakes in Michigan, we found the bacterium in 17 of 18 populations studied. In these populations, 0 to 12% of the individuals were infected, with an average of 3% during mid-summer and early autumn. Infections were less common in rock pool populations of D. magna in southern Finland, where the pathogen was found in 5 of 137 populations. The broad geographic distribution, wide host range, and high virulence of S. cienkowskii suggest it plays an important role in the ecology and evolution of daphniids. PMID:18192404

  12. Freshwater Molluscs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry B. Miller; Michael J. S. Tevesz

    Freshwater mollusc shells are among the best and most extensively preserved fossils in lacustrine sediments. These molluscs\\u000a are useful because they occur in a broad range of paleoenvironments. As a result, they have been used to reconstruct former\\u000a stream confluences, provide a basis for biostratigraphic zonation of sedimentary sequences in lake basins, and reconstruct\\u000a habitat and climatic conditions. Because many

  13. In Brief: Europe's freshwater fish threatened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-11-01

    Two hundred of Europe's 522 freshwater fish species are threatened with extinction and 12 are already extinct, according to the Handbook of European Freshwater Fishes, published in collaboration with the World Conservation Union (IUCN) and released on 1 November 2007. IUCN notes that the main threats to fish species stem from development and population growth and include water withdrawals, large dams, and inappropriate fisheries management that has led to overfishing and the introduction of alien species. Authors Maurice Kottelat, former president of the European Ichthyological Society, and Jörg Freyhof, scientist from Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology, noted that fish conservation should be managed by agencies in charge of conservation, and not as a crop by agencies in charge of agriculture. William Darwall, senior program officer with IUCN's Species Program, said the species ``are critical to the freshwater ecosystems upon which we do depend, such as for water purification and flood control.'' For more information, visit the Web site: http://www.iucn.org.

  14. Diversity, distribution and hydrocarbon biodegradation capabilities of microbial communities in oil-contaminated cyanobacterial mats from a constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Abed, Raeid M M; Al-Kharusi, Samiha; Prigent, Stephane; Headley, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Various types of cyanobacterial mats were predominant in a wetland, constructed for the remediation of oil-polluted residual waters from an oil field in the desert of the south-eastern Arabian Peninsula, although such mats were rarely found in other wetland systems. There is scarce information on the bacterial diversity, spatial distribution and oil-biodegradation capabilities of freshwater wetland oil-polluted mats. Microbial community analysis by Automated Ribosomal Spacer Analysis (ARISA) showed that the different mats hosted distinct microbial communities. Average numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUsARISA) were relatively lower in the mats with higher oil levels and the number of shared OTUsARISA between the mats was <60% in most cases. Multivariate analyses of fingerprinting profiles indicated that the bacterial communities in the wetland mats were influenced by oil and ammonia levels, but to a lesser extent by plant density. In addition to oil and ammonia, redundancy analysis (RDA) showed also a significant contribution of temperature, dissolved oxygen and sulfate concentration to the variations of the mats' microbial communities. Pyrosequencing yielded 282,706 reads with >90% of the sequences affiliated to Proteobacteria (41% of total sequences), Cyanobacteria (31%), Bacteriodetes (11.5%), Planctomycetes (7%) and Chloroflexi (3%). Known autotrophic (e.g. Rivularia) and heterotrophic (e.g. Azospira) nitrogen-fixing bacteria as well as purple sulfur and non-sulfur bacteria were frequently encountered in all mats. On the other hand, sequences of known sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) were rarely found, indicating that SRBs in the wetland mats probably belong to yet-undescribed novel species. The wetland mats were able to degrade 53-100% of C12-C30 alkanes after 6 weeks of incubation under aerobic conditions. We conclude that oil and ammonia concentrations are the major key players in determining the spatial distribution of the wetland mats' microbial communities and that these mats contribute directly to the removal of hydrocarbons from oil field wastewaters. PMID:25514025

  15. Diversity, Distribution and Hydrocarbon Biodegradation Capabilities of Microbial Communities in Oil-Contaminated Cyanobacterial Mats from a Constructed Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Raeid M. M.; Al-Kharusi, Samiha; Prigent, Stephane; Headley, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Various types of cyanobacterial mats were predominant in a wetland, constructed for the remediation of oil-polluted residual waters from an oil field in the desert of the south-eastern Arabian Peninsula, although such mats were rarely found in other wetland systems. There is scarce information on the bacterial diversity, spatial distribution and oil-biodegradation capabilities of freshwater wetland oil-polluted mats. Microbial community analysis by Automated Ribosomal Spacer Analysis (ARISA) showed that the different mats hosted distinct microbial communities. Average numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUsARISA) were relatively lower in the mats with higher oil levels and the number of shared OTUsARISA between the mats was <60% in most cases. Multivariate analyses of fingerprinting profiles indicated that the bacterial communities in the wetland mats were influenced by oil and ammonia levels, but to a lesser extent by plant density. In addition to oil and ammonia, redundancy analysis (RDA) showed also a significant contribution of temperature, dissolved oxygen and sulfate concentration to the variations of the mats’ microbial communities. Pyrosequencing yielded 282,706 reads with >90% of the sequences affiliated to Proteobacteria (41% of total sequences), Cyanobacteria (31%), Bacteriodetes (11.5%), Planctomycetes (7%) and Chloroflexi (3%). Known autotrophic (e.g. Rivularia) and heterotrophic (e.g. Azospira) nitrogen-fixing bacteria as well as purple sulfur and non-sulfur bacteria were frequently encountered in all mats. On the other hand, sequences of known sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) were rarely found, indicating that SRBs in the wetland mats probably belong to yet-undescribed novel species. The wetland mats were able to degrade 53–100% of C12–C30 alkanes after 6 weeks of incubation under aerobic conditions. We conclude that oil and ammonia concentrations are the major key players in determining the spatial distribution of the wetland mats’ microbial communities and that these mats contribute directly to the removal of hydrocarbons from oil field wastewaters. PMID:25514025

  16. Secondary invasion of the round goby into high diversity Great Lakes tributaries and species at risk hotspots: potential new concerns for endangered freshwater species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Poos; Alan J. Dextrase; Astrid N. Schwalb; Josef D. Ackerman

    2010-01-01

    The round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) first invaded North America in 1990 when it was discovered in the St. Clair River. Despite more than 15 years of potential\\u000a invasion, many Great Lakes’ lotic systems remained uninvaded. Recently, we captured the round goby from several Great Lakes\\u000a tributaries known as species-at-risk hotspots. With a combination of field sampling of round gobies and literature

  17. Harmful cyanobacterial blooms: causes, consequences, and controls.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Otten, Timothy G

    2013-05-01

    Cyanobacteria are the Earth's oldest oxygenic photoautotrophs and have had major impacts on shaping its biosphere. Their long evolutionary history (? 3.5 by) has enabled them to adapt to geochemical and climatic changes, and more recently anthropogenic modifications of aquatic environments, including nutrient over-enrichment (eutrophication), water diversions, withdrawals, and salinization. Many cyanobacterial genera exhibit optimal growth rates and bloom potentials at relatively high water temperatures; hence global warming plays a key role in their expansion and persistence. Bloom-forming cyanobacterial taxa can be harmful from environmental, organismal, and human health perspectives by outcompeting beneficial phytoplankton, depleting oxygen upon bloom senescence, and producing a variety of toxic secondary metabolites (e.g., cyanotoxins). How environmental factors impact cyanotoxin production is the subject of ongoing research, but nutrient (N, P and trace metals) supply rates, light, temperature, oxidative stressors, interactions with other biota (bacteria, viruses and animal grazers), and most likely, the combined effects of these factors are all involved. Accordingly, strategies aimed at controlling and mitigating harmful blooms have focused on manipulating these dynamic factors. The applicability and feasibility of various controls and management approaches is discussed for natural waters and drinking water supplies. Strategies based on physical, chemical, and biological manipulations of specific factors show promise; however, a key underlying approach that should be considered in almost all instances is nutrient (both N and P) input reductions; which have been shown to effectively reduce cyanobacterial biomass, and therefore limit health risks and frequencies of hypoxic events. PMID:23314096

  18. Cyanobacterial Toxin Degrading Bacteria: Who Are They?

    PubMed Central

    Kormas, Konstantinos Ar.; Lymperopoulou, Despoina S.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in nature and are both beneficial and detrimental to humans. Benefits include being food supplements and producing bioactive compounds, like antimicrobial and anticancer substances, while their detrimental effects are evident by toxin production, causing major ecological problems at the ecosystem level. To date, there are several ways to degrade or transform these toxins by chemical methods, while the biodegradation of these compounds is understudied. In this paper, we present a meta-analysis of the currently available 16S rRNA and mlrA (microcystinase) genes diversity of isolates known to degrade cyanobacterial toxins. The available data revealed that these bacteria belong primarily to the Proteobacteria, with several strains from the sphingomonads, and one from each of the Methylobacillus and Paucibacter genera. Other strains belonged to the genera Arthrobacter, Bacillus, and Lactobacillus. By combining the ecological knowledge on the distribution, abundance, and ecophysiology of the bacteria that cooccur with toxic cyanobacterial blooms and newly developed molecular approaches, it is possible not only to discover more strains with cyanobacterial toxin degradation abilities, but also to reveal the genes associated with the degradation of these toxins. PMID:23841072

  19. Gill (Na+,K+)-ATPase in diadromous, freshwater palaemonid shrimps: species-specific kinetic characteristics and alpha-subunit expression.

    PubMed

    Santos, L C F; Belli, N M; Augusto, A; Masui, D C; Leone, F A; McNamara, J C; Furriel, R P M

    2007-09-01

    To better comprehend physiological adaptation to dilute media and the molecular mechanisms underlying ammonia excretion in palaemonid shrimps, we characterized the (Na+,K+)-ATPase from Macrobrachium amazonicum gills, disclosing high- (K(0.5) = 4.2+/-0.2 micromol L(-1); V = 33.9+/-1.9 U mg(-1)) and low-affinity (K(0.5) = 0.144+/-0.010 mmol L(-1); V = 232.9+/-15.3 U mg(-1)) ATP hydrolyzing sites. Stimulation by Na+ (K(0.5) = 5.5+/-0.3 mmol L(-1); V = 275.1+/-15.1 U mg(-1)), Mg2+ (K(0.5) = 0.79+/-0.06 mmol L(-1); V = 261.9+/-18.3 U mg(-1)), K+ (K(M) = 0.88+/-0.04 mmol L(-1); V = 271.8+/-10.9 U mg(-1)) and NH4(+) (K(M) = 5.0+/-0.2 mmol L(-1); V = 385.9+/-15.8 U mg(-1)) obeys single saturation curves, activity being stimulated synergistically by NH4(+) and K+. There is a single K+ binding site, NH4(+) binding to a second, exclusive site, stimulating activity by 33%, modulating K+ affinity. (Na+,K+)-ATPase activity constitutes approximately 80% of total ATPase activity (K(Iouabain) = 147.5+/-8.9 micromol L(-1)); Na+-, K+-, Ca2+-, V- and F(o)F(1)-ATPases are also present. M. amazonicum microsomal fractions possess approximately 2-fold less (Na+,K+)-ATPase alpha-subunit than M. olfersi, consistent with a 2.6-fold lower specific activity. These differences in (Na+, K+)-ATPase stimulation by ATP and ions, and specific activities of other ATPases, suggest the presence of distinct biochemical adaptations to life in fresh water in these related species. PMID:17521934

  20. A review of the use of sonication to control cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Rajasekhar, Pradeep; Fan, Linhua; Nguyen, Thang; Roddick, Felicity A

    2012-09-15

    The development of cyanobacterial blooms in water bodies imparts undesirable characteristics to the water such as odours, tastes and the potential presence of toxins. Several chemical and physical methods have been used to control the blooms, but have limitations in terms of pollution and application on a large scale. A more recent approach has been the use of sonication in the control of cyanobacteria (also referred to as blue-green algae). This paper reviews current advancements in research on using sonication to control cyanobacteria, particularly Microcystis aeruginosa, as it is a prevalent and a major bloom-forming toxic species. The impact of sonication on the structure and function of M. aeruginosa is discussed, including the influence of sonication parameters such as power intensity, frequency and exposure time. Alternate strategies of cyanobacterial control in combination with sonication are also reviewed. PMID:22727861

  1. Feasibility study on production of a matrix reference material for cyanobacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Hollingdale, Christie; Thomas, Krista; Lewis, Nancy; Békri, Khalida; McCarron, Pearse; Quilliam, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    The worldwide increase in cyanobacterial contamination of freshwater lakes and rivers is of great concern as many cyanobacteria produce potent hepatotoxins and neurotoxins (cyanotoxins). Such toxins pose a threat to aquatic ecosystems, livestock, and drinking water supplies. In addition, dietary supplements prepared from cyanobacteria can pose a risk to consumers if they contain toxins. Analytical monitoring for toxins in the environment and in consumer products is essential for the protection of public health. Reference materials (RMs) are an essential tool for the development and validation of analytical methods and are necessary for ongoing quality control of monitoring operations. Since the availability of appropriate RMs for cyanotoxins has been very limited, the present study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of producing a cyanobacterial matrix RM containing various cyanotoxins. The first step was large-scale culturing of various cyanobacterial cultures that produce anatoxins, microcystins, and cylindrospermopsins. After harvesting, the biomass was lyophilized, blended, homogenized, milled, and bottled. The moisture content and physical characteristics were assessed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the production process. Toxin levels were measured by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and ultraviolet detection. The reference material was found to be homogeneous for toxin content. Stability studies showed no significant degradation of target toxins over a period of 310 days at temperatures up to +40 °C except for the anatoxin-a, which showed some degradation at +40 °C. These results show that a fit-for-purpose matrix RM for cyanotoxins can be prepared using the processes and techniques applied in this work. Graphical Abstract Blue-green algal reference material. PMID:25929442

  2. Freshwater Sculpins: Phylogenetics to Ecology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan B. Adams; David A. Schmetterling

    2007-01-01

    Freshwater sculpins (Cottidae) are a diverse and ecologically important component of cool- and coldwater ecosystems throughout the northern hemisphere. More than 60 sculpin species occur in a variety of habitats, and sculpin distributions range from highly localized to widespread. Despite the frequently high biomass of sculpins and their numerous ecosystem functions, the traditional fisheries management emphasis on sport fishes has

  3. Evidence for the functioning of photosynthetic CO 2 -concentrating mechanisms in lichens containing green algal and cyanobacterial photobionts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Murray R. Badger; Hardy Pfanz; Burkhard Büdel; Ulrich Heber; Otto L. Lange

    1993-01-01

    The photosynthetic properties of a range of lichens containing both green algal (11 species) and cyanobacterial (6 species) photobionts were examined with the aim of determining if there was clear evidence for the operation of a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) within the photobionts. Using a CO2-gas-exchange system, which allowed resolution of fast transients, evidence was obtained for the existence of an

  4. Cyanobacterial toxins as allelochemicals with potential applications as algaecides, herbicides and insecticides.

    PubMed

    Berry, John P; Gantar, Miroslav; Perez, Mario H; Berry, Gerald; Noriega, Fernando G

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") from marine and freshwater habitats are known to produce a diverse array of toxic or otherwise bioactive metabolites. However, the functional role of the vast majority of these compounds, particularly in terms of the physiology and ecology of the cyanobacteria that produce them, remains largely unknown. A limited number of studies have suggested that some of the compounds may have ecological roles as allelochemicals, specifically including compounds that may inhibit competing sympatric macrophytes, algae and microbes. These allelochemicals may also play a role in defense against potential predators and grazers, particularly aquatic invertebrates and their larvae. This review will discuss the existing evidence for the allelochemical roles of cyanobacterial toxins, as well as the potential for development and application of these compounds as algaecides, herbicides and insecticides, and specifically present relevant results from investigations into toxins of cyanobacteria from the Florida Everglades and associated waterways. PMID:18728763

  5. Periphyton removal by freshwater micrograzers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Vermaat

    1993-01-01

    \\u000a In various experiments, the freshwater snail species Lymnaea peregra (Müll.), Physa fontinalis (L.), Valvata piscinalis (Müll.) and Bithynia tentaculata (L.) significantly removed periphyton from glass slides, while the two tested crustacean species, Asellus aquaticus (L.) and Gammarus pulex (L.), did not. B. tentaculata removed similar amounts of periphyton accumulated in the field as it did of laboratory-cultured periphyton.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Removal rates

  6. Diversity of Heterotrophic Nitrogen Fixation Genes in a Marine Cyanobacterial Mat

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J. P.; Mellon, M.; Braun, S.; Litaker, W.; Steppe, T.; Paerl, H. W.

    1995-01-01

    The diversity of nitrogenase genes in a marine cyanobacterial mat was investigated through amplification of a fragment of nifH, which encodes the Fe protein of the nitrogenase complex. The amplified nifH products were characterized by DNA sequencing and were compared with the sequences of nitrogenase genes from cultivated organisms. Phylogenetic analysis showed that similar organisms clustered together, with the exception that anaerobic bacteria clustered together, even though they represented firmicutes, (delta)-proteobacteria, and (gamma)-proteobacteria. Mat nifH sequences were most closely related to those of the anaerobes, with a few being most closely related to the cluster of (gamma)-proteobacteria containing Klebsiella and Azotobacter species. No cyanobacterial nifH sequences were found from the mat collected in November when Microcoleus chthonoplastes was the dominant cyanobacterium, but sequences closely related to the cyanobacterium Lyngbya lagerheimeii were found during summer, when a Lyngbya strain was dominant. The results indicate that there is a high diversity of heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing organisms in marine cyanobacterial mats. PMID:16535068

  7. Heme-copper oxidases and their electron donors in cyanobacterial respiratory electron transport.

    PubMed

    Bernroitner, Margit; Zamocky, Marcel; Pairer, Martin; Furtmüller, Paul G; Peschek, Günter A; Obinger, Christian

    2008-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are the paradigmatic organisms of oxygenic (plant-type) photosynthesis and aerobic respiration. Since there is still an amazing lack of knowledge on the role and mechanism of their respiratory electron transport, we have critically analyzed all fully or partially sequenced genomes for heme-copper oxidases and their (putative) electron donors cytochrome c(6), plastocyanin, and cytochrome c(M). Well-known structure-function relationships of the two branches of heme-copper oxidases, namely cytochrome c (aa(3)-type) oxidase (COX) and quinol (bo-type) oxidase (QOX), formed the base for a critical inspection of genes and ORFs found in cyanobacterial genomes. It is demonstrated that at least one operon encoding subunits I-III of COX is found in all cyanobacteria, whereas many non-N(2)-fixing species lack QOX. Sequence analysis suggests that both cyanobacterial terminal oxidases should be capable of both the four-electron reduction of dioxygen and proton pumping. All diazotrophic organisms have at least one operon that encodes QOX. In addition, the highly refined specialization in heterocyst forming Nostocales is reflected by the presence of two paralogs encoding COX. The majority of cyanobacterial genomes contain one gene or ORF for plastocyanin and cytochrome c(M), whereas 1-4 paralogs for cytochrome c(6) were found. These findings are discussed with respect to published data about the role of respiration in wild-type and mutated cyanobacterial strains in normal metabolism, stress adaptation, and nitrogen fixation. A model of the branched electron-transport pathways downstream of plastoquinol in cyanobacteria is presented. PMID:18972533

  8. Health Risk Assessment of Cyanobacterial (Blue-green Algal) Toxins in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, Ian R.; Humpage, Andrew R.

    2005-01-01

    Cyanobacterial toxins have caused human poisoning in the Americas, Europe and Australia. There is accumulating evidence that they are present in treated drinking water supplies when cyanobacterial blooms occur in source waters. With increased population pressure and depleted groundwater reserves, surface water is becoming more used as a raw water source, both from rivers and lakes/reservoirs. Additional nutrients in water which arise from sewage discharge, agricultural run-off or storm water result in overabundance of cyanobacteria, described as a ‘water bloom’. The majority of cyanobacterial water-blooms are of toxic species, producing a diversity of toxins. The most important toxins presenting a risk to the human population are the neurotoxic alkaloids (anatoxins and paralytic shellfish poisons), the cyclic peptide hepatotoxins (microcystins) and the cytotoxic alkaloids (cylindrospermopsins). At the present time the only cyanobacteral toxin family that have been internationally assessed for health risk by the WHO are the microcystins, which cause acute liver injury and are active tumour promoters. Based on sub-chronic studies in rodents and pigs, a provisional Guideline Level for drinking water of 1?g/L of microcystin-LR has been determined. This has been adopted in legislation in countries in Europe, South America and Australasia. This may be revised in the light of future teratogenicity, reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity studies. The other cyanobacterial toxin which has been proposed for detailed health risk assessment is cylindrospermopsin, a cytotoxic compound which has marked genotoxicity, probable mutagenicity, and is a potential carcinogen. This toxin has caused human poisoning from drinking water, and occurs in water supplies in the USA, Europe, Asia, Australia and South America. An initial health risk assessment is presented with a proposed drinking water Guideline Level of 1?g/L. There is a need for both increased monitoring data for toxins in drinking water and epidemiological studies on adverse health effects in exposed populations to clarify the extent of the health risk. PMID:16705800

  9. E¡ects of an invasive cattail species (Typhaglauca )o n sediment nitrogen and microbial community composition in a freshwater wetland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas L. Angeloni; Kathi Jo Jankowski; Nancy C. Tuchman; John J. Kelly

    Sediments from Cheboygan Marsh, a coastal freshwater wetland on Lake Huron that has been invaded by an emergent exotic plant, Typhaglauca, were examined to assess the effects of invasion on wetland nutrient levels and sediment microbial communities. Comparison of invaded and uninvaded zones of the marsh indicated that the invaded zone showed significantly lower plant diversity, as well as significantly

  10. A natural view of microbial biodiversity within hot spring cyanobacterial mat communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, D. M.; Ferris, M. J.; Nold, S. C.; Bateson, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This review summarizes a decade of research in which we have used molecular methods, in conjunction with more traditional approaches, to study hot spring cyanobacterial mats as models for understanding principles of microbial community ecology. Molecular methods reveal that the composition of these communities is grossly oversimplified by microscopic and cultivation methods. For example, none of 31 unique 16S rRNA sequences detected in the Octopus Spring mat, Yellowstone National Park, matches that of any prokaryote previously cultivated from geothermal systems; 11 are contributed by genetically diverse cyanobacteria, even though a single cyanobacterial species was suspected based on morphologic and culture analysis. By studying the basis for the incongruity between culture and molecular samplings of community composition, we are beginning to cultivate isolates whose 16S rRNA sequences are readily detected. By placing the genetic diversity detected in context with the well-defined natural environmental gradients typical of hot spring mat systems, the relationship between gene and species diversity is clarified and ecological patterns of species occurrence emerge. By combining these ecological patterns with the evolutionary patterns inherently revealed by phylogenetic analysis of gene sequence data, we find that it may be possible to understand microbial biodiversity within these systems by using principles similar to those developed by evolutionary ecologists to understand biodiversity of larger species. We hope that such an approach guides microbial ecologists to a more realistic and predictive understanding of microbial species occurrence and responsiveness in both natural and disturbed habitats.

  11. A Natural View of Microbial Biodiversity within Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Mat Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ward, David M.; Ferris, Michael J.; Nold, Stephen C.; Bateson, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    This review summarizes a decade of research in which we have used molecular methods, in conjunction with more traditional approaches, to study hot spring cyanobacterial mats as models for understanding principles of microbial community ecology. Molecular methods reveal that the composition of these communities is grossly oversimplified by microscopic and cultivation methods. For example, none of 31 unique 16S rRNA sequences detected in the Octopus Spring mat, Yellowstone National Park, matches that of any prokaryote previously cultivated from geothermal systems; 11 are contributed by genetically diverse cyanobacteria, even though a single cyanobacterial species was suspected based on morphologic and culture analysis. By studying the basis for the incongruity between culture and molecular samplings of community composition, we are beginning to cultivate isolates whose 16S rRNA sequences are readily detected. By placing the genetic diversity detected in context with the well-defined natural environmental gradients typical of hot spring mat systems, the relationship between gene and species diversity is clarified and ecological patterns of species occurrence emerge. By combining these ecological patterns with the evolutionary patterns inherently revealed by phylogenetic analysis of gene sequence data, we find that it may be possible to understand microbial biodiversity within these systems by using principles similar to those developed by evolutionary ecologists to understand biodiversity of larger species. We hope that such an approach guides microbial ecologists to a more realistic and predictive understanding of microbial species occurrence and responsiveness in both natural and disturbed habitats. PMID:9841675

  12. Habitat disturbance and the stability of freshwater gastropod populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Lodge; P. Kelly

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of population stability and habitat permanence has a major influence on the microdistribution of freshwater snails. For two years (February 1980–January 1982), we monitored the abundance of macrophytes and the abundance and size structure of four species of macrophyte-associated freshwater snails in an English pond. Previous work (Lodge, in press) showed that two species, the pulmonate Lymnaea peregra

  13. FRESHWATER FISHES OF ALASKA: THEIR BIOLOGY, DISTRIBUTION AND VALUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A summary of knowledge of the freshwater fishes of Alaska is provided. Covered are 56 species in 34 genera and 15 families, including strictly freshwater species, anadromous forms and those which normally are marine but which occasionally or regularly enter fresh water. For each ...

  14. Cyanobacterial neurotoxin ?-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in shark fins.

    PubMed

    Mondo, Kiyo; Hammerschlag, Neil; Basile, Margaret; Pablo, John; Banack, Sandra A; Mash, Deborah C

    2012-02-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin ?-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the marine food web. In this study, we sampled fin clips from seven different species of sharks in South Florida to survey the occurrence of BMAA using HPLC-FD and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS methods. BMAA was detected in the fins of all species examined with concentrations ranging from 144 to 1836 ng/mg wet weight. Since BMAA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, these results may have important relevance to human health. We suggest that consumption of shark fins may increase the risk for human exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA. PMID:22412816

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A HUMAN BIOMARKER FOR CYANOBACTERIAL TOXINS-MICROCYSTINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will determine if a commercially- available enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) designed to detect microcystins in water can be used to detect microcystins in human serum and liver. Increasingly, cyanobacterial blooms are being reported worldwide due to several...

  16. The Course of Toxicity in the Pregnant Mouse after Exposure to the Cyanobacterial Toxin, Cylindrospermopsin: Clinical Effects, Serum Chemistries, Hematology and Histopathology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxin produced by a wide variety of fresh water cyanobacterial species worldwide and induces significant adverse effects in both livestock and humans. This study investigated the course of CYN-induced toxicity in pregnant mice exposed during either t...

  17. Sedimented cyanobacterial detritus as a source of nutrient for submerged macrophytes (Vallisneria spiralis and Elodea nuttallii): An isotope labeling experiment using 15N

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leiyan Zhang; Kuanyi Li; Zhengwen Liu; Jack J. Middelburg

    2010-01-01

    A tracer experiment using the nitrogen isotope 15N investigated the uptake and incorporation of nitrogen from sedimented cyanobacterial detritus by two species of submerged macrophytes, the native Vallisneria spiralis and the exotic Elodea nuttallii, in Lake Taihu (China). The cyanobacterium Microcystis was labeled with 15Nammonium and dried to produce detritus, which was injected into vegetated sediments and traced to establish

  18. The molecular phylogeny of freshwater Dothideomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, C.A.; Raja, H.A.; Miller, A.N.; Nelson, P.; Tanaka, K.; Hirayama, K.; Marvanová, L.; Hyde, K.D.; Zhang, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The freshwater Dothideomycetes species are an ecological rather than taxonomic group and comprise approximately 178 meiosporic and mitosporic species. Due to convergent or parallel morphological adaptations to aquatic habitats, it is difficult to determine phylogenetic relationships among freshwater taxa and among freshwater, marine and terrestrial taxa based solely on morphology. We conducted molecular sequence-based phylogenetic analyses using nuclear ribosomal sequences (SSU and/or LSU) for 84 isolates of described and undescribed freshwater Dothideomycetes and 85 additional taxa representative of the major orders and families of Dothideomycetes. Results indicated that this ecological group is not monophyletic and all the freshwater taxa, except three aeroaquatic Tubeufiaceae, occur in Pleosporomycetidae as opposed to Dothideomycetidae. Four clades comprised of only freshwater taxa were recovered. The largest of these is the Jahnulales clade consisting of 13 species, two of which are the anamorphs Brachiosphaera tropicalis and Xylomyces chlamydosporus. The second most speciose clade is the Lindgomycetaceae clade consisting of nine taxa including the anamorph Taeniolella typhoides. The Lindgomycetaceae clade consists of taxa formerly described in Massarina, Lophiostoma, and Massariosphaeria e.g., Massarina ingoldiana, Lophiostoma breviappendiculatum, and Massariosphaeria typhicola and several newly described and undescribed taxa. The aquatic family Amniculicolaceae, including three species of Amniculicola, Semimassariosphaeria typhicola and the anamorph, Anguillospora longissima, was well supported. A fourth clade of freshwater species consisting of Tingoldiago graminicola, Lentithecium aquaticum, L. arundinaceum and undescribed taxon A-369-2b was not well supported with maximum likelihood bootstrap and Bayesian posterior probability. Eight freshwater taxa occurred along with terrestrial species in the Lophiostoma clades 1 and 2. Two taxa lacking statistical support for their placement with any taxa included in this study are considered singletons within Pleosporomycetidae. These singletons, Ocala scalariformis, and Lepidopterella palustris, are morphologically distinct from other taxa in Pleosporomycetidae. This study suggests that freshwater Dothideomycetes are related to terrestrial taxa and have adapted to freshwater habitats numerous times. In some cases (Jahnulales and Lindgomycetaceae), species radiation appears to have occurred. Additional collections and molecular study are required to further clarify the phylogeny of this interesting ecological group. PMID:20169028

  19. Stability and Noise in the Cyanobacterial Circadian Clock

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irina Mihalcescu

    2008-01-01

    By monitoring single cyanobacterial cells in vivo we show that individual cells generate impressively stable circadian rhythms.\\u000a In multicellular organisms, the circadian clock accuracy is achieved via intercellular coupling of the individual noisy oscillators.\\u000a Here we demonstrate that cyanobacterial clock stability is a built-in property. We first theoretically design our experiment\\u000a to be able to distinguish coupling, even weak, from

  20. Lake Level Fluctuations Boost Toxic Cyanobacterial “Oligotrophic Blooms”

    PubMed Central

    Callieri, Cristiana; Bertoni, Roberto; Contesini, Mario; Bertoni, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Global warming has been shown to strongly influence inland water systems, producing noticeable increases in water temperatures. Rising temperatures, especially when combined with widespread nutrient pollution, directly favour the growth of toxic cyanobacteria. Climate changes have also altered natural water level fluctuations increasing the probability of extreme events as dry periods followed by heavy rains. The massive appearance of Dolichospermum lemmermannii (?=?planktonic Anabaena), a toxic species absent from the pelagic zone of the subalpine oligotrophic Lake Maggiore before 2005, could be a consequence of the unusual fluctuations of lake level in recent years. We hypothesized that these fluctuations may favour the cyanobacterium as result of nutrient pulses from the biofilms formed in the littoral zone when the lake level is high. To help verify this, we exposed artificial substrates in the lake, and evaluated their nutrient enrichment and release after desiccation, together with measurements of fluctuations in lake level, precipitation and D.lemmermannii population. The highest percentage of P release and the lowest C?P molar ratio of released nutrients coincided with the summer appearance of the D.lemmermannii bloom. The P pulse indicates that fluctuations in level counteract nutrient limitation in this lake and it is suggested that this may apply more widely to other oligotrophic lakes. In view of the predicted increase in water level fluctuations due to climate change, it is important to try to minimize such fluctuations in order to mitigate the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:25295866

  1. The ecology of nitrogen fixation in cyanobacterial mats.

    PubMed

    Stal, Lucas J; Severin, Ina; Bolhuis, H

    2010-01-01

    All cyanobacterial mats that have been investigated have been proven to be diazotrophic, i.e., use atmospheric dinitrogen (N(2)) as the source of nitrogen. Many cyanobacteria possess the capacity to fix N(2) and different species have evolved various ways to cope with the sensitivity of nitrogenase toward oxygen which is produced by these oxygenic phototrophs. These different strategies give rise to complex patterns of nitrogenase activity in microbial mats. Nitrogenase activity may exhibit complex variations over a day-night cycle but different types of microbial mats may also have their own characteristic patterns. Besides the cyanobacteria, numerous other members of the Bacteria as well as some Archaea are known to be diazotrophic. The complexity of the microbial community and of the observed patterns of nitrogenase activity makes it difficult to understand how the different groups of organisms contribute to N(2) fixation in microbial mats. Cyanobacteria have ample access to energy (sunlight) and reducing equivalents (water) and therefore easily satisfy the demands of nitrogenase. As well, since they also fix CO(2), they are able to synthesize the acceptor molecules for the fixed nitrogen. However, it is also feasible that other diazotrophs in a joint venture with cyanobacteria are responsible for the bulk of the fixed nitrogen. In this review we discuss the importance of cyanobacteria as diazotrophs in microbial mats, their interactions with other potential N(2)-fixing microorganisms, and the factors that control their activities. PMID:20532734

  2. Lake level fluctuations boost toxic cyanobacterial "oligotrophic blooms".

    PubMed

    Callieri, Cristiana; Bertoni, Roberto; Contesini, Mario; Bertoni, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Global warming has been shown to strongly influence inland water systems, producing noticeable increases in water temperatures. Rising temperatures, especially when combined with widespread nutrient pollution, directly favour the growth of toxic cyanobacteria. Climate changes have also altered natural water level fluctuations increasing the probability of extreme events as dry periods followed by heavy rains. The massive appearance of Dolichospermum lemmermannii (?=?planktonic Anabaena), a toxic species absent from the pelagic zone of the subalpine oligotrophic Lake Maggiore before 2005, could be a consequence of the unusual fluctuations of lake level in recent years. We hypothesized that these fluctuations may favour the cyanobacterium as result of nutrient pulses from the biofilms formed in the littoral zone when the lake level is high. To help verify this, we exposed artificial substrates in the lake, and evaluated their nutrient enrichment and release after desiccation, together with measurements of fluctuations in lake level, precipitation and D. lemmermannii population. The highest percentage of P release and the lowest C:P molar ratio of released nutrients coincided with the summer appearance of the D. lemmermannii bloom. The P pulse indicates that fluctuations in level counteract nutrient limitation in this lake and it is suggested that this may apply more widely to other oligotrophic lakes. In view of the predicted increase in water level fluctuations due to climate change, it is important to try to minimize such fluctuations in order to mitigate the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:25295866

  3. The use of algae-cyanobacterial communities for the assessment of lead pollution of gray forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temraleeva, A. D.; Pinskii, D. L.; Patova, E. N.; Spirina, E. V.

    2011-03-01

    The effect of lead acetate on the characteristics of the algae-cyanobacterial communities of a gray forest soil was studied in a model experiment. The investigation was carried out using the method of water-soil cultures. The advantages and disadvantages of the application of this method for the ecotoxicological experiments are considered. The species of cyanobacteria and algae tolerant and sensitive to heavy metals were revealed. The addition of lead acetate at doses of 750 and 1500 mg/kg to soil caused a decrease in the species diversity and abundance of the cyanobacteria and algae, a reduction of the total content of chlorophyll, and changes in the morphology of individuals, whereas a dose of 300 mg/kg stimulated the development of the algae-cyanobacterial communities. The effect observed is suggested to be due to the double action of the salt: the adverse influence of the lead cations, and the positive influence of the acetate anions and the protective function of the soil. The use of a complex of different parameters of the biological organization of the communities at the cell, organism, and community levels results in the objective and complete assessment of the toxicant effects on the algae-cyanobacterial community of the gray forest soil.

  4. 16S rRNA sequences of uncultivated hot spring cyanobacterial mat inhabitants retrieved as randomly primed cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.; Ward, D.M. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman (United States)); Weller, J.W. (Univ. of Montana, Missoula (United States))

    1991-04-01

    Cloning and analysis of cDNAs synthesized from rRNAs is one approach to assess the species composition of natural microbial communities. In some earlier attempts to synthesize cDNA from 16S rRNA (16S rcDNA) from the Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat, a dominance of short 16S rcDNAs was observed, which appear to have originated only from certain organisms. Priming of cDNA synthesis from small ribosomal subunit RNA with random deoxyhexanucleotides can retrieve longer sequences, more suitable for phylogenetic analysis. Here we report the retrieval of 16S rRNA sequences form three formerly uncultured community members. One sequence type, which was retrieved three times from a total of five sequences analyzed, can be placed in the cyanobacterial phylum. A second sequence type is related to 16S rRNAs from green nonsulfur bacteria. The third sequence type may represent a novel phylogenetic type.

