Sample records for freshwater pulmonate snail

  1. Elimination of the Cyanobacterial Hepatotoxin Microcystin from the freshwater Pulmonate Snail Lymnaea stagnalis jugularis (SAY)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald W. Zurawell; Charles F. B. Holmes; Ellie E. Prepas

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that little to no microcystin (MC), a cyanobacterial hepatotoxin, accumulates within freshwater pulmonate snails because the toxin is associated primarily with undigested gut contents that are eliminated from the animal via egestion. To test this, Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to MC-containing cyanobacteria were placed into toxin-free environments and sampled over short (24 h at 21° C) and

  2. Physiologic and environmental factors influencing the calcium-to-tissue ratio in populations of three species of freshwater pulmonate snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Douglas Hunter; Wendy W. Lull

    1977-01-01

    A study of three species of freshwater pulmonate snails, Physa gyrina (11 populations), Physa integra (17 populations), and Helisoma anceps (18 populations) was carried out from 1973 to 1976, primarily in Michigan.

  3. A light and electron microscope study on oogenesis in the freshwater pulmonate snail Biomphalaria glabrata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marijke de Jong-Brink; Ankle de Wit; G. Kraal; H. H. Boer

    1976-01-01

    In the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata the formation and composition of yolk granules and the role of the follicle cells were studied by histochemical and electron microscopical techniques. The rough endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus appeared to be involved in yolk formation, which is a continuous process throughout oogenesis. From the very beginning of yolk formation two main types

  4. Sensitivity of freshwater pulmonate snails, Lymnaea luteola L., to heavy metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. S. Khangarot; P. K. Ray

    1988-01-01

    The current alarm of the impacts of metal pollution on living organisms has received much attention with the tragedy of Minimata and later Niigata, in Japan. Although there has been a great deal of the concern about the acute and chronic toxicities of heavy metals to freshwater fishes and crustaceans but little information is available on the effects of heavy

  5. K + Channels in Cardiomyocytes of the Pulmonate Snail Helix

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Kodirov; V. L. Zhuravlev; V. K. Pavlenko; T. A. Safonova; J. Brachmann

    2004-01-01

    We used the patch-clamp technique to identify and characterize the electrophysiological, biophysical, and pharmacological properties of K + channels in enzymatically dissociated ventricular cells of the land pulmonate snail Helix. The family of outward K + currents started to activate at -30 mV and the activation was faster at more depolarized potentials (time constants: at 0 mV 17.4 ± 1.2

  6. The component community structure of larval trematodes in the pulmonate snail Helisoma anceps.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, J; Esch, G W

    1991-08-01

    Factors that affected the component community structure of larval trematodes in the pulmonate snail Helisoma anceps in Charlie's Pond, North Carolina, were studied over a 15-mo period using a multiple mark-recapture protocol. Patent infections of 8 species were observed in 1,485 of 4,899 snails examined. Reproductive activity, population size, and survival rate of the snail population were estimated to evaluate the extent of resource availability for the parasites. Antagonistic interactions between trematode species that occurred at the infracommunity level had a neglible effect on the composition and structure of the component community. The patterns observed at this level were related to temporal heterogeneity in the abundance of infective stages (mostly miracidia), differential responses of trematode species to the diverse and constantly changing distribution of snail size and abundance, differential mortality of snails infected with certain trematode species, constant recruitment of 1 trematode species over time, and the existence of predictable disturbances such as the complete mortality of the host population and recruitment of a replacement population during a 6-8 wk period. The last factor operated as a reset mechanism for this snail-trematode system once each year. A model of patch dynamics, with snails as patch resources, best explains the organization and dynamics of this system. PMID:1865260

  7. Characterization of 15 microsatellite loci in the pulmonate snail Pseudosuccinea columella (Mollusca, Gastropoda)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANTOINE NICOT; MARIE-PIERRE DUBOIS; CHANTAL DEBAIN; PATRICE DAVID; PHILIPPE JARNE

    2008-01-01

    We characterized 15 new variable microsatellites in the freshwater snail Pseudosuccinea (Lymnaea) columella, as well as conditions for multiplexing and simultaneously genotyping sets of loci. Two to six alleles were detected per locus over the six populations studied. Gene diversity ranged from 0.000 to 0.498, but essentially no heterozygous individuals were observed. This resulted in extremely high FIS estimates, and

  8. [Molluscacide activity of piquerol A isolated from Piqueria trinervia (Compositae) on 8 species of pulmonate snails].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Reyes, A; Chavarin, C; Campos Arias, M P; Taboada, J; Jimenez, M

    1989-01-01

    In laboratory trials an aqueous solution of Piquerol A from Piqueria trinervia, collected in several regions of Mexico, showed a molluscicide action on the adults of eight different pulmonates snails species: Fossaria (Fossaria) humilis, F. (Bakerilymnaea) sp., Pseudosuccinea columella and Stagnicola attenuata from Mexico; F. (B.) cubensis and Physa cubensis from Cuba; P. columella and Biomphalaria glabrata from Brazil; B. glabrata from Puerto Rico; and S. elodes from U.S.A. The solution was tested at 50, 25 and 5 ppm concentration, for two periods of 6 and 24 hours, at room temperature (20-22 degrees C). A 100% mortality was obtained for all species at 50 ppm concentration after 6 hours of exposure; the same percentage at 25 ppm after 24 hours; and 60 to 100% mortality at 5 ppm concentration during 24 hours of exposure. No recovery was observed among any of the treated snails. Piquerol A is a sesquiterpene with low stability in nature and has previously only been tested as an insecticide and as an inhibitor of metabolism in cell cultures: no field trails have been made on its toxicity to other aquatic fauna as yet, but it is believed Piquerol A could be an excellent molluscicide for use in areas where focal transmission of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis are taking place. This is the first time experiments on molluscicides have been carried out in Mexico. PMID:2319950

  9. EMPIRICAL ESTIMATES OF REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION AMONG THE FRESHWATER PULMONATE SNAILS

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    are distinct biological species. Key words: Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Physella, speciation, mate choice, allozyme all be junior synonyms of P. gyrina (Dillon & Wethington, 2006a, b). Reproductive isolation seems

  10. Regulation and Restoration of Motoneuronal Synaptic Transmission During Neuromuscular Regeneration in the Pulmonate Snail Helisoma trivolvis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, M. B.; Szabo-Maas, T. M.; Poyer, J. C.; Zoran, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of motor systems involves reestablishment of central control networks, reinnervation of muscle targets by motoneurons, and reconnection of neuromodulatory circuits. Still, how these processes are integrated as motor function is restored during regeneration remains ill defined. Here, we examined the mechanisms underlying motoneuronal regeneration of neuromuscular synapses related to feeding movements in the pulmonate snail Helisoma trivolvis. Neurons B19 and B110, although activated during different phases of the feeding pattern, innervate similar sets of muscles. However, the percentage of muscle fibers innervated, the efficacy of excitatory junction potentials, and the strength of muscle contractions were different for each cell’s specific connections. After peripheral nerve crush, a sequence of transient electrical and chemical connections formed centrally within the buccal ganglia. Neuromuscular synapse regeneration involved a three-phase process: the emergence of spontaneous synaptic transmission (P1), the acquisition of evoked potentials of weak efficacy (P2), and the establishment of functional reinnervation (P3). Differential synaptic efficacy at muscle contacts was recapitulated in cell culture. Differences in motoneuronal presynaptic properties (i.e., quantal content) were the basis of disparate neuromuscular synapse function, suggesting a role for retrograde target influences. We propose a homeostatic model of molluscan motor system regeneration. This model has three restoration events: (1) transient central synaptogenesis during axonal outgrowth, (2) intermotoneuronal inhibitory synaptogenesis during initial neuromuscular synapse formation, and (3) target-dependent regulation of neuromuscular junction formation. PMID:21876114

  11. Physiological and biochemical responses to cold and drought in the rock-dwelling pulmonate snail, Chondrina avenacea.

    PubMed

    Koštál, Vladimír; Rozsypal, Jan; Pech, Pavel; Zahradní?ková, Helena; Šimek, Petr

    2013-08-01

    The pulmonate snail Chondrina avenacea lives on exposed rock walls where it experiences drastic daily and seasonal fluctuations of abiotic conditions and food availability. We found that tolerance to dry conditions was maintained at a very high level throughout the year and was mainly based on the snails' ability to promptly enter into estivation (quiescence) whenever they experienced drying out of their environment. Snails rapidly suppressed their metabolism and minimized their water loss using discontinuous gas exchange pattern. The metabolic suppression probably included periods of tissue hypoxia and anaerobism as indicated by accumulation of typical end products of anaerobic metabolism: lactate, alanine and succinate. Though the drought-induced metabolic suppression was sufficient to stimulate moderate increase of supercooling capacity, the seasonally highest levels of supercooling capacity and the highest tolerance to subzero temperatures were tightly linked to hibernation (diapause). Hibernating snails did not survive freezing of their body fluids and instead relied on supercooling strategy which allowed them to survive when air temperatures dropped to as low as -21 °C. No accumulation of low-molecular weight compounds (potential cryoprotectants) was detected in hibernating snails except for small amounts of the end products of anaerobic metabolism. PMID:23516021

  12. Characterization of 15 microsatellite loci in the pulmonate snail Pseudosuccinea columella (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Nicot, Antoine; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Debain, Chantal; David, Patrice; Jarne, Philippe

    2008-11-01

    We characterized 15 new variable microsatellites in the freshwater snail Pseudosuccinea (Lymnaea) columella, as well as conditions for multiplexing and simultaneously genotyping sets of loci. Two to six alleles were detected per locus over the six populations studied. Gene diversity ranged from 0.000 to 0.498, but essentially no heterozygous individuals were observed. This resulted in extremely high F(IS) estimates, and therefore high selfing rates. The F(ST) estimates ranged from 0.18 to 1 among populations, but was generally high. These markers will constitute efficient tools for investigating the population structure of this invasive species. Cross-species amplification was on the whole unsuccessful. PMID:21586021

  13. The effects of the herbicide atrazine on freshwater snails.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Kyle D; Belden, Jason B; Bolek, Matthew G

    2015-07-01

    Atrazine has been shown to affect freshwater snails from the subcellular to community level. However, most studies have used different snail species, methods, endpoints, and atrazine exposure concentrations, resulting in some conflicting results and limiting our understanding. The goal of this study was to address these concerns by (1) investigating the acute and chronic effects of atrazine on four species of freshwater snails (Biomphalaria glabrata, Helisoma trivolvis, Physa acuta, and Stagnicola elodes) using the same methods, endpoints, and concentrations, and (2) summarizing the current literature pertaining to the effects of atrazine on freshwater snails. We conducted a 48 h acute toxicity test with an atrazine concentration higher than what typically occurs in aquatic environments (1000 µg/L). Additionally, we exposed snails to environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations (0, 0.3, 3, and 30 µg/L) for 28 days and assessed snail survival, growth, and reproduction. We also summarized all known literature pertaining to atrazine effects on freshwater snails. The literature summary suggests snails are often affected by environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations at the subcellular and cellular levels. These effects are typically not transitive to effects on survival, growth, or reproduction at the same concentrations. Our acute exposures corroborate the general trend of no direct effect on snail populations as atrazine did not directly affect the survival of any of the four snail species. Similarly, environmentally relevant concentrations did not significantly affect the survival, growth, or reproduction of any snail species. These results indicate that, in the absence of other possible stressors, the direct effects of environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations may not be realized at the snail population level. PMID:25971234

  14. Larval digenean community parasitizing the freshwater snail, Biomphalaria peregrina (Pulmonata: Planorbidae), from a temporary pond in Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Flores, Verónica R; Semenas, Liliana G; Veleizán, Aylén A

    2010-06-01

    Knowledge of population dynamics of parasites in freshwater snails from South America is scarce. The objective of the present study was to describe the infection dynamics of larval digeneans in the planorbid snail, Biomphalaria peregrina , during 2 sampling periods in a Patagonian temporary pond. In total, 1,003 snails were examined. Rediae of Notocotylus biomphalariae and Echinoparyphium sp., sporocysts of Cotylurus sp., and metacercariae of the 2 latter species were found. The overall prevalence was significantly higher in the second sampling period, always as single-species infections in the hepatopancreas. The presence of larvae in the first sampled snails of the second hydroperiod indicated that parasitized snails survive drought. Both species exhibited different seasonal prevalence patterns, with Echinoparyphium sp. present in all sampling months. Metacercariae of Echinoparyphium sp. occurred in the heart and kidney, and those of Cotylurus sp. between organs. No significant differences in overall prevalence of metacercariae were found, and a progressive rise in prevalence from spring to summer for both species was observed. Almost all size classes of B. peregrina were infected with metacercariae of both species, but rediae and sporocysts were present only in snails larger than 3.1 mm. The predictability of the hydroperiod year after year, the tolerance of B. peregrina to drought, and the survival of infected specimens allows the parasite community to show a similar pattern of infection over time. This is the first study in Argentina analyzing the infection dynamics of digeneans of a pulmonate snail from a temporary pond. PMID:20557212

  15. The influence of diet on the ? 13C of shell carbon in the pulmonate snail Helix aspersa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, Lowell D.

    2002-02-01

    The influence of diet and atmospheric CO 2 on the carbon isotope composition of shell aragonite and shell-bound organic carbon in the pulmonate snail Helix aspersa raised in the laboratory was investigated. Three separate groups of snails were raised on romaine lettuce (C3 plant, ? 13C=-25.8‰), corn (C4 plant, ? 13C=-10.5‰), and sour orange ( 12C-enriched C3 plant, ? 13C=-39.1‰). The isotopic composition of body tissues closely tracked the isotopic composition of the snail diet as demonstrated previously. However, the isotopic composition of the acid insoluble organic matrix extracted from the aragonite shells does not track diet in all groups. In snails that were fed corn the isotopic composition of the organic matrix was more negative than the body by as much as 5‰ whereas the matrix was approximately 1‰ heavier than the body tissues in snails fed a diet of C3 plant material. These results indicate that isotopic composition of the organic matrix carbon cannot be used as an isotopic substrate for paleodietary reconstructions without first determining the source of the carbon and any associated fractionations. The isotopic composition of the shell aragonite is offset from the body tissues by 12.3‰ in each of the culture groups. This offset was not influenced by the consumption of carbonate and is not attributable to the diffusion of atmospheric CO 2 into the hemolymph. The carbon isotopic composition of shell aragonite is best explained in terms of equilibrium fractionations associated with exchange between metabolic CO 2 and HCO 3 in the hemolymph and the fractionation associated with carbonate precipitation. These results differ from previous studies, based primarily on samples collected in the field, that have suggested atmospheric carbon dioxide contributes significantly to the shell ? 13C. The culture results indicate that the ? 13C of aragonite is a good recorder of the isotopic composition of the snail body tissue, and therefore a better recorder of diet than is the insoluble shell organic carbon. Because the systematic fractionation of carbon isotopes within the snail is temperature dependent, the ? 13C of the shell could provide an independent technique for estimating paleotemperature changes.

  16. Habitat disturbance and the stability of freshwater gastropod populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Lodge; P. Kelly

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of population stability and habitat permanence has a major influence on the microdistribution of freshwater snails. For two years (February 1980–January 1982), we monitored the abundance of macrophytes and the abundance and size structure of four species of macrophyte-associated freshwater snails in an English pond. Previous work (Lodge, in press) showed that two species, the pulmonate Lymnaea peregra

  17. Snails as Biomonitors of Oil-Spill and Bioremediation Strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. E. J. Lee; J. Stassen; A. McDonald; C. Culshaw; A. D. Venosa; K. Lee

    2002-01-01

    Aquatic and pulmonate snails were evaluated for their suitability as biomonitors of habitat recovery following an experimental oil spill in a freshwater marshland. The mystery snail, Viviparus georgianus, and the mimic pondsnail, Pseudosuccinea columella, were used as sediment quality biomonitors for a controlled oil-spill experiment at a wetland site along the St. Lawrence River (Ste. Croix, Quebec) to assess the

  18. THE SOUTHWESTERN NATURALIST 50(4):415422 DECEMBER 2005 NO REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION BETWEEN FRESHWATER PULMONATE

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    South Carolina iniciaron reproduccio´n a aproximadamente la misma edad que los controles de Arizona considerar como el sino´nimo menor de la cosmopolita P. acuta. Pulmonate gastropods of the family Physidae

  19. Camouflaged or tanned: plasticity in freshwater snail pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ahlgren, Johan; Yang, Xi; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Brönmark, Christer

    2013-01-01

    By having phenotypically plastic traits, many organisms optimize their fitness in response to fluctuating threats. Freshwater snails with translucent shells, e.g. snails from the Radix genus, differ considerably in their mantle pigmentation patterns, with snails from the same water body ranging from being completely dark pigmented to having only a few dark patterns. These pigmentation differences have previously been suggested to be genetically fixed, but we propose that this polymorphism is owing to phenotypic plasticity in response to a fluctuating environment. Hence, we here aimed to assess whether common stressors, including ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and predation, induce a plastic response in mantle pigmentation patterns of Radix balthica. We show, in contrast to previous studies, that snails are plastic in their expression of mantle pigmentation in response to changes in UVR and predator threats, i.e. differences among populations are not genetically fixed. When exposed to cues from visually hunting fish, R. balthica increased the proportion of their dark pigmentation, suggesting a crypsis strategy. Snails increased their pigmentation even further in response to UVR, but this also led to a reduction in pattern complexity. Furthermore, when exposed to UVR and fish simultaneously, snails responded in the same way as in the UVR treatment, suggesting a trade-off between photoprotection and crypsis. PMID:24046875

  20. The Organic Shell Matrix of the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria glabrata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia C Marxen; Wilhelm Becker

    1997-01-01

    The organic matrix of the aragonitic, cross-lamellar-structured shell of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Basommatophora, Pulmonata) has been investigated. The analysis of the water-soluble matrix components revealed protein as the main part of the matrix, followed by sulfate, neutral sugar, amino sugar, and small amounts of uronic acid and phosphate. In the amino acid analysis, glycine was the main amino

  1. The Effect of Aquatic Plant Abundance on Shell Crushing Resistance in a Freshwater Snail

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Steven G.

    The Effect of Aquatic Plant Abundance on Shell Crushing Resistance in a Freshwater Snail Johel matter that snails eat is related to the strength of their shells. We measured shell crushing resistance that can affect crushing resistance, such as the density of crushing predators, snail density, water p

  2. Freshwater snail diversity: effects of pond area, habitat heterogeneity and isolation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christer Brönmark

    1985-01-01

    A large number of eutrophic ponds were surveyed for the presence of freshwater gastropods. Factors thought to influence the distribution of the snails were evaluated. As the investigated area has a homogeneous geological background physicochemical factors probably have a low effect on the local distribution of snails. There was a significant, positive regression between pond area and the number of

  3. Foraging trade-offs and resource patchiness: theory and experiments with a freshwater snail community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan M. Chase; Will G. Wilson; Shane A. Richards

    2001-01-01

    Empirical results concerning a freshwater snail community are interpreted using a two- species consumer model that incorporates resource structure. Behavioural-scale measurements on a guild of five species of freshwater pond snails (Mollusca: Pulmonata) indicate a trade-off between the ability to utilize a patch's resource and the ability to quickly find new resource patches. Community-level experiments demonstrate that both species richness

  4. Freshwater snail diversity in Benin (West Africa) with a focus on human schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Ibikounlé, M; Mouahid, G; Sakiti, N G; Massougbodji, A; Moné, H

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a large-scale freshwater snail survey in Benin to assess the malacological diversity and the larval trematode infections with a focus on Schistosoma genus. We conducted 82 freshwater snail surveys in 35 sites ranked in 4 types and belonging to 9 out of 12 departments. Among 19,200 collected snails, 11 species of freshwater snails were identified. Four species of human schistosome transmitting snails, Bulinus forskalii, B. globosus, B. truncatus and Biomphalaria pfeifferi and seven species of non-human schistosome transmitting snails. Although B. forskalii and B. globosus were the most largely distributed snails, none of the Bulinus snails were found naturally infected by schistosomes. B. pfeifferi was found naturally infected by S. mansoni only in one site with a 0.56% prevalence. The most risky areas were Borgou and the four coastal departments. Preliminary contempory information on human schistosomiasis was provided from three different sites. Schistosoma haematobium was found with 57.1%, 96% and 100% prevalences (two of which were new records for this species in Benin) while S. mansoni was restricted to one site (Toho-Todougba) with 74.3% prevalence. Our data showed that both schistosomiasis haematobium and mansoni prevalences increased during the last nineteen years in Toho-Todougba site. PMID:19426659

  5. Effectors of metabolic depression in an estivating pulmonate snail ( Helix aspersa ): whole animal and in vitro tissue studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Pedler; C. J. Fuery; P. C. Withers; J. Flanigan; M. Guppy

    1996-01-01

    We have examined metabolic depression in the land snail (Helix aspersa) during estivation, and have developed a tissue model of metabolic depression using an in vitro mantle preparation. The metabolic\\u000a rate ofH. aspersa is depressed by 84% in vivo within 4 weeks of onset of estivation, and this metabolic depression is accompanied by a decrease\\u000a in haemolymphPO2 and pH, and

  6. Physiological response to low temperature in the freshwater apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae).

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Keiichiro; Tsumuki, Hisaaki; Izumi, Yohei; Wada, Takashi

    2009-08-01

    Cold hardiness of the freshwater apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, varies seasonally. We investigated lethal factors and physiological changes arising from exposure of P. canaliculata to low temperatures. Snails did not survive freezing. The supercooling point of cold-acclimated (cold tolerant) snails (-6.6+/-0.8 degrees C) did not differ significantly from that of non-acclimated ones (-7.1+/-1.5 degrees C) under laboratory conditions. Furthermore, snails died even under more moderately low temperatures approaching 0 degrees C. These results indicate that indirect chilling injury is a factor in the death of P. canaliculata at low temperatures. Regardless of whether the snails were acclimated to low temperatures, all of the dead, and even some of the snails still alive at 0 degrees C, had injured mantles, indicating that the mantle may be the organ most susceptible to the effects of low temperatures. The concentration of glucose in the posterior chamber of the kidney and concentration of glycerol in the digestive gland were significantly higher in cold-acclimated snails than in non-acclimated ones, suggesting carbohydrate metabolic pathways are altered in snails during cold acclimation. PMID:19648400

  7. Epidemiology of cercarial stage of trematodes in freshwater snails from Chiang Mai province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chontananarth, Thapana; Wongsawad, Chalobol

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the epidemiological situation of cercarial trematodes infection in freshwater snails from different water resources in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Methods The snail specimens were collected from 13 districts of Chiang Mai province during April 2008 to February 2012. The prevalence of cercarial infection in snails was investigated using the crushing method. The drawing was done with the help of a camera lucida for the morphological study. Results A total of 2?479 snail individuals were collected and classified into 7 families, 11 genera, and 14 species, Among them, 8 snails species were found to be infected with an overall prevalence of 17.27% (428/2?479), which infected with nine groups of cercariae; gymnocephalous cercaria, strigea cercaria, megalurous cercaria, monostome cercaria, parapleurolophocercous cercaria (Haplorchis cercaria), pleurolophocercous cercaria, furcocercous cercaria (Transversotrema cercaria), xiphidiocercaria, and virgulate cercaria. The parapleurolophocercous cercaria was found to be the dominant type among the cercarial infection in the snails (64.25%). Conclusions The various species of snails found in the research location act as the intermediate hosts for the high prevalence of parasitic infection of many species of mammals. This work will provide new information on both the distribution and first intermediate host of trematodes. PMID:23620846

  8. The freshwater snails (Gastropoda) of Iran, with descriptions of two new genera and eight new species

    PubMed Central

    Glöer, Peter; Peši?, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Using published records and original data from recent field work and revision of Iranian material of certain species deposited in the collections of the Natural History Museum Basel, the Zoological Museum Berlin, and Natural History Museum Vienna, a checklist of the freshwater gastropod fauna of Iran was compiled. This checklist contains 73 species from 34 genera and 14 families of freshwater snails; 27 of these species (37%) are endemic to Iran. Two new genera, Kaskakia and Sarkhia, and eight species, i.e., Bithynia forcarti, Bithynia starmuehlneri, Bithynia mazandaranensis, Pseudamnicola georgievi, Kaskakia khorrasanensis, Sarkhia sarabensis, Valvata nowsharensis and Acroloxus pseudolacustris are described as new to science; Ecrobia grimmi (Clessin & Dybowski, 1888), Heleobia dalmatica (Radoman, 1974) and Hippeutis complanatus (Linnaeus, 1758) are reported for the first time from Iran. Additional field work is highly desirable for a more appropriate evaluation of the extant freshwater snail biodiversity in Iran. PMID:22977349

  9. Ecotoxicological effect of sublethal exposure to zinc oxide nanoparticles on freshwater snail Biomphalaria alexandrina.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Sohair R; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Bakry, Fayez A; Sayed, Dawlat A

    2014-08-01

    Freshwater snails are used as sensitive biomarkers of aquatic ecosystem pollution. The potential impacts of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) on aquatic ecosystems have attracted special attention due to their unique properties. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the possible mechanisms of ecotoxicological effects of ZnONPs on freshwater snail Biomphalaria alexandrina. ZnONPs showed molluscicidal activity against B. alexandrina snails, and the LC50 was 145 ?g/ml. Two tested concentrations of ZnONPs were selected: The first concentration was equivalent to LC10 (7 ?g/ml), and the second was equivalent to LC25 (35 ?g/ml). Exposure to ZnONPs (7 and 35 ?g/ml) for three consecutive weeks significantly induced malondialdehyde and nitric oxide with concomitant decreases in glutathione and glutathione-S-transferase levels in hemolymph and soft tissues of treated snails. Moreover, ZnONPs elicited a significant decrease in total protein and albumin contents coinciding with enhancement of total lipids and cholesterol levels as well as activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase in hemolymph and soft tissues of treated snails. This study highlights the potential ecological implications of ZnONP release in aquatic environments and may serve to encourage regulatory agencies in Egypt to more carefully monitor and regulate the industrial use and disposal of ZnONPs. PMID:24736985

  10. Electron Spin Resonance Studies of Mn2+ in Freshwater Snail Shells: Pomacea Canaliculata Lamarck and Fossilized Snail Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomkan, N.; Meejoo, S.; Limsuwan, P.; Winotai, P.; Chaimanee, Y.

    2005-07-01

    We study paramagnetic Mn2+ ions present in the nowadays shells of univalve freshwater snails of Pomacea canaliculata lamarck (PCL) and the fossilized freshwater snail (FFS), Viviparus. All these shells are abundant in Thailand. The PCL shells were ground into fine powder. A set of seven samples were then separately annealed for 2 h in air atmosphere at different annealing temperatures while the FFS powder was characterized as-received. The PCL shells mainly consist of aragonite and a fraction of calcite. The heat treatments of the PCL powder samples at temperature higher than 450 degrees C resulted in an irreversible phase transformation from aragonite to calcite. However, it is found that the FFS shell is mainly made of calcite, with a minor fraction of aragonite. The crystal structure of the high-temperature-annealed PCL samples are quite similar to that of FFS, which indicates that the metamorphosis (aragonite ? calcite) in the FFS shell had occurred but was not yet completed, although it had remained under the pressure and temperature of the Earth's crusts over millions of years. Our detailed ESR spectral analyses of PCL and FFS show that Mn2+ ions enter the Ca2+ sites during a biomineralization process. Simulated ESR parameters of PCL-500 of Mn2+ at a uniaxial site of calcite are reported. It is surprising to find that the ratio of Mn2+ concentration present in FFS to those in PCL shells evaluated from ESR spectra is as much as 10:1.

  11. Predator-Induced Morphological Plasticity Across Local Populations of a Freshwater Snail

    PubMed Central

    Brönmark, Christer; Lakowitz, Thomas; Hollander, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The expression of anti-predator adaptations may vary on a spatial scale, favouring traits that are advantageous in a given predation regime. Besides, evolution of different developmental strategies depends to a large extent on the grain of the environment and may result in locally canalized adaptations or, alternatively, the evolution of phenotypic plasticity as different predation regimes may vary across habitats. We investigated the potential for predator-driven variability in shell morphology in a freshwater snail, Radix balthica, and whether found differences were a specialized ecotype adaptation or a result of phenotypic plasticity. Shell shape was quantified in snails from geographically separated pond populations with and without molluscivorous fish. Subsequently, in a common garden experiment we investigated reaction norms of snails from populations' with/without fish when exposed to chemical cues from tench (Tinca tinca), a molluscivorous fish. We found that snails from fish-free ponds had a narrow shell with a well developed spire, whereas snails that coexisted with fish had more rotund shells with a low spire, a shell morphology known to increase survival rate from shell-crushing predators. The common garden experiment mirrored the results from the field survey and showed that snails had similar reaction norms in response to chemical predator cues, i.e. the expression of shell shape was independent of population origin. Finally, we found significant differences for the trait means among populations, within each pond category (fish/fish free), suggesting a genetic component in the determination of shell morphology that has evolved independently across ponds. PMID:21818264

  12. Habitat preference of freshwater snails in relation to environmental factors and the presence of the competitor snail Melanoides tuberculatus (Müller, 1774).

    PubMed

    Giovanelli, Alexandre; da Silva, Cesar Luiz Pinto Ayres Coelho; Leal, Geórgia Borges Eccard; Baptista, Darcílio Fernandes

    2005-04-01

    Our objective is to evaluate the habitat preference of freshwater snails in relation to environmental factors and the presence of the competitor snail Melanoides tuberculatus. In the first phase, snails was collected at 12 sites. This sampling sites presented a degree of organic input. In the second phase 33 sampling sites were chosen, covering a variety of lotic and lentic environments. The snail species found at Guapimirim, state of Rio de Janeiro, displayed a marked habitat preference, specially in relation to the physical characteristics of each environment. Other limiting factors for snail distribution at the studied lotic environments were the water current velocity and the amount of organic matter, mainly to Physa marmorata, M. tuberculatus, and Biomphalaria tenagophila. The absence of interactions between M. tuberculatus and another snails could be associated to the distinct spatial distribution of those species and the instability of habitats. This later factor may favor the coexistence of M. tuberculatus with B. glabrata by reduction of population density. In areas of schistosomiasis transmission some habitat modification may add to the instability of the environment, which would make room for the coexistence of M. tuberculatus and Biomphalaria spp. In this way, some of the usual measures for the control of snail hosts would prevent the extinction of populations of Biomphalaria spp. by M. tuberculatus in particular habitats. PMID:16021304

  13. Diet alters delayed selfing, inbreeding depression, and reproductive senescence in a freshwater snail

    PubMed Central

    Auld, Josh R; Henkel, John F

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive success is a critical fitness attribute that is directly influenced by resource availability. Here, we investigate the effects of diet-based resource availability on three interrelated aspects of reproductive success: a change in mating system based on mate availability, consequent inbreeding depression, and the deterioration of reproductive efficiency with age (senescence). We employed a factorial experimental design using 22 full-sib families of the hermaphroditic freshwater snail Physa acuta to explore these interactions. Individual snails were reared in one of two mate-availability treatments (isolated [selfing] or occasionally paired [outcrossing]) and one of two diet treatments (boiled lettuce or Spirulina, an algae that is rich in protein, vitamins, and minerals). Spirulina-fed snails initiated reproduction at a 13% earlier age and 7% larger size than lettuce-fed snails. Spirulina also resulted in a 30% reduction in the time delay before selfing. Compared to lettuce, a diet of Spirulina increased inbreeding depression by 52% for egg hatching rate and 64% for posthatching juvenile survival. Furthermore, Spirulina led to a 15-fold increase in the rate of reproductive senescence compared with a diet of lettuce. These transgenerational, interactive effects of diet on inbreeding depression and reproductive senescence are discussed in the context of diet-induced phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25165532

  14. Diet alters delayed selfing, inbreeding depression, and reproductive senescence in a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Auld, Josh R; Henkel, John F

    2014-07-01

    Reproductive success is a critical fitness attribute that is directly influenced by resource availability. Here, we investigate the effects of diet-based resource availability on three interrelated aspects of reproductive success: a change in mating system based on mate availability, consequent inbreeding depression, and the deterioration of reproductive efficiency with age (senescence). We employed a factorial experimental design using 22 full-sib families of the hermaphroditic freshwater snail Physa acuta to explore these interactions. Individual snails were reared in one of two mate-availability treatments (isolated [selfing] or occasionally paired [outcrossing]) and one of two diet treatments (boiled lettuce or Spirulina, an algae that is rich in protein, vitamins, and minerals). Spirulina-fed snails initiated reproduction at a 13% earlier age and 7% larger size than lettuce-fed snails. Spirulina also resulted in a 30% reduction in the time delay before selfing. Compared to lettuce, a diet of Spirulina increased inbreeding depression by 52% for egg hatching rate and 64% for posthatching juvenile survival. Furthermore, Spirulina led to a 15-fold increase in the rate of reproductive senescence compared with a diet of lettuce. These transgenerational, interactive effects of diet on inbreeding depression and reproductive senescence are discussed in the context of diet-induced phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25165532

  15. Echinostoma revolutum: Freshwater Snails as the Second Intermediate Hosts in Chiang Mai, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chantima, Kittichai; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of 37-collar spined echinostome metacercariae in freshwater snails was investigated in 6 districts of Chiang Mai Province, Thailand, from October 2011 to April 2012. A total of 2,914 snails that belong to 12 species were examined, and 7 snail species (Clea helena, Eyriesia eyriesi, Bithynia funiculata, Bithynia siamensis siamensis, Filopaludina doliaris, Filopaludina sumatrensis polygramma, and Filopaludina martensi martensi) were found infected with echinostome metacercariae. The prevalence of metacercariae was the highest in Filopaludina spp. (38.5-58.7%) followed by B. funiculata (44.0%), E. eyriesi (12.5%), B. siamensis siamensis (8.2%), and C. helena (5.1%). Metacercariae were experimentally fed to hamsters and domestic chicks, and adult flukes were recovered from both hosts at days 15 and 20 post-infection. The adult flukes were identified based on morphological features, morphometrics, host-parasite relationships, and geographical distribution. They were compatible to Echinostoma revolutum or Echinostoma jurini, with only minor differences. As the adults were recovered from both hamsters and chicks, our specimens were more compatible to E. revolutum rather than E. jurini (reported only from mammals). This is the first report for metacercariae of E. revolutum in the snail host, C. helena, and also confirmed that Filopaludina spp., E. eryresi, and Bithynia spp. act as the second intermediate hosts of E. revolutum under natural conditions, which are indigenously distributed in Chiang Mai province. PMID:23710085

  16. Biogenic monoamines in the freshwater snail, Biomphalaria glabrata: Influence of infection by the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip Manger; Jianyong Li; Bruce M Christensen; Timothy P Yoshino

    1996-01-01

    The biogenic monoamines, serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA) and l-dopa were measured using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED) in the extracts of the central nervous system (CNS) and plasma of uninfected freshwater snails, Biomphalaria glabrata, and in snails at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days postexposure (PE) to the miracidia of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni. Relative

  17. Indirect Effects of Heavy Metals on Parasites May Cause Shifts in Snail Species Compositions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Lefcort; M. Q. Aguon; K. A. Bond; K. R. Chapman; R. Chaquette; J. Clark; P. Kornachuk; B. Z. Lang; J. C. Martin

    2002-01-01

    We studied the direct and indirect effects of pollution on the distributions and abundances of two closely related species\\u000a of pulmonate freshwater snails. Physella columbiana is more numerous at heavy metal–polluted lakes, and Lymnaea palustris is more numerous at reference lakes. Both species are present at all sites, as are predatory bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). The direct effects examined included

  18. Development of the Statocyst in the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria Glabrata (Pulmonata, Basommatophora)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Wenyuan; Wiederhold, Michael; Hejl, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The development of the statocyst of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata has been examined from embryo to adult. Special emphasis was put on the growth of the statoconia in the statocysts. In the statocysts of embryonic snails (90-120 h after oviposition) there is not a single statolith but an average of 40-50 statoconia per statocyst. The number of statoconia increases to 385-400 when the snails reach a shell diameter of 4 mm and remains relatively constant thereafter, irrespective of shell size. Small statoconia are found in supporting cells, which suggests that the statoconia are produced within these cells. The average diameter of statoconia and the total mass of statoconia increase with increasing shell diameter. The average number of large statoconia (diameter greater than 7 micrometers) per statocyst continues to increase from 2 to 10 mm animals while the number of small ones (diameter less than 4 micrometers) initially rises and then decreases after 4 mm. These results demonstrate continuous growth of the statoconia in the cyst lumen of Biomphalaria. The single statoconia vibrate in a regular pattern in vivo, indicating beating of the statocyst cilia. The statoconia sink under the influence of gravity to load and stimulate receptor cells which are at the bottom. The length of cilia and the size of statocyst gradually increase as the animal grows. However, the increase in the volume of the statocyst is relatively small compared with the increase in body weight during normal development.

  19. Angiostrongylus cantonensis: morphological and behavioral investigation within the freshwater snail Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shan; Zhang, Yi; Liu, He-Xiang; Zhang, Chao-Wei; Steinmann, Peter; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Utzinger, Jürg

    2009-06-01

    An infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the main causative agent for human eosinophilic encephalitis, can be acquired through the consumption of the freshwater snail Pomacea canaliculata. This snail also provides a suitable model to study the developmental morphology and behavior of A. cantonensis larvae, facilitated by the snail's distinct lung structure. We used microanatomy for studying the natural appearance and behavior of A. cantonensis larvae while developing within P. canaliculata. The distribution of refractile granules in the larval body and characteristic head structures changed during the developmental cycle. Two well-developed, rod-like structures with expanded knob-like tips at the anterior part were observed under the buccal cavity as early as the late second developmental stage. A "T"-shaped structure at the anterior end and its tenacity distinguished the outer sheath from that shed during the second molting. Early first-stage larvae obtained from fresh rat feces are free moving and characterized by a coiled tail, whereas a mellifluous "Q"-movement was the behavioral trait of third-stage A. cantonensis larvae outside the host tissue. In combination, the distribution of refractive granules, distinct head features, variations in sheaths, and behavioral characteristics can be utilized for differentiation of larval stages, and for distinguishing A. cantonensis larvae from those of other free-living nematodes. PMID:19172296

  20. Understanding the regulation of estivation in a freshwater snail through iTRAQ-based comparative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Mu, Huawei; Zhang, Huoming; Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli H; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Wong, Chris Kong Chu; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2013-11-01

    The apple snail Pomacea canaliculata is a freshwater gastropod with a remarkable ability to withstand seasonal or unpredictable dry conditions by entering estivation. Studies of P. canaliculata using conventional biochemical and the individual gene approaches have revealed the expressional changes of several enzymes and antioxidative genes in response to estivation and arousal. In this study, we applied iTRAQ-coupled two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to identify and quantify the global protein expression during the estivation and arousal of P. canaliculata. A total of 1040 proteins were identified, among which 701 proteins were quantified and compared across four treatments (i.e., control, active snails; short-term estivation, 3 days of exposure to air; prolonged estivation, 30 days of exposure to air; and arousal, 6 h after resubmergence in water) revealing 53 differentially expressed proteins. A comparison of protein expression profiles across treatments indicated that the proteome of this species was very insensitive to initial estivation, with only 9 proteins differentially expressed as compared with the control. Among the 9 proteins, the up-regulations of two immune related proteins indicated the initial immune response to the detection of stress cues. Prolonged estivation resulted in many more differentially expressed proteins (47 compared with short-term estivation treatment), among which 16 were down-regulated and 31 were up-regulated. These differentially expressed proteins have provided the first global picture of a shift in energy usage from glucose to lipid, prevention of protein degradation and elevation of oxidative defense, and production of purine for uric acid production to remove toxic ammonia during prolonged estivation in a freshwater snail. From prolonged estivation to arousal, only 6 proteins changed their expression level, indicating that access to water and food alone is not a necessary condition to reactivate whole-sale protein expression. A comparison with hibernation and diapause revealed many similar molecular mechanisms of hypometabolic regulation across the animal kingdom. PMID:24088062

  1. Trematode infections of the freshwater snail family Thiaridae in the Khek River, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Dechruksa, Wivitchuta; Krailas, Duangduen; Ukong, Suluck; Inkapatanakul, Wasin; Koonchornboon, Tunyarut

    2007-11-01

    The freshwater snail family Thiaridae was studied at five different locations: water sources for the Khek River, Thailand. Snail samples were collected by hand using counts per unit of time sampling method between December 2004 and October 2005. The physico-chemical quality of the water changed with the seasons and affected the sampling areas during both the dry season and the flood season. A total of 9,568 snail samples comprised of 14 species were found. These were 284 Tarebia granifera, 24 Melanoides tuberculata, 86 Thiara scabra, 3,295 Paracrostoma pseudosulcospira pseudosulcospira, 736 P. paludiformis paludiformis, 3,266 P. paludiformis dubiosa, 117 P. morrisoni, 304 Brotia (Brotia) binodosa binodosa, 1,250 B. (Brotia) microsculpta, 146 B. (Senckenbergia) wykoffi, 1 B. (Brotia) pagodula, 5 B. (Brotia) binodosa spiralis, 5 B. (Brotia) insolita and 49 B. (Brotia) manningi. The cercariae were investigated using shedding and crushing methods where they were categorized into two types and five species. The first type, Parapleurolophocercous cercariae, were comprised of Haplorchis pumilio Looss, 1899 and Centrocestus formosanus Nishigori, 1924. The second type, Xiphidiocercariae were comprised of Acanthatrium hitaense Koga, 1953, Loxogenoides bicolor Kaw, 1945 and Haematoloechus similis Looss, 1899. The cercarial infection rates in the above 5 species were 0.1% (5:9,568), 0.2% (15:9,568), 0.3% (24:9,568), 0.4% (37:9,568) and 0.1% (5:9,568), respectively. Five species of snails were susceptible to trematode infections. They were T. granifera, M. tuberculata, T. scabra, P. paludiformis paludiformis and B. (Senckenbergia) wykoffi; infections were found in 26.1% (74:284), 33.3% (8:24), 1.2% (1:86), 0.3% (2:736) and 0.7% (1:146), respectively. PMID:18613543

  2. Influence of water quality on zinc toxicity to the Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) and sensitivity of freshwater snails to zinc.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Tong, Xin

    2015-03-01

    The present study characterized the influence of water-quality characteristics on zinc (Zn) toxicity to the Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) and the sensitivity of freshwater snails to Zn. Standard 96-h renewal acute toxicity tests were conducted with Zn and juvenile P. paludosa under 3 conditions of pH and alkalinity, water hardness, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Median lethal effect concentrations (96-h LC50s), no-observed- effect concentrations, lowest-observed-effect concentrations, LC10s, and LC20s were determined for each test. The results showed that Zn toxicity to P. paludosa decreased linearly with increasing hardness, pH, and DOC. A multiple linear regression model based on pH, hardness, and DOC was able to explain 99% of the observed variability in LC50s. These results are useful for the development of a biotic ligand model (BLM) for P. paludosa and Zn. Zinc acute toxicity data were collected from the literature for 12 freshwater snail species in a wide range of water-quality characteristics for species sensitivity distribution analysis. The results showed that P. paludosa is the second most sensitive to Zn. The present study also suggested that aqueous ZnCO3 and ZnHCO3 (-) can be bioavailable to P. paludosa. Therefore, bioavailability models (e.g., BLM) should take these Zn species into consideration for bioavailability when applied to snails. PMID:25475172

  3. Costs and limits of phenotypic plasticity: Tests with predator-induced morphology and life history in a freshwater snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. DeWitt

    1998-01-01

    Potential constraints on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity were tested using data from a previous study on predator-induced morphology and life history in the freshwater snail Physa heterostropha. The benefit of plasticity can be reduced if facultative development is associated with energetic costs, developmental insta- bility, or an impaired developmental range. I examined plasticity in two traits for 29 families

  4. The symbiont Capsaspora owczarzaki, nov. gen. nov. sp., isolated from three strains of the pulmonate snail Biomphalaria glabrata is related to members of the Mesomycetozoea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn A Hertel; Christopher J Bayne; Eric S Loker

    2002-01-01

    While investigating the resistance of some strains of Biomphalaria glabrata to infection with Schistosoma mansoni, a unicellular eukaryotic symbiont was noted in the snail haemolymph. It was similar in appearance to Nuclearia sp. reported from B. glabrata. Sequences comprising the 18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2 and the beginning of the 28S rDNA gene regions were obtained from symbionts isolated from three

  5. DNA Barcode Identification of Freshwater Snails in the Family Bithyniidae from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kulsantiwong, Jutharat; Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Ruangsittichai, Jiraporn; Ruangjirachuporn, Wipaporn; Boonmars, Thidarut; Viyanant, Vithoon; Pierossi, Paola; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Tesana, Smarn

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater snails in the family Bithyniidae are the first intermediate host for Southeast Asian liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini), the causative agent of opisthorchiasis. Unfortunately, the subtle morphological characters that differentiate species in this group are not easily discerned by non-specialists. This is a serious matter because the identification of bithyniid species is a fundamental prerequisite for better understanding of the epidemiology of this disease. Because DNA barcoding, the analysis of sequence diversity in the 5’ region of the mitochondrial COI gene, has shown strong performance in other taxonomic groups, we decided to test its capacity to resolve 10 species/ subspecies of bithyniids from Thailand. Our analysis of 217 specimens indicated that COI sequences delivered species-level identification for 9 of 10 currently recognized species. The mean intraspecific divergence of COI was 2.3% (range 0-9.2 %), whereas sequence divergences between congeneric species averaged 8.7% (range 0-22.2 %). Although our results indicate that DNA barcoding can differentiate species of these medically-important snails, we also detected evidence for the presence of one overlooked species and one possible case of synonymy. PMID:24223896

  6. Larval trematode infections in freshwater snails from the highveld and lowveld areas of Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Chingwena, G; Mukaratirwa, S; Kristensen, T K; Chimbari, M

    2002-12-01

    Between November 1998 and October 2000, freshwater snails were collected monthly from the highveld and lowveld areas of Zimbabwe to determine the occurrence of larval trematodes. A total of 13,789 snails, representing ten species, were collected from 21 sites and 916 (6.6%) harboured patent trematode infections. Eight morphologically distinguishable types of cercariae were identified. Bulinus tropicus had the highest overall prevalence of infection (13.1%). The echinostome was the most common type of cercaria recovered, contributing 38.2% of all infections. Schistosoma cercariae were recovered mainly from the highveld and comprised 8.0% of all infections. Amphistome cercariae contributed 37.6% of all infections and were recorded from both the highveld and lowveld areas with a peak prevalence occurring during the post-rainy period (March-May). The main intermediate host for amphistomes was B. tropicus. Infections in B. globosus, B. forskalii and Biomphalaria pfeifferi with amphistome cercariae are new records for Zimbabwe. PMID:12498632

  7. Sediment copper bioavailability to freshwater snails in south Florida: risk implications for the Everglade snail kite ( Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert A. Frakes; Timothy A. Bargar; Emily A. Bauer

    2008-01-01

    Many properties being acquired as part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) are heavily contaminated with\\u000a copper. Estimated copper bioaccumulation in the Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) has led to the prediction of risk to the Everglade snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) at some CERP projects. Field study results presented in this paper examine the relationship between copper levels

  8. The evolution of reproductive isolation in a simultaneous hermaphrodite, the freshwater snail Physa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The cosmopolitan freshwater snail Physa acuta has recently found widespread use as a model organism for the study of mating systems and reproductive allocation. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenies suggest that Physa carolinae, recently described from the American southeast, is a sister species of P. acuta. The divergence of the acuta/carolinae ancestor from the more widespread P. pomilia appears to be somewhat older, and the split between a hypothetical acuta/carolinae/pomilia ancestor and P. gyrina appears older still. Results Here we report the results of no-choice mating experiments yielding no evidence of hybridization between gyrina and any of four other populations (pomilia, carolinae, Philadelphia acuta, or Charleston acuta), nor between pomilia and carolinae. Crosses between pomilia and both acuta populations yielded sterile F1 progeny with reduced viability, while crosses between carolinae and both acuta populations yielded sterile F1 hybrids of normal viability. A set of mate-choice tests also revealed significant sexual isolation between gyrina and all four of our other Physa populations, between pomilia and carolinae, and between pomilia and Charleston acuta, but not between pomilia and the acuta population from Philadelphia, nor between carolinae and either acuta population. These observations are consistent with the origin of hybrid sterility prior to hybrid inviability, and a hypothesis that speciation between pomilia and acuta may have been reinforced by selection for prezygotic reproductive isolation in sympatry. Conclusions We propose a two-factor model for the evolution of postzygotic reproductive incompatibility in this set of five Physa populations consistent with the Dobzhansky-Muller model of speciation, and a second two-factor model for the evolution of sexual incompatibility. Under these models, species trees may be said to correspond with gene trees in American populations of the freshwater snail, Physa. PMID:21615966

  9. Electron Spin Resonance Studies of Mn2+ in Freshwater Snail Shells:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meejoo, S.; Udomkan, N.; Winotai, P.; Chaimanee, Y.

    We have studied paramagnetic Mn2+ ions present in the shells of today's univalve freshwater snails, Sinotaia ingallsiana (FS), Pila ampullaceal (PA), Pomacea canaliculata lamarck (PCL) and the fossilized freshwater snail (FFS), Viviparus which are abundant in Thailand. The FS, PA and AG shells in our study were ground into fine powder. A set of seven samples was each then separately annealed for 2 hours in air atmosphere at 300°C, 400°C, 450°C, 500°C, 550°C, 600°C and 900°C, respectively, while the FFS powder was characterized as received. The FS, PA and PCL shells mainly consist of aragonite and a fraction of calcite. The heat treatments higher than 450°C of the FS, PA and PCL powder samples resulted in an irreversible phase transformation from aragonite to calcite. However, it is found that the FFS shell is mainly made of calcite, with a minor fraction of aragonite. The crystal structure of high temperature annealed FS, PA and PCL samples are quite similar to that of FFS, which indicates that the metamorphosis (aragonite ? calcite) in the FFS shell had occurred but not yet completed, although they remained under the pressure and temperature of the Earth's crust over millions of years. Our detailed ESR spectral analyses of FS, PA, PCL and FFS show that Mn2+ ions enter Ca2+ sites during a biomineralization process. Typical simulated ESR parameters of FS-500 of Mn2+ at a uniaxial site of calcite are gx=gy=2.078±0.001, gz=2.002±0.001, Ax=Ay=87.50±1.00 G, Az=89.00±1.00 G and D=115±1 G, respectively. It is surprising to find that the ratio of Mn2+ concentration present in FFS to those in FS, PA and PCL shells evaluated from ESR spectra is as much as 10:1. It is thus possible to gain some insight of manganese incorporation into the freshwater shells during the biomineralization process.

  10. Studies on the morphology of cercariae obtained from freshwater snails at Erawan Waterfall, Erawan National Park, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ukong, Suluck; Krailas, Duangduen; Dangprasert, Tunyarut; Channgarm, Pasapong

    2007-03-01

    The morphology of cercariae of freshwater snails from Erawan Waterfall, Erawan National Park, Kanchanaburi Province was studied between December 2002 and August 2003. The snail samples were collected by handpicking using a counts per unit of time sampling method. The cercariae, larva stage of a trematode, were investigated using the shedding method where they were categorized into three groups and six species. The first group, Pleurolophocercous cercariae, consists of Haplorchis pumillo (C1) and Stictodora tridactyla (C3). The second group, Furcocercous cercariae, consisted of Mesostephanus appendicalatus (C2), Transversotrema laruei (C6) and Cardicola alseae(C4). The third group, Xiphidio cercariae, has only one species which is Loxogenoides bicolor (C5). Out of 1163 snails, only 62 were found to be infected by cercariae, equivalent to a 5.33% infection rate. The infections grouped by species of the cercariae are as follows: C, 22 (1.9%), C, 29 (2.5%), C2 1 (0.1%), C6 1 (0.1%), C4 6 (0.5%) and C5 3 (0.3%). The freshwater snail samples consist of four species. From a total of 1163 samples, there are 687 Melanoides jugicostis, 91 Tarebia granifera, 296 Thiara scabra and 89 Melanoides tuberculata. Infections were found in 45 (6.5%), 6 (6.6%), 1 (0.3%) and 10 (11.2%), respectively. PMID:17539280

  11. Toxic Effects of Cadmium on Reproduction, Development, and Hatching in the Freshwater Snail Lymnaea stagnalisfor Water Quality Monitoring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annette Gomot

    1998-01-01

    The freshwater snailLymnaea stagnaliswas exposed to cadmium concentrations of 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 ?g liter?1. The influence of this highly toxic metal on various stages of reproduction (number of egg masses, number of eggs, embryo development, and hatching) was studied. Egg production ceased at 400 ?g Cd2+liter?1and hatching was reduced to 0.4% with 200 ?g liter?1at 20°C.

  12. Divergence preceding island formation among Aegean insular populations of the freshwater snail genus Pseudorientalia (Caenogastropoda: Truncatelloidea).

    PubMed

    Szarowska, Magdalena; Hofman, Sebastian; Osikowski, Artur; Falniowski, Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    Freshwater snails that inhabit islands are excellent model organisms for testing relationships between geological events and phylogeography, especially in the Aegean region. Although many Aegean islands were searched in the present study, species of the genus Pseudorientalia were only found on Lesvos, Samos, and Chios. Phylogenetic relationships between specimens living on these three islands were analysed using COI and 16S rRNA molecular markers and morphological data. A high level of diversity was found between islands. Genetic distances between clades showed differences high enough for the samples from different islands to be considered distinct species (p-distance: 0.105-0.133). These results are also supported by obvious morphological differences in shell morphology between islands. The mean divergence time between the Lesvos clade and Samos/Chios clade was 24.13 ± 3.30 Mya; between the Samos and Chios clades the divergence time was 14.80 ± 1.11 Mya. Our data suggest that high divergence may have occurred between Pseudorientalia populations during the Upper and Middle Miocene, when the Aegean region was part of a united landmass. It is possible that the observed highly divergent Pseudorientalia clades are relicts of high regional diversity that existed in the past. PMID:25284387

  13. Uptake and distribution of copper sulfate and its effect on the respiration rate of the hemocyanin-producing freshwater snail Lymnaea natalensis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolmarans, C.T.; Yssel, E.

    1988-08-01

    Copper sulfate was one of the earliest compounds suggested as a molluscicide and although several new compounds have since been developed, copper sulfate is still widely used against freshwater snail intermediate hosts of trematode parasites causing bilharzia. However, the toxic effect that copper sulfate may have on these species has not yet been investigated adequately. This incomplete picture of the action of copper sulfate on freshwater snails is further complicated by the fact that some of these snail species have hemocyanin (a protein containing copper) as respiration pigment. Because of the existence of a copper metabolic pathway, these species may handle external copper differently from those species with hemoglobin as respiration pigment. In the present study, the uptake of external copper in the form of copper sulfate, as well as the effect of this ion on respiration rate, was investigated in Lymnaea natalensis, the intermediate host of Fasciola gigantica. This snail possesses hemocyanin as respiratory pigment.

  14. Histopathological effects of larval trematodes on the digestive gland of freshwater snail species, Vivipara bengalensis and Lymnaea acuminata.

    PubMed

    Choubisa, S L; Sheikh, Zulfiya; Jaroli, V J

    2012-10-01

    Comparative histopathological effects were observed on the digestive glands (hepatopancreas) of freshwater snail species, Vivipara bengalensis and Lymnaea acuminata infected with single (furcocercous cercariae) and double infection of digenean trematode larvae (gymnocephalous cercariae + metacercariae), respectively. Digestive glands of both the snail species revealed degenerative changes in their digestive gland tubules. The latter became irregular in shape, reduced in size with enlarged lumen and inter-tubular space besides rupturing of digestive tubules. These changes were correlated with the size and types of trematode larvae, single or double infection and degree of parasitemia. Autolytic necrosis of numerous tubules was found in digestive glands infected with double and very severe single infection. None of the tubules was found to be invaded by sporocyst, redia and cercaria. However, metacercariae were seen to invade digestive tubules of Lymnaea species. PMID:24082545

  15. Developmental toxicity, acute toxicity and mutagenicity testing in freshwater snails Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) exposed to chromium and water samples.

    PubMed

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Hamada, Natália; Grazeffe, Vanessa Siqueira; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Okazaki, Kayo; Granatelli, Amanda Tosatte; Pereira, Ivana Wuo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Nakano, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    A protocol combining acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and mutagenicity analysis in freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata for application in ecotoxicological studies is described. For acute toxicity testing, LC50 and EC50 values were determined; dominant lethal mutations induction was the endpoint for mutagenicity analysis. Reference toxicant potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) was used to characterize B. glabrata sensitivity for toxicity and cyclophosphamide to mutagenicity testing purposes. Compared to other relevant freshwater species, B. glabrata showed high sensitivity: the lowest EC50 value was obtained with embryos at veliger stage (5.76mg/L). To assess the model applicability for environmental studies, influent and effluent water samples from a wastewater treatment plant were evaluated. Gastropod sensitivity was assessed in comparison to the standardized bioassay with Daphnia similis exposed to the same water samples. Sampling sites identified as toxic to daphnids were also detected by snails, showing a qualitatively similar sensitivity suggesting that B. glabrata is a suitable test species for freshwater monitoring. Holding procedures and protocols implemented for toxicity and developmental bioassays showed to be in compliance with international standards for intra-laboratory precision. Thereby, we are proposing this system for application in ecotoxicological studies. PMID:25259848

  16. Changes in chemical components in the freshwater apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae), in relation to the development of its cold hardiness.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Keiichiro; Tsumuki, Hisaaki; Izumi, Yohei; Wada, Takashi

    2008-04-01

    The apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, is an invasive freshwater snail. It increases its cold hardiness before winter. However, the physiological mechanism of cold hardiness in molluscs is poorly understood, especially in freshwater molluscs. In this study, we examined the changes in low molecular weight compounds, glycogen and lipids, in the body of P. canaliculata in association with the development of cold hardiness. When snails without cold hardiness were experimentally cold-acclimated, the amount of glycerol, glutamine, and carnosine increased, while glycogen and phenylalanine decreased. Overwintering cold-tolerant snails collected from a drained paddy field in November also showed increased glycerol in their bodies with decreasing glycogen concentration, compared to summer snails collected from a submerged field. Water content also decreased during the cold acclimation, although the water loss was minimal. These results indicate that the freshwater snail, P. canaliculata enhances cold hardiness by accumulation of some kinds of low molecular weight compounds in its body as some insects do. However, the actual function of each low molecular compound is still unknown. PMID:18190902

  17. Larval stages of digenetic trematodes in Melanopsis praemorsa snails from freshwater bodies in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Bdir, Sami; Adwan, Ghaleb

    2011-01-01

    Objective To detect the species of larval trematodes (cercariae) in Melanopsis praemorsa snails from 5 different fresh water bodies in Palestine. Methods A total of 1 880 Melanopsis praemorsa snails were collected from different fresh water bodies in Palestine from October, 2008 to November, 2010. Cercariae in Melanopsis praemorsa snails were obtained by lighting and crushing methods. The behavior of cercariae was observed using a dissecting microscope. Results Three different species of larval trematodes were identified from Melanopsis praemorsa snails collected only from Al-Bathan fresh water body, while snails from other water bodies were not infected. These species were microcercous cercaria, xiphidiocercaria and brevifurcate lophocercous cercaria. These cercariae called Cercaria melanopsi palestinia I, Cercaria melanopsi palestinia II and Cercaria melanopsi palestinia III have not been described before from this snail in Palestine. The infection rate of Melanopsis praemorsa collected from Al-Bathan fresh water body was 5.7%, while the overall infection rate of snails collected from all fresh water bodies was 4.3%. Details are presented on the morphology and behavior of the cercariae as well as their development within the snail. Conclusions These results have been recorded for the first time and these cercariae may be of medical and veterinary importance. PMID:23569759

  18. Adaptive responses and latent costs of multigeneration cadmium exposure in parasite resistant and susceptible strains of a freshwater snail

    SciTech Connect

    Salice, Christopher J.; Anderson, Todd; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2010-11-01

    Population response to anthropogenic activities will be influenced by prior adaptation to environmental conditions. We tested how parasite-resistant and -susceptible strains of a freshwater snail responded to cadmium and elevated temperature challenges after having been exposed to low-level cadmium continuously for multiple generations. Snails exposed to cadmium for three generations were removed for the fourth generation, and challenged in the fifth generation with (1) chronic cadmium exposure over the entire life cycle, (2) acute cadmium exposure of adults, and (3) elevated temperature challenge of adults. The parasite susceptible NMRI strain is more cadmium tolerant than the parasite resistant BS90 strain and remained more tolerant than BS90 throughout this study. Additionally, NMRI exhibited greater adaptive capacity for cadmium than BS90 and became more tolerant of both chronic and acute cadmium challenges, while BS90 became more tolerant of acute cadmium challenge only. Fitness costs, reflected in population growth rate, were not apparent in fifth generation snails maintained in cadmium-free conditions. However, costs were latent and expressed as decreased tolerance to a secondarily imposed temperature stress. Adaptation to prior selection pressures can influence subsequent adaptation to anthropogenic stresses and may have associated costs that reduce fitness in novel environments.

  19. APPLICATION OF McKENDRICK - VON FOERSTER'S MODEL OF POPULATION DYNAMICS TO FRESHWATER SNAILS: SPECIFICATION OF THE MODEL USING LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS *)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivona Velecká; Libor Jüttner

    The synthesis of the methods of field observation, of laboratory experiments and mathematical modelling was used when studying the life history of freshwater snail Bithynia tentaculata (Linné, 1758) (Prosobranchia) in the River Svratka (South Moravia, Czech Republic). McKendrick - von Foerster's model of population dynamics based on the analysis of seasonal changes in abundance and on the size structure of

  20. The Effect of Aquatic Plant Abundance on Shell Crushing Resistance in a Freshwater Snail

    PubMed Central

    Chaves-Campos, Johel; Coghill, Lyndon M.; García de León, Francisco J.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the shell material in snails is composed of calcium carbonate but the organic shell matrix determines the properties of calcium carbonate crystals. It has been shown that the deposition of calcium carbonate is affected by the ingestion of organic compounds. We hypothesize that organic compounds not synthesized by the snails are important for shell strength and must be obtained from the diet. We tested this idea indirectly by evaluating whether the abundance of the organic matter that snails eat is related to the strength of their shells. We measured shell crushing resistance in the snail Mexipyrgus churinceanus and the abundance of the most common aquatic macrophyte, the water lily Nymphaea ampla, in ten bodies of water in the valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. We used stable isotopes to test the assumption that these snails feed on water lily organic matter. We also measured other factors that can affect crushing resistance, such as the density of crushing predators, snail density, water pH, and the concentration of calcium and phosphorus in the water. The isotope analysis suggested that snails assimilate water lily organic matter that is metabolized by sediment bacteria. The variable that best explained the variation in crushing resistance found among sites was the local abundance of water lilies. We propose that the local amount of water lily organic matter provides organic compounds important in shell biomineralization, thus determining crushing resistance. Hence, we propose that a third trophic level could be important in the coevolution of snail defensive traits and predatory structures. PMID:22970206

  1. Snails from heavy-metal polluted environments have reduced sensitivity to carbon dioxide-induced acidity.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, Hugh; Cleary, David A; Marble, Aaron M; Phillips, Morgan V; Stoddard, Timothy J; Tuthill, Lara M; Winslow, James R

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 reacts with water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3) which increases water acidity. While marine acidification has received recent consideration, less attention has been paid to the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide on freshwater systems-systems that often have low buffering potential. Since many aquatic systems are already impacted by pollutants such as heavy metals, we wondered about the added effect of rising atmospheric CO2 on freshwater organisms. We studied aquatic pulmonate snails (Physella columbiana) from both a heavy-metal polluted watershed and snails from a reference watershed that has not experienced mining pollution. We used gaseous CO2 to increase water acidity and we then measured changes in antipredatory behavior and also survival. We predicted a simple negative additive effect of low pH. We hypothesized that snails from metal-polluted environments would be physiologically stressed and impaired due to defense responses against heavy metals. Instead, snails from populations that acclimated or evolved in the presence of heavy metal mining pollution were more robust to acidic conditions than were snails from reference habitats. Snails from mining polluted sites seemed to be preadapted to a low pH environment. Their short-term survival in acidic conditions was better than snails from reference sites that lacked metal pollution. In fact, the 48 h survival of snails from polluted sites was so high that it did not significantly differ from the 24 h survival of snails from control sites. This suggests that the response of organisms to a world with rising anthropogenic carbon dioxide levels may be complex and difficult to predict. Snails had a weaker behavioral response to stressful stimuli if kept for 1 month at a pH that differed from their lake of origin. We found that snails raised at a pH of 5.5 had a weaker response (less of a decrease in activity) to concentrated heavy metals than did snails raised at their natal pH of 6.5. Furthermore, snails raised a pH of 5.5, 6.0, and 7.0 all had a weaker antipredatory response to an extract of crushed snail cells than did the pH 6.5 treatment snails. PMID:26090314

  2. Freshwater snails and Schistosomiasis mansoni in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: IV - Sul Fluminense Mesoregion.

    PubMed

    Thiengo, Silvana C; Mattos, Aline C; Boaventura, M Fernanda; Fernandez, Monica A

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, the forth of a series dealing with the survey of freshwater gastropods of the state of Rio de Janeiro, the results of collections carried out in the Sul Fluminense Mesoregion from 2000 to 2002 are presented and revealed the occurrence of 18 species: Antillorbis nordestensis; Biomphalaria glabrata; Biomphalaria peregrina; Biomphalaria straminea; Biomphalaria tenagophila; Drepanotrema anatinum; Drepanotrema cimex; Drepanotrema lucidum; Ferrissia sp.; Gundlachia ticaga; Gundlachia sp.; Heleobia sp.; Lymnaea columella; Melanoides tuberculatus; Physa acuta; Physa marmorata; Pomacea sordida and Pomacea sp. As to the snail hosts of Schistosoma mansoni the most frequent species was B. tenagophila, found in all municipalities surveyed, except Parati. Besides new records the present study extends the distribution of B. peregrina and B. straminea in the state. No specimens were found harbouring larval forms of S. mansoni although different kinds of cercariae had been observed. An account about the current schistosomiasis transmission sites in this Mesoregion is presented as well. PMID:15273799

  3. Freshwater snails and schistosomiasis mansoni in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: VI--Noroeste Fluminense Mesoregion.

    PubMed

    Thiengo, Silvana C; Mattos, Aline C; Santos, Sonia B; Fernandez, Monica A

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, the last of a series dealing with the survey of freshwater gastropods of the state of Rio de Janeiro, the results of collections carried out in the Noroeste Fluminense Mesoregion from 2002 to 2005 are presented and revealed the occurrence of 20 species: Antillorbis nordestensis; Biomphalaria glabrata; B. straminea; B. tenagophila; Drepanotrema anatinum; D. cimex; D. depressissimum; D. lucidum; Ferrissia sp.; Gundlachia ticaga; Gundlachia sp.; Heleobia sp.; Idiopyrgus sp.; Lymnaea columella; Melanoides tuberculatus; Physa acuta; P. marmorata; Plesiophysa guadeloupensis; Pomacea lineata; and Pomacea sp. Concerning the snail hosts of schistosomiasis the three natural vectors were identified and, although no specimens were found harbouring larval forms of Schistosoma mansoni, different kinds of cercariae had been observed. PMID:17308776

  4. Freshwater snails and schistosomiasis mansoni in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: V -- Norte Fluminense Mesoregion.

    PubMed

    Thiengo, Silvana C; Mattos, Aline C; Boaventura, M Fernanda; Loureiro, Márcio S; Santos, Sonia B; Fernandez, Monica A

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the fifth of a series dealing with the survey of freshwater gastropods of the state of Rio de Janeiro, the results of collections carried out in the Norte Fluminense Mesoregion from 2002 to 2003 are presented and revealed the occurrence of 19 species: Antillorbis nordestensis; Burnupia sp.; Biomphalaria tenagophila; Drepanotrema anatinum; Drepanotrema cimex; Drepanotrema depressissimum; Drepanotrema lucidum; Ferrissia sp.; Gundlachia ticaga; Gundlachia sp.; Heleobia sp.; Hebetancylus moricandi; Idiopyrgus sp.; Lymnaea columella; Melanoides tuberculatus; Physa acuta; Physa marmorata; Pomacea sordida, and Pomacea sp. Concerning the snail hosts of Schistosoma mansoni only B. tenagophila was found, in contrast with other previuosly studied mesoregions.No specimens were found harbouring larval forms of S. mansoni although different kinds of cercariae had been observed. An account about the current schistosomiasis transmission sites in this Mesoregion is presented as well. PMID:15486644

  5. Identification of an estrogen receptor gene in the natural freshwater snail Bithynia tentaculata.

    PubMed

    Hultin, Cecilia L; Hallgren, Per; Persson, Anders; Hansson, Maria C

    2014-04-25

    Mollusks have received increasing interest in ecotoxicological studies but so far the available scientific analyses of how their genes are affected by anthropogenic pollutants are scarce. The focus of this study is to identify an estrogen receptor (er) gene in the common prosobranch snail Bithynia tentaculata and to test a hypothesis that 17?-Ethinylestradiol (EE2) will modulate er gene expression after short-term exposure. We set up exposure experiments with a total of 144 snails, which were collected from a natural population in southern Sweden. Snails were exposed to either 10ng/L or 100ng/L EE2 during 24h and/or 72h. From the isolated B. tentaculata RNA we successfully identified and characterized a novel er gene and phylogenetic analyses strongly indicate that the Bithynia er gene is an ortholog to the human ER? (ESR1, NR3A1). We found a significant interaction between EE2-dose and exposure duration on the er's gene expression (Two-way ANOVA; p=0.04). We also found a significant difference in the gene expression of the er when comparing the control and 100ng/L treatment groups after 72h in female snails (One-way ANOVA; p=0.047). The results from this study should be useful for future field-related studies of estrogen receptors in natural populations of mollusks. PMID:24583164

  6. Effects of 17?-methyltestosterone on the reproduction of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Wendt, C L G; Borges, A C; Oliveira-Filho, E C; Miranda-Vilela, A L; Ferreira, M F N; Grisolia, C K

    2014-01-01

    17-?-methyltestosterone (MT) is a synthetic hormone used in fish hatcheries to induce male monosex. Snails hold promise as possible test models to assess chemicals acting on the endocrine system. Biomphalaria glabrata is an aquatic gastropod mollusk (Pulmonata, Planorbidae) that can be easily maintained in aquaria, predisposing the species for use in ecotoxicological testing. This study evaluated the reproductive effects of MT on B. glabrata by examining histological changes and its reproductive performance. Ten snails per group were exposed for 4 weeks to different concentrations of MT (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg/L). The total number of laid eggs, egg mass per group, size of type V oocytes, and production of spermatozoids were determined. Reproduction of B. glabrata was affected by MT. At the lowest concentration (0.01 mg/L), MT caused a statistically significant increase in the number of egg mass per snail compared with controls unexposed to MT. Histopathology analyses showed an increase in the sperm production at the higher MT concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/L. Chromatographic analyses of water samples showed that MT concentrations rapidly declined within a 96-h period. These results highlight the importance of giving more support to regulatory authorities, since MT is not registered for use on fish hatcheries in many countries around the world. Wastewater from fish farms discharged into aquatic ecosystems should be monitored for MT residues, since its presence could compromise the reproduction of other native snail species. PMID:24615026

  7. Apple Snails (Ampullariidae)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stijn A. I. Ghesquiere

    This web site provides information on apple snails (family Ampullariidae), the largest living freshwater snails on earth, often kept as aquarium pets because of their attractive appearance and size. Topics include the care of apple snails, their anatomy, species and genera, and information on snail pests, embryology, and genetics. There is also a frequently-asked-questions feature, photos, links to web sites and literature, and an online discussion forum.

  8. Determination of digestive enzyme kinetics: a new method to define trophic niches in freshwater snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heinz Brendelberger

    1996-01-01

    Fluorogenic substrate analogues (MUF substrates) are very sensitive in detecting hydrolytic enzymes. This method was adapted\\u000a for the quantitative analysis of extracellular enzymes in snails and other animals. It was then used to determine cellobiase,\\u000a chitobiase, protease, esterase, phosphatase and lipase in the digestive tract of Radix \\u000a peregra and Bithynia \\u000a tentaculata. The method was sensitive enough to determine the complete

  9. Population dynamics of Chaetogaster limnaei (Oligochaeta: Naididae) in the field populations of freshwater snails and its implications as a potential regulator of trematode larvae community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohamed Moussa Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to study (1) the population dynamics of Chaetogaster limnaei in the field populations of freshwater snails and the implications for the species as a potential regulator of the trematode\\u000a larvae community and (2) prevalence and intensity of C. limnaei in relation to host species, host size, and season. This study was conducted at Al-Salam

  10. Operculum closing as a defence against predatory leeches in four British freshwater prosobranch snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul M. Kelly; Jenny S. Cory

    1987-01-01

    The defence reaction of operculum closing in response to the presence of the molluscivorous leech Glossiphonia complanata (L.) and the non-molluscivorous Erpobdella octoculata (L.) was studied in four species of freshwater prosobranch gastropod. Bithynia tentaculata (L.) and Valvata piscinalis (Mller) can distinguish between the leeches, reacting only to G. complanata. V. piscinalis is capable of a greater degree of distance

  11. [Freshwater snails of the Campus of Manguinhos, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, RJ].

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M A; Thiengo, S C; Boaventura, M F

    2001-01-01

    A survey of freshwater gastropods of the Campus of Manguinhos, Fundaçăo Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, was carried out during the last two years aiming to compare the current species with those found at the beginning of this century. Among 18 breeding sites in 880,000m2 of the surveyed area, 13 showed the following species: Antillorbis nordestensis; Biomphalaria glabrata; Biomphalaria straminea; Lymnaea columella; Melanoides tuberculatus; Physa cubensis; Pomacea glauca and Pomacea lineata. Notably, Biomphalaria tenagophila reported by Lutz in 1918, had disappeared and B. straminea and the Asiatic thiarid M. tuberculatus had been introduced. No specimens infected with Schistosoma mansoni were found. PMID:11460215

  12. Population dynamics of Chaetogaster limnaei (Oligochaeta: Naididae) in the field populations of freshwater snails and its implications as a potential regulator of trematode larvae community.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Moussa

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this work were to study (1) the population dynamics of Chaetogaster limnaei in the field populations of freshwater snails and the implications for the species as a potential regulator of the trematode larvae community and (2) prevalence and intensity of C. limnaei in relation to host species, host size, and season. This study was conducted at Al-Salam Canal and Al-Abtal village (new cultivated area in north Sinai). The samples were collected from March 2004 to February 2005. The natural infection rate by trematodes and C. limnaei was assessed monthly. Thirteen species of snails were examined for C. limnaei infection, five species were found infected. There were positive correlations between host size and both combined prevalence and mean intensity in all hosts. The data demonstrated that prevalence in Bulinus truncatus was higher when compared with other hosts. Bellamya unicolor has higher mean intensity when compared with other host species. A significant difference was found between host species and both prevalence and intensity. There were spatial and temporal variations in prevalence and mean intensity in most hosts, and the data suggest some seasonality. A negative correlation was found between prevalence of C. limnaei and trematode infection. C. limnaei did not co-occur with trematode larvae in infected hosts indicating that the oligochaete may protect the hosts from trematode infection. B. unicolor was recorded for the first time as a host for C. limnaei. C. limnaei may be a potential regulator of the trematode community in freshwater snails. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that C. limnaei, symbiotically associated with snail vector of parasitic diseases, may have important implications with respect to biological control and/or changes in the epizootiology of native parasites in the study area. PMID:17252272

  13. The role of Chaetogaster limnaei in the dynamics of trematode transmission in natural populations of freshwater snails.

    PubMed

    Fashuyi, S A; Williams, M O

    1977-12-13

    Chaetogaster limnaei, an oligochaete was always found infesting Bulinus (Phy.) globosus, B.(B.) forskalii and Lymnaea natalensis in Bo, Sierra Leone, living below the shell or embedded in the mucus of the foot. The worms had no preference for snails with trematode infection. The population was highest in the dry season when fewer snails were infected by trematodes. This is suggested to be a result of the protection the worms give to snails against invading miracidia. PMID:602368

  14. Freshwater snails and schistosomiasis mansoni in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: I-- Metropolitan mesoregion.

    PubMed

    Thiengo, S C; Fernandez, M A; Boaventura, M F; Grault, C E; Silva, H F; Mattos, A C; Santos, S B

    2001-01-01

    In order to elaborate a planorbid chart of the State of Rio de Janeiro a survey of freshwater gastropods in the Metropolitan Mesoregion of this State was performed and revealed the occurrence of 20 species: Antillorbis nordestensis (Lucena, 1954); Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818); Biomphalaria schrammi (Crosse, 1864); Biomphalaria straminea (Dunker, 1848); Biomphalaria tenagophila (Orbigny, 1835); Burnupia sp.; Drepanotrema anatinum (Orbigny, 1835); Drepanotrema cimex (Moricand, 1839); Drepanotrema lucidum (Pfeiffer, 1839); Ferrissia sp.; Gundlachia ticaga (Marcus & Marcus, 1962); Heleobia davisi Silva & Thomé, 1985; Lymnaea columella Say, 1817; Melanoides tuberculatus (Müller, 1774); Physa cubensis Pfeiffer, 1839; Physa marmorata Guilding, 1828; Pomacea sp.; Pomacea canaliculata (Lamarck, 1822); Pomacea lineata (Spix, 1827) and Pomacea sordida (Swainson, 1823). Among the planorbid species B. tenagophila was the most frequent, occurring in all municipalities surveyed. The present study extends the distribution of B. straminea in the State of Rio de Janeiro and reports new records for A. nordestensis, B. schrammi, G. ticaga, H. davisi and the genera Burnupia and Ferrissia. An account about the current transmission areas of schistosomiasis mansoni in this Mesoregion is presented as well. PMID:11586447

  15. The role of Chaetogaster limnaei in the dynamics of trematode transmission in natural populations of freshwater snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Fashuyi; Modupč O. Williams

    1977-01-01

    Summary Chaetogaster limnaei, an oligochaete was always found infesting Bulinus (Phy.) globosus, B.(B.) forskalii and Lymnaea natalensis in Bo, Sierra Leone, living below the shell or embedded in the mucus of the foot. The worms had no preference for snails with trematode infection. The population was highest in the dry season when fewer snails were infected by trematodes. This is

  16. Comparative analysis of circulating hemocytes of the freshwater snail Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Accorsi, Alice; Bucci, Laura; de Eguileor, Magda; Ottaviani, Enzo; Malagoli, Davide

    2013-05-01

    Molluscs are invertebrates of great relevance for economy, environment and public health. The numerous studies on molluscan immunity and physiology registered an impressive variability of circulating hemocytes. This study is focused on the first characterization of the circulating hemocytes of the freshwater gastropod Pomacea canaliculata, a model for several eco-toxicological and parasitological researches. Flow cytometry analysis identified two populations of hemocytes on the basis of differences in size and internal organization. The first population contains small and agranular cells. The second one displays major size and a more articulated internal organization. Light microscopy evidenced two principal morphologies, categorized as Group I (small) and II (large) hemocytes. Group I hemocytes present the characteristics of blast-like cells, with an agranular and basophilic cytoplasm. Group I hemocytes can adhere onto a glass surface but seem unable to phagocytize heat-inactivated Escherichia coli. The majority of Group II hemocytes displays an agranular cytoplasm, while a minority presents numerous granules. Agranular cytoplasm may be basophilic or acidophilic. Granules are positive to neutral red staining and therefore acidic. Independently from their morphology, Group II hemocytes are able to adhere and to engulf heat-inactivated E. coli. Transmission electron microscopy analysis clearly distinguished between agranular and granular hemocytes and highlighted the electron dense content of the granules. After hemolymph collection, time-course analysis indicated that the Group II hemocytes are subjected to an evident dynamism with changes in the percentage of agranular and granular hemocytes. The ability of circulating hemocytes to quickly modify their morphology and stainability suggests that P. canaliculata is endowed with highly dynamic hemocyte populations able to cope with rapid environmental changes as well as fast growing pathogens. PMID:23422816

  17. Phylogeny, taxonomy, genetics and global heritage ranks of an imperilled, freshwater snail genus Lithasia (Pleuroceridae).

    PubMed

    Minton, Russell L; Lydeard, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Numerous aquatic species are threatened with extinction from habitat elimination or modification. One particularly imperilled group is the freshwater gastropod family Pleuroceridae. Pleurocerids reach their greatest diversity in the southeastern United States, and many species are currently considered extinct, endangered or threatened. One issue hindering efforts to implement conservation management plans for imperilled pleurocerid species is that the taxonomy is in an abysmal state. The taxonomy of pleurocerids is currently based on late 19th- and early 20th-century studies, which used a typological or morphospecies concept. Most biologists today doubt the validity of many of the currently recognized species; however, this does not stop them from assigning conservation ranks in an attempt to determine which species are imperilled or currently stable. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis of the pleurocerid genus Lithasia using morphological and mitochondrial DNA sequence (mtDNA) data in an attempt to delimit species boundaries and test previous taxonomic schemes. We found that the current taxonomy of Lithasia does not reflect species diversity adequately within the genus, with two new undescribed species being discovered. The conservation status ranks of the new, undescribed species are imperilled and would have been overlooked had we relied on the conventional taxonomy. Additionally, the undescribed species' conservation ranks that were previously apparently secure became vulnerable due to being inappropriately assigned as members of formerly widely distributed species instead of the imperilled status they warrant and vice versa, as some taxa that were considered imperilled are now thought to be modestly stable. Our study suggests that conservation ranks should be considered suspect at best in taxonomically poorly known groups until the taxa are reviewed using modern systematic methods. PMID:12492879

  18. Detection of Ehrlichia risticii, the Agent of Potomac Horse Fever, in Freshwater Stream Snails (Pleuroceridae: Juga spp.) from Northern California

    PubMed Central

    Barlough, Jeffrey E.; Reubel, Gerhard H.; Madigan, John E.; Vredevoe, Larisa K.; Miller, Paul E.; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    1998-01-01

    Ehrlichia DNA was identified by nested PCR in operculate snails (Pleuroceridae: Juga spp.) collected from stream water in a northern California pasture in which Potomac horse fever (PHF) is enzootic. Sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA from a suite of genes (the 16S rRNA, groESL heat shock operon, 51-kDa major antigen genes) indicated that the source organism closely resembled Ehrlichia risticii, the causative agent of PHF. The minimum percentage of Juga spp. harboring the organism in the population studied was 3.5% (2 of 57 snails). No ehrlichia DNA was found in tissues of 123 lymnaeid, physid, and planorbid snails collected at the same site. These data suggest that pleurocerid stream snails may play a role in the life cycle of E. risticii in northern California. PMID:9687446

  19. Detection and quantification of schistosome DNA in freshwater snails using either fluorescent probes in real-time PCR or oligochromatographic dipstick assays targeting the ribosomal intergenic spacer.

    PubMed

    Kane, Richard A; Stothard, J Russell; Rollinson, David; Leclipteux, Thierry; Evraerts, Jonathan; Standley, Claire J; Allan, Fiona; Betson, Martha; Kaba, Rehana; Mertens, Pascal; Laurent, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    Several DNA probes were designed for use in real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to target sequence variation within the ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS) of schistosomes. A sub-section of the IGS (?300bp) was amplified, with cross-specific primers, after which group-specific fluorescent, locked nucleic acid probes were assessed for their ability to differentiate and quantify DNA from Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni group parasites. A number of fluorescent probe candidates were screened and validated against genomic DNA from adult schistosome worms and laboratory infected freshwater snails. Two fluorescent, locked nucleic acid probes ShaemLNA5 and SmanLNA2, of 20-26bp in length, were identified and found to be effective in providing evidence of infection in field-collected snails. To adapt these real-time PCR assays for more resource-poor laboratory settings, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay was developed and primer/probe combinations were modified for use in oligochromatography, a DNA 'dipstick' technology. An appropriate dipstick was developed, inclusive of internal amplification and amplicon migration controls that could be of particular importance for assessing schistosome transmission dynamics. These assays and tools also have future potential for use in detection of schistosome infections in humans and livestock. PMID:22100540

  20. Aquatic Snails from Mining Sites Have Evolved to Detect and Avoid Heavy Metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Lefcort; D. P. Abbott; D. A. Cleary; E. Howell; N. C. Keller; M. M. Smith

    2004-01-01

    Toxicants in polluted environments are often patchily distributed. Hence, rather than being passive absorbers of pollution, some organisms have evolved the ability to detect and avoid toxicants. We studied the avoidance behavior of Physella columbiana, an aquatic pulmonate snail, in a pond that has been polluted with heavy metals for more than 120 years. Populations of this snail are rare

  1. Indirect effects of heavy metals on parasites may cause shifts in snail species compositions.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, H; Aguon, M Q; Bond, K A; Chapman, K R; Chaquette, R; Clark, J; Kornachuk, P; Lang, B Z; Martin, J C

    2002-07-01

    We studied the direct and indirect effects of pollution on the distributions and abundances of two closely related species of pulmonate freshwater snails. Physella columbiana is more numerous at heavy metal-polluted lakes, and Lymnaea palustris is more numerous at reference lakes. Both species are present at all sites, as are predatory bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). The direct effects examined included the snails' growth and reproduction in both the presence and absence of heavy metals and their short-term survival when exposed to large concentrations of heavy metals. The indirect effects were the species' ability to elude capture by sunfish and the diversity and abundance of parasites within the snails. We found that heavy metals had little direct effect on growth and reproduction and that both species acquired similar levels of metals in their tissues. Interestingly, P. columbiana (the more abundant species in polluted lakes) actually exhibited higher recruitment in the absence of metals than did L. palustris (reference lakes). L. palustris has life history characteristics that favor increased growth and reduced reproduction. These characteristics resulted in decreased predation of adults by gape-limited predators and a greater ability to cope with heavy parasite burdens. P. columbiana exhibited slower growth, which resulted in increased predation although higher reproduction rates may compensate.The major effect of heavy metals on species distributions was indirect on the snails' parasites. Parasites appeared to be very susceptible to metals, and this resulted in lower parasite diversity and intensities at polluted sites for both species of snails. P. columbiana may only be able to outcompete L. palustris at polluted sites due to the indirect effects of heavy metals; the negative effect of heavy metals on parasites, and a proposed negative effect of metals on the foraging ability of sunfish that favors the faster-reproducing P. columbiana. PMID:12045872

  2. Freshwater snails and schistosomiasis mansoni in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: V - Norte fluminense mesoregion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silvana C Thiengo; Aline C Mattos; M Fernanda Boaventura; Monica A Fernandez; Sonia B Santos

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the forth of a series dealing with the survey of freshwater gastropods of the state of Rio de Janeiro, the results of collections carried out in the Sul Fluminense Mesoregion from 2000 to 2002 are presented and revealed the occurrence of 18 species: Antillorbis nordestensis; Biomphalaria glabrata; Biomphalaria peregrina; Biomphalaria straminea; Biomphalaria tenagophila; Drepanotrema anatinum; Drepanotrema cimex;

  3. Freshwater snails and Schistosomiasis mansoni in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: II--Centro Fluminense Mesoregion.

    PubMed

    Thiengo, Silvana C; Fernandez, Monica A; Boaventura, M Fernanda; Santos, Sonia B; Mattos, Aline C

    2002-07-01

    During the course of a survey carried out from 2000 to 2001 in the Centro Fluminense Mesoregion of the State of Rio de Janeiro 22 molluscan species were found. Many of the records are new due to the dearth of previous studies. Concerning the snail hosts of Schistosoma mansoni, the most frequently encountered species was Biomphalaria tenagophila, as it occurred in all the surveyed municipalities. There are new records of Biomphalaria straminea and Biomphalaria peregrina which is regarded as a potential intermediate host. Drepanotrema lucidum and Antillorbis nordestensis were found to be shedding echinostome cercariae and strigid cercariae respectively. An account about the current schistosomiasis transmission sites in this Mesoregion is presented as well. PMID:12219122

  4. Disjunct distributions of freshwater snails testify to a central role of the Congo system in shaping biogeographical patterns in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The formation of the East African Rift System has decisively influenced the distribution and evolution of tropical Africa’s biota by altering climate conditions, by creating basins for large long-lived lakes, and by affecting the catchment and drainage directions of river systems. However, it remains unclear how rifting affected the biogeographical patterns of freshwater biota through time on a continental scale, which is further complicated by the scarcity of molecular data from the largest African river system, the Congo. Results We study these biogeographical patterns using a fossil-calibrated multi-locus phylogeny of the gastropod family Viviparidae. This group allows reconstructing drainage patterns exceptionally well because it disperses very poorly in the absence of existing freshwater connections. Our phylogeny covers localities from major drainage basins of tropical Africa and reveals highly disjunct sister-group relationships between (a) the endemic viviparids of Lake Malawi and populations from the Middle Congo as well as between (b) the Victoria region and the Okavango/Upper Zambezi area. Conclusions The current study testifies to repeated disruptions of the distribution of the Viviparidae during the formation of the East African Rift System, and to a central role of the Congo River system for the distribution of the continent’s freshwater fauna during the late Cenozoic. By integrating our results with previous findings on palaeohydrographical connections, we provide a spatially and temporarily explicit model of historical freshwater biogeography in tropical Africa. Finally, we review similarities and differences in patterns of vertebrate and invertebrate dispersal. Amongst others we argue that the closest relatives of present day viviparids in Lake Malawi are living in the Middle Congo River, thus shedding new light on the origin of the endemic fauna of this rift lake. PMID:24597925

  5. Imposex and novel mechanisms of reproductive failure induced by tributyltin (TBT) in the freshwater snail Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Giraud-Billoud, Maximiliano; Vega, Israel A; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G; Clément, María E; Castro-Vazquez, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    The effects of tributyltin (TBT) on mortality and reproduction were studied in the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata. The nominal median lethal concentration (LC50) was 9 µg TBT/L, after 28 d. The nominal no-observed effect on lethality concentration (NOECL) was 6 µg TBT/L after the same period. Male-female couples and females that had been group-mated but were isolated from males during the experiment (isolated females) were exposed (for 28 d) to either 0 µg/L or 6 µg/L of TBT (nominal NOECL-exposed). Copulation and oviposition frequencies, egg clutch mass, and percentage of egg fertility were recorded. Gonads (both sexes) and the seminal receptacle (females) were studied histologically at the end of the experiment. A significant decrease in copulation frequency was observed in mated-exposed females. Exposure also decreased oviposition frequency of mated-exposed and isolated-exposed females, but only the latter reached significance. No differences in either egg clutch mass or percentage of fertility were observed at first oviposition, but both parameters were drastically reduced in subsequent egg clutches of exposed females. No histological alterations were observed in gonads of TBT-exposed animals; however, sperm storage in the seminal receptacle was drastically decreased in exposed females. Imposex but no oviductal obstruction was observed in all exposed females. It is concluded that TBT induces reproductive failure in P. canaliculata by decreasing copulation frequency and by severely affecting sperm storage by the female. PMID:23775621

  6. Land and water snails

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Olivia Worland (Purdue University; Biological Sciences)

    2008-06-03

    Land snails live on the land and water snails make water their habitat. Land snails have shells to protect them and so do water snails. Land snails have two sets of antennae, while water snails only have one set.

  7. Effects of selection and drift on G matrix evolution in a heterogeneous environment: a multivariate Qst-Fst Test with the freshwater snail Galba truncatula.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Elodie; Martin, Guillaume; Goudet, Jérôme

    2008-12-01

    Unraveling the effect of selection vs. drift on the evolution of quantitative traits is commonly achieved by one of two methods. Either one contrasts population differentiation estimates for genetic markers and quantitative traits (the Q(st)-F(st) contrast) or multivariate methods are used to study the covariance between sets of traits. In particular, many studies have focused on the genetic variance-covariance matrix (the G matrix). However, both drift and selection can cause changes in G. To understand their joint effects, we recently combined the two methods into a single test (accompanying article by Martin et al.), which we apply here to a network of 16 natural populations of the freshwater snail Galba truncatula. Using this new neutrality test, extended to hierarchical population structures, we studied the multivariate equivalent of the Q(st)-F(st) contrast for several life-history traits of G. truncatula. We found strong evidence of selection acting on multivariate phenotypes. Selection was homogeneous among populations within each habitat and heterogeneous between habitats. We found that the G matrices were relatively stable within each habitat, with proportionality between the among-populations (D) and the within-populations (G) covariance matrices. The effect of habitat heterogeneity is to break this proportionality because of selection for habitat-dependent optima. Individual-based simulations mimicking our empirical system confirmed that these patterns are expected under the selective regime inferred. We show that homogenizing selection can mimic some effect of drift on the G matrix (G and D almost proportional), but that incorporating information from molecular markers (multivariate Q(st)-F(st)) allows disentangling the two effects. PMID:18854589

  8. Influence of hardness on the bioavailability of silver to a freshwater snail after waterborne exposure to silver nitrate and silver nanoparticles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoiber, Tasha L.; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Romer, Isabella; Tejamaya, Mila; Lead, Jamie R.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2015-01-01

    The release of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) into the aquatic environment is likely, but the influence of water chemistry on their impacts and fate remains unclear. Here, we characterize the bioavailability of Ag from AgNO3 and from AgNPs capped with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP AgNP) and thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG AgNP) in the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, after short waterborne exposures. Results showed that water hardness, AgNP capping agents, and metal speciation affected the uptake rate of Ag from AgNPs. Comparison of the results from organisms of similar weight showed that water hardness affected the uptake of Ag from AgNPs, but not that from AgNO3. Transformation (dissolution and aggregation) of the AgNPs was also influenced by water hardness and the capping agent. Bioavailability of Ag from AgNPs was, in turn, correlated to these physical changes. Water hardness increased the aggregation of AgNPs, especially for PEG AgNPs, reducing the bioavailability of Ag from PEG AgNPs to a greater degree than from PVP AgNPs. Higher dissolved Ag concentrations were measured for the PVP AgNPs (15%) compared to PEG AgNPs (3%) in moderately hard water, enhancing Ag bioavailability of the former. Multiple drivers of bioavailability yielded differences in Ag influx between very hard and deionized water where the uptake rate constants (kuw, l g-1 d-1 ± SE) varied from 3.1?±?0.7 to 0.2?±?0.01 for PEG AgNPs and from 2.3?±?0.02 to 1.3?±?0.01 for PVP AgNPs. Modeling bioavailability of Ag from NPs revealed that Ag influx into L. stagnalis comprised uptake from the NPs themselves and from newly dissolved Ag.

  9. Pulmonic Ingressive Speech in Shetland English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundkvist, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study of pulmonic ingressive speech, a severely understudied phenomenon within varieties of English. While ingressive speech has been reported for several parts of the British Isles, New England, and eastern Canada, thus far Newfoundland appears to be the only locality where researchers have managed to provide substantial…

  10. Biological Control of Aquatic Pest Snails by the Black Carp Mylopharyngodon piceus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frida Ben-Ami; Joseph Heller

    2001-01-01

    Some freshwater snail species are severe pests to human health or agriculture. We tested the hypothesis that the fish Mylopharyngodon piceus, the black carp, may serve as a biological control agent of two pest snails, Physella acuta (a bank-dwelling snail) and Melanoides tuberculata (a substratum-dwelling snail). Experiments were carried out in the laboratory and under controlled field conditions. In the

  11. A comparison of metal levels and antioxidant enzymes in freshwater snails, Lymnaea natalensis, exposed to sediment and water collected from Wright Dam and Lower Mguza Dam, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Siwela, A H; Nyathi, C B; Naik, Y S

    2010-10-01

    We compared the bioaccumulation of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) with antioxidant enzyme activity in tissues of the snails, Lymnaea natalensis, exposed to elements of two differently polluted dams. 45 snails were exposed to sediment and water collected from Wight Dam (reference) whilst another 45 snails were also exposed to sediment and water collected from Lower Mguza Dam (polluted dam). Except for Fe in sediment and Pb in water, metal concentrations were statistically higher in sediment and water collected from Lower Mguza Dam. Lead, Cd and Zn were two times higher in tissues of snails exposed to Lower Mguza Dam elements. On one hand, superoxide dismutase (SOD), diphosphotriphosphodiaphorase (DTD) and catalase (CAT) activities were significantly lower whilst malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly higher in tissues of snails exposed to Lower Mguza Dam sediment and water. On the other hand, selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPX) activity was significantly elevated in tissues of snails exposed to Lower Mguza Dam sediment and water. Snails exposed to Lower Mguza Dam elements seem to have responded to pollution by increasing CAT and Se-GPX specific activity in an effort to detoxify peroxides produced as a result of metal induced oxidative stress. PMID:20813407

  12. Trematode infections in freshwater snails and cattle from the Kafue wetlands of Zambia during a period of highest cattle-water contact.

    PubMed

    Phiri, A M; Phiri, I K; Chota, A; Monrad, J

    2007-03-01

    A total of 984 snails, comprising nine species, were collected from six areas in the Kafue wetlands between August and October 2003 to assess larval trematode infections. Of these, 135 (13.7%) were positive. Most trematode infections were recorded from Lymnaea natalensis (42.8%), which harboured four of the five morphologically different cercariae found. No trematodes were recovered from Bellamya capillata, Biomphalaria pfeifferi, Melanoides tuberculata, Physa acuta and Cleopatra nswendweensis. One snail (0.2%) of 416 Bulinus snails shed brevifurcate-apharyngeate distome cercariae while three (0.7%) shed amphistomes. Gymnocephalous and longifurcate-pharyngeate distome were the commonest types of cercariae recorded while xiphidiocercaria was the least common. The highest prevalence rates of F. gigantica (68.8%) and amphistomes (50.0%) in cattle (n = 101) were in Chiyasa while those in Kaleya had the lowest (9.1 and 18.2%, respectively). In most habitats, infections were recorded in both cattle and snails. Critical determinants of infection may have been the distance of settlements and/or cattle kraals, the number of animals in nearby homesteads and the presence of susceptible host snails. This study suggests that fascioliasis and amphistomiasis could be major constraints of cattle production in the Kafue wetlands because favourable factors were available to introduce and maintain the infections. It further provides a starting point for some comprehensive studies on snail-related aspects of transmission and snail host ecology in Zambia. PMID:17381873

  13. ‹nterstisyel akcier hastal›¤›nda pulmoner hipertansiyon \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grosshadern der Ludwig; J. Behr; J. H. Ryu

    da pulmoner hipertansiyonun (PH) göreceli yüksek prevalansini (%30-40) açiklayabilecek ortak pa- tomekanizmalara sahiptir. PH özellikle, ?AH hastalarinda egzersiz sinirlamasi ve kötü prognoza kat- kida bulunmaktadir. Spesifik klinik semptomlarin olmamasi ço?unlukla taninin geç konulmasina yol açmaktadir. Klinik karar ve difüzyon kapasitesindeki orantisiz dü?ü? yani sira, ?iddetli hipok- semi veya egzersiz oksijen desatürasyonu, ekokardiyografi ve B-tipi natriüretik peptid (BNP) ve N- terminal

  14. Antioxidant defenses and metabolic depression. The hypothesis of preparation for oxidative stress in land snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcelo Hermes-Lima; Janet M. Storey; Kenneth B. Storey

    1998-01-01

    The roles of enzymatic antioxidant defenses in the natural tolerance of environmental stresses that impose changes in oxygen availability and oxygen consumption on animals is discussed with a particular focus on the biochemistry of estivation and metabolic depression in pulmonate land snails. Despite reduced oxygen consumption and PO2 during estivation, which should also mean reduced production of oxyradicals, the activities

  15. Chronic toxicity of the azaarene quinoline, a synthetic fuel component, to the pond snail Physa gyrina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond E. Millemann; Daniel S. Ehrenberg

    1982-01-01

    The azaarene quinoline was tested for chronic toxicity to embryos of the pulmonate snail Physa gyrina. Toxicity criteria were effects on embryogenesis, embryo survival, time to hatching, hatching success, and posthatching survival. Of the controls, 91% hatched, compared with 99, 78, and 5% exposed to 12.5, 25, and 50 mg\\/L of quinoline, respectively. No eggs hatched at or above 100

  16. Quantitative analysis of total proteins and carbohydrates in the digestive gland-gonad complex (DGG) and hemolymph of the freshwater prosobranch snail Lanistes carinatus.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amaal Hassan M; Mahmoud, Salim; El-Hamidy, A

    2010-08-01

    Laboratory investigations were carried out to quantify the amount of total proteins, carbohydrates and reducing sugar in the hemolymph and Digestive Gland Gonad- complex (DGG) of infected and uinfected lanistes arinatus. Snails were naturally infected with two different types of trematode la:val stages (rediae of gymnocepahalus cercaria and sporocyst of xiphidiocercaria), collected from the River Nile at Sohag governorate, Egypt. Analysis was carried out using an extraction of the DGGs tissue with buffer solution, while snails' hemolymph was applied directly. The results revealed that snail infection by rediae of gymnocephalus cercariae led to non significant increasing in both total carbohydrates and protein in hemolymph. However, infection by sporocysts of xiphidiocercariae caused a significant increasing only in hemolymph total protein. On the other hand, the amount of both reducing sugar and total proteins in DGG did not increase significantly whenever the infection caused by both types of trematode larvae. However, total carbohydrates in DGG increased significantly. PMID:21246938

  17. Quadricuspid pulmonic valve found on well exam.

    PubMed

    Dunay, Stephen N; Roberge, Robert A; Avedissian, Lena S

    2015-01-01

    Quadricuspid pulmonic valve (QPV) is almost always a benign anomaly and is therefore usually discovered incidentally on radiographic studies or post-mortem at autopsy. Because of its rarity, the true extent of the physiology of QPV is not fully understood, and the few reported cases of it may underestimate its physiological consequences. In this case, we report on a young active-duty solider who presented for a well check-up and was discovered on imaging to have a QPV. We also review the most recent literature and provide recommendations regarding the most effective diagnostic modalities. PMID:25922689

  18. Supercharged Snails for Stream Ecology & Water-Quality Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Arthur J.; Ryon, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Gill-breathing freshwater snails (Family "Pleuroceridae") are ecologically important, abundant in many streams in the United States, and easy to collect and maintain under classroom conditions. These snails can be used in classroom tests to demonstrate effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms. In more advanced classes, students can cage the…

  19. Snails and trematode infection after Indian Ocean tsunami in Phang-Nga Province, southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sri-Aroon, Pusadee; Chusongsang, Phiraphol; Chusongsang, Yupa; Pornpimol, Surinthwong; Butraporn, Piyarat; Lohachit, Chantima

    2010-01-01

    The tsunami and non-tsunami affected areas of Takua Pa District, Phang-Nga Province were investigated for fresh- and brackish-water snails that transmit human parasitic diseases during 2006 and 2007. Among 46 snail species found, 17 species of 8 families were freshwater snails, 28 species of another 7 families were brackish-water snails, and 1 species was a land snail. Of these species, 11 freshwater snails, 4 brackish-water snails and 1 land snail were of medical importance. The fresh-water snails were Pomacea canaliculata, Pila angelica, P. gracilis, P. polita, Filopaludina (S.) martensi, F. (F.) s. polygramma, Melanoides tuberculata, Indoplanorbis exuxtus, Radix rubiginosa, Helicorbis umbilicalis, Gyraulus convexiusculus. Four brackish-water snails were Cerithidea cingulata, C. djadjarensis, C. alata, Sermyla riqueti and Achatina fulica was the land snail. I. exutus, M. tuberculata and F. (F.) s. polygramma harbored Xiphidio, Microcercus, Furocercus, Echinostome cercariae, and cercaria without eyespots or tail with hair. Three species of brackish-water snails, Cerithidia cingulata, C. djadjariensis, and C. alata presented with 6 types of trematode cercariae and rediae. Knowledge of medically important snails and their parasitic diseases, and prevention were given to Takua Pa people by poster, pamphlets and broadcasting through community radio. PMID:20578482

  20. Why are there few algae on snail shells? The effects of grazing, nutrients and shell chemistry on the algae on shells of Helisoma trivolvis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LINDSEY L. ABBOTT; ELIZABETH A. BERGEY

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. Freshwater snails often lack visible growths of algae on their shells. We tested three possible mechanisms that may account for this (grazing, snail-derived nutrients and chemical defences), using the ramshorn snail Helisoma trivolvis. 2. The experiments were carried out in floating plastic enclosures in a pond and comprised seven treatments. Grazing treatments were: a lone snail (ungrazed, as

  1. Molecular and functional characterization of a tandem-repeat galectin from the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Timothy P.; Dinguirard, Nathalie; Kunert, John; Hokke, Cornelius H.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, a tandem-repeat type galectin was characterized from an embryonic cell line (Bge) and circulating hemocytes of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. The predicted B. glabrata galectin (BgGal) protein of 32 kDa possessed 2 carbohydrate recognition domains, each displaying 6 of 8 conserved amino acids involved in galactoside-binding activity. A recombinant BgGal (rBgGal) demonstrated hemagglutinating activity against rabbit erythrocytes, which was specifically inhibited by galactose-containing sugars (lacNAc/lac > galNAc/gal). Although native galectin was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of Bge cells and the plasma membrane of a subset of snail hemocytes (60%), it was not detected in cell-free plasma by Western blot analysis. The findings that rBgGal selectively recognizes the schistosome-related sugar, lacNAc, and strongly binds to hemocytes and the tegument of S. mansoni sporocysts in a sugar-inhibitable fashion suggest that hemocyte-bound galectin may be serving as pattern recognition receptor for this, or other pathogens possessing appropriate sugar ligands. Based on molecular and functional features, BgGal represents an authentic galectin, the first to be fully characterized in the medically-important molluscan Class Gastropoda. PMID:18280060

  2. Fecundity of the Chinese mystery snail in a Nebraska reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephen, Bruce J.; Allen, Craig R.; Chaine, Noelle M.; Fricke, Kent A.; Haak, Danielle M.; Hellman, Michelle L.; Kill, Robert A.; Nemec, Kristine T.; Pope, Kevin L.; Smeenk, Nicholas A.; Uden, Daniel R.; Unstad, Kody M.; VanderHam, Ashley E.; Wong, Alec

    2013-01-01

    The Chinese mystery snail (Bellamya chinensis) is a non-indigenous, invasive species in freshwater ecosystems of North America. We provide fecundity estimates for a population of these snails in a Nebraska reservoir. We dissected 70 snails, of which 29 were females. Nearly all female snails contained developing young, with an average of 25 young per female. Annual fecundity was estimated at between 27.2 and 33.3 young per female per year. Based on an estimated adult population and the calculated fecundity, the annual production for this reservoir was between 2.2 and 3.7 million young.