  5. Facts about Cyanobacteria (Blue-green Algae) and Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms

    E-print Network

    ) and Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms (CyanoHABs) Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) Cyanobacteria are bacteria smell bad. #12;2 Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) CyanoHABs are algae blooms and how they form Cyanobacterial blooms occur when algae that are normally present grow exuberantly

  6. Limnology and cyanobacterial diversity of high altitude lakes of Lahaul-Spiti in Himachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Y; Khattar, Jis; Singh, D P; Rahi, P; Gulati, A

    2014-09-01

    Limnological data of four high altitude lakes from the cold desert region of Himachal Pradesh, India, has been correlated with cyanobacterial diversity. Physico-chemical characteristics and nutrient contents of the studied lakes revealed that Sissu Lake is mesotrophic while Chandra Tal, Suraj Tal and Deepak Tal are ultra-oligotrophic. Based on morphology and 16S rRNA gene sequence, a total of 20 cyanobacterial species belonging to 11 genera were identified. Canonical correspondence analysis distinguished three groups of species with respect to their occurrence and nutrient/physical environment demand. The first group, which included Nostoc linckia, N. punctiforme, Nodularia sphaerocarpa, Geitlerinema acutissimum, Limnothrix redekii, Planktothrix agardhii and Plank. clathrata, was characteristic of water with high nutrient content and high temperature. The second group, including Gloeocapsopsis pleurocapsoides, Leptolyngbya antarctica, L. frigida, Pseudanabaena frigida and N. spongiaeforme, occurred in oligotrophic water with high pH and low temperature. The distribution of third group of Cyanobium parvum, Synechocystis pevalekii, L. benthonica, L. foveolarum, L. lurida, L. valderiana, Phormidium autumnale and P. chalybeum could not be associated with a particular environmental condition because of their presence in all sampling sites. PMID:25116619

  7. Cyanobacterial Diversity and a New Acaryochloris-Like Symbiont from Bahamian Sea-Squirts

    PubMed Central

    López-Legentil, Susanna; Song, Bongkeun; Bosch, Manel; Pawlik, Joseph R.; Turon, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Symbiotic interactions between ascidians (sea-squirts) and microbes are poorly understood. Here we characterized the cyanobacteria in the tissues of 8 distinct didemnid taxa from shallow-water marine habitats in the Bahamas Islands by sequencing a fragment of the cyanobacterial 16S rRNA gene and the entire 16S–23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) and by examining symbiont morphology with transmission electron (TEM) and confocal microscopy (CM). As described previously for other species, Trididemnum spp. mostly contained symbionts associated with the Prochloron-Synechocystis group. However, sequence analysis of the symbionts in Lissoclinum revealed two unique clades. The first contained a novel cyanobacterial clade, while the second clade was closely associated with Acaryochloris marina. CM revealed the presence of chlorophyll d (chl d) and phycobiliproteins (PBPs) within these symbiont cells, as is characteristic of Acaryochloris species. The presence of symbionts was also observed by TEM inside the tunic of both the adult and larvae of L. fragile, indicating vertical transmission to progeny. Based on molecular phylogenetic and microscopic analyses, Candidatus Acaryochloris bahamiensis nov. sp. is proposed for this symbiotic cyanobacterium. Our results support the hypothesis that photosymbiont communities in ascidians are structured by host phylogeny, but in some cases, also by sampling location. PMID:21915246

  8. Young Freshwater Mussels as seen Through a Microscope

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    During laboratory tests, USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center scientists and partners found that the heart and growth rates of some species of young freshwater mussels declined as a result of elevated water temperatures, and many died. Freshwater mussels have been compared to the “...

  9. Parasitofauna of freshwater fishes in the Serbian open waters: a checklist of parasites of freshwater fishes in Serbian open waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vesna Djikanovic; Momir Paunovic; Vera Nikolic; Predrag Simonovic; Predrag Cakic

    As a result of freshwater fish parasitofauna investigations, throughout the past 75 years, the number of parasitic species\\u000a is presented. This paper reviews the history, current state, and tendencies of the fish parasitofauna studies in Serbian open\\u000a waters. Up to now, in total 170 parasitic species have been reported. Systematic parasitofauna investigations have been carried\\u000a out on 54 freshwater fish species

  10. Variation of microcystins, cyanobacterial hepatotoxins, in Anabaena spp. as a function of growth stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Rapala, J; Sivonen, K; Lyra, C; Niemelä, S I

    1997-01-01

    Cyanobacterial hepatotoxins, microcystins, are specific inhibitors of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and potent tumor promoters. They have caused several poisonings of animals and also pose a health hazard for humans through the use of water for drinking and recreation. Different strains of the same cyanobacterial species may variously be nontoxic, be neurotoxic, or produce several microcystin variants. It is poorly understood how the amount of toxins varies in a single strain. This laboratory study shows the importance of external growth stimuli in regulating the levels and relative proportions of different microcystin variants in two strains of filamentous, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena spp. The concentration of the toxins in the cells increased with phosphorus. High temperatures (25 to 30 degrees C), together with the highest levels of light studied (test range, 2 to 100 mumol m-2 s-1), decreased their amount. Different structural variants of microcystins responded differently to growth stimuli. Variants of microcystin (MCYST)-LR correlated with temperatures below 25 degrees C, and those of MCYST-RR correlated with higher temperatures. Nitrogen added into the growth medium and increasing temperatures increased the proportion of microcystin variants demethylated in amino acid 3. All variants remained mostly intracellular. Time was the most important factor causing the release of the toxins into the growth medium. Time, nitrogen added into the growth medium, and light fluxes above 25 mumol m-2 s-1 significantly increased the concentrations of the dissolved toxins. According to the results, it thus seems that the reduction of phosphorus loads in bodies of water might play a role in preventing the health hazards that toxic cyanobacterial water blooms pose, not only by decreasing the cyanobacteria but also by decreasing their toxin content. PMID:9172340

  11. Monitoring Biological Invasions in Freshwater Habitats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Montserrat Vilà; Emili García-Berthou

    \\u000a Alien species invading freshwater systems are causing major changes in biodiversity worldwide. Some alien species have been\\u000a used as indicators of water quality and environmental degradation. We discuss the reasons for monitoring invasive species\\u000a beyond their use as ecological indicators, and offer guidance on the design of appropriate long-term monitoring schemes. Monitoring\\u000a plays an essential role in providing an early

  12. Thermal sensitivity of metabolic enzymes in subarctic and temperate freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionoida)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hélène Doucet-Beaupré; Caroline Dubé; Sophie Breton; Hans O. Pörtner; Pierre U. Blier

    2010-01-01

    Temperature has a major impact on the physiological processes of freshwater invertebrates. Despite the endangered status of many freshwater mussel species and the potential effect of global warming on North America’s northern aquatic habitats, thermal sensitivity of the metabolic apparatus of freshwater bivalves has received little attention. By examining the thermal sensitivity of 10 key metabolic enzymes and in situ

  13. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited growth rate effects

    E-print Network

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and spe- cies. Organic Geochemistry. Two species of freshwater green algae, Eudorina unicocca and Volvox aureus, were grown in batch

  14. Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Cyanobacterial System

    SciTech Connect

    Weyman, Philip D [J. Craig Venter Institute; Smith, Hamillton O.

    2014-12-03

    Photobiological processes are attractive routes to renewable H2 production. With the input of solar energy, photosynthetic microbes such as cyanobacteria and green algae carry out oxygenic photosynthesis, using sunlight energy to extract protons and high energy electrons from water. These protons and high energy electrons can be fed to a hydrogenase system yielding H2. However, most hydrogen-evolving hydrogenases are inhibited by O2, which is an inherent byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The rate of H2 production is thus limited. Certain photosynthetic bacteria are reported to have an O2-tolerant evolving hydrogenase, yet these microbes do not split water, and require other more expensive feedstocks. To overcome these difficulties, the goal of this work has been to construct novel microbial hybrids by genetically transferring O2-tolerant hydrogenases from other bacteria into a class of photosynthetic bacteria called cyanobacteria. These hybrid organisms will use the photosynthetic machinery of the cyanobacterial hosts to perform the water-oxidation reaction with the input of solar energy, and couple the resulting protons and high energy electrons to the O2-tolerant bacterial hydrogenase, all within the same microbe (Fig. 1). The ultimate goal of this work has been to overcome the sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme to O2 and address one of the key technological hurdles to cost-effective photobiological H2 production which currently limits the production of hydrogen in algal systems. In pursuit of this goal, work on this project has successfully completed many subtasks leading to a greatly increased understanding of the complicated [NiFe]-hydrogenase enzymes. At the beginning of this project, [NiFe] hydrogenases had never been successfully moved across wide species barriers and had never been heterologously expressed in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, the idea that whole, functional genes could be extracted from complicated, mixed-sequence meta-genomes was not established. In the course of this work, we identified a new hydrogenase from environmental DNA sequence and successfully expressed it in a variety of hosts including cyanobacteria. This was one of the first examples of these complicated enzymes being moved across vastly different bacterial species and is the first example of a hydrogenase being “brought to life” from no other information than a DNA sequence from metagenomic data. The hydrogenase we identified had the molecular signature of other O2-tolerant hydrogenases, and we discovered that the resulting enzyme had exceptionally high oxygen- and thermo-tolerance. The new enzyme retained 80% of its activity after incubation at 80° C for 2 hours and retained 20% activity in 1% O2. We performed detailed analysis on the maturation genes required for construction of a functional enzyme of this class of hydrogenase, and found that seven additional maturation genes were required for minimal activity and a total of nine genes besides the hydrogenase were required for optimal maturation efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the maturation genes are functional on closely-related hydrogenase enzymes such as those from Alteromonas macleodii and Thiocapsa roseopersicina. Finally, we have extensively modified the hydrogenase to engineer new traits including higher H2 production and better interaction with electron donors. For example, combining two strategies increased hydrogenase activity in cyanobacteria by at least 20-fold over our initial expression level. The activity of this combined strain is almost twice that of the native hydrogenase activity in S. elongatus. This work validates the idea that these enzymes are broadly tolerant to modifications that may help integrate them into a successful photobiological H2 production system. While we did not achieve our ultimate goal of integrating the functional hydrogenase with the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus, the work on this project has led to significant advances in the understanding of these complicated enzymes. This work will greatly benefit future

  15. Episodic Cyanobacterial Expansions During Permian-Triassic Biotic Crisis at Meishan in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S.; Pancost, R.; Huang, X.; Jiao, D.; Lu, L.; Huang, J.; Wang, H.; Yang, F.; Yin, H.; Evershed, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) mass extinction was the most severe biotic crisis in the Phanerozoic, eliminating over 90% of all marine species and 70% of terrestrial vertebrate families. The pattern of the marine mass extinction near the P-Tr boundary is still debated. A stepwise multi-phase biotic extinction proposed on the basis of several southern China sections has recently been challenged by a proposal of a main sudden biotic crisis. Reconciling this debate is necessary in order to estimate the duration (abruptness) of the extinction and to evaluate proposed mechanisms. In contrast with the previous investigations focusing on faunal fossil records, we have conducted a survey of microbial biomarkers (molecular fossils) in sedimentary rocks spanning the P-Tr boundary at Meishan sections in South China where the GSSP was defined. By using the powerful techniques of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-combustion-isotope ratio MS, we are able to identify a series of biomarkers and measure the compound-specific carbon isotope composition. In the saturated hydrocarbon fraction of solvent extracts of the sedimentary rocks, a series of 2?-methylhopanes (2-MHP) derived from cyanobacterial 2-methyl-bacteriohopanepolyols precursors are present. The ratio of 2-MHP to hopanes (2-MHP index) reflects the abundance of cyanobacterial component relative to the general bacterial population. The striking aspect of the Meishan 2-MHP profile is the presence of two distinct maxima (beds 26 and 29) within the investigated intervals. Significantly, the 2-MHP indices are stratigraphically coupled with the faunal extinction probability; minima in 2-MHP indices coincide with, or slightly precede, the times of maximum faunal extinction (beds 25 and 28), while maxima in 2-MHP indices clearly lag extinction. It appears that faunal and microbial turnover was closely related, probably reflecting their ecological coupling and/or distinct but coincidental responses to external environmental forcings. The large changes in cyanobacterial population abundances, coupled with faunal mass extinction, likely signify a stepwise multi-phase environmental perturbation. In addition, the two cyanobacterial expansions are characterised by two strong negative shifts (about 9 per mil in ?13C values of n-C19 n-alkanes, likely derived from phytoplankton and/or bacteria. In contrast, positive excursions are observed in association with the two horizons of faunal mass extinction. The large fluctuation of n-alkane ?13C signature clearly suggests major, episodic changes in either micro-organism inputs or sedimentary environmental conditions during the P-Tr biotic crisis.

  16. TOXICITY AND METABOLISM STUDIES WITH EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) PRIORITY POLLUTANTS AND RELATED CHEMICALS IN FRESHWATER ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty-two chemicals from the EPA priority pollutant list were studied for their acute and/or chronic toxicity to selected freshwater organisms. Freshwater species tested included the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis...

  17. Photoautotrophic Polyhydroxybutyrate Granule Formation Is Regulated by Cyanobacterial Phasin PhaP in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Hauf, Waldemar; Watzer, Björn; Roos, Nora; Klotz, Alexander; Forchhammer, Karl

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic microorganisms which fix atmospheric carbon dioxide via the Calvin-Benson cycle to produce carbon backbones for primary metabolism. Fixed carbon can also be stored as intracellular glycogen, and in some cyanobacterial species like Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulates when major nutrients like phosphorus or nitrogen are absent. So far only three enzymes which participate in PHB metabolism have been identified in this organism, namely, PhaA, PhaB, and the heterodimeric PHB synthase PhaEC. In this work, we describe the cyanobacterial PHA surface-coating protein (phasin), which we term PhaP, encoded by ssl2501. Translational fusion of Ssl2501 with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) showed a clear colocalization to PHB granules. A deletion of ssl2501 reduced the number of PHB granules per cell, whereas the mean PHB granule size increased as expected for a typical phasin. Although deletion of ssl2501 had almost no effect on the amount of PHB, the biosynthetic activity of PHB synthase was negatively affected. Secondary-structure prediction and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of PhaP revealed that the protein consists of two ?-helices, both of them associating with PHB granules. Purified PhaP forms oligomeric structures in solution, and both ?-helices of PhaP contribute to oligomerization. Together, these results support the idea that Ssl2501 encodes a cyanobacterial phasin, PhaP, which regulates the surface-to-volume ratio of PHB granules. PMID:25911471

  18. The Oligomeric State of c Rings from Cyanobacterial F-ATP Synthases Varies from 13 to 15?

    PubMed Central

    Pogoryelov, Denys; Reichen, Christian; Klyszejko, Adriana L.; Brunisholz, René; Muller, Daniel J.; Dimroth, Peter; Meier, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We isolated the c rings of F-ATP synthases from eight cyanobacterial strains belonging to four different taxonomic classes (Chroococcales, Nostocales, Oscillatoriales, and Gloeobacteria). These c rings showed different mobilities on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), probably reflecting their molecular masses. This supposition was validated with the previously characterized c11, c14, and c15 rings, which migrated on SDS-PAGE in proportion to their molecular masses. Hence, the masses of the cyanobacterial c rings can conveniently be deduced from their electrophoretic mobilities and, together with the masses of the c monomers, allow the calculation of the c ring stoichiometries. The method is a simple and fast way to determine stoichiometries of SDS-stable c rings and hence a convenient means to unambiguously determine the ion-to-ATP ratio, a parameter reflecting the bioenergetic efficacy of F-ATP synthases. AFM imaging was used to prove the accuracy of the method and confirmed that the c ring of Synechococcus elongatus SAG 89.79 is a tridecameric oligomer. Despite the high conservation of the c-subunit sequences from cyanobacterial strains from various environmental groups, the stoichiometries of their c rings varied between c13 and c15. This systematic study of the c-ring stoichiometries suggests that variability of c-ring sizes might represent an adaptation of the individual cyanobacterial species to their particular environmental and physiological conditions. Furthermore, the two new examples of c15 rings underline once more that an F1/Fo symmetry mismatch is not an obligatory feature of all F-ATP synthases. PMID:17545285

  19. The oligomeric state of c rings from cyanobacterial F-ATP synthases varies from 13 to 15.

    PubMed

    Pogoryelov, Denys; Reichen, Christian; Klyszejko, Adriana L; Brunisholz, René; Muller, Daniel J; Dimroth, Peter; Meier, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    We isolated the c rings of F-ATP synthases from eight cyanobacterial strains belonging to four different taxonomic classes (Chroococcales, Nostocales, Oscillatoriales, and Gloeobacteria). These c rings showed different mobilities on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), probably reflecting their molecular masses. This supposition was validated with the previously characterized c(11), c(14), and c(15) rings, which migrated on SDS-PAGE in proportion to their molecular masses. Hence, the masses of the cyanobacterial c rings can conveniently be deduced from their electrophoretic mobilities and, together with the masses of the c monomers, allow the calculation of the c ring stoichiometries. The method is a simple and fast way to determine stoichiometries of SDS-stable c rings and hence a convenient means to unambiguously determine the ion-to-ATP ratio, a parameter reflecting the bioenergetic efficacy of F-ATP synthases. AFM imaging was used to prove the accuracy of the method and confirmed that the c ring of Synechococcus elongatus SAG 89.79 is a tridecameric oligomer. Despite the high conservation of the c-subunit sequences from cyanobacterial strains from various environmental groups, the stoichiometries of their c rings varied between c(13) and c(15). This systematic study of the c-ring stoichiometries suggests that variability of c-ring sizes might represent an adaptation of the individual cyanobacterial species to their particular environmental and physiological conditions. Furthermore, the two new examples of c(15) rings underline once more that an F(1)/F(o) symmetry mismatch is not an obligatory feature of all F-ATP synthases. PMID:17545285

  20. Effects of barley straw ( Hordeum vulgare ) on freshwater and brackish phytoplankton and cyanobacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily F. Brownlee; Stella G. Sellner; Kevin G. Sellner

    2003-01-01

    A short-term laboratory study was conductedto investigate the effect of barley strawin controlling several common phytoplanktonand cyanobacterial species. Following aone-month incubation of barley straw incoarsely filtered fresh Potomac River andbrackish Patuxent River waters, the growthof six autotrophic taxa was followed inculture. Barley straw slurry reduced theyield of three taxa (Ankistrodesmusfalcatus, Chlorella capsulata, Isochrysis sp.) in comparison withcultures not receiving the

  1. Invasive species threat: parasite phylogenetics reveals patterns and processes of host-switching between non-native and native captive freshwater turtles.

    PubMed

    Verneau, O; Palacios, C; Platt, T; Alday, M; Billard, E; Allienne, J-F; Basso, C; DU Preez, L H

    2011-11-01

    One of the major threats to biodiversity involves biological invasions with direct consequences on the stability of ecosystems. In this context, the role of parasites is not negligible as it may enhance the success of invaders. The red-eared slider, Trachemys scripta elegans, has been globally considered among the worst invasive species. Since its introduction through the pet trade, T. s. elegans is now widespread and represents a threat for indigenous species. Because T. s. elegans coexists with Emys orbicularis and Mauremys leprosa in Europe, it has been suggested it may compete with the native turtle species and transmit pathogens. We examined parasite transfer from American captive to the two native species that co-exist in artificial pools of a Turtle Farm in France. As model parasite species we used platyhelminth worms of the family Polystomatidae (Monogenea) because polystomes have been described from American turtles in their native range. Phylogenetic relationships among polystomes parasitizing chelonian host species that are geographically widespread show patterns of diversification more complex than expected. Using DNA barcoding to identify species from adult and/or polystome eggs, several cases of host switching from exotic to indigenous individuals were illustrated, corroborating that parasite transmission is important when considering the pet trade and in reintroduction programmes to reinforce wild populations of indigenous species. PMID:21767431

  2. Cherax (Astaconephrops) pulcher, a new species of freshwater crayfish (Crustacea, Decapoda, Parastacidae) from the Kepala Burung (Vogelkop) Peninsula, Irian Jaya (West Papua), Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Lukhaup, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new species, Cherax (Astaconephrops) pulcher sp. n., from Hoa Creek, close to the village Teminabuan in the southern-central part of the Kepala Burung (Vogelkop) Peninsula, West Papua, Indonesia, is described, figured and compared with the morphologically closest species, Cherax boesemani Lukhaup & Pekny, 2008. PMID:26019660

  3. AVES.NET: The Freshwater Dinoflagellates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carty, Susan

    Hosted by AVES.NET, this website about Freshwater Dinoflagellates was created by Victor W. Fazio III and Dr. Susan Carty of Heidelberg College (Tiffin, Ohio). Two main attractions of this site are the Freshwater Dinoflagellate Image Archive, and the Recent Additions-Freshwater Dinoflagellate Images 2003 (from the 2003-04 winter field season). Individual Dinoflagellate image pages generally include a ventral view, dorsal view, or both, and the pages featuring species from Ohio include county distribution maps. Site visitors can email Dr. Carty for permission to use any of the images. The website also contains a List of Freshwater Dinoflagellates in Ohio, some of which link to the individual image pages. Additionally, the site offers a Review of Online Images of Freshwater Dinoflagellates including links to many other host sites, and a link to an online article by Dr. Susan Carty and Daniel E. Wujek entitled _A New Species of Peridinium and New Records of Dinoflagellates and Silica-Scaled Chrysophytes from Belize._ [NL

  4. Transfer of a cyanobacterial neurotoxin within a temperate aquatic ecosystem suggests pathways for human exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jonasson, Sara; Eriksson, Johan; Berntzon, Lotta; Spá?il, Zden?k; Ilag, Leopold L.; Ronnevi, Lars-Olof; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    ?-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic nonprotein amino acid produced by most cyanobacteria, has been proposed to be the causative agent of devastating neurodegenerative diseases on the island of Guam in the Pacific Ocean. Because cyanobacteria are widespread globally, we hypothesized that BMAA might occur and bioaccumulate in other ecosystems. Here we demonstrate, based on a recently developed extraction and HPLC-MS/MS method and long-term monitoring of BMAA in cyanobacterial populations of a temperate aquatic ecosystem (Baltic Sea, 2007–2008), that BMAA is biosynthesized by cyanobacterial genera dominating the massive surface blooms of this water body. BMAA also was found at higher concentrations in organisms of higher trophic levels that directly or indirectly feed on cyanobacteria, such as zooplankton and various vertebrates (fish) and invertebrates (mussels, oysters). Pelagic and benthic fish species used for human consumption were included. The highest BMAA levels were detected in the muscle and brain of bottom-dwelling fishes. The discovery of regular biosynthesis of the neurotoxin BMAA in a large temperate aquatic ecosystem combined with its possible transfer and bioaccumulation within major food webs, some ending in human consumption, is alarming and requires attention. PMID:20439734

  5. Molecular Mechanism of Photoactivation and Structural Location of the Cyanobacterial Orange Carotenoid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Prado, Mindy; Jiang, Jing; Gross, Michael L.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) plays a similar photoprotective role in cyanobacterial photosynthesis to that of non-photochemical quenching in higher plants. Under high-light conditions, OCP binds to the phycobilisome (PBS) and reduces energy transfer to the photosystems. The protective cycle starts from a light-induced activation of OCP. Detailed information on the molecular mechanism of this process as well as the subsequent recruitment of active OCP to the phycobilisome is not known. We report here our investigation on OCP photoactivation from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by using a combination of native mass spectrometry (MS) and protein cross-linking. We demonstrate that Native MS is able to capture OCP with its intact pigment and further reveal that OCP undergoes a dimer-tomonomer transition upon light illumination. The reversion of activated form of OCP to inactive, dark form was also observed by using native MS. Furthermore, in vitro reconstitution of OCP and PBS allowed to perform protein chemical cross-linking experiments. LC-MS/MS analysis identified cross-linking species between OCP and the PBS core components. Our result indicates that the N-terminal domain of OCP is closely involved in the association with a site formed by two allophycocyanin trimers in the basal cylinders of the phycobilisome core. This report helps to understand the activation mechanism of OCP and the structural binding site of OCP during the cyanobacterial non-photochemical quenching process. PMID:24359496

  6. Ecological Specialization of Two Photobiont-Specific Maritime Cyanolichen Species of the Genus Lichina

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Álvarez, Rüdiger; de los Ríos, Asunción; Fernández-Mendoza, Fernando; Torralba-Burrial, Antonio; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    All fungi in the class Lichinomycetes are lichen-forming and exclusively associate with cyanobacteria. Two closely related maritime species of the genus Lichina (L. confinis and L. pygmaea) show similar distribution ranges in the Northeast Atlantic, commonly co-occurring at the same rocky shores but occupying different littoral zones. By means of 16S rRNA and phycocyanin operon markers we studied a) the phylogenetic relationships of cyanobionts associated with these species, b) the match of divergence times between both symbionts, and c) whether Lichina species differ in photobiont association and in how geography and ecology affect selectivity. The cyanobionts studied are closely related to both marine and freshwater strains of the genus Rivularia. We found evidence of a high specificity to particular cyanobiont lineages in both species: Lichina pygmaea and L. confinis incorporate specific lineages of Rivularia that do not overlap at the haplotype nor the OTU levels. Dating divergences of the fungal and cyanobacterial partners revealed an asynchronous origin of both lineages. Within each fungal species, selectivity varied across the studied area, influenced by environmental conditions (both atmospheric and marine), although patterns were highly correlated between both lichen taxa. Ecological speciation due to the differential association of photobionts to each littoral zone is suspected to have occurred in marine Lichina. PMID:26181436

  7. DISPERSAL IN FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David T. Bilton; Joanna R. Freeland; Beth Okamura

    2001-01-01

    ? Abstract Movement between discrete habitat patches can present significant challenges to organisms. Freshwater invertebrates achieve dispersal using a variety of mechanisms that can be broadly categorized as active or passive, and which have important consequences for processes of colonization, gene flow, and evolutionary divergence. Apart from flight in adult freshwater insects, active dispersal appears rela- tively uncommon. Passive dispersal

  8. Consideration of the bioavailability of metal/metalloid species in freshwaters: experiences regarding the implementation of biotic ligand model-based approaches in risk assessment frameworks.

    PubMed

    Rüdel, Heinz; Díaz Muñiz, Cristina; Garelick, Hemda; Kandile, Nadia G; Miller, Bradley W; Pantoja Munoz, Leonardo; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Purchase, Diane; Shevah, Yehuda; van Sprang, Patrick; Vijver, Martina; Vink, Jos P M

    2015-05-01

    After the scientific development of biotic ligand models (BLMs) in recent decades, these models are now considered suitable for implementation in regulatory risk assessment of metals in freshwater bodies. The BLM approach has been described in many peer-reviewed publications, and the original complex BLMs have been applied in prospective risk assessment reports for metals and metal compounds. BLMs are now also recommended as suitable concepts for the site-specific evaluation of monitoring data in the context of the European Water Framework Directive. However, the use is hampered by the data requirements for the original BLMs (about 10 water parameters). Recently, several user-friendly BLM-based bioavailability software tools for assessing the aquatic toxicity of relevant metals (mainly copper, nickel, and zinc) became available. These tools only need a basic set of commonly determined water parameters as input (i.e., pH, hardness, dissolved organic matter, and dissolved metal concentration). Such tools seem appropriate to foster the implementation of routine site-specific water quality assessments. This work aims to review the existing bioavailability-based regulatory approaches and the application of available BLM-based bioavailability tools for this purpose. Advantages and possible drawbacks of these tools (e.g., feasibility, boundaries of validity) are discussed, and recommendations for further implementation are given. PMID:25750051

  9. Role of fungi in freshwater ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle K. M. Wong; Teik-Khiang Goh; I. John Hodgkiss; Kevin D. Hyde; V. Mala Ranghoo; Clement K. M. Tsui; Wai-Hong Ho; Wilson S. W. Wong; Tsz-Kit Yuen

    1998-01-01

    There are more than 600 species of freshwater fungi with a greater number known from temperate, as compared to tropical, regions. Three main groups can be considered which include Ingoldian fungi, aquatic ascomycetes and non-Ingoldian hyphomycetes, chytrids and, oomycetes. The fungi occurring in lentic habitats mostly differ from those occurring in lotic habitats. Although there is no comprehensive work dealing

  10. Toxicity of vanadium to different freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Beusen, J.M.; Neven, B.

    1987-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the acute and subchronic toxicity of vanadium for various species of freshwater fish. The long-term toxicity and the effect of vanadium on the reproduction of Daphnia magna is also evaluated and compared with the toxicity of other metals.

  11. Inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by cyanobacterial extracts - indications of novel tumor promoting cyanotoxins?

    PubMed Central

    Bláha, Lud?k; Babica, Pavel; Hilscherová, Klára; Upham, Brad L.

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity and liver tumor promotion of cyanotoxins microcystins have been extensively studied. However, recent studies document that other metabolites present in the complex cyanobacterial water blooms may also have adverse health effects. In this study we used rat liver epithelial stem-like cells (WB-F344) to examine the effects of cyanobacterial extracts on two established markers of tumor promotion, inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) – ERK1/2. Extracts of cyanobacteria (laboratory cultures of Microcystis aeruginosa and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and water blooms dominated by these species) inhibited GJIC and activated MAPKs in a dose-dependent manner (effective concentrations ranging 0.5 - 5 mg d.w./mL). Effects were independent of the microcystin content and the strongest responses were elicited by the extracts of Aphanizomenon sp. Neither pure microcystin-LR nor cylindrospermopsin inhibited GJIC or activated MAPKs. Modulations of GJIC and MAPKs appeared to be specific to cyanobacterial extracts since extracts from green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, heterotrophic bacterium Klebsiella terrigena, and isolated bacterial lipopolysaccharides had no comparable effects. Our study provides the first evidence on the existence of unknown cyanobacterial toxic metabolites that affect in vitro biomarkers of tumor promotion, i.e. inhibition of GJIC and activation of MAPKs. PMID:19619572

  12. Global warming and cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Paul, Valerie J

    2008-01-01

    The Earth and the oceans have warmed significantly over the past four decades, providing evidence that the Earth is undergoing long-term climate change. Increasing temperatures and changing rainfall patterns have been documented. Cyanobacteria have a long evolutionary history, with their first occurrence dating back at least 2.7 billion years ago. Cyanobacteria often dominated the oceans after past mass extinction events. They evolved under anoxic conditions and are well adapted to environmental stress including exposure to UV, high solar radiation and temperatures, scarce and abundant nutrients. These environmental conditions favor the dominance of cyanobacteria in many aquatic habitats, from freshwater to marine ecosystems. A few studies have examined the ecological consequences of global warming on cyanobacteria and other phytoplankton over the past decades in freshwater, estuarine, and marine environments, with varying results. The responses of cyanobacteria to changing environmental patterns associated with global climate change are important subjects for future research. Results of this research will have ecological and biogeochemical significance as well as management implications. PMID:18461772

  13. Mitigating cyanobacterial blooms: how effective are 'effective microorganisms'?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. F. L. L. W. Lürling; Y. Tolman; M. Euwe

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 'Effective Microorganisms (EM)' on the growth of cyanobacteria, and their ability to terminate cyanobacterial blooms. The EM was tested in the form of 'mudballs' or 'Bokashi-balls', and as a suspension (EM-A) in laboratory experiments. No growth inhibition was observed for a laboratory strain of Microcystis aeruginosa and for M. aeruginosa from the field at

  14. Toxicological Review of Cyanobacterial Toxins: Cylindrospermopsin (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Environmental Assessment has prepared the Toxicological Reviews of Cyanobacterial Toxins: Anatoxin-a, Cylindrospermopsin and Microcystins (LR, RR, YR and LA) as a series of dose-response assessments to support the health assessment of unregulated contamina...

  15. Exploring cyanobacterial genomes for natural product biosynthesis pathways.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Melinda L; D'Agostino, Paul M; Al-Sinawi, Bakir; Neilan, Brett A; Moffitt, Michelle C

    2015-06-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a vast array of natural products, some of which are toxic to human health, while others possess potential pharmaceutical activities. Genome mining enables the identification and characterisation of natural product gene clusters; however, the current number of cyanobacterial genomes remains low compared to other phyla. There has been a recent effort to rectify this issue by increasing the number of sequenced cyanobacterial genomes. This has enabled the identification of biosynthetic gene clusters for structurally diverse metabolites, including non-ribosomal peptides, polyketides, ribosomal peptides, UV-absorbing compounds, alkaloids, terpenes and fatty acids. While some of the identified biosynthetic gene clusters correlate with known metabolites, genome mining also highlights the number and diversity of clusters for which the product is unknown (referred to as orphan gene clusters). A number of bioinformatic tools have recently been developed in order to predict the products of orphan gene clusters; however, in some cases the complexity of the cyanobacterial pathways makes the prediction problematic. This can be overcome by the use of mass spectrometry-guided natural product genome mining, or heterologous expression. Application of these techniques to cyanobacterial natural product gene clusters will be explored. PMID:25482899

  16. Seasonal changes in composition of the cyanobacterial community and the

    E-print Network

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    DE´ PARTEMENT DES SCIENCES BIOLOGIQUES, UNIVERSITE´ DU QUE´BEC A` MONTRE´AL, CASE POSTALE 8888, SUCC seasonal changes, and to study the role of taxonomic and environmental factors in cyanobacterial toxin produce this toxin. Within different toxin-producing strains, the factors controlling MC production

  17. Field methods in the study of toxic cyanobacterial blooms: results and insights from Lake Erie research.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    Sound field methodologies are an essential prerequisite in the development of a basic understanding of toxic cyanobacteria blooms. Sample collection, on-site processing, storage and transportation, and subsequent analysis and documentation are all critically dependent on a sound field program that allows the researcher to construct, with minimal uncertainty, linkages between bloom events and cyanotoxin production with the ecology of the studied system. Since 1999, we have collected samples in Lake Erie as part of the MELEE (Microbial Ecology of the Lake Erie Ecosystem) and MERHAB-LGL (Monitoring Event Responses for Harmful Algal Blooms in the Lower Great Lakes) research programs to develop appropriate tools and refine methods necessary to characterize the ecology of the reoccurring cyanobacterial blooms in the systems. Satellite imagery, large ship expeditions, classical and novel molecular tools have been combined to provide insight into both the cyanobacteria responsible for these events as well as into some of the environmental cues that may facilitate the formation of toxic blooms. This information, as well new directions in cyano-specific monitoring will be presented to highlight needs for field program monitoring and/or researching toxic freshwater cyanobacteria. PMID:18461781

  18. Distribution and Diversity of Natural Product Genes in Marine and Freshwater Cyanobacterial Cultures and Genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian M. Ehrenreich; John B. Waterbury; Eric A. Webb

    2005-01-01

    Natural products are a functionally diverse class of biochemically synthesized compounds, which include antibiotics, toxins, and siderophores. In this paper, we describe both the detection of natural product activities and the sequence identification of gene fragments from two molecular systems that have previously been implicated in natural product production, i.e., nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and modular polyketide synthases (PKSs), in

  19. UV Radiation and Arctic Freshwater Zooplankton

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. O. Hessen

    \\u000a Arctic freshwaters possess simple zooplankton communities.The high Arctic lakes and ponds are commonly inhabited by only a\\u000a few species of rotifers, cladocerans and copepods. Dominant inhabitants of high Arctic zooplankton communities are first and\\u000a foremost members of the circumpolar cladoceran species Daphnia pulex complex (Colbourne et al. 1998; Weider et al. 1999). Members of this complex are recorded in all

  20. Removal of cyanobacterial toxins by sediment passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruetzmacher, G.; Boettcher, G.; Chorus, I.; Bartel, H.

    2003-04-01

    Cyanbacterial toxins ("Cyanotoxins") comprise a wide range of toxic substances produced by cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae"). Cyanobacteria occur in surface water word wide and can be found in high concentrations during so-called algal blooms when conditions are favourable (e.g. high nutrient levels, high temperatures). Some cyanobacteria produce hepato- or neurotoxins, of which the hepatotoxic microcystins are the most common in Germany. The WHO guideline value for drinking water was set at 1 ?g/L. However, maximum concentrations in surface water can reach 25 mg/L, so that a secure method for toxin elimination has to be found when this water is used as source water for drinking water production. In order to assess if cyanotoxins can be removed by sediment passage the German Federal Environmental Agency (UBA) conducted laboratory- and field scale experiments as well as observations on bank filtration field sites. Laboratory experiments (batch- and column experiments for adsorption and degradation parameters) were conducted in order to vary a multitude of experimental conditions. These experiments were followed by field scale experiments on the UBA's experimental field in Berlin. This plant offers the unique possibility to conduct experiments on the behaviour of various agents - such as harmful substances - during infiltration and bank filtration under well-defined conditions on a field scale, and without releasing these substances to the environment. Finally the development of microcystin concentrations was observed between infiltrating surface water and a drinking water well along a transsecte of observation wells. The results obtained show that infiltration and bank filtration normally seem to be secure treatment methods for source water contaminated by microcystins. However, elimination was shown to be difficult under the following circumstances: - dying cyanobacterial population due to insufficient light and / or nutrients, low temperatures or application of algizides (high amount of extracellular microcystins), - sandy material with low shares of clay and silt (little adsorption), - low temperatures (delayed biodegradation), - anoxic conditions (delayed biodegradation), - missing clogging layer or "schmutzdecke" (little bacteria), - no previous contact to microcystins (non adapted bacteria). It is therefore the aim of a new project financed by the KompetenzZentrum Wasser Berlin (KWB) to focus on these critical circumstances in order to find out how to optimise artificial recharge and bank filtration regarding microcystin elimination.