  3. Cercarial Dermatitis Transmitted by Exotic Marine Snail

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Andrew N.; James, David; Hui, Lucia; Hom, Albert; Loker, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer’s itch) is caused by the penetration of human skin by cercariae of schistosome parasites that develop in and are released from snail hosts. Cercarial dermatitis is frequently acquired in freshwater habitats, and less commonly in marine or estuarine waters. To investigate reports of a dermatitis outbreak in San Francisco Bay, California, we surveyed local snails for schistosome infections during 2005–2008. We found schistosomes only in Haminoea japonica, an Asian snail first reported in San Francisco Bay in 1999. Genetic markers place this schistosome within a large clade of avian schistosomes, but do not match any species for which there are genetic data. It is the second known schistosome species to cause dermatitis in western North American coastal waters; these species are transmitted by exotic snails. Introduction of exotic hosts can support unexpected emergence of an unknown parasite with serious medical or veterinary implications. PMID:20735918

  4. Aquatic snails from mining sites have evolved to detect and avoid heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, H; Abbott, D P; Cleary, D A; Howell, E; Keller, N C; Smith, M M

    2004-05-01

    Toxicants in polluted environments are often patchily distributed. Hence, rather than being passive absorbers of pollution, some organisms have evolved the ability to detect and avoid toxicants. We studied the avoidance behavior of Physella columbiana, an aquatic pulmonate snail, in a pond that has been polluted with heavy metals for more than 120 years. Populations of this snail are rare at reference sites and are only robust at heavy-metal-polluted sites. We hypothesized that the snails are able to persist because they have evolved the ability to minimize their exposure to metals by actively avoiding metals in their environment. Using a Y-maze flow tank, we tested the avoidance behavior of snails to heavy-metal-polluted sediments and single-metal solutions of cadmium, zinc, or lead. We also tested the avoidance behaviors of the snails' laboratory-reared offspring raised in nonpolluted conditions. In addition, we tested the avoidance behavior of a small population of snails from a reference pond. Although all the snails we tested were able to detect low concentrations of heavy metals, we found that snails from the polluted site were the most sensitive, that their offspring were somewhat less sensitive, and that snails from the reference site were the least sensitive. This suggests that the ability of polluted-site snails to avoid heavy metals is both genetic and environmental. The concentrations of metals avoided by the snails from the polluted site were below the levels found at hot spots within their natal pond. The snails may be able to persist at this site because they decrease their exposure by moving to less-polluted sections of the pond. One application of our findings is the use of aquatic snails and our Y-maze design as an inexpensive pollution detector. Environmental pollutants such as lead, zinc, and arsenic are a problem throughout the world. People in underdeveloped countries often lack sophisticated pollution detection devices. We have developed a behavioral assay of aquatic pollution that is easy to use, is extremely sensitive (detection below 10 ppb), and can be constructed for fewer than 100 US dollars. Pulmonate snails are widely distributed in tropical, subtropical, and temperate parts of the globe, and they are often common in polluted waters. For countries such as India and Bangladesh, which must test thousands of shallow wells for possible contamination with heavy metals, our assay would be a good initial test. Once snails detected metals, then those samples could be confirmed by spectrometers. We encourage scientists in underdeveloped nations to consider our assay as an option. PMID:15253045

  5. Invertebrate Invasions on Pacific Islands and the Replacement of Unique Native Faunas: A Synthesis of the Land and Freshwater Snails*Contribution no. 2001-001 of Bishop Museum's Pacific Biological Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Cowie

    2001-01-01

    The once immense diversity of native Pacific island land snail species, with high single island or archipelago endemism, is declining dramatically. The native\\/endemic species are being replaced by a much smaller number of widespread tropical ‘tramps’, that is, those species that are most readily transported by humans. The 82 introduced (including 14 ‘cryptogenic’) land snail species recorded include some that

  6. Schedule of Spermatogenesis in the Pulmonate Snail Helix aspersa, with Special Reference to Histone Transition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID P. BLOCH; HOWARD Y. C. HEW

    1960-01-01

    The schedule of spermatogenesis is determined from the times necessary for cells labeled with tritium thymidine during premeiotic DNA synthesis to pass through the successive spermatogenic stages. A transition from a typically somatic histone rich in lysine, to a histone rich in arginine is shown to occur during sper- matid stages. A later shift to a protamine is observed in

  7. Schedule of Spermatogenesis in the Pulmonate Snail Helix aspersa, with Special Reference to Histone Transition

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, David P.; Hew, Howard Y. C.

    1960-01-01

    The schedule of spermatogenesis is determined from the times necessary for cells labeled with tritium thymidine during premeiotic DNA synthesis to pass through the successive spermatogenic stages. A transition from a typically somatic histone rich in lysine, to a histone rich in arginine is shown to occur during spermatid stages. A later shift to a protamine is observed in the maturing sperm. These changes are characterized by the use of in situ staining methods. The transition to an arginine-rich histone is accompanied by incorporation of tritium-labeled arginine, hence reflects synthesis of new protein. Comparison of the timing of arginine and thymidine incorporation, and independent measurements of DNA, show that in contrast to the case of premitotic chromosome duplication, the histone synthesis in the spermatid is unaccompanied by DNA synthesis. During the initial histone change, fine filaments are formed within the nucleus, which aggregate to form lamellae. This fine structure is lost during maturation of the sperm. PMID:13801496

  8. CHANGES IN NUCLEAR HISTONES DURING FERTILIZATION, AND EARLY EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE PULMONATE SNAIL, Helix aspersa

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, David P.; Hew, Howard Y. C.

    1960-01-01

    Calf thymus histories comprising two fractions, one rich in lysine, the other having roughly equal amounts of lysine and arginine, Loligo testes histones rich in arginine, and salmine, are compared with respect to their amino acid compositions, and their staining properties when the proteins are fixed on filter paper. The three types of basic proteins; somatic, arginine-rich spermatid histones, and protamine can be distinguished on the following basis. Somatic and testicular histones stain with fast green or bromphenol blue under the same conditions used for specific staining of histones in tissue preparations. The former histones lose most or all of their stainability after deamination or acetylation. Staining of the arginine-rich testicular histones remains relatively unaffected by this treatment. Protamines do not stain with fast green after treatment with hot trichloracetic acid, but are stained by bromphenol blue or eosin after treatment with picric acid. These methods provide a means for the characterization of nuclear basic proteins in situ. Their application to the early developmental stages of Helix aspersa show the following: After fertilization the protamine of the sperm is lost, and is replaced by faintly basic histones which differ from adult histones in their inability to bind fast green, and from protamines, by both their inability to bind eosin, and their weakly positive reaction with bromphenol blue. These "cleavage" histones are found in the male and female pronuclei, the early polar body chromosomes, and the nuclei of the cleaving egg and morula stages. During gastrulation, the histone complement reverts to a type as yet indistinguishable from that of adult somatic cells. PMID:19866570

  9. Land snail anatomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    N/A N/A (None; )

    2006-06-17

    Land snails have a shell for protection. They have four tentacles, a foot, and a head and a tail region. The top set of tentacles are the snail's eyes. The bottom set of tentacles are what the snail uses to smell.

  10. Occurrence of larval Philophthalmus gralli (Mathis and Leger, 1910) in freshwater snail Melanoides tuberculatus (Muller) from Al-Hafuf, Saudi Arabia and its development into adult in various experimental hosts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. N. Kalantan; M. Arfin; H. A. Al-Arefi; H. I. Bobshait; S. A. Hamadah; F. H. Al-Thawab; A. A. Al-Shamrani

    1997-01-01

    This is the first report of occurrence of Philophthalmus gralli in Melanoides tuberculatus from Saudi Arabia. The overall infection rate of M. tuberculatus with P. gralli larvae was 8.9%. However, the incidence of infection varied from 6.46 to 10.16% depending on the size of the snail, and larger snails were found to be more infected than the smaller ones. The

  11. Species- and size-specific infection of snails by Cyclocoelum mutabile (Digenea: Cyclocoelidae).

    PubMed

    McKindsey, C W; McLaughlin, J D

    1995-08-01

    Infectivity of Cyclocoelum mutabile miracidia to 9 species and up to 4 size classes of pulmonate snails at 14, 16, and 20 C was studied under laboratory conditions. Of the 9 species examined, 6 (Stagnicola elodes, Lymnaea stagnalis, Gyraulus parvus, Gyraulus circumstriatus, Promenetus exacuous, and Armiger crista) were highly susceptible (infection success > or = 25%), 2 (Physa jennessi and Helisoma trivolvis) had low susceptibility (infection success < 25%, > 0), and 1 (Physa gyrina) was not susceptible to infection. Within highly susceptible species, snail size was negatively related to susceptibility and temperature had variable effects. Infection success was not affected by temperature or snail size in species with low susceptibility. Production of cercariae was negatively correlated with susceptibility among snails of different sizes and species, but was not influenced by snail size for a given species. Among species, metacercariae production was typically higher in lymnaeids than in either planorbids or physids. Results of experiments where miracidia were provided with a choice of 2 different snails suggest that they do not discriminate between species with high and low susceptibility. PMID:7623190

  12. Pedal sole immunoreactive axons in terrestrial pulmonates: Limax, Arion, and Helix.

    PubMed

    Longley, Roger D

    2014-02-01

    A century ago histological techniques such as formic acid-gold chloride showed the nerve morphology of the pedal sole in Limax and Helix. There have been no similar descriptions since then of the central nervous system relevant to locomotory pedal waves in the foot of slugs and snails. Topical application of 5-HT affects locomotory waves, but the innervation of the pedal sole with 5-HT axons is not known. Three-dimensional morphology of pedal axons in terrestrial pulmonate embryos is shown herein with modern histological techniques using antibodies and the confocal microscope. In Limax maximus, pedal ganglia are shown with Tritonia pedal peptide (TPep) antibodies. Ladder-like cross bridges in the pedal sole are shown with antibodies to both TPep and 5-HT. In Arion ater, pedal ganglia neurons and their axons that form a plexus in the pedal sole are shown with 5-HT antibodies. In Helix aspersa, 5-HT immunoreactive pedal ganglia neurons and a developing pedal sole axon plexus are seen as in A. ater. Axons in this plexus that grow across the pedal sole can be seen growing into pre-existing nerves. No peripheral 5-HT neurons were identified in these three species. This immunoreactive plexus to 5-HT antibodies in A. ater and H. aspersa spreads over the pedal sole epithelium. Axons immunoreactive to 5-HT antibodies in A. ater and H. aspersa extend the length of the foot, primarily in the rim, so that activity in these axons cannot provide local patterned input to produce locomotory waves, but may provide modulatory input to pedal sole muscles. PMID:24648204

  13. Microscopy and Morphometry of Integument of the Foot of Pulmonate Gastropods Arion rufus and Helix pomatia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. TONAR; A. MARKO

    Tonar Z., A. Marko‰: Microscopy and Morphometry of Integument of the Foot of Pulmonate Gastropods Arion rufus and Helix pomatia. Acta Vet. Brno 2004, 73: 3-8. The aim of our work was to carry out morphometric analysis of histological sections through the foot of pulmonate gastropods with an output suitable as a data entry for its biomechanical scale- dependent modelling.

  14. An ecological study of Bithynia snails, the first intermediate host of Opisthorchis viverrini in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Chen; Ho, Richard Cheng Yong; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Namsanor, Jutamas; Sithithaworn, Paiboon

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the food-borne trematodiasis, liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, is a major public health concern in Southeast Asia. While epidemiology and parasitic incidence in humans are well studied, ecological information on the O. viverrini intermediate hosts remains limited. This study aimed to investigate the factors affecting the distribution and abundance of the first intermediate host, Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails. Water quality and snails were sampled in 31 sites in Muang District, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand from June 2012 to January 2013 to characterize the B.s. goniomphalos snail habitats. Species relative abundance and Shannon's diversity and evenness indices were employed to describe snail compositions and diversities across different habitat types. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine the extent to which the water quality variables and species interactions account for the relative abundance of B.s. goniomphalos snails. The results showed that the freshwater habitats of ponds, streams and rice paddies possessed significantly different abiotic water qualities, with water temperature and pH showing distinct statistical differences (P<0.05). Different habitats had different snail diversity and species evenness, with high B.s. goniomphalos snail abundance at rice paddy habitats. The differences in snail abundance might be due to the distinct sets of abiotic water qualities associated with each habitat types. The relative abundance of B.s. goniomphalos snails was found to be negatively correlated with that of Filopaludina martensi martensi snails (r=-0.46, P<0.05), underscoring the possible influence of species interaction on B.s. goniomphalos snail population. Field work observations revealed that rice planting seasons and irrigation could regulate snail population dynamics at rice paddy habitats. This study provides new ecological insights into the factors affecting Bithynia snail distribution and abundance. It bridges the knowledge gap in O. viverrini disease ecology and highlights the potential effect of anthropogenic irrigation practices on B.s. goniomphalos snail ecology. PMID:24561073

  15. All About Snails

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-11-01

    This website introduces younger students to snails. Topics include their physical characteristics and living habits, diet, reproduction, locomotion, life history, predators, and many others. There are also links to additional material on snails, including lesson plans, stories, poems, and songs, clip-art, art and craft activties, and other resources.

  16. Differences in snail ecology lead to infection pattern variation of Echinostoma spp. larval stages.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael R; Luth, Kyle E; Esch, Gerald W

    2014-09-01

    The infection patterns of parasites are often tied to host behavior. Although most studies have investigated definitive hosts and their parasites, intermediate host behavior may play a role in shaping the distribution and accumulation of parasites, particularly the larval stages. In an attempt to answer this question, more than 4,500 pulmonate snails were collected from 11 states in the mid-Atlantic and Midwestern United States in the summer of 2012. These snails were necropsied and echinostome metecercariae were commonly observed infecting the snails as 2(nd) intermediate hosts (20.0%). The snails included species of 3 genera with distinct differences in the infection patterns of Echinostoma spp. metacercariae among them. Physa spp. (comprising of P. acuta and P. gyrina) snails exhibited a significantly higher prevalence of infection (23.5%) than both Lymnaea columella (11.6%) and Helisoma spp. (comprising of H. anceps and H. trivolvis) (14.2%; P < 0.05), with no difference in prevalence observed between the latter 2 genera (P > 0.05). The intensity of metacercariae within the snail hosts was significantly different between the 3 genera (P < 0.05), with L. columella having the highest intensity (24.3 ± 5.6), followed by Physa spp. (15.2 ± 1.5) and Helisoma spp. (5.0 ± 0.9). Differences in prevalence and intensity were also observed when the different snail families co-habited the same body of water. The disparities in infection patterns are likely due to distinct differences in the behavioral and feeding ecology of the snail hosts. PMID:25119366

  17. Neurogenesis in the procerebrum of the snail Helix aspersa: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Longley, Roger D

    2011-10-01

    The procerebrum, a specialized structure for olfaction in terrestrial pulmonate molluscs, contains 20,000 to 50,000 small, uniformly sized neurons that increase in number with age. Here I show the likely source of neurons added to the procerebrum of Helix aspersa and that the rate of neuron addition depends on snail weight. After hatching, during the initial exponential growth phase, H. aspersa adds neurons to the procerebral apex by mitosis and from a cerebral tube. In the logistic growth phase beginning 30-40 days post-hatch, neurons also seem to be added to the procerebrum from the peritentacular and olfactory nerves, causing the rate of neuron addition to approximately double; but as in the earlier exponential growth phase, this rate remains a function of snail weight. This neuron addition throughout the life of the snail can be predicted by snail weight. In the two growth phases, the number of neurons in the procerebrum is given by logarithmic functions of snail weight. The results here for H. aspersa provide the basis for experiments to determine the peripheral origin and destination of neuronal precursors that are added to the procerebrum and to determine how neuron addition affects the function of the procerebrum. PMID:22042440

  18. Periphyton removal by freshwater micrograzers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Vermaat

    1993-01-01

    \\u000a In various experiments, the freshwater snail species Lymnaea peregra (Müll.), Physa fontinalis (L.), Valvata piscinalis (Müll.) and Bithynia tentaculata (L.) significantly removed periphyton from glass slides, while the two tested crustacean species, Asellus aquaticus (L.) and Gammarus pulex (L.), did not. B. tentaculata removed similar amounts of periphyton accumulated in the field as it did of laboratory-cultured periphyton.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Removal rates

  19. Guild structure of larval trematodes in the snail Helisoma anceps: patterns and processes at the individual host level.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, J; Esch, G W

    1991-08-01

    Factors that influenced the infracommunity structure of trematodes parasitizing the pulmonate snail Helisoma anceps were studied over a 15-mo period; the guild included 8 species of parasites. Infracommunities were depauperate, with double patent infections observed in only 7 of 1,485 infected snails; a total of 4,899 was examined. Halipegus occidualis-Haematoloechus longiplexus was the most common dual infection. Both species share the same definitive host and, in both cases, eggs are the infective stage for the snail. Switches and losses of infections in individual snails were observed, suggesting the occurrence of dynamic interactions within the guild. A dominance hierarchy was constructed based on field observations and experimental infections. Echinostomatids were dominant; species without rediae in their life cycles were subordinates. Halipegus occidualis (which has rediae) was intermediate in dominance. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the distribution and abundance of trematode infective stages indicate that not all the snails have the same probability of becoming infected. Habitat structure, behavior of the definitive host, the nature of the infective stages, and snail population dynamics (mortality, recruitment, and size structure) generated spatial and temporal heterogeneity in this system. As a consequence, predictions of the probabilities of interspecific interactions based on an analysis of observed and expected frequencies of multiple infections could be inappropriate unless the potential sources of heterogeneity are considered. PMID:1865259

  20. Population estimate of Chinese mystery snail (Bellamya chinensis) in a Nebraska reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaine, Noelle M.; Allen, Craig R.; Fricke, Kent A.; Haak, Danielle M.; Hellman, Michelle L.; Kill, Robert A.; Nemec, Kristine T.; Pope, Kevin L.; Smeenk, Nicholas A.; Stephen, Bruce J.; Uden, Daniel R.; Unstad, Kody M.; VanderHam, Ashley E.

    2012-01-01

    The Chinese mystery snail (Bellamya chinensis) is an aquatic invasive species in North America. Little is known regarding this species' impacts on freshwater ecosystems. It is be lieved that population densities can be high, yet no population estimates have been reported. We utilized a mark-recapture approach to generate a population estimate for Chinese mystery snail in Wild Plum Lake, a 6.47-ha reservoir in southeast Nebraska. We calculated, using bias-adjusted Lincoln-Petersen estimation, that there were approximately 664 adult snails within a 127 m2 transect (5.2 snails/m2). If this density was consistent throughout the littoral zone (<3 m in depth) of the reservoir, then the total adult population in this impoundment is estimated to be 253,570 snails, and the total Chinese mystery snail wet biomass is estimated to be 3,119 kg (643 kg/ha). If this density is confined to the depth sampled in this study (1.46 m), then the adult population is estimated to be 169,400 snails, and wet biomass is estimated to be 2,084 kg (643 kg/ha). Additional research is warranted to further test the utility of mark-recapture methods for aquatic snails and to better understand Chinese mystery snail distributions within reservoirs.

  1. Life cycle stages of heterophyid trematodes in Vietnamese freshwater fishes traced by molecular and morphometric methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jakob Skov; Per W. Kania; Anders Dalsgaard; Thomas R. Jřrgensen; Kurt Buchmann

    2009-01-01

    A survey of digenean zoonotic trematodes infecting snails and fishes in a North Vietnamese freshwater fish culture system revealed shedding of three types of parapleurolophocercous cercariae from the snail host Melanoides tuberculata and the presence of metacercariae within the genus Haplorchis (H. pumilio and H. taichui) and Procerovum sp. in tissues of cultured fishes (silver carp, Indian carp and climbing

  2. Genetics, Shell Morphology, and Life History of the Freshwater Pulmonate Limpets Ferrissia rivularis and Ferrissia fragilis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert T. Dillon Jr; Jacob J. Herman

    2009-01-01

    The weak and variable nature of the shell morphometric criteria by which the North American ancylid limpets Ferrissia rivularis and Ferrissia fragilis are distinguished has led to speculation that they may be ecophenotypic variants. The shells of F. rivularis that we collected from a rocky river in the upper piedmont of South Carolina were significantly higher and wider per length

  3. Lichen endozoochory by snails.

    PubMed

    Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Werth, Silke; Rüetschi, Jörg; Fischer, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Endozoochory plays a prominent role for the dispersal of seed plants. However, for most other plant taxa it is not known whether this mode of dispersal occurs at all. Among those other taxa, lichens as symbiotic associations of algae and fungi are peculiar as their successful dispersal requires movement of propagules that leaves the symbiosis functional. However, the potential for endozoochorous dispersal of lichen fragments has been completely overlooked. We fed sterile thalli of two foliose lichen species (Lobaria pulmonaria and Physcia adscendens) differing in habitat and air-quality requirements to nine snail species common in temperate Europe. We demonstrated morphologically that L. pulmonaria regenerated from 29.0% of all 379 fecal pellets, whereas P. adscendens regenerated from 40.9% of all 433 fecal pellets, showing that lichen fragments survived gut passage of all snail species. Moreover, molecular analysis of regenerated lichens confirmed the species identity for a subset of samples. Regeneration rates were higher for the generalist lichen species P. adscendens than for the specialist lichen species L. pulmonaria. Furthermore, lichen regeneration rates varied among snail species with higher rates after gut passage of heavier snail species. We suggest that gastropods generally grazing on lichen communities are important, but so far completely overlooked, as vectors for lichen dispersal. This opens new ecological perspectives and questions the traditional view of an entirely antagonistic relationship between gastropods and lichens. PMID:21533256

  4. Small Snails, Enormous Elephants

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chicago Children's Museum

    2011-01-01

    This activity (located on page 2 of PDF) introduces learners to the real size of animals using nonstandard measurement. Learners use Unifix cubes and yarn lengths to measure a variety of animals (photos), from the very small like a snail to the very large like an elephant. As an extension, learners can use the cubes to create a bar graph depicting the animals' lengths.

  5. Freshwater Macroinvertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalepa, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of freshwater biology particularly freshwater macroinvertebrates and their effect on water pollution, covering publications of 1976-77. A list of 158 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. UNEP: Freshwater

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

    This searchable site, from The United Nations Environment Programme, is a clearinghouse for information about freshwater around the globe. The site provides links to UN reports, background guides on key freshwater issues, and many other resources.

  7. Snail size as a determinant of prepatent period duration in Helisoma anceps infected with Halipegus occidualis (Digenea: Hemiuridae).

    PubMed

    Zelmer, D A; Esch, G W

    2000-08-01

    Pulmonate snails (Helisoma anceps) of varying sizes were exposed to 2, 4, 8, or 16 eggs of Halipegus occidualis and observed over several months to determine the duration of the prepatent period. Infection probability was positively correlated with number of eggs ingested. The number of eggs ingested did not, however, have a significant effect on the duration of the prepatent period, presumably because low infectivity of the eggs (15%) dictated that most patent infections arose from a single miracidium. There was a significant, positive correlation between snail length (measured at time of exposure) and duration of prepatent period, suggesting that density-dependent effects are, in part, responsible for the initiation of cercariae production in H. occidualis. PMID:10958484

  8. A GUIDE TO FRESHWATER MOLLUSKS OF THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON THE GENUS PISIDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented here are keys and notes on distribution and ecology for the freshwater snails (Gastropoda), mussels (Unionidae), and fingernail clams (Sphaeriidae) which have been collected from the Laurentian Great Lakes. Including subspecies and forms, 121 taxa are discussed: 47 Gast...

  9. Exposure routes of copper: Short term effects on survival, weight, and uptake in Florida apple snails ( Pomacea paludosa)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tham C. Hoang; Gary M. Rand

    2009-01-01

    The uptake and effects (survival, weight) of copper (Cu) on Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) via exposures to copper-enriched agricultural soil–water and water-only treatments were investigated. Soils were collected from citrus sites in south Florida and flooded with laboratory freshwater for 14d. Neonate apple snails (?96-h-old) were then exposed to either Cu from a soil-overlying water (i.e., flooded agricultural soils)

  10. Inquiry, Land Snails, and Environmental Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Krantz, Patrick D.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces land snails for use in inquiry-based science activities. Describes common characteristics and safety considerations while introducing students to land snails. Explains procedures for inquiry-based use of land snails in classrooms. (YDS)

  11. Habitat requirements of the pulmonate land snails Trochulus oreinos oreinos and Cylindrus obtusus endemic to the Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Michael; Kruckenhauser, Luise; Haring, Elisabeth; Sattmann, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    The habitat needs and potential threats to Trochulus oreinos oreinos (Wagner 1915) and Cylindrus obtusus (Draparnaud 1805) were assessed by comparing vegetation maps and our own records. We selected four sites from which we had adequate samples and for which exact vegetation maps were available: the mountains Hoch-schwab, Schneealpe, Rax and Schneeberg. Both taxa prefer open dry alpine grassland with diggable soil and/or stones. T. oreinos oreinos is restricted to subalpine and alpine boulder societies and Caricetum firmae. While C. obtusus dwells on several communities of plants, it seems to be bound to unconsolidated stony ground. As both taxa prefer naturally forest-free areas, they are not affected by structural changes of the habitat, such as reforestation caused by the abandonment of grazing and the shift of vegetation zones. But it has to be considered that T. oreinos oreinos and C. obtusus are limited by microclimatic factors, as they prefer cooler habitats. The mountains Schneealpe, Rax and Schneeberg, reaching barely 2000 m in height, are on the climatic limit of the species distribution. Therefore, the investigated taxa are vulnerable to the upward shift of climate zones. T. oreinos oreinos shows striking similarities in its habitat preference to the Swiss endemic T. biconicus, as both taxa prefer the same dry alpine habitats which are quite different to those of other representatives of the genus, which prefer damp habitats. PMID:25729612

  12. O-Glycosylation of snails.

    PubMed

    Stepan, Herwig; Pabst, Martin; Altmann, Friedrich; Geyer, Hildegard; Geyer, Rudolf; Staudacher, Erika

    2012-05-01

    The glycosylation abilities of snails deserve attention, because snail species serve as intermediate hosts in the developmental cycles of some human and cattle parasites. In analogy to many other host-pathogen relations, the glycosylation of snail proteins may likewise contribute to these host-parasite interactions. Here we present an overview on the O-glycan structures of 8 different snails (land and water snails, with or without shell): Arion lusitanicus, Achatina fulica, Biomphalaria glabrata, Cepaea hortensis, Clea helena, Helix pomatia, Limax maximus and Planorbarius corneus. The O-glycans were released from the purified snail proteins by ?-elimination. Further analysis was carried out by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and - for the main structures - by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Snail O-glycans are built from the four monosaccharide constituents: N-acetylgalactosamine, galactose, mannose and fucose. An additional modification is a methylation of the hexoses. The common trisaccharide core structure was determined in Arion lusitanicus to be N-acetylgalactosamine linked to the protein elongated by two 4-O-methylated galactose residues. Further elongations by methylated and unmethylated galactose and mannose residues and/or fucose are present. The typical snail O-glycan structures are different to those so far described. Similar to snail N-glycan structures they display methylated hexose residues. PMID:22581130

  13. Spatial mosaic evolution of snail defensive traits

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Steven G; Hulsey, C Darrin; de León, Francisco J García

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent models suggest that escalating reciprocal selection among antagonistically interacting species is predicted to occur in areas of higher resource productivity. In a putatively coevolved interaction between a freshwater snail (Mexipyrgus churinceanus) and a molluscivorous cichlid (Herichthys minckleyi), we examined three components of this interaction: 1) spatial variation in two putative defensive traits, crushing resistance and shell pigmentation; 2) whether abiotic variables or frequency of molariform cichlids are associated with spatial patterns of crushing resistance and shell pigmentation and 3) whether variation in primary productivity accounted for small-scale variation in these defensive traits. Results Using spatial autocorrelation to account for genetic and geographic divergence among populations, we found no autocorrelation among populations at small geographic and genetic distances for the two defensive traits. There was also no correlation between abiotic variables (temperature and conductivity) and snail defensive traits. However, crushing resistance and frequency of pigmented shells were negatively correlated with molariform frequency. Crushing resistance and levels of pigmentation were significantly higher in habitats dominated by aquatic macrophytes, and both traits are phenotypically correlated. Conclusion Crushing resistance and pigmentation of M. churinceanus exhibit striking variation at small spatial scales often associated with differences in primary productivity, substrate coloration and the frequency of molariform cichlids. These local geographic differences may result from among-habitat variation in how resource productivity interacts to promote escalation in prey defenses. PMID:17397540

  14. An artificial perch to help Snail Kites handle an exotic Apple Snail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pias, Kyle E.; Welch, Zach C.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, the Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) is a federally endangered species and restricted to the wetlands of south-central Florida where the current population numbers less than 1,500. The Snail Kite is an extreme dietary specialist, previously feeding almost exclusively on one species of snail, the Florida Apple Snail (Pomacea paludosa). Within the past decade, an exotic species of apple snail, the Island Apple Snail (Pomacea insularum), has become established on lakes in central Florida. Island Apple Snails are larger than the native Florida Apple Snails, and Snail Kites handle the exotic snails less efficiently. Juvenile Snail Kites, in particular, have lower daily energy balances while feeding on Island Apple Snails. An inexpensive, easy-to-construct platform was developed that would provide Snail Kites with a flat, stable surface on which to extract snails. The platform has the potential to reduce the difficulties Snail Kites experience when handling exotic snails, and may benefit the Snail Kite population as a whole. Initial observations indicate that Snail Kites use the platforms frequently, and snails extracted at the platforms are larger than snails extracted at other perches.

  15. Alterations of biochemical indicators in hepatopancreas of the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, from paddy fields in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yuh-Wen; Wu, Jui-Pin; Hsieh, Tsung-Chih; Liang, Shih-Hsiung; Chen, Chien-Min; Huang, Da-Ji

    2014-07-01

    The freshwater golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, is one of the world's 100 worst invasive alien species. The snails' wide distribution, high abundance, and sensitivity to environmental pollution make them a potential bioindicator for environmental contamination. In this study, the biochemical status of golden apple snails collected from paddy fields throughout the island of Taiwan was examined. This study found that the biochemical status of apple snails collected from paddy fields differed from that of animals bred and maintained in the laboratory. Furthermore, certain biochemical endpoints of the snails collected from the paddy fields before and after agricultural activities were also different-hemolymphatic vitellogenin protein was induced in male snail after exposure to estrogen-like chemicals, the hepatic monooxygenase (1.97 +/- 0.50 deltaA(650mm) 30 min(-1) mg(-1) protein in control group) and glutathione S transferase (0.02 +/- 0.01 delta A(340mm) 30 min(-1) mg(-1) protein in control group) snails exposed to pesticides, as well as the hepatopancreatic levels of aspartate aminotransferase (450.00 +/- 59.40 U mg(-1) mg(-1) protein in control group) and alanine aminotransferase (233.27 +/- 42.09 U mg(-1) mg(-1) protein in control group) decreased the indicating that xenobiotics destroyed hepatopancreatic. The above findings reveal that apple snail could be used as a practical bioindicator to monitor anthropogenic environmental pollution. PMID:25004751

  16. Freshwater Blooms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

    This Bigelow Laboratory "Special Topics" page discusses freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs). The interactive web page describes the features of a freshwater HAB with a focus on location, organisms affected, human symptoms, toxins (neurotoxins and hepatotoxins), and causative organisms. Links are provided to other pages within the Toxic and Harmful Algal Blooms collection.

  17. Metal distribution and metallothionein induction after cadmium exposure in the terrestrial snail Helix aspersa (Gastropoda, Pulmonata).

    PubMed

    Hispard, Florian; Schuler, Dietmar; de Vaufleury, Annette; Scheifler, Renaud; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the effect of Cd2+ exposure on metallothionein (MT) induction and on the distribution of metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn) in the terrestrial pulmonate Helix aspersa. In particular, the soluble and nonsoluble pools of the accumulated metals and their tissue distribution in uncontaminated and contaminated edible snails were investigated after a two-week exposure to Cd2+. In the soluble cytosolic pool of the midgut gland of H. aspersa, three metal-specific putative MT isoforms were separated following a fractionation protocol with diethylaminoethyl cellulose, size-exclusion chromatography, ultrafiltration, and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Interestingly, one of the above isoforms seems to bind both Cd and Cu, which may in addition mobilize, after induction by Cd2+, some of the intracellular Cu and, thus, perhaps increase the Cu pool in the cytosolic fraction. The cDNA and its translated amino acid sequence of a Cd2+-binding MT isoform from the snail midgut gland was characterized and attributed to one of the putative MT isoforms obtained by RP-HPLC. The amino acid sequence of this Cd-MT isoform of H. aspersa differed from similar sequences described in other terrestrial pulmonates, such as Helix pomatia or Arianta arbustorum, by only a few amino acids (n = 4 and 8, respectively). That the identified Cd-MT from H. aspersa is inducible by Cd2+ also was shown, chromatographic evidence aside, by a specific polymerase chain reaction protocol on a cDNA basis, which included a noninducible housekeeping gene as a control. PMID:18384240

  18. ACOUSTIC AND AUDITORY ANALYSIS OF N|UU LINGUAL AND LINGUO-PULMONIC STOP BURSTS 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda Miller; Johanna Brugman; Bonny Sands

    2007-01-01

    We provide data on Centers of Gravity (COG) and resonances of two spectral peaks (P1 and P2) in bark-scaled acoustic spectra of N|uu lingual (L) (?, ?, ?, ?, ?) and linguo-pulmonic (LP) stops: (?°q, ?°q, ?°q, ?°q, ?°q). COG, P1 and P2 values for click bursts in L and LP stops do not differ, indicating that the L\\/LP contrast

  19. Impact of invasive apple snails on the functioning and services of natural and managed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, Finbarr G.; Stuart, Alexander M.; Kudavidanage, Enoka P.

    2014-01-01

    At least 14 species of apple snail (Ampullariidae) have been released to water bodies outside their native ranges; however, less than half of these species have become widespread or caused appreciable impacts. We review evidence for the impact of apple snails on natural and managed wetlands focusing on those studies that have elucidated impact mechanisms. Significant changes in wetland ecosystems have been noted in regions where the snails are established: Two species in particular (Pomacea canaliculata and Pomacea maculata) have become major pests of aquatic crops, including rice, and caused enormous increases in molluscicide use. Invasive apple snails have also altered macrophyte community structure in natural and managed wetlands through selective herbivory and certain apple snail species can potentially shift the balance of freshwater ecosystems from clear water (macrophyte dominated) to turbid (plankton dominated) states by depleting densities of native aquatic plants. Furthermore, the introductions of some apple snail species have altered benthic community structure either directly, through predation, or indirectly, through exploitation competition or as a result of management actions. To date much of the evidence for these impacts has been based on correlations, with few manipulative field or mesocosm experiments. Greater attention to impact monitoring is required, and, for Asia in particular, a landscape approach to impact management that includes both natural and managed-rice wetlands is recommended.

  20. Biological control of the snail hosts of Schistosoma mansoni in the Caribbean area using Thiara spp.

    PubMed

    Pointier, J P; McCullough, F

    1989-05-01

    Field observations and experiments using thiarid snails as competitors of Biomphalaria spp., potential intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni in the Caribbean area, are reviewed. The parthenogenetic snails, Thiara granifera and T. (= Melanoides) tuberculata, were introduced to the Neotropical area in recent decades. In numerous islands and countries, these oriental species have demonstrated their capacity to colonize rapidly and densely many types of habitats while at the same time reducing and even eliminating populations of Biomphalaria spp. The results of field experiments, carried out in several Caribbean islands, have shown the efficiency as well as the limitations of T. tuberculata as a competitor of B. glabrata and B. straminea. In St. Lucia, B. glabrata was apparently eliminated from marshes and streams, 6 to 22 months after the introduction of the competitor. In Martinique, T. tuberculata was introduced into two groups of water-cress beds which constituted the last transmission sites of schistosomiasis on the island. In just less than three years after the introduction of the competitor, both B. glabrata and B. straminea have been eliminated from the transmission sites. In Guadeloupe, several introductions have been carried out in different types of habitat such as permanent ponds, canals, streams and temporary marshes. The findings of all field experiments have indicated that thiarid snails as competitors of pulmonates are favoured by the presence of permanent and stable habitats, preferably shallow, with emergent plants and well oxygenated. On the other hand, the competitor snails are at a disadvantage in waterbodies which are temporary, extremely deep, poorly oxygenated or with a dense mat of floating aquatic vegetation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2566267

  1. METHODS FOR CONDUCTING SNAIL (APLEXA HYPNORUM) EMBRYO THROUGH ADULT EXPOSURES: EFFECTS OF CADMIUM AND REDUCED PH LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two separate embryo through adult exposures were conducted with cadmium and with reduced pH levels to validate various test methodologies and to determine the feasibility of testing and ease of handling the freshwater snail (Aplexa hypnorum) in a test system designed for fish bio...

  2. Notocotylus biomphalariae n. sp. (Digenea: Notocotylidae)from Biomphalaria peregrina (Gastropoda: Pulmonata) in Patagonia, Argentina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Verónica Flores; Norma Brugni

    2005-01-01

    A new species of Notocotylus was found parasiting a freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria peregrina. Naturally infected snails were collected from two temporary ponds in the Nahuel Huapí National Park in Patagonia. The characteristics of the larval stages are presented. Experimental adults were recovered from the intestinal caeca of ducks and chicks. Adults of Notocotylus biomphalariae n. sp. exhibit an aspinose

  3. Impacts of an Invasive Snail (Tarebia granifera) on Nutrient Cycling in Tropical Streams: The Role of Riparian Deforestation in Trinidad, West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Jennifer M.; Snider, Sunny B.; MacNeill, Keeley; Gilliam, James F.; Flecker, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species and habitat degradation are two major catalysts of environmental change and often occur simultaneously. In freshwater systems, degradation of adjacent terrestrial vegetation may facilitate introduced species by altering resource availability. Here we examine how the presence of intact riparian cover influences the impact of an invasive herbivorous snail, Tarebia granifera, on nitrogen (N) cycling in aquatic systems on the island of Trinidad. We quantified snail biomass, growth, and N excretion in locations where riparian vegetation was present or removed to determine how snail demographics and excretion were related to the condition of the riparian zone. In three Neotropical streams, we measured snail biomass and N excretion in open and closed canopy habitats to generate estimates of mass- and area-specific N excretion rates. Snail biomass was 2 to 8 times greater and areal N excretion rates ranged from 3 to 9 times greater in open canopy habitats. Snails foraging in open canopy habitat also had access to more abundant food resources and exhibited greater growth and mass-specific N excretion rates. Estimates of ecosystem N demand indicated that snail N excretion in fully closed, partially closed, and open canopy habitats supplied 2%, 11%, and 16% of integrated ecosystem N demand, respectively. We conclude that human-mediated riparian canopy loss can generate hotspots of snail biomass, growth, and N excretion along tropical stream networks, altering the impacts of an invasive snail on the biogeochemical cycling of N. PMID:22761706

  4. Histamine Immunoreactive Elements in the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems of the Snail, Biomphalaria spp., Intermediate Host for Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Mohamed R.; Mohamed, Azza H.; Osman, Gamalat Y.; Sharaf El-Din, Ahmed T.; Mossalem, Hanan S.; Delgado, Nadia; Torres, Grace; Rolón-Martínez, Solymar; Miller, Mark W.; Croll, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine appears to be an important transmitter throughout the Animal Kingdom. Gastropods, in particular, have been used in numerous studies establishing potential roles for this biogenic amine in the nervous system and showing its involvement in the generation of diverse behaviours. And yet, the distribution of histamine has only previously been described in a small number of molluscan species. The present study examined the localization of histamine-like immunoreactivity in the central and peripheral nervous systems of pulmonate snails of the genus Biomphalaria. This investigation demonstrates immunoreactive cells throughout the buccal, cerebral, pedal, left parietal and visceral ganglia, indicative of diverse regulatory functions in Biomphalaria. Immunoreactivity was also present in statocyst hair cells, supporting a role for histamine in graviception. In the periphery, dense innervation by immunoreactive fibers was observed in the anterior foot, perioral zone, and other regions of the body wall. This study thus shows that histamine is an abundant transmitter in these snails and its distribution suggest involvement in numerous neural circuits. In addition to providing novel subjects for comparative studies of histaminegic neurons in gastropods, Biomphalaria is also the major intermediate host for the digenetic trematode parasite, which causes human schistosomiasis. The study therefore provides a foundation for understanding potential roles for histamine in interactions between the snail hosts and their trematode parasites. PMID:26086611

  5. Study of the diet effect on ? 13C of shell carbonate of the land snail Helix aspersa in experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metref, S.; Rousseau, D.-D.; Bentaleb, I.; Labonne, M.; Vianey-Liaud, M.

    2003-06-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the influence of the metabolic CO 2 derived from the diet and of the atmospheric CO 2 on the shell carbonate ? 13C of the pulmonate snail Helix aspersa maxima raised under controlled conditions. Adult snails were analyzed and compared with three hatching and 1-day old young snails stemming from the same breeding. One day after, the 2-day old individuals were raised during 1 month. Three groups of gastropods were fed with fresh lettuce (C 3 plant, ? 13C=-27.49‰), three groups with corn (C 4 plant, ? 13C=-11.7‰), and three groups ate alternately both (C 3+C 4). The difference between the average ? 13C values of the adult snails on the one hand and the hatched and 1-day old snails on the other hand indicates a depletion of 2.47‰. Therefore, the isotopic parents-offspring signal is not preserved. The depleted ingested albumen by the snail embryo in the egg during the building of the shell could explain this depletion. The C 3 diet experiment gave the expected isotopic composition difference between the diet (lettuce) and the shells (average ? 13C shell-lettuce=13.75‰±0.52). This result shows a clear diet effect on the isotopic composition of the snail shells. For the C 4 experiment, the difference in carbon isotope composition between the corn and the shell (? 13C shell-corn) yielded an average value of 4.89‰±0.87. The main result is that ? 13C is not constant and appears to depend on the type of ingested food. Several hypotheses can arise from this study to explain the different fractionations: (a) differences in the quality of the two diets, (b) differences in turnover rate for C 3 and C 4 feeders. The groups regularly fed with mixed diet yielded ? 13C values showing a preferential use of C 3 food for most values. The C 3-C 4 mixed dietary alternation probably led snails to use mainly the lettuce instead of the corn powder.

  6. Origin and diversification of the endemic Hawaiian tree snails (Achatinellidae: Achatinellinae) based on molecular evidence.

    PubMed

    Holland, Brenden S; Hadfield, Michael G

    2004-08-01

    Tree snails of the endemic subfamily Achatinellinae comprise a diverse and important component of the Hawaiian fauna. In recent decades anthropogenic impacts have resulted in devastating extinction rates in Hawaiian tree snails. To address long-standing biogeographic, systematic, and evolutionary questions we used cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences to reconstruct the phylogeny of 23 extant species spanning the range of the subfamily from five Hawaiian Islands. To investigate family-level relationships, data were analyzed from 11 terrestrial pulmonate families. Although nodal support for monophyly of the endemic Pacific family Achatinellidae and endemic Hawaiian subfamily Achatinellinae was strong, bifurcation order among deeper ingroup nodes was not well-supported by bootstrap resampling. We hypothesize that lineage extinction and rapidity of lineage formation may have rendered evolutionary reconstruction difficult using a standard phylogenetic approach. Use of an optimized evolutionary model, however, improved resolution and recovered three main clades. The diversification pattern inferred contradicts the traditional biogeographic hypothesis of a Maui origin of the achatinelline lineage. Taxa comprising the basal ingroup clade (Achatinella spp.) and seeding lineages for subsequent clades originated on O'ahu. Therefore it appears that the ancestral colonizing species of achatinellines arrived first on O'ahu from an unknown source, and that O'ahu is the Hawaiian origin of the subfamily. Species previously defined by morphological criteria were generally found to be phylogenetically distinct, and the overall colonization pattern follows the island-age progression rule with several instances of generic polyphyly and back-colonization. PMID:15223040

  7. Major carbon-14 deficiency in modern snail shells from southern nevada springs.

    PubMed

    Riggs, A C

    1984-04-01

    Carbon-14 contents as low as 3.3 +/- 0.2 percent modern (apparent age, 27,000 years) measured from the shells of snails Melanoides tuberculatus living in artesian springs in southern Nevada are attributed to fixation of dissolved HCO(3)(-) with which the shells are in carbon isotope equilibrium. Recognition of the existence of such extreme deficiencies is necessary so that erroneous ages are not attributed to freshwater biogenic carbonates. PMID:17783523

  8. Major carbon-14 deficiency in modern snail shells from southern Nevada springs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon-14 contents as low as 3.3 ?? 0.2 percent modern (apparent age, 27,000 years) measured from the shells of snails Melanoides tuberculatus living in artesian springs in southern Nevada are attributed to fixation of dissolved HCO3- with which the shells are in carbon isotope equilibrium. Recognition of the existence of such extreme deficiencies is necessary so that erroneous ages are not attributed to freshwater biogenic carbonates.

  9. Plasma N-Terminal Pro B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Concentrations in Dogs with Pulmonic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, Keiya; HORI, Yasutomo; CHIMURA, Syuuichi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The detailed information between plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and dogs with pulmonic stenosis (PS) is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical utility of measuring plasma NT-proBNP concentrations in dogs with PS and to determine whether plasma NT-proBNP concentration could be used to assess disease severity. This retrospective study enrolled 30 client-owned, untreated dogs with PS (asymptomatic [n=23] and symptomatic [n=7]) and 11 healthy laboratory beagles. Results of physical examination, thoracic radiography and echocardiography were recorded. Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were measured using commercial laboratories. Compared to the healthy control dogs, cardiothoracic ratio was significantly increased in dogs with both asymptomatic and symptomatic PS. Similarly, the ratio of the main pulmonary artery to aorta was significantly decreased in dogs with both asymptomatic and symptomatic PS. The pulmonic pressure gradient in the symptomatic PS dogs was significantly higher than that in the asymptomatic PS dogs. Plasma NT-proBNP concentration was significantly elevated in the symptomatic PS dogs compared to the healthy control dogs and the asymptomatic PS dogs. Furthermore, the Doppler-derived pulmonic pressure gradient was significantly correlated with the plasma NT-proBNP concentration (r=0.78, r2=0.61, P<0.0001). Plasma NT-proBNP concentration >764 pmol/l to identify severe PS had a sensitivity of 76.2% and specificity of 81.8%. The plasma NT-proBNP concentration increased by spontaneous PS, i.e. right-sided pressure overload and can be used as an additional method to assess the severity of PS in dogs. PMID:24561377

  10. Freshwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  11. Changes in gastropod assemblages in freshwater habitats in the vicinity of Basel (Switzerland) over 87 years

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno Baur; Birgit Ringeis

    2002-01-01

    The gastropod fauna in 18 freshwater habitats (streams, rivers and ponds) in the vicinity of Basel, first surveyed in 1906\\/1907, was re-examined in 1994. The freshwater snail fauna changed considerably over 87 years. One species (Aplexa hypnorum) recorded in 1906\\/1907 was not found in 1994, most probably it had become extinct in the period between the two surveys. Ten species

  12. A study on snail location by Fasciola hepatica using radioisotopically labelled miracidia.

    PubMed

    Nansen, P; Frandsen, F; Christensen, N O

    1976-04-01

    A number of common freshwater molluscs were exposed to Fasciola hepatica miracidia labelled in vivo with radioselenium. Radioactivity was rapidly incorporated in all lymnaeid species tested (L. stagnalis, L. tomentosa and L. truncatula) whereas no radioactivity could be demonstrated in non-lymnaeid pulmonate species (Aplexa hypnorum, Physa acuta, Physa fontinalis, Anisus vortex, Gyraulus albus and Planorbis planorbis) or in the prosobranchs Valvata cristata and Valvata piscinalis. However, the prosobranchs Bithynia leachii, Bithynia tentaculata and Potamopyrgus jenkinsi showed a slow but significant uptake of radioactivity which was presumably explained by uptake of labelled miracidia through a 'filter-feeding' mechanism. Sphaerium corneum, a true filter-feeder, showed a similar course of uptake of radioactivity. PMID:1264488

  13. Freshwater Molluscs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry B. Miller; Michael J. S. Tevesz

    Freshwater mollusc shells are among the best and most extensively preserved fossils in lacustrine sediments. These molluscs\\u000a are useful because they occur in a broad range of paleoenvironments. As a result, they have been used to reconstruct former\\u000a stream confluences, provide a basis for biostratigraphic zonation of sedimentary sequences in lake basins, and reconstruct\\u000a habitat and climatic conditions. Because many

  14. Effects of temperature on food ingestion rate and absorption, retention, and equilibrium burden of phosphorus in an aquatic snail, Goniobasis clavaeformis Lea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Elwood; R. A. Goldstein

    1975-01-01

    The effects of sublethal temperatures on feeding rates and phosphorus dynamics of a freshwater snail, Goniobasis clavaeformis Lea, were determined and feeding rates were measured at four temperatures. The food source was aufwuchs labelled with radioactive phosphorus. A model was developed to elucidate the results of this type of study. Food ingestion rate increased with increasing temperature up to 14°C

  15. Regulation of laboratory populations of snails (Biomphalaria and Bulinus spp.) by river prawns, Macrobrachium spp. (Decapoda, Palaemonidae): implications for control of schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Sokolow, Susanne H; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Human schistosomiasis is a common parasitic disease endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. One barrier to achieving long-term control of this disease has been re-infection of treated patients when they swim, bathe, or wade in surface fresh water infested with snails that harbor and release larval parasites. Because some snail species are obligate intermediate hosts of schistosome parasites, removing snails may reduce parasitic larvae in the water, reducing re-infection risk. Here, we evaluate the potential for snail control by predatory freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii and M. vollenhovenii, native to Asia and Africa, respectively. Both prawn species are high value, protein-rich human food commodities, suggesting their cultivation may be beneficial in resource-poor settings where few other disease control options exist. In a series of predation trials in laboratory aquaria, we found both species to be voracious predators of schistosome-susceptible snails, hatchlings, and eggs, even in the presence of alternative food, with sustained average consumption rates of 12% of their body weight per day. Prawns showed a weak preference for Bulinus truncatus over Biomphalaria glabrata snails. Consumption rates were highly predictable based on the ratio of prawn: snail body mass, suggesting satiation-limited predation. Even the smallest prawns tested (0.5-2g) caused snail recruitment failure, despite high snail fecundity. With the World Health Organization turning attention toward schistosomiasis elimination, native prawn cultivation may be a viable snail control strategy that offers a win-win for public health and economic development. PMID:24388955

  16. Salinity adaptation of the invasive New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) in the Columbia River estuary (Pacific Northwest, USA): physiological and molecular studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoy, Marshal; Boese, Bruce L.; Taylor, Louise; Reusser, Deborah; Rodriguez, Rusty

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine salinity stress tolerances of two populations of the invasive species New Zealand mud snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, one population from a high salinity environment in the Columbia River estuary and the other from a fresh water lake. In 1996, New Zealand mud snails were discovered in the tidal reaches of the Columbia River estuary that is routinely exposed to salinity at near full seawater concentrations. In contrast, in their native habitat and throughout its spread in the western US, New Zealand mud snails are found only in fresh water ecosystems. Our aim was to determine whether the Columbia River snails have become salt water adapted. Using a modification of the standard amphipod sediment toxicity test, salinity tolerance was tested using a range of concentrations up to undiluted seawater, and the snails were sampled for mortality at daily time points. Our results show that the Columbia River snails were more tolerant of acute salinity stress with the LC50 values averaging 38 and 22 Practical Salinity Units for the Columbia River and freshwater snails, respectively. DNA sequence analysis and morphological comparisons of individuals representing each population indicate that they were all P. antipodarum. These results suggest that this species is salt water adaptable and in addition, this investigation helps elucidate the potential of this aquatic invasive organism to adapt to adverse environmental conditions.

  17. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Misako, E-mail: haraguci@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Indo, Hiroko P. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Iwasaki, Yasumasa [Health Care Center, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan)] [Health Care Center, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Iwashita, Yoichiro [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Fukushige, Tomoko [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Majima, Hideyuki J. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa [Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kanekura, Takuro [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Furukawa, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ozawa, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ? MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ? MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ? TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ? MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ? MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of key enzymes. This results in enhanced glucose dependency and leads to cell death under low-glucose conditions. On the other hand, the reduced requirements for oxygen and nutrients from the surrounding environment, might confer the resistance to cell death induced by hypoxia and malnutrition.

  18. F-LE Snail Invasion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: In 1966, a Miami boy smuggled three Giant African Land Snails into the country. His grandmother eventually released them into the garden, and in seven ...

  19. Study of the diet effect on d13C of shell carbonate of the land snail Helix aspersa in experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metref, S.; Rousseau, D. D.; Bentaleb, I.; Labonne, M.; Vianey-Liaud, M.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the influence of the metabolic CO2 derived from the diet and of the atmospheric CO2 on the shell carbonate d13C of the pulmonate snail Helix aspersa maxima raised under controlled conditions. Adult snails were analyzed and compared with three hatching and one-day young snails stemming from the same breeding. One day after, the two-days old individuals were raised during one month. Three groups of gastropods were fed with fresh lettuce (C3 plant, d13C = -27.49 ppt), three groups with corn (C4 plant, d13C = -11.7 ppt), and three groups ate both (C3 + C4). The difference between the mean d13C values of the adult snails on one hand and the hatched and one-day snails on the other hand indicates a depletion of 2.47 ‰. Therefore, the isotopic parents offspring signal is not preserved. The depleted ingested albumen by the snail embryo in the egg during the built of the shell could explain this depletion. The C3 diet experiment gave the expected isotopic composition difference between the diet (lettuce) and the shells (mean D13Cshell-Lettuce = 13.75 ppt +- 0.52). This result shows a clear diet effect on the isotopic composition of the snail shells. For the C4 experiment, the difference in carbon isotope composition between the corn and the shell (D13Cshell-corn) yielded a mean value of 4.89 ppt +- 0.87. The main result is that D13C is not constant and appears to depend on the type of ingested food. Several hypothesis can raise from this study to explain the different fractionations : a) The differences in quality of the two diets seem to have placed the animals in different growth states, b) Differences in turnover rate for C3 and C4 feeders. The groups regularly fed with mixed diet yielded d13C values, showing a preferential use of C3 food for the most values. The C3-C4 mixed dietary alternation probably led snails to use mainly the lettuce instead of the corn powder.

  20. Production of apple snail for space diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Motoki, Shigeru; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.; Katayama, Naomi

    For food production in space at recycling bio-elements under closed environment, appropriate organisms should be chosen to drive the closed materials recycle loop. We propose a combination of green algae, photosynthetic protozoa, and aquatic plants such as Wolffia spp., for the primary producer fixing solar energy to chemical form in biomass, and apple snail, Pomacea bridgesii, which converts this biomass to animal meat. Because of high proliferation rate of green algae or protozoa compared to higher plants, and direct conversion of them to apple snail, the efficiency of food production in this combination is high, in terms of energy usage, space for rearing, and yield of edible biomass. Furthermore, green algae and apple snail can form a closed ecological system with exchanging bio-elements between two member, i.e. excreta of snail turn to fertilizer of algae, and grown algae become feed for snail. Since apple snail stays in water or on wet substrate, control of rearing is easy to make. Mass production technology of apple snail has been well established to utilize it as human food. Nutrients of apple snail are also listed in the standard tables of food composition in Japan. Nutrients for 100 g of apple snail canned in brine are energy 340 kJ, protein 16.5 g, lipid 1.0 g, cholesterol 240 mg, carbohydrate 0.8 g, Ca 400 mg, Fe 3.9 mg, Zn 1.5 mg. It is rich in minerals, especially Ca and Fe. Vitamin contents are quite low, but K 0.005 mg, B2 0.09 mg, B12 0.0006 mg, folate 0.001 mg, and E 0.6 mg. The amino acid score of apple snail could not be found in literature. Overall, apple snail provides rich protein and animal lipid such as cholesterol. It could be a good source of minerals. However, it does not give enough vitamin D and B12 , which are supposed to be supplemented by animal origin foods. In terms of acceptance in food culture, escargot is a gourmet menu in French dishes, and six to ten snail, roughly 50 g, are served for one person. Apple snail reaches to 30 g of body weight within two or three month from its egg. Several hundreds of egg are laid by one snail. It start egg laying after three months from hatching. In order to harvest 50 g for every day's meal, 3 m2 is required for rearing space. Eating apple snail and establishing its rearing system might save the food crisis on Earth.

  1. Larval stages of digenetic trematodes of Melanopsis praemorsa (L. 1758, Buccinum) (Thiaridae) snails from Yarmouk River, Jordan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naim S. Ismail; Sami K. Abdel-Hafez

    1983-01-01

    Seven new types of cercariae are described from the freshwater snailMelanopsis praemorsa (L. 1758, Buccinum) collected from Yarmouk River, north Jordan, during 1982: two virgulate xiphidiocercariae, a microcotylous xiphidiocercaria belonging to the “Pusilla” sub-type, a brevifurcate lophocercous cercaria, a microcercous cercaria, and two pleurolophocercous cercariae. These cercariae are namedCercaria melanopsi I throughVII. Details are presented on the morphology and behavior

  2. Predator avoidance and immune defence: costs and trade-offs in snails.

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, M C; Jokela, J

    2000-01-01

    Organisms are often confronted by both predators and pathogens. Defending against such widely divergent enemies requires more than one type of defence. Multiple defences, however, raise the possibility of trade-offs among defences. We tested for such trade-offs by manipulating the level of predator-avoidance behaviour and immune function in the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda: Pulmonata). Our results show that predator avoidance and immune function had clear costs in terms of reproduction and survival. Further, we show that increased levels of predator-avoidance behaviour reduced the snails' ability to defend against potential pathogens. Predator-avoidance behaviour may thus have the additional indirect cost of reduced immunocompetence and increased susceptibility to pathogens. Our results suggest that ecological factors (e.g. predator density) may considerably modify the expression and costs of immune defences. PMID:10687823

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome of the giant ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingling; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2014-09-26

    Abstract We report the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the giant ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis, a biocontrol agent of freshwater weeds and snail vectors of schistosomes. The mitogenome is 15,923?bp in length, encoding 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs. The mitogenome is A+T biased (70.0%), with 28.9% A, 41.1% T, 16.7% G, and 13.3% C. A comparison with Pomacea canaliculata, the other member in the same family (Ampullariidae) with a sequenced mitogenome, shows that the two species have an identical gene order, but their intergenic regions vary substantially in sequence length. The mitogenome data can be used to understand the population genetics of M. cornuarietis, and resolve the phylogenetic relationship of various genera in Ampullariidae. PMID:25259454

  4. Controlling slugs and snails in orchids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slugs and snails are pests of orchids, preferring tender plant tissues such as flowers and root tips. Unlike many insect pests which feed only on certain types of plants, most species of slugs and snails are generalists, feeding on green plants, algae, fungi, decaying plant matter, or decaying anima...

  5. Inquiry, Land Snails, and Environmental Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Krantz, Patrick D.

    2005-01-01

    Land snails are common invertebrates that fascinate children. Unfortunately, they are seldom used for activities in the science classroom. Snails are inexpensive, take up little space in the classroom, and require only low maintenance, and their learning dividends can be enormous. For example, students can use them in inquiry-based activities that…

  6. [The distribution of freshwater molluscs the intermediate hosts of human schistosomas in Katan, south-Kivu].

    PubMed

    Bagalwa, M; Baluku, B

    1997-01-01

    In eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, the prevalence of bilharziasis due to Schistosoma mansoni is high along the Kivu lake shoreline where Biomphalaria pfeifferi, i.e. the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, is the only snail that has been described until now. Although their occurrence has not been reported in the area, other schistosomas remain possible since their intermediate hosts are present. This study was carried out in 1992 to determine the distribution of intermediate host snails in freshwater systems in the region. Samples were collected according to the standardized harvest time unit method. Five species of intermediate host snails for human schistosomiasis were identified. By far the most prevalent species was Biomphalaria pfeifferi which was found in 75% of the freshwater systems studied. Given the presence of Schistosoma mansoni in the region, spread of this type of schistosome is likely. Ferrissia burnipi, the recognized intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium, was observed in association with Biomphalaria pfeifferi. Snails of the Bulinus genus were confined to special environments. Factors preventing infestation by Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma intercalatum remain unclear. Control measures against snails and their larvae in fresh water systems in the region are needed to stop the spread of Schistosoma mansoni and prevent the appearance of Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma intercalutum. PMID:9612779

  7. Climate and pH Predict the Potential Range of the Invasive Apple Snail (Pomacea insularum) in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Byers, James E.; McDowell, William G.; Dodd, Shelley R.; Haynie, Rebecca S.; Pintor, Lauren M.; Wilde, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the potential range of invasive species is essential for risk assessment, monitoring, and management, and it can also inform us about a species’ overall potential invasiveness. However, modeling the distribution of invasive species that have not reached their equilibrium distribution can be problematic for many predictive approaches. We apply the modeling approach of maximum entropy (MaxEnt) that is effective with incomplete, presence-only datasets to predict the distribution of the invasive island apple snail, Pomacea insularum. This freshwater snail is native to South America and has been spreading in the USA over the last decade from its initial introductions in Texas and Florida. It has now been documented throughout eight southeastern states. The snail’s extensive consumption of aquatic vegetation and ability to accumulate and transmit algal toxins through the food web heighten concerns about its spread. Our model shows that under current climate conditions the snail should remain mostly confined to the coastal plain of the southeastern USA where it is limited by minimum temperature in the coldest month and precipitation in the warmest quarter. Furthermore, low pH waters (pH <5.5) are detrimental to the snail’s survival and persistence. Of particular note are low-pH blackwater swamps, especially Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia (with a pH below 4 in many areas), which are predicted to preclude the snail’s establishment even though many of these areas are well matched climatically. Our results elucidate the factors that affect the regional distribution of P. insularum, while simultaneously presenting a spatial basis for the prediction of its future spread. Furthermore, the model for this species exemplifies that combining climatic and habitat variables is a powerful way to model distributions of invasive species. PMID:23451090

  8. Antioxidant defenses and metabolic depression. The hypothesis of preparation for oxidative stress in land snails.

    PubMed

    Hermes-Lima, M; Storey, J M; Storey, K B

    1998-07-01

    The roles of enzymatic antioxidant defenses in the natural tolerance of environmental stresses that impose changes in oxygen availability and oxygen consumption on animals is discussed with a particular focus on the biochemistry of estivation and metabolic depression in pulmonate land snails. Despite reduced oxygen consumption and PO2 during estivation, which should also mean reduced production of oxyradicals, the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, increased in 30 day-estivating snails. This appears to be an adaptation that allows the snails to deal with oxidative stress that takes place during arousal when PO2 and oxygen consumption rise rapidly. Indeed, oxidative stress was indicated by increased levels of lipid peroxidation damage products accumulating in hepatopancreas within minutes after arousal was initiated. The various metabolic sites responsible for free radical generation during arousal are still unknown but it seems unlikely that the enzyme xanthine oxidase plays any substantial role in this despite being implicated in oxidative stress in mammalian models of ischemia/reperfusion. We propose that the activation of antioxidant defenses in the organs of Otala lactea during estivation is a preparative mechanism against oxidative stress during arousal. Increased activities of antioxidant enzymes have also observed under other stress situations in which the actual production of oxyradicals should decrease. For example, antioxidant defenses are enhanced during anoxia exposure in garter snakes Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis (10 h at 5 degrees C) and leopard frogs Rana pipiens (30 h at 5 degrees C) and during freezing exposure (an ischemic condition due to plasma freezing) in T. sirtalis parietalis and wood frogs Rana sylvatica. It seems that enhancement of antioxidant enzymes during either anoxia or freezing is used as a preparatory mechanism to deal with a physiological oxidative stress that occurs rapidly within the early minutes of recovery during reoxygenation or thawing. Thus, a wide range of stress tolerant animals display coordinated changes in antioxidant defenses that allow them to deal with oxidative stress that occurs as part of natural cycles of stress/recovery that alter oxygen levels in tissues. The molecular mechanisms that trigger and regulate changes in antioxidant enzyme activities in these species are still unknown but could prove to have key relevance for the development of new intervention strategies in the treatment of cardiovascular ischemia/reperfusion injuries in humans. PMID:9787804

  9. No-choice mating experiments among six nominal taxa of the subgenus Physella (Basommatophora: Physidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROBERT T. DILLON; AMY R. WETHINGTON

    Breeding studies have recently demonstrated no postzygotic reproductive isolation among several of the most common nomi- nal species in the subgenus Costatella of the widespread freshwater pulmonate snail family Physidae. Here we extend these results to include six nominal taxa in the other major subgenus of North American physids, Physella. We established first generation lines from the type or near-type

  10. Schistosomes and snails: a molecular encounter.

    PubMed

    Knight, Matty; Arican-Goktas, Halime D; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Odoemelam, Edwin C; Miller, André N; Bridger, Joanna M

    2014-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata snails play an integral role in the transmission of Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent for human schistosomiasis in the Western hemisphere. For the past two decades, tremendous advances have been made in research aimed at elucidating the molecular basis of the snail/parasite interaction. The growing concern that there is no vaccine to prevent schistosomiasis and only one effective drug in existence provides the impetus to develop new control strategies based on eliminating schistosomes at the snail-stage of the life cycle. To elucidate why a given snail is not always compatible to each and every schistosome it encounters, B. glabrata that are either resistant or susceptible to a given strain of S. mansoni have been employed to track molecular mechanisms governing the snail/schistosome relationship. With such snails, genetic markers for resistance and susceptibility were identified. Additionally, differential gene expression studies have led to the identification of genes that underlie these phenotypes. Lately, the role of schistosomes in mediating non-random relocation of gene loci has been identified for the first time, making B. glabrata a model organism where chromatin regulation by changes in nuclear architecture, known as spatial epigenetics, orchestrated by a major human parasite can now be investigated. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in using molecular approaches to describe snail/schistosome compatibility issues. Uncovering the signaling networks triggered by schistosomes that provide the impulse to turn genes on and off in the snail host, thereby controlling the outcome of infection, could also yield new insights into anti-parasite mechanism(s) that operate in the human host as well. PMID:25101114

  11. Schistosomes and snails: a molecular encounter

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Matty; Arican-Goktas, Halime D.; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Odoemelam, Edwin C.; Miller, André N.; Bridger, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata snails play an integral role in the transmission of Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent for human schistosomiasis in the Western hemisphere. For the past two decades, tremendous advances have been made in research aimed at elucidating the molecular basis of the snail/parasite interaction. The growing concern that there is no vaccine to prevent schistosomiasis and only one effective drug in existence provides the impetus to develop new control strategies based on eliminating schistosomes at the snail-stage of the life cycle. To elucidate why a given snail is not always compatible to each and every schistosome it encounters, B. glabrata that are either resistant or susceptible to a given strain of S. mansoni have been employed to track molecular mechanisms governing the snail/schistosome relationship. With such snails, genetic markers for resistance and susceptibility were identified. Additionally, differential gene expression studies have led to the identification of genes that underlie these phenotypes. Lately, the role of schistosomes in mediating non-random relocation of gene loci has been identified for the first time, making B. glabrata a model organism where chromatin regulation by changes in nuclear architecture, known as spatial epigenetics, orchestrated by a major human parasite can now be investigated. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in using molecular approaches to describe snail/schistosome compatibility issues. Uncovering the signaling networks triggered by schistosomes that provide the impulse to turn genes on and off in the snail host, thereby controlling the outcome of infection, could also yield new insights into anti-parasite mechanism(s) that operate in the human host as well. PMID:25101114

  12. Evidence for specific genotype-dependent immune priming in the lophotrochozoan Biomphalaria glabrata snail.

    PubMed

    Portela, Julien; Duval, David; Rognon, Anne; Galinier, Richard; Boissier, Jérôme; Coustau, Christine; Mitta, Guillaume; Théron, André; Gourbal, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the prevailing view in the field of invertebrate immunity was that invertebrates that do not possess acquired adaptive immunity rely on innate mechanisms with low specificity and no memory. Several recent studies have shaken this paradigm and suggested that the immune defenses of invertebrates are more complex and specific than previously thought. Mounting evidence has shown that at least some invertebrates (mainly Ecdysozoa) show high levels of specificity in their immune responses to different pathogens, and that subsequent reexposure may result in enhanced protection (recently called 'immune priming'). Here, we investigated immune priming in the Lophotrochozoan snail species Biomphalaria glabrata, following infection by the trematode pathogen Schistosoma mansoni. We confirmed that snails were protected against a secondary homologous infection whatever the host strain. We then investigated how immune priming occurs and the level of specificity of B. glabrata immune priming. In this report we confirmed that immune priming exists and we identified a genotype-dependent immune priming in the fresh-water snail B. glabrata. PMID:23343530

  13. Effects of single, binary and tertiary combinations with Jatropha gossypifolia and other plant-derived molluscicides on reproduction and survival of the snail Lymnaea acuminata.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ram P; Singh, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The effect of sub-lethal doses (40% and 80% of LC(50)/24h) of plant derived molluscicides of singly, binary (1:1) and tertiary (1:1:1) combinations of the Rutin, Ellagic acid, Betulin and taraxerol with J. gossypifolia latex, leaf and stem bark powder extracts and their active component on the reproduction of freshwater snail Lymnaea acuminata have been studied. It was observed that the J. gossypifolia latex, stem bark, individual leaf and their combinations with other plant derived active molluscicidal components caused a significant reduction in fecundity, hatchability and survival of young snails. It is believed that sub-lethal exposure of these molluscicides on snail reproduction is a complex process involving more than one factor in reducing the reproductive capacity. PMID:25229223

  14. The apple snail Pomacea canaliculata, a novel vector of the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis: its introduction, spread, and control in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting-Bao; Wu, Zhong-Dao; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2013-06-01

    The freshwater apple snail Pomacea canaliculata was introduced to Taiwan then to mainland China in the early 1980s from Argentina, its native region, for the purpose of aquaculture. Because of the lack of natural enemies and its tolerance of a wide range of environmental conditions, both its abundance and distribution have dramatically increased and it has become a harmful species to local agriculture and other native species in many areas of China. Unfortunately, the snail also acts as an intermediate host of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, and has been implicated in transfer of the parasite to people, resulting in angiostrongyliasis manifested as eosinophilic meningitis. Efforts to prevent its further spread and population expansion were initiated many years ago, including the use of chemicals and biological control agents to control the snail. PMID:23901377

  15. The Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata, a Novel Vector of the Rat Lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis: its Introduction, Spread, and Control in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhong-Dao; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2013-01-01

    The freshwater apple snail Pomacea canaliculata was introduced to Taiwan then to mainland China in the early 1980s from Argentina, its native region, for the purpose of aquaculture. Because of the lack of natural enemies and its tolerance of a wide range of environmental conditions, both its abundance and distribution have dramatically increased and it has become a harmful species to local agriculture and other native species in many areas of China. Unfortunately, the snail also acts as an intermediate host of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, and has been implicated in transfer of the parasite to people, resulting in angiostrongyliasis manifested as eosinophilic meningitis. Efforts to prevent its further spread and population expansion were initiated many years ago, including the use of chemicals and biological control agents to control the snail. PMID:23901377

  16. EFFECTS OF SINGLE, BINARY AND TERTIARY COMBINATIONS WITH Jatropha gossypifolia AND OTHER PLANT-DERIVED MOLLUSCICIDES ON REPRODUCTION AND SURVIVAL OF THE SNAIL Lymnaea acuminata

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ram P.; Singh, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The effect of sub-lethal doses (40% and 80% of LC50/24h) of plant derived molluscicides of singly, binary (1:1) and tertiary (1:1:1) combinations of the Rutin, Ellagic acid, Betulin and taraxerol with J. gossypifolia latex, leaf and stem bark powder extracts and their active component on the reproduction of freshwater snail Lymnaea acuminata have been studied. It was observed that the J. gossypifolia latex, stem bark, individual leaf and their combinations with other plant derived active molluscicidal components caused a significant reduction in fecundity, hatchability and survival of young snails. It is believed that sub-lethal exposure of these molluscicides on snail reproduction is a complex process involving more than one factor in reducing the reproductive capacity. PMID:25229223

  17. Behavioural responses of the snail Lymnaea acuminata to carbohydrates in snail-attractant pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Farindra; Singh, D. K.

    Snail control is one of the most important tools in the campaign to reduce the incidence of fascioliasis. In order to attain this objective, the method of bait formulation in order to contain an attractant and a molluscicide is an expedient approach to lure the target snail population to the molluscicide. This study identifies certain carbohydrates, namely sucrose, maltose, glucose, fructose and starch, for preparing such baits. These were tested on Lymnaea acuminata, an intermediate host of the digenean trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. The behavioural responses of snails to these carbohydrates were examined. Significant variations in behavioural responses were observed in the snail even when the five carbohydrates were used in low concentrations in snail-attractant pellets. Starch emerged as the strongest attractant for Lymnaea acuminata, followed by maltose.

  18. Is reproduction of the snail Physella acuta affected by endocrine disrupting compounds? An in situ bioassay in three Iberian basins.

    PubMed

    De Castro-Catalŕ, N; López-Doval, J; Gorga, M; Petrovic, M; Muńoz, I

    2013-12-15

    An in situ bioassay was conducted in three Iberian basins (Ebro, Llobregat and Júcar Rivers) to study the reproductive effects on the freshwater snail Physella acuta. Adult individuals were transplanted in specially designed cylindrical cages. Endpoints included mortality, number of eggs and clutches, number of eggs per clutch and embryo development after 8 days. The results were contrasted with laboratory controls. Significant changes in P. acuta reproduction parameters were detected in all of the rivers: the number of clutches or eggs per snail decreased in the Ebro and Llobregat basins downstream but the number of eggs per clutch increased. The complete development of snails was delayed at some sites downstream in the Júcar and the Ebro basins. The results were contrasted with concentrations of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) and their Estrogenic Equivalent Quotients (EEQs). Positive relationships (Pearson correlations) were identified between the number of eggs per clutch and the total EDC concentration, bisphenol A (BPA) and their EEQs, lipid regulators and diuretics. These endocrine-disrupting chemicals may constitute a toxicological risk for the reproductive performance of snails in the studied basins. PMID:23972665

  19. Introduction, distribution, spread, and impacts of exotic freshwater gastropods in Texas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Y. Karatayev; Lyubov E. Burlakova; Vadim A. Karatayev; Dianna K. Padilla

    2009-01-01

    We examined the patterns of distribution, vectors of introduction, and potential ecological impacts of freshwater exotic species\\u000a in Texas over the last 45 years. Currently, five species of exotic gastropods are established: channeled-type applesnail (Pomacea insularum), red-rim melania (Melanoides tuberculatus), quilted melania (Tarebia granifera), giant rams-horn snail (Marisa cornuarietis), and Chinese mysterysnail (Cipangopaludina\\u000a chinensis). In contrast to the northern part of

  20. Relationships between nutrient enrichment, pleurocerid snail density and trematode infection rate in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciparis, Serena; Iwanowicz, Deborah D.; Voshell, J. Reese, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Summary 1. Nutrient enrichment is a widespread environmental problem in freshwater ecosystems. Eutrophic conditions caused by nutrient enrichment may result in a higher prevalence of infection by trematode parasites in host populations, due to greater resource availability for the molluscan first intermediate hosts. 2. This study examined relationships among land use, environmental variables indicating eutrophication, population density of the pleurocerid snail, Leptoxis carinata, and trematode infections. Fifteen study sites were located in streams within the Shenandoah River catchment (Virginia, U.S.A.), where widespread nutrient enrichment has occurred. 3. Snail population density had a weak positive relationship with stream water nutrient concentration. Snail population density also increased as human activities within stream catchments increased, but density did not continue to increase in catchments where anthropogenic disturbance was greatest. 4. Cercariae from five families of trematodes were identified in L. carinata, and infection rate was generally low (<10%). Neither total infection rate nor the infection rate of individual trematode types showed a positive relationship with snail population density, nutrients or land use. 5. There were statistically significant but weak relationships between the prevalence of infection by two trematode families and physical and biological variables. The prevalence of Notocotylidae was positively related to water depth, which may be related to habitat use by definitive hosts. Prevalence of Opecoelidae had a negative relationship with orthophosphate concentration and a polynomial relationship with chlorophyll a concentration. Transmission of Opecoelid trematodes between hosts may be inhibited by eutrophic conditions. 6. Leptoxis carinata appears to be a useful species for monitoring the biological effects of eutrophication and investigating trematode transmission dynamics in lotic systems.

  1. Structure of two FREP genes that combine IgSF and fibrinogen domains, with comments on diversity of the FREP gene family in the snail Biomphalaria glabrata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pascale M Léonard; Coen M Adema; Si-Ming Zhang; Eric S Loker

    2001-01-01

    Upon exposure to infection with digenetic trematodes such as Echinostomaparaensei, the freshwater snail Biomphalariaglabrata produces increased quantities of hemolymph lectins, some of which are unique polypeptides containing both immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) and fibrinogen domains. These unusual lectins have been termed fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs), and recognize and precipitate digenean antigens. We here report 11 distinct FREP-encoding sequences from B.glabrata, and provide

  2. Snail–periphyton interactions in a prairie lacustrine wetland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Hann; C. J. Mundy; L. G. Goldsborough

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the effects of nutrients and macrophytes on snail grazers and periphyton in a prairie wetland food web. Snails (Gyraulus circumstriatus) and periphyton in large enclosures in a lacustrine wetland, Delta Marsh, MB, Canada were subjected to two experimental treatments, nutrient addition (nitrogen, phosphorus) and macrophyte exclusion (using a porous geotextile carpet) during July and August. Snail biomass

  3. Snail-periphyton interactions in a prairie lacustrine wetland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Hann; C. J. Mundy; L. G. Goldsborough

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the effects of nutrients and macrophytes on snail grazers and periphyton in a prairie wetland food web. Snails (Gyraulus circumstriatus) and periphyton in large enclosures in a lacustrine wetland, Delta Marsh, MB, Canada were subjected to two experimental treatments, nutrient addition (nitrogen, phosphorus) and macrophyte exclusion (using a porous geotextile carpet) during July and August. Snail biomass

  4. Snail populations in arctic lakes: competition mediated by predation?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne E. Hershey

    1990-01-01

    For 2 species of snails in arctic Alaskan lakes, I studied the patterns of snail distribution with respect to habitat, distribution of predatory fish, and the potential for interspecific competition. The snails Lymnaea elodes and Valvata lewisi co-exist in these arctic lakes, either in the presence of lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, or in the absence of predation. Intensive sediment core

  5. Images of Minute Minnesota Land Snails Matt Barthel

    E-print Network

    Nekola, Jeffrey C.

    Images of Minute Minnesota Land Snails Matt Barthel January 2000 This disk contains diagnostic images representative of minute land snail taxa from Minnesota. The snails imaged are from throughout at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay (UWGB). The shells imaged were assigned to species (or subspecies) based

  6. Decreased trophic position as a function of increasing body size of a benthic omnivorous fish from the largest freshwater lake in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuyu Wang; Xiubo Yu; Jun Xu

    2011-01-01

    Potential body size-trophic position relationships of the Darkbarbel catfish Pelteobagrus vachelli (Richardson 1846) were examined using stable isotope analysis. Pelteobagrus vachelli is a benthic feeding fish from Lake Poyang, the largest freshwater lake in China. Two-source mixing model with mussel (Corbicula fluminea) and snail (Bellamya aeruginosa) as baseline primary consumers of planktonic and benthic food webs, respectively, was used to

  7. Mineral contents of tissues and body fluids and heavy metal contaminants of four predominant snail species in the Niger Delta

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. D. Mepba; C. U. Ogunka-Nnoka

    Mineral contents and heavy metal contaminants of four predominant snail species in the Niger Delta: African giant land snail (Archachatina marginata), African land snail (Achatina fulica), water snail (Pila ovata) and garden snail (Limicolaria aurora) were evaluated. Snail tissues and body fluids were harvested having cracked the tail-end of the shell. Triplicate samples of macerated snail tissues and body fluids

  8. Induced chemical defenses in a freshwater macrophyte suppress herbivore fitness and the growth of associated microbes.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Wendy E; Hay, Mark E

    2011-02-01

    The freshwater macrophyte Cabomba caroliniana induces a chemical defense when attacked by either the crayfish Procambrus clarkii or the snail Pomacea canaliculata. Induction by either consumer lowers the palatability of the plant to both consumers. When offered food ad libitum, snails feeding on non-induced C. caroliniana grew 2.6-2.7 times more than those feeding on induced C. caroliniana. Because snails fed less on induced plants, this could be a behavioral effect (reduced feeding), a physiological effect of the induced metabolites on the consumer, or both. To assess these possibilities, we made artificial diets with lipid extracts of induced versus non-induced C. caroliniana and restricted control snails to consuming only as much as treatment snails consumed. Growth measured as shell diameter was significantly lower on the diet containing extract from induced, as opposed to non-induced, plants; change in snail mass was more variable and showed a similar, but non-significant, trend. Thus, snails may reduce feeding on induced plants to avoid suppression of fitness. The induced defenses also suppressed growth of co-occurring microbes that might attack the plant through herbivore-generated feeding scars. When two bacteria and three fungi isolated from C. caroliniana surfaces were cultured with the lipid extract from induced and non-induced C. caroliniana, both extracts inhibited the microbes, but the induced extract was more potent against three of the five potential pathogens. Thus, induced plant defenses can act against both direct consumers and microbes that might invade the plant indirectly through herbivore-generated wounds. PMID:20927537

  9. Production and Characterization of Ehrlichia risticii, the Agent of Potomac Horse Fever, from Snails (Pleuroceridae: Juga spp.) in Aquarium Culture and Genetic Comparison to Equine Strains

    PubMed Central

    Reubel, Gerhard H.; Barlough, Jeffrey E.; Madigan, John E.

    1998-01-01

    We report on the production and characterization of Ehrlichia risticii, the agent of Potomac horse fever (PHF), from snails (Pleuroceridae: Juga spp.) maintained in aquarium culture and compare it genetically to equine strains. Snails were collected from stream waters on a pasture in Siskiyou County, Calif., where PHF is enzootic and were maintained for several weeks in freshwater aquaria in the laboratory. Upon exposure to temperatures above 22°C the snails released trematode cercariae tentatively identified as virgulate cercariae. Fragments of three different genes (genes for 16S rRNA, the groESL heat shock operon, and the 51-kDa major antigen) were amplified from cercaria lysates by PCR and sequenced. Genetic information was also obtained from E. risticii strains from horses with PHF. The PCR positivity of snail secretions was associated with the presence of trematode cercariae. Sequence analysis of the three genes indicated that the source organism closely resembled E. risticii, and the sequences of all three genes were virtually identical to those of the genes of an equine E. risticii strain from a property near the snail collection site. Phylogenetic analyses of the three genes indicated the presence of geographical E. risticii strain clusters. PMID:9620368

  10. Epigenetic Regulation of EMT: The Snail Story

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yiwei; Dong, Chenfang; Zhou, Binhua P.

    2014-01-01

    While the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a fundamental role during development, its deregulation can adversely promote tumor metastasis. The phenotypic and cellular plasticity of EMT indicates that it is subject to epigenetic regulation. In this review, we try to embrace recent findings on the mechanisms of the transcription factor Snail-mediated E-cadherin silencing, which is a hallmark of EMT. Our studies as well as those of others have clearly demonstrated that Snail can recruit multiple chromatin enzymes including LSD1, HDAC1/2, PRC2, G9a and Suv39H1 to the E-cadherin promoter. These enzymes function in a highly orchestrated fashion to generate heterochromatin and promote DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)-mediated DNA methylation at the promoter region. Disruption of the connection between Snail and these chromatin-modifying enzymes may represent an efficient strategy for the treatment of EMT-related diseases. PMID:23888971

  11. Seasonal changes in the biochemical composition of the chiton Chiton iatricus (Polyplacophora: Mollusca) and the marine pulmonate Onchidium verruculatum (Gastropoda: Mollusca) in relation to their reproductive cycles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. D. Deshpande; R. Nagabhushanam

    1983-01-01

    Seasonal changes in the biochemical composition of two molluses, gonochoric Chiton iatricus and a marine pulmonate, Ochnidium verruculatum inhabiting the same tropical area, but having different modes of reproduction, were studied. Protein is the major biochemical component stored in C. iatricus, whereas lipid is predominantly stored in O. verruculatum. The correlation between these quantifications and the annual reproductive cycles of

  12. Aquatic Snails, Passive Hosts of Mycobacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Marsollier, Laurent; Sévérin, Tchibozo; Aubry, Jacques; Merritt, Richard W.; Saint André, Jean-Paul; Legras, Pierre; Manceau, Anne-Lise; Chauty, Annick; Carbonnelle, Bernard; Cole, Stewart T.

    2004-01-01

    Accumulative indirect evidence of the epidemiology of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections causing chronic skin ulcers (i.e., Buruli ulcer disease) suggests that the development of this pathogen and its transmission to humans are related predominantly to aquatic environments. We report that snails could transitorily harbor M. ulcerans without offering favorable conditions for its growth and replication. A novel intermediate link in the transmission chain of M. ulcerans becomes likely with predator aquatic insects in addition to phytophage insects. Water bugs, such as Naucoris cimicoides, a potential vector of M. ulcerans, were shown to be infected specifically by this bacterium after feeding on snails experimentally exposed to M. ulcerans. PMID:15466578

  13. Cued in: advances and opportunities in freshwater chemical ecology.

    PubMed

    Burks, Romi L; Lodge, David M

    2002-10-01

    We focus this mini-review on how naturally occurring chemical cues mediate ecological interactions, especially interspecific competition and predation in freshwater communities. Although freshwater chemical ecology lags behind terrestrial and marine chemical ecology, we identify recent progress toward: (1) identifying the chemical composition of cues important in food web interactions, e.g., specific glucosinolates, benzyl succinoates, and lignoids as deterrents to herbivory on freshwater macrophytes; (2) employing a nonreductionist approach that tests for emergent responses to suites of multiple chemical cues, e.g., trade-offs in snail refuge-seeking behavior in the presence of chemical cues from both fish and crayfish; (3) investigating how abiotic forces, such as hydrodynamics, impact chemical communication across a broad spatial and temporal scale, e.g., drift responses of mayfly nymphs to whole-stream additions of trout cue; and (4) quantifying the importance of genetic variability, e.g., how chemical cues change selective pressures of local environments. The questions of interest in freshwater chemical ecology cross taxonomic boundaries; traverse broad spatial and temporal scales; demonstrate nonlinear, unpredictable results; and necessitate a multidisciplinary approach for adequate understanding. PMID:12474890

  14. DISPERSAL IN FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David T. Bilton; Joanna R. Freeland; Beth Okamura

    2001-01-01

    ? Abstract Movement between discrete habitat patches can present significant challenges to organisms. Freshwater invertebrates achieve dispersal using a variety of mechanisms that can be broadly categorized as active or passive, and which have important consequences for processes of colonization, gene flow, and evolutionary divergence. Apart from flight in adult freshwater insects, active dispersal appears rela- tively uncommon. Passive dispersal

  15. Conserving Madagascar's Freshwater Biodiversity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    JONATHAN P. BENSTEAD, PATRICK H. DE RHAM, JEAN-LUC GATTOLLIAT, FRANĂ?OIS-MARIE GIBON, PAUL V. LOISELLE, MICHEL SARTORI, JOHN S. SPARKS, and MELANIE L. J. STIASSNY (; )

    2003-11-01

    This peer-reviewed article from BioScience is about conserving freshwater diversity in Madagascar. The island nation of Madagascar, an international conservation priority, is now also recognized as a global hotspot for freshwater biodiversity. Three emerging characteristics of Madagascar's threatened freshwater biota deserve increased attention from the scientific and conservation communities. First, species richness is not low, as was once assumed for both the freshwater fishes and the invertebrates. Second, many species are restricted to a specific region or even to single river basins. Often these species are also limited to streams or rivers draining primary forest habitat. Finally, many of the island's freshwater fishes are basal taxa, having diverged earlier than any other extant members of their clade. As such, these taxa assume disproportional phylogenetic importance. In the face of ongoing environmental threats, links among microendemism, forest stream specialization, and basal phylogenetic position highlight the importance and vulnerability of these species and provide a powerful incentive for immediate conservation action.

  16. The Identification of Markers Segregating with Resistance to Schistosoma mansoni Infection in the Snail Biomphalaria glabrata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matty Knight; Andre N. Miller; Carolyn N. Patterson; Christopher G. Rowe; George Michaels; Daniel Carr; Charles S. Richards; Fred A. Lewis

    1999-01-01

    Both snail and parasite genes determine the susceptibility of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata to infection with the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. To identify molecular markers associated with resistance to the parasite in the snail host, we performed genetic crosses between parasite-resistant and -susceptible isogenic snails. Because resistance to infection in adult snails is controlled by a single locus, DNA samples from

  17. What happens when snails get sick?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS; )

    2004-07-09

    Scientists used to think that the two major groups of animals, vertebrates and invertebrates, protected themselves from getting sick in very different ways. A new study in snails suggests that both groups' immune systems might be slightly more similar than previously thought.

  18. Population Control in Snails by Natural Inhibitors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. G. Levy; M. Tunis; H. Isseroff

    1973-01-01

    IN many areas of the world diseases such as schistosomiasis caused by trematodes, still cause misery to millions of people and much damage to livestock. Because a specific mollusc, often a snail, is necessary for the completion of the trematode life cycle, the elimination of that host would eradicate the disease. According to Southgate1 none of the molluscicides currently available

  19. Biological invasions: the case of planorbid snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Pointier; P. David; P. Jarne

    2005-01-01

    A large number of planorbid snails are now commonly transported by man mainly through the aquatic plant trade. However, only a restricted number of species establish viable populations in a new habitat and a more restricted number spread. Only five planorbid species can be ranked in this last category and can be considered as pests because of their role in

  20. Transboundary Freshwater Dispute Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collection of databases is intended to aid in the assessment of the process of water conflict prevention and resolution. The searchable collections include data such as case studies, freshwater treaties from 1820 to 2001, events concerning historical water relations from 1948 to 1999, a register of international river basins, and information on interstate water compacts in the United States. There is also spatial data on transboundary freshwater indicator variables, international river basins, and a map and image gallery. Other materials include links to the organization's publications and research projects, and a set of links to other databases and publications on freshwater conflict issues.

  1. Effects of Stream Chemistry on the Distribution, Growth, and Diatom Colonization of the Freshwater Limpet, Ferrissia rivularis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. T. Keating; R. S. Prezant

    1998-01-01

    The freshwater limpet, Ferrisla rivularis, was found in several watersheds in south-central and south-western Pennsylvania. Shell size was not significantly correlated with stream pH, calcium, iron, or manganese concentrations. Limpets tolerated stream iron concentrations up to 0.36 mg\\/l and manganese concentrations up to 0.25 mg\\/l. The shells of these snails were quickly and heavily colonized by adherent or embedded diatoms,

  2. Seasonal variation in the content of free reducing sugars in body fluids of freshwater mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. Karanova

    2006-01-01

    Accumulation of certain mono-and disaccharides in body fluids of ectotherms in autumn and winter suggests their protective\\u000a role in adaptation to near-zero temperatures. In this context, the effect of seasonal temperature variation on the content\\u000a of free reducing sugars was studied in freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. The summer and autumn carbohydrate spectrum essentially featured high concentrations of fructose and glucose.

  3. Nitrate impacts on the Florida apple snail, Pomacea paludosa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norah Myers Corrao; Philip C. Darby; Christopher M. Pomory

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate pollution in springs in Florida has been suggested as a possible reason for declining populations of the Florida apple\\u000a snail, Pomacea paludosa (Say). No correlation was found between snail density and nitrate concentration measured in six Florida springs. In laboratory\\u000a studies examining short-term acute impacts of nitrate, adult and juvenile snail 96 h LC50 values could not be determined due

  4. Genotoxicity of platinum in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and ramshorn snail (Marisa cornuarietis).

    PubMed

    Osterauer, Raphaela; Fassbender, Christopher; Braunbeck, Thomas; Köhler, Heinz-R

    2011-05-01

    The metal platinum is inter alia used for industrial and medical purposes. Due to its application in automobile catalytic converters and as an anti-cancer drug, Pt enters the aquatic environment via road runoff and hospital sewage and raises concerns about its environmental impact and toxicity to organisms. Therefore, the genotoxicity of Pt at 0, 0.1, 1, 10, 50, 100 and 200?g/l PtCl(2) was tested on two freshwater organisms, zebrafish (Danio rerio) and ramshorn snail (Marisa cornuarietis) using the single cell gel electrophoresis, also called comet assay. PtCl(2) did not show any genotoxicity for D. rerio at the tested concentrations, whereas significantly elevated DNA damage was observed in M. cornuarietis at 1?g/l PtCl(2) and beyond. The results of the study suggest a high sensitivity of M. cornuarietis concerning the genotoxic impact of PtCl(2). PMID:21420724

  5. Fascioliasis of livestock and snail host for Fasciola in the Altiplano Region of Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Ueno, H; Arandia, R; Morales, G; Medina, G

    1975-01-01

    Fascioliasis caused by Fasciola hepatica was a serious problem for sheep and alpacas in the Altiplano Region of Bolivia. In some provinces close to Lake Titicaca, the raising of sheep was forced to discontinue, because infection with the fluke made it unprofitable and almost impossible. It was proved that in the Altiplano Region, two species of freshwater snails, Lymnaea viatrix and L. cubensis var., served as intermediate hosts for F. hepatica. In some subtropical areas of Bolivia, these snails could not be found, although other Lymnaea sp. was widely distributed there. As it is possible for Lymnaea sp. to be intermediate host for the fluke, further studies are required on the identification. Acute fascioliasis of sheep occurred in the Altiplano Region principally during a period from May to July, or the dry season. In some areas, the mortality rate of infected sheep was roughly estimated as 15 to 25% annually. Contamination with Fasciola metacercariae of herbage and semi-aquatic plants grown in a swamp in one of these areas was biologically assessed, using guinea pigs. Plants of Compositae and Eleocharis sp. were contaminated most intensely and those of Senicio sp. and Vallisneria sp. carried a fairly large number of cysts, while plants of Scirpus sp. and Ranunclaceae carried only a few cysts. No signs of Fasciola infection were observed in any animal given the plants of Liliaceae. PMID:1182037

  6. Isolation and evaluation of dextral-specific and dextral-enriched cDNA clones as candidates for the handedness-determining gene in a freshwater gastropod, Lymnaea stagnalis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshito Harada; Yuji Hosoiri; Reiko Kuroda

    2004-01-01

    The handedness of gastropods is genetically determined. The freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis is a normally dextral species, but contains minor sinistral populations. The gene responsible for handedness determination in this species is predicted to function maternally and specifically in the dextral-ovipositing snail. In this study, we used differential screening and cDNA subtraction to isolate eight “dextral genes” that are specific

  7. Embryogenesis and the effects of temperature on embryonic development, juvenile growth rates, and the onset of oviposition in the fresh-water pulmonate gastropod Physella cubensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DONALD L. THOMAS; JAMES B. McCLINTOCK

    1990-01-01

    Embryonic development in Physella cubensis is similar to that in other members of Physella, although trochophore or veliger-like embryonic stages previously noted in P. gyrina were lacking. Egg masses of adults collected from Shades Creek, Birmingham, Alabama were subjected to three temperature treatments (10, 20 and 30°C) within the normal range of temperatures experienced in the field, and developmental stages

  8. Variation of snail's abundance in two water bodies harboring strains of Pseudosuccinea columella resistant and susceptible to Fasciola hepatica miracidial infection, in Pinar del Río Province, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alfredo; Hernandez, Dagmar F; Sánchez, Jorge

    2005-11-01

    The abundance of freshwater snails in two rural sites of Pinar del Río, Cuba, which harbor Pseudosuccinea columella susceptible and resistant to miracidia of Fasciola hepatica was followed for one year. Susceptible snails were found in the most anthropic site (IPA) whereas the resistant population inhabited the most preserved one (El Azufre). Only two snail species coexisted with P. columella at IPA site (Physa cubensis and Tarebia granifera) while five species were found at El Azufre, including an endemic from that province (Hemisinus cubanianus). Populations of both resistant and susceptible snails showed stable densities throughout the year, although the susceptible strain attained higher abundance. The highest densities were observed in April-May 2004 for the susceptible population whereas the resistant strain attained its highest abundance in January 2004. No record of Fossaria cubensis was made and the thiarid T. granifera occurred only at low densities. One of the sampled sites (IPA) meets all the conditions for the first report of P. columella naturally infected with larvae of F. hepatica. PMID:16410958

  9. Effects of endocrine disruptors on prosobranch snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda) in the laboratory. Part II: Triphenyltin as a xeno-androgen.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Oehlmann, U; Tillmann, M; Markert, B; Oehlmann, J; Watermann, B; Scherf, S

    2000-12-01

    In laboratory experiments the effects of suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals on freshwater and marine prosobranch species were analysed. In this second of three publications the responses of the freshwater ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis and of two marine prosobranchs (the dogwhelk Nucella lapillus and the netted whelk Hinia reticulata) to the xeno-androgenic model compound triphenyltin (TPT) are presented. Marisa and Nucella were exposed via water (nominal concentrations 5-500 ng TPT-Sn/L) and Hinia via sediments (nominal concentrations 50-500 micrograms TPT-Sn/kg dry wt.) for up to 4 months. Female ramshorn snails but not the two marine species developed imposex in a time and concentration dependent manner (EC10 4 months: 12.3 ng TPT-Sn/L) with a comparable intensity as described for tributyltin. TPT reduced furthermore the fecundity of Marisa at lower concentrations (EC10 4 months: 5.59 ng TPT-Sn/L) with a complete inhibition of spawning at nominal concentrations > or = 250 ng TPT-Sn/L (mean measured +/- SD: > or = 163 +/- 97.0 ng TPT-Sn/L). The extension of the pallial sex organs (penis with accessory structures and prostate gland) of male ramshorn snails and dogwhelks were reduced by up to 25% compared to the control but not in netted whelks. Histopathological analyses for M. cornuarietis and H. reticulata provide evidence for a marked impairment of spermatogenesis (both species) and oogenesis (only netted whelks). The test compound induced a highly significant and concentration independent increase in the incidence of hyperplasia on gills, osphradia and other organs in the mantle cavity of N. lapillus indicating a carcinogenic potential of TPT. The results show that prosobranchs are sensitive to endocrine disruption at environmentally relevant concentrations of TPT. Also, M. cornuarietis is a promising candidate for a future organismic invertebrate system to identify endocrine-mimetic test compounds. PMID:11214444

  10. Acute toxic effects of two lampricides on twenty-one freshwater invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, Robert P., Jr.; King, Everett Louis, Jr.

    1976-01-01

    We conducted laboratory static bioassays to determine acute toxicity of two lampricides -- a 70% 2-aminoethanol salt of 5,2'dichloro-4'-nitrosalicylanilide (Bayer 73) and a mixture containing 98% 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2% Bayer 73 (TFM-2B) -- to 21 freshwater invertebrates. LC50 values were determined for 24-h exposure periods at 12.8 C. Organisms relatively sensitive to Bayer 73 were a turbellarian (Dugesia tigrina), aquatic earthworms (Tubifex tubifex and Lumbriculus inconstans), snails (Physa sp.) and (Pleurocera sp.), a clam (Eliptio dilatatus), blackflies (Simulium sp.), leeches (Erpobdellidae), and a daphnid (Daphnia pulex). The invertebrates most sensitive to TFM-2B were turbellarians, aquatic earthworms (Tubifex), snails (Physa), blackflies, leeches, and burrowing mayflies (Hexagenia sp.). Bayer 73 was generally much more toxic to the test organisms than TFM-2B. At lampricidal concentrations, TFM-2B was more highly selective than Bayer 73 against larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus).

  11. Implications of water hardness in ecotoxicological assessments for water quality regulatory purposes: a case study with the aquatic snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818).