  1. Transboundary Freshwater Dispute Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collection of databases is intended to aid in the assessment of the process of water conflict prevention and resolution. The searchable collections include data such as case studies, freshwater treaties from 1820 to 2001, events concerning historical water relations from 1948 to 1999, a register of international river basins, and information on interstate water compacts in the United States. There is also spatial data on transboundary freshwater indicator variables, international river basins, and a map and image gallery. Other materials include links to the organization's publications and research projects, and a set of links to other databases and publications on freshwater conflict issues.

  2. Fatty Acid composition and levels of selected polyunsaturated Fatty acids in four commercial important freshwater fish species from lake victoria, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Robert, Agnes; Mfilinge, Prosper; Limbu, Samwel M; Mwita, Chacha J

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) particularly ?3 and ?6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) play important role in human health. This study aimed to investigate the composition and levels of selected ?3 PUFAs in four commercial fish species, Nile perch (Lates niloticus), Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), Tilapia zillii, and dagaa (Rastrineobola argentea) from Mwanza Gulf in Lake Victoria. The results indicated that 36 types of FAs with different saturation levels were detected. These FAs were dominated by docosahexaenoic (DHA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), docosapentaenoic (DPA), and eicosatetraenoic acids. O. niloticus had the highest composition of FAs (34) compared to L. niloticus (27), T. zillii (26), and R. argentea (21). The levels of EPA differed significantly among the four commercial fish species (F = 6.19, ?P = 0.001). The highest EPA levels were found in R. argentea followed by L. niloticus and O. niloticus and the lowest in T. zillii. The DPA levels showed no significant difference among the four fish species studied (F = 0.652, ?P = 0.583). The study concluded that all four commercial species collected from Mwanza Gulf are good for human health, but R. argentea is the best for consumption because it contains higher levels of ?3 FAs, mainly EPA. PMID:25610654

  3. Morphological variation in Echinorhynchus truttae Schrank, 1788 and the Echinorhynchus bothniensis Zdzitowiecki & Valtonen, 1987 species complex from freshwater fishes of northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Echinorhynchus truttae and the Echinorhynchus bothniensis species complex are common parasites of salmoniform and other fishes in northern Europe. Echinorhynchus bothniensis and its sibling species Echinorhynchus 'bothniensis' are thought to be closely related to the Nearctic Echinorhynchus leidyi Van Cleave, 1924 based on morphological similarity and common usage of a mysid intermediate host. This study provides the first analysis of morphological and meristic variation in Echinorhynchus truttae and expands our knowledge of anatomical variability in the Echinorhynchus bothniensis group. Morphological variability in Echinorhynchus truttae was found to be far greater than previously reported, with part of the variance attributable to sexual dimorphism. Echinorhynchus truttae, the two species of the Echinorhynchus bothniensis group and Echinorhynchus leidyi displayed considerable interspecific overlap in the ranges of all conventional morphological characters. However, Proboscis profiler, a tool for detecting acanthocephalan morphotypes using multivariate analysis of hook morphometrics, successfully separated Echinorhynchus truttae from the other taxa. The Echinorhynchus bothniensis species group could not be reliably distinguished from Echinorhynchus leidyi (or each other), providing further evidence of the affinity of these taxa. Observations on the distribution of Echinorhynchus truttae in its definitive host population are also reported. PMID:24723769

  4. A comparison of the growth and survival of two freshwater crayfish species, Astacus leptodactylus Eschscholtz and Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana), under different temperature and density regimes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Muzaffer Mustafa Harl?o?lu

    2009-01-01

    Growth experiments carried out with two juvenile crayfish species, Astacus leptodactylus Eschscholtz and Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana), at different temperatures and densities highlighted the problem of cannibalism under conditions aimed at intensifying\\u000a crayfish production. Cannibalism proved to be much lower in A. leptodactylus than P. leniusculus, suggesting that the former might be the better candidate for astaciculture. In the first of

  5. Revision of Sauvagella Bertin (Clupeidae; Pellonulinae; Ehiravini) with a Description of a New Species from the Freshwaters of Madagascar and Diagnosis of the Ehiravini

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melanie L. J. Stiassny; J. D. McEachran

    2002-01-01

    The Madagascan genus Sauvagella is revised and a new species, Sauvagella robusta, from the Ambomboa River (Sofia drainage) described. Preliminary analysis suggests Sauvagella is an ehiravin and that the pellonuline tribe Ehiravini is monophyletic. The immediate relationships of Sauvagella appear to lie with the single other ehiravin genus from Madagascan waters, Spratellomorpha. Reports of the occurrence of Gil- christella in

  6. Cyanobacterial crusts linked to soil productivity under different grazing management practices in Northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alchin, Bruce; Williams, Wendy

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid Australia, the central role of healthy soil ecosystems in broad-acre grazing lands may be attributed to the widespread presence of cyanobacterial crusts. In terms of soil nutrient cycling and stability their role is particularly crucial in a climate dominated by annual dry seasons and variable wet seasons. In this study, we aimed to measure the contribution of cyanobacteria to soil nutrient cycling under contrasting levels of disturbance associated with grazing management. Field sampling was carried out on six paired sites (twelve properties) located across an east-west 3,000 km transect that covered different rangeland types on grazing properties in northern Australia (Queensland, Northern Territory and Western Australia). At each location paired sites were established and two different management systems were assessed, cell-paddock rotations (25-400 ha) and continuous grazing (200-2,000 ha). Cyanobacterial soil crusts were recorded from all of the twelve sites and cyanobacteria with the capacity to fix nitrogen were found at ten of the twelve sites. The overall diversity of cyanobacteria varied from three to ten species under any type of grazing system. As field work was conducted in the dry season, it is likely that the diversity may be greater in the wet season than the initial data may indicate. The average cyanobacterial soil crust cover across soil surfaces, between grass tussocks, during the dry season was estimated to be 50.9% and, 42.6% in the early wet season. This reflected longer established crust cover (dry season) versus newly established crusts. There was a high level of variability in the biomass of cyanobacteria however; the grazing system did not have any marked effect on the biomass for any one rangeland type. The grazing system differences did not appear to significantly influence the diversity at any location except on a floodplain in the Pilbara (WA). Biological nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria was recorded at all sites. Nitrogen fixation rates were significantly higher in the wet season samples compared to the dry season. Rates of nitrogen fixation, mineralisable nitrogen and cyanobacterial biomass were comparative to other studies both in Australia and globally. Eleven of the twelve sites had higher plant-available (mineralisable) nitrogen in the 0-1 cm depth compared to the 1-5 cm depth. Nitrogen isotopes showed that the nitrogen concentration found in the surface soils (0-1 cm) from five sites originated from cyanobacterial nitrogen fixation. At the remaining sites the isotopic signatures were slightly more positive, indicative of fractionation. The results have substantiated the link between cyanobacteria and their contribution to carbon and nitrogen cycling across the northern Australian rangelands. The data also highlights the variability between sites and management practices that influence biogeochemical processes that affect soil productivity.

  7. Pathologic findings and toxin identification in cyanobacterial (Nodularia spumigena) intoxication in a dog.

    PubMed

    Simola, O; Wiberg, M; Jokela, J; Wahlsten, M; Sivonen, K; Syrjä, P

    2012-09-01

    A 3-year-old Cairn Terrier dog that had been in contact with sea water containing cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) was euthanized because of acute hepatic failure and anuria after a 5-day illness. Histologic findings included lytic and hemorrhagic centrilobular hepatocellular necrosis and renal tubular necrosis. The cyanotoxin nodularin was detected in liver and kidney by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nodularin is a potent hepatotoxin produced by the algal species Nodularia spumigena. The intensity of algal blooms has increased during the past decades in the Baltic Sea region, thus increasing the risk for intoxications in domestic and wild animals. The authors describe the pathologic findings of cyanobacterial toxicosis in a dog with direct identification of the toxin from organ samples. PMID:21825312

  8. Native or not? Tracing the origin of wild-caught and captive freshwater turtles in a threatened and widely distributed species ( Emys orbicularis )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guillermo Velo-Antón; Michael Wink; Norbert Schneeweiß; Uwe Fritz

    2011-01-01

    Pet and food trade are among the major threats for many chelonians species worldwide. We investigate the impact of the present\\u000a and past trade in European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis, E. trinacris) on their extant distribution pattern. Using a comprehensive mtDNA dataset of cytochrome b haplotypes derived from more than 1,550 individuals, we assigned wild-caught allochthonous and captive turtles from

  9. Effect of water pH on the toxicity of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol to four species of freshwater animals

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, L.T.; Markee, T.; Vande Venter, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Superior, WI (United States); Spehar, R.; Erickson, R. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1994-12-31

    2,4,5-Trichlorophenol (TCP) is a weak acid with a pH of approximately 7.2 which is expected to have a significant effect upon its toxicity. Lumbriculus variegatus, Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, and Hyalella azteca were exposed to TCP in 96 h flow-through toxicity tests. For the first two species, simultaneous tests were conducted at three pH values (7.0, 7.8, 8.6). The other two species were tested at six pH values conducted in two sets of three simultaneous tests (6.2, 7.4, 8.6 and 6.8, 8.0, 9.2). All species tested showed decreased sensitivity to TCP with increased pH of the water. Over the pH range tested, LC50s for L. variegatus varied by about 5-fold, for P. promelas by 12-fold, for H. azteca by 10-fold, and for O. mykiss by 1.5-fold. The effects of pH on TCP toxicity to P. promelas was also tested in 30 day chronic tests at pH 7.0, 7.8 and 8.6. Survival in these tests was affected by pH similarly to the acute tests. Growth also was less severely affected at higher pH.

  10. GC constituents and relative codon expressed amino acid composition in cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins.

    PubMed

    Kannaujiya, Vinod K; Rastogi, Rajesh P; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2014-08-10

    The genomic as well as structural relationship of phycobiliproteins (PBPs) in different cyanobacterial species are determined by nucleotides as well as amino acid composition. The genomic GC constituents influence the amino acid variability and codon usage of particular subunit of PBPs. We have analyzed 11 cyanobacterial species to explore the variation of amino acids and causal relationship between GC constituents and codon usage. The study at the first, second and third levels of GC content showed relatively more amino acid variability on the levels of G3+C3 position in comparison to the first and second positions. The amino acid encoded GC rich level including G rich and C rich or both correlate the codon variability and amino acid availability. The fluctuation in amino acids such as Arg, Ala, His, Asp, Gly, Leu and Glu in ? and ? subunits was observed at G1C1 position; however, fluctuation in other amino acids such as Ser, Thr, Cys and Trp was observed at G2C2 position. The coding selection pressure of amino acids such as Ala, Thr, Tyr, Asp, Gly, Ile, Leu, Asn, and Ser in ? and ? subunits of PBPs was more elaborated at G3C3 position. In this study, we observed that each subunit of PBPs is codon specific for particular amino acid. These results suggest that genomic constraint linked with GC constituents selects the codon for particular amino acids and furthermore, the codon level study may be a novel approach to explore many problems associated with genomics and proteomics of cyanobacteria. PMID:24933001

  11. ACUTE LETHAL CONCENTRATIONS OF CAFFEINE ON NON-TARGET FRESHWATER ORGANISMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the recent detection of caffeine in US streams, studies investigating caffeine's toxic effects on non-target freshwater organisms lack acute data for several standard surrogate species and chronic data for any freshwater species. The present study describes the mortality rate at different c...

  12. Evolution of active host-attraction strategies in the freshwater mussel tribe Lampsilini (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David T. Zanatta; Robert W. Murphy

    2006-01-01

    Most freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionoida) require a host, usually a fish, to complete their life cycle. Most species of mussels show adaptations that increase the chances of glochidia larvae contacting a host. We investigated the evolutionary relationships of the freshwater mussel tribe Lampsilini including 49 of the approximately 100 extant species including 21 of the 24 recognized genera. Mitochondrial DNA

  13. First records of freshwater molluscs from the ecological reserve El Edén, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Cózatl-Manzano; Edna Naranjo-García

    The diversity of the freshwater molluscs at El Edén was unknown. This is the fi rst treatment of them, allowing us to compare spatial and temporal species distribution. Eleven species of freshwater molluscs were found in 2 surveys carried in March (dry season) and September (rainy season) 1998 at the reserve El Edén. A total of 266 individuals were collected;

  14. In Vitro Test-Based Comparison of Pesticide-Induced Sensitivity in Marine and Freshwater Phytoplankton

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geneviève Arzul; Françoise Quiniou; Cécile Carrie

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to assess the effects of two pesticides, namely the insecticide carbofuran and the herbicide isoproturon, on monospecifically cultivated marine and freshwater phytoplankton according to standard methods. In the presence of pesticide, growth rates were lower in marine species Chaetoceros gracilis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum than in freshwater species Chlorella vulgaris and Selenastrum capricornutum after 72 hours. The EC50

  15. Global diversity of bryozoans (Bryozoa or Ectoprocta) in freshwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jos A. Massard; Gaby Geimer

    2008-01-01

    The present study considers 88 bryozoan species occurring in freshwater: 69 phylactolaemate and 19 gymnolaemate species. Roughly\\u000a 49% of these species are confined to one zoogeographical region. The cosmopolitan status of species like Fredericella sultana, Plumatella repens or P. emarginata has to be reconsidered. Among the Phylactolaemata, which are phylogenetically older than the Gymnolaemata, the gelatinous\\u000a species (Lophopodidae, Pectinatellidae, Cristatellidae)

  16. The eastern swamp crayfish Gramastacus lacus sp. n. (Decapoda, Parastacidae) a new species of freshwater crayfish from coastal New South Wales, Australia

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Gramastacus lacus sp. n., is described from coastal lowlands of the Central and Mid North Coast regions of New South Wales, Australia. Gramastacus lacus has a restricted distribution in ephemeral habitats, being dependent on regular natural flooding and drying cycles, and burrows for survival during temporary dry cycles. Documented are population distributions in lowland habitats (3–48 m, a.s.l.) from Wamberal Lagoon, north along the coastal strip to Wallis Lake. The species is small, reaching a maximum weight of 7 grams and 21.3 mm OCL, and distinguished by a large male genital papilla, large raised post orbital ridges, laterally compressed carapace and elongated chelae. PMID:24715801

  17. Promotion of oxidative stress in the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum during biotransformation of the cyanobacterial toxin microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2004-12-10

    Cyanobacterial toxins have been shown to have adverse effects on mammals, birds and fish and are therefore being increasingly recognised as a potent stress and health hazard factor in aquatic ecosystems. Microcystins, which are cyclic heptapeptides and a main group of the cyanotoxins, are mainly retained within the producer-cells during cyanobacterial bloom development. However, these toxins are released into the surrounding medium by senescence and lysis of the blooms. The released toxins could then come into contact with a wide range of aquatic organisms including invertebrates, fish and aquatic plants. In many organisms, biotransformation of the toxins will take place via several glutathione-related conjugate. During the biotransformation process in which the toxin and the toxin conjugate are broken down, the formation of reactive oxygen species might occur. These reactive oxygen species activate several antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and also influence the glutathione-ascorbate cycle. Aim of this study was to investigate formation of the glutathione-conjugate, activation of glutathione S-transferases and the elevation of several antioxidant enzymes giving evidence for the promotion of oxidative stress by microcystins. During exposure of Ceratophyllum demersum to the cyanobacterial toxin microcystin-LR in an concentration of 5.0 microg/L, an elevation of microsomal and cytosolic glutathione S-transferase was measured, showing the beginning formation of the glutathione-toxin conjugate. The superoxide dismutase as well as in parallel the hydrogen peroxide level increased giving evidence for oxidative stress in the aquatic plant. Other reactive oxygen detoxifiying enzymes were also elevated and the glutathione pool, expressed in reduced glutathione and glutathione disulfide concentration was changed accordingly. PMID:15550274

  18. A single phosphorus treatment doubles growth of cyanobacterial lichen transplants.

    PubMed

    McCune, Bruce; Caldwell, Bruce A

    2009-02-01

    Lichens are reputedly slow growing and become unhealthy or die in response to supplements of the usual limiting resources, such as water and nitrogen. We found, however, that the tripartite cyanobacterial lichen Lobaria pulmonaria doubled in annual biomass growth after a single 20-minute immersion in a phosphorus solution (K2HPO4), as compared to controls receiving no supplemental phosphorus. This stimulation of cyanolichens by phosphorus has direct relevance to community and population ecology of lichens, including improving models of lichen performance in relation to air quality, improving forest management practices affecting old-growth associated cyanolichens, and understanding the distribution and abundance of cyanolichens on the landscape. Phosphorus may be as important a stimulant to cyanobacterial-rich lichen communities as it is to cyanobacteria in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:19323240

  19. A phycocyanin probe as a tool for monitoring cyanobacteria in freshwater bodies.

    PubMed

    Brient, Luc; Lengronne, Marion; Bertrand, Emilie; Rolland, Delphine; Sipel, Arnaud; Steinmann, Delphine; Baudin, Isabelle; Legeas, Michèle; Le Rouzic, Bertrand; Bormans, Myriam

    2008-02-01

    In many countries, the presence of cyanobacteria in freshwater bodies used for both drinking water and recreational purposes is under increasing public health attention. Water managers are considering how to implement monitoring that leads to a minimization of the risks incurred by the users of potentially contaminated sites. To address this question, this study involved assessing the performance of a submersible probe for measuring phycocyanin-specific fluorescence as a function of cyanobacterial biomass, with the aim of applying it as a tool for surveillance management. Its advantages and limits compared to more traditional analyses are discussed. The monitoring of cyanobacteria in the water bodies of western France was carried out using a minifluorimeter specific to the fluorescence of phycocyanin, a pigment specific to cyanobacteria. The results are compared with the analyses recommended by the World Health Organisation (chlorophyll a and cell counting). This study based on nearly 800 samples shows a significant correlation between the phycocyanin content and the cyanobacterial biomass, expressed as the number of cells per mL (R2 = 0.73). This submersible probe is simple and rapid to use, making it possible to take into account horizontal and vertical heterogeneities in the proliferation growth. In this way, we are able to detect at an early stage the conditions that could potentially lead to a risk, in order to start sampling. Due to its sensitivity, this tool proves suitable for monitoring aimed at reducing the risks incurred by the users of contaminated sites and launching preventative actions. The use of the phycocyanin probe provides an effective tool to complement traditional analyses of cyanobacterial presence. It is suggested that a surveillance protocol based on phycocyanin concentration can significantly improved the accuracy of the extent of cyanobacterial bloom development in the light of spatial and temporal variabilities associated with these occurrences. PMID:18246219

  20. Cyanobacterial blooms and water quality in two urban fish ponds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharmeen Rahman; Abu Sayed Jewel

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence and abundance of cyanobacterial population was monitored monthly in two urban fish ponds in Rajshahi City Corporation area from January to December, 2006. The bloom was observed in March, August and September. Some environmental parameters such as water temperature, transparency, pH, Dissolved Oxygen(DO), free Carbon dioxide(CO2), Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD), NO2-N, NH3-N, NH4 + , toxic ammonia, Oxidation

  1. Molecular characterization of cyanobacterial diversity in Lake Gregory, Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magana-Arachchi, Dhammika; Wanigatunge, Rasika; Liyanage, Madhushankha

    2011-07-01

    Eutrophication or the process of nutrient enrichment of stagnant waters due to excessive use of fertilizer is becoming a critical issue worldwide. Lake Gregory, an artificial lake situated in Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka was once a very attractive landscape feature and recreational area attracting a large number of visitors. Rapid urbanization in surrounding areas and the consequent intensification of agricultural and industrial activities led to eutrophication and siltation in the lake. Present study was conducted to detect cyanobacterial diversity and their ability to produce hepatotoxic microcystins using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. Twenty five water samples (surface and bottom) were collected from the lake and total nitrogen and total carbon were estimated. Cyanobacterial cultures were grown in appropriate media and microscopic observations were used to determine the morphological diversity of cyanobacteria isolated from different sites. Genomic DNA was isolated and purified from cyanobacteria using Boom's method. DNA samples were analyzed by PCR with oligonucleotide primers for 16S rRNA gene and mcyA gene of the operon that encodes a microcystin synthetase. The 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed the presences of cyanobacteria belong to Synechococcus sp., Microcystis aeruginosa, Calothrix sp., Leptolyngbya sp., Limnothrix sp., order Oscillatoriales and order Chroococcales. The sequences obtained from this study were deposited in the database under the accession numbers (GenBank: GU368104-GU368116). PCR amplification of mcyA primers indicated the potential for toxin formation of isolated M. aeruginosa from Lake Gregory. This preliminary study shows that the Lake Gregory is under the potential risk of cyanobacterial toxicity. Clearly more work is needed to extend this finding and clarify if other cyanobacterial isolates have genetic potential to produce microcystin since this lake is utilized for recreational activities.

  2. The Extracellular Matrix in Photosynthetic Mats: A Cyanobacterial Gingerbread House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, R.; Stannard, W.; Bebout, B.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Mayali, X.; Weber, P. K.; Lipton, M. S.; Lee, J.; Everroad, R. C.; Thelen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Hypersaline laminated cyanobacterial mats are excellent model systems for investigating photoautotrophic contributions to biogeochemical cycling on a millimeter scale. These self-sustaining ecosystems are characterized by steep physiochemical gradients that fluctuate dramatically on hour timescales, providing a dynamic environment to study microbial response. However, elucidating the distribution of energy from light absorption into biomass requires a complete understanding of the various constituents of the mat. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which can be composed of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and DNA are a major component of these mats and may function in the redistribution of nutrients and metabolites within the community. To test this notion, we established a model mat-building culture for comparison with the phylogenetically diverse natural mat communities. In these two systems we determined how proteins and glycans in the matrix changed as a function of light and tracked nutrient flow from the matrix. Using mass spectrometry metaproteomics analysis, we found homologous proteins in both field and culture extracellular matrix that point to cyanobacterial turnover of amino acids, inorganic nutrients, carbohydrates and nucleic acids from the EPS. Other abundant functions identified included oxidative stress response from both the cyanobacteria and heterotrophs and cyanobacterial structural proteins that may play a role in mat cohesion. Several degradative enzymes also varied in abundance in the EPS in response to light availability, suggesting active secretion. To further test cyanobacterial EPS turnover, we generated isotopically-labeled EPS and used NanoSIMS to trace uptake of this labeled EPS. Our findings suggest Cyanobacteria may facilitate nutrient transfer to other groups, as well as uptake of their own products through degradation of EPS components. This work provides evidence for the essential roles of EPS for storage, structural cohesion and protection, with active light-dependent turnover by both Cyanobacteria and the heterotrophic community.

  3. Sample amount alternatives for data adjustment in comparative cyanobacterial metabolomics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan Huege; Leonard Krall; Marie-Caroline Steinhauser; Patrick Giavalisco; Rosmarie Rippka; Nicole Tandeau de Marsac; Dirk Steinhauser

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe an integrative protocol for metabolite extraction and the measurement of three cellular constituents, chlorophyll\\u000a a, total protein, and glycogen from the same small volume of cyanobacterial cultures that can be used as alternative sample\\u000a amount parameters for data adjustment in comparative metabolome studies. We conducted recovery experiments to assess the robustness\\u000a and reproducibility of the measurements obtained

  4. Anti-cyanobacterial fatty acids released from Myriophyllum spicatum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satoshi Nakai; Shingo Yamada; Masaaki Hosomi

    2005-01-01

    This study was carried out to identify unknown allelochemicals released from Myriophyllum spicatum and to investigate their anti-cyanobacterial effects. A series of analyses of culture solutions and methanol extracts of M. spicatum using gas chromatograph equipped with a mass selective detector revealed that M. spicatum released fatty acids, specifically, nonanoic, tetradecanoic, hexadecanoic, octadecanoic, and octadecenoic acids. Nonanoic, cis-6-octadecenoic, and cis-9-octadecenoic

  5. The effect of rock composition on cyanobacterial weathering of crystalline basalt and rhyolite.

    PubMed

    Olsson-Francis, K; Simpson, A E; Wolff-Boenisch, D; Cockell, C S

    2012-09-01

    The weathering of volcanic rocks contributes significantly to the global silicate weathering budget, effecting carbon dioxide drawdown and long-term climate control. The rate of chemical weathering is influenced by the composition of the rock. Rock-dwelling micro-organisms are known to play a role in changing the rate of weathering reactions; however, the influence of rock composition on bio-weathering is unknown. Cyanobacteria are known to be a ubiquitous surface taxon in volcanic rocks. In this study, we used a selection of fast and slow growing cyanobacterial species to compare microbial-mediated weathering of bulk crystalline rocks of basaltic and rhyolitic composition, under batch conditions. Cyanobacterial growth caused an increase in the pH of the medium and an acceleration of rock dissolution compared to the abiotic controls. For example, Anabaena cylindrica increased the linear release rate (R(i)(l)) of Ca, Mg, Si and K from the basalt by more than fivefold (5.21-12.48) and increased the pH of the medium by 1.9 units. Although A. cylindrica enhanced rhyolite weathering, the increase in R(i)(l) was less than threefold (2.04-2.97) and the pH increase was only 0.83 units. The R(i)(l) values obtained with A. cylindrica were at least ninefold greater with the basalt than the rhyolite, whereas in the abiotic controls, the difference was less than fivefold. Factors accounting for the slower rate of rhyolite weathering and lower biomass achieved are likely to include the higher content of quartz, which has a low rate of weathering and lower concentrations of bio-essential elements, such as, Ca, Fe and Mg, which are known to be important in controlling cyanobacterial growth. We show that at conditions where weathering is favoured, biota can enhance the difference between low and high Si-rock weathering. Our data show that cyanobacteria can play a significant role in enhancing rock weathering and likely have done since they evolved on the early Earth. PMID:22694082

  6. Screening of cyanobacterial extracts for synthesis of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Husain, Shaheen; Sardar, Meryam; Fatma, Tasneem

    2015-08-01

    Improvement of reliable and eco-friendly process for synthesis of metallic nanoparticles is a significant step in the field of application nanotechnology. One approach that shows vast potential is based on the biosynthesis of nanoparticles using micro-organisms. In this study, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using 30 cyanobacteria were investigated. Cyanobacterial aqueous extracts were subjected to AgNP synthesis at 30 °C. Scanning of these aqueous extracts containing AgNP in UV-Visible range showed single peak. The ? max for different extracts varied and ranged between 440 and 490 nm that correspond to the "plasmon absorbance" of AgNP. Micrographs from scanning electron microscope of AgNP from cyanobacterial extracts showed that though synthesis of nanoparticles occurred in all strains but their reaction time, shape and size varied. Majority of the nanoparticles were spherical. Time taken for induction of nanoparticles synthesis by cyanobacterial extracts ranged from 30 to 360 h and their size from 38 to 88 nm. In terms of size Cylindrospermum stagnale NCCU-104 was the best organism with 38 and 40 nm. But in terms of time Microcheate sp. NCCU-342 was the best organism as it took 30 h for AgNP synthesis. PMID:25971548

  7. Use of cyanobacterial diazotrophic technology in rice agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, D.N.; Kumar, A.; Mishra, A.K. [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India)

    1991-12-31

    Diazotrophic cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic organisms that require sunlight as a sole energy source for the fixation of carbon and nitrogen. Therefore, they have great potential as biofertilizers, and their use will decrease fuel demand for fertilizer production. The agronomic potential of heterocystous cyanobacteria, either free-living or in symbiotic association with water fern Azolla, has long been recognized. This has led to the development of small scale biotechnology involving the use of paddy soils with appropriate cyanobacterial strains as biofertilizers in rice culture, as has been reported from China, Egypt, Philippines, and India. Besides increasing soil fertility and sustaining rice yield, these forms are also reported to benefit rice seedlings by producing growth-promoting substances, the nature of which is said to resemble gibberellins. Whereas the incorporation of nif genes into the rice plants by using tissue culture and modern genetic tools remain one of the ambitious research goals, the use of cyanobacterial diazotrophic technology in rice agriculture offers an immediate or even long-term alternative to synthetic nitrogen fertilizers, particularly in developing countries and the world as a whole. However, one of the weaknesses in this technology is the heavy application of several toxic agrochemicals, especially herbicides, which are reported in most cases as inhibitors of cyanobacterial diazotrophic growth, and in some cases as mutagenic. Naturally, a successful biotechnology requires the selection of suitable diazotrophic strains, as biofertilizers, that could tolerate the field-dose concentrations of herbicides and secrete ammonia.

  8. Phytotoxic effects of the cyanobacterial neurotoxin anatoxin-a: morphological, physiological and biochemical responses in aquatic macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mi-Hee; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2013-08-01

    Anatoxin-a is one of the common and major cyanobacterial neurotoxins acting as a powerful agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). In recent years, the toxin has become the focus of public attention, due to the mass development of cyanobacteria (cyanobacterial blooms) in freshwater bodies triggered by eutrophication and climate change. Anatoxin-a is suspected to have a distinct toxic mechanism depending on physiological and nervous systems in exposed organisms. The numerous researches have been actively conducted with respect to the toxic effects of anatoxin-a on mammals; however, little research has aimed at its possible effects on aquatic plants, wherein well-structured nervous system is absent with the lack of various components of the acetylcholine mechanism. In this study, submerged macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum (C. demersum) was adopted to examine the effects of anatoxin-a on morphological (growth), physiological (photosynthetic pigment contents) and biochemical (hydrogen peroxide level, biotransformation and antioxidative enzymes) responses in the aquatic plant at environmentally relevant concentrations (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 and 50 ?g/L). The significant elevation of antioxidative enzymes in parallel with increased formation of hydrogen peroxide appeared from 0.5 ?g/L of anatoxin-a. In the measurement of photosynthetic pigments, the decrease in chlorophyll a content was detected at 5 and 50 ?g/L, whereas the increase in carotenoids/total chlorophyll was observed from 0.05 ?g/L. Accordingly, the alteration in growth was manifested in the presence of 5 and 50 ?g/L of anatoxin-a. The results clearly indicate that anatoxin-a can disrupt homeostasis of C. demersum through induction of oxidative stress; furthermore this aquatic plant possesses effective defense mechanisms to cope with low concentrations of anatoxin-a. PMID:23578514

  9. Causes and Controls of Freshwater Drum Mortality during Transportation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Johnson; Michael T. Metcalf

    1982-01-01

    The freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens is an abundant and underutilized species in Lake Eric. Transportation of live fish from commercial shore seines to pay-fishing lakes causes high immediate and delayed mortality during warm summer months. Freshwater drums transported 6 hours had 4% immediate mortality and 94% delayed mortality (over 1–2 weeks). Salt (5 g\\/liter NaCl), low hauled-fish densities (60 g

  10. Restricted-Range Fishes and the Conservation of Brazilian Freshwaters

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Cristiano; Buckup, Paulo A.; Menezes, Naercio A.; Oyakawa, Osvaldo T.; Kasecker, Thais P.; Ramos Neto, Mario B.; da Silva, José Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Freshwaters are the most threatened ecosystems on earth. Although recent assessments provide data on global priority regions for freshwater conservation, local scale priorities remain unknown. Refining the scale of global biodiversity assessments (both at terrestrial and freshwater realms) and translating these into conservation priorities on the ground remains a major challenge to biodiversity science, and depends directly on species occurrence data of high taxonomic and geographic resolution. Brazil harbors the richest freshwater ichthyofauna in the world, but knowledge on endemic areas and conservation in Brazilian rivers is still scarce. Methodology/Principal Findings Using data on environmental threats and revised species distribution data we detect and delineate 540 small watershed areas harboring 819 restricted-range fishes in Brazil. Many of these areas are already highly threatened, as 159 (29%) watersheds have lost more than 70% of their original vegetation cover, and only 141 (26%) show significant overlap with formally protected areas or indigenous lands. We detected 220 (40%) critical watersheds overlapping hydroelectric dams or showing both poor formal protection and widespread habitat loss; these sites harbor 344 endemic fish species that may face extinction if no conservation action is in place in the near future. Conclusions/Significance We provide the first analysis of site-scale conservation priorities in the richest freshwater ecosystems of the globe. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that freshwater biodiversity has been neglected in former conservation assessments. The study provides a simple and straightforward method for detecting freshwater priority areas based on endemism and threat, and represents a starting point for integrating freshwater and terrestrial conservation in representative and biogeographically consistent site-scale conservation strategies, that may be scaled-up following naturally linked drainage systems. Proper management (e. g. forestry code enforcement, landscape planning) and conservation (e. g. formal protection) of the 540 watersheds detected herein will be decisive in avoiding species extinction in the richest aquatic ecosystems on the planet. PMID:20613986

  11. Highly plastic genome of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, a ubiquitous toxic freshwater cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Frangeul, Lionel; Quillardet, Philippe; Castets, Anne-Marie; Humbert, Jean-François; Matthijs, Hans CP; Cortez, Diego; Tolonen, Andrew; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Kehr, Jan-Christoph; Zilliges, Yvonne; Ziemert, Nadine; Becker, Sven; Talla, Emmanuel; Latifi, Amel; Billault, Alain; Lepelletier, Anthony; Dittmann, Elke; Bouchier, Christiane; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Background The colonial cyanobacterium Microcystis proliferates in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems and is exposed to changing environmental factors during its life cycle. Microcystis blooms are often toxic, potentially fatal to animals and humans, and may cause environmental problems. There has been little investigation of the genomics of these cyanobacteria. Results Deciphering the 5,172,804 bp sequence of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 has revealed the high plasticity of its genome: 11.7% DNA repeats containing more than 1,000 bases, 6.8% putative transposases and 21 putative restriction enzymes. Compared to the genomes of other cyanobacterial lineages, strain PCC 7806 contains a large number of atypical genes that may have been acquired by lateral transfers. Metabolic pathways, such as fermentation and a methionine salvage pathway, have been identified, as have genes for programmed cell death that may be related to the rapid disappearance of Microcystis blooms in nature. Analysis of the PCC 7806 genome also reveals striking novel biosynthetic features that might help to elucidate the ecological impact of secondary metabolites and lead to the discovery of novel metabolites for new biotechnological applications. M. aeruginosa and other large cyanobacterial genomes exhibit a rapid loss of synteny in contrast to other microbial genomes. Conclusion Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 appears to have adopted an evolutionary strategy relying on unusual genome plasticity to adapt to eutrophic freshwater ecosystems, a property shared by another strain of M. aeruginosa (NIES-843). Comparisons of the genomes of PCC 7806 and other cyanobacterial strains indicate that a similar strategy may have also been used by the marine strain Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501 to adapt to other ecological niches, such as oligotrophic open oceans. PMID:18534010

  12. Health-based cyanotoxin guideline values allow for cyanotoxin-based monitoring and efficient public health response to cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Farrer, David; Counter, Marina; Hillwig, Rebecca; Cude, Curtis

    2015-02-01

    Human health risks from cyanobacterial blooms are primarily related to cyanotoxins that some cyanobacteria produce. Not all species of cyanobacteria can produce toxins. Those that do often do not produce toxins at levels harmful to human health. Monitoring programs that use identification of cyanobacteria genus and species and enumeration of cyanobacterial cells as a surrogate for cyanotoxin presence can overestimate risk and lead to unnecessary health advisories. In the absence of federal criteria for cyanotoxins in recreational water, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) developed guideline values for the four most common cyanotoxins in Oregon's fresh waters (anatoxin-a, cylindrospermopsin, microcystins, and saxitoxins). OHA developed three guideline values for each of the cyanotoxins found in Oregon. Each of the guideline values is for a specific use of cyanobacteria-affected water: drinking water, human recreational exposure and dog recreational exposure. Having cyanotoxin guidelines allows OHA to promote toxin-based monitoring (TBM) programs, which reduce the number of health advisories and focus advisories on times and places where actual, rather than potential, risks to health exist. TBM allows OHA to more efficiently protect public health while reducing burdens on local economies that depend on water recreation-related tourism. PMID:25664510

  13. Health-Based Cyanotoxin Guideline Values Allow for Cyanotoxin-Based Monitoring and Efficient Public Health Response to Cyanobacterial Blooms

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, David; Counter, Marina; Hillwig, Rebecca; Cude, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Human health risks from cyanobacterial blooms are primarily related to cyanotoxins that some cyanobacteria produce. Not all species of cyanobacteria can produce toxins. Those that do often do not produce toxins at levels harmful to human health. Monitoring programs that use identification of cyanobacteria genus and species and enumeration of cyanobacterial cells as a surrogate for cyanotoxin presence can overestimate risk and lead to unnecessary health advisories. In the absence of federal criteria for cyanotoxins in recreational water, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) developed guideline values for the four most common cyanotoxins in Oregon’s fresh waters (anatoxin-a, cylindrospermopsin, microcystins, and saxitoxins). OHA developed three guideline values for each of the cyanotoxins found in Oregon. Each of the guideline values is for a specific use of cyanobacteria-affected water: drinking water, human recreational exposure and dog recreational exposure. Having cyanotoxin guidelines allows OHA to promote toxin-based monitoring (TBM) programs, which reduce the number of health advisories and focus advisories on times and places where actual, rather than potential, risks to health exist. TBM allows OHA to more efficiently protect public health while reducing burdens on local economies that depend on water recreation-related tourism. PMID:25664510

  14. Center forCenter for FreshwaterFreshwater

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) are among the group of primary producers within an aquatic ecosystem, including vegetation, carrion, animal protein, detritus, and algae. Through direct consumption of algae and strain out particles for consumption. Algae are a primary food source and cyanobacterial consumption can

  15. Global diversity of freshwater birds (Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Dehorter; Matthieu Guillemain

    Among the 10,000 birds species living on earth, 5% (e.g., 560) need imperatively freshwater habitat in order to satisfy at\\u000a least one of their life history traits. About 11 completed families could even disappear if their wetland habitat left. About\\u000a 10% (58) of these can be considered as endemic. Africa contains the biggest number of endemic (20) and more precisely

  16. Global diversity of freshwater birds (Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Dehorter; Matthieu Guillemain

    2008-01-01

    Among the 10,000 birds species living on earth, 5% (e.g., 560) need imperatively freshwater habitat in order to satisfy at\\u000a least one of their life history traits. About 11 completed families could even disappear if their wetland habitat left. About\\u000a 10% (58) of these can be considered as endemic. Africa contains the biggest number of endemic (20) and more precisely

  17. Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Oxygen-Tolerant Cyanobacterial System (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Smith, H. O.; Maness, P.-C.