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Filho, E C; Caixeta, N R; Simplício, N C S; Sousa, S R; Aragăo, T P; Muniz, D H F

    2014-02-01

    Water hardness is a property depending on the presence of alkaline earth metals, mainly calcium and magnesium. Among the strategies for water quality monitoring, ecotoxicological assays are performed to minimize impacts and classify water bodies. For these laboratory evaluations parameters are previously defined in the guidelines, including water hardness for both cultivation and testing medium. The present work was performed to evaluate the effects of different levels of water hardness on the survival and reproduction of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata and discuss the influence of natural water hardness on the results of ecotoxicological tests with these environmental samples. Comparing the groups it was possible to observe that those maintained in waters with least hardness had lower reproductive success, while the groups maintained in highest hardness showed better reproduction. These data show that waters with low hardness make the reproduction of the snail B. glabrata unfeasible, and this reveal a problem for ecotoxicity assays using natural water samples. PMID:25055099

  12. Pest Control: Caffeine as a repellent for slugs and snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert G. Hollingsworth; John W. Armstrong; Earl Campbell

    2002-01-01

    Most commercial products for snail and slug control contain either metaldehyde or methiocarb as the active ingredient, the residues of which are not permitted in food crops in the United States. We have discovered that solutions of caffeine are effective in killing or repelling slugs and snails when applied to foliage or the growing medium of plants. Because caffeine is

  13. Carthusian snail Monacha cartusiana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-print Network

    Carthusian snail Monacha cartusiana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets as a prohibited mollusk species by Michigan's plant protection regulations (MDA 2009). Plant hosts A wide variety plants. In addition, invasive snails can potentially transmit plant and animal pathogens and displace

  14. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Venomous Cone Snail Conus consors

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Age; Kurz, Alexander; Stockwell, Tim; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Heidler, Juliana; Wittig, Ilka; Kauferstein, Silke; Mebs, Dietrich; Stöcklin, Reto; Remm, Maido

    2012-01-01

    Cone snails are venomous predatory marine neogastropods that belong to the species-rich superfamily of the Conoidea. So far, the mitochondrial genomes of two cone snail species (Conus textile and Conus borgesi) have been described, and these feed on snails and worms, respectively. Here, we report the mitochondrial genome sequence of the fish-hunting cone snail Conus consors and describe a novel putative control region (CR) which seems to be absent in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of other cone snail species. This possible CR spans about 700 base pairs (bp) and is located between the genes encoding the transfer RNA for phenylalanine (tRNA-Phe, trnF) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). The novel putative CR contains several sequence motifs that suggest a role in mitochondrial replication and transcription. PMID:23236512

  15. Rare and endangered species: freshwater gastropods of southern New England

    SciTech Connect

    Jokinen, E.H.; Pondick, J.

    1981-01-01

    The rare and endangered species of freshwater gastropods of southern New England are reported on based upon data collected over the past four years. Field sampling was concentrated in Connecticut but included parts of southern Massachusetts east to Cape Code (69 55 W to 73 45'W, 40 00'N). Water chemistry data were collected along with the snails. Collection methods and water analysis techniques have been described elsewhere by Jokinen (The Nautilus 92:156-160, 1978). Voucher specimens have been placed in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, The Florida State Museum, and the Museum of Zoology, the University of Michigan. Acid rain poses a threat to poorly buffered habitats. 6 references, 1 table.

  16. Paramphistomum daubneyi : the development of redial generations in the snail Lymnaea truncatula

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Abrous; D. Rondelaud; G. Dreyfuss

    1996-01-01

    Rediae of Paramphistomum daubneyi were counted and measured in Lymnaea truncatula to elucidate the variability in the numbers of free rediae and cercariae occurring between naturally infected snails and experimental single-miracidium infections. Experiments were performed using one miracidium per snail and snail raising was carried out at 20°C. Two redial generations succeeded each other in the snail until day 49.

  17. A SNAIL'S SPACE SETS A SNAIL'S PACE: MOVEMENT RATES OF LAVIGERIA GASTROPODS IN LAKE TANGANYIKA, EAST AFRICA

    E-print Network

    McIntyre, Peter

    A SNAIL'S SPACE SETS A SNAIL'S PACE: MOVEMENT RATES OF LAVIGERIA GASTROPODS IN LAKE TANGANYIKA gastropods are diverse and common in the benthos of Lake Tanganyika. We used in situ studies of marked of three closely related species of gastropods in Lake Tanganyika. In addition to potential interspecific

  18. Toxicity of Common Aquaculture Disinfectants to New Zealand Mud Snails and Mud Snail Toxicants to Rainbow Trout Eggs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall W. Oplinger; Eric J. Wagner

    2009-01-01

    The New Zealand mud snail (NZMS) Potamopyrgus antipodarum is an invasive species that threatens North American fish populations. Establishment of NZMS in fish hatcheries is a concern because fish stocking practices could expedite the spread of the species. We evaluated the potential use of chemicals to remove snails that are inadvertently collected during egg take operations involving wild broodstock from

  19. Morphological and Genetic Variation Between the Japanese Populations of the Amphidromous Snail Stenomelania crenulata (Cerithioidea: Thiaridae).

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Hiroka; Kano, Yasunori

    2014-09-01

    Freshwater gastropods often have limited dispersal capability and small geographic ranges, and face severe threats from habitat loss and degradation. However, in addition to the scarcity of knowledge on their life history traits, species taxonomy has not been adequately resolved and boundaries between intra- and interspecific variation remain unclear for many taxa. One such example of an indeterminate species boundary with implications for conservation issues is the relationship between the thiarid snails Stenomelania crenulata in Okinawa and southwards (ranked as CR+EN in the 2012 Japanese Red List) and S. rufescens in mainland Japan (VU). The results of our multi-disciplinary investigation into variation in the shell morphology and mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (ITS-1) gene sequences suggest that S. rufescens represents a geographic variant and a junior synonym of S. crenulata. The widespread geographic range of S. crenulata, spanning a few thousand kilometers north to south, is possible due to an amphidromous life cycle that involves a marine planktotrophic larval phase and upstream migration after settlement in estuaries. Nevertheless, there is recognizable morphological and genetic differentiation between distant populations, probably reflecting a relatively short pelagic duration and possibly also infrequent transoceanic dispersal; metamorphic competence is achieved in two weeks in full seawater and even more rapidly in brackish water. The Okinawan population, with only a few known localities, therefore deserves the high conservation priority; conservation efforts need to involve the proper maintenance of migration pathways including all marine, brackish and freshwater environments. PMID:25186931

  20. Relationship between Snail Population Density and Infection Status of Snails and Fish with Zoonotic Trematodes in Vietnamese Carp Nurseries

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Jesper Hedegaard; Madsen, Henry; Murrell, K. Darwin; Phan Thi, Van; Nguyen Manh, Hung; Viet, Khue Nguyen; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Background Fish-borne zoonotic trematodes (FZT) are a food safety and health concern in Vietnam. Humans and other final hosts acquire these parasites from eating raw or under-cooked fish with FZT metacercariae. Fish raised in ponds are exposed to cercariae shed by snail hosts that are common in fish farm ponds. Previous risk assessment on FZT transmission in the Red River Delta of Vietnam identified carp nursery ponds as major sites of transmission. In this study, we analyzed the association between snail population density and heterophyid trematode infection in snails with the rate of FZT transmission to juvenile fish raised in carp nurseries. Methodology/Principal Findings Snail population density and prevalence of trematode (Heterophyidae) infections were determined in 48 carp nurseries producing Rohu juveniles, (Labeo rohita) in the Red River Delta area. Fish samples were examined at 3, 6 and 9 weeks after the juvenile fish were introduced into the ponds. There was a significant positive correlation between prevalence of FZT metacercariae in juvenile fish and density of infected snails. Thus, the odds of infection in juvenile fish were 4.36 and 11.32 times higher for ponds with medium and high density of snails, respectively, compared to ponds where no infected snails were found. Further, the intensity of fish FZT infections increased with the density of infected snails. Interestingly, however, some ponds with no or few infected snails were collected also had high prevalence and intensity of FZT in juvenile fish. This may be due to immigration of cercariae into the pond from external water sources. Conclusions/Significance The total number and density of potential host snails and density of host snails infected with heterophyid trematodes in the aquaculture pond is a useful predictor for infections in juvenile fish, although infection levels in juvenile fish can occur despite low density or absence infected snails. This suggests that intervention programs to control FZT infection of fish should include not only intra-pond snail control, but also include water sources of allochthonous cercariae, i.e. canals supplying water to ponds as well as snail habitats outside the pond such as rice fields and surrounding ponds. PMID:23285303

  1. Loons in freshwater lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith W. McIntyre

    1994-01-01

    Loons (Gaviidae) divide their annual cycle between salt and freshwater habitat, the latter being the site of breeding activites. Territorial requirements include sufficient size to permit runs of more than 100 m for take-off and landings; food for chicks and water clarity sufficient to permit foraging for it at depths generally = 5 m; protected nest sites, preferably islands; and

  2. Topographic organization of serotonergic and dopaminergic neurons in the cerebral ganglia and their peripheral projection patterns in the head areas of the snail Helix pomatia.

    PubMed

    Hernádi, L; Elekes, K

    1999-08-23

    The distribution of monoaminergic neurons within the cerebral ganglia was investigated in the pulmonate snail Helix pomatia. Simultaneous serotonin and tyrosine hydroxylase double immunostaining revealed that the immunoreactive cell groups are concentrated in a putative monoaminergic center on the ventral surface of the cerebral ganglia. Simultaneous cobalt (Co)- and nickel (Ni)-lysine backfills of cerebral nerves were combined with 5, 6-dihydroxytryptamine pigment-labelling of serotonergic neurons, or with fluorescence immunocytochemistry of dopaminergic neurons. This showed that the serotonergic and dopaminergic cell groups can be divided into smaller subgroups on the basis of their axonal projections into different cerebral nerves. These subgroups show a topographic organization within the serotonergic and dopaminergic neuronal clusters. In the serotonergic system, the different regions of the head are represented in a rostrocaudal direction, whereas a caudorostral organization is characteristic for the dopaminergic system. No serotonin- or dopamine-immunoreative cell bodies but numerous fibers were observed in the head areas, indicating that these are innervated by cerebral monoaminergic neurons and show different innervation patterns. Serotonin-immunoreactive fibers mostly innervate muscle fibers, whereas dopamine-immunoreactive processes do not innervate effector cells, but terminate within the nerve branches of the head areas. On the basis of their innervation pattern, we suggest that dopaminergic neurons may take part in en route modulation of sensory afferent and efferent processes in an as yet unknown manner. The serotonergic neurons, on the other hand, may play a direct role in the modulation of muscle function. PMID:10404253

  3. Representation of an immune responsive gene family encoding fibrinogen-related proteins in the freshwater mollusc Biomphalaria glabrata, an intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Si-Ming Zhang; Eric S. Loker

    2004-01-01

    Fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) are found in the hemolymph of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata, are up-regulated following exposure to digenetic trematode parasites, and bind to trematode larval surfaces, suggestive of a role in internal defense. Southern blot and degenerate-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses were undertaken to better understand the diversity of the FREP-encoding gene family. Probes corresponding to the N-terminal

  4. Protein C, Protein S Eksikli?i, Aktive Protein C Rezistansi ve Faktör V Leiden Mutasyonuna Ba?li Tekrarlayan Pulmoner Tromboemboli Olgusu

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nazire UÇAR; A. Berna DURSUN; Sibel ALPAR; Tuba KARAKAYA; Bahar KURT

    Atatürk Gö?üs Hastaliklari ve Gö?üs Cerrahisi E?itim ve Ara?tirma Hastanesi, ANKARA # Bu çali?ma, Toraks Derne?i 6. Yillik Kongresi (23-26 Nisan 2003, Antalya)'nde sunulmu?tur. ÖZET Otuz ya?inda erkek hasta iki gündür olan öksürük, nefes darli?i, yan a?risi ve 10 gün önce ortaya çikan sol bacakta a?ri ve ?i?lik yakinmalari ile ba?vurdu. ?ki yil önce de pulmoner tromboembolizm tanisiyla hastaneye yatirilmi?ti.

  5. Acidification of freshwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Cresser, M.S.; Edwards, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This volume gives an account that draws not only on the main branches of chemistry but also on soil physics, chemistry, hydrology, meteorology, geography, geology, plant physiology, soil microbiology and zoology. The author examine the numerous interacting physical, chemical, and biological, processes that regulate the acidity of freshwaters, a phenomenon that has various causes, including precipitation; acidifying pollutions; and the interaction of plants, soils and water. The relative importance of the different processes is examined.

  6. Freshwater wetlands and wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Sharitz, R.R.; Gibbons, J.W. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This volume is a product of the Freshwater Wetlands and Wildlife symposium held in Charleston, South Carolina, on March 24--27, 1986 and contains 94 papers. The stimulus for the symposium came from our interest in augmenting the findings of the long-term research programs on freshwater wetlands and wildlife that have been carried out on the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The symposium provided a forum on an international scale for the exchange of data about freshwater ecosystems: their functions, uses, and their future. The papers in this volume address issues related to natural, man-managed, and degraded ecosystems. The volume is divided into two sections. The first section deals with the functions and values of wetlands, including their use as habitat for plants and animals, their role in trophic dynamics, and their basic processes. The second section treats the subject of their status and management, including techniques for assessing their value, laws for protecting them, and plans for properly managing them. Individual papers will be indexed and entered separately on the energy data base.

  7. Predation of schistosomiasis vector snails by ostracoda (crustacea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohn, I.G.; Kornicker, L.S.

    1972-01-01

    An ostracod species of Cypretta is an effective predator in laboratory experiments on 1- to 3-day-old Biomphalaria glabrata, a vector snail of the blood fluke that causes the tropical and subtropical disease schistosomiasis.

  8. High tolerance to abiotic stressors and invasion success of the slow growing freshwater snail, Melanoides tuberculatus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott M. WeirChristopher; Christopher J. Salice

    Considerable research has been conducted to determine traits common to invasive species with the goal of predicting, preventing,\\u000a or managing invasions. The importance of physiological tolerance to abiotic stressors in the ability of invasive species to\\u000a establish and displace native species has been hypothesized to be important although there are few actual tests of the hypothesis\\u000a in the literature. In

  9. A new freshwater snail (Caenogastropoda: Cochliopidae) from the Atacama Desert, northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Collado, Gonzalo A

    2015-01-01

    In the family Cochliopidae, Heleobia Stimpson, 1865 is the most speciose genus in South America, with about 90 species (Hershler & Thompson 1992; Cazzaniga 2011). A recent molecular and morphological analysis performed in northern Chile (Atacama Desert) showed that the previously undescribed springsnails from Aguada de Chorrillos belong to Heleobia (Collado et al. 2013). In this study I formally describe this new species. Although this paper does not treat morphology in detail, the anatomical characters, in combination with the previously published molecular data provides a strong basis for recognizing this population as a distinct species. PMID:25781755

  10. CHRONIC EFFECTS OF THE HERBICIDE DIURON ON FRESHWATER CLADOCERANS,AMPHIPODS,MIDGES,MINNOWS,WORMS, AND SNAILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and reproduction of Daphnia pulex, and survival and growth of the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus tentans, juvenile and embro/larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, annelid worms, Lumbriculus variegatus,...

  11. LIFE CYCLE OF THE FRESHWATER SNAIL 'CAMPELOMA DECISUM' (VIVIPARIDAE) IN THE LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Campeloma decisum reared in Minnesota Lake Superior water grew consistently well when clam meat or commercial fish food was provided and a substrate of sand or mud was present. Food alone, or the substrate alone, was generally ineffective in promoting growth. Thick substrates wer...

  12. Respiration rates and population metabolism of woodland snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. F. Mason; Botanic Gardens

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were done to measure the respiration rates of twenty species of terrestrial snail. Acclimatization phenomena were sought in two species, Discus rotundatus and Hygromia striolata, but not detected. The Q10s between 5 and 15° C for the twenty species varied between 1.20 and 4.27, with a mean Q10 of 2.21. Q10 was higher in larger snail species. There was

  13. Snails, stable iostopes, and southwestern desert paleoclimates

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.E. [Univ. and Community College System of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Whelan, J.F.; Forester, R.M.; Burdett, J.

    1995-09-01

    Modern and fossil molluscs (snails) occur in many localities in and semi-arid regions throughout the desert southwest. Live terrestrial snails are found under rocks and in forest litter and aquatic taxa inhabit springs, seeps, and/or wetlands. Molluscs uptake local water during their growing season (spring and summer) and incorporate its delta 180 signature into their shells. Preliminary 180 analysis of modem shells from the southern Great Basin indicates that the shells probably reflect meteoric water 180 values during the growing season. This provides a way to estimate the delta 180 value of precipitation and, thereby, the source of the moisture-bearing air masses. Significant 180 variability in shells analyzed include geographic location, elevation, taxonomy, and habitat (terrestrial, spring, or wetland). We found a rough inverse correlation with elevation in modem shells from the Spring Range in southern Nevada. The delta 180 values of modem and fossil shells are also very different; modem values in this location are much higher than those from nearby late Pleistocene-age molluscs suggesting that the Pleistocene summers were variously colder and wetter than today or less evaporative (more humid). Assuming shell material directly reflects the 180 of the growing-season environment, comparison of modem and fossil shell delta 180 values can potentially identify changes in air-mass moisture sources and can help to define seasonal precipitation change through time. Comprehension and quantification of community and isotopic variability in modem gastropods is required to create probabilistic valid transfer functions with fossil materials. Valid inferences about past environmental conditions can then be established with known confidence limits.

  14. Behavior of technetium in freshwater environments

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    In a previous study, /sup 95m/Tc, as a pertechnetate, was released to a small, experimental, freshwater pond, and the concentrations were determined in biotic and abiotic components of the pond ecosystem. A simple mathematical model was developed to predict the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in fish and snails. Results from this study indicated that uptake through the food chain was an important source of technetium to the higher trophic levels (i.e., fish). In the current study, an experimental pond was spiked with /sup 95m/Tc in the pertechnetate form, and the concentrations of /sup 95m/Tc were measured in the lower trophic levels. Emphasis was placed on measuring the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and the aquatic macrophyte Elodea canadensis. Fish were excluded from the pond to allow the development of a large zooplankton population. The concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in water decreased from 0.75 Bq/mL 1 h after the pond was spiked, to 0.21 Bq/mL at 20 d. Throughout the experiment, at least 98% of the /sup 95m/Tc in the water was in the dissolved fraction (0.4 ..mu..m). Zooplankton accumulated /sup 95m/Tc rapidly, having concentration factors (Bq/g sample wet wt. divided by Bq/g water) ranging from 3 at 4 h to 36 at 20 d. Concentration factors ranged from 3 to 8 for benthic insects and from 1 to 62 for the aquatic macrophyte.

  15. Global ocean freshwater transport pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talley, L.

    2008-12-01

    Variations in the atmospheric hydrological cycle are most easily observed through ocean salinity changes, and therefore it is useful to understand the basic ocean circulations responsible for maintaining the mean ocean salinity distribution. Ocean freshwater transports are calculated here from geostrophic and Ekman velocities and salinities. The net transports are assigned quantitatively to upper ocean gyre circulations, intermediate and deep overturning, and Bering Strait/Indonesian Throughflow. Excess freshwater input into the ocean in high latitudes must be transported via ocean circulation to the evaporative lower latitudes. High latitude northern hemisphere freshwater input of about 0.6 Sv is removed southwards through deep and intermediate water formation (NADW and NPIW). In complete contrast, high latitude southern hemisphere freshwater, also about 0.6 Sv, is removed northwards via the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian gyres, rather than through deep water formation. This northern-southern hemisphere asymmetry is consistent with the known "Drake Passage" effect. Excess evaporation in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans is balanced by inflow of freshwater from other regions; each transfer is quantified here. The Pacific Ocean is nearly neutral with respect to freshwater. It is seen that the NADW freshwater balance is nearly closed within the Atlantic/Arctic Ocean and the freshwater transport associated with export of NADW to the Southern Ocean is only a small component of the Atlantic freshwater budget. Bering Strait's small freshwater transport of < 0.1 Sv helps to maintain the Atlantic-Pacific salinity difference. However, proportionally large variations in the small Bering Strait transport can only marginally impact NADW salinity, whose freshening relative to saline surface water is mainly due to air-sea/runoff fluxes in the subpolar North Atlantic and Arctic. In contrast, Bering Strait freshwater export has proportionally much greater impact on North Pacific salinity balances, including NPIW salinity, because the Pacific has a much smaller overturning rate than the Atlantic.

  16. Antioxidant and molecular chaperone defences during estivation and arousal in the South American apple snail Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Giraud-Billoud, Maximiliano; Vega, Israel A; Tosi, Martín E Rinaldi; Abud, María A; Calderón, María L; Castro-Vazquez, Alfredo

    2013-02-15

    The invasive Pomacea canaliculata estivates during periods of drought and should cope with harmful effects of reoxygenation during arousal. We studied thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, SOD and catalase, CAT) and non-enzymatic antioxidants (uric acid and reduced glutathione), and heat shock protein expression (Hsc70, Hsp70 and Hsp90) in (1) active control snails, (2) snails after 45 days of estivation, and (3) aroused snails 20 min and (4) 24 h after water exposure, in midgut gland, kidney and foot. Both kidney and foot (but not the midgut gland) showed a TBARS increase during estivation and a decrease after arousal. Tissue SOD and CAT did not change in any experimental groups. Uric acid increased during estivation in all tissues, and it decreased after arousal in the kidney. Allantoin, the oxidation product of uric acid, remained constant in the midgut gland but it decreased in the kidney until 20 min after arousal; however, allantoin levels rose in both kidney and foot 24 h after arousal. Reduced glutathione decreased during estivation and arousal, in both midgut gland and kidney, and it remained constant in the foot. Hsc70 and Hsp70 kidney levels were stable during the activity-estivation cycle and Hsp90 expression decreases during estivation and recovers in the early arousal. In foot, the expression of Hsp70 and Hsp90 was high during activity and estivation periods and disminished after arousal. Results indicate that a panoply of antioxidant and molecular chaperone defences may be involved during the activity-estivation cycle in this freshwater gastropod. PMID:23077161

  17. Heavy metal accumulation in sediment and freshwater fish in U.S. Arctic lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-Gil, S.M. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife; Gubala, C.P. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Landers, D.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab.; Lasorsa, B.K.; Crecelius, E.A. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Div., Sequim, WA (United States); Curtis, L.R. [East Tennessee State Univ., Johnson City, TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Metal concentrations in sediment and two species of freshwater fish (lake trout [Salvelinus namaycush], and grayling [Thymallus arcticus]) were examined in four Arctic lakes in Alaska. Concentrations of several metals were naturally high in the sediment relative to uncontaminated lakes in other Arctic regions and more temperate locations. For example, concentrations of Hg and Ni were 175 ng/g and 250 ng/g dry weight, respectively, in Feniak Lake surface sediment. If any anthropogenic enrichment has occurred, it is not distinguishable from background variability based on surface sediment to down core comparisons. With the exception of Hg, the site rank order of metal concentrations (Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in sediment and freshwater fish tissue among lakes is not consistent. This suggests that a number of physical, chemical, and physiological parameters mediate metal bioavailability and uptake in these systems. Maximum concentrations of most metals in fish from this study are equal to or higher than those collected from remote Arctic lakes and rivers in Canada, Finland, and Russia. Muscle Hg concentrations in excess of 1 {micro}g/g wet weight were observed in lake trout from Feniak Lake, which has no identified Hg source other than naturally Hg-enriched sediments. Fish diet seems to influence some heavy metal burdens, as evidenced by the higher concentrations of some metals in lake trout compared to grayling, and differences among lakes for lake trout. Cadmium, Cu, and Zn burdens were higher in lakes where snails were consumed by trout compared to lakes without snails.

  18. Volatile foraging kairomones in the littoral zone: attraction of an herbivorous freshwater gastropod to algal odors.

    PubMed

    Fink, Patrick; von Elert, Eric; Jüttner, Friedrich

    2006-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by algae and cyanobacteria are primarily responsible for odors in fresh waters. Among other functions, VOCs may serve as important infochemicals in biofilms of benthic primary producers. VOCs liberated by benthic, mat-forming cyanobacteria can be used as habitat-finding cues by insects, nematodes, and possibly other organisms. We developed a new gastropod behavioral assay that allows detection of food preference without offering food, thus allowing the distinction between taste, which requires direct contact with the food source, and the detection of odorous infochemicals, which work over distance. We demonstrated that VOCs released from disintegrated cells of a benthic, mat-forming, green alga (Ulothrix fimbriata) are food-finding cues ("foraging kairomones") that attract the herbivorous freshwater snail Radix ovata. A mixture of three C5 lipoxygenase compounds and 2(E),4(E)-heptadienal that mimic the major VOCs released by U. fimbriata attracted the snails, whereas neither the mixture of C5 compounds nor 2(E),4(E)-heptadienal were effective when given alone. This study suggests that VOCs can play a steering role as infochemicals in freshwater benthic habitats, as has been established for many organismic interactions in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:16902829

  19. Functional Changes in the Snail Statocyst System Elicited by Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Pavel M.; Malyshev, Aleksey Y.; Ierusalimsky, Victor N.; Aseyev, Nikolay; Korshunova, Tania A.; Bravarenko, Natasha I.; Lemak, M. S.; Roshchin, Matvey; Zakharov, Igor S.; Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background The mollusk statocyst is a mechanosensing organ detecting the animal's orientation with respect to gravity. This system has clear similarities to its vertebrate counterparts: a weight-lending mass, an epithelial layer containing small supporting cells and the large sensory hair cells, and an output eliciting compensatory body reflexes to perturbations. Methodology/Principal Findings In terrestrial gastropod snail we studied the impact of 16- (Foton M-2) and 12-day (Foton M-3) exposure to microgravity in unmanned orbital missions on: (i) the whole animal behavior (Helix lucorum L.), (ii) the statoreceptor responses to tilt in an isolated neural preparation (Helix lucorum L.), and (iii) the differential expression of the Helix pedal peptide (HPep) and the tetrapeptide FMRFamide genes in neural structures (Helix aspersa L.). Experiments were performed 13–42 hours after return to Earth. Latency of body re-orientation to sudden 90° head-down pitch was significantly reduced in postflight snails indicating an enhanced negative gravitaxis response. Statoreceptor responses to tilt in postflight snails were independent of motion direction, in contrast to a directional preference observed in control animals. Positive relation between tilt velocity and firing rate was observed in both control and postflight snails, but the response magnitude was significantly larger in postflight snails indicating an enhanced sensitivity to acceleration. A significant increase in mRNA expression of the gene encoding HPep, a peptide linked to ciliary beating, in statoreceptors was observed in postflight snails; no differential expression of the gene encoding FMRFamide, a possible neurotransmission modulator, was observed. Conclusions/Significance Upregulation of statocyst function in snails following microgravity exposure parallels that observed in vertebrates suggesting fundamental principles underlie gravi-sensing and the organism's ability to adapt to gravity changes. This simple animal model offers the possibility to describe general subcellular mechanisms of nervous system's response to conditions on Earth and in space. PMID:21479267

  20. Cooperative action of Sox9, Snail2 and PKA signaling in early neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Daisuke; Suzuki, Takashi; Osumi, Noriko; Wakamatsu, Yoshio

    2006-04-01

    In neural crest formation, transcription factors, such as group E Sox and Snail1/Snail2 (Slug) regulate subsequent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migration. In particular, Sox9 has a strong effect on neural crest formation, EMT and differentiation of crest-derived cartilages in the cranium. It remains unclear, however, how Sox9 functions in these events, and how Sox9 activity is regulated. In this study, our gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments reveal that Sox9 is essential for BMP signal-mediated induction of Snail2 and subsequent EMT in avian neural crest. We also show that Snail2 activates the Snail2 promoter, although Snail family proteins have been known as a repressor. Consistently, Sox9 directly activates the Snail2 promoter in synergy with, and through a direct binding to, Snail2. Finally, functions of these transcription factors in neural crest cells are enhanced by PKA signaling. PMID:16510505

  1. Copper uptake and depuration by juvenile and adult Florida apple snails ( Pomacea paludosa )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tham C. Hoang; Emily C. Rogevich; Gary M. Rand; Robert A. Frakes

    2008-01-01

    The present study characterized copper (Cu) uptake and depuration by juvenile and adult Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) from water, soil, and diet. During a 28-day uptake period, juvenile apple snails were exposed to aqueous Cu and adult apple\\u000a snails were exposed to Cu-contaminated soil, water, and food. In the follow-up 14-day depuration period, both juvenile and\\u000a adult apple snails

  2. MTA3 regulates CGB5 and Snail genes in trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Miyazaki, Jun; Nishizawa, Haruki; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Leach, Richard; Wang, Kai

    2013-04-19

    Secreted by the placental trophoblast, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important hormone during pregnancy and is required for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that dys-regulation of hCG expression is associated with preeclampsia. However, the exact relationship between altered hCG levels and development of preeclampsia is unknown. Metastasis associated protein 3 (MTA3), a chromatin remodeling protein, is abundantly expressed in the placental trophoblasts, but its function is unknown. In breast cancer, MTA3 has been shown to repress the expression of Snail and cell migration. However, whether MTA3 acts similarly in the trophoblast has not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the role of MTA3 in regulating the hCG ?-subunit gene (gene name: CGB5) and Snail expression in the trophoblast cell line, BeWo, as well as its relevance to the high hCG expression levels seen in preeclampsia. First, we investigated MTA3 expression in preeclamptic placenta as compared to normal control placenta via gene expression microarray and qRT-PCR and found that MTA3 was significantly down-regulated, whereas both CGB5 and Snail were up-regulated in preeclamptic placenta. Secondly, we knocked down MTA3 gene in trophoblast cell line BeWo and found Snail and hCG were both up-regulated, suggesting that MTA3 represses Snail and hCG gene expression in trophoblasts. Next, we cloned the CGB5 and Snail promoters into the pGL3-basic vector individually and found that silencing of MTA3 by siRNA resulted in an increase of both CGB5 and Snail promoter activities. To confirm that this MTA3 inhibition is a direct effect, we performed a chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) assay and found that MTA3 occupied the proximal promoter regions of both Snail and hCG within BeWo cells. Furthermore, we examined MTA3 expression in placental trophoblast by immunohistochemistry and found that MTA3 expression was higher in villous cytotrophoblasts versus syncytiotrophoblasts, which supports an inverse association of MTA3 with hCG expression. Lastly, using the well-characterized trophoblast fusion model, we examined MTA3 and hCG levels in forskolin-treated BeWo cells and found that MTA3 down-regulation was accompanied by an up-regulation of hCG. These data further suggest that MTA3 is repressing placental hCG expression. In summary, MTA3 plays a critical role in repressing hCG and Snail in placenta trophoblast and its deregulation is associated with preeclampsia. PMID:23510993

  3. MTA3 regulates CGB5 and Snail genes in trophoblast

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Miyazaki, Jun; Nishizawa, Haruki; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Secreted by the placental trophoblast, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important hormone during pregnancy and is required for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that dys-regulation of hCG expression is associated with preeclampsia. However, the exact relationship between altered hCG levels and development of preeclampsia is unknown. Metastasis associated protein 3 (MTA3), a chromatin remodeling protein, is abundantly expressed in the placental trophoblasts, but its function is unknown. In breast cancer, MTA3 has been shown to repress the expression of Snail and cell migration. However, whether MTA3 acts similarly in the trophoblast has not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the role of MTA3 in regulating the hCG ?-subunit gene (gene name: CGB5) and Snail expression in the trophoblast cell line, BeWo, as well as its relevance to the high hCG expression levels seen in preeclampsia. First, we investigated MTA3 expression in preeclamptic placenta as compared to normal control placenta via gene expression microarray and qRT-PCR and found that MTA3 was significantly down-regulated, whereas both CGB5 and Snail were up-regulated in preeclamptic placenta. Secondly, we knocked down MTA3 gene in trophoblast cell line BeWo and found Snail and hCG were both up-regulated, suggesting that MTA3 represses Snail and hCG gene expression in trophoblasts. Next, we cloned the CGB5 and Snail promoters into the pGL3-basic vector individually and found that silencing of MTA3 by siRNA resulted in an increase of both CGB5 and Snail promoter activities. To confirm that this MTA3 inhibition is a direct effect, we performed a chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) assay and found that MTA3 occupied the proximal promoter regions of both Snail and hCG within BeWo cells. Furthermore, we examined MTA3 expression in placental trophoblast by immunohistochemistry and found that MTA3 expression was higher in villous cytotrophoblasts versus syncytiotrophoblasts, which supports an inverse association of MTA3 with hCG expression. Lastly, using the well-characterized trophoblast fusion model, we examined MTA3 and hCG levels in forskolin-treated BeWo cells and found that MTA3 down-regulation was accompanied by an up-regulation of hCG. These data further suggest that MTA3 is repressing placental hCG expression. In summary, MTA3 plays a critical role in repressing hCG and Snail in placenta trophoblast and its deregulation is associated with preeclampsia. PMID:23510993

  4. SCAI/AATS/ACC/STS operator and institutional requirements for transcatheter valve repair and replacement, Part III: Pulmonic valve.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Ziyad M; Ruiz, Carlos E; Zahn, Evan; Ringel, Richard; Aldea, Gabriel S; Bacha, Emile A; Bavaria, Joseph; Bolman, R Morton; Cameron, Duke E; Dean, Larry S; Feldman, Ted; Fullerton, David; Horlick, Eric; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Moon, Marc R; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Trento, Alfredo; Tommaso, Carl L

    2015-07-01

    With the evolution of transcatheter valve replacement, an important opportunity has arisen for cardiologists and surgeons to collaborate in identifying the criteria for performing these procedures. Therefore, The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS), American College of Cardiology (ACC), and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) have partnered to provide recommendations for institutions to assess their potential for instituting and/or maintaining a transcatheter valve program. This article concerns transcatheter pulmonic valve replacement (tPVR). tPVR procedures are in their infancy with few reports available on which to base an expert consensus statement. Therefore, many of these recommendations are based on expert consensus and the few reports available. As the procedures evolve, technology advances, experience grows, and more data accumulate, there will certainly be a need to update this consensus statement. The writing committee and participating societies believe that the recommendations in this report serve as appropriate requisites. In some ways, these recommendations apply to institutions more than to individuals. There is a strong consensus that these new valve therapies are best performed using a Heart Team approach; thus, these credentialing criteria should be applied at the institutional level. Partnering societies used the ACC's policy on relationships with industry (RWI) and other entities to author this document (http://www.acc.org/guidelines/about-guidelines-and-clinical-documents). To avoid actual, potential, or perceived conflicts of interest due to industry relationships or personal interests, all members of the writing committee, as well as peer reviewers of the document, were asked to disclose all current healthcare-related relationships including those existing 12 months before the initiation of the writing effort. A committee of interventional cardiologists and surgeons was formed to include a majority of members with no relevant RWI and to be led by an interventional cardiology cochair and a surgical cochair with no relevant RWI. Authors with relevant RWI were not permitted to draft or vote on text or recommendations pertaining to their RWI. RWI were reviewed on all conference calls and updated as changes occurred. Author and peer reviewer RWI pertinent to this document are disclosed in the Appendices. In addition, to ensure complete transparency, authors' comprehensive disclosure information (including RWI not pertinent to this document) is available in Appendix AII. The work of the writing committee was supported exclusively by the partnering societies without commercial support. SCAI, AATS, ACC, and STS believe that adherence to these recommendations will maximize the chances that these therapies will become a successful part of the armamentarium for treating valvular heart disease in the United States. In addition, these recommendations will hopefully facilitate optimum quality during the delivery of this therapy, which will be important to the development and successful implementation of future, less invasive approaches to structural heart disease. PMID:25809590

  5. Periphytic food and predatory crayfish: relative roles in determining snail distribution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. M. Weber; D. M. Lodge

    1990-01-01

    In the laboratory and field, we examined how periphyton (food of snails) and predatory crayfish influenced snail distribution in Trout Lake, a permanent, northern Wisconsin lake. Laboratory experiments (with no crayfish) tested the importance of periphyton biomass in determining snail preference among rocks, and among rock, sand, and macrophyte substrates. Among rocks with four different amounts of periphyton, periphyton biomass

  6. Persistence and extinction of local populations of the garden snail Helix aspersa in unfavorable environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. C. Potts

    1975-01-01

    In southern California, previously disturbed but currently uncultivated habitats are unfavorable environments for the introduced snail Helix aspersa. In these habitats, snails were often distributed in small, local populations only a few meters apart. Migration between neighboring populations was minimal because the snails have strong homing tendencies. Local micro-environmental differences produced differences in the demographic properties of 4 adjacent populations

  7. Helix and Drugs: Snails for Western Health Care From Antiquity to the Present

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The land helix, or snail, has been used in medicine since antiquity and prepared according to several formulations. This historical report traces the understanding of their properties from the time of Hippocrates, who proposed the use of snail mucus against protoccle and Pliny who thought that the snail increased the speed of delivery and was “a sovereign remedy to treat pain related to burns, abscesses and other wounds”, Galien recommended snails against hydrops foetails. In the 18th century, various snail “preparations” were also recommended for external use with dermatological disorders and internally for symptoms associated with tuberculosis and nephritis. Surprisingly, the 19th century saw a renewed interest in the pharmaceutical and medical use of snails with numerous indications for snail preparations. This interest in snails did not stop at the end of the 19th century. The 1945 edition of Dorvault devotes an entire paragraph to snails, indicating that the therapeutic usage of snails was still alive at that time. Recently the FDA has also shown an interest in snails. Ziconotide (SNXIII), a synthetic peptide coming from snail venom, has been under FDA review since 1999. Pre-clinical and clinical studies of this new drug are promising. PMID:15841274

  8. Lamprey snail highlights conserved and novel patterning roles in vertebrate embryos

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rod A. Rahimi; Jared J. Allmond; Hilary Wagner; David W. McCauley; James A. Langeland

    2009-01-01

    snail genes mark presumptive mesoderm across bilaterian animals. In gnathostome vertebrates, snail genes are a multimember family that are also markers of premigratory neural crest (pnc) and some postmigratory neural crest\\u000a derivatives in the pharyngeal arches. Previous studies of nonvertebrate chordates indicate that they have single snail genes that retain ancestral functions in mesoderm development and perhaps in specification of

  9. Prey selection by molluscivorous cichlids foraging on a schistosomiasis vector snail, Biomphalaria glabrata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Slootweg

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers prey size selection by four molluscivorous cichlids feeding on the intermediate host snail of Schistosoma parasites, Biomphalaria glabrata. Haplochromis ishmaeli obtains its prey by crushing the snails between the pharyngeal jaws, whereas H. xenognathus, H. sauvagei and Macropleurodus bicolor apply both pharyngeal crushing and oral shelling. The fishes crushed significantly more snails with the highest reward in

  10. Lactic acid microflora of the gut of snail Cornu aspersum

    PubMed Central

    Koleva, Zdravka; Dedov, Ivaylo; Kizheva, Joana; Lipovanska, Roxana; Moncheva, Penka; Hristova, Petya

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal lactic acid microflora of the edible snail Cornu aspersum was studied by culture-based methods and was phenotypically and molecularly characterized. The antibacterial activity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates was investigated. Snails in different stages of development were collected from farms located in several regions of Bulgaria. One hundred twenty-two isolates, belonging to the group of LAB, were characterized morphologically and were divided into four groups. Representative isolates from each morphological type were subjected to phenotypic characterization and molecular identification. The snail gut lactic acid microflora was composed by Enterococcus (17 isolates), Lactococcus (12 isolates), Leuconostoc (7 isolates), Lactobacillus (18 isolates) and Weissella (1 isolate). The species affiliation of Lactococcus lactis (12), Leuconostoc mesenteroides (4) and Lactobacillus plantarum (2) was confirmed by species-specific primers. The Lactobacillus isolates were identified by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA as Lactobacillus brevis (12), L. plantarum (2), Lactobacillus graminis (1) and Lactobacillus curvatus (3). The species L. brevis, L. graminis and L. curvatus were found in snails in a phase of hibernation, whereas L. plantarum was identified both in active and hibernation phases. Antibacterial activity (bacteriocine-like) was shown only by one strain of L. mesentereoides P4/8 against Propionibacterium acnes. The present study showed that the LAB are a component of the microbial communities in the snail digestive system. This is the first report on Lactobacillus strains detected in the gut of C. aspersum. PMID:26019550

  11. Simultaneous multiple species testing: Acute toxicity of 13 chemicals to 12 diverse freshwater amphibian, fish, and invertebrate families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary W. Holcombe; Gary L. Phipps; Abdul H. Sulaiman; Alex D. Hoffman

    1987-01-01

    This test series developed methods for testing a compliment of aquatic organisms in a single test that satisfies the freshwater acute toxicity requirements for setting water quality criteria. Species tested included fathead minnowsPimephales promelas, rainbow troutSalmo gairdneri, bluegillLepomis macrochirus, channel catfishIctalurus punctatus, goldfishCarassius auratus, white suckerCatostomus commersoni, daphnidDaphnia magna, midgeTanytarsus dissimilis, crayfishOrconectes immunis, snailAplexa hypnorum, tadpoleXenopus laevis, and leechNephelopsis obscura.

  12. Although Schmalz described the innervation of the ovotestis in pulmonate snails as early as 1914, no functions have been attributed to it. In H. aspersa, the intestinal nerve branches profusely within the

    E-print Network

    Chase, Ronald

    steroid hormones [1]. Studies of the ovary in bivalve molluscs have revealed that innervation may have, 1205 Ave. Docteur Penfield, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1B1 (Received: August 31, 2003; accepted

  13. Transboundary Freshwater Dispute Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created and maintained by Dr. Aaron T. Wolf of the Department of Geosciences at Oregon State University, this site is designed to help researchers and students explore water disputes and negotiations in the 20th century. To that end, it offers a searchable database containing the summaries and full text of 150 international water-related treaties and another similar database of 39 interstate compacts within the US. Treaties within the databases may be selected by nation or state, main and treaty basins, focus, and beginning and ending dates. Additional resources include a digitized inventory of international watersheds. In the future, Wolf plans to add descriptions of indigenous/ traditional methods for the resolution of water disputes, news files and bibliographic entries of acute water conflicts, and an annotated bibliography of the state of the art of Transboundary Freshwater Dispute Resolution.

  14. Allelopathy in freshwater cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leăo, Pedro N; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D; Vasconcelos, Vítor M

    2009-01-01

    Freshwater cyanobacteria produce several bioactive secondary metabolites with diverse chemical structure, which may achieve high concentrations in the aquatic medium when cyanobacterial blooms occur. Some of the compounds released by cyanobacteria have allelopathic properties, influencing the biological processes of other phytoplankton or aquatic plants. These kinds of interactions are more easily detectable under laboratory studies; however their ecological relevance is often debated. Recent research has discovered new allelopathic properties in some cyanobacteria species, new allelochemicals and elucidated some of the allelopathic mechanisms. Ecosystem-level approaches have shed some light on the factors that influence allelopathic interactions, as well as how cyanobacteria may be able to modulate their surrounding environment by means of allelochemical release. Nevertheless, the role of allelopathy in cyanobacteria ecology is still not well understood, and its clarification should benefit from carefully designed field studies, chemical characterization of allelochemicals and new methodological approaches at the "omics" level. PMID:19863381

  15. Movements of florida apple snails in relation to water levels and drying events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darby, P.C.; Bennetts, R.E.; Miller, S.J.; Percival, H.F.

    2002-01-01

    Florida apple snails (Pomacea Paludosa) apparently have only a limited tolerance to wetland drying events (although little direct evidence exists), but their populations routinely face dry downs under natural and managed water regimes. In this paper, we address speculation that apple snails respond to decreasing water levels and potential drying events by moving toward refugia that remain inundated. We monitored the movements of apple snails in central Florida, USA during drying events at the Blue Cypress Marsh (BC) and at Lake Kissimmee (LK). We monitored the weekly movements of 47 BC snails and 31 LK snails using radio-telemetry. Snails tended to stop moving when water depths were 10 cm. Snails moved along the greatest positive depth gradient (i.e., towards deeper water) when they encountered water depths between 10 and 20 cm. Snails tended to move toward shallower water in water depths ???50 cm, suggesting that snails were avoiding deep water areas such as canals and sloughs. Of the 11 BC snails originally located in the area that eventually went dry, three (27%) were found in deep water refugia by the end of the study. Only one of the 31 LK snails escaped the drying event by moving to deeper water. Our results indicate that some snails may opportunistically escape drying events through movement. The tendency to move toward deeper water was statistically significant and indicates that this behavioral trait might enhance survival when the spatial extent of a dry down is limited. However, as water level falls below 10 cm, snails stop moving and become stranded. As the spatial extent of a dry down increases, we predict that the number of snails stranded would increase proportionally. Stranded Pomacea paludosa must contend with dry marsh conditions, possibly by aestivation. Little more than anecdotal information has been published on P. paludosa aestivation, but it is a common adaptation among other apple snails (Caenogastropoda: Ampullaridae). ?? 2002, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  16. Survival of the faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bithynia tentaculata, the faucet snail, is a non indigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia that was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871. The snail’s distribution in the United States has expanded to the mid-Atlantic states and the drainage basin of the Great Lakes and most recently to the Mississippi...

  17. Chemo-orientation of echinostome cercariae towards their snail hosts: the stimulating structure of amino acids and other attractants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martina Körner; Wilfried Haas

    1998-01-01

    The cercariae of Pseudechinoparyphium echinatum and Echinostoma revolutum locate their host snails by turning back when swimming in decreasing gradients of the small molecular weight fraction (< 500) of snail conditioned water. Fractionation and chemical modifications of snail conditioned water from Lymnaea stagnalis showed that amino acids are necessary for the stimulating activity of snail conditioned water. A complete mixture

  18. Seasonal fluctuation of invasive flatworm predation pressure on land snails: Implications for the range expansion and impacts of invasive species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shinji Sugiura

    2009-01-01

    Introduction of the snail-eating flatworm Platydemus manokwari has caused extinction and decline of native land snails on tropical and subtropical islands. As the factors influencing flatworm predation pressure on land snails remain unclear, I examined the effects of seasonal variation in flatworm predation pressure on land snail survival in the wild on a subtropical island. I also examined the feeding

  19. Diagnostic utility of snail in metaplastic breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare subtype of breast cancer characterized by coexistence of carcinomatous and sarcomatous components. Snail is a nuclear transcription factor incriminated in the transition of epithelial to mesenchymal differentiation of breast cancer. Aberrant Snail expression results in lost expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin, an event associated with changes in epithelial architecture and invasive growth. We aimed to identify the utility of Snail, and of traditional immunohistochemical markers, in accurate MBC classification and to evaluate clinicopathologic characteristics and outcome. We retrospectively reviewed 34 MBC cases from January 1997 to September 2007. The control group contained 26 spindle cell lesions. Immunohistochemistry used Snail, p63, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), OSCAR, and wide spectrum cytokeratin (WS-KER). Negative was a score less than 1%. We found that Snail and EGFR are sensitive (100%) markers with low specificity (3.8% and 19.2%) for detecting MBC. p63 and WS-KER are specific (100%), with moderate sensitivity (67.6% and 76.5%); OSCAR is sensitive (85.3%) and specific (92.3%). A combination of any 2 of the p63, OSCAR, and WS-KER markers increased sensitivity and specificity. MBCs tended to be high-grade (77%), triple negative (negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2) [27/33; 81.8%], and carcinomas with low incidence of axillary lymph node involvement (15%), and decreased disease-free [71% (95%CI: 54%, 94%) at 3 yrs.) and overall survival. A combination of p63, OSCAR and WS-KER are useful in its work-up. On the other hand, Snail is neither a diagnostic nor a prognostic marker for MBC. PMID:21110878

  20. [Schistosomiasis mansoni and distribution of freshwater mollusks in natural bodies of water in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Almir de Souza; Cruz, Oswaldo José da; Fernandez, Monica Ammon

    2002-01-01

    The authors report on the distribution of freshwater mollusks in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, and notification of schistosomiasis cases in this municipality from 1995 to 2000. All breeding sites favorable to freshwater mollusks were surveyed, showing the following species: Antillorbis nordestensis (Lucena, 1954), Biomphalaria straminea (Dunker, 1848), Biomphalaria tenagophila (Orbigny, 1835), Drepanotrema anatinum (Orbigny, 1835), Lymnaea columella Say, 1817, Melanoides tuberculatus (Müller, 1774), Physa cubensis Pfeiffer, 1839, Physa marmorata Guilding, 1828, and Pomacea sordida (Swainson, 1823). Some 3,691 specimens of snail hosts for Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, 1907 were examined by exposure to artificial light and crushing. No S. mansoni cercariae were found, although other types of cercariae were observed. PMID:12244379

  1. Euparyphium albuferensis and Echinostoma friedi (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae): experimental cercarial transmission success in sympatric snail communities.

    PubMed

    Muńoz-Antoli, Carla; Marin, Antoni; Vidal, Amparo; Toledo, Rafael; Esteban, José Guillermo

    2008-06-01

    Euparyphium albuferensis and Echinostoma friedi cercarial infectivity to four species of sympatric snails was examined under single- or multiple-choice laboratory conditions to show the level of parasite-snail host compatibility. Radix peregra, Lymnaeafuscus, Physella acuta and Gyraulus chinensis act as second intermediate hosts of both parasite species although different cercarial transmission success (CTS) was observed. In single-host experiments, R. peregra and P. acuta showed a high degree of compatibility with E. albuferensis, while only P. acuta in the case of E. friedi. In two-choice snail communities, a snail with high CTS increased the values of another with low compatibility, in both parasite species. In multiple-choice snail communities, high CTS of some hosts decreased, while low CTS of other hosts increased. The degree of parasite-host compatibility of each snail species could be determined by the presence of other snails in the community. PMID:18666415

  2. Flying shells: historical dispersal of marine snails across Central America

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Osamu; Torchin, Mark E.; Bermingham, Eldredge; Jacobs, David K.; Hechinger, Ryan F.

    2012-01-01

    The geological rise of the Central American Isthmus separated the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans about 3 Ma, creating a formidable barrier to dispersal for marine species. However, similar to Simpson's proposal that terrestrial species can ‘win sweepstakes routes’—whereby highly improbable dispersal events result in colonization across geographical barriers—marine species may also breach land barriers given enough time. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether intertidal marine snails have crossed Central America to successfully establish in new ocean basins. We used a mitochondrial DNA genetic comparison of sister snails (Cerithideopsis spp.) separated by the rise of the Isthmus. Genetic variation in these snails revealed evidence of at least two successful dispersal events between the Pacific and the Atlantic after the final closure of the Isthmus. A combination of ancestral area analyses and molecular dating techniques indicated that dispersal from the Pacific to the Atlantic occurred about 750 000 years ago and that dispersal in the opposite direction occurred about 72 000 years ago. The geographical distribution of haplotypes and published field evidence further suggest that migratory shorebirds transported the snails across Central America at the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in southern Mexico. Migratory birds could disperse other intertidal invertebrates this way, suggesting the Central American Isthmus may not be as impassable for marine species as previously assumed. PMID:21920976

  3. MOLLUSCICIDAL ACTIVITY OF VULGARONE B AGAINST RAM'S HORN SNAIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ram's horn snail (Planorbdella trivolvis) is an intermediate host for a digenetic trematode (Bolbophorus confusus) that has recently been discovered to be a significant problem in commercial catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) production ponds in the Mississippi Delta region of the USA. In these catf...

  4. The snail superfamily of zinc-finger transcription factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Angela Nieto

    2002-01-01

    The Snail superfamily of zinc-finger transcription factors is involved in processes that imply pronounced cell movements, both during embryonic development and in the acquisition of invasive and migratory properties during tumour progression. Different family members have also been implicated in the signalling cascade that confers left–right identity, as well as in the formation of appendages, neural differentiation, cell division and

  5. Snail Shells in a Practical Application of Statistical Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Stephen W.; Shepherd, Deborah K.; Williams-Hart, Tara; Gossett, Dalton R.; Crnkovic, Amanda C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is based upon a laboratory exercise designed for biology students in secondary schools or those taking introductory biology laboratory courses in colleges and universities. This exercise requires a set of calipers, a calculator and populations of snail shells collected either from the wild or obtained from a biological supply house. The…

  6. Food Choice in the Common Snail (Helix Aspersa).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, John; Howell, Pauline

    1985-01-01

    The easily obtained common snail shows interesting dietary preferences which can be the source of several simple experiments. Specific student instructions are given for quantitative and comparative studies using cabbage, lettuce, carrot, rutabaga, and onion. Suggestions for laboratory setup and further work are included. (DH)

  7. Food, feeding rates and assimilation in woodland snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. F. Mason

    1970-01-01

    Analyses of the faeces of seven species of woodland, litterdwelling snails (Marpessa laminata, Clausilia bidentata, Oxychilus cellarius, O. alliarius, Discus rotundatus, Arianta arbustorum and Hygromia striolata), showed that all feed predominently on higher plant material, be it living or dead. H. striolata and A. arbustorum took more chlorophyll-containing plant material than the other species, D. rotundatus had a significant amount

  8. Cellular mechanisms of behavioral plasticity in terrestrial snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Balaban

    2002-01-01

    Functional organization of networks underlying withdrawal, feeding, and respiration in terrestrial gastropod snail Helix are described. Tracking the changes during non-associative and associative modifications of behavior, analysis of plasticity mechanisms in identified neurons involved in these networks allowed to formulate several conceptual principles which are not widely accepted. The review will present data underlying the following principles:1.Command neuron concept can

  9. Flying shells: historical dispersal of marine snails across Central America.

    PubMed

    Miura, Osamu; Torchin, Mark E; Bermingham, Eldredge; Jacobs, David K; Hechinger, Ryan F

    2012-03-22

    The geological rise of the Central American Isthmus separated the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans about 3 Ma, creating a formidable barrier to dispersal for marine species. However, similar to Simpson's proposal that terrestrial species can 'win sweepstakes routes'-whereby highly improbable dispersal events result in colonization across geographical barriers-marine species may also breach land barriers given enough time. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether intertidal marine snails have crossed Central America to successfully establish in new ocean basins. We used a mitochondrial DNA genetic comparison of sister snails (Cerithideopsis spp.) separated by the rise of the Isthmus. Genetic variation in these snails revealed evidence of at least two successful dispersal events between the Pacific and the Atlantic after the final closure of the Isthmus. A combination of ancestral area analyses and molecular dating techniques indicated that dispersal from the Pacific to the Atlantic occurred about 750 000 years ago and that dispersal in the opposite direction occurred about 72 000 years ago. The geographical distribution of haplotypes and published field evidence further suggest that migratory shorebirds transported the snails across Central America at the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in southern Mexico. Migratory birds could disperse other intertidal invertebrates this way, suggesting the Central American Isthmus may not be as impassable for marine species as previously assumed. PMID:21920976

  10. Microgeographic evolution of snail shell shape and predator behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Menno Schilthuizen; Angelique van Til; Merijn Salverda; Thor-Seng Liew; S. Sheena James; Berjaya bin Elahan; Jaap J. Vermeulen

    2006-01-01

    AbstractGenetic divergence in geographically isolated populations is a prerequisite for allopatric speciation, one of the most common modes of speciation. In ecologically equivalent populations existing within a small, environmentally homogeneous area, an important role for environmentally neutral divergence is often found or inferred. We studied a species complex of conspicuously shaped Opisthostoma land snails on scattered limestone outcrops within a

  11. Effects of 17?-ethynylestradiol, fluoxetine, and the mixture on life history traits and population growth rates in a freshwater gastropod.

    PubMed

    Luna, Tamara O; Plautz, Stephanie C; Salice, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), some of which have endocrine-disrupting effects at environmentally relevant concentrations, have been detected in many surface waters. The authors evaluated the effects of 2 common endocrine disrupting PPCPs on the life history traits of the snail, Physa pomilia, using a life table response experiment with snails raised in environmentally relevant concentrations of 17?-ethynylestradiol (EE2), fluoxetine, or their mixture. Exposure to fluoxetine or the mixture reduced snail reproduction, but EE2 did not. Generally, individual life history traits were affected minimally by the PPCPs, but when integrated using a demographic model, all 3 chemical exposure scenarios decreased population growth rates, with the EE2 and fluoxetine mixture causing the most adverse effects. Overall, the results provide additional insight into the effects of PPCPs on freshwater invertebrates and point to the importance of testing simultaneous exposures to multiple PPCPs. In addition, using a demographic model to integrate individual endpoints provided insights into effects that were not apparent from individual life history traits alone and suggest at least a potential for adverse ecological effects under realistic environmental exposures concentrations. PMID:23983099

  12. The distribution of NADPH diaphorase activity and immunoreactivity to nitric oxide synthase in the nervous system of the pulmonate mollusc Helix aspersa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian R. C. Cooke; Susan L. Edwards; Colin R. Anderson

    1994-01-01

    Enzyme histochemistry and immunocytochemistry were used to determine the distribution of neurons in the snail Helix aspersa which exhibited nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase activity and\\/or immunoreactivity to nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NADPH diaphorase-positive cells and fibres were distributed extensively throughout the central and peripheral nervous system. NADPH diaphorase-positive fibres were present in all neuropil regions of the central

  13. Lymnaea glabra: progressive increase in susceptibility to Fasciola hepatica through successive generations of experimentally infected snails.

    PubMed

    Rondelaud, D; Teukeng, F F Djuikwo; Vignoles, P; Dreyfuss, G

    2015-07-01

    Experimental infections of Lymnaea glabra (two populations) with Fasciola hepatica were carried out during seven successive snail generations, to determine if prevalence and intensity of snail infection increased over time through descendants of snails already infected with F. hepatica. Controls were descendants coming from uninfected parents and infected according to the same protocol. No larval forms were found in the bodies of control snails coming from uninfected parents. In contrast, prevalence and intensity of F. hepatica infection in snails originating from infected parents progressively increased from the F2 or F3 to the F6 generation of L. glabra. In another experiment carried out with the F7 generations of L. glabra and a single generation of Galba truncatula (as controls), the prevalence of F. hepatica infection and the total number of cercariae were lower in L. glabra (without significant differences between both populations). If the number of cercariae shed by infected snails was compared to overall cercarial production noted in snails containing cercariae but dying without emission, the percentage was greater in G. truncatula (69% instead of 52-54% in L. glabra). Even if most characteristics of F. hepatica infection were lower in L. glabra, prevalence and intensity of parasite infection increased with snail generation when tested snails came from infected parents. This mode of snail infection with F. hepatica suggests an explanation for cases of fasciolosis occurring in cattle-breeding farms where paramphistomosis is lacking and G. truncatula is absent. PMID:24735873

  14. Trematode communities in snails can indicate impact and recovery from hurricanes in a tropical coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Macedo, María Leopoldina; Vidal-Martínez, Victor M; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2011-11-01

    In September 2002, Hurricane Isidore devastated the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. To understand its effects on the parasites of aquatic organisms, we analyzed long-term monthly population data of the horn snail Cerithidea pliculosa and its trematode communities in Celestún, Yucatán, Mexico before and after the hurricane (February 2001 to December 2009). Five trematode species occurred in the snail population: Mesostephanus appendiculatoides, Euhaplorchis californiensis, two species of the genus Renicola and one Heterophyidae gen. sp. Because these parasites use snails as first intermediate hosts, fishes as second intermediate hosts and birds as final hosts, their presence in snails depends on food webs. No snails were present at the sampled sites for 6 months after the hurricane. After snails recolonised the site, no trematodes were found in snails until 14 months after the hurricane. It took several years for snail and trematode populations to recover. Our results suggest that the increase in the occurrence of hurricanes predicted due to climate change can impact upon parasites with complex life cycles. However, both the snail populations and their parasite communities eventually reached numbers of individuals and species similar to those before the hurricane. Thus, the trematode parasites of snails can be useful indicators of coastal lagoon ecosystem degradation and recovery. PMID:22079832

  15. Pseudosuccinea columella: age resistance to Calicophoron daubneyi infection in two snail populations.

    PubMed

    Dar, Yasser; Rondelaud, Daniel; Vignoles, Philippe; Dreyfuss, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Individual infections of Egyptian and French Pseudosuccinea columella with five miracidia of Calicophoron daubneyi were carried out to determine whether this lymnaeid was capable of sustaining larval development of this parasite. On day 42 post-exposure (at 23 °C), infected snails were only noted in groups of individuals measuring 1 or 2 mm in height at miracidial exposure. Snail survival in the 2-mm groups was significantly higher than that noted in the 1-mm snails, whatever the geographic origin of snail population. In contrast, prevalence of C. daubneyi infection was significantly greater in the 1-mm groups (15-20% versus 3.4-4.0% in the 2-mm snails). Low values were noted for the mean shell growth of infected snails at their death (3.1-4.0 mm) and the mean number of cercariae (<9 in the 1-mm groups, <19 in the 2-mm snails). No significant differences between snail populations and snails groups were noted for these last two parameters. Most infected snails died after a single cercarial shedding wave. Both populations of P. columella showed an age resistance to C. daubneyi infection and only juveniles measuring 2 mm or less in shell height at exposure can ensure larval development of this digenean up to cercarial shedding. PMID:25664810

  16. Reversing the Resistance Phenotype of the Biomphalaria glabrata Snail Host Schistosoma mansoni Infection by Temperature Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Knight, Matty

    2012-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata snails that display either resistant or susceptible phenotypes to the parasitic trematode, Schistosoma mansoni provide an invaluable resource towards elucidating the molecular basis of the snail-host/schistosome relationship. Previously, we showed that induction of stress genes either after heat-shock or parasite infection was a major feature distinguishing juvenile susceptible snails from their resistant counterparts. In order to examine this apparent association between heat stress and snail susceptibility, we investigated the effect of temperature modulation in the resistant snail stock, BS-90. Here, we show that, incubated for up to 4 hrs at 32°C prior to infection, these resistant snails became susceptible to infection, i.e. shedding cercariae at 5 weeks post exposure (PE) while unstressed resistant snails, as expected, remained resistant. This suggests that susceptibility to infection by this resistant snail phenotype is temperature-sensitive (ts). Additionally, resistant snails treated with the Hsp 90 specific inhibitor, geldanamycin (GA) after heat stress, were no longer susceptible to infection, retaining their resistant phenotype. Consistently, susceptible snail phenotypes treated with 100 mM GA before parasite exposure also remained uninfected. These results provide direct evidence for the induction of stress genes (heat shock proteins; Hsp 70, Hsp 90 and the reverse transcriptase [RT] domain of the nimbus non-LTR retrotransposon) in B. glabrata susceptibility to S. mansoni infection and characterize the resistant BS-90 snails as a temperature-sensitive phenotype. This study of reversing snail susceptibility phenotypes to S. mansoni provides an opportunity to directly track molecular pathway(s) that underlie the B. glabrata snail's ability to either sustain or destroy the S. mansoni parasite. PMID:22577362

  17. The Anguillidae, or the Freshwater Eels

    E-print Network

    Limburg, Karin E.

    1 The Anguillidae, or the Freshwater Eels K. Limburg, Fisheries Science Lecture Notes FishBase.org Anguillids, or freshwater eels 1 genus (Anguilla), 15 species European eel, Anguilla anguilla American eel, ABase.org Tesch, 1977 In contrast with salmons, freshwater eels are catadromous - although not all of them

  18. Submerged macrophytes mitigate direct and indirect insecticide effects in freshwater communities.

    PubMed

    Brogan, William R; Relyea, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how ecological interactions mitigate the impacts of perturbations such as pesticides in biological communities is an important basic and applied question for ecologists. In aquatic ecosystems, new evidence from microcosm experiments suggests that submerged macrophytes can buffer cladocerans from pulse exposures to the widely used insecticide malathion, and that mitigation increases with macrophyte density. However, whether these results scale up to more complex aquatic communities where ecological interactions such as competition can alter toxicity is unknown. Further, macrophyte abilities to mitigate different insecticide exposure scenarios (i.e. single versus repeated pulses) have never been tested. To address these gaps, we performed a factorial mesocosm experiment examining the influence of four macrophyte treatments (0, 10, 50, or 100 Elodea Canadensis shoots planted per mesocosm) crossed with three malathion exposure scenarios (no insecticide, single pulse, repeated pulses) on aquatic communities containing zooplankton, phytoplankton, periphyton, two snail species, and larval amphibians. In the absence of macrophytes, single malathion pulses caused short-term declines in cladoceran abundance followed by their rapid recovery, which precluded any indirect effects (i.e. trophic cascades). However, repeated malathion pulses caused cladoceran extinctions, resulting in persistent phytoplankton blooms and reduced abundance of one snail species. In contrast, with macrophytes present, even at low density, malathion had no effect on any taxa. We also discovered novel effects of macrophytes on the benthic food web. In the two highest macrophyte treatments, we observed trends of reduced periphyton biomass, decreased abundance of one snail species, and decreased amphibian time to and mass at metamorphosis. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of negative submerged macrophyte effects on amphibians, a taxa of global conservation concern. Our findings suggest that facilitating macrophytes could be an important strategy for buffering freshwater communities from insecticides, though consideration of their impacts on animal species is necessary. PMID:25978686

  19. Submerged Macrophytes Mitigate Direct and Indirect Insecticide Effects in Freshwater Communities

    PubMed Central

    Brogan, William R.; Relyea, Rick A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how ecological interactions mitigate the impacts of perturbations such as pesticides in biological communities is an important basic and applied question for ecologists. In aquatic ecosystems, new evidence from microcosm experiments suggests that submerged macrophytes can buffer cladocerans from pulse exposures to the widely used insecticide malathion, and that mitigation increases with macrophyte density. However, whether these results scale up to more complex aquatic communities where ecological interactions such as competition can alter toxicity is unknown. Further, macrophyte abilities to mitigate different insecticide exposure scenarios (i.e. single versus repeated pulses) have never been tested. To address these gaps, we performed a factorial mesocosm experiment examining the influence of four macrophyte treatments (0, 10, 50, or 100 Elodea Canadensis shoots planted per mesocosm) crossed with three malathion exposure scenarios (no insecticide, single pulse, repeated pulses) on aquatic communities containing zooplankton, phytoplankton, periphyton, two snail species, and larval amphibians. In the absence of macrophytes, single malathion pulses caused short-term declines in cladoceran abundance followed by their rapid recovery, which precluded any indirect effects (i.e. trophic cascades). However, repeated malathion pulses caused cladoceran extinctions, resulting in persistent phytoplankton blooms and reduced abundance of one snail species. In contrast, with macrophytes present, even at low density, malathion had no effect on any taxa. We also discovered novel effects of macrophytes on the benthic food web. In the two highest macrophyte treatments, we observed trends of reduced periphyton biomass, decreased abundance of one snail species, and decreased amphibian time to and mass at metamorphosis. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of negative submerged macrophyte effects on amphibians, a taxa of global conservation concern. Our findings suggest that facilitating macrophytes could be an important strategy for buffering freshwater communities from insecticides, though consideration of their impacts on animal species is necessary. PMID:25978686

  20. Larval trematode infections in freshwater gastropods from the Albufera Natural Park in Spain.

    PubMed

    Toledo, R; Muńoz-Antolí, C; Pérez, M; Esteban, J G

    1998-03-01

    Malacological samplings were made from January 1994 to December 1996 in the Albufera Natural Park (Valencia, Spain) to trace the dynamics of molluscan populations and the prevalence and intensity of infection by larval trematodes. A total of 10,533 freshwater gastropods belonging to seven species (Lymnaea auricularia, L. truncatula, L. palustris, L. peregra, Bithynia tentaculata, Physa acuta and Gyraulus chinensis) was examined, and 110 (1.04%) were found to harbour some of the nine distinguishable types of cercariae, namely four echinostome cercariae (Hypoderaeum conoideum, Echinoparyphium recurvatum, Euparyphium albuferensis, and Echinostoma sp.), four furcocercous cercariae, and one xiphidiocercous cercaria. This study shows that the composition of the snail and trematode communities may be determined by the particular environmental conditions present and the human intervention in the area. PMID:9639906

  1. DNA barcodes reveal the presence of the introduced freshwater leech Helobdella europaea in Spain.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Oceguera-Figueroa, Alejandro; Snell, Sara; Negredo, Alicia; Barba, Emilio; Fernández, Luis; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2014-10-01

    Abstract We report the finding of the freshwater leech Helobdella europaea in Spain for the first time. Three leech specimens were found attached to the European pond turtle Emys orbicularis. Helobdella europaea is not a blood feeder and, like all members of the genus, feeds on the hemolymph of aquatic invertebrates including snails and worms. Despite the fact that the original geographical distribution or source population of this species is unknown, the close relationship between H. europaea and leeches of the "triserialis" series (sensu Sawyer, 1986) suggests a New World origin. Given its ability to invade and persist in new environments, this leech has been described as a new species by local taxonomists resulting in some nomenclatural problems. The presence of this introduced organism in Spain may represent serious obstacles to the current efforts to preserve endemic fauna and the potential negative impacts of this species in European environments should be investigated. PMID:23885897

  2. Measurement of Selected Enzymatic Activities in Solanum nigrum-Treated Biomphalaria arabica Snails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Daihan, Sooad

    In the present study, glucose, acid and alkaline phosphatases (ACP and ALP), ?-amylase and lipase were measured for the first time in tissue homogenates of Biomphalaria arabica snails, molluscan intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni in Saudi Arabia. Also, the effect of sublethal concentrations (LC25) of dry powdered Solanum nigrum leaf was tested as plant molluscicide against this snail species. The tested enzymes were altered in molluscicide-treated snails compared to control. While ALP and amylase were slightly affected, ACP and lipase were significantly altered. Glucose as an important energy source for a successful schistosome-snail relationship was significantly reduced in molluscicide-treated snails. In conclusion, sublethal concentration of the molluscicide showed potent effect in disturbing snail biochemistry which may render them physiologically unsuitable for the developing of schistosome parasite. This could be considered as a promising strategy to control the disease.

  3. Effects of endocrine disruptors on prosobranch snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda) in the laboratory. Part III: Cyproterone acetate and vinclozolin as antiandrogens.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, M; Schulte-Oehlmann, U; Duft, M; Markert, B; Oehlmann, J

    2001-12-01

    The effects of suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals on freshwater and marine prosobranch species were analysed in laboratory experiments. In this last of three publications, the responses of the fresh water snail Marisa cornuarietis and of two marine prosobranchs (Nucella lapillus, Nassarius (Hinia) reticulatus) to the antiandrogenic model compounds cyproterone acetate (CPA) and vinclozolin (VZ) are presented. The snails were exposed to nominal CPA concentrations of 1.25 mg/L alone and simultaneously to a potent synthetic estrogen (ethinylestradiol), androgen (methyltestosterone) or an indirectly acting xeno-androgen (tributyltin) in experiments with adult specimens and in a life cycle test for 12 months. Marisa and Nucella were furthermore exposed to nominal concentrations of 0.03-1.0 microgram VZ/L for up to 5 months. The antiandrogens induced a number of biological responses in all three species. The length of the penis and of accessory male sex organs (e.g., penis sheath, prostate) were significantly reduced. For Marisa, this effect occurred only in sexually immature specimens and was reversible as the males attained puberty. Typical androgen-mediated responses (imposex development, delayed spermatogenesis, tubulus necrosis of the testis with orchitis and Leydig cell hyperplasia) were partially or totally suppressed by a simultaneous administration of CPA. In the two marine species even adult, sexually mature males responded to antiandrogens with a reduction of the male sex organs and an advancement of the sexual repose phase. The results for CPA and VZ are compared with the effects of an exposure to xeno-estrogens (bisphenol A, octylphenol) and xeno-androgens (triphenyltin, tributyltin) in the same species. Each group of endocrine disruptors induces a characteristic set of toxicological effects in prosobranch snails which can be used as endpoints in an organismic invertebrate test for the identification of endocrine mimetic test compounds. Estrogens cause primarily an induction of superfemales resulting in an increased female mortality by the enhancement of spawning mass and egg production. The main effects of androgens are a virilization of females by imposex development and a marked decrease of the fecundity. Compared with estrogens and androgens, the antiandrogen responses seem to be less drastic and might have--in contrast to the two other disruptor classes--no biologically significant effects at the population level. PMID:11759570

  4. Use of Bayluscide (Bayer 73) for Snail Control in Fish Ponds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruth Francis-Floyd; James Gildea; Peggy Reed; Ruthellen Klinger

    1997-01-01

    Bayluscide applied to ponds on two commercial fish farms at five rates (from L1 to 13.5 kilogram per surface hectare) effectively controlled aquatic snails. Laboratory toxicity tests confirmed susceptibility of three endemic species of aquatic snail—Melanoides tuberculatus, Physella hendersoni, and Planorbella duryi—to Bayluscide. Observed 24-h concentrations lethal to 50% of snails (LC50) ranged from 0.062 to 0.085 mg\\/L, and 24-h

  5. Effects of dietary exposure to forest pesticides on the brown garden snail Helix aspersa mueller

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Schuytema; A. V. Nebeker; W. L. Griffis

    1994-01-01

    Brown garden snails, Helix aspersa, were fed prepared diets with 12 pesticides used in forest spraying practices where endangered arboreal and terrestrial snails may be at risk. Acephate, atrazine, glyphosate, hexazinone, and picloram were not lethal at concentrations of 5,000 mg\\/kg in 14-day screening tests. The remaining seven pesticides, lethal to 13-100% of the tested snails at 5,000 mg\\/kg, were

  6. Snail and Sonic Hedgehog activation in neuroendocrine tumors of the ileum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Volker Fendrich; Jens Waldmann; Farzad Esni; Annette Ramaswamy; Michael Mullendore; Malte Buchholz; Anirban Maitra; Georg Feldmann

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factor Snail represses E-cadherin and induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a process also exploited by invasive cancer cells. Aberrant Hedgehog (Hh) signaling was recently observed in a variety of epithelial cancers and it has been shown that the Hh target geneGli1 induces expression of Snail. In this study, we examined whether Snail and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) are expressed in neuroendocrine

  7. Removal of corallivorous snails as a proactive tool for the conservation of acroporid corals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dana E; Miller, Margaret W; Bright, Allan J; Cameron, Caitlin M

    2014-01-01

    Corallivorous snail feeding is a common source of tissue loss for the threatened coral, Acropora palmata, accounting for roughly one-quarter of tissue loss in monitored study plots over seven years. In contrast with larger threats such as bleaching, disease, or storms, corallivory by Coralliophila abbreviata is one of the few direct sources of partial mortality that may be locally managed. We conducted a field experiment to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of snail removal. Long-term monitoring plots on six reefs in the upper Florida Keys were assigned to one of three removal treatments: (1) removal from A. palmata only, (2) removal from all host coral species, or (3) no-removal controls. During the initial removal in June 2011, 436 snails were removed from twelve 150 m(2) plots. Snails were removed three additional times during a seven month "removal phase", then counted at five surveys over the next 19 months to track recolonization. At the conclusion, snails were collected, measured and sexed. Before-After-Control-Impact analysis revealed that both snail abundance and feeding scar prevalence were reduced in removal treatments compared to the control, but there was no difference between removal treatments. Recolonization by snails to baseline abundance is estimated to be 3.7 years and did not differ between removal treatments. Recolonization rate was significantly correlated with baseline snail abundance. Maximum snail size decreased from 47.0 mm to 34.6 mm in the removal treatments. The effort required to remove snails from A. palmata was 30 diver minutes per 150 m(2) plot, compared with 51 min to remove snails from all host corals. Since there was no additional benefit observed with removing snails from all host species, removals can be more efficiently focused on only A. palmata colonies and in areas where C. abbreviata abundance is high, to effectively conserve A. palmata in targeted areas. PMID:25469321

  8. Removal of corallivorous snails as a proactive tool for the conservation of acroporid corals

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Margaret W.; Bright, Allan J.; Cameron, Caitlin M.

    2014-01-01

    Corallivorous snail feeding is a common source of tissue loss for the threatened coral, Acropora palmata, accounting for roughly one-quarter of tissue loss in monitored study plots over seven years. In contrast with larger threats such as bleaching, disease, or storms, corallivory by Coralliophila abbreviata is one of the few direct sources of partial mortality that may be locally managed. We conducted a field experiment to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of snail removal. Long-term monitoring plots on six reefs in the upper Florida Keys were assigned to one of three removal treatments: (1) removal from A. palmata only, (2) removal from all host coral species, or (3) no-removal controls. During the initial removal in June 2011, 436 snails were removed from twelve 150 m2 plots. Snails were removed three additional times during a seven month “removal phase”, then counted at five surveys over the next 19 months to track recolonization. At the conclusion, snails were collected, measured and sexed. Before-After-Control-Impact analysis revealed that both snail abundance and feeding scar prevalence were reduced in removal treatments compared to the control, but there was no difference between removal treatments. Recolonization by snails to baseline abundance is estimated to be 3.7 years and did not differ between removal treatments. Recolonization rate was significantly correlated with baseline snail abundance. Maximum snail size decreased from 47.0 mm to 34.6 mm in the removal treatments. The effort required to remove snails from A. palmata was 30 diver minutes per 150 m2 plot, compared with 51 min to remove snails from all host corals. Since there was no additional benefit observed with removing snails from all host species, removals can be more efficiently focused on only A. palmata colonies and in areas where C. abbreviata abundance is high, to effectively conserve A. palmata in targeted areas. PMID:25469321

  9. Effects of dietary exposure to forest pesticides on the brown garden snail Helix aspersa Müller

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Schuytema; A. V. Nebeker; W. L. Griffis

    1994-01-01

    Brown garden snails, Helix aspersa, were fed prepared diets with 12 pesticides used in forest spraying practices where endangered arboreal and terrestrial snails may be at risk. Acephate, atrazine, glyphosate, hexazinone, and picloram were not lethal at concentrations of 5,000 mg\\/kg in 14-day screening tests. The remaining seven pesticides, lethal to 13–100% of the tested snails at 5,000 mg\\/kg, were

  10. Current advances on the study of snail-snail interactions, with special emphasis on competition process.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, J R; dos Santos, M B

    1995-01-01

    Field work research on population dynamic of snails from the regions of Belo Horizonte and Lagoa Santa give much information about interactions among two or more species of mollusks: Pomacea haustrum, Biomphalaria glabrata, B. tenagophila, B. straminea and Melanoides tuberculata. Data ranging from two years to several decades ago suggest that the Pampulha reservoir is like a cemetery of B. glabrata and B. straminea, species that coexist for more than 14 years in a small part of a stream, whereas only B. glabrata lives in all the streams of the basin. In the last ten to twenty years B. tenagophila has coexisted with P. haustrum and M. tuberculata in the Serra Verde ponds and in the Pampulha dam. However these species have not settled in any of the brooks, except temporarily. The data suggest that the kind of biotope and the habitat conditions are decisive factors for the permanence of each species in its preferencial biotope. B. glabrata, natural from streams and riverheads, quickly disappears from the reservoirs and ponds where it coexists with other species for a short time, independently of the competitive process. Competition needs to be better studied, since in Central America and Caribean islands this kind of study has favored the biological control of planorbid species. PMID:8531669

  11. A Population Growth Trend Analysis for Neotricula aperta, the Snail Intermediate Host of Schistosoma mekongi, after Construction of the Pak-Mun Dam

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Stephen W.; Upatham, E. Suchart

    2013-01-01

    Background The Pak-Mun dam is a controversial hydro-power project on the Mun River in Northeast Thailand. The dam is sited in a habitat of the freshwater snail Neotricula aperta, which is the intermediate host for the parasitic blood-fluke Schistosoma mekongi causing Mekong schistosomiasis in humans in Cambodia and Laos. Few data are available which can be used to assess the effects of water resource development on N. aperta. The aim of this study was to obtain data and to analyze the possible impact of the dam on N. aperta population growth. Methodology/Principal Findings Estimated population densities were recorded for an N. aperta population in the Mun River 27 km upstream of Pak-Mun, from 1990 to 2011. The Pak-Mul dam began to operate in 1994. Population growth was modeled using a linear mixed model expression of a modified Gompertz stochastic state-space exponential growth model. The N. aperta population was found to be quite stable, with the estimated growth parameter not significantly different from zero. Nevertheless, some marked changes in snail population density were observed which were coincident with changes in dam operation policy. Conclusions/Significance The study found that there has been no marked increase in N. aperta population growth following operation of the Pak-Mun dam. The analysis did indicate a large and statistically significant increase in population density immediately after the dam came into operation; however, this increase was not persistent. The study has provided the first vital baseline data on N. aperta population behavior near to the Pak-Mun dam and suggests that the operation policy of the dam may have an impact on snail population density. Nevertheless, additional studies are required for other N. aperta populations in the Mun River and for an extended time series, to confirm or refine the findings of this work. PMID:24244775

  12. Acute toxicity of nitrate and nitrite to sensitive freshwater insects, mollusks, and a crustacean.

    PubMed

    Soucek, D J; Dickinson, A

    2012-02-01

    Both point- and nonpoint-sources of pollution have contributed to increased inorganic nitrogen concentrations in freshwater ecosystems. Although numerous studies have investigated the toxic effects of ammonia on freshwater species, relatively little work has been performed to characterize the acute toxicity of the other two common inorganic nitrogen species: nitrate and nitrite. In particular, to our knowledge, no published data exist on the toxicity of nitrate and nitrite to North American freshwater bivalves (Mollusca) or stoneflies (Insecta, Plecoptera). We conducted acute (96-h) nitrate and nitrite toxicity tests with two stonefly species (Allocapnia vivipara and Amphinemura delosa), an amphipod (Hyalella azteca), two freshwater unionid mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea and Megalonaias nervosa), a fingernail clam (Sphaerium simile), and a pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis). Overall, we did not observe a particularly wide degree of variation in sensitivity to nitrate, with median lethal concentrations ranging from 357 to 937 mg NO(3)-N/l; furthermore, no particular taxonomic group appeared to be more sensitive to nitrate than any other. In our nitrite tests, the two stoneflies tested were by far the most sensitive, and the three mollusks tested were the least sensitive. In contrast to what was observed in the nitrate tests, variation among species in sensitivity to nitrite spanned two orders of magnitude. Examination of the updated nitrite database, including previously published data, clearly showed that insects tended to be more sensitive than crustaceans, which were in turn more sensitive than mollusks. Although the toxic mechanism of nitrite is generally thought to be the conversion of oxygen-carrying pigments into forms that cannot carry oxygen, our observed trend in sensitivity of broad taxonomic groups, along with information on respiratory pigments in those groups, suggests that some other yet unknown mechanism may be even more important. PMID:21877224

  13. Freshwater Sculpins: Phylogenetics to Ecology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan B. Adams; David A. Schmetterling

    2007-01-01

    Freshwater sculpins (Cottidae) are a diverse and ecologically important component of cool- and coldwater ecosystems throughout the northern hemisphere. More than 60 sculpin species occur in a variety of habitats, and sculpin distributions range from highly localized to widespread. Despite the frequently high biomass of sculpins and their numerous ecosystem functions, the traditional fisheries management emphasis on sport fishes has

  14. International Year of Freshwater 2003

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-01

    Near the conclusion of the year 2000, the United Nations General Assembly created a resolution to proclaim 2002 as the International Year of Freshwater. Given the importance of freshwater to all human, plant, and animal life, this designation seems altogether fitting and timely. As the resolution notes, it is hoped that many governments and political actors will use the year to increase awareness of the importance of sustainable freshwater use, management, and protection. To this end, this helpful Web site provides a host of online resources designed to educate the web-browsing public about various events related to this overriding theme, along with presenting an online library of publications about freshwater. Visitors can read the online newsletter, Splash, along with browsing a water library, organized by themes (such as water and society and ecosystems), and geographic regions. Another compelling feature are the water proverbs taken from a number of areas, including the Middle East and Latin America. Given the global mission of the site it is refreshing to note that many of the materials are also available in French and Spanish. [KMG

  15. Analysis of Snail1 function and regulation by Twist1 in palatal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenli; Zhang, Yanping; Ruest, L. Bruno; Svoboda, Kathy K. H.

    2013-01-01

    Palatal fusion is a tightly controlled process which comprises multiple cellular events, including cell movement and differentiation. Midline epithelial seam (MES) degradation is essential to palatal fusion. In this study, we analyzed the function of Snail1 during the degradation of the MES. We also analyzed the mechanism regulating the expression of the Snail1 gene in palatal shelves. Palatal explants treated with Snail1 siRNA did not degrade the MES and E-cadherin was not repressed leading to failure of palatal fusion. Transforming growth factor beta 3 (Tgf?3) regulated Snail1 mRNA, as Snail1 expression decreased in response to Tgf?3 neutralizing antibody and a PI-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Twist1, in collaboration with E2A factors, regulated the expression of Snail1. Twist1/E47 dimers bond to the Snail1 promoter to activate expression. Without E47, Twist1 repressed Snail1 expression. These results support the hypothesis that Tgf?3 may signal through Twist1 and then Snail1 to downregulate E-cadherin expression during palatal fusion. PMID:23424071

  16. Structure of mega-hemocyanin reveals protein origami in snails.

    PubMed

    Gatsogiannis, Christos; Hofnagel, Oliver; Markl, Jürgen; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Mega-hemocyanin is a 13.5 MDa oxygen transporter found in the hemolymph of some snails. Similar to typical gastropod hemocyanins, it is composed of 400 kDa building blocks but has additional 550 kDa subunits. Together, they form a large, completely filled cylinder. The structural basis for this highly complex protein packing is not known so far. Here, we report the electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) structure of mega-hemocyanin complexes from two different snail species. The structures reveal that mega-hemocyanin is composed of flexible building blocks that differ in their conformation, but not in their primary structure. Like a protein origami, these flexible blocks are optimally packed, implementing different local symmetries and pseudosymmetries. A comparison between the two structures suggests a surprisingly simple evolutionary mechanism leading to these large oxygen transporters. PMID:25482543

  17. Mercury residues in south Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisemann, J.D.; Beyer, W.N.; Bennetts, R.E.; Morton, Alexandra

    1997-01-01

    Mercury concentrations in the sediments of south Florida wetlands have increased three fold in the last century (Rood et al. 1993). Because south Florida is home to many endemic and endangered species, it is important to understand the potential impacts of mercury in this ecosystem's food web. Recent research by Malley et al. (1996) has shown mollusks to be sensitive indicators of methyl mercury which can reflect small differences in background methyl mercury concentrations. In this study, we attempted to determine if the apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) or its eggs are good indicators of bioavailable mercury. Then, using the apple snail as an indicator, we attempted to determine geographic differences in the concentrations of mercury in south Florida.

  18. Mercury residues in south Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisemann, J.D.; Beyer, W.N.; Morton, A. [National Biological Services, Laurel, MD (United States)] [National Biological Services, Laurel, MD (United States); Bennetts, R.E. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Mercury concentrations in the sediments of south Florida wetlands have increased three fold in the last century. Because south Florida is home to many endemic and endangered species, it is important to understand the potential impacts of mercury in this ecosystem`s food web. Recent research by Malley et al. has shown mollusks to be sensitive indicators of methyl mercury which can reflect small differences in background methyl mercury concentrations. In this study, we attempted to determine if the apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) or its eggs are good indicators of bioavailable mercury. Then, using the apple snail as an indicator, we attempted to determine geographic differences in the concentrations of mercury in south Florida. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Neurohormonal control of cardiac activity in the snail, Helix aspersa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip E. Lloyd

    1978-01-01

    1.The characteristics of a cardioactive peptide(s), LCP, were investigated in the snail,Helix aspersa, to determine if LCP functions as a neurohormone.2.Fractionation of isotonic homogenates of the auricle and sub-esophageal ganglia indicate that LCP is associated with microsomal elements, probably granules observed in electron micrographs of the microsomal pellets.3.Ligation experiments carried out under culture conditions suggest that LCP is transported from

  20. Determinants of paternity in the garden snail Helix aspersa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David W. Rogers; Ronald Chase

    2002-01-01

    Despite the likely importance of post-copulatory sexual selection in simultaneous hermaphrodites, the factors influencing sperm competition in these organisms are generally unknown. We have investigated the effects of dart-shooting, mating order, and several other predictors on the proportion of offspring fathered by penultimate (Pn-1) and ultimate (Pn) sperm donors in multiply mated garden snails, Helix aspersa. While paternity ratios were

  1. Effect of Glyphosate on the Development of Pseudosuccinea columella Snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Tate; J. O. Spurlock; F. A. Christian

    1997-01-01

    .   Glyphosate (Roundup) is one of the most commonly used broad-spectrum herbicides with little to no hazard to animals, man,\\u000a or the environment. Due to its widespread use, there is continuous contamination of the environment in both soil and water\\u000a with this herbicide. There is a paucity of long-term exposure studies with sublethal concentrations of glyphosate on aquatic\\u000a snails. This

  2. Impact of cigarette butt leachate on tidepool snails.

    PubMed

    Booth, David J; Gribben, Paul; Parkinson, Kerryn

    2015-06-15

    In urban areas, cigarette butts are the most common discarded refuse articles. In marine intertidal zones, they often fall into tidepools. We tested how common intertidal molluscs were affected by butt leachate in a laboratory experiment, where snails were exposed to various leachate concentrations. Mortality was very high, with all species showing 100% mortality at the full leachate concentration (5 butts per litre and 2h soak time) after 8days. However, Austrocochlea porcata showed higher mortality than the other 2 species at lower concentrations (10%, 25%) which may affect the relative abundance of the 3 snails under different concentrations of leachate pollution. Also, sublethal effects of leachate on snail activity were observed, with greater activity of Nerita atramentosa than the other 2 species at higher concentrations, suggesting it is more resilient than the other 2 species. While human health concerns predominate with respect to smoking, we show strong lethal and sublethal (via behavioural modifications) impacts of discarded butts on intertidal organisms, with even closely-related taxa responding differently. PMID:25913792

  3. Phenoloxidase activity of Helix aspersa maxima (garden snail, gastropod) hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Raynova, Yuliana; Doumanova, Lyuba; Idakieva, Krassimira Nikolova

    2013-12-01

    The oxygen-transporting protein, hemocyanin (Hc), of the garden snail Helix aspersa maxima (HaH) was isolated and kinetically characterized. Kinetic parameters of the reaction of catalytic oxidation of catechol to quinone, catalyzed by native HaH were determined: the V max value amounted to 22 nmol min(-1) mg(-1), k cat to 1.1 min(-1). Data were compared to those reported for other molluscan Hcs and phenoloxidases (POs). The o-diphenoloxidase activity of the native HaH is about five times higher than the activity determined for the Hcs of the terrestrial snail Helix pomatia and of the marine snail Rapana thomasiana (k cat values of 0.22 and 0.25 min(-1), respectively). The K m values obtained for molluscan Hcs from different species are comparable to those for true POs, but the low catalytic efficiency of Hcs is probably related to inaccessibility of the active sites to potential substrates. Upon treatment of HaH with subtilisin DY, the enzyme activity against substrate catechol was considerably increased. The relatively high proteolytically induced o-diPO activity of HaH allowed using it for preparation of a biosensor for detection of catechol. PMID:24243490

  4. Neuron, Vol. 32, 173176, October 25, 2001, Copyright 2001 by Cell Press Of Snakes, Snails, and Surrogates

    E-print Network

    Kasher, Roni

    Neuron, Vol. 32, 173­176, October 25, 2001, Copyright 2001 by Cell Press Previews Of Snakes, Snails that are conservative substitutes.water snail. The kraits and other elapid snakes lunch on vertebrate prey

  5. THE BIOCIDE TRIBUTYLTIN REDUCES THE ACCUMULATION OF TESTOSTERONE AS FATTY ACID ESTERS IN THE MUD SNAIL (ILYANASSA OBSOLETA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Imposex, the development of male sex characteristics by female gonochoristic snails, has been documented globally and is causally associated with exposure to the ubiquitous environmental contaminant tributyltin (TBT). Elevated testosterone levels in snails also are associated wit...

  6. [Lipids composition and speed of energy metabolism in gastropods].

    PubMed

    Arakelova, E S

    2008-01-01

    Lipid composition of digestive gland and pedal muscle of two northern freshwater pulmonate snails Lymnaea stagnalis and Lymnaea ovata and three marine prosobranch gastropods Littorina obtusata, Littorina littorea, Buccinum undatum from the White Sea was studied. The species differ in ecology, particularly in trophic nabits and motor activity. The content of triacilglycerides both in digestive gland and pedal was higher in littoral dwellers Littorina the activity of which depends on the tide level. The phospholipids content in digestive gland does not differ in quantity in all cases and does not relate to type of feeding or resource quality. In a pedal muscle of marine species the quantity of common phospholipids is higher in comparison with the freshwater ones. The amount of total phospholipids in pedal muscle correlates with mass of metabolic inert formation which constitutes a part of whole mass of snails. The presence of massive shell enhances demands in energy needed for supporting movement and activity. Because the intensity of energy metabolism is related to quantity of total phospholipids, mitochondria and activity of their oxidizing ferments, the presence of thick shell in marine snails together with motor activity costs more in terms of energy than in freshwater snails with thin shell. This hypothesis is supported by the higher specific rate of oxygen consumption in marine snails than in freshwaters. PMID:19140337

  7. Defense response of susceptible and resistant Biomphalaria alexandrina snails against Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Naga, Iman F; Radwan, Eman H

    2012-09-01

    In Egypt, Biomphalaria alexandrina is the intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni. The fates of Schistosoma miracidia in the snails varies between different species of Biomphalaria. The internal defense system is one of the factors that influence the susceptibility pattern of the snails. The interaction between Biomphalaria snails and S. mansoni needs to be identified for each species, and even between the members of the same species with different degrees of susceptibility. In the present study, the first generation of susceptible and resistant parents of B. alexandrina was examined histologically at the 30th day post exposure. The study includes the characterization of the immune response, as expressed by tissue reactions, of susceptible and resistant B. alexandrina snails against S. mansoni. It was also designed to determine the impact of the resistance increase in parent snails, on the mechanisms of interaction of their offspring against infection. The results showed that the infection rate of the offspring from the susceptible parents was 92%. No susceptible offspring was produced from the resistant parents. When the parents were of equal number of susceptible and resistant snails, they gave an offspring with an infection rate of 20%. Susceptible snails that had susceptible parents showed a higher degree of susceptibility than those that had both susceptible and resistant parents. A common feature of the resistant snails was the absence of any viable parasites. The tissue reactions of the resistant snails having only resistant parents occurred at the site of miracidial penetration. In resistant snails for which susceptible ones were included in their parents, the reactions occurred in the deep tissues. These results characterized the immune response of B. alexandrina snails against Schistosoma infection which was found to occur by two different mechanisms. One type of defense occurs in highly resistant snails, and employs direct miracidial destruction soon after parasite penetration. The other type occurs in less resistant snails where a delayed resistance development occurs after the dissemination of the sporocysts in the snail tissues. It seems that B. alexandrina snails respond more or less similar to B. glabrata. The results also proved that the immune response of the internal defense system increased with increasing the number of the inherited resistant genes. PMID:23025090

  8. Phosphorylated P68 RNA Helicase Activates Snail1 Transcription by Promoting HDAC1 Dissociation from the Snail1 Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Christie L.; Lin, Chunru; Liu, Chia-yi; Yang, Liuqing; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear p68 RNA helicase is a prototypical member of the DEAD box family of RNA helicases. P68 RNA helicase has been implicated in cell proliferation and early organ development and maturation. However, the functional role of p68 RNA helicase in these biological processes at the molecular level is not well understood. We previously reported that tyrosine phosphorylation of p68 RNA helicase mediates the effects of PDGF in induction of EMT by promoting ?-catenin nuclear translocation (Yang et.al. Cell 127:139-155 2006). Here we report that phosphorylation of p68 RNA helicase at Y593 up-regulates transcription of the Snail1 gene. The phosphorylated p68 activates transcription of the Snail1 gene by promoting HDAC1 dissociation from the Snail1 promoter. Our results showed that p68 interacted with the nuclear remodeling and deacetylation complex MBD3:Mi-2/NuRD. Thus, our data suggested that a DEAD box RNA unwindase can potentially regulate gene expression by functioning as a protein ‘displacer’ to modulate protein-protein interactions at the chromatin remodeling complex. PMID:20676135

  9. The effect of isolation on reproduction and growth of Pseudosuccinea columella (Pulmonata: Lymnaeidae): a snail-conditioned water experiment.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alfredo; Yong, Mary; Wong, Lin; Sánchez, Jorge

    2002-09-01

    A snail-conditioned water experiment was conducted in Pseudosuccinea columella to test the possible role of a chemical interaction between snails on the diminished growth and fecundity rates found for snails raised in pairs compared to those raised in complete isolation. The results permit to discard the hypothesis of an inhibition of growth and reproduction between snails due to factors released into the water. PMID:12386712

  10. Survival of the Faucet Snail after Chemical Disinfection, pH extremes, and Heated Water Bath Treatments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew J. Mitchell; Rebecca A. Cole

    2008-01-01

    The faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata, a nonindigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia, was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871 and has spread to the mid-Atlantic states, the Great Lakes region, Montana, and most recently, the Mississippi River. The faucet snail serves as intermediate host for several trematodes that have caused large-scale mortality among water birds, primarily in the Great Lakes region

  11. Temperature Tolerance of Red-Rim Melania Melanoides tuberculatus, an Exotic Aquatic Snail Established in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew J. Mitchell; Thomas M. Brandt

    2005-01-01

    The red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus (family Thiaridae), a tropical, nonindigenous aquatic snail, has become established and is spreading in the United States. Concerns associated with the spread of this snail include its potential to displace native snail populations and to transmit trematodes. Of particular concern is the gill trematode Centrocestus formosanus now found in U.S. commercial and wild fish stocks.

  12. Measuring Animal Movements in a Natural Ecosystem: A Mark-Recapture Investigation Using Stream-Dwelling Snails

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Timothy W.

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation, students measure and describe movements of animals in a natural ecosystem. Students mark stream-dwelling snails with nail polish, then search for these snails 1-7 days later. Distances and directions moved by recaptured snails are recorded. Simple statistical techniques are used to answer specific research questions and…

  13. Increased response to cadmium and Bacillus thuringiensis maize toxicity in the snail Helix aspersa infected by the nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita.

    PubMed

    Kramarz, Paulina E; de Vaufleury, Annette; Zygmunt, Piotr M S; Verdun, Cyrille

    2007-01-01

    To determine the effect of nematode infection on the response of snails to selected toxins, we infected Helix aspersa with 0-, 0.25-, 1-, or 4-fold the recommended field dose of a commercial nematode application for agricultural use. In the first experiment, the snails also were exposed to cadmium via food and soil at concentrations of 0, 30, 60, 120, or 240 mg/kg in a full-factorial design. In the second experiment, snails were infected with nematodes and also fed either Bt (expressing Bacillus thuringiensis toxin) maize or non-Bt maize. The snails were weighed at the beginning and end (after four weeks) of the experiments, and mortality was checked daily. Neither exposure of snails to nematodes nor exposure of snails to cadmium or Bt toxin affected the survival rates of snails. The number of dead snails was highest for combinations of nematode treatments with cadmium concentrations of 120 and 240 mg/kg. In both experiments (Bt and cadmium), the growth rate decreased with increasing nematode dose. The Bt maize was not harmful to the snails in the absence of nematodes, but infected snails grew faster when fed non-Bt maize. The growth rate of snails exposed to cadmium decreased with exposure to increasing Cd concentrations and differed significantly between the no-nematode treatment and the treatments with nematode doses of one- and fourfold the recommended field dose. Snails treated with the highest dose of nematodes accumulated the highest cadmium concentrations. PMID:17269462

  14. Hormetic effects of heavy metals in aquatic snails: is a little bit of pollution good?

    PubMed

    Lefcort, Hugh; Freedman, Zachary; House, Sherman; Pendleton, Mathew

    2008-03-01

    Hormesis is the term to describe a stimulatory effects associated with a low dose of a potentially toxic substance or stress. We had anecdotal evidence of hormetic effects in some of our previous experiments concerning the influence of heavy metals on aquatic snail growth and recruitment. We therefore repeated a version of an earlier experiment but this time we expanded our low-dose treatments and increased our sample size. We also explored if metals had a hormetic effect on algae periphyton. We raised snails in outdoor mini-ecosystems containing lead, zinc, and cadmium-contaminated soil from an Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site in the Silver Valley of northern Idaho. The snails came from two sites. One population (Physella columbiana) has evolved for 120 years in the presence of heavy metals and one (Lymnaea palustris) has not. We found that P. columbiana exhibited hormesis with snails exposed to small amounts of metals exhibiting more reproduction and growth than snails not exposed to metals. Naturally occurring Oscillatoria algae also exhibited a hormetic effect of heavy metals but L. palustris did not display hormesis. Large doses negatively impacted all three species. Overall the levels of cadmium, lead, and zinc measured in the tissues of the snails were inversely correlated to the number of snails recruited into the tub populations. Only in comparisons of the lowest metal treatment to the control treatment is a positive effect detected. Indirect effects on competing species of snails, periphyton, and also fishermen, may be less favorable. PMID:18648792

  15. Morphology of Interneurons in the Procerebrum of the Snail Helix aspersa

    E-print Network

    Chase, Ronald

    Terrestrial snails have a highly developed sense of olfaction. Because the procerebrum has a large number:359­372, 1997. r 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Indexing terms: olfaction; cerebral ganglion; gastropod mollusc; biocytin for the successful adaptation of snails to a terrestrial environment, where olfaction is important for their survival

  16. Antinociceptive effects of a pulsed magnetic field in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alex W. Thomas; Martin Kavaliers; Frank S Prato; Klaus-Peter Ossenkopp

    1997-01-01

    Pulsed magnetic fields (patent pending) consisting of approximately 100 ?T (peak), frequency modulated, extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELFMF) were shown to induce a significant degree of antinociception (`analgesia') in the land snail Cepaea nemoralis. Fifteen minute exposures to a specific magnetic field both increased enkephalinase inhibitor induced opioid analgesia and induced analgesia in untreated snails. Injection of the prototypic

  17. Effects of desiccation on two life stages of an invasive snail and its native cohabitant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allison M. Wood; Cody R. Haro; Roger J. Haro; Gregory J. Sandland

    Invasive species are of critical concern as they have the potential to rapidly alter biotic systems around the globe. The\\u000a upper Mississippi River (UMR) system has been recently invaded by the aquatic snail, Bithynia tentaculata, which spread from the Great Lakes region. In addition to potentially impacting native aquatic snails, B. tentaculata also carries three parasites which kill thousands of

  18. Oviposition in land snails requires the successful completion of several metabolically costly processes, including oogenesis,

    E-print Network

    Chase, Ronald

    the optimized conditions of a breeding farm, only 13% of snails Helix aspersa oviposit more than once every of Biologists Ltd doi:10.1242/jeb.00625 Because oviposition in the land snail Helix aspersa is a metabolically). Clutch sizes in H. aspersa vary considerably between populations and under different conditions

  19. Snail ( Helix aspersa ) exposure history and possible adaptation to lead as reflected in shell composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Newman; M. Mulvey; A. Beeby; R. W. Hurst; L. Richmond

    1994-01-01

    Lead sequestration in shell was examined for English and Welsh populations of the common garden snail (Helix aspersa) with different Pb exposure histories. Isotopic Pb ratios provided signatures for Pb source and a means of implying duration of population exposure from decades to millennia. Total Pb concentrations were used to quantify the intensity of exposure experienced by the populations. Snails

  20. BOTANICAL EXTRACTS EXHIBIT DUAL ACTION AGAINST CULEX PIPIENS LARVAE AND BIOMPHALARIA ALEXANDRINA SNAILS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. M. ELYASSAKI; M. M. EL-SAYED

    Some extracts of Euphorbia helioscopia (Euphorbiaceae), Calendula micrantha (Compositae) and Azadriachta indica (Meliaceae) were screened for the control of Culex pipiens larvae, the vector of Filariasis and Biomphalaria alexandrina snails the vector of Schistosomiasis in Egypt. These plants exhibit dual effect on both pests which share the same aquatic breeding habitat and are of medical importance. B. alexandrina snails were

  1. THE EFFECT OF CHEMICAL TREATMENTS ON MELANOIDES TUBERCULATUS, A SNAIL THAT VECTORS AN IMPORTANT FISH TREMATODE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States, Melanoides tuberculatus is a nonindigenous aquatic snail that vectors a trematode infecting both cultured and wild fish species. This snail is now found in 16 states and among other ways is believed to be spread from place to place by the use of contaminated fisheries equipmen...

  2. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF THE RAMS-HORN SNAIL IN COMMERCIAL FISH PONDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trematodes can cause massive infections in fish. The most promising approach for the control of these infections is the reduction or elimination of snails that vector these parasites. This poster is a summary of information from several research efforts aimed at controlling rams-horn snails in com...