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this report is to develop an O{sub 2}-tolerant cyanobacterial system for continuous light-driven H{sub 2} production from water. The overall goal is to produce a cyanobacterial recombinant to produce H{sub 2} continuously.

  18. Cyanobacterial carboxysomes: microcompartments that facilitate CO2 fixation.

    PubMed

    Rae, Benjamin D; Long, Benedict M; Whitehead, Lynne F; Förster, Britta; Badger, Murray R; Price, G Dean

    2013-01-01

    Carboxysomes are extraordinarily efficient proteinaceous microcompartments that encapsulate the primary CO2-fixing enzyme (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, RuBisCO) in cyanobacteria and some proteobacteria. These microbodies form part of a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), operating together with active CO2 and HCO3(-) uptake transporters which accumulate HCO3(-) in the cytoplasm of the cell. Cyanobacteria (also known as blue-green algae) are highly productive on a global scale, especially those species from open-ocean niches, which collectively contribute nearly 30% of global net primary fixation. This productivity would not be possible without a CCM which is dependent on carboxysomes. Two evolutionarily distinct forms of carboxysome are evident that encapsulate proteobacterial RuBisCO form-1A or higher-plant RuBisCO form- 1B, respectively. Based partly on RuBisCO phylogeny, the two carboxysome types are known either as ?-carboxysomes, found in predominantly oceanic cyanobacteria (?-cyanobacteria) and some proteobacteria, or as ?-carboxysomes, found mainly in freshwater/estuarine cyanobacteria (?-cyanobacteria). Both carboxysome types are believed to have evolved in parallel as a consequence of fluctuating atmospheric CO2 levels and evolutionary pressure acting via the poor enzymatic kinetics of RuBisCO. The three-dimensional structures and protein components of each carboxysome type reflect distinct evolutionarily strategies to the same major functions: subcellular compartmentalization and RuBisCO encapsulation, oxygen exclusion, and CO2 concentration and fixation. PMID:23920493

  19. Length-Dry Weight Relationships of Some Freshwater Zooplankton

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rudolph A. Rosen

    1981-01-01

    Biomass of zooplankton can be estimated from the relation between length and weight by measuring the appropriate dimension of length on individual zooplankton. Length-dry weight relationships for 15 species of freshwater crustacean zooplankton collected from the Connecticut River were determined. Length-weight equations can be used to rapidly determine the biomass of zooplankton species when it is impractical to directly measure

  20. The freshwater zooplankton of Central America and the Caribbean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carmen Collado; C. H. Fernando; Dawn Sephton

    1984-01-01

    So far mainly sporadic studies have been made on the freshwater zooplankton of this region. We studied material from Costa Rica, Cuba, Bahamas, El Salvador, Haiti and Trinidad and listed unpublished species data from Jamaica. In all 183 species of Rotifera; 104 of Cladocera; 64 Calanoida and Cyclopoida and a few Ostracoda are known from the region which includes Central

  1. Toxicity of rotenone to giant river freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculturists have often suffered predation losses in the production of freshwater giant river prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii due to the presence of wild fish species in culture ponds. The piscicide rotenone is widely used to remove undesirable fish species from ponds. Although evidence in the t...

  2. Similarities in acute temperature preferences of freshwater fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DILIP MATHUR; ROBERT M. SCHUTSKY; EDMUND J. PURDY; CARL A. SILVER

    1981-01-01

    A statistical analysis of new and published laboratory data revealed strong geographic similarities in acute (up to 4-h) temperature preferences for several freshwater fishes. Regression models developed from our laboratory studies predicted acute temperature preferences of species from other geographic areas. Species within a family (three cyprinids, two ictalurids, and six centrarchids were tested) have similar acute preferenda, except that

  3. Similarities in Acute Temperature Preferences of Freshwater Fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dilip Mathur; Robert M. Schutsky; Edmund J. Purdy Jr; Carl A. Silver

    1981-01-01

    A statistical analysis of new and published laboratory data revealed strong geographic similarities in acute (up to 4-hour) temperature preferences for several freshwater fishes. Regression models developed from our laboratory studies predicted acute temperature preferences of species from other geographic areas. Species within a family (three cyprinids, two ictalurids, and six centrarchids were tested) have similar acute preferenda, except that

  4. A novel cyanophage with a cyanobacterial nonbleaching protein A gene in the genome.

    PubMed

    Gao, E-Bin; Gui, Jian-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2012-01-01

    A cyanophage, PaV-LD, has been isolated from harmful filamentous cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii in Lake Donghu, a shallow freshwater lake in China. Here, we present the cyanophage's genomic organization and major structural proteins. The genome is a 95,299-bp-long, linear double-stranded DNA and contains 142 potential genes. BLAST searches revealed 29 proteins of known function in cyanophages, cyanobacteria, or bacteria. Thirteen major structural proteins ranging in size from 27 kDa to 172 kDa were identified by SDS-PAGE and mass-spectrometric analysis. The genome lacks major genes that are necessary to the tail structure, and the tailless PaV-LD has been confirmed by an electron microscopy comparison with other tail cyanophages and phages. Phylogenetic analysis of the major capsid proteins also reveals an independent branch of PaV-LD that is quite different from other known tail cyanophages and phages. Moreover, the unique genome carries a nonbleaching protein A (NblA) gene (open reading frame [ORF] 022L), which is present in all phycobilisome-containing organisms and mediates phycobilisome degradation. Western blot detection confirmed that 022L was expressed after PaV-LD infection in the host filamentous cyanobacterium. In addition, its appearance was companied by a significant decline of phycocyanobilin content and a color change of the cyanobacterial cells from blue-green to yellow-green. The biological function of PaV-LD nblA was further confirmed by expression in a model cyanobacterium via an integration platform, by spectroscopic analysis and electron microscopy observation. The data indicate that PaV-LD is an exceptional cyanophage of filamentous cyanobacteria, and this novel cyanophage will also provide us with a new vision of the cyanophage-host interactions. PMID:22031930

  5. A Novel Cyanophage with a Cyanobacterial Nonbleaching Protein A Gene in the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, E-Bin; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2012-01-01

    A cyanophage, PaV-LD, has been isolated from harmful filamentous cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii in Lake Donghu, a shallow freshwater lake in China. Here, we present the cyanophage's genomic organization and major structural proteins. The genome is a 95,299-bp-long, linear double-stranded DNA and contains 142 potential genes. BLAST searches revealed 29 proteins of known function in cyanophages, cyanobacteria, or bacteria. Thirteen major structural proteins ranging in size from 27 kDa to 172 kDa were identified by SDS-PAGE and mass-spectrometric analysis. The genome lacks major genes that are necessary to the tail structure, and the tailless PaV-LD has been confirmed by an electron microscopy comparison with other tail cyanophages and phages. Phylogenetic analysis of the major capsid proteins also reveals an independent branch of PaV-LD that is quite different from other known tail cyanophages and phages. Moreover, the unique genome carries a nonbleaching protein A (NblA) gene (open reading frame [ORF] 022L), which is present in all phycobilisome-containing organisms and mediates phycobilisome degradation. Western blot detection confirmed that 022L was expressed after PaV-LD infection in the host filamentous cyanobacterium. In addition, its appearance was companied by a significant decline of phycocyanobilin content and a color change of the cyanobacterial cells from blue-green to yellow-green. The biological function of PaV-LD nblA was further confirmed by expression in a model cyanobacterium via an integration platform, by spectroscopic analysis and electron microscopy observation. The data indicate that PaV-LD is an exceptional cyanophage of filamentous cyanobacteria, and this novel cyanophage will also provide us with a new vision of the cyanophage-host interactions. PMID:22031930

  6. Loons in freshwater lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith W. McIntyre

    1994-01-01

    Loons (Gaviidae) divide their annual cycle between salt and freshwater habitat, the latter being the site of breeding activites. Territorial requirements include sufficient size to permit runs of more than 100 m for take-off and landings; food for chicks and water clarity sufficient to permit foraging for it at depths generally = 5 m; protected nest sites, preferably islands; and

  7. Persistence of Environmental DNA in Freshwater Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Duparc, Antoine; Pellier-Cuit, Stéphanie; Pompanon, François; Taberlet, Pierre; Miaud, Claude

    2011-01-01

    The precise knowledge of species distribution is a key step in conservation biology. However, species detection can be extremely difficult in many environments, specific life stages and in populations at very low density. The aim of this study was to improve the knowledge on DNA persistence in water in order to confirm the presence of the focus species in freshwater ecosystems. Aquatic vertebrates (fish: Siberian sturgeon and amphibian: Bullfrog tadpoles) were used as target species. In control conditions (tanks) and in the field (ponds), the DNA detectability decreases with time after the removal of the species source of DNA. DNA was detectable for less than one month in both conditions. The density of individuals also influences the dynamics of DNA detectability in water samples. The dynamics of detectability reflects the persistence of DNA fragments in freshwater ecosystems. The short time persistence of detectable amounts of DNA opens perspectives in conservation biology, by allowing access to the presence or absence of species e.g. rare, secretive, potentially invasive, or at low density. This knowledge of DNA persistence will greatly influence planning of biodiversity inventories and biosecurity surveys. PMID:21858099

  8. Analysis of images of cyanobacterial S-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyzanek, Vladislav

    1999-01-01

    Methods for analysis, especially 2D reconstruction, of cyanobacterial S-layers were improved. The locally normalized correlation was used in the course of correlation averaging. For elimination of image distortion, the function of the distortion was approximated step by step by the linear fractional function or by the Lagrange interpolation polynomials. The modification of the methods is illustrated on figures of S-layers of Synechocystis aquatilis Kovacik 1990/8 and Microcystis aeruginosa Hindak 1971/1 (negatively stained), and Microcystis cf. wesenbergii Bitov 1994 (metal shadow).

  9. Cryptoendolithic lichen and cyanobacterial communities of the Ross Desert, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, E. I.; Hua, M.; Ocampo-Friedmann, R.

    1988-01-01

    Cryptoendolithic microbial communities in the Ross Desert (McMurdo Dry Valleys) are characterized on the basis of photosynthetic microorganisms and fungi. Two eukaryotic communities (the lichen-dominated and Hemichloris communities) and three cyanobacterial communities (the red Gloeocapsa, Hormathonema-Gloeocapsa, and Chroococcidiopsis communities) are described. Eleven coccoid, one pleurocapsoid, and five filamentous cyanobacteria occurring in these communities are characterized and illustrated. The moisture grade of the rock substrate seems to affect pH, formation of primary iron stain, and the distribution of microbial communities.

  10. Foraging trade-offs and resource patchiness: theory and experiments with a freshwater snail community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan M. Chase; Will G. Wilson; Shane A. Richards

    2001-01-01

    Empirical results concerning a freshwater snail community are interpreted using a two- species consumer model that incorporates resource structure. Behavioural-scale measurements on a guild of five species of freshwater pond snails (Mollusca: Pulmonata) indicate a trade-off between the ability to utilize a patch's resource and the ability to quickly find new resource patches. Community-level experiments demonstrate that both species richness

  11. Influence of local and global environmental parameters on the composition of cyanobacterial mats in a tropical lagoon.

    PubMed

    Echenique-Subiabre, Isidora; Villeneuve, Aurélie; Golubic, Stjepko; Turquet, Jean; Humbert, Jean-François; Gugger, Muriel

    2015-02-01

    Cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mat communities thrive widely and year round in coral reefs and tropical lagoons, with periodic massive development of benthic blooms. We studied the diversity and spatiotemporal variation of the cyanobacterial dominance in mats of the shallow lagoon of La Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean by means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and cloning-sequencing approaches targeting the 16S rRNA gene, combined with macromorphological and micromorphological characterization of corresponding phenotypes. The mat-forming cyanobacteria were highly diversified with at least 67 distinct operational taxonomic units identified in the lagoon, encompassing the entire morphological spectrum of the phylum Cyanobacteria, but with striking dominance of Oscillatoriales and Nostocales. It appeared also that selective pressures acting at different geographical scales have an influence on the structure and composition of these mats dominated by cyanobacteria. First, large changes were observed in their diversity and composition in relation to local changes occurring in their environment. Second, from the data obtained on the richness and composition of the mats and from the comparison with similar studies in the world, tropical mats seem to display wider cyanobacterial richness than in temperate and cold areas. Moreover, these tropical mats share more species with mats in other tropical regions than with those in temperate and cold climatic regions, suggesting that marine cyanobacteria in biofilms and mats display a biogeographic structure. PMID:25260923

  12. Improving the coverage of the cyanobacterial phylum using diversity-driven genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Patrick M.; Wu, Dongying; Latifi, Amel; Axen, Seth D.; Fewer, David P.; Talla, Emmanuel; Calteau, Alexandra; Cai, Fei; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole; Rippka, Rosmarie; Herdman, Michael; Sivonen, Kaarina; Coursin, Therese; Laurent, Thierry; Goodwin, Lynne; Nolan, Matt; Davenport, Karen W.; Han, Cliff S.; Rubin, Edward M.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Woyke, Tanja; Gugger, Muriel; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterial phylum encompasses oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes of a great breadth of morphologies and ecologies; they play key roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles. The chloroplasts of all photosynthetic eukaryotes can trace their ancestry to cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria also attract considerable interest as platforms for “green” biotechnology and biofuels. To explore the molecular basis of their different phenotypes and biochemical capabilities, we sequenced the genomes of 54 phylogenetically and phenotypically diverse cyanobacterial strains. Comparison of cyanobacterial genomes reveals the molecular basis for many aspects of cyanobacterial ecophysiological diversity, as well as the convergence of complex morphologies without the acquisition of novel proteins. This phylum-wide study highlights the benefits of diversity-driven genome sequencing, identifying more than 21,000 cyanobacterial proteins with no detectable similarity to known proteins, and foregrounds the diversity of light-harvesting proteins and gene clusters for secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Additionally, our results provide insight into the distribution of genes of cyanobacterial origin in eukaryotic nuclear genomes. Moreover, this study doubles both the amount and the phylogenetic diversity of cyanobacterial genome sequence data. Given the exponentially growing number of sequenced genomes, this diversity-driven study demonstrates the perspective gained by comparing disparate yet related genomes in a phylum-wide context and the insights that are gained from it. PMID:23277585

  13. The effects of barley straw ( Hordeum vulgare) on the growth of freshwater algae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Ferrier; B. R. Butler; D. E. Terlizzi; R. V. Lacouture

    2005-01-01

    Bioassays were conducted to determine the efficacy of barley straw liquor in controlling algal growth of 12 freshwater species of algae representing three divisions. Barley straw liquor inhibited the growth of three nuisance algae common in freshwater: Synura petersenii, Dinobyron sp., and Microcystis aeruginosa. However, Selenastrum capricornutum, Spirogyra sp., Oscillatoria lutea var. contorta, and Navicula sp. had significantly increased growth

  14. Biotechnological Screening of Microalgal and Cyanobacterial Strains for Biogas Production and Antibacterial and Antifungal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Mudimu, Opayi; Rybalka, Nataliya; Bauersachs, Thorsten; Born, Jens; Friedl, Thomas; Schulz, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae and cyanobacteria represent a valuable natural resource for the generation of a large variety of chemical substances that are of interest for medical research, can be used as additives in cosmetics and food production, or as an energy source in biogas plants. The variety of potential agents and the use of microalgae and cyanobacteria biomass for the production of these substances are little investigated and not exploited for the market. Due to the enormous biodiversity of microalgae and cyanobacteria, they hold great promise for novel products. In this study, we investigated a large number of microalgal and cyanobacterial strains from the Culture Collection of Algae at Göttingen University (SAG) with regard to their biomass and biogas production, as well antibacterial and antifungal effects. Our results demonstrated that microalgae and cyanobacteria are able to generate a large number of economically-interesting substances in different quantities dependent on strain type. The distribution and quantity of some of these components were found to reflect phylogenetic relationships at the level of classes. In addition, between closely related species and even among multiple isolates of the same species, the productivity may be rather variable. PMID:24957031

  15. Acidification of freshwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Cresser, M.S.; Edwards, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This volume gives an account that draws not only on the main branches of chemistry but also on soil physics, chemistry, hydrology, meteorology, geography, geology, plant physiology, soil microbiology and zoology. The author examine the numerous interacting physical, chemical, and biological, processes that regulate the acidity of freshwaters, a phenomenon that has various causes, including precipitation; acidifying pollutions; and the interaction of plants, soils and water. The relative importance of the different processes is examined.

  16. Mechanical challenges to freshwater residency in sharks and rays.

    PubMed

    Gleiss, Adrian C; Potvin, Jean; Keleher, James J; Whitty, Jeff M; Morgan, David L; Goldbogen, Jeremy A

    2015-04-01

    Major transitions between marine and freshwater habitats are relatively infrequent, primarily as a result of major physiological and ecological challenges. Few species of cartilaginous fish have evolved to occupy freshwater habitats. Current thought suggests that the metabolic physiology of sharks has remained a barrier to the diversification of this taxon in freshwater ecosystems. Here, we demonstrate that the physical properties of water provide an additional constraint for this species-rich group to occupy freshwater systems. Using hydromechanical modeling, we show that occurrence in fresh water results in a two- to three-fold increase in negative buoyancy for sharks and rays. This carries the energetic cost of lift production and results in increased buoyancy-dependent mechanical power requirements for swimming and increased optimal swim speeds. The primary source of buoyancy, the lipid-rich liver, offers only limited compensation for increased negative buoyancy as a result of decreasing water density; maintaining the same submerged weight would involve increasing the liver volume by very large amounts: 3- to 4-fold in scenarios where liver density is also reduced to currently observed minimal levels and 8-fold without any changes in liver density. The first data on body density from two species of elasmobranch occurring in freshwater (the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas, Müller and Henle 1839, and the largetooth sawfish Pristis pristis, Linnaeus 1758) support this hypothesis, showing similar liver sizes as marine forms but lower liver densities, but the greatest negative buoyancies of any elasmobranch studied to date. Our data suggest that the mechanical challenges associated with buoyancy control may have hampered the invasion of freshwater habitats in elasmobranchs, highlighting an additional key factor that may govern the predisposition of marine organisms to successfully establish in freshwater habitats. PMID:25573824

  17. Selecting reliable and robust freshwater macroalgae for biomass applications.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Rebecca J; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2013-01-01

    Intensive cultivation of freshwater macroalgae is likely to increase with the development of an algal biofuels industry and algal bioremediation. However, target freshwater macroalgae species suitable for large-scale intensive cultivation have not yet been identified. Therefore, as a first step to identifying target species, we compared the productivity, growth and biochemical composition of three species representative of key freshwater macroalgae genera across a range of cultivation conditions. We then selected a primary target species and assessed its competitive ability against other species over a range of stocking densities. Oedogonium had the highest productivity (8.0 g ash free dry weight m?² day?¹), lowest ash content (3-8%), lowest water content (fresh weigh: dry weight ratio of 3.4), highest carbon content (45%) and highest bioenergy potential (higher heating value 20 MJ/kg) compared to Cladophora and Spirogyra. The higher productivity of Oedogonium relative to Cladophora and Spirogyra was consistent when algae were cultured with and without the addition of CO? across three aeration treatments. Therefore, Oedogonium was selected as our primary target species. The competitive ability of Oedogonium was assessed by growing it in bi-cultures and polycultures with Cladophora and Spirogyra over a range of stocking densities. Cultures were initially stocked with equal proportions of each species, but after three weeks of growth the proportion of Oedogonium had increased to at least 96% (±7 S.E.) in Oedogonium-Spirogyra bi-cultures, 86% (±16 S.E.) in Oedogonium-Cladophora bi-cultures and 82% (±18 S.E.) in polycultures. The high productivity, bioenergy potential and competitive dominance of Oedogonium make this species an ideal freshwater macroalgal target for large-scale production and a valuable biomass source for bioenergy applications. These results demonstrate that freshwater macroalgae are thus far an under-utilised feedstock with much potential for biomass applications. PMID:23717561

  18. Selecting Reliable and Robust Freshwater Macroalgae for Biomass Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Rebecca J.; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Intensive cultivation of freshwater macroalgae is likely to increase with the development of an algal biofuels industry and algal bioremediation. However, target freshwater macroalgae species suitable for large-scale intensive cultivation have not yet been identified. Therefore, as a first step to identifying target species, we compared the productivity, growth and biochemical composition of three species representative of key freshwater macroalgae genera across a range of cultivation conditions. We then selected a primary target species and assessed its competitive ability against other species over a range of stocking densities. Oedogonium had the highest productivity (8.0 g ash free dry weight m?2 day?1), lowest ash content (3–8%), lowest water content (fresh weigh: dry weight ratio of 3.4), highest carbon content (45%) and highest bioenergy potential (higher heating value 20 MJ/kg) compared to Cladophora and Spirogyra. The higher productivity of Oedogonium relative to Cladophora and Spirogyra was consistent when algae were cultured with and without the addition of CO2 across three aeration treatments. Therefore, Oedogonium was selected as our primary target species. The competitive ability of Oedogonium was assessed by growing it in bi-cultures and polycultures with Cladophora and Spirogyra over a range of stocking densities. Cultures were initially stocked with equal proportions of each species, but after three weeks of growth the proportion of Oedogonium had increased to at least 96% (±7 S.E.) in Oedogonium-Spirogyra bi-cultures, 86% (±16 S.E.) in Oedogonium-Cladophora bi-cultures and 82% (±18 S.E.) in polycultures. The high productivity, bioenergy potential and competitive dominance of Oedogonium make this species an ideal freshwater macroalgal target for large-scale production and a valuable biomass source for bioenergy applications. These results demonstrate that freshwater macroalgae are thus far an under-utilised feedstock with much potential for biomass applications. PMID:23717561

  19. Freshwater wetlands and wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Sharitz, R.R.; Gibbons, J.W. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This volume is a product of the Freshwater Wetlands and Wildlife symposium held in Charleston, South Carolina, on March 24--27, 1986 and contains 94 papers. The stimulus for the symposium came from our interest in augmenting the findings of the long-term research programs on freshwater wetlands and wildlife that have been carried out on the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The symposium provided a forum on an international scale for the exchange of data about freshwater ecosystems: their functions, uses, and their future. The papers in this volume address issues related to natural, man-managed, and degraded ecosystems. The volume is divided into two sections. The first section deals with the functions and values of wetlands, including their use as habitat for plants and animals, their role in trophic dynamics, and their basic processes. The second section treats the subject of their status and management, including techniques for assessing their value, laws for protecting them, and plans for properly managing them. Individual papers will be indexed and entered separately on the energy data base.

  20. Molecular insights into the terminal energy acceptor in cyanobacterial phycobilisome.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Nan; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wu, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-09-01

    The linker protein L(CM) (ApcE) is postulated as the major component of the phycobilisome terminal energy acceptor (TEA) transferring excitation energy from the phycobilisome to photosystem II. L(CM) is the only phycobilin-attached linker protein in the cyanobacterial phycobilisome through auto-chromophorylation. However, the underlying mechanism for the auto-chromophorylation of L(CM) and the detailed molecular architecture of TEA is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the N-terminal phycobiliprotein-like domain of L(CM) (Pfam00502, LP502) can specifically recognize phycocyanobilin (PCB) by itself. Biochemical assays indicated that PCB binds into the same pocket in LP502 as that in the allophycocyanin ?-subunit and that Ser152 and Asp155 play a vital role in LP502 auto-chromophorylation. By carefully conducting computational simulations, we arrived at a rational model of the PCB-LP502 complex structure that was supported by extensive mutational studies. In the PCB-LP502 complex, PCB binds into a deep pocket of LP502 with a distorted conformation, and Ser152 and Asp155 form several hydrogen bonds to PCB fixing the PCB Ring A and Ring D. Finally, based on our results, the dipoles and dipole-dipole interactions in TEA are analysed and a molecular structure for TEA is proposed, which gives new insights into the energy transformation mechanism of cyanobacterial phycobilisome. PMID:22758351

  1. A census of nuclear cyanobacterial recruits in the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Makai, Szabolcs; Li, Xiao; Hussain, Javeed; Cui, Cuiju; Wang, Yuesheng; Chen, Mingjie; Yang, Zhaowan; Ma, Chuang; Guo, An-Yuan; Zhou, Yanhong; Chang, Junli; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2015-01-01

    The plastids and mitochondria of the eukaryotic cell are of endosymbiotic origin. These events occurred ~2 billion years ago and produced significant changes in the genomes of the host and the endosymbiont. Previous studies demonstrated that the invasion of land affected plastids and mitochondria differently and that the paths of mitochondrial integration differed between animals and plants. Other studies examined the reasons why a set of proteins remained encoded in the organelles and were not transferred to the nuclear genome. However, our understanding of the functional relations of the transferred genes is insufficient. In this paper, we report a high-throughput phylogenetic analysis to identify genes of cyanobacterial origin for plants of different levels of complexity: Arabidopsis thaliana, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Physcomitrella patens, Populus trichocarpa, Selaginella moellendorffii, Sorghum bicolor, Oryza sativa, and Ostreococcus tauri. Thus, a census of cyanobacterial gene recruits and a study of their function are presented to better understand the functional aspects of plastid symbiogenesis. From algae to angiosperms, the GO terms demonstrated a gradual expansion over functionally related genes in the nuclear genome, beginning with genes related to thylakoids and photosynthesis, followed by genes involved in metabolism, and finally with regulation-related genes, primarily in angiosperms. The results demonstrate that DNA is supplied to the nuclear genome on a permanent basis with no regard to function, and only what is needed is kept, which thereby expands on the GO space along the related genes. PMID:25794152

  2. Toxicity of harmful cyanobacterial blooms to bream and roach.

    PubMed

    Trinchet, Isabelle; Cadel-Six, Sabrina; Djediat, Chakib; Marie, Benjamin; Bernard, Cécile; Puiseux-Dao, Simone; Krys, Sophie; Edery, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing increasing environmental pressures, leading to an increasing frequency of cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms (cHABs) that have emerged as a worldwide concern due to their growing frequency and their potential toxicity to the fauna that threatens the functioning of ecosystems. Cyanobacterial blooms raise concerns due to the fact that several strains produce potent bioactive or toxic secondary metabolites, such as the microcystins (MCs), which are hepatotoxic to vertebrates. These strains of cyanobacteria may be potentially toxic to fish via gastrointestinal ingestion and also by direct absorption of the toxin MC from the water. The purpose of our study was to investigate toxic effects observed in fish taken from several lakes in the Ile-de-France region, where MCs-producing blooms occur. This study comprises histological studies and the measurement of MC concentrations in various organs. The histological findings are similar to those obtained following laboratory exposure of medaka fish to MCs: hepatic lesions predominate and include cell lysis and cell detachment. MC concentrations in the organs revealed that accumulation was particularly high in the digestive tract and the liver, which are known to be classical targets of MCs. In contrast concentrations were very low in the muscles. Differences in the accumulation of MC variants produced by blooms indicate that in order to more precisely evaluate the toxic potential of a specific bloom it is necessary not only to consider the concentration of toxins, but also the variants produced. PMID:23732128

  3. Bioremediation of hexavalent chromium by a cyanobacterial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Dhara; Vankar, Padma S.; Srivastava, Sarvesh Kumar

    2012-12-01

    The study comprises the use of cyanobacterial mat (collected from tannery effluent site) to remove hexavalent chromium. This mat was consortium of cyanobacteria/blue-green algae such as Chlorella sp., Phormidium sp. and Oscillatoria sp. The adsorption experiments were carried out in batches using chromium concentrations 2-10, 15-30 and 300 ppm at pH 5.5-6.2. The adsorption started within 15 min; however, 96 % reduction in metal concentration was observed within 210 min. The adsorption phenomenon was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. This biosorption fitted Freundlich adsorption isotherm very well. It was observed that the best adsorption was at 4 ppm, and at 25 ppm in the chosen concentration ranges. Scanning electron micrograph showed the physiology of mat, indicating sites for metal uptake. The main focus was collection of the cyanobacterial mat from local environments and its chromium removal potential at pH 5.5-6.2.

  4. Double strand breaks and cell-cycle arrest induced by the cyanobacterial toxin cylindrospermopsin in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Alja, Štraser; Filipi?, Metka; Novak, Matjaž; Žegura, Bojana

    2013-08-01

    The newly emerging cyanobacterial cytotoxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is increasingly found in surface freshwaters, worldwide. It poses a potential threat to humans after chronic exposure as it was shown to be genotoxic in a range of test systems and is potentially carcinogenic. However, the mechanisms of CYN toxicity and genotoxicity are not well understood. In the present study CYN induced formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), after prolonged exposure (72 h), in human hepatoma cells, HepG2. CYN (0.1-0.5 µg/mL, 24-96 h) induced morphological changes and reduced cell viability in a dose and time dependent manner. No significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage could be observed after CYN exposure, indicating that the reduction in cell number was due to decreased cell proliferation and not due to cytotoxicity. This was confirmed by imunocytochemical analysis of the cell-proliferation marker Ki67. Analysis of the cell-cycle using flow-cytometry showed that CYN has an impact on the cell cycle, indicating G0/G1 arrest after 24 h and S-phase arrest after longer exposure (72 and 96 h). Our results provide new evidence that CYN is a direct acting genotoxin, causing DSBs, and these facts need to be considered in the human health risk assessment. PMID:23966038

  5. Thiols in a Connecticut Stratified Freshwater Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Mylon, S. E.; Benoit, G.

    2003-12-01

    Thiols are an important class of dissolved reduced sulfur (DRS) species in aquatic environments. They are generally formed from biological processes or during diagenesis of biogenic matter. Thiols can affect the biogeochemistry of B-type metals as they form strong complexes that influence trace metal speciation, bioavailability and toxicity. While current literature focuses on the biogeochemistry of thiols in marine systems, little is known about the biogeochemistry of thiols in oxic freshwaters. We chose to study thiols in Linsley Pond a stratified freshwater lake that has been extensively studied by Hutchinson. Our goals were to identify and quantify the range of thiols present throughout this small lake. Additionally, we hoped to discern the environmental factors that influence the production and distribution of thiols in the water column, and to evaluate importance of thiols in trace metal speciation. To identify and quantify various thiols in freshwaters, we adopted a sensitive and selective analytical method, which involves precolumn fluorometric labeling coupled to high performance liquid chromatography and sensitive fluorescence detection. Using this method, our analytical detection limit is below one nanomolar. Among others, two thiol species were observed in Linsley Pond: 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) and glutathione (GSH). 3-MPA exists in both oxic and anoxic water layers at nanomolar levels, and increases from surface to bottom. GSH is only detected in subsurface layer and co-varies with Chl a, indicating possible biological sources of GSH in these layers. There is a third, unidentified thiol species which is currently under investigation. The unidentified thiol species appears only in anoxic lake waters, and tests indicate that it is not PC2 (phytochelatin with 2 glutamic acid-cysteine units). Throughout the water column, concentrations of all three thiols are greater in whole water samples than in the dissolved phase (0.45 um).

  6. An assessment of the DNA barcodes of Indian freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Mohua; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Freshwater fishes in India are poorly known and plagued by many unresolved cryptic species complexes that masks some latent and endemic species. Limitations in traditional taxonomy have resulted in this crypticism. Hence, molecular approaches like DNA barcoding, are needed to diagnose these latent species. We have analyzed 1383 barcode sequences of 175 Indian freshwater fish species available in the databases, of which 172 sequences of 70 species were generated. The congeneric and conspecific genetic divergences were calculated using Kimura's 2 parameter distance model followed by the construction of a Neighbor Joining tree using the MEGA 5.1. DNA barcoding principle at its first hand approach, led to the straightforward identification of 82% of the studied species with 2.9% (S.E=0.2) divergence between the nearest congeners. However, after validating some cases of synonymy and mislabeled sequences, 5% more species were found to be valid. Sequences submitted to the database under different names were found to represent single species. On the other hand, some sequences of the species like Barilius barna, Barilius bendelisis and Labeo bata were submitted to the database under a single name but were found to represent either some unexplored species or latent species. Overall, 87% of the available Indian freshwater fish barcodes were diagnosed as true species in parity with the existing checklist and can act as reference barcode for the particular taxa. For the remaining 13% (21 species) the correct species name was difficult to assign as they depicted some erroneous identification and cryptic species complex. Thus, these barcodes will need further assay and inclusion of barcodes of more specimens from same and sister species. PMID:24378233

  7. Feasting in fresh water: impacts of food concentration on freshwater tolerance and the evolution of food × salinity response during the expansion from saline into fresh water habitats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Carol Eunmi; Moss, Wynne E; Olson, Nora; Chau, Kevin Fongching; Chang, Yu-Mei; Johnson, Kelsey E

    2013-01-01

    Saline to freshwater invasions have become increasingly common in recent years. A key hypothesis is that rates of freshwater invasions have been amplified in recent years by increased food concentration, yet this hypothesis has remained unexplored. We examined whether elevated food concentration could enhance freshwater tolerance, and whether this effect evolves following saline to freshwater invasions. We examined physiological response to salinity and food concentration in a 2 × 2 factorial design, using ancestral brackish and freshwater invading populations of the copepod Eurytemora affinis. We found that high food concentration significantly increases low-salinity tolerance. This effect was reduced in the freshwater population, indicating evolution following the freshwater invasion. Thus, ample food could enable freshwater invasions, allowing subsequent evolution of low-salinity tolerance even under food-poor conditions. We also compared effects of food concentration on freshwater survival between two brackish populations from the native range. Impacts of food concentration on freshwater survival differed between the brackish populations, suggesting variation in functional properties affecting their propensity to invade freshwater habitats. The key implication is that high food concentration could profoundly extend range expansions of brackishwater species into freshwater habitats, potentially allowing for condition-specific competition between saline invaders and resident freshwater species. PMID:23789033

  8. Strong influences of larval diet history on subsequent post-settlement growth in the freshwater mollusc Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Alexander; von Elert, Eric

    2002-01-01

    A significant seasonal variation in size at settlement has been observed in newly settled larvae of Dreissena polymorpha in Lake Constance. Diet quality, which varies temporally and spatially in freshwater habitats, has been suggested as a significant factor influencing the life history and development of freshwater invertebrates. Accordingly, experiments were conducted with field-collected larvae to test the proposal that diet quality can determine planktonic larval growth rates, size at settlement and subsequent post-metamorphic growth rates. Larvae were fed one of two diets or starved. One diet was composed of cyanobacterial cells, which are deficient in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and the other was a mixed diet rich in PUFAs. Freshly metamorphosed animals from the starvation treatment had a carbon content per individual 70% lower than that of larvae fed the mixed diet. This apparent exhaustion of larval internal reserves resulted in a 50% reduction of the post-metamorphic growth rates. Growth was also reduced in animals previously fed the cyanobacterial diet. Hence, low food quantity or low food quality during the larval stage of D. polymorpha, lead to irreversible effects for post-metamorphic animals and are related to inferior competitive abilities. PMID:12396485

  9. Global ocean freshwater transport pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talley, L.

    2008-12-01

    Variations in the atmospheric hydrological cycle are most easily observed through ocean salinity changes, and therefore it is useful to understand the basic ocean circulations responsible for maintaining the mean ocean salinity distribution. Ocean freshwater transports are calculated here from geostrophic and Ekman velocities and salinities. The net transports are assigned quantitatively to upper ocean gyre circulations, intermediate and deep overturning, and Bering Strait/Indonesian Throughflow. Excess freshwater input into the ocean in high latitudes must be transported via ocean circulation to the evaporative lower latitudes. High latitude northern hemisphere freshwater input of about 0.6 Sv is removed southwards through deep and intermediate water formation (NADW and NPIW). In complete contrast, high latitude southern hemisphere freshwater, also about 0.6 Sv, is removed northwards via the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian gyres, rather than through deep water formation. This northern-southern hemisphere asymmetry is consistent with the known "Drake Passage" effect. Excess evaporation in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans is balanced by inflow of freshwater from other regions; each transfer is quantified here. The Pacific Ocean is nearly neutral with respect to freshwater. It is seen that the NADW freshwater balance is nearly closed within the Atlantic/Arctic Ocean and the freshwater transport associated with export of NADW to the Southern Ocean is only a small component of the Atlantic freshwater budget. Bering Strait's small freshwater transport of < 0.1 Sv helps to maintain the Atlantic-Pacific salinity difference. However, proportionally large variations in the small Bering Strait transport can only marginally impact NADW salinity, whose freshening relative to saline surface water is mainly due to air-sea/runoff fluxes in the subpolar North Atlantic and Arctic. In contrast, Bering Strait freshwater export has proportionally much greater impact on North Pacific salinity balances, including NPIW salinity, because the Pacific has a much smaller overturning rate than the Atlantic.