  3. Acetylation and hydroxylation of sulphatroxazole in the snail Cepaea hortensis and the slug Arion rufus.

    PubMed

    Vree, T B; Vree, M L; Nouws, J F

    1987-01-01

    The snail Cepaea hortensis can acetylate and hydroxylate sulphatroxazole via a pathway similar to that in man. The principal metabolic pathways, in order of decreasing rate, are hydroxylation, glucuronidation and acetylation. The slug Arion rufus also can acetylate and hydroxylate sulphatroxazole, although, in contrast to the snail, is rate of acetylation is higher than that of hydroxylation. PMID:3564322

  4. Acetylation and hydroxylation of sulphatroxazole in the snail Cepaea hortensis and the slug Arion rufus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. B. Vree; M. L. Vree; J. F. M. Nouws

    1987-01-01

    The snail Cepaea hortensis can acetylate and hydroxylate sulphatroxazole via a pathway similar to that in man. The principal metabolic pathways, in order of decreasing rate, are hydroxylation, glucuronidation and acetylation. The slug Anion rufus also can acetylate and hydroxylate sulphatroxazole, although, in contrast to the snail, is rate of acetylation is higher than that of hydroxylation.

  5. Biological, biochemical, and molecular parameters of Helisoma duryi snails exposed to the pesticides Malathion and Deltamethrin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fayez A. Bakry; Wafaa S. Hasheesh; Salwa A. H. Hamdi

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic environments get contaminated with pesticides residues that result from the application of pesticides in agricultural practices. The present study aimed to evaluate the pesticides Malathion and Deltamethrin on biological and biochemical parameters of Helisoma duryi snails. The results showed that LC10 of the two pesticides caused considerable reduction in survival rates and egg production of treated snails. Glucose concentration

  6. A molecular phylogeography approach to biological invasions of the New World by parthenogenetic Thiarid snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. FACON; J.-P. POINTIER; M. GLAUBRECHT; C. POUX; P. JARNE; P. DAVID

    2003-01-01

    The parthenogenetic snail Melanoides tuberculata , present in tropical fresh waters of most of the Old World before 1950, has now invaded the Neotropical area. The phylogeography of this snail was studied to evaluate the pathways and number of such invasions. Because of parthenogenetic reproduction, individuals are structured into genetical clones. Within populations from both the original and invaded areas,

  7. Demographic Processes Influencing Population Viability of the Iowa Pleistocene snail (Discus macclintocki)

    E-print Network

    Clark, William R.

    Demographic Processes Influencing Population Viability of the Iowa Pleistocene snail (Discus Pleistocene snails (Discus macclintocki) using the robust mark-recapture design to estimate population size will likely affect survival of adults and persistence of the populations. INTRODUCTION The Iowa Pleistocene

  8. Fluoride accumulation in the land snail Oreohelix subrudis from western Montana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. P. Hammer; R. B. Brumson

    1975-01-01

    Land snails of the species Oreohelix subrudis (Pfeiffer Reeve, 1854) were collected and analyzed for their fluoride content. The snails were collected within a region in western Montana that is known to be contaminated with gaseous and particulate fluoride emissions from an aluminum reduction plant. Analyses of the specimens revealed that fluoride accumulation had occurred within the shells and to

  9. Local adaptation of the trematode Fasciola hepatica to the snail Galba truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Dreyfuss, G.; Vignoles, P.; Rondelaud, D.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental infections of six riverbank populations of Galba truncatula with Fasciola hepatica were carried out to determine if the poor susceptibility of these populations to this digenean might be due to the scarcity or the absence of natural encounters between these snails and the parasite. The first three populations originated from banks frequented by cattle in the past (riverbank group) whereas the three others were living on islet banks without any known contact with local ruminants (islet group). After their exposure, all snails were placed in their natural habitats from the end of October up to their collection at the beginning of April. Compared to the riverbank group, snails, which died without cercarial shedding clearly predominated in the islet group, while the other infected snails were few in number. Most of these last snails released their cercariae during a single shedding wave. In islet snails dissected after their death, the redial and cercarial burdens were significantly lower than those noted in riverbank G. truncatula. Snails living on these islet banks are thus able to sustain larval development of F. hepatica. The modifications noted in the characteristics of snail infection suggest the existence of an incomplete adaptation between these G. truncatula and the parasite, probably due to the absence of natural contact between host and parasite. PMID:22910670

  10. A repetitive DNA probe for the sensitive detection of Fasciola hepatica infected snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Kaplan; J. B. Dame; G. R. Reddy; C. H. Courtney

    1995-01-01

    Epizootiologic studies on F. hepatica frequently use microscopic techniques for the detection of infected snails, however, the poor efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity associated with these techniques limit their usefulness. A DNA-based test for the identification of snails infected with larval stages of F. hepatica would solve these problems and enable a level of detection accuracy previosly unavailable. We have cloned

  11. Detection of Fasciola gigantica infection in snails by polymerase chain reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Velusamy; B. P Singh; O. K Raina

    2004-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Fasciola gigantica infection in the snail intermediate host. Fasciola specific primers amplified a 124bp fragment in PCR when the genomic DNA isolated from F. gigantica infected Lymnaea auricularia snails was used as template. In addition to the 124bp amplicon, a ladder of DNA fragments representing amplification of the 124bp repetitive sequences was

  12. Studies on the molluscicidal activity of Agave angustifolia and Pittosporum tobira on schistosomiasis transmitting snails.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdalla M; Abdel-Gawad, Mahfouz M; El-Nahas, Hanan A; Osman, Nadia S

    2015-04-01

    In the search for new molluscicidal plants for controlling the snail vectors of schistosomiasis, laboratory evaluation was made to assess the molluscicidal activity of Agave angustifolia and Pittosporum tobira plants against Biomphalaria alexandrina snails. Results indicated that both plants have promising molluscicidal activity as the LC90 of the dry powder of both plants was 120 ppm. Both plants showed marked cercaricidal and miracidicidal potencies against S. mansoni larvae. The LC90 of both plants (120 ppm) killed most B. alexandrina eggs within 24 h of exposure. The sub-lethal concentrations of both plants markedly suppressed the survival rate of B. alexandrina snails and the mortality increased with increasing the concentrations and the exposure period up to 10 successive weeks. The accumulative toxic effect of these concentrations was continuous during the recovery period. Also, the reproductive rates of exposed snails were greatly affected even through the recovery period. This depression in reproductive ability of snails was accompanied by histological damage in the hermaphrodite glands of exposed snails. Meanwhile, the growth of snails was estimated weekly and it showed great inhibition in exposed snails comparing with the control ones. PMID:26012228

  13. JUVENILE SNAILS, ADULT APPETITES: CONTRASTING RESOURCE CONSUMPTION BETWEEN TWO SPECIES OF APPLESNAILS

    E-print Network

    Burks, Romi

    crassipes (water hyacinth). In addition, we added chemical extracts to reconstituted watermilfoil and water reconstituted resources. All snails, regardless of life-history stage, avoided water hyacinth in either form. Chemical extracts from both water hyacinth and watermilfoil deterred consumption by all snails. When

  14. Dry down impacts on apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) demography: Implications for wetland water management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darby, P.C.; Bennetts, R.E.; Percival, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa Say) are prey for several wetland-dependent predators, most notably for the endangered Florida snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis Vieillot). Management concerns for kites have been raised regarding the impacts of wetland dry downs on snails, but little data exists to validate these concerns. We simulated drying events in experimental tanks, where we observed that snail survival patterns, regardless of hydrology, were driven by a post-reproductive die off. In contrast to earlier reports of little to no dry down tolerance, we found that 70% of pre-reproductive adult-sized snails survived a 12-week dry down. Smaller size classes of snails exhibited significantly lower survival rates (< 50% after eight weeks dry). Field surveys showed that 77% of egg production occurs in April-June. Our hydrologic analyses of six peninsular Florida wetlands showed that most dry downs overlapped a portion of the peak snail breeding season, and 70% of dry downs were ??? 12 weeks in duration. Dry down timing can affect recruitment by truncating annual egg production and stranding juveniles. Dry down survival rates and seasonal patterns of egg cluster production helped define a range of hydrologic conditions that support robust apple snail populations, and illustrate why multiple characteristics of dry down events should be considered in developing target hydrologic regimes for wetland fauna. ?? 2008, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  15. CONTROLLING THE SPREAD OF NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAILS ON WADING GEAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert C. Hosea; Brian Finlayson

    SUMMARY New Zealand mud snails were first reported in Europe during the 1800s and in North America (Idaho) in 1987. Mud snails quickly colonize habitable waters, and they were first discovered in the Owens River in Eastern California in late 1999 and have since spread to the Mokelumne, Calaveras, and Napa rivers, as well as Rush, Hot and Putah creeks.

  16. Herbivory on aquatic vascular plants by the introduced golden apple snail ( Pomacea canaliculata ) in Lao PDR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nils O. L. Carlsson; Jean O. Lacoursičre

    2005-01-01

    The effect of naturally found densities of the exotic and herbivorous golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata) on three dominant aquatic plants – duckweed (Lemna minor), water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and morning glory (Ipomoea aquatica) – was assessed in a wetland survey and quantified in a field experiment in Laos in southeast Asia. Snail grazing reduced plant biomass, but plant species

  17. Supplementary Information Species Optimal N:P Freshwater/ Taxon Source

    E-print Network

    Cyanobacterium 8 Heterosigma akashiwo 13.1 Marine Rhaphydophyte 9 Anabaena solitaria 14.0 Freshwater Coccolithophorid 11 Oscillatoria redekei 17.1 Freshwater Cyanobacterium 8 Anabaena flos-aquae 17.7 Freshwater

  18. Snails and slugs damaging the cut foliage, Cordyline fruticosa and use of biorationals towards their management.

    PubMed

    Karthiga, S; Jegathambigai, V; Karunarathne, M D S D; Svinningen, A; Mikunthan, G

    2012-01-01

    Snails and slugs became a serious molluscan pests and damaging leaves of purple compacta, Cordyline fruticosa extensively grown for export at Green Farm Ltd, Sri Lanka. The export quality of leaves of C. fruticosa is lowered due to feeding of snails, Achantina fulica (Bowditch), Opeas pyrgula Schmacker and Boettgerx and Helix aspersa Muller and slugs incurring great loss to cut foliage industry. Paucity of information is available to understand snails and slugs damage and their host range that limits to develop suitable management practices. Therefore this study was aimed to determine damage, alternate hosts and to develop possible management practices. Snails and slugs damaged mainly fresh leaves of C. fruticosa. The severity of damage was 44.5% in infested field based on the visual rating method. Leaves of cassava, sting bean, okra, cucumber, passion fruit, papaya, Glyricidia and shoe flower were identified as alternate hosts and neem, Ixora and Dracaena spp were not served as alternate hosts. Among the plant materials tested for their repellence against snails and slugs revealed that neem seed powder was an irritant; neem leaves, mint leaves and Lantana leaves were acted as anti-feedant and Salt as chemical repellent. Among the barrier and bait experiments Bordeaux mixture exhibited a significant barrier effect against horizontal movement of snails. Baits made out of Metaldehyde bait, vegetables bait and jaggery had a strong effect in repelling the snails and slugs. Mulching with Madhuca longifolia punnac was the best to reduce the snails and slugs population compared to M. longifolia seed kernel powder. Oil from M. longifolia failed to reduce their population. Hence the results revealed that saponin containing M. longifolia punnac helped to eliminate snails and slugs when used as mulch. Metaldehyde, vegetable and jaggery baits are also useful to minimize their colonization further. Hence combination of these methods will help to prevent snails and slugs from damaging C. fruticosa and benefit to the cut foliage industry to sustain its export quality. PMID:23885439

  19. Occurrence of a Snail Borne Disease, Cercarial Dermatitis (Swimmer Itch) in Doon Valley (Uttarakhand), India

    PubMed Central

    JAUHARI, Rakesh Kumar; NONGTHOMBAM, Pemola Devi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background ‘Cercarial dermatitis’ also known as swimmers itch (Skin allergies) is caused by a trematode parasite, Schistosoma which has two hosts - an invertebrate (snail) and a vertebrate (livestock, human being). Although the availability of both vector snails and pathogens at the selected site the Doon Valley in northern India has already been confirmed but there was a hazy picture of the disease, whether it is due to entrance of cercariae or due to wild variety of grass (Parthenium hysterophorus). The present study is an attempt to provide a way forward towards the vector snails and snail borne diseases in the study area. Methods Snail sampling and identification was done by applying standard methods / using Keys & Catalogues. Associated parasites and cercariometry in snails has been worked out by cercarial shedding. Human involvement at zo-onotic level has been performed in collaboration with Health centers and socio- economic aspect of inhabitants of study area. Results The snail diversity encountered 19 species including the vector species such as Indoplanorbis exustus, Gyraulus convexiusculus, Melanoides tuberculata and Lymnaea acuminata. The cercarial diversity comprised Furcocercous, Monostome, Amphistome and liver fluke / Xiphidiocercaria. During the study (2009–2010), 0.173% was found with cercarial dermatitis among human population in the selected area. The symptoms of disease recorded were red spots and swellings on effected parts of skin. Frequent visits of livestock to the water body and presence of vector snails provides a clue in completing the life cycle of the parasite of the family Schistosomatidae. Conclusion Cercarial dermatitis has been considered a potential risk at those places where warm blooded and snail’s hosts share a link with aquatic bodies with particular emphasis to temperature and time of year.

  20. Use of a saponin based molluscicide to control Pomacea canaliculata snails in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    San Martíns, R; Gelmi, Claudio; de Oliveira, Jaime Vargas; Galo, José Luis; Pranto, Honorio

    2009-10-01

    Pomacea canaliculata snails pose a severe problem to direct seeded rice cultivated in Southern Brazil. Control of this snail is nowadays performed with toxic chemicals such as copper sulfate and fungicides such as fentin. A novel natural molluscicide based on alkali modified quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) saponins was tested under laboratory conditions. Snails were collected in rice fields close to Porto Alegre (State of Rio Grande do Sul) and in Brusque (State of Santa Catarina, 400 km north of Porto Alegre). In Santa Catarina the product was very effective, while in Porto Alegre it had no effect. This unexpected behavior was probably due to the respiratory habits of the snails under different contents of dissolved oxygen in the water. Near Porto Alegre the water used in rice fields is heavily polluted, with dissolved oxygen levels of 1-2 ppm, and the snails rely primarily on their siphon and lungs to breathe. Since saponin control is probably due to an interaction between saponins with the sterols present in the cell walls in the gills, no control was observed. By contrast, in Santa Catarina the dissolved oxygen level of the water is 5-6 ppm, and the snails remain mostly underwater, breathing with their gills. In this case the snails died within 24 h at a dose of 20 and 30 ppm of product. To test this observation, snails grown in polluted waters were forced to remain underwater in saponin solutions and water (control) preventing the use of their siphon to breathe. The snails exposed to saponin solutions died, while the control snails survived, indicating that they were still able to use their gills to breathe. These results indicate that the use of the saponin product is limited to rice fields not irrigated with heavily polluted waters. PMID:19911565

  1. Uranium bioaccumulation in a freshwater ecosystem: impact of feeding ecology.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Lisa D; Evans, Douglas

    2012-11-15

    The objectives of our study were: (1) to determine if there was significant uranium (U) bioaccumulation in a lake that had been historically affected by a U mine and (2) to use a combined approach of gut content examination and stable nitrogen and carbon isotope analysis to determine if U bioaccumulation in fish was linked to foodweb ecology. We collected three species of fish: smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), in addition to several invertebrate species including freshwater bivalves (family: Sphaeriidae), dragonfly nymphs (order: Odonata), snails (class: Gastropoda) and zooplankton (family: Daphniidae). Results showed significant U bioaccumulation in the lake impacted by historical mining activities. Uranium accumulation was 2-3 orders of magnitude higher in invertebrates than in the fish species. Within fish, U was measured in operculum (bone), liver and muscle tissue and accumulation followed the order: operculum>liver>muscle. There was a negative relationship between stable nitrogen ratios ((15)N/(14)N) and U bioaccumulation, suggesting U biodilution in the foodweb. Uranium bioaccumulation in all three tissues (bone, liver, muscle) varied among fish species in a consistent manner and followed the order: bluegill>yellow perch>smallmouth bass. Collectively, gut content and stable isotope analysis suggests that invertebrate-consuming fish species (i.e. bluegill) have the highest U levels, while fish species that were mainly piscivores (i.e. smallmouth bass) have the lowest U levels. Our study highlights the importance of understanding the feeding ecology of fish when trying to predict U accumulation. PMID:22963859

  2. Toxic effects of Cadmium on the garden snail (Helix aspersa)

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.K. (Northrop Services Inc., Corvallis, OR); DeHaven, J.I.; Botts, R.P.

    1981-05-01

    Spreading treated municipal wastes on agricultural and forest lands is becoming an established method of disposal. However, there is concern about the deleterious effects of toxicants, particularly cadmium, in the sludges. Cadmium concentrations in sewage sludge have been reported as high as 1500 ppM. The work reported here is a part of a larger project to investigate the ecological effects of municipal wastes on forest lands. Snails, Helix aspersa, were chosen to examine the entrance of cadmium into terrestrial food chains. This experiment was designed to determine cadmium accumulation, acute toxicity, and behavioral, reproductive and growth responses with increasing levels of cadmium.

  3. Toxicity of botanical insecticides on golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata).

    PubMed

    Ruamthum, W; Visetson, S; Milne, J R; Bullangpoti, V

    2010-01-01

    The molluscicidal activity of crude extracts from five highly potential plants, Annona squamosa seed, Nerium indicum Leaves, Stemona tuberose root, Cyperus rotundus corm and Derris elliptica root was assessed to Pomacea canaliculata. D. elliptica root and C. rotundus corm extracts showed the highest toxicity against 3-month old snails which have LC50 as 23.68 +/- 2.96 mg/l and 133.20 +/- 7.94 mg/l, respectively. The C. rotundus corm extracts were chosen for detoxification enzyme in vivo assay which shows esterase and glutathione S-transferase activity in stomach, intestinal tracts and digestive glands of survival treated P. canaliculata were inhibited. PMID:21542482

  4. Effects of snail grazing and nutrient release on growth of the macrophytes Ceratophyllum demersum and Elodea canadensis and the filamentous green alga Cladophora sp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Agnieszka Pinowska

    2002-01-01

    The effects of snail (Lymnaea (Galba) turricula) nutrient release and grazing on young macrophytes and filamentous green algae were examined in a laboratory experiment. Snails released an average of 24.2 µg PO4-P and 48.9 µg NH4-N g-1 snail FW d-1. Snails consumed Cladophora sp. at the highest rate (45 mg g-1 snail FW d-1), Elodea canadensis at a lower rate

  5. Developmental Consequences of Egg Capsule Attributes among Sibling and Nonsibling Egg Capsules of the Freshwater Snail Lymnaea columella

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keller Kristin

    2002-01-01

    Among invertebrate species, female reproductive energy can be divided two ways, the production of many small eggs each with small amounts of energy or a few large eggs each with large amounts of energy (McEdward, 1988; Baur, 1994; Baur & Baur, 1997). It has also been demonstrated that variation in egg size and energy content among species leads to variation

  6. Bacterial induction of Snail1 contributes to blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Brandon J; Hancock, Bryan M; Bermudez, Andres; Cid, Natasha Del; Reyes, Efren; van Sorge, Nina M; Lauth, Xavier; Smurthwaite, Cameron A; Hilton, Brett J; Stotland, Aleksandr; Banerjee, Anirban; Buchanan, John; Wolkowicz, Roland; Traver, David; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a serious infection of the CNS that results when blood-borne bacteria are able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal meningitis; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate bacterial BBB disruption and penetration are not well understood. Here, we found that infection of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) with GBS and other meningeal pathogens results in the induction of host transcriptional repressor Snail1, which impedes expression of tight junction genes. Moreover, GBS infection also induced Snail1 expression in murine and zebrafish models. Tight junction components ZO-1, claudin 5, and occludin were decreased at both the transcript and protein levels in hBMECs following GBS infection, and this repression was dependent on Snail1 induction. Bacteria-independent Snail1 expression was sufficient to facilitate tight junction disruption, promoting BBB permeability to allow bacterial passage. GBS induction of Snail1 expression was dependent on the ERK1/2/MAPK signaling cascade and bacterial cell wall components. Finally, overexpression of a dominant-negative Snail1 homolog in zebrafish elevated transcription of tight junction protein-encoding genes and increased zebrafish survival in response to GBS challenge. Taken together, our data support a Snail1-dependent mechanism of BBB disruption and penetration by meningeal pathogens. PMID:25961453

  7. Determination and quantification of Schistosoma mansoni cercarial emergence from Biomphalaria glabrata snails.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Matthew S; Lewis, Fred A; Driver, James D; Granath, Willard O

    2014-12-01

    Living and fixed samples of Schistosoma mansoni -infected Biomphalaria glabrata snails were used to determine the relative contributions of different snail tissues to cercarial emergence (shedding). Three methods of observations were employed: (1) direct microscopical observations of shedding snails; (2) microscopic analysis of 5 ?m serial sections (H&E stained) of actively shedding snails; and (3) scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations of snails that were fixed while actively shedding. For this investigation, there were advantages and disadvantages to using each method. We confirmed the results of others that there were 3 tissues of the snail that contributed most prominently to cercarial release (mantle collar, pseudobranch, and headfoot). Based on histological analysis of cercarial accumulations in presumed shedding sites in these 3 tissues, 57% of the cercariae could be seen in the mantle collar, 30.6% in the pseudobranch, and 12.5% in the headfoot. Other anterior structures were involved to a much lesser extent. SEM observations clearly showed cercariae emerging either body first, tail first, or likely emerging en masse from blebs, especially from the mantle collar. These studies provide a more quantitative appraisal of the role the different anterior snail tissues play in cercarial emergence. PMID:25019357

  8. Temperature dependence of Opisthorchis viverrini infection in first intermediate host snail, Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos.

    PubMed

    Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Kulsantiwong, Jutharat; Piratae, Supawadee; Khampoosa, Panita; Thammasiri, Chalida; Suwannatrai, Apiporn; Laha, Thewarach; Grams, Rudi; Loukas, Alex; Tesana, Smarn

    2015-01-01

    Determining of the success of a parasite's infectiveness in its snail host clearly depends on environmental conditions. Temperature, one of the most influential factors impinging on metabolism of cold-blooded animals, is believed to be an important factor in parasitic infection in snails. In order to elucidate the influence of temperature, sex and size of snails on infectivity of Opisthorchis viverrini to its first intermediate host, Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos, 960 snails were divided into 2 groups by sex. Each group was subdivided by their size into small and medium sub-groups. Each snail was fed with embryonated uterine-eggs of O. viverrini at different temperatures (16-37°C, 3°C intervals). Dissections were carried out 1, 7, 14, 28 and 56 days thereafter and detection of O. viverrini infection was undertaken by PCR using specific primers. Infection was strongly temperature-dependent, as temperature increases of 1°C resulted in increased odds of infection 5.4% (P<0.01). A temperature of 34°C gave the highest rate of infection of 44.14%. We also found that the odds of infection in small sized snails was 39.8% higher relative to medium sized snails (P<0.05). Relative to day 1, the decrease in the odds of infection was detected when the day post infection was longer (P<0.01). Proportion of infection in female was not different to male significantly. PMID:24161535

  9. Dining local: the microbial diet of a snail that grazes microbial communities is geographically structured.

    PubMed

    O'Rorke, Richard; Cobian, Gerald M; Holland, Brenden S; Price, Melissa R; Costello, Vincent; Amend, Anthony S

    2015-05-01

    Achatinella mustelina is a critically endangered tree snail that subsists entirely by grazing microbes from leaf surfaces of native trees. Little is known about the fundamental aspects of these microbe assemblages: not taxonomic composition, how this varies with host plant or location, nor whether snails selectively consume microbes. To address these questions, we collected 102 snail faecal samples as a proxy for diet, and 102 matched-leaf samples from four locations. We used Illumina amplicon sequencing to determine bacterial and fungal community composition. Microbial community structure was significantly distinct between snail faeces and leaf samples, but the same microbes occurred in both. We conclude that snails are not 'picky' eaters at the microbial level, but graze the surface of whatever plant they are on. In a second experiment, the gut was dissected from non-endangered native tree snails in the same family as Achatinella to confirm that faecal samples reflect gut contents. Over 60% of fungal reads were shared between faeces, gut and leaf samples. Overall, location, sample type (faeces or leaf) and host plant identity all significantly explained the community composition and variation among samples. Understanding the microbial ecology of microbes grazed by tree snails enables effective management when conservation requires captive breeding or field relocation. PMID:25285515

  10. A molecular role for lysyl oxidase-like 2 enzyme in snail regulation and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Héctor; Del Carmen Iglesias-de la Cruz, Maria; Olmeda, David; Csiszar, Katalin; Fong, Keith S K; Vega, Sonia; Nieto, Maria Angela; Cano, Amparo; Portillo, Francisco

    2005-10-01

    The transcription factor Snail controls epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) by repressing E-cadherin expression and other epithelial genes. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of Snail function are not fully understood. Here we show that lysyl-oxidase-like 2 and 3 (LOXL2 and LOXL3), two members of the lysyl-oxidase gene family, interact and cooperate with Snail to downregulate E-cadherin expression. Snail's lysine residues 98 and 137 are essential for Snail stability, functional cooperation with LOXL2/3 and induction of EMT. Overexpression of LOXL2 or LOXL3 in epithelial cells induces an EMT process, supporting their implication in tumor progression. The biological importance of LOXL2 is further supported by RNA interference of LOXL2 in Snail-expressing metastatic carcinoma cells, which led to a strong decrease of tumor growth associated to increased apoptosis and reduced expression of mesenchymal and invasive/angiogenic markers. Taken together, these results establish a direct link between LOXL2 and Snail in carcinoma progression. PMID:16096638

  11. Comparative toxicity of Paraquat herbicide and some plant extracts in Lymnaea natalensis snails.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Fayez A; Eleiwa, Mona E; Taha, Samir A; Ismil, Somya M

    2013-09-30

    Paraquat has been shown to be a highly toxic compound for humans and animals, and many cases of acute poisoning and death have been reported over the past few decades. The present study was undertaken to evaluate comprehensively herbicides (Paraquat) and some plant extracts to biochemical aspects of Lymnaea natalensis snails. It was found that the exposure of L. natalensis to Paraquat and plant extracts led to a significant reduction in the infectivity of Fasciola gigantica miracidia to the snail. The glucose level in hemolymph of exposed snails was elevated, while the glycogen showed a decrease in soft tissues when compared with the control group. In addition, the activity level of some enzymes representing glycolytic enzymes as hexokinase (HK), pyruvate kinase (PK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) in snail's tissues were reduced in response to the treatment. It was concluded that the pollution of the aquatic environment by herbicide would adversely affect the metabolism of the L. natalensis snails. Snails treated with Agave attenuate, Ammi visnaga, and Canna iridiflora plant had less toxic effect compared to snails treated with Paraquat. PMID:24081640

  12. Allying with armored snails: the complete genome of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Satoshi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yohey; Murakami, Shun-ichi; Watanabe, Tamaki; Fujiyoshi, So; Mino, Sayaka; Sawabe, Tomoo; Maeda, Takahiro; Makita, Hiroko; Nemoto, Suguru; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Hiromi; Watsuji, Tomo-o; Takai, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea vents harbor dense populations of various animals that have their specific symbiotic bacteria. Scaly-foot gastropods, which are snails with mineralized scales covering the sides of its foot, have a gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont in their enlarged esophageal glands and diverse epibionts on the surface of their scales. In this study, we report the complete genome sequencing of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont. The endosymbiont genome displays features consistent with ongoing genome reduction such as large proportions of pseudogenes and insertion elements. The genome encodes functions commonly found in deep-sea vent chemoautotrophs such as sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation. Stable carbon isotope (13C)-labeling experiments confirmed the endosymbiont chemoautotrophy. The genome also includes an intact hydrogenase gene cluster that potentially has been horizontally transferred from phylogenetically distant bacteria. Notable findings include the presence and transcription of genes for flagellar assembly, through which proteins are potentially exported from bacterium to the host. Symbionts of snail individuals exhibited extreme genetic homogeneity, showing only two synonymous changes in 19 different genes (13?810 positions in total) determined for 32 individual gastropods collected from a single colony at one time. The extremely low genetic individuality in endosymbionts probably reflects that the stringent symbiont selection by host prevents the random genetic drift in the small population of horizontally transmitted symbiont. This study is the first complete genome analysis of gastropod endosymbiont and offers an opportunity to study genome evolution in a recently evolved endosymbiont. PMID:23924784

  13. Allying with armored snails: the complete genome of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Satoshi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yohey; Murakami, Shun-ichi; Watanabe, Tamaki; Fujiyoshi, So; Mino, Sayaka; Sawabe, Tomoo; Maeda, Takahiro; Makita, Hiroko; Nemoto, Suguru; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Hiromi; Watsuji, Tomo-o; Takai, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea vents harbor dense populations of various animals that have their specific symbiotic bacteria. Scaly-foot gastropods, which are snails with mineralized scales covering the sides of its foot, have a gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont in their enlarged esophageal glands and diverse epibionts on the surface of their scales. In this study, we report the complete genome sequencing of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont. The endosymbiont genome displays features consistent with ongoing genome reduction such as large proportions of pseudogenes and insertion elements. The genome encodes functions commonly found in deep-sea vent chemoautotrophs such as sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation. Stable carbon isotope ((13)C)-labeling experiments confirmed the endosymbiont chemoautotrophy. The genome also includes an intact hydrogenase gene cluster that potentially has been horizontally transferred from phylogenetically distant bacteria. Notable findings include the presence and transcription of genes for flagellar assembly, through which proteins are potentially exported from bacterium to the host. Symbionts of snail individuals exhibited extreme genetic homogeneity, showing only two synonymous changes in 19 different genes (13?810 positions in total) determined for 32 individual gastropods collected from a single colony at one time. The extremely low genetic individuality in endosymbionts probably reflects that the stringent symbiont selection by host prevents the random genetic drift in the small population of horizontally transmitted symbiont. This study is the first complete genome analysis of gastropod endosymbiont and offers an opportunity to study genome evolution in a recently evolved endosymbiont. PMID:23924784

  14. Characterizations of cholinesterases in golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata).

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiang-Hui; Xie, Heidi Qun-Hui; Zha, Guang-Cai; Chen, Vicky Ping; Sun, Yan-Jie; Zheng, Yu-Zhong; Tsim, Karl Wah-Keung; Dong, Tina Ting-Xia; Choi, Roy Chi-Yan; Luk, Wilson Kin-Wai

    2014-07-01

    Cholinesterases (ChEs) have been identified in vertebrates and invertebrates. Inhibition of ChE activity in invertebrates, such as bivalve molluscs, has been used to evaluate the exposure of organophosphates, carbamate pesticides, and heavy metals in the marine system. The golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata) is considered as one of the worst invasive alien species harmful to rice and other crops. The ChE(s) in this animal, which has been found recently, but poorly characterized thus far, could serve as biomarker(s) for environmental surveillance as well as a potential target for the pest control. In this study, the tissue distribution, substrate preference, sensitivity to ChE inhibitors, and molecular species of ChEs in P. canaliculata were investigated. It was found that the activities of both AChE and BChE were present in all test tissues. The intestine had the most abundant ChE activities. Both enzymes had fair activities in the head, kidney, and gills. The BChE activity was more sensitive to tetra-isopropylpyrophosphoramide (iso-OMPA) than the AChE. Only one BChE molecular species, 5.8S, was found in the intestine and head, whereas two AChE species, 5.8S and 11.6S, were found there. We propose that intestine ChEs of this snail may be potential biomarkers for manipulating pollutions. PMID:24217797

  15. Chemosensitivity of the osphradium of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer; Schild

    1995-01-01

    The osphradium of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis was studied to determine the stimuli to which this organ responds. The following stimuli were tested: hypoxia, hypercapnia, a mixture of amino acids, a mixture of citralva and amyl acetate and a mixture of lyral, lilial and ethylvanillin. The mean nerve activity consistently increased with elevated PCO2, whereas hypoxia produced variable effects. The nerve activity became rhythmic upon application of citralva and amyl acetate, but it increased in a non-rhythmic way upon application of the other two odorant mixtures tested. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from a group of 15 neurones that lay next to the issuing osphradial nerve, to determine whether ganglion cells were involved in olfactory signal processing. All neurones tested responded to at least one of the three mixtures of odorants. Both excitatory and inhibitory responses occurred. Our results indicate that the osphradium of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis is sensitive to elevated PCO2 as well as to three different classes of odorants. In addition, at least some neurones within the osphradium are involved in the processing of olfactory information. PMID:9319649

  16. Suitability of six lymnaeid snails for infection with Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Reyes, A; Malek, E A

    1987-05-01

    The suitability of Fossaria (Bakerilymnaea) cubensis and Pseudosuccinea columella from Louisiana as intermediate hosts for Fasciola hepatica was compared to P. columella and Stagnicola elodes from Ann Arbor, MI, S. attenuata from Hidalgo, Mexico, Lymnaea gedrosiana from Iran and L. natalensis from Senegal. P. columella from LA was shown to be a more suitable host (51.3% became infected) than F. (B.) cubensis (15.2% and 26.4% of two populations became infected). The infection rate for P. columella from MI, was 50% and for L. gedrosiana was 32.5%, whereas L. natalensis, S. elodes and S. attenuata were refractory. F. (B.) cubensis and P. columella have some degree of suitability as intermediate hosts for F. hepatica under laboratory conditions, but field observations of their habitat in southern LA and characteristic management of cattle indicate that the former snail is more important as an intermediate host in this enzootic area. Tissue sections of suitable snails had few histopathological effects but physical damage caused by rediae was pronounced, mainly in the digestive gland and in the mantle. PMID:3617426

  17. Freshwater for resilience: a shift in thinking.

    PubMed Central

    Folke, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Humanity shapes freshwater flows and biosphere dynamics from a local to a global scale. Successful management of target resources in the short term tends to alienate the social and economic development process from its ultimate dependence on the life-supporting environment. Freshwater becomes transformed into a resource for optimal management in development, neglecting the multiple functions of freshwater in dynamic landscapes and its fundamental role as the bloodstream of the biosphere. The current tension of these differences in worldview is exemplified through the recent development of modern aquaculture contrasted with examples of catchment-based stewardship of freshwater flows in dynamic landscapes. In particular, the social and institutional dimension of catchment management is highlighted and features of social-ecological systems for resilience building are presented. It is concluded that this broader view of freshwater provides the foundation for hydrosolidarity. PMID:14728796

  18. Radix natalensis: the effect of Fasciola hepatica infection on the reproductive activity of the snail

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Yasser; Vignoles, Philippe; Rondelaud, Daniel; Dreyfuss, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Experimental infections of Egyptian Radix natalensis (shell height at miracidial exposure: 4 mm) with a French isolate of Fasciola hepatica were carried out under laboratory conditions at 22 °C to specify the characteristics and follow the dynamics of their egg-laying. Controls constituted unexposed R. natalensis of the same size. No significant difference between controls and the uninfected snails of the exposed group was noted, whatever the parameter considered. In controls and exposed snails, the dates of the first egg masses were close to each other (56.4–65.3 days). In contrast, the life span of snails and the length of the egg-laying period were significantly shorter and egg production was significantly lower in infected R. natalensis than in controls and uninfected snails. In infected R. natalensis, but without cercarial shedding (NCS snails), egg production was irregular throughout the egg-laying period. In cercarial-shedding (CS) snails, the first egg masses were laid before the first cercarial emergence (at a mean of 56 days and 67 days, respectively). Thereafter, egg mass production of CS snails was irregular up to day 72 of the experiment, stopped during the following two weeks and started again after day 88 for a single snail. In conclusion, the F. hepatica infection of R. natalensis reduced the reproductive activity in both NCS and CS snails. The pattern noted for egg production in infected R. natalensis seems to be species-specific because of the high shell size of this lymnaeid and its role as an atypical intermediate host in the life cycle of the parasite. PMID:24871866

  19. The ectopic expression of Snail in MDBK cells does not induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Genya; Kobayashi, Wakako; Haraguchi, Misako; Sudo, Akiharu; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in the tumor metastatic cascade, is characterized by the loss of cell-cell junctions and cell polarity, as well as by the acquisition of migratory and invasive properties. However, the precise molecular events that initiate this complex EMT process are poorly understood. Snail expression induces EMT in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line, A431. Snail is a zinc finger transcription factor and triggers EMT by suppressing E-cadherin expression. In the present study, to broaden our knowledge of Snail?induced EMT, we generated stable Snail transfectants using Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Contrary to the MDCK or A431 cells examined in our previous studies, the MDBK cells transfected with the Snail construct maintained an epithelial morphology and showed no sign of reduced cell-cell adhesiveness compared to the control cells. Consistent with these observations, the downregulation of epithelial marker proteins, e.g. E-cadherin and desmoglein, and the upregulation of mesenchymal marker proteins, e.g., N-cadherin and fibronectin, were not detected. Furthermore, the E-cadherin promoter was not methylated. Therefore, in the MDBK cells, the ectopic expression of Snail failed to induce EMT. As previously demonstrated, in MDCK cells, Snail expression is accompanied by the increased expression of other EMT-inducing transcription factors, e.g., Slug and zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1). However, the MDBK cells transfected with the Snail construct did not exhibit an increased expression of these factors. Thus, it is possible that the failure to upregulate other EMT-related transcription factors may explain the lack of Snail-mediated induction of EMT in MDBK cells. PMID:25998899

  20. Snail Transcription Factor Regulates Neuroendocrine Differentiation in LNCaP Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    McKeithen, Danielle; Graham, Tisheeka; Chung, Leland W. K.; Odero-Marah, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Background Snail transcription factor induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via decreased cell adhesion-associated molecules like E-cadherin, and increased mesenchymal markers like vimentin. We previously established Snail-mediated EMT model utilizing androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. These cells express increased vimentin protein and relocalization of E-cadherin from the cell membrane to the cytosol. Interestingly, Snail transfection in LNCaP cells resulted in cells acquiring a neuroendocrine-like morphology with long neurite-like processes. Methods We tested for expression of neuroendocrine markers neuron specific enolase (NSE) and chromogranin A (CgA) by Western blot analysis, and performed proliferation assays to test for paracrine cell proliferation. Results LNCaP cells transfected with Snail displayed increase in the neuroendocrine markers, NSE and CgA as well as translocation of androgen receptor to the nucleus. LNCaP C-33 cells that have been previously published as a Neuroendocrine Differentiation (NED) model exhibited increased expression levels of Snail protein as compared to LNCaP parental cells. Functionally, conditioned medium from the LNCaP-Snail transfected cells increased proliferation of parental LNCaP and PC-3 cells, which could be abrogated by NSE/CgA siRNA. Additionally, NED in LNCaP-C33 cells or that induced in parental LNCaP cells by serum starvation could be inhibited by knockdown of Snail with siRNA. Conclusion Overall our data provide evidence that Snail transcription factor may promote tumor aggressiveness in the LNCaP cells through multiple processes; induction of EMT may be required to promote migration, while NED may promote tumor proliferation by a paracrine mechanism. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail may prove beneficial in not only abrogating EMT but also NED. PMID:20166136

  1. On the interpretation of age-prevalence curves for schistosome infections of host snails.

    PubMed

    Woolhouse, M E

    1989-08-01

    The prevalence of schistosome infections in intermediate host snails varies with snail age. The relationship between age and prevalence, the age-prevalence curve, is complex and may vary in space and time, and among parasite-host species. Field studies show that the shape of the age-prevalence curve may be seasonally variable, and that at some times there may be a decline in prevalence among older snails. This paper attempts to explain these observations in terms of the underlying epidemiological processes. A discrete-time version of Muench's catalytic model for age-dependent infection is developed. Model simulations were carried out using life-history and epidemiological parameters derived from studies of Schistosoma haematobium-Bulinus globusus in Zimbabwe. Analysis of model behaviour identifies aspects of the schistosome-snail interaction that affect the shape of the age-prevalence curve. The following features can result in a decline in prevalence among older snails. (1) A decrease in the survival rate of patent infected snails with age. (2) A decrease in the force of infection with age. (3) A high rate of loss of infection. (4) A heterogeneity in the snail population such that the probability of infection is correlated with snail fecundity. (This would occur if there existed a spatial correlation between force of infection and fecundity, or if there were a correlation between fecundity and susceptibility.) The evidence for the occurrence of these features in the field is assessed. Survival rate is related more closely to the duration of patent infection than to age per se. The evidence for age-dependent force of infection is equivocal. Significant loss-of-infection rates have yet to be demonstrated. Heterogeneities in force of infection and fecundity have been reported and, for the Zimbabwe data, this mechanism can explain seasonality in the age-prevalence curve as a function of known seasonal variation in the force of infection and snail fecundity. PMID:2797871

  2. Interannual variations of freshwater in Hornsund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dřlven, Knut Ola; Falck, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Hornsund is a fjord situated at the south-west coast of Spitsbergen. The main goal of this study is to calculate and describe the interannual variations of freshwater content in Hornsund. In addition to this, we aim to trace the freshwater sources to the fjord and calculate the fractional contributions from these by using oxygen isotope data. The mixing between these freshwater sources and oceanic waters is described as well as the general summer hydrography of the fjord. Calculation of freshwater content is based on Conductivity-Temperature-Depth data obtained in July of 2001 to 2014. Oxygen isotope data are obtained in Autumn 2013/2014 and Spring 2014. The freshwater in Hornsund is assumed to be provided by either meteoric freshwater sources (glacial melt/precipitation/river-runoff) or the melting of sea ice. Both sources can be produced locally or advected into the fjord. The fraction of the ą?O isotope (?ą?O) is an effective tracer for freshwater sources in the Arctic due to the progressive depletion of this isotope in water molecules during poleward atmospheric transport (Ostlund and Hut, 1984). Calculation of fractional contribution from the two freshwater sources is done based on a method presented in Ostlund and Hut (1984), where the mass-balance, salinity-balance and ?ą?O-balance are utilized to calculate the fractions of seawater, meteoric water and sea ice meltwater. Preliminary results show freshwater content varying between 0.211kmł and 1.068kmł, based on a reference salinity of 34.2. In Autumn 2013, meteoric water was the largest contributor of freshwater to the fjord. However, there was a significant contribution of sea ice meltwater which had a deeper vertical distribution than the meteoric water. References: H. G. Ostlund and G. Hut. 1984. Arctic Ocean water mass balance from isotope data. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 89(C4):6373-6381

  3. Snail2 promotes osteosarcoma cell motility through remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and regulates tumor development.

    PubMed

    Sharili, Amir-Shaya; Allen, Steve; Smith, Ken; Price, Joanna; McGonnell, Imelda M

    2013-06-10

    The function of Snail2 in mesenchymal tumors is, to date unknown. Using knockdown and overexpression studies, we show that Snail2 regulates migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells. Knockdown resulted in significantly decreased motility, remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, and loss of cellular protrusions. Over-expression increased motility, formation of actin-rich cellular protrusions, and altered expression of some non-canonical Wnt pathway components whilst decreasing expression of the adhesion molecule OB-cadherin. Unexpectedly, knockdown also resulted in significantly smaller tumors in an in vivo CAM assay. Therefore Snail2 may be a potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention of osteosarcoma. PMID:23352643

  4. Trophic Ecology of Freshwater Drum in Large Rivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David H. Wahl; Kathleen Bruner; Larry A. Nielsen

    1988-01-01

    We compared growth and diets of freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) collected from the Ohio and Kanawha rivers to those reported in the literature for freshwater drum in lentic systems. Diets of freshwater drum in large rivers were primarily composed of detritivores such as molluscs, crayfish and collector-gatherer invertebrates (trichopterans, ephemeropterans and dipterans) whereas zooplankton (cladoceran) and dipteran prey dominated freshwater

  5. Life cycle stages of heterophyid trematodes in Vietnamese freshwater fishes traced by molecular and morphometric methods.

    PubMed

    Skov, Jakob; Kania, Per W; Dalsgaard, Anders; Jřrgensen, Thomas R; Buchmann, Kurt

    2009-03-01

    A survey of digenean zoonotic trematodes infecting snails and fishes in a North Vietnamese freshwater fish culture system revealed shedding of three types of parapleurolophocercous cercariae from the snail host Melanoides tuberculata and the presence of metacercariae within the genus Haplorchis (H. pumilio and H. taichui) and Procerovum sp. in tissues of cultured fishes (silver carp, Indian carp and climbing perch). No morphological characters were able to link the different cercariae specifically to any of the metacercariae. Subsequent molecular work including PCR and sequencing of ribosomal DNA (the ITS2 region) in cercariae and metacercariae associated only one type of the cercariae to the recovered H. pumilio metacercariae. Further, full identity (100%) was found with regard to the ITS sequence of adult H. pumilio obtained from the same North Vietnamese region. None of the cercariae showed sequence identities with H. taichui but more than 99% identity was found between one cercaria type and the Procerovum sp. metacercaria. It was indicated that trematode parasites of farmed fishes may originate from sources outside the fish ponds and may be introduced as free-swimming cercariae when pond water is being replenished by river water. Likewise, cercariae from the ponds may not always result in metacercarial infections of the farmed fishes. The present study frames the needs for including molecular techniques as auxiliary tools when conducting ecological studies of cercariae in complex ecosystems. The parasites recorded in the fish ponds are not only known to affect the health of aquacultured fishes but also the documented zoonotic potential of the diagnosed metacercaria calls for alerts regarding human consumption of raw or inadequately processed fish dishes. PMID:19056180

  6. Down-regulation of SNAIL suppresses MIN mouse tumorigenesis: Modulation of apoptosis,

    E-print Network

    Ottino, Julio M.

    Down-regulation of SNAIL suppresses MIN mouse tumorigenesis: Modulation of apoptosis, proliferation of apoptosis and proliferation. Furthermore, microarchitec- tural alterations were determined through apoptosis rate (2-fold), decreased

  7. Effects of eutrophication and snails on Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) invasion

    E-print Network

    Effects of eutrophication and snails on Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) invasion; accepted in revised form 10 October 2005 Key words: eutrophication, food web, invasive species) run- off, which causes eutrophication. Eutrophication has a myriad of negative consequences, including

  8. Snail1 is stabilized by O-GlcNAc modification in hyperglycaemic condition

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Yoon; Kim, Hyun Sil; Kim, Nam Hee; Ji, Suena; Cha, So Young; Kang, Jeong Gu; Ota, Ichiro; Shimada, Keiji; Konishi, Noboru; Nam, Hyung Wook; Hong, Soon Won; Yang, Won Ho; Roth, Jürgen; Yook, Jong In; Cho, Jin Won

    2010-01-01

    Protein O-phosphorylation often occurs reciprocally with O-GlcNAc modification and represents a regulatory principle for proteins. O-phosphorylation of serine by glycogen synthase kinase-3? on Snail1, a transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin and a key regulator of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) programme, results in its proteasomal degradation. We show that by suppressing O-phosphorylation-mediated degradation, O-GlcNAc at serine112 stabilizes Snail1 and thus increases its repressor function, which in turn attenuates E-cadherin mRNA expression. Hyperglycaemic condition enhances O-GlcNAc modification and initiates EMT by transcriptional suppression of E-cadherin through Snail1. Thus, dynamic reciprocal O-phosphorylation and O-GlcNAc modification of Snail1 constitute a molecular link between cellular glucose metabolism and the control of EMT. PMID:20959806

  9. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  10. Mitochondrial differentiation in a polymorphic land snail: evidence for Pleistocene survival within the boundaries of permafrost

    E-print Network

    Wirth, Thierry

    Mitochondrial differentiation in a polymorphic land snail: evidence for Pleistocene survival within arbustorum; dispersal; mitochondrial DNA; phylogeography; Pleistocene; polymorphism; refugia. Abstract the Pleistocene glaciations depends to a great extent on the speed of expansion. Slow dispersers maintain

  11. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  12. Loss of polarity protein AF6 promotes pancreatic cancer metastasis by inducing Snail expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Chang, Renxu; Peng, Zhiyong; Wang, Yanmei; Ji, Weiwei; Guo, Jingyu; Song, Lele; Dai, Cheng; Wei, Wei; Wu, Yanjun; Wan, Xinjian; Shao, Chenghao; Zhan, Lixing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a particularly lethal form of cancer with high potential for metastasis to distant organs. Disruption of cell polarity is a hallmark of advanced epithelial tumours. Here we show that the polarity protein AF6 (afadin and MLLT4) is expressed at low levels in PC. We demonstrate that depletion of AF6 markedly promotes proliferation and metastasis of PC cells through upregulation of the expression of Snail protein, and this requires the nuclear localization of AF6. Furthermore, AF6 deficiency in PC cells leads to increased formation of a Dishevelled 2 (Dvl2)-FOXE1 complex on the promoter region of Snail gene, and activation of Snail expression. Altogether, our data established AF6 as a potential inhibitor of metastasis in PC cells. Targeting the Dvl2-FOXE1-Snail signalling axis may thus represent a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26013125

  13. THE BIOCIDE TRIBUTYLTIN ALTERS TESTOSTERONE ESTERIFICATION IN MUD SNAILS (ILYANASSA OBSOLETA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Biocide Tributyltin Alters Testosterone Esterification in Mud Snails (Ilyanassa obsoleta) Meredith P. Gooding and Gerald A. LeBlanc Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7633 Tributyltin (TBT...

  14. Detection of Fasciola gigantica infection in snails by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, R; Singh, B P; Raina, O K

    2004-02-26

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Fasciola gigantica infection in the snail intermediate host. Fasciola specific primers amplified a 124 bp fragment in PCR when the genomic DNA isolated from F. gigantica infected Lymnaea auricularia snails was used as template. In addition to the 124 bp amplicon, a ladder of DNA fragments representing amplification of the 124 bp repetitive sequences was observed. Genomic DNA of the parasite was used as a positive control, which also gave an amplification of the 124 bp fragment. DNA isolated from non-infected snails was used as a negative control and no amplification of this sequence was observed. This technique is highly specific and sensitive and possesses fairly good prospects of its utility as an epidemiological tool for ascertaining the infectivity status in ubiquitous snail populations. PMID:15019146

  15. Bioluminescent signals spatially amplified by wavelength-specific diffusion through the shell of a marine snail

    PubMed Central

    Deheyn, Dimitri D.; Wilson, Nerida G.

    2011-01-01

    Some living organisms produce visible light (bioluminescence) for intra- or interspecific visual communication. Here, we describe a remarkable bioluminescent adaptation in the marine snail Hinea brasiliana. This species produces a luminous display in response to mechanical stimulation caused by encounters with other motile organisms. The light is produced from discrete areas on the snail's body beneath the snail's shell, and must thus overcome this structural barrier to be viewed by an external receiver. The diffusion and transmission efficiency of the shell is greater than a commercial diffuser reference material. Most strikingly, the shell, although opaque and pigmented, selectively diffuses the blue-green wavelength of the species bioluminescence. This diffusion generates a luminous display that is enlarged relative to the original light source. This unusual shell thus allows spatially amplified outward transmission of light communication signals from the snail, while allowing the animal to remain safely inside its hard protective shell. PMID:21159673

  16. Bioaccumulative and conchological assessment of heavy metal transfer in a soil-plant-snail food chain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) can pose serious threats to environmental health because they tend to bioaccumulate in terrestrial ecosystems. We investigated under field conditions the transfer of these heavy metals in a soil-plant-snail food chain in Banat area, Romania. The main goal of this paper was to assess the Roman snail (Helix pomatia) usefulness in environmental monitoring as bioindicator of heavy metal accumulation. Eight sampling sites, selected by different history of heavy metal (HM) exposure, were chosen to be sampled for soil, nettle leaves, and newly matured snails. This study also aimed to identify the putative effects of HM accumulation in the environment on phenotypic variability in selected shell features, which included shell height (SH), relative shell height (RSH), and whorl number (WN). Results Significantly higher amounts of HMs were accumulated in snail hepatopancreas and not in foot. Cu, Zn, and Cd have biomagnified in the snail body, particularly in the hepatopancreas. In contrast, Pb decreased when going up into the food chain. Zn, Cd, and Pb correlated highly with each other at all levels of the investigated food chain. Zn and Pb exhibited an effective soil–plant transfer, whereas in the snail body only foot Cu concentration was correlated with that in soil. There were significant differences among sampling sites for WN, SH, and RSH when compared with reference snails. WN was strongly correlated with Cd and Pb concentrations in nettle leaves but not with Cu and Zn. SH was independent of HM concentrations in soil, snail hepatopancreas, and foot. However, SH correlated negatively with nettle leaves concentrations for each HM except Cu. In contrast, RSH correlated significantly only with Pb concentration in hepatopancreas. Conclusions The snail hepatopancreas accumulates high amounts of HMs, and therefore, this organ can function as a reliable biomarker for tracking HM bioavailability in soil. Long-term exposure to HMs via contaminated food might influence the variability of shell traits in snail populations. Therefore, our results highlight the Roman snail (Helix pomatia) potential to be used in environmental monitoring studies as bioindicator of HM pollution. PMID:22703871

  17. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack.