  10. Interactions between a cyanobacterial bloom ( Microcystis) and the submerged aquatic plant Ceratophyllum oryzetorum Kom.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dunhai; Li, Genbao; Chen, Wuxiong; Liu, Yongding

    2009-02-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, macrophytes and phytoplankton are main primary producers, in which macrophyte plays an important role in maintaining clear water state, while phytoplankton often dominates in turbid waterbodies. In the present study, the growth and photosynthetic activity of the submerged aquatic plant Ceratophyllum oryzetorum Kom. in different cell densities of cyanobacterial bloom are studied. The results show that the plant length and fresh mass of C. oryzetorum are promoted by low cyanobacterial cell densities. Medium and high cyanobacterial cell densities, on the contrary, act as inhibitory. Furthermore, the photosynthetic activity of C. oryzetorum is strongly inhibited by high cyanobacterial cell densities. To a certain extent, the growth of cyanobacteria is inhibited by C. oryzetorum, but no significant effect is found in this study.

  11. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    DOEpatents

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  12. Panbiogeographical analysis of Costa Rican freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Vásquez, Jonathan; Bussing, William; Villalobos, Federico

    2008-03-01

    Track analysis and Parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE) were performed to analyze the distribution pattern of Costa Rican freshwater fishes. A basic matrix (presence/absence) was prepared using the distribution of 77 freshwater fish. The data were analyzed with CLIQUE software in order to find generalized tracks (cliques). Data also were analyzed with the software NONA and Winclada version 1.00.08 in order to perform the Parsimony Analysis of Endemicity (PAE). Fourteen equally probable cliques were found with 31 species in each and the intersection of the amount was selected as a generalized track dividing the country in two main zones: Atlantic slope from Matina to Lake Nicaragua and Pacific slope from the Coto River to the basin of the Tempisque River connected with some branches oriented to the central part of the country. PAE analysis found ten cladogram areas (72 steps, CI=0.45, RI=0.64), using the "strict consensus option" two grouping zones were identified: Atlantic slope and Pacific slope. Both PAE and Track Analysis show the division of the two slopes and the orientation of the generalized track suggests new biogeographical evidence on the influence of both old and new southern elements to explain the migrations of freshwater fish into Central America during two different geological events. PMID:18624234

  13. Modelling of light and temperature influences on cyanobacterial growth and biohydrogen production

    E-print Network

    Zhang, D.; Dechatiwongse, P.; Rio-Chanona, E. A. del; Maitland, G. C.; Hellgardt, K.; Vassiliadis, V. S.

    2015-04-03

    -emitting diodes (LED) was used. As an anaerobic environment is necessary for the onset of cyanobacterial H2 production, glycerol was chosen to replace CO2 as carbon source. In the presence of glycerol, photosynthetic ac- tivities of Cyanothece 51142 are inhibited... ). The second term on the right hand side of Eq. (2) represents the res- piration rate of cyanobacteria, which can be derived from the Logistic model [12] (detailed derivation is presented in Appendix A). The cur- rentwork assumes that cyanobacterial respiration...

  14. Hydrogen metabolism by decomposing cyanobacterial aggregates in Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oremland

    1983-01-01

    Hydrogen production by incubated cyanobacterial epiphytes occurred only in the dark, was stimulated by CâHâ, and was inhibited by Oâ. Addition of NOâ⁻ inhibited dark, anaerobic Hâ production, whereas the addition of NHâ\\/sup +\\/ inhibited Nâ fixation (CâHâ reduction) but not dark Hâ production. Aerobically incubated cyanobacterial aggregates consumed Hâ, but light-incubated rates (3.6 mu mol of Hâ g-1 h-1)

  15. Detection of microcystins in Pamvotis lake water and assessment of cyanobacterial bloom toxicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theodoti Papadimitriou; Euthimia Armeni; Constantine D. Stalikas; Ifigeneia Kagalou; Ioannis D. Leonardos

    Lake Pamvotis is a shallow, eutrophic Mediterranean lake with ecological significance. This paper deals with the evaluation\\u000a of cyanobacterial toxicity in Lake Pamvotis. ELISA and HPLC revealed the presence of significant amounts of MCYST-LR. Danio rerio bioassay confirmed the toxic nature of the bloom. Cyanobacterial extracts had adverse toxic effects on development of D. rerio. Also, it was shown that

  16. Rectal ultrastructure in salt- and freshwater mosquito larvae in relation to physiological state

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Meredith; J. E. Phillips

    1973-01-01

    A comparison of rectal morphology and ultrastructure is made between a freshwater (A. aegypti) and salt water (A. campestris) species of mosquito larvae, and between A. campestris larvae producing hyper- and hyposmotic urine.

  17. A GUIDE TO THE FRESHWATER TUBIFICIDAE (ANNELIDA: CLITELLATA: OLIGOCHAETA) OF NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In North America, the freshwater annelid worms (Clitellata: Oligochaeta), belonging in the family Tubificidae, are composed of 18 genera, 54 species, one subspecies, and several variant forms. All taxa can be identified by external and internal morphological features. This guide ...

  18. HEAVY METAL ACCUMULATION IN SEDIMENT AND FRESHWATER FISH IN U.S. ARCTIC LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal concentrations in sediment and two species of freshwater fish (lake trout [Salvelinus namaycush], and grayling [Thymallus arcticus]} were examined in four Arctic lakes in Alaska. Concentrations of several metals were naturally high in the sediment relative to uncontaminated...

  19. Growth rate and mortality of Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata, in four freshwater

    E-print Network

    Wilde, Gene

    Growth rate and mortality of Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata, in four freshwater, Queensland, Australia Abstract Growth and total mortality of Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata fish 30 cm TL, but exceeded previous estimates for the species. Annual total mortality rates, based

  20. Salinity tolerance of diapausing eggs of freshwater zooplankton

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SARAH A. B AILEY; C. D UGGAN; OLIN D. A. V AN O VERDIJK; T HOMAS H. J OHENGEN

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. Many freshwater zooplankton produce diapausing eggs capable of withstanding periods of adverse environmental conditions, such as anoxia, drought and extreme temperature. These eggs may also allow oligostenohaline species to survive increased salinity during periods of tidal flux or evaporation, and here we test the ability of diapause eggs to withstand such conditions. 2. Salinity tolerance may also enable

  1. Olfactory Toxicity of Copper to Salmon in Freshwater and Seawater

    E-print Network

    as threatened or endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act · NOAA Fisheries is involved in effortsOlfactory Toxicity of Copper to Salmon in Freshwater and Seawater David Baldwin Photo by Desmond.) The geographical distribution of threatened and endangered Pacific salmon on the west coast of the U.S. coho (O

  2. Off-flavor compounds from decaying cyanobacterial blooms of Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhimei; Niu, Yuan; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Tao, Min; Deng, Xuwei

    2013-03-01

    The effect of cyanobacterial bloom decay on water quality and the complete degradation of cyanobacterial blooms in a short period were examined by an enclosure experiment in Gonghu Bay of Lake Taihu, China. Water quality parameters as well as taste and odor compounds during the breakdown of cyanobacterial blooms were measured. Results showed that the decay of cyanobacterial blooms caused anoxic water conditions, decreased pH, and increased nutrient loading to the lake water. The highest concentrations of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), and beta-cyclocitral were observed in the anoxic water, at 62331.8, 12413.3, and 1374.9 ng/L, respectively. 2-Methylisoborneol was dominant during the live growth phase of cyanobacterial blooms, whereas DMS and DMTS were dominant during the decomposition phase. Dissolved oxygen, pH, and chlorophyll a were negatively correlated with DMS, DMTS, and beta-cyclocitral, whereas total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and ammonium (NH(4+)-N) were positively correlated with DMS, DMTS, beta3-cyclocitral, and beta-ionone. The experimental results suggested that preventing the anaerobic decomposition of cyanobacterial blooms is an important strategy against the recurrence of a malodor crisis in Lake Taihu. PMID:23923422

  3. A Computational Analysis of Stoichiometric Constraints and Trade-Offs in Cyanobacterial Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, Henning; Steuer, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a promising biological chassis for the synthesis of renewable fuels and chemical bulk commodities. Significant efforts have been devoted to improve the yields of cyanobacterial products. However, while the introduction and heterologous expression of product-forming pathways is often feasible, the interactions and incompatibilities of product synthesis with the host metabolism are still insufficiently understood. In this work, we investigate the stoichiometric properties and trade-offs that underlie cyanobacterial product formation using a computational reconstruction of cyanobacterial metabolism. First, we evaluate the synthesis requirements of a selection of cyanobacterial products of potential biotechnological interest. Second, the large-scale metabolic reconstruction allows us to perform in silico experiments that mimic and predict the metabolic changes that must occur in the transition from a growth-only phenotype to a production-only phenotype. Applied to the synthesis of ethanol, ethylene, and propane, these in silico transition experiments point to bottlenecks and potential modification targets in cyanobacterial metabolism. Our analysis reveals incompatibilities between biotechnological product synthesis and native host metabolism, such as shifts in ATP/NADPH demand and the requirement to reintegrate metabolic by-products. Similar strategies can be employed for a large class of cyanobacterial products to identify potential stoichiometric bottlenecks. PMID:25941672

  4. Cyanobacterial Diversity in Biological Soil Crusts along a Precipitation Gradient, Northwest Negev Desert, Israel.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Martin; Henneberg, Manja; Felde, Vincent J M N L; Drahorad, Sylvie L; Berkowicz, Simon M; Felix-Henningsen, Peter; Kaplan, Aaron

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria occur worldwide but play an important role in the formation and primary activity of biological soil crusts (BSCs) in arid and semi-arid ecosystems. The cyanobacterial diversity in BSCs of the northwest Negev desert of Israel was surveyed at three fixed sampling stations situated along a precipitation gradient in the years 2010 to 2012. The three stations also are characterized by marked differences in soil features such as soil carbon, nitrogen, or electrical conductivity. The cyanobacterial biodiversity was analyzed by sequencing inserts of clone libraries harboring partial 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained with cyanobacteria-specific primers. Filamentous, non-diazotrophic strains (subsection III), particularly Microcoleus-like, dominated the cyanobacterial community (30 % proportion) in all years. Specific cyanobacterial groups showed increased (e.g., Chroococcidiopsis, Leptolyngbya, and Nostoc strains) or decreased (e.g., unicellular strains belonging to the subsection I and Scytonema strains) abundances with declining water availability at the most arid, southern station, whereas many cyanobacterial strains were frequently found in the soils of all three stations. The cyanobacterial diversity at the three sampling stations appears dependent on the available precipitation, whereas the differences in soil chemistry were of lower importance. PMID:25408227

  5. Cyanobacterial blooms in stratified and destratified eutrophic reservoirs in semi-arid region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Enio W; Moura, Ariadne N; Bittencourt-Oliveira, Maria do Carmo

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of cyanobacteria in two deep, eutrophic reservoirs in a semi-arid region of Brazil during periods of stratification and destratification. Four collections were carried out at each reservoir at two depths at three-month intervals. The following abiotic variables were analyzed: water temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, water transparency, total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus, orthophosphate and total nitrogen. Phytoplankton density was quantified for the determination of the biomass of cyanobacteria. The data were analyzed using CCA. Higher mean phytoplankton biomass values (29.8 mm(3).L(-1)) occurred in the period of thermal stratification. A greater similarity in the phytoplankton communities also occurred in this period and was related to the development of cyanobacteria, mainly Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (>3.9 mm(3).L(-1)). During the period of thermal destratification, this species co-dominated the environment with Planktothrix agardhii, Geitlerinema amphibium, Microcystis aeruginosa and Merismopedia tenuissima, as well as with diatoms and phytoflagellates. Environmental instability and competition among algae hindered the establishment of blooms more during the mixture period than during the stratification period. Thermal changes in the water column caused by climatologic events altered other physiochemical conditions of the water, leading to changes in the composition and biomass of the cyanobacterial community in tropical reservoirs. PMID:22146960

  6. A Synopsis of Research Needs Identified at the Interagency, International Symposium on Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms (ISOC-HAB)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Kenneth Hudnell; Quay Dortch

    Evidence indicates that the incidence of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs) is increasing in spatial extent and temporal\\u000a frequency worldwide. Cyanobacterial blooms produce highly potent toxins and huge, noxious biomasses in surface waters used\\u000a for recreation, commerce, and as drinking water sources. The Interagency, International Symposium on Cyanobacterial Harmful\\u000a Algal Blooms (ISOC-HAB) characterized the state of the science and identified

  7. Acanthocorbis mongolica nov. spec. – Description of the first freshwater loricate choanoflagellate (Acanthoecida) from a Mongolian lake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus Paul

    A new acanthoecid choanoflagellate species, Acanthocorbis mongolica sp. nov. was found in preserved phytoplankton samples from the freshwater lake Bayan Nuur (Uvs Nuur Basin, NW Mongolia) in concentrations of up to 1.8×105cellsL?1. It is the first well-documented species of the mainly marine order Acanthoecida to be found in a freshwater lake. The lorica structures were studied with scanning electron microscopy.

  8. In vitro test-based comparison of pesticide-induced sensitivity in marine and freshwater phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Arzul, Geneviève; Quiniou, Françoise; Carrie, Cécile

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to assess the effects of two pesticides, namely the insecticide carbofuran and the herbicide isoproturon, on monospecifically cultivated marine and freshwater phytoplankton according to standard methods. In the presence of pesticide, growth rates were lower in marine species Chaetoceros gracilis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum than in freshwater species Chlorella vulgaris and Selenastrum capricornutum after 72 hours. The EC50 values were obtained with the REGTOX Macro software, and the NEC values by applying the DEBtox model. PMID:20021018

  9. Changes in gastropod assemblages in freshwater habitats in the vicinity of Basel (Switzerland) over 87 years

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno Baur; Birgit Ringeis

    2002-01-01

    The gastropod fauna in 18 freshwater habitats (streams, rivers and ponds) in the vicinity of Basel, first surveyed in 1906\\/1907, was re-examined in 1994. The freshwater snail fauna changed considerably over 87 years. One species (Aplexa hypnorum) recorded in 1906\\/1907 was not found in 1994, most probably it had become extinct in the period between the two surveys. Ten species

  10. A bioaccumulation bioassay for freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Noguchi, George E.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Edsall, Carol C.; Shoesmith, John A.; Bowker, James D.

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory bioassay is described for determining the bioavailability of contaminants from freshwater sediments. The bioassay consists of 10-d exposures to whole sediments under flow-through conditions. After testing five species, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the earthworm (Lubricus terrestris) were recommended for use in the test. When the availability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Hg and Zn from Great Lakes sediments was examined in laboratory exposures, only the PCBs were accumulated. A field validation study demonstrated that the magnitude of accumulation in laboratory exposures was similar to that in organisms caged in the field. A protocol is recommended for using the test as a standardized bioaccumulation bioassay.

  11. Freshwater aspects of anadromous salmonid enhancement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, Rowan W.

    1982-01-01

    Freshwater enhancement of anadromous salmonid populations has been practiced in the United States and Canada since the late 1800's. Reduction of natural spawning habitat and increasing fishing pressure make artificial enhancement a possible alternative to declining populations. Enhancement of anadromous salmonids involved improvement of the natural environment and reducing natural mortality. Methods of enhancement include fishways, spawning and rearing channels, stream rehabilitation, lake fertilization, environmental management, and artificial propagation techniques. Five Pacific salmon species and steelhead trout are commonly enhanced, primarily in watershed entering the Pacific Ocean and Great Lakes. Enhancement efforts contribute heavily to a commercial and sport industry realizing over $1.5 billion.

  12. Phenotype variability of identical genotypes: the need for a combined approach in cyanobacterial taxonomy demonstrated on Merismopedia-like isolates

    PubMed

    Palinska; Liesack; Rhiel; Krumbein

    1996-10-17

    Five Merismopedia-like cyanobacterial strains were collected from microbial mats at Norderney Island, subcultured in the laboratory, and finally grown as unicyanobacterial cultures. As a sixth strain, Merismopedia glauca from the rising dbl quote, left (low)Sammlung von Algenkulturen" at Gottingen (SAG) was used for comparisons. According to morphological and physiological characteristics initially observed in the field and during initial subculturing, the five strains were assigned to the species Merismopedia glauca, Merismopedia punctata, or Merismopedia elegans. However, after prolonged maintenance under laboratory conditions, the formation of platelet-like colonies stopped, whereas cell sizes, production of extracellular polymeric substances, and division patterns were stably maintained. These physiological and morphological parameters allowed us to divide the six strains into two clusters. This division was further supported by the profiling of total cell protein and phycobilisomes using SDS-PAGE. The nearly complete 16S rDNA sequence of three of the six isolates was determined. The comparative sequencing analysis revealed an almost 100% identity of these three Merismopedia-like strains. The evolutionary distance dendrogram constructed placed this Merismopedia cluster into a common line of descent with Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6906. Based on the analysis of common stretches of 1,050 nucleotides, the overall similarity between the sequence types of rising dbl quote, left (low)Merismopedia" and rising dbl quote, left (low)Synechocystis" is 96-97%. The values of the different methods for taxonomic classification of unicyanobacterial strains, the relationship of the cyanobacterial genera Merismopedia, Synechococcus, Synechocystis, and Eucapsis sp., and the functional role of different Merismopedia morphologies within microbial mats are discussed. It is suggested that all analyzed Merismopedia strains be combined into one species, namely Merismopedia punctata Meyen (1839). PMID:8824145

  13. Fungal Parasitism: Life Cycle, Dynamics and Impact on Cyanobacterial Blooms

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Furthermore, little is known about their dynamics in freshwater food webs. Large and/or colonial phytoplankton 'DREP: Diversite´ et Ro^les des Eumyce`tes dans le Pe´lagos'. The funders had no role in study design.e. chytrids) [1]. Although significant progress has recently been made with new approaches designed to assess

  14. Why freshwater organisms survived the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-08-01

    Roughly 65.5 million years ago, a massive asteroid smashed into present-day Chicxulub, Mexico. The impact set fire to Earth's surface. Dust and ash darkened the sky, sending the planet into an "impact winter" that lasted months to years and caused the extinction of nonavian dinosaurs and half of ocean-dwelling species. However, life in inland freshwater ecosystems largely escaped this fate. To try to understand why freshwater organisms held on while ocean life failed, Robertson et al. surveyed relevant research to understand how the mechanisms of extinction would have operated differently in the two environments.

  15. Nematodes from terrestrial and freshwater habitats in the Arctic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We present an updated list of terrestrial and freshwater nematodes from all regions of the Arctic, for which records of properly identified nematode species are available: Svalbard, Jan Mayen, Iceland, Greenland, Nunavut, Northwest territories, Alaska, Lena River estuary, Taymyr and Severnaya Zemlya and Novaya Zemlya. The list includes 391 species belonging to 146 genera, 54 families and 10 orders of the phylum Nematoda. PMID:25197239

  16. Nematodes from terrestrial and freshwater habitats in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Holovachov, Oleksandr

    2014-01-01

    WE PRESENT AN UPDATED LIST OF TERRESTRIAL AND FRESHWATER NEMATODES FROM ALL REGIONS OF THE ARCTIC, FOR WHICH RECORDS OF PROPERLY IDENTIFIED NEMATODE SPECIES ARE AVAILABLE: Svalbard, Jan Mayen, Iceland, Greenland, Nunavut, Northwest territories, Alaska, Lena River estuary, Taymyr and Severnaya Zemlya and Novaya Zemlya. The list includes 391 species belonging to 146 genera, 54 families and 10 orders of the phylum Nematoda. PMID:25197239

  17. Aggressive interactions during feeding between native and invasive freshwater turtles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nuria Polo-CaviaPilar; Pilar López; José Martín

    2011-01-01

    The red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans) is a worldwide highly invasive species, currently introduced in most freshwater habitats as a consequence of massive pet\\u000a trade. In the Iberian Peninsula, this species is competing with and displacing the endangered native Spanish terrapin (Mauremys leprosa). Sliders are considered environmentally-aggressive turtles, capable of threatening or biting other individuals during competitive\\u000a activities such as

  18. Transboundary Freshwater Dispute Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created and maintained by Dr. Aaron T. Wolf of the Department of Geosciences at Oregon State University, this site is designed to help researchers and students explore water disputes and negotiations in the 20th century. To that end, it offers a searchable database containing the summaries and full text of 150 international water-related treaties and another similar database of 39 interstate compacts within the US. Treaties within the databases may be selected by nation or state, main and treaty basins, focus, and beginning and ending dates. Additional resources include a digitized inventory of international watersheds. In the future, Wolf plans to add descriptions of indigenous/ traditional methods for the resolution of water disputes, news files and bibliographic entries of acute water conflicts, and an annotated bibliography of the state of the art of Transboundary Freshwater Dispute Resolution.

  19. Comparison of oxygen consumption in freshwater mussels (Unionidae) from different habitats during declining dissolved oxygen concentration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li-Yen Chen; Alan G. Heath; Richard J. Neves

    2001-01-01

    The rate of oxygen consumption (OC) of 9 species of freshwater mussels was measured under declining dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. The effects of temperature for some species also was investigated. The pattern of the OC vs. DO curve for each species was used in a hyperbolic model to compare abilities to regulate OC under low oxygen conditions. At 24.5 °C,

  20. Genome sequence of the thermophilic fresh-water bacterium Spirochaeta caldaria type strain (H1T), reclassification of Spirochaeta caldaria, Spirochaeta stenostrepta, and Spirochaeta zuelzerae in the genus Treponema as Treponema caldaria comb. nov., Treponema stenostrepta comb. nov., and Treponema zuelzerae comb. nov., and emendation of the genus Treponema

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Birte; Göker, Markus; Scheuner, Carmen; Han, Cliff; Lu, Megan; Misra, Monica; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Gronow, Sabine; Detter, John C.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Spirochaeta caldaria Pohlschroeder et al. 1995 is an obligately anaerobic, spiral-shaped bacterium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain, H1T, was isolated in 1990 from cyanobacterial mat samples collected at a freshwater hot spring in Oregon, USA, and is of interest because it enhances the degradation of cellulose when grown in co-culture with Clostridium thermocellum. Here we provide a taxonomic re-evaluation for S. caldaria based on phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences and whole genomes, and propose the reclassification of S. caldaria and two other Spirochaeta species as members of the emended genus Treponema. Whereas genera such as Borrelia and Sphaerochaeta possess well-distinguished genomic features related to their divergent lifestyles, the physiological and functional genomic characteristics of Spirochaeta and Treponema appear to be intermixed and are of little taxonomic value. The 3,239,340 bp long genome of strain H1T with its 2,869 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:23961314

  1. Effect of pH, EDTA, and Anions on Heavy Metal Toxicity Toward a Bioluminescent Cyanobacterial Bioreporter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ismael Rodea-Palomares; Coral González-García; Francisco Leganés; Francisca Fernández-Piñas

    2009-01-01

    The bioavailability and therefore toxicity of a metal depends on the chemical species present in a particular environment.\\u000a We evaluated the effect of a series of factors that could potentially modify metal speciation on the toxicity of Hg, Cu, Zn,\\u000a and Cd toward a recombinant strain of the freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 with cloned lux operon of luminescent

  2. Promotion of oxidative stress in the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum during biotransformation of the cyanobacterial toxin microcystin-LR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan Pflugmacher

    2004-01-01

    Cyanobacterial toxins have been shown to have adverse effects on mammals, birds and fish and are therefore being increasingly recognised as a potent stress and health hazard factor in aquatic ecosystems. Microcystins, which are cyclic heptapeptides and a main group of the cyanotoxins, are mainly retained within the producer-cells during cyanobacterial bloom development. However, these toxins are released into the

  3. Multiple drivers of decline in the global status of freshwater crayfish (Decapoda: Astacidea)

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Nadia I.; Böhm, Monika; Adams, Susan B.; Alvarez, Fernando; Bergey, Elizabeth A.; Bunn, John J. S.; Burnham, Quinton; Cordeiro, Jay; Coughran, Jason; Crandall, Keith A.; Dawkins, Kathryn L.; DiStefano, Robert J.; Doran, Niall E.; Edsman, Lennart; Eversole, Arnold G.; Füreder, Leopold; Furse, James M.; Gherardi, Francesca; Hamr, Premek; Holdich, David M.; Horwitz, Pierre; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Jones, Clive M.; Jones, Julia P. G.; Jones, Robert L.; Jones, Thomas G.; Kawai, Tadashi; Lawler, Susan; López-Mejía, Marilu; Miller, Rebecca M.; Pedraza-Lara, Carlos; Reynolds, Julian D.; Richardson, Alastair M. M.; Schultz, Mark B.; Schuster, Guenter A.; Sibley, Peter J.; Souty-Grosset, Catherine; Taylor, Christopher A.; Thoma, Roger F.; Walls, Jerry; Walsh, Todd S.; Collen, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Rates of biodiversity loss are higher in freshwater ecosystems than in most terrestrial or marine ecosystems, making freshwater conservation a priority. However, prioritization methods are impeded by insufficient knowledge on the distribution and conservation status of freshwater taxa, particularly invertebrates. We evaluated the extinction risk of the world's 590 freshwater crayfish species using the IUCN Categories and Criteria and found 32% of all species are threatened with extinction. The level of extinction risk differed between families, with proportionally more threatened species in the Parastacidae and Astacidae than in the Cambaridae. Four described species were Extinct and 21% were assessed as Data Deficient. There was geographical variation in the dominant threats affecting the main centres of crayfish diversity. The majority of threatened US and Mexican species face threats associated with urban development, pollution, damming and water management. Conversely, the majority of Australian threatened species are affected by climate change, harvesting, agriculture and invasive species. Only a small proportion of crayfish are found within the boundaries of protected areas, suggesting that alternative means of long-term protection will be required. Our study highlights many of the significant challenges yet to come for freshwater biodiversity unless conservation planning shifts from a reactive to proactive approach. PMID:25561679

  4. Evaluation of phytotoxicity and ecotoxicity potentials of a cyanobacterial extract containing microcystins under realistic environmental concentrations and in a soil-plant system.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Sylvain; Mougin, Christian; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Crouzet, Olivier; Bru, David; Nélieu, Sylvie; Bouaïcha, Noureddine

    2015-06-01

    The impact of a crude extract of Microcystis aeruginosa (PCC7820) containing 14 microcystin variants was investigated on seeds germination and radicles development of four agricultural plants: two tomato varieties Solanum lycopersicum (MicroTom and Saint-Pierre), the wheat Triticum aestivum and the lettuce Lactuca sativa. In addition, the effect of 14 d-exposure to irrigation water containing realistic concentrations of microcystins (0-0.1 mg eq. microcystin-LRL(-1)) on the tomato MicroTom seedling growth was further evaluated on roots and aerial part biomasses. Impacts on soil bacterial parameters, as such extracellular enzymatic activities, nitrification activity and abundances of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms were also investigated. In germination-test, the cyanobacterial extract inhibited only the germination of the wheat seeds, with an EC50 of 11 mg eq. microcystin-LRL(-1); which is 13 times lower than that of the cadmium chloride (EC50 of 145 mg L(-1)). Moreover, the cyanobacterial extract containing low concentrations of microcystins increased the growth of primary roots; however, high concentrations decreased it for all plants except for the wheat. In the soil-plant approach, only aerial part biomass of the tomato MicroTom was enhanced significantly. In addition, only soil nitrification potential and ammonia-oxidizing bacterial abundances were consistently impacted. A significant positive correlation (r=0.56) was found between the increase of nitrification potential and abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. This work suggested, that exposure to a cyanobacterial extract containing realistic environmental microcystins concentrations could affect seed germination, depending plant species. It was also highlighted, for the first time, disturbances in soil bacteria functioning, evidences on soil nitrification process. PMID:25754013

  5. The Alps as barrier to dispersal in cold-adapted freshwater fishes? Phylogeographic history and taxonomic status of the bullhead in the Adriatic freshwater drainage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vendula Slechtovaa; Giovanni B. Delmastrod

    The freshwater faunas of the Italian peninsula are isolated from the rest of Europe by the geographic barrier of the Alps and consequently have developed many endemic forms and contain few non-endemic species. However, some non-endemics may ei- ther represent recent invaders of the Adriatic basin or cryptic endemic species. To test these two hypotheses against each other, we studied

  6. First records of freshwater molluscs from the ecological reserve El Edén, Quintana Roo, Mexico Primeros registros de moluscos dulceacuícolas de la Reserva Ecológica El Edén, Quintana Roo, México

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Cózatl-Manzano; Edna Naranjo-García

    2007-01-01

    The diversity of the freshwater molluscs at El Edén was unknown. This is the fi rst treatment of them, allowing us to compare spatial and temporal species distribution. Eleven species of freshwater molluscs were found in 2 surveys carried in March (dry season) and September (rainy season) 1998 at the reserve El Edén. A total of 266 individuals were collected;

  7. Selective inhibition of toxic cyanobacteria by ?-carboline-containing bacterium Bacillus flexus isolated from Saudi freshwaters

    PubMed Central

    Alamri, Saad A.; Mohamed, Zakaria A.

    2013-01-01

    A bacterial strain SSZ01 isolated from a eutrophic lake in Saudi Arabia dominated by cyanobacterial blooms, showed an antialgal activity against cyanobacteria species. Based on the analysis of the 16S rDNA gene sequence, the isolated strain (SSZ01) most likely belonged to the genus Bacillus with a 99% similarity to Bacillus flexus strain EMGA5. The thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis of the ethyl acetate extract of this bacterium revealed that this strain can produce harmine and norharmane compared to different ?-carboline analog standards. Harmine and norharmane were also detected in considerable amounts in bacterial growth medium, indicating a potential excretion of these compounds into the aquatic environment. The crude extract of Bacillus flexus as well as pure materials of harmine and norharmane inhibited the growth of tested species of cyanobacteria. However, the bacterial crude extract has a higher toxicity against tested species of cyanobacteria than harmine and norharmane. In addition, harmine was more toxic to cyanobacteria than norharmane. On the other hand, neither pure compounds of harmine and norharmane nor crude bacterial extract showed any antialgal activity against tested species of green algae. The results of the present study suggest that B. flexus SSZ01 or its crude extract containing harmine and norharmane could be a candidate for the selective control of cyanobacterial blooms without affecting other algal species. PMID:24235872

  8. Dynamic Inhomogeneity in the Photodynamics of Cyanobacterial Phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are widespread red/far-red photosensory proteins well known as critical regulators of photomorphogenesis in plants. It is often assumed that natural selection would have optimized the light sensing efficiency of phytochromes to minimize nonproductive photochemical deexcitation pathways. Surprisingly, the quantum efficiency for the forward Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion of phytochromes seldom exceeds 15%, a value very much lower than that of animal rhodopsins. Exploiting ultrafast excitation wavelength- and temperature-dependent transient absorption spectroscopy, we resolve multiple pathways within the ultrafast photodynamics of the N-terminal PAS-GAF-PHY photosensory core module of cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 (termed Cph1?) that are primarily responsible for the overall low quantum efficiency. This inhomogeneity primarily reflects a long-lived fluorescent subpopulation that exists in equilibrium with a spectrally distinct, photoactive subpopulation. The fluorescent subpopulation is favored at elevated temperatures, resulting in anomalous excited-state dynamics (slower kinetics at higher temperatures). The spectral and kinetic behavior of the fluorescent subpopulation strongly resembles that of the photochemically compromised and highly fluorescent Y176H variant of Cph1?. We present an integrated, heterogeneous model for Cph1? that is based on the observed transient and static spectroscopic signals. Understanding the molecular basis for this dynamic inhomogeneity holds potential for rational design of efficient phytochrome-based fluorescent and photoswitchable probes. PMID:24742290

  9. Engineering a cyanobacterial cell factory for production of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, S Andreas; Paszota, Michal; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2012-10-01

    Metabolic engineering of microorganisms has become a versatile tool to facilitate production of bulk chemicals, fuels, etc. Accordingly, CO(2) has been exploited via cyanobacterial metabolism as a sustainable carbon source of biofuel and bioplastic precursors. Here we extended these observations by showing that integration of an ldh gene from Bacillus subtilis (encoding an l-lactate dehydrogenase) into the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 leads to l-lactic acid production, a phenotype which is shown to be stable for prolonged batch culturing. Coexpression of a heterologous soluble transhydrogenase leads to an even higher lactate production rate and yield (lactic acid accumulating up to a several-millimolar concentration in the extracellular medium) than those for the single ldh mutant. The expression of a transhydrogenase alone, however, appears to be harmful to the cells, and a mutant carrying such a gene is rapidly outcompeted by a revertant(s) with a wild-type growth phenotype. Furthermore, our results indicate that the introduction of a lactate dehydrogenase rescues this phenotype by preventing the reversion. PMID:22865063

  10. Engineering a Cyanobacterial Cell Factory for Production of Lactic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Angermayr, S. Andreas; Paszota, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic engineering of microorganisms has become a versatile tool to facilitate production of bulk chemicals, fuels, etc. Accordingly, CO2 has been exploited via cyanobacterial metabolism as a sustainable carbon source of biofuel and bioplastic precursors. Here we extended these observations by showing that integration of an ldh gene from Bacillus subtilis (encoding an l-lactate dehydrogenase) into the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 leads to l-lactic acid production, a phenotype which is shown to be stable for prolonged batch culturing. Coexpression of a heterologous soluble transhydrogenase leads to an even higher lactate production rate and yield (lactic acid accumulating up to a several-millimolar concentration in the extracellular medium) than those for the single ldh mutant. The expression of a transhydrogenase alone, however, appears to be harmful to the cells, and a mutant carrying such a gene is rapidly outcompeted by a revertant(s) with a wild-type growth phenotype. Furthermore, our results indicate that the introduction of a lactate dehydrogenase rescues this phenotype by preventing the reversion. PMID:22865063

  11. A plea for the use of copepods in freshwater ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Devdutt; Gergs, André; Hommen, Udo; Ratte, Hans Toni; Preuss, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Standard species used in ecological risk assessment are chosen based on their sensitivity to various toxicants and the ease of rearing them for laboratory experiments. However, this mostly overlooks the fact that species in the field that may employ variable life-history strategies, which may have consequences concerning the vulnerability of such species to exposure with contaminants. We aimed to highlight the importance of copepods in ecology and to underline the need to include freshwater copepods in ecotoxicology. We carried out a literature search on copepods and Daphnia in ecology and ecotoxicology to compare the recognition given to these two taxa in these respective fields. We also conducted a detailed analysis of the literature on copepods and their current role in ecotoxicology to characterize the scale and depth of the studies and the ecotoxicological information therein. The literature on the ecology of copepods outweighed that in ecotoxicology when compared with daphnids. Copepods, like other zooplankton, were found to be sensitive to toxicants and important organisms in aquatic ecosystems. The few studies that were conducted on the ecotoxicology of copepods mainly focused on marine copepods. However, very little is known about the ecotoxicology of freshwater copepods. To enable a more realistic risk higher tier environmental risk assessment, we recommend considering freshwater copepods as part of the hazard assessment process. This could include the establishment of laboratory experiments to analyse the effects of toxicants on copepods and the development of individual-based models to extrapolate effects across species and scenarios. PMID:22899440

  12. Acid base properties of cyanobacterial surfaces. II: Silica as a chemical stressor influencing cell surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalonde, S. V.; Smith, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Konhauser, K. O.

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria grow in complex solutions where the adsorption of aqueous species and nucleation of mineral phases on the cell surface may interfere with membrane-dependent homeostatic functions. While previous investigations have provided evidence that bacteria may alter their surface chemical properties in response to environmental stimuli, to our knowledge no effort has been made to evaluate surface compositional changes resulting from non-nutritional chemical stresses within a quantitative framework applicable to surface complexation modeling. We consider here the influence of exposure to silica on cyanobacterial surface chemistry, particularly in light of the propensity for cyanobacteria to become silicified in geothermal environments. Using data modeled from over 50 potentiometric titrations of the unsheathed cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, we find that both abiotic geochemical and biotic biochemical-assimilatory factors have important and different effects on cell surface chemistry. Changes in functional group distribution that resulted from growth by different nitrogen assimilation pathways were greatest in the absence of dissolved silica and less important in its presence. Furthermore, out of the three nitrogen assimilation pathways investigated, in terms of surface functional group distribution, nitrate-reducing cultures were least sensitive, and ammonium-assimilating cultures were most sensitive, to changes in media silica concentration. When functional group distributions were plotted as a function of silica concentration, it appears that, with higher silica concentrations, basic groups (p Ka > 7) increase in concentration relative to acidic groups (p Ka < 7), and the total ligand densities (on a per-weight basis) decreased. The results imply a decrease in both the magnitude and density of surface charge as the net result of growth at high silica concentrations. Thus, Anabaena sp. appears to actively respond to growth in silicifying solutions by altering its surface properties in a manner that is likely to be manifested in nature by facilitated surface attachment. We conclude that potentiometric titrations reveal a Gram-negative bacterial surface whose properties are dynamic with respect to both nutrient and geochemical stressors.

  13. TOXICITY AND RECOVERY IN THE PREGNANT MOUSE AFTER GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO THE CYANOBACTERIAL TOXIN, CYLINDROSPERMOPSIN

    PubMed Central

    Chernoff, N.; Rogers, E.H.; Zehr, R.D.; Gage, M.I.; Malarkey, D.E.; Bradfield, C. A.; Liu, Y.; Schmid, J.E.; Jaskot, R.H.; Richards, J.H.; Wood, C.R.; Rosen, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a tricyclic alkaloid toxin produced by fresh water cyanobacterial species worldwide. CYN has been responsible for both livestock and human poisoning after oral exposure to CYN. This study investigated the toxicity of CYN to pregnant mice exposed during different segments of gestation. The course of recovery and individual responses to the toxin were evaluated. Adverse effects of CYN were monitored up to four weeks post dosing by clinical examination, histopathology, biochemistry, and gene expression. Exposure on gestational days (GD) 8–12 induced significantly more lethality than GD13–17 exposure. Periorbital, gastrointestinal and distal tail hemorrhages were seen in both groups. Serum markers indicative of hepatic injury (alanine amino transferase, aspartate amino transferase and sorbitol dehydrogenase) were increased in both groups; markers of renal dysfunction (blood urea nitrogen and creatinine) were elevated in the GD8–12 animals. Histopathology was observed in the liver (centrilobular necrosis) and kidney (interstitial inflammation) in groups exhibiting abnormal serum markers. The expression profiles of genes involved in ribosomal biogenesis, xenobiotic and lipid metabolism, inflammatory response and oxidative stress were altered 24 hours after the final dose. One week after dosing, gross, histological and serum parameters had returned to normal although increased liver/body weight ratio and one instance of gastrointestinal bleeding was found in the GD13–17 group. Gene expression changes persisted up to two weeks post dosing and returned to normal by four weeks. Responses of individual animals to CYN exposure indicated highly significant inter-animal variability within the treated groups. PMID:20936652

  14. [Latin American malacology. Freshwater mollusks from Argentina].

    PubMed

    Rumi, Alejandra; Gregoric, Diego E Gutiérrez; Núñez, Verónica; Darrigran, Gustavo A

    2008-03-01

    A report and an updated list with comments on the species of freshwater molluscs of Argentina which covers an area of 2 777 815 km2 is presented. Distributions of Gastropoda and Bivalvia families, endemic, exotic, invasive as well as entities of sanitary importance are also studied and recommendations on their conservation are provided. Molluscs related to the Del Plata Basin have been thoroughly studied in comparison to others areas of the country. This fauna exhibits relatively the biggest specific richness and keeps its affinity with the fauna of other regions of the basin in areas of Paraguay and Brasil. The 4 500 records of molluscs considered in this paper arise from the study of the collections of Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia", Buenos Aires; Museo de La Plata, La Plata and Fundación "Miguel Lillo", Tucumán. These institutions keep very important collections of molluscs in southern South America. Field information has recently been obtained and localities cited by other authors are also included in the data base. Until today, 166 species have been described, 101 belonging to 10 families of Gastropoda and 65 to 7 of Bivalvia. Families with highest specific richness are Lithoglyphidae (22) and Sphaeriidae (25), respectively. The number of endemic species (those present only in Argentina) by family is: Gastropoda: Ampullariidae (1), Cochliopidae (10), Lithoglyphidae (11), Thiariidae (3), Chilinidae (11), Lymnaeidae (2) and Physidae (2?); Bivalvia: Hyriidae (1?); Etheriidae (1?) and Sphaeriidae (10). Families with a distribution that comprise almost the whole country are: the Sphaeriidae and the gastropods Cochliopidae, Chilinidae and Lymnaeidae. Families Erodonidae and Solecurtidae (Bivalvia) were registered in mixohaline environments from Buenos Aires province. Gastropod families Thiaridae and Glacidorbiidae show a very restricted distribution. The rest of the families are present mainly in the center and north of the country. Species of sanitary interest are the propagators of: schistosomiasis -Biomphalaria peregrina, B. straminea y B. tenagophila, Planorbidae-, fasciolasis -Lymnaea viatrix and L. columnella, Lymnaeidae- and dermatitis -Chilina gibbosa and C. fluminea, Chilinidae. Invasive species are: Corbicula fluminea (Corbiculidae) and Limnoperna fortunei (Mytilidae). The construction of new areas for the protection and conservation of the high risk endemic species of freshwater molluscs is a priority. It is necessary to give special attention to the species of the patagonic mountain range and of the mesopotamic area of the Del Plata Basin. PMID:18624229

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of freshwater sponges provide evidence for endemism and radiation in ancient lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin J. Meixner; Carsten Lüter; Carsten Eckert; Valeria Itskovich; Dorte Janussen; Thomas von Rintelen; Alexandra V. Bohne; Johannes M. Meixner; Wolfgang R. Hess

    2007-01-01

    Morphologic and phylogenetic analysis of freshwater sponges endemic to lakes in Central Sulawesi, Siberia and South-East Europe is presented. We also analyzed several cosmopolitan sponge species from Eurasia and North America and included sponge sequences from public databases. In agreement with previous reports [Addis, J.S., Peterson, K.J., 2005. Phylogenetic relationships of freshwater sponges (Porifera, Spongillina) inferred from analyses of 18S

  16. Total synthesis of the marine cyanobacterial cyclodepsipeptide apratoxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiehao; Forsyth, Craig J.

    2004-01-01

    A total synthesis of apratoxin A was developed. Apratoxin A, isolated from Lyngbya spp. cyanobacteria, is representative of a growing class of marine cyanobacterial cyclodepsipeptides wherein discrete polypeptide and polyketide domains are merged by ester and amide or amide-derived linkages. In the apratoxins, the N terminus of the peptide domain [(Pro)-(N-Me-Ile)-(N-Me-ala)-(O-Me-Tyr)-(moCys)] is a modified vinylogous cysteine that is joined to a novel ketide [3,7-dihydroxy-2,5,8,8-tetramethylnonanoic acid (Dtna)] by an acid-sensitive thiazoline. The C-terminal proline is esterified to a hindered hydroxyl vicinal to the ketide's tert-butyl terminus. Major synthetic challenges included assembly and maintenance the thiazoline-containing moiety and macrolide formation involving acylation of the C39 hydroxyl. The Dtna domain was assembled in the biogenetic direction beginning with a Brown allylation of trimethylacetaldehyde to establish the C39 alcohol configuration. Diastereofacial selective addition of a higher-order dimethylcuprate upon a ring-closing metathesis-derived ?,?-unsaturated valerolactone installed the C37 methyl-bearing center. A Paterson anti-aldol process was used to incorporate the remaining two ketide stereogenic centers at C34 and C35. Although attempts to incorporate the thiazoline moiety by condensations of thiol esters bearing ?-amino carbamate derivatives failed, an intramolecular Staudinger reduction–aza-Wittig process using ?-azido thiol esters was uniquely successful. Late-stage macrocycle closure proceeded well by lactam formation between Pro and N-Me-Ile residues, but attempted lactonizations of the Pro carboxylate with the C39 hydroxyl failed. Optimization of C35 hydroxyl group protection-deprotection completed the effort, which culminated in the first total synthesis of apratoxin A and will enable analog generation toward improving differential cytotoxicity. PMID:15231999

  17. Arsenic speciation patterns in freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Slejkovec, Zdenka; Bajc, Zlatka; Doganoc, Darinka Z

    2004-04-19

    Muscle of 16 freshwater fish (9 different species belonging to 4 different families) was analysed for arsenic species using HPLC separation (anion and cation exchange) followed by on-line UV-decomposition, hydride generation and AFS detection. The main arsenic compounds found in the extracts were arsenobetaine (AsB), which accounted for 92-100% of extractable arsenic in species of salmonids (Salmo marmoratus, Oncorhynchus mykiss, Salmo trutta m. fario), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), which accounted for 75% of extractable arsenic in burbot (Lota lota). AsB was also found in lower concentrations in almost all other fish species analysed (Silurus glanis, L. lota, Barbus barbus, Rutilus pigus virgo, Chondrostoma nasus). Arsenite (As(III)) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were detected in low concentrations in some representatives of Cyprinidae only (R. pigus virgo, C. nasus). Except in salmonids, an unknown cationic compound was present in most of the samples in relatively low concentrations. Cluster analysis of the generated data seems to indicate that there is a correlation between fish family and the arsenic speciation pattern. This is especially clear for the salmonids which show a completely separate cluster and thus a very distinct arsenic speciation pattern. PMID:18969382

  18. The effects of the herbicide atrazine on freshwater snails.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Kyle D; Belden, Jason B; Bolek, Matthew G

    2015-07-01

    Atrazine has been shown to affect freshwater snails from the subcellular to community level. However, most studies have used different snail species, methods, endpoints, and atrazine exposure concentrations, resulting in some conflicting results and limiting our understanding. The goal of this study was to address these concerns by (1) investigating the acute and chronic effects of atrazine on four species of freshwater snails (Biomphalaria glabrata, Helisoma trivolvis, Physa acuta, and Stagnicola elodes) using the same methods, endpoints, and concentrations, and (2) summarizing the current literature pertaining to the effects of atrazine on freshwater snails. We conducted a 48 h acute toxicity test with an atrazine concentration higher than what typically occurs in aquatic environments (1000 µg/L). Additionally, we exposed snails to environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations (0, 0.3, 3, and 30 µg/L) for 28 days and assessed snail survival, growth, and reproduction. We also summarized all known literature pertaining to atrazine effects on freshwater snails. The literature summary suggests snails are often affected by environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations at the subcellular and cellular levels. These effects are typically not transitive to effects on survival, growth, or reproduction at the same concentrations. Our acute exposures corroborate the general trend of no direct effect on snail populations as atrazine did not directly affect the survival of any of the four snail species. Similarly, environmentally relevant concentrations did not significantly affect the survival, growth, or reproduction of any snail species. These results indicate that, in the absence of other possible stressors, the direct effects of environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations may not be realized at the snail population level. PMID:25971234

  19. Studies on the freshwater cercariae of Kerala VII. Echinostomatid cercariae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Mohandas

    1981-01-01

    Six species of Echinostomatid cercariae were found in freshwater molluscs of Kerala including three previously described forms,\\u000a namely, cercariaEchinostoma revolution (Frölich 1802) Looss 1899, cercariaEchinostoma malayanum Leiper 1911 and cercariaEchinostoma ivaniosi Mohandas 1973. CercariaE. revolutum is redescribed with the report of a new intermediate host,Idiopoma dissimilis (Müller).Cercaria sp. VI Kerala n.sp. is characterised by 47 collar spines (5+7+23+7+5), three penetration

  20. Evolutionary history of Otophysi (Teleostei), a major clade of the modern freshwater fishes: Pangaean origin and Mesozoic radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masanori Nakatani; Masaki Miya; Kohji Mabuchi; Kenji Saitoh; Mutsumi Nishida

    2011-01-01

    Background  Freshwater harbors approximately 12,000 fish species accounting for 43% of the diversity of all modern fish. A single ancestral\\u000a lineage evolved into about two-thirds of this enormous biodiversity (? 7900 spp.) and is currently distributed throughout\\u000a the world's continents except Antarctica. Despite such remarkable species diversity and ubiquity, the evolutionary history\\u000a of this major freshwater fish clade, Otophysi, remains largely

  1. Gastric cryptosporidiosis in freshwater angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, B.G.; Bradway, D.; Walsh, T.; Sanders, G.E.; Snekvik, K.

    2009-01-01

    A freshwater angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) hatchery experienced variable levels of emaciation, poor growth rates, swollen coelomic cavities, anorexia, listlessness, and increased mortality within their fish. Multiple chemotherapeutic trials had been attempted without success. In affected fish, large numbers of protozoa were identified both histologically and ultrastructurally associated with the gastric mucosa. The youngest cohort of parasitized fish was the most severely affected and demonstrated the greatest morbidity and mortality. The protozoa were morphologically most consistent with Cryptosporidium. All of the protozoan life stages were identified ultrastructurally and protozoal genomic DNA was isolated from parasitized tissue viscera and sequenced. Histological, ultrastructural, genetic, and phylogenetic analyses confirmed this protozoal organism to be a novel species of Cryptosporidium.

  2. Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed Central

    Black, J J; Baumann, P C

    1991-01-01

    Epizootics of neoplasms in freshwater fish species are considered in relation to circumstantial and experimental evidence that suggest that some epizootics of neoplasia of hepatocellular, cholangiocellular, epidermal, and oral epithelial origin may be causally related to contaminant exposure. Although there is concern for the safety of consuming fish affected with neoplasms, this concern may be misdirected as direct transmission of cancer by ingesting cancerous tissue would seem unlikely. Of greater concern is the matter of toxic and cancer-causing chemicals present in edible fish that exhibit neoplasia as a symptom of past exposure via residence in a polluted waterway. There is ample evidence to suggest that contaminant chemicals ingested via contaminated Great Lakes fish may already be affecting both human and ecosystem health, but these effects are subtle and may require new approaches to the study of the affected systems. PMID:2050071

  3. Accelerated removal of pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene in freshwater sediments with amendment of cyanobacteria-derived organic matter.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zaisheng; Jiang, Helong; Li, Xiaohong; Shi, Yuan

    2014-05-15

    The removal of pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) were investigated in freshwater sediments with amendment of seven different organic matters including cyanobacteria-derived organic matter (COM), plant-derived organic matter (POM), and humic substances (HS). During the 210 days of experiments, the amendment of COM or HS enhanced significantly the removal of pyrene and BaP in sediments, especially with fresh COM (FCOM) treatment much superior to HS. On the contrary, degradation of these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was not significantly improved and even inhibited in POM-amended sediments. The first-order rate constants of pyrene and BaP degradation in the FCOM-amended sediments reached 0.00540±0.00017d(-1) and 0.00517±0.00057d(-1), respectively, and were about three and five folds of those in the control treatment. The enhanced PAHs degradation in FCOM-amended sediments was related to higher PAH-degrading bacteria number and bioavailability with a result of biostimulation and priming effect by labile carbon and high-value nutrition in FCOM. Thus, this study improved our understanding about effects of settled biomass from cyanobacterial blooms, which occurred frequently in eutrophic aquatic ecosystems, on the natural attenuation of PAHs in sediments. Furthermore, this study would also help develop a new promising approach to remediate PAH-contaminated sediments through utilization of cyanobacterial bloom biomass. PMID:24681443

  4. Kocuria polaris sp. nov., an orange-pigmented psychrophilic bacterium isolated from an Antarctic cyanobacterial mat sample.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Gundlapally S N; Prakash, Jogadhenu S S; Prabahar, Vadivel; Matsumoto, Genki I; Stackebrandt, Erko; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2003-01-01

    Strain CMS 76orT, an orange-pigmented bacterium, was isolated from a cyanobacterial mat sample from a pond located in McMurdo Dry Valley, Antarctica. On the basis of chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties, strain CMS 76orT was identified as a member of the genus Kocuria. It exhibited a 16S rDNA similarity of 99.8% and DNA-DNA similarity of 71% with Kocuria rosea (ATCC 186T). Phenotypic traits confirmed that strain CMS 78orT and K. rosea were well differentiated. Furthermore, strain CMS 76orT could be differentiated from the other reported species of Kocuria, namely Kocuria kristinae (ATCC 27570T), Kocuria varians (ATCC 15306T), Kocuria rhizophila (DSM 11926T) and Kocuria palustris (DSM 11025T), on the basis of a number of phenotypic features. Therefore, it is proposed that strain CMS 76orT (= MTCC 3702T = DSM 14382T) be assigned to a novel species of the genus Kocuria, as Kocuria polaris. PMID:12656171

  5. Climate Change Vulnerability of Native and Alien Freshwater Fishes of California: A Systematic Assessment

    E-print Network

    Climate Change Vulnerability of Native and Alien Freshwater Fishes of California: A Systematic and climate change vulnerability scores were derived for 121 native and 43 alien fish species. The two scores baseline and greater climate change vulnerability than did alien species. Fifty percent of California

  6. Maturative pattern of ovary and testis in eutardigrades of freshwater and terrestrial habitats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LORENA REBECCHI; ROBERTO BERTOLANI

    1994-01-01

    We studied the life history of tardigrades with a particular focus on the maturative patterns of the ovary and testis. Specimens collected in nature belonging to four species of one freshwater and two semiterrestrial genera of eutardigrades were examined. The females of all examined species are always iteroparous; they have several maturative cycles with synchronously developing oocytes. Four maturative stages

  7. Hidden diversity in the freshwater planktonic diatom Asterionella formosa.

    PubMed

    Van den Wyngaert, S; Möst, M; Freimann, R; Ibelings, B W; Spaak, P

    2015-06-01

    Many freshwater and marine algal species are described as having cosmopolitan distributions. Whether these widely distributed morphologically similar algae also share a similar gene pool remains often unclear. In the context of island biogeography theory, stronger spatial isolation deemed typical of freshwater lakes should restrict gene flow and lead to higher genetic differentiation among lakes. Using nine microsatellite loci, we investigate the genetic diversity of a widely distributed freshwater planktonic diatom, Asterionella formosa, across different lakes in Switzerland and the Netherlands. We applied a hierarchical spatial sampling design to determine the geographical scale at which populations are structured. A subset of the isolates was additionally analysed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Our results revealed complex and unexpected population structure in A. formosa with evidence for both restricted and moderate to high gene flow at the same time. Different genetic markers (microsatellites and AFLPs) analysed with a variety of multivariate methods consistently revealed that genetic differentiation within lakes was much stronger than among lakes, indicating the presence of cryptic species within A. formosa. We conclude that the hidden diversity found in this study is expected to have implications for the further use of A. formosa in biogeographical, conservation and ecological studies. Further research using species-level phylogenetic markers is necessary to place the observed differentiation in an evolutionary context of speciation. PMID:25919789

  8. UV radiation and freshwater zooplankton: damage, protection and recovery.

    PubMed

    Rautio, Milla; Tartarotti, Barbara

    2010-12-01

    While many laboratory and field studies show that zooplankton are negatively affected when exposed to high intensities of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), most studies also indicate that zooplankton are well adapted to cope with large variations in their UVR exposure in the pelagic zone of lakes. The response mechanisms of zooplankton are diverse and efficient and may explain the success and richness of freshwater zooplankton in optically variable waters. While no single behavioural or physiological protection mechanism seems to be superior, and while several unexplained and contradictory patterns exist in zooplankton UVR ecology, recent increases in our understanding are consistent with UVR playing an important role for zooplankton. This review examines the variability in freshwater zooplankton responses to UVR, with a focus on crustacean zooplankton (Cladocera and Copepoda). We present an overview of UVR-induced damages, and the protection and recovery mechanisms freshwater zooplankton use when exposed to UVR. We review the current knowledge of UVR impact on freshwater zooplankton at species and community levels, and discuss briefly how global change over the last three decades has influenced the UVR milieu in lakes. PMID:21516254

  9. Dinoflagellates associated with freshwater sponges from the ancient lake baikal.

    PubMed

    Annenkova, Natalia V; Lavrov, Dennis V; Belikov, Sergey I

    2011-04-01

    Dinoflagellates are a diverse group of protists that are common in both marine and freshwater environments. While the biology of marine dinoflagellates has been the focus of several recent studies, their freshwater relatives remain little-investigated. In the present study we explore the diversity of dinoflagellates in Lake Baikal by identifying and analyzing dinoflagellate sequences for 18S rDNA and ITS-2 from total DNA extracted from three species of endemic Baikalian sponges (Baikalospongia intermedia,Baikalospongia rectaand Lubomirskia incrustans). Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences revealed extensive dinoflagellate diversity in Lake Baikal. We found two groups of sequences clustering within the order Suessiales, known for its symbiotic relationships with various invertebrates. Thus they may be regarded as potential symbionts of Baikalian sponges. In addition,Gyrodinium helveticum, representatives from the genus Gymnodinium, dinoflagellates close to the family Pfiesteriaceae, and a few dinoflagellates without definite affiliation were detected. No pronounced difference in the distribution of dinoflagellates among the studied sponges was found, except for the absence of the Piscinoodinium-like dinoflagellates inL. incrustans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the diversity of dinoflagellates in freshwater sponges, the first systematic investigation of dinoflagellate molecular diversity in Lake Baikal and the first finding of members of the order Suessiales as symbionts of freshwater invertebrates. PMID:20817555

  10. The phylogeny of marine and freshwater caulobacters reflects their habitat.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, D A; Key, R; Flesher, B; Smit, J

    1992-01-01

    Caulobacter is a distinctive genus of prosthecate bacteria. Because caulobacters adhere to surfaces and are found in diverse locales, their role in oligotrophic environments and bacterial biofilm communities is of interest. The phylogenetic relationships of a group of marine and freshwater caulobacters were examined in part to address whether the taxonomic grouping of these bacteria (based primarily on morphological characters) was consistent with 16S rRNA sequence divergence. The caulobacters examined (9 marine and 11 freshwater species or strains) were affiliated with the alpha proteobacteria. They made up a diverse yet, with the possible exception of a strain of Caulobacter subvibrioides, coherent assemblage. The diversity was most apparent in a comparison of freshwater and marine isolates; an early divergence within the main caulobacter lineage generally corresponded to strains isolated from freshwater and marine habitats. The marine caulobacter assemblage was not exclusive; it also embraced strains of marine hyphomonads and Rhodobacter capsulatus. We hypothesize that these genera are derived from more ancestral caulobacters. Overall, the data are consistent with the interpretation that all of the caulobacters examined, with the possible exception of C. subvibrioides, are ancestrally related, albeit anciently, and that most often division by terrestrial and marine habitats corresponds to an early evolutionary divergence within the genus. PMID:1551840

  11. Toxicological Review of Cyanobacterial Toxins: Anatoxin-a (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Environmental Assessment has prepared the Toxicological Reviews of Cyanobacterial Toxins: Anatoxin-a, Cylindrospermopsin and Microcystins (LR, RR, YR and LA) as a series of dose-response assessments to support the health assessment of unregulated contamina...

  12. Toxicological Review of Cyanobacterial Toxins: Microcystins Lr, Rr, Yr and La (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Environmental Assessment has prepared the Toxicological Reviews of Cyanobacterial Toxins: Anatoxin-a, Cylindrospermopsin and Microcystins (LR, RR, YR and LA) as a series of dose-response assessments to support the health assessment of unregulated contamina...

  13. Nanoclimate environment of cyanobacterial communities in China's hot and cold hyperarid deserts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimberley A. Warren-Rhodes; Kevin L. Rhodes; Shuangjiang Liu; Peijin Zhou; Christopher P. McKay

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes linkages between lithic (lithobiontic, lithophytic) cyanobacterial community (LCC) abundance and climate across a wide range of environmental conditions and geographical distance in China's northwest region, an area containing some of the world's oldest, driest and most isolated deserts. In situ monitoring and long-term climate data show that extreme heterogeneity in liquid water availability characterizes the LCC environment

  14. New strategies for the monitoring and control of cyanobacterial films on valuable lithic faces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrizia Albertano; Laura Bruno; Simona Bellezza

    2005-01-01

    A survey of studies on the structure and functioning of sub-aerial epilithic phototrophic biofilms, which develop inside hypogea sites, was conducted in the framework of projects whose aim is to investigate cyanobacteria and associated microorganisms causing deterioration of stone artefacts. Using different methodological approaches, it was possible to identify and characterize cyanobacterial taxa, and to deduce their relationships with other

  15. Cyanobacterial construction of hot spring siliceous stromatolites in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Berelson, William M; Corsetti, Frank A; Treants, Merika; Spear, John R

    2012-05-01

    Living stromatolites growing in a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park are composed of silica-encrusted cyanobacterial mats. Two cyanobacterial mat types grow on the stromatolite surfaces and are preserved as two distinct lithofacies. One mat is present when the stromatolites are submerged or at the water-atmosphere interface and the other when stromatolites protrude from the hot spring. The lithofacies created by the encrustation of submerged mats constitutes the bulk of the stromatolites, is comprised of silica-encrusted filaments, and is distinctly laminated. To better understand the cyanobacterial membership and community structure differences between the mats, we collected mat samples from each type. Molecular methods revealed that submerged mat cyanobacteria were predominantly one novel phylotype while the exposed mats were predominantly heterocystous phylotypes (Chlorogloeopsis HTF and Fischerella). The cyanobacterium dominating the submerged mat type does not belong in any of the subphylum groups of cyanobacteria recognized by the Ribosomal Database Project and has also been found in association with travertine stromatolites in a Southwest Japan hot spring. Cyanobacterial membership profiles indicate that the heterocystous phylotypes are 'rare biosphere' members of the submerged mats. The heterocystous phylotypes likely emerge when the water level of the hot spring drops. Environmental pressures tied to water level such as sulfide exposure and possibly oxygen tension may inhibit the heterocystous types in submerged mats. These living stromatolites are finely laminated and therefore, in texture, may better represent similarly laminated ancient forms compared with more coarsely laminated living marine examples. PMID:22356555

  16. Cyanobacterial diversity across landscape units in a polar desert: Taylor Valley, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Alexander B; Šabacká, Marie; Priscu, John C

    2012-11-01

    Life in the Taylor Valley, Antarctica, is dominated by microorganisms, with cyanobacteria being key primary producers in the region. Despite their abundance and ecological importance, the factors controlling biogeography, diversity, dispersal of cyanobacteria in Taylor Valley and other polar environments are poorly understood. Owing to persistent high winds, we hypothesize that the cyanobacterial diversity across this polar landscape is influenced by aeolian processes. Using molecular and pigment analysis, we describe the cyanobacterial diversity present in several prominent habitats across the Taylor Valley. Our data show that the diversity of cyanobacteria increases from the upper portion of the valley towards the McMurdo Sound. This trend is likely due to the net transport of organisms in a down-valley direction, consistent with the prevailing orientation of high-energy, episodic föhn winds. Genomic analysis of cyanobacteria present in aeolian material also suggests that wind mixes the cyanobacterial phylotypes among the landscape units. Our 16S rRNA gene sequence data revealed that (1) many of the cyanobacterial phylotypes present in our study site are common in polar or alpine environments, (2) many operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (22) were endemic to Antarctica and (3) four OTUs were potentially endemic to the McMurdo Dry Valleys. PMID:23074986

  17. Cyanobacterial toxicity and migration in a mesotrophic lake in western Washington, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernadette R. Johnston; Jean M. Jacoby

    2003-01-01

    In fall 1997, the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa was documented in Lake Sammamish (western Washington, U.S.A.) for the first time. Cyanobacterial activity and environmental conditions that may promote toxic cyanobacteria were investigated during summer and fall 1999. Development of toxic Microcystis was hypothesized to be due to runoff of nutrients from the watershed (external loading hypothesis) or from vertical migration

  18. Polyphenols and fatty acids responsible for anti-cyanobacterial allelopathic effects of submerged macrophyte Myriophyllum spicatum.

    PubMed

    Nakai, S; Zou, G; Okuda, T; Nishijima, W; Hosomi, M; Okada, M

    2012-01-01

    Myriophyllum spicatum is known to inhibit the growth of cyanobacteria such as Microcystis aeruginosa by releasing anti-cyanobacterial allelochemicals. The allelochemicals possibly responsible for the inhibition include five polyphenols and three fatty acids, but the extent to which these are indeed responsible for the anti-cyanobacterial effects is unclear. The goal of this research was to determine the contribution of these compounds to the allelopathic effect of M. spicatum on M. aeruginosa. We first collected information on the release rates of these compounds and then added the compounds to a cyanobacterial medium on the basis of their release rates so as to simulate their excretion by M. spicatum. Addition of the polyphenols and fatty acids inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa, and the interaction of the polyphenols and fatty acids was additive. The EC50 of a polyphenol and fatty acid mixture was compared with that of M. spicatum itself as previously determined in a mixed culture system in which M. spicatum and M. aeruginosa were incubated. The former was about 1.9 times higher than that of the latter, the implication being that the inhibitory effect of the polyphenols and fatty acids contributed about 53% of the allelopathic effect of M. spicatum. This paper is the first to describe allelochemicals that account for a half of the anti-cyanobacterial allelopathic effect of a macrophyte. PMID:22797226

  19. THE CYANOBACTERIAL TOXIN, CYLINDROSPERMOPSIN, INDUCES FETAL TOXICITY IN THE MOUSE AFTER EXPOSURE LATE IN GESTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cylindrospermopsin (cyn) is a cyanobacterial toxin implicated in human and wildlife poisonings. We have completed studies investigating the potential of purified cyn to induce developmental toxicity in mammals. The teratology study involved intraperitoneal injections (8.0¿128ug/k...

  20. Chronic effects of cyanobacterial toxins on Daphnia magna and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thanh Son; Do-Hong, Lan-Chi; Wiegand, Claudia

    2010-06-15

    The zooplankton grazer Daphnia magna endures living in water bodies up to moderate densities of cyanobacteria, such as Microcystis spp., known for producing toxic secondary metabolites. Although daphnids are affected via decreased food filtering, inhibition of digestive proteases and lethality, development of tolerance against cyanobacterial toxins has also been observed. Aim of our study was to investigate in detail chronic effects of cyanobacterial toxins, with emphasis on microcystin, on D. magna. The animals were exposed chronically for two generations to either microcystin-LR in 5 or 50 microg L(-1), or to cyanobacterial crude extract containing the same amount of total microcystin, starting at neonate stadium. Survival, growth, maturation and fecundity were observed for the first generation during two months. In the offspring survival, maturation, and growth were followed for the first week. Low concentration of microcystin-LR slightly affected the growth and reproduction of parent daphnids. Survivorship decreased during chronic exposure with increasing microcystin concentration. Age to maturity of the offspring increased and their survival decreased after parent generation was exposed to the toxin, even if the offspring were raised in control medium. Besides, cessation of the eggs/embryos was observed and malformation of neonates caused by cyanobacterial toxins was firstly recorded. PMID:20132836

  1. Chronic effects of cyanobacterial toxins on Daphnia magna and their offspring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thanh Son Dao; Lan-Chi Do-Hong; Claudia Wiegand

    2010-01-01

    The zooplankton grazer Daphnia magna endures living in water bodies up to moderate densities of cyanobacteria, such as Microcystis spp., known for producing toxic secondary metabolites. Although daphnids are affected via decreased food filtering, inhibition of digestive proteases and lethality, development of tolerance against cyanobacterial toxins has also been observed. Aim of our study was to investigate in detail chronic

  2. Cyanobacterial toxicity and migration in a mesotrophic lake in western Washington, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernadette R. Johnston; Jean M. Jacoby

    2003-01-01

    In fall 1997, the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa was documented in Lake Sammamish (western Washington, U.S.A.) for the first time. Cyanobacterial activity and environmental conditions that may promote toxic cyanobacteria were investigated during summer and fall 1999. Development of toxic Microcystis was hypo- thesized to be due to runoff of nutrients from the watershed (external loading hypothesis) or from vertical

  3. Author's personal copy The relationships between nutrients, cyanobacterial toxins and the microbial

    E-print Network

    Wilhelm, Steven W.

    factors that control harmful algal blooms, including those attributable to cyanobacteria, are the subject of considerable debate. In particular, the relative importance of Harmful Algae 10 (2011) 207­215 A R T I C L E I October 2010 Keywords: Microcystis DNA sequencing Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms Cyanotoxins Fecal

  4. Effect of ozonation on the removal of cyanobacterial toxins during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Hoeger, Stefan J; Dietrich, Daniel R; Hitzfeld, Bettina C

    2002-01-01

    Water treatment plants faced with toxic cyanobacteria have to be able to remove cyanotoxins from raw water. In this study we investigated the efficacy of ozonation coupled with various filtration steps under different cyanobacterial bloom conditions. Cyanobacteria were ozonated in a laboratory-scale batch reactor modeled on a system used by a modern waterworks, with subsequent activated carbon and sand filtration steps. The presence of cyanobacterial toxins (microcystins) was determined using the protein phosphatase inhibition assay. We found that ozone concentrations of at least 1.5 mg/L were required to provide enough oxidation potential to destroy the toxin present in 5 X 10(5 )Microcystis aeruginosa cells/mL [total organic carbon (TOC), 1.56 mg/L]. High raw water TOC was shown to reduce the efficiency of free toxin oxidation and destruction. In addition, ozonation of raw waters containing high cyanobacteria cell densities will result in cell lysis and liberation of intracellular toxins. Thus, we emphasize that only regular and simultaneous monitoring of TOC/dissolved organic carbon and cyanobacterial cell densities, in conjunction with online residual O(3) concentration determination and efficient filtration steps, can ensure the provision of safe drinking water from surface waters contaminated with toxic cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:12417484

  5. Marine-freshwater transitions are associated with the evolution of dietary diversification in terapontid grunters (Teleostei: Terapontidae).

    PubMed

    Davis, A M; Unmack, P J; Pusey, B J; Johnson, J B; Pearson, R G

    2012-06-01

    The ecological opportunities associated with transitions across the marine-freshwater interface are regarded as an important catalyst of diversification in a range of aquatic taxa. Here, we examined the role of these major habitat transitions and trophic diversification in a radiation of Australasian fishes using a new molecular phylogeny incorporating 37 Terapontidae species. A combined mitochondrial and nuclear gene analysis yielded a well-supported tree with most nodes resolved. Ancestral terapontids appear to have been euryhaline in habitat affiliation, with a single transition to freshwater environments producing all Australasian freshwater species. Mapping of terapontid feeding modes onto the molecular phylogeny-predicted carnivorous dietary habits was displayed by ancestral terapontids, which subsequently diversified into a range of additional carnivorous, omnivorous, herbivorous and detritivorous dietary modes upon transition to freshwater habitats. Comparative analyses suggested that following the freshwater invasion, the single freshwater clade has exhibited an increased rate of diversification at almost three times the background rate evident across the rest of the family. The marine-freshwater transition within Terapontidae appears to have resulted in substantial dietary radiation in freshwater environments, as well as increased lineage diversification rates relative to euryhaline-marine habitats. PMID:22519660

  6. Nitrate toxicity to aquatic animals: a review with new data for freshwater invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Julio A; Alonso, Alvaro; Salamanca, Annabella

    2005-03-01

    Published data on nitrate (NO3-) toxicity to freshwater and marine animals are reviewed. New data on nitrate toxicity to the freshwater invertebrates Eulimnogammarus toletanus, Echinogammarus echinosetosus and Hydropsyche exocellata are also presented. The main toxic action of nitrate is due to the conversion of oxygen-carrying pigments to forms that are incapable of carrying oxygen. Nitrate toxicity to aquatic animals increases with increasing nitrate concentrations and exposure times. In contrast, nitrate toxicity may decrease with increasing body size, water salinity, and environmental adaptation. Freshwater animals appear to be more sensitive to nitrate than marine animals. A nitrate concentration of 10 mg NO3-N/l (USA federal maximum level for drinking water) can adversely affect, at least during long-term exposures, freshwater invertebrates (E. toletanus, E. echinosetosus, Cheumatopsyche pettiti, Hydropsyche occidentalis), fishes (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, Salmo clarki), and amphibians (Pseudacris triseriata, Rana pipiens, Rana temporaria, Bufo bufo). Safe levels below this nitrate concentration are recommended to protect sensitive freshwater animals from nitrate pollution. Furthermore, a maximum level of 2 mg NO3-N/l would be appropriate for protecting the most sensitive freshwater species. In the case of marine animals, a maximum level of 20 mg NO3-N/l may in general be acceptable. However, early developmental stages of some marine invertebrates, that are well adapted to low nitrate concentrations, may be so susceptible to nitrate as sensitive freshwater invertebrates. PMID:15667845

  7. Innovative design for early detection of invasive species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-native aquatic species impose significant ecological impacts and rising financial costs in marine and freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Early detection of invasive species, as they enter a vulnerable ecosystem, is critical to successful containment and eradication. ORD, at t...

  8. International Year of Freshwater 2003

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-01

    Near the conclusion of the year 2000, the United Nations General Assembly created a resolution to proclaim 2002 as the International Year of Freshwater. Given the importance of freshwater to all human, plant, and animal life, this designation seems altogether fitting and timely. As the resolution notes, it is hoped that many governments and political actors will use the year to increase awareness of the importance of sustainable freshwater use, management, and protection. To this end, this helpful Web site provides a host of online resources designed to educate the web-browsing public about various events related to this overriding theme, along with presenting an online library of publications about freshwater. Visitors can read the online newsletter, Splash, along with browsing a water library, organized by themes (such as water and society and ecosystems), and geographic regions. Another compelling feature are the water proverbs taken from a number of areas, including the Middle East and Latin America. Given the global mission of the site it is refreshing to note that many of the materials are also available in French and Spanish. [KMG

  9. Symbiotic adaptation drives genome streamlining of the cyanobacterial sponge symbiont "Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum".

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhao-Ming; Wang, Yong; Tian, Ren-Mao; Wong, Yue Him; Batang, Zenon B; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaz M; Bajic, Vladimir B; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    "Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum" is a cyanobacterial symbiont widely distributed in sponges, but its functions at the genome level remain unknown. Here, we obtained the draft genome (1.66 Mbp, 90% estimated genome recovery) of "Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum" strain SH4 inhabiting the Red Sea sponge Carteriospongia foliascens. Phylogenomic analysis revealed a high dissimilarity between SH4 and free-living cyanobacterial strains. Essential functions, such as photosynthesis, the citric acid cycle, and DNA replication, were detected in SH4. Eukaryoticlike domains that play important roles in sponge-symbiont interactions were identified exclusively in the symbiont. However, SH4 could not biosynthesize methionine and polyamines and had lost partial genes encoding low-molecular-weight peptides of the photosynthesis complex, antioxidant enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, and proteins involved in resistance to environmental toxins and in biosynthesis of capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. These genetic modifications imply that "Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum" SH4 represents a low-light-adapted cyanobacterial symbiont and has undergone genome streamlining to adapt to the sponge's mild intercellular environment. IMPORTANCE Although the diversity of sponge-associated microbes has been widely studied, genome-level research on sponge symbionts and their symbiotic mechanisms is rare because they are unculturable. "Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum" is a widely distributed uncultivated cyanobacterial sponge symbiont. The genome of this symbiont will help to characterize its evolutionary relationship and functional dissimilarity to closely related free-living cyanobacterial strains. Knowledge of its adaptive mechanism to the sponge host also depends on the genome-level research. The data presented here provided an alternative strategy to obtain the draft genome of "Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum" strain SH4 and provide insight into its evolutionary and functional features. PMID:24692632

  10. DTAF: an efficient probe to study cyanobacterial-plant interaction using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mehboob; Stal, Lucas J; Hasnain, Shahida

    2011-01-01

    A variety of microscopic techniques have been utilized to study cyanobacterial associations with plant roots, but confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the least used due to the unavailability of a suitable fluorescent dye. Commonly used lectins have problems with their binding ability with root cells and their visualization under CLSM. DTAF (5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein) is a fluorescent dye that has been widely used for staining various biological samples for fluorescent microscopy. It reacts with polysaccharides and peptides at ordinary conditions. The possible application and efficiency of DTAF for CLSM studies were examined in various aspects of cyanobacterial-plant interactions. Seedlings of Pisum sativum, Vigna rediata and Triticum aestivum were co-cultivated and stained with DTAF as a fluorochrome. Extracellular and intracellular interactions of cyanobacteria and the plant root surface were observed by CLSM. Results were compared with staining by other commonly used lectins. Advantages of the use of DTAF over other stains are its penetration into root tissues and binding with polysaccharides, mainly the cellulose. The staining was smooth, which clearly showed minute details on the cell of surface and root hairs with higher resolution. The emission wavelength for DTAF is 517 nm, which is highly advantageous as cyanobacteria have auto-fluorescence at 665 nm, and both can be simultaneously used in CLSM by visualizing in different channels. This worked efficiently with all three plants used and with filamentous and unicellular cyanobacterial strains. Cyanobacterial presence was not only clearly observed on the root surface, but also inside the root tissue and epidermal cells. The easy protocol and absence of tissue processing make DTAF a useful probe for studies of cyanobacterial associations with plant roots by CLSM. PMID:20803245

  11. Monitoring levels of cyanobacterial blooms using the visual cyanobacteria index (VCI) and floating algae index (FAI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Yoichi; Fukushima, Takehiko; Matsushita, Bunkei; Matsuzaki, Hana; Kamiya, Koichi; Kobinata, Hisao

    2015-06-01

    Cyanobacterial bloom is a growing environmental problem in inland waters. In this study, we propose a method for monitoring levels of cyanobacterial blooms from Landsat/ETM+ images. The visual cyanobacteria index (VCI) is a simple index for in-situ visual interpretation of cyanobacterial blooms levels, by classifying them into six categories based on aggregation (e.g., subsurface blooms, surface scum). The floating algae index (FAI) and remote sensing reflectance in the red wavelength domain, which can be obtained from Landsat/ETM+ images, were related to the VCI for estimating cyanobacteria bloom levels from the Landsat/ETM+ images. Nine field campaigns were carried out at Lakes Nishiura and Kitaura (Lake Kasumigaura group), Japan, from June to August 2012. We also collected reflectance spectra at 20 stations for different VCI levels on August 3, 2012. The reflectance spectra were recalculated in correspondence to each ETM+ band, and used to calculate the FAI. The FAI values were then used to determine thresholds for classifying cyanobacterial blooms into different VCI levels. These FAI thresholds were validated using three Landsat/ETM+ images. Results showed that FAI values differed significantly at the respective VCI levels except between levels 1 and 2 (subsurface blooms) and levels 5 and 6 (surface scum and hyperscum). This indicated that the FAI was able to detect the high level of cyanobacteria that forms surface scum. In contrast, the Landsat/ETM+ band 3 reflectance could be used as an alternative index for distinguishing surface scum and hyperscum. Application of the thresholds for VCI classifications to three Landsat/ETM+ images showed that the volume of cyanobacterial blooms can be effectively classified into the six VCI levels.

  12. Stability and Noise in the Cyanobacterial Circadian Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalcescu, Irina

    2008-03-01

    Accuracy in cellular function has to be achieved despite random fluctuations (noise) in the concentrations of different molecular constituents inside and outside the cell. Single cell in vivo monitoring reveals that individual cells generate autonomous circadian rhythms in protein abundance. In multi-cellular organisms, the individual cell rhythms appear to be noisy with drifting phases and frequencies. However, the whole organism is significantly more accurate, the temporal precision being achieved most probably via intercellular coupling of the individual noisy oscillators. In cyanobacteria, we have shown that single cell oscillators are impressively stable and a first estimation rules out strong intercellular coupling. Interestingly, these prokaryotes also have the simplest molecular mechanism at the heart of their circadian clock. In the absence of transcriptional activity in vivo, as well alone in vitro, the three clock proteins KaiA, KaiB and KaiC generate a self-sustained circadian oscillation of autophosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Recent chemical kinetics models provide a possible understanding of the three-protein oscillator, but the measured in vivo stability remains yet unexplained. Is the clock stability a built-in property for each bacterium or does a weak intercellular coupling, make them appear like that? To address this question we first theoretically designed our experiment to be able to distinguish coupling, even weak, from phase diffusion. As the precision of our evaluation increases with the length of the experiments, we continuously monitor, for a couple of weeks, mixtures of cell populations with different initial phases. The inherent experimental noise contribution, initially dominant, is reduced by enhanced statistics. In addition, in situ entrainment experiments confirm our ability to detect a coupling of the circadian oscillator to an external force and to describe explicitly the dynamic change of the mean phase. We report a value of the coupling constant that is small compared to the diffusion constant. These results therefore confirm that the cyanobacterial clock stability is a built-in property: the cyanobacterian clock mechanism is not only the simplest but also the most robust.

  13. Prevalence of Ingested Fish Hooks in Freshwater Turtles from Five Rivers in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Steen, David A.; Hopkins, Brittney C.; Van Dyke, James U.; Hopkins, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater turtles may ingest baited fish hooks because many are opportunistic scavengers. Although the ingestion of fish hooks is known to be a source of mortality in multiple vertebrate groups, the prevalence of hook ingestion by freshwater turtles has not been well studied. We trapped turtles from five rivers in the southeastern United States and used radiographs to examine over 600 individuals of four species. Depending on the species, sex, and age class, 0–33% of turtles contained ingested fish hooks. For some species, larger turtles were more likely to contain a fish hook than smaller individuals. Freshwater turtle demography suggests that even small increases in adult mortality may lead to population declines. If our study areas are representative of other aquatic systems that receive fishing pressure, this work likely identifies a potential conflict between a widespread, common recreational activity (i.e., fishing) and an imperiled taxonomic group. PMID:24621919

  14. Prevalence of ingested fish hooks in freshwater turtles from five rivers in the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Steen, David A; Hopkins, Brittney C; Van Dyke, James U; Hopkins, William A

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater turtles may ingest baited fish hooks because many are opportunistic scavengers. Although the ingestion of fish hooks is known to be a source of mortality in multiple vertebrate groups, the prevalence of hook ingestion by freshwater turtles has not been well studied. We trapped turtles from five rivers in the southeastern United States and used radiographs to examine over 600 individuals of four species. Depending on the species, sex, and age class, 0-33% of turtles contained ingested fish hooks. For some species, larger turtles were more likely to contain a fish hook than smaller individuals. Freshwater turtle demography suggests that even small increases in adult mortality may lead to population declines. If our study areas are representative of other aquatic systems that receive fishing pressure, this work likely identifies a potential conflict between a widespread, common recreational activity (i.e., fishing) and an imperiled taxonomic group. PMID:24621919

  15. Fast Evolution from Precast Bricks: Genomics of Young Freshwater Populations of Threespine Stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus

    PubMed Central

    Terekhanova, Nadezhda V.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Penin, Aleksey A.; Neretina, Tatiana V.; Barmintseva, Anna E.; Bazykin, Georgii A.; Kondrashov, Alexey S.; Mugue, Nikolai S.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation is driven by natural selection; however, many adaptations are caused by weak selection acting over large timescales, complicating its study. Therefore, it is rarely possible to study selection comprehensively in natural environments. The threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is a well-studied model organism with a short generation time, small genome size, and many genetic and genomic tools available. Within this originally marine species, populations have recurrently adapted to freshwater all over its range. This evolution involved extensive parallelism: pre-existing alleles that adapt sticklebacks to freshwater habitats, but are also present at low frequencies in marine populations, have been recruited repeatedly. While a number of genomic regions responsible for this adaptation have been identified, the details of selection remain poorly understood. Using whole-genome resequencing, we compare pooled genomic samples from marine and freshwater populations of the White Sea basin, and identify 19 short genomic regions that are highly divergent between them, including three known inversions. 17 of these regions overlap protein-coding genes, including a number of genes with predicted functions that are relevant for adaptation to the freshwater environment. We then analyze four additional independently derived young freshwater populations of known ages, two natural and two artificially established, and use the observed shifts of allelic frequencies to estimate the strength of positive selection. Adaptation turns out to be quite rapid, indicating strong selection acting simultaneously at multiple regions of the genome, with selection coefficients of up to 0.27. High divergence between marine and freshwater genotypes, lack of reduction in polymorphism in regions responsible for adaptation, and high frequencies of freshwater alleles observed even in young freshwater populations are all consistent with rapid assembly of G. aculeatus freshwater genotypes from pre-existing genomic regions of adaptive variation, with strong selection that favors this assembly acting simultaneously at multiple loci. PMID:25299485

  16. Fast evolution from precast bricks: genomics of young freshwater populations of threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus.

    PubMed

    Terekhanova, Nadezhda V; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Neretina, Tatiana V; Barmintseva, Anna E; Bazykin, Georgii A; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Mugue, Nikolai S

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation is driven by natural selection; however, many adaptations are caused by weak selection acting over large timescales, complicating its study. Therefore, it is rarely possible to study selection comprehensively in natural environments. The threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is a well-studied model organism with a short generation time, small genome size, and many genetic and genomic tools available. Within this originally marine species, populations have recurrently adapted to freshwater all over its range. This evolution involved extensive parallelism: pre-existing alleles that adapt sticklebacks to freshwater habitats, but are also present at low frequencies in marine populations, have been recruited repeatedly. While a number of genomic regions responsible for this adaptation have been identified, the details of selection remain poorly understood. Using whole-genome resequencing, we compare pooled genomic samples from marine and freshwater populations of the White Sea basin, and identify 19 short genomic regions that are highly divergent between them, including three known inversions. 17 of these regions overlap protein-coding genes, including a number of genes with predicted functions that are relevant for adaptation to the freshwater environment. We then analyze four additional independently derived young freshwater populations of known ages, two natural and two artificially established, and use the observed shifts of allelic frequencies to estimate the strength of positive selection. Adaptation turns out to be quite rapid, indicating strong selection acting simultaneously at multiple regions of the genome, with selection coefficients of up to 0.27. High divergence between marine and freshwater genotypes, lack of reduction in polymorphism in regions responsible for adaptation, and high frequencies of freshwater alleles observed even in young freshwater populations are all consistent with rapid assembly of G. aculeatus freshwater genotypes from pre-existing genomic regions of adaptive variation, with strong selection that favors this assembly acting simultaneously at multiple loci. PMID:25299485

  17. Coastal Environmental Impacts Brought About by Alterations to Freshwater Flow in the Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed

    Sklar; Browder

    1998-07-01

    / Freshwater inflow is one of the most influential landscape processes affecting community structure and function in lagoons, estuaries, and deltas of the world; nevertheless there are few reviews of coastal impacts associated with altered freshwater inputs. A conceptual model of the possible influences of freshwater inflows on biogeochemical and trophic interactions was used to structure this review, evaluate dominant effects, and discuss tools for coastal management. Studies in the Gulf of Mexico were used to exemplify problems commonly encountered by coastal zone managers and scientists around the world. Landscape alteration, impacting the timing and volume of freshwater inflow, was found to be the most common stress on estuarine systems. Poorly planned upstream landscape alterations can impact wetland and open-water salinity patterns, nutrients, sediment fertility, bottom topography, dissolved oxygen, and concentrations of xenobiotics. These, in turn, influence productivity, structure, and behavior of coastal plant and animal populations. Common biogeochemical impacts include excessive stratification, eutrophication, sediment deprivation, hypoxia, and contamination. Common biological impacts include reduction in livable habitats, promotion of "exotic" species, and decreased diversity. New multiobjective statistical models and dynamic landscape simulations, used to conduct policy-relevant experiments and integrate a wide variety of coastal data for freshwater inflow management, assume that optimum estuarine productivity and diversity is found somewhere between the stress associated with altered freshwater flow and the subsidy associated with natural flow. These models attempt to maximize the area of spatial overlap where favorable dynamic substrates, such as salinity, coincide with favorable fixed substrates, such as bottom topography. Based upon this principle of spatial overlap, a statistical performance model demonstrates how population vitality measurements (growth, survival, and reproduction) can be used to define sediment, freshwater, and nutrient loading limits. Similarly, a spatially articulate landscape simulation model demonstrates how cumulative impacts and ecosystem processes can be predicted as a function of changes in freshwater, sediment, and nutrient inflows.KEY WORDS: Resource management; Landscape impacts; Freshwater discharge; Coastal, ecosystem models; Coastal wetlands PMID:9582391

  18. Isotopic variation of fishes in freshwater and estuarine zones of a large subtropical coastal lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A. M.; Hoeinghaus, D. J.; Vieira, J. P.; Winemiller, K. O.

    2007-07-01

    We used stable C and N isotope ratios of tissues from 29 fish species from a large subtropical lagoon in southern Brazil to examine spatial variability in isotopic composition and vertical trophic structure across freshwater and estuarine habitats. Nitrogen isotope ratios indicated a smooth gradation in trophic positions among species, with most fishes occupying the secondary and tertiary consumer level. Fish assemblages showed a significant shift in their carbon isotopic signatures between freshwater and estuarine sites. Depleted carbon signatures (from -24.7‰ to -17.8‰) were found in freshwater, whereas more enriched signatures (from -19.1‰ to -12.3‰) were obtained within the estuarine zone downstream. Based on our survey of the C 3 and C 4 plants and isotopic values for phytoplankton and benthic microalgae reported for ecosystems elsewhere, we hypothesized that the observed ?13C differences in the fish assemblage between freshwater and estuarine sites is due to a shift from assimilating organic matter ultimately derived from C 3 freshwater marsh vegetation and phytoplankton at the freshwater site ( ?13C ranging from -25‰ to -19‰), to C 4 salt-marsh (e.g. Spartina) and widgeon grass ( Ruppia maritima), benthic microalgae and marine phytoplankton at the estuarine sites (from -18‰ to -12‰). Our results suggested that fish assemblages are generally supported by autochthonous primary production. Freshwater fishes that likely were displaced downstream into the estuary during periods of high freshwater discharge had depleted ?13C values that were characteristic of the upper lagoon. These results suggest that spatial foodweb subsidies can occur within the lagoon.

  19. UNH Center for Freshwater Biology Research 13(1): 1-9 (2011) Bioaccumulation of Microcystins by Freshwater Mussels in Mystic

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    2011-01-01

    by Freshwater Mussels in Mystic Lake and Middle Pond, MA Breanna Travers, Amanda Murby, and James Haney Dept mussels in Mystic Lake and Middle Pond (Barnstable, MA). Four mussel species, Elliptio complanata (Eastern Mystic Lake and Middle Pond of Barnstable, MA experienced severe blooms of cyanobacteria in the summers

  20. Contaminant Sensitivity of Freshwater Mussels ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY OF PESTICIDE FORMULATIONS (ATRAZINE, CHLORPYRIFOS, AND PERMETHRIN) TO GLOCHIDIA AND JUVENILES OF LAMPSILIS SILIQUOIDEA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROBERT B. BRINGOLF; W. GREGORY COPE; M. CHRIS BARNHART; SHAD MOSHER; PETER R. LAZARO; DAMIAN SHEA

    Freshwater mussels are among the most imperiled faunal groups in North America; approximately 67% of the nearly 300 native freshwater mussel species (family Unionidae) are listed as endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Despite evidence that glochidia and juvenile life stages are highly sensitive to some chemical contaminants, the effects of pesticides on early life stages of unionid mussels are

  1. Community Composition, Toxigenicity, and Environmental Conditions during a Cyanobacterial Bloom Occurring along 1,100 Kilometers of the Murray River

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tebrineh, Jamal; Merrick, Chester; Ryan, David; Humpage, Andrew; Bowling, Lee

    2012-01-01

    A cyanobacterial bloom impacted over 1,100 km of the Murray River, Australia, and its tributaries in 2009. Physicochemical conditions in the river were optimal to support a bloom at the time. The data suggest that at least three blooms occurred concurrently in different sections of the river, with each having a different community composition and associated cyanotoxin profile. Microscopic and genetic analyses suggested the presence of potentially toxic Anabaena circinalis, Microcystis flos-aquae, and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii at many locations. Low concentrations of saxitoxins and cylindrospermopsin were detected in Anabaena and Cylindrospermopsis populations. A multiplex quantitative PCR was used, employing novel oligonucleotide primers and fluorescent TaqMan probes, to examine bloom toxigenicity. This single reaction method identified the presence of the major cyanotoxin-producing species present in these environmental samples and also quantified the various toxin biosynthesis genes. A large number of cells present throughout the bloom were not potential toxin producers or were present in numbers below the limit of detection of the assay and therefore not an immediate health risk. Potential toxin-producing cells, possessing the cylindrospermopsin biosynthesis gene (cyrA), predominated early in the bloom, while those possessing the saxitoxin biosynthesis gene (sxtA) were more common toward its decline. In this study, the concentrations of cyanotoxins measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) correlated positively with the respective toxin gene copy numbers, indicating that the molecular method may be used as a proxy for bloom risk assessment. PMID:22081581

  2. Assessment of freshwater fish assemblages and their habitats in the National Park Service system of the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, James M.; Nibbelink, Nathan P.; McAbee, Kevin T.; Stahli, Julie W.

    2012-01-01

    The southeast region of the United States contains the highest diversity of freshwater fish species in the country: approximately 662 species. Existing protected areas like units of the National Park Service (NPS) should reflect this biodiversity, but there has been no broad-scale assessment. We compiled several data sets identifying native freshwater fish species distributions in and surrounding NPS units and threats to those resources. Focusing on the 26 NPS units containing only freshwater fish species, we documented 288 species within NPS boundaries. The largest NPS units tended to have the most fish species and aquatic habitat but also the greatest amount of alteration. Increasing rates of urbanization, declines in percentage agriculture land cover, and increased density of road-stream crossings in surrounding watersheds were good predictors of nonindigenous species presence within NPS unit boundaries. These results help document the role of NPS units in conserving freshwater fish diversity and, in this region, suggest that measures aimed at controlling urbanization in the adjacent watersheds could affect the diversity of freshwater fish communities in these units.

  3. Coexistence of Typha Angustifolia and Impatiens Capensis in a tidal freshwater marsh

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristine N. Hopfensperger; Katharina A. M. Engelhardt

    2007-01-01

    Several salt marsh plant species can oxygenate soils through their aerenchymous tissue and thereby facilitate the growth of\\u000a neighboring species. Such positive interactions remain poorly understood for tidal freshwater marshes, yet may explain why\\u000a species adverse to submerged roots are able to thrive in these marshes. Field observations showed a positive association between\\u000a Typha angustifolia L. and Impatiens capensis Meerb.,

  4. Similarities in acute temperature preferences of freshwater fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, D. (Muddy Run Ecological Lab., Drumore, PA); Schutsky, R.M.; Purdy, E.J. Jr.; Silver, C.

    1981-01-01

    A statistical analysis of new and published laboratory data revealed strong geographic similarities in acute (up to 4-h) temperature preferences for several freshwater fishes. Regression models developed from our laboratory studies predicted acute temperature preferences of species from other geographic areas. Species within a family (three cyprinids, two ictalurids, and six centrarchids were tested) have similar acute preferenda, except that white crappie (Pomoxis annularis) differs from other centrarchids. For the species analyzed, acclimation temperature is the only significant variable affecting acute preferenda and accounted for up to 82% of the total variation. These emerging generalities should minimize the need for further site-specific studies of acute temperature preference for individual species and thus should result in substantial savings in money and time.

  5. Bacterial Pollution Indicators in the Intestinal Tract of Freshwater Fish

    PubMed Central

    Geldreich, Edwin E.; Clarke, Norman A.

    1966-01-01

    A study was made of the occurrence, distribution, and persistence of coliforms, fecal coliforms, and fecal streptococci in the intestinal tract of freshwater fish. A total of 132 fish representing 14 different species were used in various phases of these experiments. Examination of the intestinal contents of 78 fish from moderately polluted sections of the Little Miami River indicated that fecal coliform densities were lowest in bluegills (less than 20 per gram) and highest in catfish (1,090,000 per gram). Levels of fecal streptococci for these two species were 220 and 240,000 per gram, respectively. The occurrence of fecal coliforms in fish caught in this stream reflected the warm-blooded-animal-pollution level of the water. All fish used in this phase of the study were caught during July, August, and September when the water temperatures were between 13 and 18 C. The fate of fecal coliforms and Streptococcus faecalis in the fish intestine indicated that these organisms can probably survive and multiply when fish and water temperatures are 20 C or higher, but only when the organisms are retained in the gut for periods beyond 24 hr. Based on the biochemical reactions for 3,877 coliform strains isolated from 132 freshwater fish of 14 different species, 91.4% of all strains were composed of five IMViC types. In a similar study of the biochemical reactions of 850 streptococci isolated from the intestinal tract of 55 freshwater fish, the predominant strains included S. faecalis and various closely associated biotypes. No consistently recurring pattern for either coliforms or streptococci could be developed to identify species of fish investigated. The composition of the intestinal flora is, however, related in varying degree to the level of contamination of water and food in the environment. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6008184

  6. Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO?.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingjie; Liberton, Michelle; Cliften, Paul F; Head, Richard D; Jacobs, Jon M; Smith, Richard D; Koppenaal, David W; Brand, Jerry J; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbes are of emerging interest as production organisms in biotechnology because they can grow autotrophically using sunlight, an abundant energy source, and CO?, a greenhouse gas. Important traits for such microbes are fast growth and amenability to genetic manipulation. Here we describe Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a unicellular cyanobacterium capable of rapid autotrophic growth, comparable to heterotrophic industrial hosts such as yeast. Synechococcus UTEX 2973 can be readily transformed for facile generation of desired knockout and knock-in mutations. Genome sequencing coupled with global proteomics studies revealed that Synechococcus UTEX 2973 is a close relative of the widely studied cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, an organism that grows more than two times slower. A small number of nucleotide changes are the only significant differences between the genomes of these two cyanobacterial strains. Thus, our study has unraveled genetic determinants necessary for rapid growth of cyanobacterial strains of significant industrial potential. PMID:25633131

  7. Assessment of Chemical and Physico-Chemical Properties of Cyanobacterial Lipids for Biodiesel Production

    PubMed Central

    Da Rós, Patrícia C. M.; Silva, Caroline S. P.; Silva-Stenico, Maria E.; Fiore, Marli F.; De Castro, Heizir F.

    2013-01-01

    Five non-toxin producing cyanobacterial isolates from the genera Synechococcus, Trichormus, Microcystis, Leptolyngbya and Chlorogloea were examined in terms of quantity and quality as lipid feedstock for biofuel production. Under the conditions used in this study, the biomass productivity ranged from 3.7 to 52.7 mg·L?1·day?1 in relation to dry biomass, while the lipid productivity varied between 0.8 and 14.2 mg·L?1·day?1. All cyanobacterial strains evaluated yielded lipids with similar fatty acid composition to those present in the seed oils successfully used for biodiesel synthesis. However, by combining biomass and lipid productivity parameters, the greatest potential was found for Synechococcus sp. PCC7942, M. aeruginosa NPCD-1 and Trichormus sp. CENA77. The chosen lipid samples were further characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), viscosity and thermogravimetry and used as lipid feedstock for biodiesel synthesis by heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:23880929

  8. Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Jingjie; Liberton, Michelle; Cliften, Paul F.; Head, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Brand, Jerry J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-30

    Photosynthetic microbes are of emerging interest as production organisms in biotechnology because they can grow autotrophically using sunlight, an abundant energy source, and CO2, a greenhouse gas. Important traits for such microbes are fast growth and amenability to genetic manipulation. Here we describe Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a unicellular cyanobacterium capable of rapid autotrophic growth, comparable to heterotrophic industrial hosts such as yeast. Synechococcus 2973 can be readily transformed for facile generation of desired knockout and knock-in mutations. Genome sequencing coupled with global proteomics studies revealed that Synechococcus 2973 is a close relative of the widely studied cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatusmore »PCC 7942, an organism that grows more than two times slower. A small number of nucleotide changes are the only significant differences between the genomes of these two cyanobacterial strains. Thus, our study has unraveled genetic determinants necessary for rapid growth of cyanobacterial strains of significant industrial potential.« less

  9. Genomic deletions disrupt nitrogen metabolism pathways of a cyanobacterial diatom symbiont.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Jason A; Foster, Rachel A; Tripp, H James; Carter, Brandon J; Zehr, Jonathan P; Villareal, Tracy A

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms with symbiotic N?-fixing cyanobacteria are often abundant in the oligotrophic open ocean gyres. The most abundant cyanobacterial symbionts form heterocysts (specialized cells for N? fixation) and provide nitrogen (N) to their hosts, but their morphology, cellular locations and abundances differ depending on the host. Here we show that the location of the symbiont and its dependency on the host are linked to the evolution of the symbiont genome. The genome of Richelia (found inside the siliceous frustule of Hemiaulus) is reduced and lacks ammonium transporters, nitrate/nitrite reductases and glutamine:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase. In contrast, the genome of the closely related Calothrix (found outside the frustule of Chaetoceros) is more similar to those of free-living heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. The genome of Richelia is an example of metabolic streamlining that has implications for the evolution of N?-fixing symbiosis and potentially for manipulating plant-cyanobacterial interactions. PMID:23612308

  10. Effects of salinity on freshwater fishes in coastal plain drainages in the southeastern U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Mark S.; Meador, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    This review focuses on the influence of salinity on freshwater fishes in coastal rivers and estuaries of the southeastern U.S. Influences of salinity on freshwater fish species can be explained partly through responses evidenced by behavior, physiology, growth, reproduction, and food habits during all aspects of life history. Factors influencing the rate of salinity change affect the community structure and dynamics of freshwater fishes in brackish environments. Our understanding of the relation between salinity and the life history of freshwater fishes is limited because little ecological research has been conducted in low-salinity habitats that we consider an “interface” between freshwater streams and the estuary proper. Much of the available data are descriptive in nature and describe best general patterns, but more specific studies are required to better determine the influence of salinity on freshwater fishes. Improved understanding of the influence of human-induced changes on the productivity and viability of these important systems will require a new research focus.

  11. The composition of the global and feature specific cyanobacterial core-genomes

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Stefan; Keller, Mario; Selymesi, Mario; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes important for many ecosystems with a high potential for biotechnological usage e.g., in the production of bioactive molecules. Either asks for a deep understanding of the functionality of cyanobacteria and their interaction with the environment. This in part can be inferred from the analysis of their genomes or proteomes. Today, many cyanobacterial genomes have been sequenced and annotated. This information can be used to identify biological pathways present in all cyanobacteria as proteins involved in such processes are encoded by a so called core-genome. However, beside identification of fundamental processes, genes specific for certain cyanobacterial features can be identified by a holistic genome analysis as well. We identified 559 genes that define the core-genome of 58 analyzed cyanobacteria, as well as three genes likely to be signature genes for thermophilic and 57 genes likely to be signature genes for heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. To get insights into cyanobacterial systems for the interaction with the environment we also inspected the diversity of the outer membrane proteome with focus on ?-barrel proteins. We observed that most of the transporting outer membrane ?-barrel proteins are not globally conserved in the cyanobacterial phylum. In turn, the occurrence of ?-barrel proteins shows high strain specificity. The core set of outer membrane proteins globally conserved in cyanobacteria comprises three proteins only, namely the outer membrane ?-barrel assembly protein Omp85, the lipid A transfer protein LptD, and an OprB-type porin. Thus, we conclude that cyanobacteria have developed individual strategies for the interaction with the environment, while other intracellular processes like the regulation of the protein homeostasis are globally conserved. PMID:25852675

  12. Cyanobacterial macrolichens on Populus tremula as indicators of forest continuity in Finland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mikko Kuusinen

    1996-01-01

    The frequency of cyanobacterial or cephalodial macro-lichens on old standing Populus trees in southern and middle boreal Finland was surveyed on 22 sample plots containing 22–41 trunks. The sample plots were divided into four main groups according to location and human impact: (A) middle boreal ± old-growth, (B) southern boreal old-growth, (C) southern boreal slightly managed and (D) southern boreal

  13. The composition of the global and feature specific cyanobacterial core-genomes.

    PubMed

    Simm, Stefan; Keller, Mario; Selymesi, Mario; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes important for many ecosystems with a high potential for biotechnological usage e.g., in the production of bioactive molecules. Either asks for a deep understanding of the functionality of cyanobacteria and their interaction with the environment. This in part can be inferred from the analysis of their genomes or proteomes. Today, many cyanobacterial genomes have been sequenced and annotated. This information can be used to identify biological pathways present in all cyanobacteria as proteins involved in such processes are encoded by a so called core-genome. However, beside identification of fundamental processes, genes specific for certain cyanobacterial features can be identified by a holistic genome analysis as well. We identified 559 genes that define the core-genome of 58 analyzed cyanobacteria, as well as three genes likely to be signature genes for thermophilic and 57 genes likely to be signature genes for heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. To get insights into cyanobacterial systems for the interaction with the environment we also inspected the diversity of the outer membrane proteome with focus on ?-barrel proteins. We observed that most of the transporting outer membrane ?-barrel proteins are not globally conserved in the cyanobacterial phylum. In turn, the occurrence of ?-barrel proteins shows high strain specificity. The core set of outer membrane proteins globally conserved in cyanobacteria comprises three proteins only, namely the outer membrane ?-barrel assembly protein Omp85, the lipid A transfer protein LptD, and an OprB-type porin. Thus, we conclude that cyanobacteria have developed individual strategies for the interaction with the environment, while other intracellular processes like the regulation of the protein homeostasis are globally conserved. PMID:25852675

  14. DTAF: an efficient probe to study cyanobacterial-plant interaction using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mehboob Ahmed; Lucas J. Stal; Shahida Hasnain

    2011-01-01

    A variety of microscopic techniques have been utilized to study cyanobacterial associations with plant roots, but confocal\\u000a laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the least used due to the unavailability of a suitable fluorescent dye. Commonly used\\u000a lectins have problems with their binding ability with root cells and their visualization under CLSM. DTAF (5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl)\\u000a aminofluorescein) is a fluorescent dye that has

  15. Functionally important structural elements of the cyanobacterial clock-related protein Pex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shunsuke Kurosawa; Reiko Murakami; Kiyoshi Onai; Megumi Morishita; Daisuke Hasegawa; Ryo Iwase; Tatsuya Uzumaki; Fumio Hayashi; Tomomi Kitajima-Ihara; Shuhei Sakata; Midori Murakami; Tsutomu Kouyama; Masahiro Ishiura

    2009-01-01

    Pex, a clock-related protein involved in the input pathway of the cyanobacterial circadian clock system, suppresses the expression of clock gene kaiA and lengthens the circadian period. Here, we determined the crystal structure of Anabaena Pex (AnaPex; Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120) and Synechococcus Pex (SynPex; Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942). Pex is a homodimer that forms a winged-helix structure.

  16. Effect of photosynthesis on pH variation in cyanobacterial biofilms from Roman catacombs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Albertano; L. Bruno; D. D'Ottavi; D. Moscone; G. Palleschi

    2000-01-01

    Cyanobacterial biofilms present on stone surfaces inRoman hypogea were studied with the aim of assessingtheir deteriogenic activity on the colonisedsubstrata. In order to achieve this, non-destructivemethods were developed and applied to measure pHvariation induced via photosynthesis and respirationin representative cyanobacteria from Roman catacombs.Amperometric and potentiometric microsensors were alsoused on Scytonema biofilms in culture in orderto measure photosynthesis and assess pH

  17. Hydrogen metabolism by decomposing cyanobacterial aggregates in Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Oremland, R.S.

    1983-05-01

    Hydrogen production by incubated cyanobacterial epiphytes occurred only in the dark, was stimulated by C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, and was inhibited by O/sub 2/. Addition of NO/sub 3//sup -/ inhibited dark, anaerobic H/sub 2/ production, whereas the addition of NH/sub 4//sup +/ inhibited N/sub 2/ fixation (C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ reduction) but not dark H/sub 2/ production. Aerobically incubated cyanobacterial aggregates consumed H/sub 2/, but light-incubated rates (3.6 mu mol of H/sub 2/ g-1 h-1) were statistically equivalent to dark uptake rates (4.8 mu mol of H/sub 2/ g-1 h-1), which were statistically equivalent to dark, anaerobic production rates (2.5 to 10 mu mol of H/sub 2/ g-1 h-1). Production rates of H/sub 2/ were fourfold higher for aggregates in a more advanced stage of decomposition. Enrichment cultures of H/sub 2/-producing fermentative bacteria were recovered from freshly harvested, H/sub 2/-producing cyanobacterial aggregates. Hydrogen production in these cyanobacterial communities appears to be caused by the resident bacterial flora and not by the cyanobacteria. In situ areal estimates of dark H/sub 2/ production by submerged epiphytes (6.8 mu mol of H/sub 2/ m-2 h-1) were much lower than rates of light-driven N/sub 2/ fixation by the epiphytic cyanobacteria (310 mu mol of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ meters -2 h-1). (26 Refs.)

  18. Taste and odour and cyanobacterial toxins: impairment, prediction, and management in the Great Lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan B. Watson; Jeff Ridal; Gregory L. Boyer

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the issues associated with algal-cyanobacterial taste-odour (T&O) compounds and toxins in the Great Lakes. As with other remediated water bodies, the Great Lakes have undergone significant shifts in nutrient and food-web regimes and are exhibiting erratic blooms and noxious algal metabolite (NAM) outbreaks, despite reduced off- shore nutrient levels. We appraise the chemistry, biota, and distribution of

  19. Role of Cyanobacterial Exopolysaccharides in Phototrophic Biofilms and in Complex Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Federico; De Philippis, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) are an important class of biopolymers with great ecological importance. In natural environments, they are a common feature of microbial biofilms, where they play key protective and structural roles. As the primary colonizers of constrained environments, such as desert soils and lithic and exposed substrates, cyanobacteria are the first contributors to the synthesis of the EPSs constituting the extracellular polymeric matrix that favors the formation of microbial associations with varying levels of complexity called biofilms. Cyanobacterial colonization represents the first step for the formation of biofilms with different levels of complexity. In all of the possible systems in which cyanobacteria are involved, the synthesis of EPSs contributes a structurally-stable and hydrated microenvironment, as well as chemical/physical protection against biotic and abiotic stress factors. Notwithstanding the important roles of cyanobacterial EPSs, many aspects related to their roles and the relative elicited biotic and abiotic factors have still to be clarified. The aim of this survey is to outline the state-of-the-art of the importance of the cyanobacterial EPS excretion, both for the producing cells and for the microbial associations in which cyanobacteria are a key component. PMID:25837843

  20. Phosphonate degradation by Spirulina strains: cyanobacterial biofilters for the removal of anticorrosive polyphosphonates from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Prearo, Valentina; Wieczorek, Dorota; Kafarski, Pawe?; Lipok, Jacek

    2011-03-01

    The ability of Spirulina spp. to metabolize the recalcitrant xenobiotic Dequest 2054(®) [hexamethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(methylphosphonic acid)], a CaSO(4) inhibitor used for boiler treatment and reverse osmosis desalination, was investigated. The compound served as sole source of phosphorus, but not of nitrogen, for cyanobacterial growth. In vivo utilization was followed by (31)P NMR analysis. The disappearance of the polyphosphonate proceeded only with actively dividing cells, and no release of inorganic phosphate was evident. However, no difference was found between P-starved and P-fed cultures. Maximal utilization reached 1.0 ± 0.2 mmoll(-1), corresponding to 0.56 ± 0.11 mmol g(-1) dry biomass, thus residual amounts were still present in the exhausted medium when the compound was supplied at higher initial concentrations. At low substrate levels metabolism rates were lower, suggesting that a concentration-driven uptake may represent a limiting step during the biodegradation process. The compound was not retained by biocolumns made with immobilized cyanobacterial cells, either alive or dead. A lab-scale pilot plant, consisting of a series of sequentially connected vessels containing an actively proliferating algal culture, was built and tested for wastewater treatment. Results showed 50% removal of the polyphosphonate added to an initial concentration of 2.5mM. Although further optimization will be required, data strengthen the possibility of using cyanobacterial strains for bioremediation purposes. PMID:22112915

  1. Electrochemical Detection of Circadian Redox Rhythm in Cyanobacterial Cells via Extracellular Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Koichi; Pornpitra, Tunanunkul; Izawa, Seiichiro; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Kato, Souichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2015-06-01

    Recent research on cellular circadian rhythms suggests that the coupling of transcription-translation feedback loops and intracellular redox oscillations is essential for robust circadian timekeeping. For clarification of the molecular mechanism underlying the circadian rhythm, methods that allow for the dynamic and simultaneous detection of transcription/translation and redox oscillations in living cells are needed. Herein, we report that the cyanobacterial circadian redox rhythm can be electrochemically detected based on extracellular electron transfer (EET), a process in which intracellular electrons are exchanged with an extracellular electrode. As the EET-based method is non-destructive, concurrent detection with transcription/translation rhythm using bioluminescent reporter strains becomes possible. An EET pathway that electrochemically connected the intracellular region of cyanobacterial cells with an extracellular electrode was constructed via a newly synthesized electron mediator with cell membrane permeability. In the presence of the mediator, the open circuit potential of the culture medium exhibited temperature-compensated rhythm with approximately 24 h periodicity. Importantly, such circadian rhythm of the open circuit potential was not observed in the absence of the electron mediator, indicating that the EET process conveys the dynamic information regarding the intracellular redox state to the extracellular electrode. These findings represent the first direct demonstration of the intracellular circadian redox rhythm of cyanobacterial cells. PMID:25975263

  2. Detecting KaiC phosphorylation rhythms of the cyanobacterial circadian oscillator in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ick; Boyd, Joseph S; Espinosa, Javier; Golden, Susan S

    2015-01-01

    The central oscillator of the cyanobacterial circadian clock is unique in the biochemical simplicity of its components and the robustness of the oscillation. The oscillator is composed of three cyanobacterial proteins: KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. If very pure preparations of these three proteins are mixed in a test tube in the right proportions and with ATP and MgCl2, the phosphorylation states of KaiC will oscillate with a circadian period, and these states can be analyzed simply by SDS-PAGE. The purity of the proteins is critical for obtaining robust oscillation. Contaminating proteases will destroy oscillation by degradation of Kai proteins, and ATPases will attenuate robustness by consumption of ATP. Here, we provide a detailed protocol to obtain pure recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli to construct a robust cyanobacterial circadian oscillator in vitro. In addition, we present a protocol that facilitates analysis of phosphorylation states of KaiC and other phosphorylated proteins from in vivo samples. PMID:25662456

  3. Flux Balance Analysis of Cyanobacterial Metabolism: The Metabolic Network of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, Henning; Gründel, Marianne; Zilliges, Yvonne; Lehmann, Robert; Hoffmann, Sabrina; Lockau, Wolfgang; Steuer, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are versatile unicellular phototrophic microorganisms that are highly abundant in many environments. Owing to their capability to utilize solar energy and atmospheric carbon dioxide for growth, cyanobacteria are increasingly recognized as a prolific resource for the synthesis of valuable chemicals and various biofuels. To fully harness the metabolic capabilities of cyanobacteria necessitates an in-depth understanding of the metabolic interconversions taking place during phototrophic growth, as provided by genome-scale reconstructions of microbial organisms. Here we present an extended reconstruction and analysis of the metabolic network of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Building upon several recent reconstructions of cyanobacterial metabolism, unclear reaction steps are experimentally validated and the functional consequences of unknown or dissenting pathway topologies are discussed. The updated model integrates novel results with respect to the cyanobacterial TCA cycle, an alleged glyoxylate shunt, and the role of photorespiration in cellular growth. Going beyond conventional flux-balance analysis, we extend the computational analysis to diurnal light/dark cycles of cyanobacterial metabolism. PMID:23843751

  4. Non-ribosomal halogenated protease inhibitors from cyanobacterial isolates as attractive drug targets.

    PubMed

    Silva-Stenico, M E; Rigonato, J; Leal, M G; Vaz, M G M V; Andreote, A P D; Fiore, M F

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the ability to produce compounds with remarkable biological activity, and have thus attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry. Cyanopeptides acting as protease inhibitors have shown potential in the field of pharmacotherapy through regulation of abnormal physiological processes in the human body. Despite the already described cyanopeptide protease inhibitors, the search for new congeners is of considerable interest which may pave the way for more efficient molecules. In this study, the presence of the protease inhibitors aeruginosin and cyanopeptolin with non-, mono- and dichlorination and also genes coding for their synthetases was investigated in 90 cyanobacterial strains. Mass spectrometry analyses highlighted production of 91, 19 and 3 non-, mono- and dichlorinated congeners, respectively. The purified extract of Microcystis botrys SPC759 inhibited 61% of pepsin protease. PCR amplifications of aeruginosin and cyanopeptolin synthetase gene regions were observed in 41 and 28% of evaluated strains, respectively. The sequences obtained for the aerA-aerB (aeruginosin) and mcnC-mcnE (cyanopeptolin) gene regions grouped together with their homologues found in other cyanobacterial strains in the phylogenetic analyses with high bootstrap support. Antimicrobial activity assays performed using all intracellular extracts inhibited 31 and 26% of Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogenic bacterial growth, respectively. The results of this study showed the production of aeruginosin and cyanopeptolin and the presence of their genes in several cyanobacterial genera for the first time besides the discovery of novel congeners. PMID:22934766

  5. Genetic management guidelines for captive propagation of freshwater mussels (unionoidea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.; Hallerman, E.M.; Neves, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Although the greatest global diversity of freshwater mussels (???300 species) resides in the United States, the superfamily Unionoidea is also the most imperiled taxon of animals in the nation. Thirty-five species are considered extinct, 70 species are listed as endangered or threatened, and approximately 100 more are species of conservation concern. To prevent additional species losses, biologists have developed methods for propagating juvenile mussels for release into the wild to restore or augment populations. Since 1997, mussel propagation facilities in the United States have released over 1 million juveniles of more than a dozen imperiled species, and survival of these juveniles in the wild has been documented. With the expectation of continued growth of these programs, agencies and facilities involved with mussel propagation must seriously consider the genetic implications of releasing captive-reared progeny. We propose 10 guidelines to help maintain the genetic resources of cultured and wild populations. Preservation of genetic diversity will require robust genetic analysis of source populations to define conservation units for valid species, subspecies, and unique populations. Hatchery protocols must be implemented that minimize risks of artificial selection and other genetic hazards affecting adaptive traits of progeny subsequently released to the wild. We advocate a pragmatic, adaptive approach to species recovery that incorporates the principles of conservation genetics into breeding programs, and prioritizes the immediate demographic needs of critically endangered mussel species.

  6. A synthetic phylogeny of freshwater crayfish: insights for conservation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Christopher L; Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Stern, David; Crandall, Keith A

    2015-02-19

    Phylogenetic systematics is heading for a renaissance where we shift from considering our phylogenetic estimates as a static image in a published paper and taxonomies as a hardcopy checklist to treating both the phylogenetic estimate and dynamic taxonomies as metadata for further analyses. The Open Tree of Life project (opentreeoflife.org) is developing synthesis tools for harnessing the power of phylogenetic inference and robust taxonomy to develop a synthetic tree of life. We capitalize on this approach to estimate a synthesis tree for the freshwater crayfish. The crayfish make an exceptional group to demonstrate the utility of the synthesis approach, as there recently have been a number of phylogenetic studies on the crayfishes along with a robust underlying taxonomic framework. Importantly, the crayfish have also been extensively assessed by an IUCN Red List team and therefore have accurate and up-to-date area and conservation status data available for analysis within a phylogenetic context. Here, we develop a synthesis phylogeny for the world's freshwater crayfish and examine the phylogenetic distribution of threat. We also estimate a molecular phylogeny based on all available GenBank crayfish sequences and use this tree to estimate divergence times and test for divergence rate variation. Finally, we conduct EDGE and HEDGE analyses and identify a number of species of freshwater crayfish of highest priority in conservation efforts. PMID:25561670

  7. REPRODUCTIVE MECHANISMS IN THE GIANT FRESHWATER PRAWN, MACROBRACHIUM ROSENBERGII AND COOPERATIVE RESEARCH TO IMPROVE SEED PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY IN THE MEKONG DELTA REGION OF VIETNAM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcy N. Wilder; Wei-Jun Yang; Do Thi Thanh Huong; Masachika Maeda

    The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii , is a commercially important species of crustacean cultured extensively throughout Southeast Asia. In Vietnam, where Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS) is currently implementing a comprehensive project entitled \\

  8. ACUTE TOXICITY OF NITRITE TO RAINBOW TROUT (SALMO GAIRDNERI): EFFECTS OF PH, NITRITE SPECIES, AND ANION SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of nitrite to rainbow trout is pH-dependent within the range considered acceptable to most freshwater aquatic life (pH 6.5-9.0). Both of the nitrite species, NO2(-) and HNO2, are toxic. It is recommended that nitrite criteria to protect freshwater aquatic life be bas...

  9. Characterisation of Cyanobacterial Bicarbonate Transporters in E. coli Shows that SbtA Homologs Are Functional in This Heterologous Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiahui; Förster, Britta; Rourke, Loraine; Howitt, Susan M.; Price, G. Dean

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial HCO3- transporters BCT1, SbtA and BicA are important components of cyanobacterial CO2-concentration mechanisms. They also show potential in applications aimed at improving photosynthetic rates and yield when expressed in the chloroplasts of C3 crop species. The present study investigated the feasibility of using Escherichia coli to assess function of a range of SbtA and BicA transporters in a heterologous expression system, ultimately for selection of transporters suitable for chloroplast expression. Here, we demonstrate that six ?-forms of SbtA are active in E. coli, although other tested bicarbonate transporters were inactive. The sbtA clones were derived from Synechococcus sp. WH5701, Cyanobium sp. PCC7001, Cyanobium sp. PCC6307, Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, and Synechococcus sp. PCC7002. The six SbtA homologs varied in bicarbonate uptake kinetics and sodium requirements in E. coli. In particular, SbtA from PCC7001 showed the lowest uptake affinity and highest flux rate and was capable of increasing the internal inorganic carbon pool by more than 8 mM relative to controls lacking transporters. Importantly, we were able to show that the SbtB protein (encoded by a companion gene near sbtA) binds to SbtA and suppresses bicarbonate uptake function of SbtA in E. coli, suggesting a role in post-translational regulation of SbtA, possibly as an inhibitor in the dark. This study established E. coli as a heterologous expression and analysis system for HCO3- transporters from cyanobacteria, and identified several SbtA transporters as useful for expression in the chloroplast inner envelope membranes of higher plants. PMID:25536191

  10. Phylogenetic and Chemical Diversity of Three Chemotypes of Bloom-Forming Lyngbya Species (Cyanobacteria: Oscillatoriales) from Reefs of Southeastern Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koty Sharp; Karen E. Arthur; Liangcai Gu; Cliff Ross; Genelle Harrison; Sarath P. Gunasekera; Theresa Meickle; Susan Matthew; Hendrik Luesch; Robert W. Thacker; David H. Sherman; Valerie J. Paul

    2009-01-01

    The cyanobacterial genus Lyngbya includes free-living, benthic, filamentous cyanobacteria that form periodic nuisance blooms in lagoons, reefs, and estuaries. Lyngbya spp. are prolific producers of biologically active compounds that deter grazers and help blooms persist in the marine environment. Here, our investigations reveal the presence of three distinct Lyngbya species on nearshore reefs in Broward County, FL, sampled in 2006

  11. THE EFFECTS OF THREE ORGANIC CHEMICALS ON THE UPPER THERMAL TOLERANCES OF FOUR FRESHWATER FISHES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RONALD W. P ATRA; JOHN C. CHAPMAN; RICHARD P. L IM; PETER C. GEHRKE

    2007-01-01

    The upper temperature tolerance limits of four freshwater fish species, silver perchBidyanusbidyanus, eastern rainbowfish Melanotaenia duboulayi, western carp gudgeon Hypseleotris klunzingeri, and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, were determined using the critical thermal maximum (CTMaximum) method. The CTMaximum tests were carried out with unexposed fish and fish exposed to sublethal concentrations of endosulfan, chlorpyrifos, and phenol to determine whether or not

  12. Operculum closing as a defence against predatory leeches in four British freshwater prosobranch snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul M. Kelly; Jenny S. Cory

    1987-01-01

    The defence reaction of operculum closing in response to the presence of the molluscivorous leech Glossiphonia complanata (L.) and the non-molluscivorous Erpobdella octoculata (L.) was studied in four species of freshwater prosobranch gastropod. Bithynia tentaculata (L.) and Valvata piscinalis (Mller) can distinguish between the leeches, reacting only to G. complanata. V. piscinalis is capable of a greater degree of distance

  13. Predation on Zebra Mussels by Freshwater Drum and Yellow Perch in Western Lake Erie

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Todd W. Morrison; William E. Lynch Jr.; Konrad Dabrowski

    1997-01-01

    Although considerable research has been done regarding zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) expansion in the Great Lakes, information on fish species preying on zebra mussels is lacking. We examined diets of freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) and yellow perch (Perca flavescens) collected in western Lake Erie, 1992. Stomach contents were quantified in May, July, and October to examine the importance of zebra

  14. Heavy metal accumulation in sediment and freshwater fish in U.S. Arctic lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan M. Allen-Gil; Chad P. Gubala; Dixon H. Landers; Brenda K. Lasorsa; Eric A. Crecelius; Lawrence R. Curtis

    1997-01-01

    Metal concentrations in sediment and two species of freshwater fish (lake trout [Salvelinus namaycush], and grayling [Thymallus arcticus]) were examined in four Arctic lakes in Alaska. Concentrations of several metals were naturally high in the sediment relative to uncontaminated lakes in other Arctic regions and more temperate locations. For example, concentrations of Hg and Ni were 175 ng\\/g and 250

  15. ACTIVITY OF ESTERASES FROM DIFFERENT TISSUES OF FRESHWATER FISH AND RESPONSES OF THEIR ISOENZYMES TO INHIBITORS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shao-nan Li; De-Fang Fan

    1997-01-01

    Activity of nonspecific esterase from different tissues (i.e., liver, gallbladder, heart, intestine, and muscle) of five species of freshwater fish, namely, topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva), goldfish (Carassius auratus), nile tilapia (Tilapia nilotica), mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) was tested using ?-naphthyl acetate as sub strate. The results indicated that activity of the enzyme was mainly concentrated in

  16. Rectal Glands of Marine and Fresh-Water Sharks: Comparative Histology.

    PubMed

    Oguri, M

    1964-05-29

    The rectal glands of elasmobranchs perform the function of salt-excreting organs. These glands are smaller and show regressive changes in specimens of the bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas found in fresh-water environment, compared with specimens of this and other species from a marine habitat. PMID:17814499

  17. Isolation of three water molds from two freshwater fishes and insect exuviae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Furhan T. Mhaisen; Nazar M. Ali

    1989-01-01

    During March 1988, three fungus species namely: Saprolegnia ferax, S. terrestris and Achlya polyandra were isolated from alive and dead specimens of two freshwater fishes (Cyprinus carpio and Liza abu), honey bees (Apis mellifera) and California flies (Calliphora sp.) which were cultured \\/ or fallen in small fish tanks of the Department of Hydrobiology at Al?Rashidiya, north of Baghdad, Iraqi.

  18. Preliminary report on the pathogenicity of Legionella pneumophila for freshwater and soil amoebae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T J Rowbotham

    1980-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative organism of Legionnaires' disease, is pathogenic for free living, ubiquitous, freshwater, and soil amoebae of the genera Acanthamoeba and Naegleria. Some species support the growth of strains from serogroups 1 to 6, others only strains from certain serogroups. Initial studies with seeded material indicate that amoebal enrichment could be utilised for the isolation of legionellae from

  19. ACUTE AND CHRONIC EFFECTS OF DIFLUBENZURON (DIMILIN) ON FRESHWATER FISH AND INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two fish and seven invertebrate freshwater species were exposed to diflubenzuron (Dimilin) in acute and chronic laboratory tests. No effects on newly hatched and juvenile fathead minnows or juvenile guppies were seen at or below 36 micrograms/L, the highest concentration tested. ...

  20. Testing sediment biological effects with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca: the gap between laboratory and nature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feiyue Wang; Richard R. Goulet; Peter M. Chapman

    2004-01-01

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is widely used in laboratory sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. However, its responses in the laboratory are probably very different from those in the field. A review of the literature indicates that in its natural habitat this species complex is primarily epibenthic, derives little nutrition from the sediments, and responds primarily to contaminants in the

  1. Infections of the Hemoflagellate, Cryptobia salmositica Katz, 1951, in Freshwater Teleosts of the Pacific Coast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clarence D. Becker; Max Katz

    1965-01-01

    Infections of Cryptobia salmositica Katz, 1951, are common and widely distributed in freshwater teleosts of the Pacific coast from southern British Columbia to northern California. The hemoflagellates are reported from 16 species of fish, representing four families and including 10 new hosts. The most susceptible hosts, as indicated by the incidence and intensity of infection, are the pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha)

  2. Microsatellites from the burbot ( Lota lota ), a freshwater gadoid fish (Teleostei)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MATTHIAS SANETRA; AXEL MEYER

    We developed 21 polymorphic dinucleotide microsatellite loci, (CA) n and (CT) n , for the Holarctic freshwater fish, Lota lota , using an enriched genomic library protocol. The species has an interesting life history because winter-spawning adults migrate over long distances to form spawning aggregations, a behaviour which should maintain genetic homogeneity across large spatial scales. Availability of the reported

  3. Some endohelminths from the freshwater turtle Trachemys scripta from Yucatan, Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Moravec; J. Vargas-Vázquez

    1998-01-01

    An examination of three specimens of the freshwater turtle Trachemys scripta (Schoepf) from a small lake in central Yucatan revealed the presence of the following four helminth species parasitic in the digestive tract: Telorchis attenuata Goldberger, 1911 (Trematoda), Serpinema trispinosum (Leidy, 1852), Spiroxys contortus (Rudolphi, 1819) and Falcaustra affinis (Leidy, 1856) (all Nematoda). Telorchis corti (Stunkard, 1915) and T. dissimilis

  4. Modelling self-design of the aquatic community in a newly created freshwater wetland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen D Metzker; William J Mitsch

    1997-01-01

    A dynamic simulation model was constructed to predict the natural development of a fish community in a recently constructed, freshwater marsh in the midwestern USA, and to determine which forces are significant in shaping the self-design trajectory of the fish community. The model allowed immigration of five species of fishes from a nearby river into the constructed wetland system and

  5. Assessing effects of the pharmaceutical ivermectin on meiobenthic communities using freshwater microcosms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marvin Brinke; Sebastian Höss; Guido Fink; Thomas A. Ternes; Peter Heininger; Walter Traunspurger

    2010-01-01

    Ivermectin is a widely applied veterinary pharmaceutical that is highly toxic to several non-target organisms. So far, little is known about its impact on benthic freshwater species, although its rapid sorption to sediment particles and high persistence in aquatic sediments have raised concerns about the risk for benthic organisms. In the present study, indoor microcosms were used to assess the

  6. Freshwater for resilience: a shift in thinking.

    PubMed Central

    Folke, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Humanity shapes freshwater flows and biosphere dynamics from a local to a global scale. Successful management of target resources in the short term tends to alienate the social and economic development process from its ultimate dependence on the life-supporting environment. Freshwater becomes transformed into a resource for optimal management in development, neglecting the multiple functions of freshwater in dynamic landscapes and its fundamental role as the bloodstream of the biosphere. The current tension of these differences in worldview is exemplified through the recent development of modern aquaculture contrasted with examples of catchment-based stewardship of freshwater flows in dynamic landscapes. In particular, the social and institutional dimension of catchment management is highlighted and features of social-ecological systems for resilience building are presented. It is concluded that this broader view of freshwater provides the foundation for hydrosolidarity. PMID:14728796

  7. Comparative Study of Cyanobacterial and E. coli RNA Polymerases: Misincorporation, Abortive Transcription, and Dependence on Divalent Cations

    PubMed Central

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Tanaka, Kan; Shimamoto, Nobuo

    2011-01-01

    If Mg2+ ion is replaced by Mn2+ ion, RNA polymerase tends to misincorporate noncognate nucleotide, which is thought to be one of the reasons for the toxicity of Mn2+ ion. Therefore, most cells have Mn2+ ion at low intracellular concentrations, but cyanobacteria need the ion at a millimolar concentration to maintain photosynthetic machinery. To analyse the mechanism for resistance against the abundant Mn2+ ion, we compared the properties of cyanobacterial and E. coli RNA polymerases. The cyanobacterial enzyme showed a lower level of abortive transcription and less misincorporation than the E. coli enzyme. Moreover, the cyanobacterial enzyme showed a slower rate of the whole elongation by an order of magnitude, paused more frequently, and cleaved its transcript faster in the absence of NTPs. In conclusion, cyanobacterial RNA polymerase maintains the fidelity of transcription against Mn2+ ion by deliberate incorporation of a nucleotide at the cost of the elongation rate. The cyanobacterial and the E. coli enzymes showed different sensitivities to Mg2+ ion, and the physiological role of the difference is also discussed. PMID:22567357

  8. Metabolism of pyrene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in freshwater turtles.

    PubMed

    Oroszlany, Balazs; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Saengtiengchan, Aksorn; Oguri, Mami; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2013-02-01

    Reptile population decrease is an alarming trend all around the world. Yet little is known about the role of xenobiotics in this decrease. In this study, we investigated the metabolism of pyrene in three freshwater turtle species (Red-EARED sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans), Chinese pond turtles (Mauremys reevesii) and Chinese softshell turtles (Pelodiscus sinensis). Compared to other vertebrates, all turtles showed an unique metabolite distribution, pyrene-1-sulfate being the main metabolite. The observed low phase II enzyme metabolic rates raises the question of the effect of long-time exposure. PMID:23631161

  9. Interannual variations of freshwater in Hornsund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dølven, Knut Ola; Falck, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Hornsund is a fjord situated at the south-west coast of Spitsbergen. The main goal of this study is to calculate and describe the interannual variations of freshwater content in Hornsund. In addition to this, we aim to trace the freshwater sources to the fjord and calculate the fractional contributions from these by using oxygen isotope data. The mixing between these freshwater sources and oceanic waters is described as well as the general summer hydrography of the fjord. Calculation of freshwater content is based on Conductivity-Temperature-Depth data obtained in July of 2001 to 2014. Oxygen isotope data are obtained in Autumn 2013/2014 and Spring 2014. The freshwater in Hornsund is assumed to be provided by either meteoric freshwater sources (glacial melt/precipitation/river-runoff) or the melting of sea ice. Both sources can be produced locally or advected into the fjord. The fraction of the ¹?O isotope (?¹?O) is an effective tracer for freshwater sources in the Arctic due to the progressive depletion of this isotope in water molecules during poleward atmospheric transport (Ostlund and Hut, 1984). Calculation of fractional contribution from the two freshwater sources is done based on a method presented in Ostlund and Hut (1984), where the mass-balance, salinity-balance and ?¹?O-balance are utilized to calculate the fractions of seawater, meteoric water and sea ice meltwater. Preliminary results show freshwater content varying between 0.211km³ and 1.068km³, based on a reference salinity of 34.2. In Autumn 2013, meteoric water was the largest contributor of freshwater to the fjord. However, there was a significant contribution of sea ice meltwater which had a deeper vertical distribution than the meteoric water. References: H. G. Ostlund and G. Hut. 1984. Arctic Ocean water mass balance from isotope data. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 89(C4):6373-6381

  10. Effect of water temperature on the immune response and infectivity pattern of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in freshwater crayfish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pikul Jiravanichpaisal; Kenneth Söderhäll; Irene Söderhäll

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility of two species of freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus and Astacus astacus, to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) by intramuscular injection was compared and the results show that both species are susceptible to WSSV. The effect of water temperature on the development of white spot disease in crayfish was also studied. Crayfish were exposed to different temperatures after WSSV

  11. Fishborne Trematode Metacercariae in Freshwater Fish from Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Keeseon S.; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Hoang, Eui-Hyug; Yang, Yichao; Li, Xueming

    2009-01-01

    A survey was performed to investigate the infection status of fishborne trematode (FBT) metacercariae in freshwater fish from Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. A total of 307 freshwater fish of 31 species were collected from 5 administrative regions of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. They were examined by artificial digestion method from July 2003 to August 2004. No metacercariae were detected in fish from Fusui-xian. In fish from Mashan-xian and a market in Nanning, 3 species of metacercariae, Haplorchis taichui, Haplorchis pumilio, and Centrocestus formosanus, were mainly detected. Metacercariae (8 in number) of Clonorchis sinensis were found in 1 Chanodichthys dabryi purchased from a market in Nanning. In fish from Yangshuo, Metagonimus yokogawai metacercariae were detected from all 18 fish species examined. Total 13 C. sinensis metacercariae were found in 3 out of 10 Hemibarbus maculatus from Yangshuo. All 7 Zacco platypus from Yangshuo were infected with 8-112 Echinochasmus perfoliatus metacercariae. In fish from Binyang-xian, H. pumilo metacercariae were mainly detected in all 5 fish species examined, and only 1 metacercaria of C. sinensis was found in a Hemiculter leucisculus. From the above results, it was confirmed that some species of freshwater fish play a role of second intermediate hosts for FBT in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. In particular, 4 species of intestinal flukes, M. yokogawai, H. taichui, H. pumilio, and C. formosanus, were prevalent in fish hosts, whereas C. sinensis metacercariae were detected only in 3 fish species. PMID:19724698

  12. Fishborne trematode metacercariae in freshwater fish from Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Woon-Mok; Eom, Keeseon S; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Hoang, Eui-Hyug; Yang, Yichao; Li, Xueming

    2009-09-01

    A survey was performed to investigate the infection status of fishborne trematode (FBT) metacercariae in freshwater fish from Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. A total of 307 freshwater fish of 31 species were collected from 5 administrative regions of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. They were examined by artificial digestion method from July 2003 to August 2004. No metacercariae were detected in fish from Fusui-xian. In fish from Mashan-xian and a market in Nanning, 3 species of metacercariae, Haplorchis taichui, Haplorchis pumilio, and Centrocestus formosanus, were mainly detected. Metacercariae (8 in number) of Clonorchis sinensis were found in 1 Chanodichthys dabryi purchased from a market in Nanning. In fish from Yangshuo, Metagonimus yokogawai metacercariae were detected from all 18 fish species examined. Total 13 C. sinensis metacercariae were found in 3 out of 10 Hemibarbus maculatus from Yangshuo. All 7 Zacco platypus from Yangshuo were infected with 8-112 Echinochasmus perfoliatus metacercariae. In fish from Binyang-xian, H. pumilo metacercariae were mainly detected in all 5 fish species examined, and only 1 metacercaria of C. sinensis was found in a Hemiculter leucisculus. From the above results, it was confirmed that some species of freshwater fish play a role of second intermediate hosts for FBT in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. In particular, 4 species of intestinal flukes, M. yokogawai, H. taichui, H. pumilio, and C. formosanus, were prevalent in fish hosts, whereas C. sinensis metacercariae were detected only in 3 fish species. PMID:19724698

  13. Resistance to freshwater exposure in White Sea Littorina spp. II: Acid-base regulation.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, I M; Bock, C; Pörtner, H O

    2000-03-01

    Parameters of acid-base and energy status were studied by in vivo 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in three White Sea Littorina spp. (L. littorea, L. saxatilis and L. obtusata) during prolonged anaerobiosis in freshwater. Intracellular pH decreased significantly, especially during the early period of anaerobiosis, but later the decrease in intracellular pH slowed down considerably, suggesting a capacity for intracellular pH regulation in all three species. There was a trend for intracellular pH to fall most rapidly in the least freshwater-resistant species, L. obtusata, as compared to the most resistant, L. littorea. Non-bicarbonate, non-phosphate buffer values estimated by the homogenate technique were similar in the three studied species (28-37 mmol pH(-1) kg(-1) wet weight) and did not change during freshwater exposure. The CaCO3 buffer value of the foot tissues was considerably higher (171-218 mmol pH(-1) kg(-1) wet weight) and decreased significantly during freshwater exposure. The contribution of the multiple tissue buffering systems to intracellular pH regulation in Littorina spp. shifts between different stages of freshwater exposure. Initially, the non-bicarbonate, non-phosphate tissue buffering system seems to be of major importance for metabolic proton buffering at intracellular pH between 7.5 and 7.0. During later stages of anaerobiosis and at lower intracellular pH, the CaCO3 buffer is involved in proton buffering. Decrease in the CaCO3 buffer value during freshwater exposure was in quantitative agreement with the amount of metabolic protons buffered, thus suggesting that CaCO3 tissue stores may serve as a major buffering system during prolonged anaerobiosis in Littorina spp. PMID:10791570

  14. Controlling Cyanobacterial Blooms in Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China: Will Nitrogen Reductions Cause Replacement of Non-N2 Fixing by N2 Fixing Taxa?

    PubMed Central

    Paerl, Hans W.; Xu, Hai; Hall, Nathan S.; Zhu, Guangwei; Qin, Boqiang; Wu, Yali; Rossignol, Karen L.; Dong, Linghan; McCarthy, Mark J.; Joyner, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs have caused an alarming increase in harmful cyanobacterial blooms, threatening sustainability of lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China’s third largest freshwater lake, typifies this predicament, with toxic blooms of the non-N2 fixing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. dominating from spring through fall. Previous studies indicate N and P reductions are needed to reduce bloom magnitude and duration. However, N reductions may encourage replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria. This potentially counterproductive scenario was evaluated using replicate, large (1000 L), in-lake mesocosms during summer bloom periods. N+P additions led to maximum phytoplankton production. Phosphorus enrichment, which promoted N limitation, resulted in increases in N2 fixing taxa (Anabaena spp.), but it did not lead to significant replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria, and N2 fixation rates remained ecologically insignificant. Furthermore, P enrichment failed to increase phytoplankton production relative to controls, indicating that N was the most limiting nutrient throughout this period. We propose that Microcystis spp. and other non-N2 fixing genera can maintain dominance in this shallow, highly turbid, nutrient-enriched lake by outcompeting N2 fixing taxa for existing sources of N and P stored and cycled in the lake. To bring Taihu and other hypertrophic systems below the bloom threshold, both N and P reductions will be needed until the legacy of high N and P loading and sediment nutrient storage in these systems is depleted. At that point, a more exclusive focus on P reductions may be feasible. PMID:25405474

  15. Microcystin production by a freshwater spring cyanobacterium of the genus Fischerella.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Marli Fátima; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; da Silva, Caroline Souza Pamplona; Shishido, Tânia Keiko; Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo; Cantúsio Neto, Romeu; Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the production of a hepatotoxic, cyclic heptapeptide, microcystin, by a filamentous branched cyanobacterium belonging to the order Stigonematales, genus Fischerella. The freshwater Fischerella sp. strain CENA161 was isolated from spring water in a small concrete dam in Piracicaba, São Paulo State, Brazil, and identified by combining a morphological description with 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Microcystin (MCYST) analysis performed using an ELISA assay on cultured cells gave positive results. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) analysis detected 33.6microg MCYST-LR per gram dry weight of cyanobacterial cells. Microcystin profile revealed by quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS/MS) analysis confirmed the production of MCYST-LR. Furthermore, genomic DNA was analyzed by PCR for sequences similar to the ketosynthase (KS) domain of the type I polyketide synthase gene, which is involved in microcystin biosynthesis. This revealed the presence of a KS nucleotide fragment similar to the mcyD and ndaD genes of the microcystin and nodularin synthetase complexes. Phylogenetic analysis grouped the Fischerella KS sequence together with mcyD sequences of the three known microcystin synthetase operon (Microcystis, Planktothrix and Anabaena) and ndaD of the nodularin synthetase operon, with 100% bootstrap support. Our findings demonstrate that Fischerella sp. CENA161 produces MYCST-LR and for the first time identify a nucleotide sequence putatively involved in microcystin synthesis in this genus. PMID:19233225

  16. Trophic Ecology of Freshwater Drum in Large Rivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David H. Wahl; Kathleen Bruner; Larry A. Nielsen

    1988-01-01

    We compared growth and diets of freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) collected from the Ohio and Kanawha rivers to those reported in the literature for freshwater drum in lentic systems. Diets of freshwater drum in large rivers were primarily composed of detritivores such as molluscs, crayfish and collector-gatherer invertebrates (trichopterans, ephemeropterans and dipterans) whereas zooplankton (cladoceran) and dipteran prey dominated freshwater

  17. Changes in Global Economies and Trade: the Potential Spread of Exotic Freshwater Bivalves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Y. Karatayev; Dianna K. Padilla; Dan Minchin; Demetrio Boltovskoy; Lyubov E. Burlakova

    2007-01-01

    The globalization of economies and trade have facilitated the spread of exotic species including the five most important freshwater\\u000a suspension feeding invaders Dreissena polymorpha, D. bugensis, Corbicula fluminea, C. fluminalis, and Limnoperna fortunei. We suggest that the spread of these exotic species has not been a continuous process, but rather punctuated by periods of\\u000a rapid long distance spread (jump), during

  18. Introduction, distribution, spread, and impacts of exotic freshwater gastropods in Texas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Y. Karatayev; Lyubov E. Burlakova; Vadim A. Karatayev; Dianna K. Padilla

    2009-01-01

    We examined the patterns of distribution, vectors of introduction, and potential ecological impacts of freshwater exotic species\\u000a in Texas over the last 45 years. Currently, five species of exotic gastropods are established: channeled-type applesnail (Pomacea insularum), red-rim melania (Melanoides tuberculatus), quilted melania (Tarebia granifera), giant rams-horn snail (Marisa cornuarietis), and Chinese mysterysnail (Cipangopaludina\\u000a chinensis). In contrast to the northern part of

  19. Characteristics of a refuge for native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae) in Lake St. Clair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daryl J. McGoldrick; Janice L. Metcalfe-Smith; Michael T. Arts; Donald W. Schloesser; Teresa J. Newton; Gerald L. Mackie; Emy M. Monroe; Johann Biberhofer; Kennon Johnson

    2009-01-01

    The Lake St. Clair delta (?100 km2) provides an important refuge for native freshwater mussels (Unionidae) wherein 22 of the ?35 historical species co-occur with invasive dreissenids. A total of 1875 live unionids representing 22 species were found during snorkeling surveys of 32 shallow (?1 m) sites throughout the delta. Richness and density of unionids and zebra mussel infestation rates varied among

  20. The ecology of European ponds: defining the characteristics of a neglected freshwater habitat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Céréghino; J. Biggs; B. Oertli; S. Declerck

    2008-01-01

    There is growing awareness in Europe of the importance of ponds, and increasing understanding of the contribution they make\\u000a to aquatic biodiversity and catchment functions. Collectively, they support considerably more species, and specifically more\\u000a scarce species, than other freshwater waterbody types. Ponds create links (or stepping stones) between existing aquatic habitats,\\u000a but also provide ecosystem services such as nutrient interception,