    PubMed

    Scherbakov, Alexander M; Stefanova, Lidia B; Sorokin, Danila V; Semina, Svetlana E; Berstein, Lev M; Krasil'nikov, Mikhail A

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors--from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O2 atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK - the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well the level of AMPK phosphorylation may be considered as predictors of the tumor sensitivity to anti-angiogenic drugs. PMID:23973669

  18. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  19. Toxicity of Euphorbia milii Latex and Niclosamide to Snails and Nontarget Aquatic Species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo C. Oliveira-Filho; Francisco J. R. Paumgartten

    2000-01-01

    The toxicity of Euphorbia milii molluscicidal latex and niclosamide (NCL) to target snails (Biomphalaria glabrata and Biomphalaria tenagophila) and nontarget aquatic organisms is evaluated. Planorbidae snails were killed by very low concentrations of lyophilized latex (48-h LC50, mg\\/L: B. glabrata, 0.12; B. tenagophila, 0.09; Helisoma duryi, 0.10). Latex was less toxic (48-h LC50 or EC50, mg\\/L) to oligochaeta (Tubifex tubifex,

  20. Effect of 2450 MHz microwave radiation on the ultrastructure of snail neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Arber, S.L.; Neilly, J.P.; Lin, J.C.; Kriho, V.

    1986-01-01

    An electron microscopical study of snail neurons was undertaken to verify whether any ultrastructural alterations accompany microwave-induced electrophysiological changes observed in these neurons. Subesophageal ganglia from Helix aspersa snails were exposed to 2450 MHz microwave radiation in vitro at SAR 12.9 mW/g for 60 minutes. It was found that exposure at 21 degrees C causes minor changes in Golgi complexes and slight swelling of the endoplasmic reticulum.

  1. The Giant Snail Achatina fulica as a Candidate Species for Advanced Bioregenerative Life Support Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbitskaya, Olga; Manukovsky, Nickolay; Kovalev, Vladimir

    Maintenance of crew health is of paramount importance for long duration space missions. Weight loss, bone and calcium loss, increased exposure to radiation and oxidative stress are critical concerns that need to be alleviated. Rational nutrition is a resource for mitigating the influence of unfavorable conditions. The insufficiency of vegetarian diet has been examined by the Japanese, Chinese and U.S. developers of bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). Hence, inclusion of animals such as silkworm in BLSS looks justified. The giant snail is currently under studying as a source of animal food and a species of reducing waste in BLSS. An experimental system to conduct cultivation of giant snail was developed. It was established that there are some reasons to use the giant snails in BLSS. It could be a source of delicious meat. A. fulica is capable of consuming a wide range of feedstuffs including plant residues. Cultivation of snail in the limited volume does not demand the big expenditures of labor. The production of crude edible biomass and protein of A. fulica was 60±15 g and 7±1.8 g respectively per 1 kg of consumed forage (fresh salad leaves, root and leafy tops of carrot). To satisfy daily animal protein needs (30-35 g) a crewman has to consume 260-300 g of snail meat. To produce such amount of snail protein it takes to use 4.3-5.0 kg of plant forage daily. The nutritional composition of A. fulica whole bodies (without shell) and a meal prepared in various ways was quantitatively determined. Protein, carbohydrate, fat acid and ash content percentages were different among samples prepared in various ways. The protein content was highest (68 %) in the dry sample washed with CH3 COOH solution. Taking into consideration the experimental results a conceptual configuration of BLSS with inclusion of giant snail was developed and mass flow rates between compartments were calculated. Keywords: animal food; protein; giant snail; BLSS; conceptual configuration.

  2. Refuge function of marine algae complicates selection in an intertidal snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petri Kemppainen; Solveig van Nes; Christofer Ceder; Kerstin Johannesson

    2005-01-01

    Species with restricted gene flow often show trait-shifts from one type of environment to another. In those rock-dwelling marine gastropods that lack larval dispersal, size generally decreases in wave-exposed habitats reducing risk of dislodgement, while increases in less exposed habitats to resist crab-crushing. In Littorina fabalis, however, snails of moderately exposed shores are generally much larger (11–14 mm) than snails of

  3. Deterministic assembly of land snail communities according to species size and diet.

    PubMed

    Schamp, Brandon; Horsák, Michal; Hájek, Michal

    2010-07-01

    1. We investigated whether coexisting snail species in 145 treeless fen communities in the Western Carpathian Mountains differed more in size and diet than would be expected by chance, as predicted for traits commonly associated with competition and differential resource acquisition under limiting similarity theory. 2. Contrary to expectations, coexisting snail species were no more different in body size than expected by chance under a null model. However, variation in body size played a significant role in structuring snail communities: coexisting snail species were significantly more similar with respect to body size. 3. We developed two new test statistics to expand our investigation of limiting similarity to include diet, a nominal trait. We tested whether communities of snails were characterized by a greater richness of diet, and whether different diets were represented more or less evenly within communities. Communities of snails were significantly less evenly distributed than expected by chance, with detritivores being over-represented relative to predatory strategies. 4. We also examined the effect of water pH and conductivity, herbaceous cover, and bryophyte and vascular plant richness, on these trends by examining how the effect size of our tests varied across these gradients. Convergence in species size increased with increasing habitat pH. Specifically, smaller snail species were over-represented in fen communities in general, and this effect was accentuated in increasingly calcareous fens. 5. Theory predicts that traits related strongly to environmental conditions are more likely to be convergent. Our findings support this suggestion, as small snail species have an advantage in tolerating freezing conditions over winter when refuges are limited. 6. These results add to the growing body of literature demonstrating that variation in body size and diet play a strong role in structuring communities, although frequently in ways not predicted by limiting similarity theory. Finally, our results increase our understanding of how species are assembled non-randomly into communities with respect to important traits. PMID:20345504

  4. OVERWINTERING OF SPIDERS IN EMPTY LAND-SNAIL SHELLS IN XERIC HABITATS OF SOUTHERN MORAVIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Our first objective was to find, which species of s piders overwinter in the land-snail shells in the x eric habitats of Southern Moravia (Czech Republic). During the winter 2008\\/2009 we collected 2448 empty land-snail shells from 31 xeric localities. Land-sn ail shells were represented by three species from t hree genera ( Cepea , Helix and Helicella ). Alltogether

  5. The effects of wetland habitat structure on Florida apple snail density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karunaratne, L.B.; Darby, P.C.; Bennetts, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    Wetlands often support a variety of juxtaposed habitat patches (e.g., grass-, shrub- or tree-dominated) differentially suited to support the inhabiting fauna. The proportion of available habitat types has been affected by human activity and consequently has contributed to degrading habitat quality for some species. The Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) has drawn attention as a critical prey item for wetlands wildlife and as an indicator of wetlands restoration success in peninsular Florida, USA. An apparent contradiction has evolved wherein this species appears intolerant of drying events, but these disturbances may be necessary to maintain suitable habitat structure for apple snails. We recently reported that assertions regarding intolerance to dry downs in this species were inaccurate. Here, we compared snail density in habitats with (wet prairie) and without (slough) emergent macrophytes, as well as evaluating the effects of structural attributes within the broad wet prairie habitat type. Snail densities were greater in prairies relative to sloughs (??2= 12.90, df=1, P=0.0003), often by a factor of two to three. Within wet prairie habitats, we found greater snail densities in Panicum hemitomon as compared to Eleocharis cellulosa (??2=31.45, df=1, P=0.0001). Significantly fewer snails were found in dense E. cellulosa as compared to habitats with lower stem density (??2= 10.73, df=1, P=0.011). Our results indicate that wet prairie habitat supports greater snail densities than nymphaea-dominatd slough. Our results have implications for wetlands water management in that continuous inundation has been shown to convert wet prairie to slough habitat, and we suggest this should be avoided in support of apple snails and their predators. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  6. Solar radio-transmitters on snail kites in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, N.F.R.; Beissinger, S.R.; Fuller, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness and safety of one- and two-stage solar radio-transmitters in tracking the movements and survival of adult and fledgling Snail Kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis) were evaluated between 1979 and 1983 in southern Florida. Transmitters were attached to birds with back-pack arrangements using teflon ribbon straps. Accessory plastic shields minimized feather coverage of the solar cells. Intact transmitters were seen on birds up to 47 mo after installation. Operating lives ranged from 8 to 21 mo for one-stage, and 10 to 14 mo for two-stage transmitters. Because survival of adult and nestling radio-marked kites was high, we conclude that our transmitter-attachment method had little effect on the birds.

  7. Diversity of single potassium channels in isolated snail neurons.

    PubMed

    Sotkis, A V; Kostyuk, P G; Lukyanetz, E A

    1998-05-11

    Comparison of K+ channels in mollusk and mammalian neurons has been made to elucidate their fundamental properties. Using patch clamp cell-attached configuration, K+ channels in isolated snail neurons were separated into three subtypes: with big (BKC), medium (MKC) and small (SKC) unitary conductances. BKC and MKC were activated at -30 mV and SKC at more negative potentials. BKC and MKC proved sensitive to TEA, whereas SKC were sensitive to 4-AP. Cd2+ in the pipet decreased unitary conductance of BKC by 55% and of MKC by about 31%. Bath application of 5-HT selectively suppressed MKC. It is suggested that BKC can be referred to large conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K+ currents (KCa), MKC to intermediate conductance KCa and SKC channels comply with the characteristics of A current of mammals. These data show that KCa and A currents may be the most general types of currents generated by K+ channels. PMID:9631439

  8. Associative learning phenomena in the snail (Helix aspersa): conditioned inhibition.

    PubMed

    Acebes, Félix; Solar, Patricia; Moris, Joaquín; Loy, Ignacio

    2012-03-01

    Two experiments using garden snails (Helix aspersa) showed conditioned inhibition using both retardation and summation tests. Conditioned inhibition is a procedure by which a stimulus becomes a predictor of the absence of a relevant event--the unconditioned stimulus (US). Typically, conditioned inhibition consists of pairings between an initially neutral conditioned stimulus, CS(2), and an effective excitatory conditioned stimulus, CS(1), in the absence of the US. Retardation and summation tests are required in order to confirm that CS(2) has acquired inhibitory properties. Conditioned inhibition has previously been found in invertebrates; however, these demonstrations did not use the retardation and summation tests required for an unambiguous demonstration of inhibition, allowing for alternative explanations. The implications of our results for the fields of comparative cognition and invertebrate physiological models of learning are discussed. PMID:21877176

  9. Effects of dietary exposure to forest pesticides on the brown garden snail Helix aspersa mueller

    SciTech Connect

    Schuytema, G.S.; Nebeker, A.V.; Griffis, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Brown garden snails, Helix aspersa, were fed prepared diets with 12 pesticides used in forest spraying practices where endangered arboreal and terrestrial snails may be at risk. Acephate, atrazine, glyphosate, hexazinone, and picloram were not lethal at concentrations of 5,000 mg/kg in 14-day screening tests. The remaining seven pesticides, lethal to 13-100% of the tested snails at 5,000 mg/kg, were evaluated in 10-day definitive feeding tests. Azinphosmethyl (Guthion) and aminocarb were the most toxic, with 10-day LC50s of 188 and 313 mg/kg, respectively. Paraquat, trichlorfon and fenitrothion had 10-day LC50s of 659, 664, and 7,058 mg/kg respectively. Avoidance of pesticide-containing foods occurred, e.g., 10-day LC50s of >10,000 mg/kg for carbaryl and ethyl parathion. Significant descreases (p<0.05) in snail weight (total, shell-only, body-only) or shell diameter were accompanied by a significant decrease in the amount of food consumed/snail/day. Concentrations of pesticide in tissues were measured in snails exposed to atrazine and azinphosmethyl; there was no bioaccumulation. (Copyright (c) 1994 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.)

  10. NF2 blocks Snail-mediated p53 suppression in mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Su-Jin; Oh, Ah-Young; Yoon, Min-Ho; Woo, Tae-Geun; Park, Bum-Joon

    2015-04-30

    Although asbestos causes malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), rising from lung mesothelium, the molecular mechanism has not been suggested until now. Extremely low mutation rate in classical tumor suppressor genes (such as p53 and pRb) and oncogenes (including Ras or myc) indicates that there would be MPM-specific carcinogenesis pathway. To address this, we treated silica to mimic mesothelioma carcinogenesis in mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (NSCLC). Treatment of silica induced p-Erk and Snail through RKIP reduction. In addition, p53 and E-cadherin were decreased by silica-treatment. Elimination of Snail restored p53 expression. We found that NF2 (frequently deleted in MPM) inhibited Snail-mediated p53 suppression and was stabilized by RKIP. Importantly, GN25, an inhibitor of p53-Snail interaction, induced p53 and apoptosis. These results indicate that MPM can be induced by reduction of RKIP/NF2, which suppresses p53 through Snail. Thus, the p53-Snail binding inhibitor such as GN25 is a drug candidate for MPM. PMID:25823924

  11. Molluscicidal activity of vulgarone B against ram's horn snail (Planorbella trivolvis).

    PubMed

    Meepagala, Kumudini M; Sturtz, George; Mischke, Charles C; Wise, David; Duke, Stephen O

    2004-05-01

    The ram's horn snail (Planorbella trivolvis (Say)) is an intermediate host for a digenetic trematode (Bolbophorus confusus (Krause) Dubois) that has recently been discovered to be a significant problem in commercial channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus Raf) production ponds in the Mississippi Delta region in the USA. In these catfish ponds, the digenetic life cycle of this parasitic trematode involves two intermediate hosts, the ram's horn snail and the channel catfish, and the final host, the American white pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos Gmelin). One approach to eradicate this problem is to disrupt the life cycle of the parasitic trematodes by eliminating the snails. During our search for natural-product-based molluscicides to control the snails in the catfish ponds, vulgarone B, isolated from the steam distillate of the aerial parts of the plant Artemisia douglasiana Besser (Asteraceae), was found to be active towards the snails with a LC50 of ca 24 microM. Channel catfish toxicity studies indicated a LC50 of ca 207 microM. Vulgarone B may be an environmentally acceptable alternative for snail control in aquaculture. PMID:15154515

  12. Bacterial diversity in different regions of gastrointestinal tract of Giant African Snail (Achatina fulica)

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kiran D; Banskar, Sunil; Rane, Shailendra D; Charan, Shakti S; Kulkarni, Girish J; Sawant, Shailesh S; Ghate, Hemant V; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of invasive land snail Achatina fulica is known to harbor metabolically active bacterial communities. In this study, we assessed the bacterial diversity in the different regions of GI tract of Giant African snail, A. fulica by culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. Five 16S rRNA gene libraries from different regions of GI tract of active snails indicated that sequences affiliated to phylum ?-Proteobacteria dominated the esophagus, crop, intestine, and rectum libraries, whereas sequences affiliated to Tenericutes dominated the stomach library. On phylogenetic analysis, 30, 27, 9, 27, and 25 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from esophagus, crop, stomach, intestine, and rectum libraries were identified, respectively. Estimations of the total bacterial diversity covered along with environmental cluster analysis showed highest bacterial diversity in the esophagus and lowest in the stomach. Thirty-three distinct bacterial isolates were obtained, which belonged to 12 genera of two major bacterial phyla namely ?-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Among these, Lactococcus lactis and Kurthia gibsonii were the dominant bacteria present in all GI tract regions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis indicated significant differences in bacterial load in different GI tract regions of active and estivating snails. The difference in the bacterial load between the intestines of active and estivating snail was maximum. Principal component analysis (PCA) of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism suggested that bacterial community structure changes only in intestine when snail enters estivation state. PMID:23233413

  13. Endothelial Snail Regulates Capillary Branching Morphogenesis via Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 3 Expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Ae; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Lee, In-Kyu; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2015-07-01

    Vascular branching morphogenesis is activated and maintained by several signaling pathways. Among them, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling is largely presented in arteries, and VEGFR3 signaling is in veins and capillaries. Recent reports have documented that Snail, a well-known epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition protein, is expressed in endothelial cells, where it regulates sprouting angiogenesis and embryonic vascular development. Here, we identified Snail as a regulator of VEGFR3 expression during capillary branching morphogenesis. Snail was dramatically upregulated in sprouting vessels in the developing retinal vasculature, including the leading-edged vessels and vertical sprouting vessels for capillary extension toward the deep retina. Results from in vitro functional studies demonstrate that Snail expression colocalized with VEGFR3 and upregulated VEGFR3 mRNA by directly binding to the VEGFR3 promoter via cooperating with early growth response protein-1. Snail knockdown in postnatal mice attenuated the formation of the deep capillary plexus, not only by impairing vertical sprouting vessels but also by downregulating VEGFR3 expression. Collectively, these data suggest that the Snail-VEGFR3 axis controls capillary extension, especially in vessels expressing VEGFR2 at low levels. PMID:26147525

  14. Spatial distribution of Biomphalaria spp., the intermediate host snails of Schistosoma mansoni, in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Scholte, Ronaldo G C; Carvalho, Omar S; Malone, John B; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2012-09-01

    Schistosomiasis mansoni remains an important parasitic disease of man, endemic in large parts of sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, South America and the Caribbean. The aetiological agent is the trematode Schistosoma mansoni, whereas aquatic snails of the genus Biomphalaria act as intermediate hosts in the parasite life cycle. In Brazil, the distribution of Biomphalaria spp. is closely associated with the occurrence of schistosomiasis. The purpose of this study was to map and predict the spatial distribution of the intermediate host snails of S. mansoni across Brazil. We assembled snail "presenceonly" data and used a maximum entropy approach, along with climatic and environmental variables to produce predictive risk maps. We identified a series of risk factors that govern the distribution of Biomphalaria snails. We find that high-risk areas for B. glabrata are concentrated in the regions of Northeast and Southeast and the northern part of the South region. B. straminea are found in the Northeast and Southeast regions, and B. tenagophila are concentrated in the Southeast and South regions. Our findings confirm that the presence of the intermediate host snails is correlated with the occurrence of schistosomiasis mansoni. The generated risk maps of intermediate host snails might assist the national control programme for spatial targeting of control interventions and to ultimately move towards schistosomiasis elimination in Brazil. PMID:23032289

  15. Doxorubicin enhances Snail/LSD1-mediated PTEN suppression in a PARP1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yiwei; Kang, Tiebang; Zhou, Binhua P

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Snail not only functions as a master regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), but also mediates cell proliferation and survival. While previous studies have showed that Snail protects tumor cells from apoptosis through transcriptional repression of PTEN, the specific mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that Snail cooperates with LSD1 to repress PTEN in a PARP1-dependent manner. Upon doxorubicin treatment, Snail becomes tightly associated with PARP1 through its pADPr-binding motif and is subject to poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. This modification can enhance Snail-LSD1 interaction and promote the recruitment of LSD1 to PTEN promoter, where LSD1 removes methylation on histone H3 lysine 4 for transcription repression. Furthermore, treatment of tumor cells with PARP1 inhibitor AZD2281 can compromise doxorubicin-induced PTEN suppression and enhance the inhibitory effect of doxorubicin. Together, we proposed a tentative drug-resistant mechanism through which tumor cells defend themselves against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PARP1 inhibitors in combination with DNA damaging reagents might represent a promising treatment strategy targeting tumors with over-activated Snail and LSD1. PMID:24675890

  16. The transcription factor snail regulates osteogenic differentiation by repressing Runx2 expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Jin; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Jogeswar, Gadi; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Yook, Jong In; Choi, Han Seok; Rhee, Yumie; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lim, Sung-Kil

    2010-06-01

    Osteoblasts originate from mesenchymal stem cells by the coordinated activities of different signaling pathways that regulate the expression of osteoblast-specific genes. Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) is the master transcription factor for osteoblast differentiation. Despite the importance of Runx2 in the developing skeleton, how Runx2 expression is regulated remains a pivotal question. Snail, a zinc finger transcription factor, is essential for triggering epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) during embryonic development and tumor progression. Here, we report that Runx2 expression is significantly up- or down-regulated relative to Snail expression. We demonstrate that Snail binds to the Runx2 promoter and that repression of Runx2 transcription by Snail is dependent on specific E-box sequence within the promoter. With antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO)-mediated knockdown of Snail expression in zebrafish, we observed alterations in osteogenic potential. These results indicate that Snail plays a crucial role in osteogenic differentiation by acting as a direct Runx2 repressor. PMID:20215006

  17. Foraging and refuge use by a pond snail: Effects of physiological state, predators, and resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojdak, Jeremy M.

    2009-09-01

    The costs and benefits of anti-predator behavioral responses should be functions of the actual risk of predation, the availability of the prey's resources, and the physiological state of the prey. For example, a food-stressed individual risks starvation when hiding from predators, while a well-fed organism can better afford to hide (and pay the cost of not foraging). Similarly, the benefits of resource acquisition are probably highest for the prey in the poorest state, while there may be diminishing returns for prey nearing satiation. Empirical studies of state-dependent behavior are only beginning, however, and few studies have investigated interactions between all three potentially important factors. Here I present the results of a laboratory experiment where I manipulated the physiological state of pond snails ( Physa gyrina), the abundance of algal resources, and predation cues ( Belostoma flumineum waterbugs consuming snails) in a full factorial design to assess their direct effects on snail behavior and indirect effects on algal biomass. On average, snails foraged more when resources were abundant, and when predators were absent. Snails also foraged more when previously exposed to physiological stress. Snails spent more time at the water's surface (a refuging behavior) in the presence of predation cues on average, but predation, resource levels, and prey state had interactive effects on refuge use. There was a consistent positive trait-mediated indirect effect of predators on algal biomass, across all resource levels and prey states.

  18. A repetitive DNA probe for the sensitive detection of Fasciola hepatica infected snails.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, R M; Dame, J B; Reddy, G R; Courtney, C H

    1995-05-01

    Epizootiologic studies on F. hepatica frequently use microscopic techniques for the detection of infected snails, however, the poor efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity associated with these techniques limit their usefulness. A DNA-based test for the identification of snails infected with larval stages of F. hepatica would solve these problems and enable a level of detection accuracy previously unavailable. We have cloned and sequenced a 124 bp fragment of repetitive DNA from F. hepatica which hybridizes specifically with DNA of F. hepatica but not with DNA of its snail intermediate hosts Fossaria cubensis and Pseudosuccinea columella, or with DNA of Fascioloides magna and Paramphistomum liorchis, ruminant trematodes which share the same intermediate host and same enzootic range as F. hepatica. Using this 124 bp fragment as a probe, infection in snails was detected immediately following miracidial penetration, thus a sensitivity equivalent to the minimum biologic unit of the parasite was achieved. This 124 bp repeated sequence belongs to a large family of 124 bp repeats that share a high level of sequence identity and constitute approximately 15% of the F. hepatica genome. We also report here the development of a quick and inexpensive DNA extraction protocol for use in field-collected snails. Thus, we have developed both a highly sensitive and specific DNA probe and a means to use the probe in a large epizootiologic study of F. hepatica where thousands of field-collected snails need to be assayed for infection. PMID:7635638

  19. Snail mediates medial-lateral patterning of the ascidian neural plate.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Clare; Sirour, Cathy; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi

    2015-07-15

    The ascidian neural plate exhibits a regular, grid-like arrangement of cells. Patterning of the neural plate across the medial-lateral axis is initiated by bilateral sources of Nodal signalling, such that Nodal signalling induces expression of lateral neural plate genes and represses expression of medial neural plate genes. One of the earliest lateral neural plate genes induced by Nodal signals encodes the transcription factor Snail. Here, we show that Snail is a critical downstream factor mediating this Nodal-dependent patterning. Using gain and loss of function approaches, we show that Snail is required to repress medial neural plate gene expression at neural plate stages and to maintain the lateral neural tube genetic programme at later stages. A comparison of these results to those obtained following Nodal gain and loss of function indicates that Snail mediates a subset of Nodal functions. Consistently, overexpression of Snail can partially rescue a Nodal inhibition phenotype. We conclude that Snail is an early component of the gene regulatory network, initiated by Nodal signals, that patterns the ascidian neural plate. PMID:25962578

  20. NF2 blocks Snail-mediated p53 suppression in mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Su-Jin; Oh, Ah-Young; Yoon, Min-Ho; Woo, Tae-Geun; Park, Bum-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Although asbestos causes malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), rising from lung mesothelium, the molecular mechanism has not been suggested until now. Extremely low mutation rate in classical tumor suppressor genes (such as p53 and pRb) and oncogenes (including Ras or myc) indicates that there would be MPM-specific carcinogenesis pathway. To address this, we treated silica to mimic mesothelioma carcinogenesis in mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (NSCLC). Treatment of silica induced p-Erk and Snail through RKIP reduction. In addition, p53 and E-cadherin were decreased by silica-treatment. Elimination of Snail restored p53 expression. We found that NF2 (frequently deleted in MPM) inhibited Snail-mediated p53 suppression and was stabilized by RKIP. Importantly, GN25, an inhibitor of p53-Snail interaction, induced p53 and apoptosis. These results indicate that MPM can be induced by reduction of RKIP/NF2, which suppresses p53 through Snail. Thus, the p53-Snail binding inhibitor such as GN25 is a drug candidate for MPM. PMID:25823924

  1. Endothelial Snail Regulates Capillary Branching Morphogenesis via Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Ae; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2015-01-01

    Vascular branching morphogenesis is activated and maintained by several signaling pathways. Among them, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling is largely presented in arteries, and VEGFR3 signaling is in veins and capillaries. Recent reports have documented that Snail, a well-known epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition protein, is expressed in endothelial cells, where it regulates sprouting angiogenesis and embryonic vascular development. Here, we identified Snail as a regulator of VEGFR3 expression during capillary branching morphogenesis. Snail was dramatically upregulated in sprouting vessels in the developing retinal vasculature, including the leading-edged vessels and vertical sprouting vessels for capillary extension toward the deep retina. Results from in vitro functional studies demonstrate that Snail expression colocalized with VEGFR3 and upregulated VEGFR3 mRNA by directly binding to the VEGFR3 promoter via cooperating with early growth response protein-1. Snail knockdown in postnatal mice attenuated the formation of the deep capillary plexus, not only by impairing vertical sprouting vessels but also by downregulating VEGFR3 expression. Collectively, these data suggest that the Snail-VEGFR3 axis controls capillary extension, especially in vessels expressing VEGFR2 at low levels. PMID:26147525

  2. In Brief: Europe's freshwater fish threatened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-11-01

    Two hundred of Europe's 522 freshwater fish species are threatened with extinction and 12 are already extinct, according to the Handbook of European Freshwater Fishes, published in collaboration with the World Conservation Union (IUCN) and released on 1 November 2007. IUCN notes that the main threats to fish species stem from development and population growth and include water withdrawals, large dams, and inappropriate fisheries management that has led to overfishing and the introduction of alien species. Authors Maurice Kottelat, former president of the European Ichthyological Society, and Jörg Freyhof, scientist from Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology, noted that fish conservation should be managed by agencies in charge of conservation, and not as a crop by agencies in charge of agriculture. William Darwall, senior program officer with IUCN's Species Program, said the species ``are critical to the freshwater ecosystems upon which we do depend, such as for water purification and flood control.'' For more information, visit the Web site: http://www.iucn.org.

  3. EFFECTS OF POLLUTION ON FRESHWATER FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    An extensive literature review is presented which is concerned with the effects of pollutants (metals, pesticides, detergents, industrial wastes) on freshwater fish; chemical and biological methods for identifying and determining the effects of such pollutants; and the effects of...

  4. Freshwater Ecology Laboratory Hypothesis generation assignment

    E-print Network

    Hutchens, John

    Freshwater Ecology Laboratory Hypothesis generation assignment Due 10 September 2014 20 pts Once scientific hypotheses regarding your project. Generating hypotheses forces you to focus your ideas factors influencing potential differences among the habitats. Third, write one more hypothesis about

  5. Distribution and abundance of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis host snails along the Mara River in Kenya and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Dida, Gabriel O; Gelder, Frank B; Anyona, Douglas N; Matano, Ally-Said; Abuom, Paul O; Adoka, Samson O; Ouma, Collins; Kanangire, Canisius K; Owuor, Phillip O; Ofulla, Ayub V O

    2014-01-01

    We purposively selected 39 sampling sites along the Mara River and its two perennial tributaries of Amala and Nyangores and sampled snails. In addition, water physicochemical parameters (temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, alkalinity, salinity and pH) were taken to establish their influence on the snail abundance and habitat preference. Out of the 39 sites sampled, 10 (25.6%) had snails. The snail species encountered included Biomphalaria pfeifferi Krauss - the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, Bulinus africanus - the intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium, and Lymnaea natalensis Krauss - the intermediate host of both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica Cobbold. Ceratophallus spp., a non-vector snail was also encountered. Most (61.0%) of the snails were encountered in streamside pools. Schistosomiasis-transmitting host snails, B. pfeifferi and B. africanus, were fewer than fascioliasis-transmitting Lymnaea species. All the four different snail species were found to be attached to different aquatic weeds, with B. pfeifferi accounting for over half (61.1%) of the snails attached to the sedge, followed by B. africanus and Lymnaea spp., accounting for 22.2 and 16.7%, respectively. Ceratophallus spp. were non-existent in sedge. The results from this preliminary study show that snails intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis exists in different habitats, in few areas along the Mara River, though their densities are still low to have any noticeable impacts on disease transmission in case they are infected. The mere presence of the vector snails in these focal regions calls for their immediate control and institution of proper regulations, management, and education among the locals that can help curtail the spread of the snails and also schistosomiasis and fascioliasis within the Mara River basin. PMID:25405008

  6. [Occurrence of the flagellated protozoan, Cryptobia helicis Leidy, 1846 (Kinetoplasta: Bodonea: Cryptobiidae) in the garden snail, Helix aspersa].

    PubMed

    Göçmen, Bayram; Gürelli, Gözde

    2008-01-01

    In this survey, the prevalence and cytological features of the flagellated protozoan, Cryptobia helicis living in the bursa copulatrix of the garden snail, Helix aspersa Müller 1774 found in the vicinity of Izmir, Turkey was investigated. The prevalence of Cryptobia helicis in garden snails collected in the spring of 2005 was found to be 68.65%. This study is the first record of the occurrence of Cryptobia helicis in the garden snail Helix aspersa found in Turkey. PMID:18351561

  7. The detection and quantification of a digenean infection in the snail host with special emphasis on Fasciola sp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yannick Caron; Daniel Rondelaud; Bertrand Losson

    2008-01-01

    In this review, ten methods used to study digenean infections in their intermediate hosts were compared to determine which\\u000a one should be used either in the field or in the lab to establish the prevalence and intensity of infections in snails. Snail\\u000a crushing and snail dissection allow quick establishing of prevalence in natural or experimental infections, whereas histology\\u000a is considered

  8. Future freshwater demands in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D.; Strang, E. T.; Hinzman, L.; Alessa, L.; Kliskey, A.

    2004-12-01

    The overall objective of our research is to understand how humans rely on freshwater at local and regional scales in the Arctic, how these dependencies have changed in the recent past, and how they are likely to change in the future. This study will take place on the Seward Peninsula where climate induced changes in the hydrologic cycle are already being observed. This presentation will describe the human dependencies on freshwater in the Arctic. In particular, we will discuss the effects of inadequate quantity or quality of freshwater on Arctic inhabitants. The freshwater used by humans in the Arctic for drinking, cooking, and washing is derived in many cases from surface water, such as lakes and streams. Since the surface water frozen 6-9 months of the year in the Arctic, communities that rely on rivers and lakes must treat and store large volumes of water for use during winter. The stored water must be heated throughout the winter and distributed on an as-needed basis. Unfortunately, when not enough water can be gathered in the summer or stored in the winter, the entire community may be without freshwater. During these months, water must be collected by individuals from ice, snow, and rain. Collecting water during breakup can be dangerous. River ice is rotten, there is too little snow for snow mobiles, and the tundra is too soft all terrain vehicles. While the state of Alaska and Federal programs are making progress towards developing sustainable water sources for Alaska's Arctic communities, freshwater remains a precious commodity. Communities throughout the Arctic, including Canada and Russia, have similar problems with obtaining and purifying freshwater. As climate induced changes are being observed in the Arctic, the threat to the freshwater resource is now a greater concern than ever. This study is being funded under the NSF Arctic System Science Program, Human Dimensions of the Arctic (OPP-0328686).

  9. Global diversity of amphibians (Amphibia) in freshwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miguel Vences; Jörn Köhler

    2008-01-01

    This article present a review of species numbers, biogeographic patterns and evolutionary trends of amphibians in freshwater.\\u000a Although most amphibians live in freshwater in at least their larval phase, many species have evolved different degrees of\\u000a independence from water including direct terrestrial development and viviparity. Of a total of 5,828 amphibian species considered\\u000a here, 4,117 are aquatic in that they

  10. Global diversity of amphibians (Amphibia) in freshwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miguel Vences; Jörn Köhler

    This article present a review of species numbers, biogeographic patterns and evolutionary trends of amphibians in freshwater.\\u000a Although most amphibians live in freshwater in at least their larval phase, many species have evolved different degrees of\\u000a independence from water including direct terrestrial development and viviparity. Of a total of 5,828 amphibian species considered\\u000a here, 4,117 are aquatic in that they

  11. Effect of Sodium Chloride, Tricaine Methanesulfonate, and Light on New Zealand Mud Snail Behavior, Survival of Snails Defecated from Rainbow Trout, and Effects of Epsom Salt on Snail Elimination Rate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall W. Oplinger; Pat Brown; Eric J. Wagner

    2009-01-01

    The New Zealand mud snail (NZMS) Potamopyrgus antipodarum is an invasive species that threatens fish populations in North America. Establishment of NZMS in fish hatcheries is particularly problematic because NZMS could be inadvertently spread through fish stocking. Herein, we present the results of tests conducted to improve our understanding of (1) the risk of stocking fish from NZMS-infested hatcheries and

  12. Freshwater Commercial Bycatch: an Understated Conservation Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Graham D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial fisheries bycatch in marine systems has been regarded as a global conservation concern by environmental groups, scientists, government, and the public for decades. Fortunately, some headway has been made to mitigate the negative impacts of bycatch in marine environments. In a survey of the literature, we found that despite freshwater commercial fisheries yields comprising 11% of the global commercial catch, bycatch research focusing on freshwater commercial fisheries represented only {approx}3% of the total bycatch literature. This paucity of research is particularly alarming given that freshwater animals and habitats are some of the world's most imperiled. The limited inland bycatch literature that does exist includes examples of population declines attributed to commercial bycatch (e.g., freshwater dolphins in the Yangtze River in China) and illustrates that in some systems bycatch can be substantial (e.g., lake trout bycatch in the Laurentian Great Lakes). Encouraging results from the marine realm can serve as models for bycatch research in freshwater, and lead to measurable gains in conservation of freshwater ecosystems. We summarize existing work on inland bycatch in an effort to draw attention to this understated and understudied conservation problem.

  13. Localization of the neuropeptide APGWamide in gastropod molluscs by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    de Lange, R P; van Minnen, J

    1998-02-01

    The amidated tetrapeptide Ala-Pro-Gly-Trp-NH2 (APGWamide) plays a key role in the control of male copulation behavior in the basommatophoran pulmonate freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. The morphological basis for a conserved role of APGWamide in the control of male reproduction in gastropod molluscs is presented. The prosobranch Littorina littorea, the opisthobranch Aplysia californica, the basommatophoran pulmonate Bulinus truncatus, and the stylommatophoran pulmonates Arion ater and Limax maximus have been examined for the presence of APGWamide producing neurons using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization. In all species investigated a cluster of APGWamide expressing neurons is present in the anteromedial region of the cerebral ganglia. The asymmetrical distribution which exists in Lymnaea and which coincides with the innervation of the asymmetrically located penial complex is also found in the opisthobranch Aplysia, as well as in the stylommatophoran pulmonate slugs Arion and Limax, in which APGWamide immunoreactive neurons are only found in the mesocerebrum of the right cerebral ganglion. APGWamide immunoreactive varicose fibers innervate muscles of the male accessory sex organs in Bulinus and Aplysia, confirming the hypothesis that APGWamide may be a biochemically and functionally conserved factor in the regulation of gastropod mollusc reproduction. PMID:9473361

  14. Changes in epilithic communities due to individual and combined treatments of zinc and snail grazing in stream mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Genter, R.B.; Colwell, F.S.; Pratt, J.R.; Cherry, D.S.; Cairns, J. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    Effects of 0.5 mg/liter zinc (Zn) and snail grazing (400 snails/m2) on density of dominant algal and protozoan taxa, epilithic glucose respiration, and ash-free dry weight (AFDW) were examined using established (12-day colonization) periphyton communities in flow-through stream mesocosms with four treatments (Zn, snails, Zn and snails, control) for 30 days. Grazing and Zn similarly reduced the abundance of 5 of 10 dominant algal taxa and AFDW during the first 10 days of treatment. Abundance of these taxa and AFDW in grazed (ambient Zn) treatments approached control levels after 10 days as the effect due to snails decreased. Decreasing temperatures may have reduced snail activity. Snails, Zn, and the combination of these treatments contributed to higher rates of glucose respiration per unit AFDW. Protozoan species abundance was reduced to less than half by Zn but was unaffected by snails. Although Zn and snails individually altered structural and functional aspects of this microbial community, the effects when both treatments were combined could not always be inferred from the individual effects. Testing individual and combined variables that affect periphyton with a corresponding assessment of population dynamics, biomass, and community functional attributes will enhance understanding of the overall effects of pollutants on periphyton communities.

  15. Proterometra macrostoma (Trematoda: Azygiidae): location of the redia and emergence path from the snail, Elimia semicarinata (Gastropoda: Pleuroceridae).

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ronald; Berg, Ericka; Dolan, Julianna; King, Bailey; Martin, Michon; Mehmeti, Franceska

    2013-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe (1) the osmotic environment and precise location of the Proterometra macrostoma redia in its snail intermediate host, (2) where retraction of the distome body into the cercarial tail occurs, and (3) the subsequent emergence path of the cercaria out of the snail. Snails, Elimia semicarinata , were collected from North Elkhorn Creek in Scott County, Kentucky and screened daily for patent infections. Live rediae were extracted from infected snails in either artificial pond water (APW) or artificial snail water (ASW) and monitored for changes in morphology and movement every hour over 5 hr at 22 C. Infected and control snails were simultaneously fixed and decalcified in Cal-Ex II, prepared for routine paraffin sectioning, and serial sections subsequently analyzed for rediae and cercariae location. Significantly (?(2) = 42.45; 1 df; P = 0.0001) more rediae showed movement in ASW than in APW after 5 hr, suggesting a host compartment separate from the mantle cavity. Histological sections clearly showed rediae developing in close association with the snail digestive tract, within the peri-intestinal sinus of the snail, and isolated from the mantle cavity by a mantle membrane. Retraction of the distome body into the cercarial tail follows the emergence of the cercaria from the redia. Cercariae then enter the mantle cavity and emerge into fresh water through a siphon-like structure formed by the mantle collar of the snail. PMID:23343411

  16. FBXO11 promotes ubiquitination of the Snail family of transcription factors in cancer progression and epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Shenoy, Anitha K; Doernberg, Samuel; Chen, Hao; Luo, Huacheng; Shen, Huangxuan; Lin, Tong; Tarrash, Miriam; Cai, Qingsong; Hu, Xin; Fiske, Ryan; Chen, Ting; Wu, Lizi; Mohammed, Kamal A; Rottiers, Veerle; Lee, Siu Sylvia; Lu, Jianrong

    2015-06-28

    The Snail family of transcription factors are core inducers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we show that the F-box protein FBXO11 recognizes and promotes ubiquitin-mediated degradation of multiple Snail family members including Scratch. The association between FBXO11 and Snai1 in vitro is independent of Snai1 phosphorylation. Overexpression of FBXO11 in mesenchymal cells reduces Snail protein abundance and cellular invasiveness. Conversely, depletion of endogenous FBXO11 in epithelial cancer cells causes Snail protein accumulation, EMT, and tumor invasion, as well as loss of estrogen receptor expression in breast cancer cells. Expression of FBXO11 is downregulated by EMT-inducing signals TGF? and nickel. In human cancer, high FBXO11 levels correlate with expression of epithelial markers and favorable prognosis. The results suggest that FBXO11 sustains the epithelial state and inhibits cancer progression. Inactivation of FBXO11 in mice leads to neonatal lethality, epidermal thickening, and increased Snail protein levels in epidermis, validating that FBXO11 is a physiological ubiquitin ligase of Snail. Moreover, in C. elegans, the FBXO11 mutant phenotype is attributed to the Snail factors as it is suppressed by inactivation/depletion of Snail homologs. Collectively, these findings suggest that the FBXO11-Snail regulatory axis is evolutionarily conserved and critically governs carcinoma progression and mammalian epidermal development. PMID:25827072

  17. Effects of washing produce contaminated with the snail and slug hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with three common household solutions.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A; Cowie, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms. PMID:23901391

  18. Influence of copper on the feeding rate, growth and reproduction of the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata Lamarck.

    PubMed

    Peńa, Silvia C; Pocsidio, Glorina N

    2007-12-01

    The influence of copper on feeding rate, growth, and reproduction of Pomacea canaliculata Lamarck was evaluated. Ten days of exposure to copper of relatively high concentration (67.5 microg/L) reduced the snails' feeding rate and retarded their growth. Exposure to 20 microg/L after 36 days increased feeding rate to 28%. After 20 days of exposure at 30 microg/L, snail's growth was significant but thereafter declined. Growth of all snails including control was negligible by day 50 when snails were in the reproductive state. Copper did not affect reproduction. PMID:17999015

  19. Effects of endocrine disruptors on prosobranch snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda) in the laboratory. Part I: Bisphenol A and octylphenol as xeno-estrogens.

    PubMed

    Oehlmann, J; Schulte-Oehlmann, U; Tillmann, M; Markert, B

    2000-12-01

    The effects of suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals on freshwater and marine prosobranch species were analysed in laboratory experiments. In this first publication, the responses of the freshwater snail Marisa cornuarietis and of the marine prosobranch Nucella lapillus to the xeno-estrogenic model compounds bisphenol A (BPA) and octylphenol (OP) are presented at nominal concentration ranges between 1 and 100 micrograms/L. Marisa was exposed during 5 months using adult specimens and in a complete life-cycle test for 12 months. In both experiments, the xeno-estrogens induced a complex syndrome of alterations in female Marisa referred to as "superfemales" at the lowest concentrations. Affected specimens were characterised by the formation of additional female organs, an enlargement of the accessory pallial sex glands, gross malformations of the pallial oviduct section resulting in an increased female mortality, and a massive stimulation of oocyte and spawning mass production. The effects of BPA and OP were comparable at the same nominal concentrations. An exposure to OP resulted in inverted U-type concentration response relationships for egg and spawning mass production. Adult Nucella from the field were tested for three months in the laboratory. As in Marisa, superfemales with enlarged accessory pallial sex glands and an enhancement of oocyte production were observed. No oviduct malformations were found probably due to species differences in the gross anatomical structure of the pallial oviduct. A lower percentage of exposed specimens had ripe sperm stored in their vesicula seminalis and additionally male Nucella exhibited a reduced length of penis and prostate gland when compared to the control. Because statistically significant effects were observed at the lowest nominal test concentrations (1 microgram BPA or OP/L), it can be assumed that even lower concentrations may have a negative impact on the snails. The results show that prosobranchs are sensitive to endocrine disruption at environmentally relevant concentrations and that especially M. cornuarietis is a promising candidate for a future organismic invertebrate model to identify endocrine-mimetic test compounds. PMID:11214443

  20. The molecular phylogeny of freshwater Dothideomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, C.A.; Raja, H.A.; Miller, A.N.; Nelson, P.; Tanaka, K.; Hirayama, K.; Marvanová, L.; Hyde, K.D.; Zhang, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The freshwater Dothideomycetes species are an ecological rather than taxonomic group and comprise approximately 178 meiosporic and mitosporic species. Due to convergent or parallel morphological adaptations to aquatic habitats, it is difficult to determine phylogenetic relationships among freshwater taxa and among freshwater, marine and terrestrial taxa based solely on morphology. We conducted molecular sequence-based phylogenetic analyses using nuclear ribosomal sequences (SSU and/or LSU) for 84 isolates of described and undescribed freshwater Dothideomycetes and 85 additional taxa representative of the major orders and families of Dothideomycetes. Results indicated that this ecological group is not monophyletic and all the freshwater taxa, except three aeroaquatic Tubeufiaceae, occur in Pleosporomycetidae as opposed to Dothideomycetidae. Four clades comprised of only freshwater taxa were recovered. The largest of these is the Jahnulales clade consisting of 13 species, two of which are the anamorphs Brachiosphaera tropicalis and Xylomyces chlamydosporus. The second most speciose clade is the Lindgomycetaceae clade consisting of nine taxa including the anamorph Taeniolella typhoides. The Lindgomycetaceae clade consists of taxa formerly described in Massarina, Lophiostoma, and Massariosphaeria e.g., Massarina ingoldiana, Lophiostoma breviappendiculatum, and Massariosphaeria typhicola and several newly described and undescribed taxa. The aquatic family Amniculicolaceae, including three species of Amniculicola, Semimassariosphaeria typhicola and the anamorph, Anguillospora longissima, was well supported. A fourth clade of freshwater species consisting of Tingoldiago graminicola, Lentithecium aquaticum, L. arundinaceum and undescribed taxon A-369-2b was not well supported with maximum likelihood bootstrap and Bayesian posterior probability. Eight freshwater taxa occurred along with terrestrial species in the Lophiostoma clades 1 and 2. Two taxa lacking statistical support for their placement with any taxa included in this study are considered singletons within Pleosporomycetidae. These singletons, Ocala scalariformis, and Lepidopterella palustris, are morphologically distinct from other taxa in Pleosporomycetidae. This study suggests that freshwater Dothideomycetes are related to terrestrial taxa and have adapted to freshwater habitats numerous times. In some cases (Jahnulales and Lindgomycetaceae), species radiation appears to have occurred. Additional collections and molecular study are required to further clarify the phylogeny of this interesting ecological group. PMID:20169028

  1. There is no clear criterion for determining sustainabil-ity of freshwater fisheries. Freshwater fisheries worldwide

    E-print Network

    Kwak, Thomas J.

    130 There is no clear criterion for determining sustainabil- ity of freshwater fisheries. Freshwater fisheries worldwide receive varying levels of human management, usually by government agencies intensively managed fisheries (e.g., by fish culture, stocking, and harvest or habitat manipula- tions

  2. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of copper in outdoor freshwater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Pryor, Rachel L; Rand, Gary M; Frakes, Robert A

    2011-05-01

    This study characterizes the effects of copper (Cu) on Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) and mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) using a replicated outdoor microcosm design. Soils used in this study were collected from two Cu-enriched citrus agricultural sites in South Florida (Agler property (AGLR) in St. Lucie County and Sunrise Boys property (SRB) in Palm Beach County) and a reference site (Equus property) in St. Lucie County. The study included a 5-week aging phase, an 11 month exposure phase, and a 3 month post-treatment (exposure) phase. The aging phase was initiated by flooding agricultural soils with rainwater in 4 m(3) fiberglass microcosm tanks. Introducing juvenile apple snails (?7 d old) and mosquito fish (2-3 cm) into the microcosm tanks initiated the exposure phase. Survival, growth, and reproduction of apple snails and fish, and Cu uptake in apple snails, fish, and periphyton were determined in this study. Water chemistry (e.g., dissolved Cu concentration, dissolved organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations, pH, hardness, alkalinity, etc.) was measured daily or weekly during the study. Initial soil Cu concentrations in Equus, SRB, and AGLR microcosms were 7, 55, and 99 mg/kg dw, respectively. Dissolved Cu concentrations in Equus, SRB and AGLR microcosms at the beginning of the study were 3, 82, and 43 ?g/L, respectively and decreased to low saturation levels of about ?9 ?g/L Cu after the first 3 months of the study. The decrease of dissolved Cu concentrations was likely due to the dilution of rainwater. Snail and fish mortality appeared to be higher in SRB microcosms than in Equus and AGLR microcosms. There was no significant difference in growth of the snails between treatments. Snail growth data followed the von Bertalanffy Model. The maximum shell length, shell height, and shell width of the snails calculated by the von Bertalanffy Model (L(?)) were 2.76, 2.05, and 2.18 cm, respectively. The maximum wet weight was 9.38 g. Growth rate (k) of the snails increased in order of shell height (0.459), shell length (0.550), and shell weight (0.598). There was no reproduction in the snails in any treatments including the reference during the exposure phase. However, Cu did not affect reproduction of fish during this period. Copper concentrations in periphyton from Equus, SRB, and AGLR microcosms ranged from 2 to 62, 31 to 371, and 13 to 478 mg/kg, respectively. Copper concentrations in fish at the beginning, days 30 and 150 of the study ranged from 3.19 to 7.53 mg/kg and were not significantly different from the different treatments. Average Cu concentrations in the soft tissue of dead snails from SRB and AGLR microcosms were 4602 mg/kg dw (ranged from 2913 to 8370 mg/kg dw) and 2824 mg/kg dw (ranged from 2118 to 3600 mg/kg dw), respectively. The Cu concentrations in the soft tissue of dead snails found in this study were higher than the tissue Cu concentrations in live aquatic organisms reported in the literature. These high Cu concentrations in edible apple snail soft tissue might pose a risk to Florida apple snail predators, including the snail kite. The post-exposure phase, with snails exposed to only water (i.e., no soils) showed depuration of copper from apple snails and reproduction in all treatments. PMID:21345490

  3. Deriving freshwater quality criteria for iron, lead, nickel, and zinc for protection of aquatic life in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Shuhaimi-Othman, M; Nadzifah, Y; Nur-Amalina, R; Umirah, N S

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater quality criteria for iron (Fe), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) were developed with particular reference to aquatic biota in Malaysia, and based on USEPA's guidelines. Acute toxicity tests were performed on eight different freshwater domestic species in Malaysia which were Macrobrachium lanchesteri (prawn), two fish: Poecilia reticulata and Rasbora sumatrana, Melanoides tuberculata (snail), Stenocypris major (ostracod), Chironomus javanus (midge larvae), Nais elinguis (annelid), and Duttaphrynus melanostictus (tadpole) to determine 96 h LC(50) values for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn. The final acute value (FAV) for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn were 74.5, 17.0, 165, and 304.9 ?g L(-1), respectively. Using an estimated acute-to-chronic ratio (ACR) of 8.3, the value for final chronic value (FCV) was derived. Based on FAV and FCV, a criterion maximum concentration (CMC) and a criterion continuous concentration (CCC) for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn that are 37.2, 8.5, 82.5, and 152.4 ?g?L(-1) and 9.0, 2.0, 19.9, and 36.7 ?g?L(-1), respectively, were derived. The results of this study provide useful data for deriving national or local water quality criteria for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn based on aquatic biota in Malaysia. Based on LC(50) values, this study indicated that N. elinguis, M. lanchesteri, N. elinguis, and R. sumatrana were the most sensitive to Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn, respectively. PMID:22919358

  4. Deriving freshwater quality criteria for copper, cadmium, aluminum and manganese for protection of aquatic life in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Shuhaimi-Othman, M; Nadzifah, Y; Nur-Amalina, R; Umirah, N S

    2013-03-01

    Freshwater quality criteria for copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), aluminum (Al), and manganese (Mn) were developed with particular reference to aquatic biota in Malaysia, and based on USEPA's guidelines. Acute toxicity tests were performed on eight different freshwater domestic species in Malaysia, which were Macrobrachiumlanchesteri (prawn), two fish -Poeciliareticulata and Rasborasumatrana, Melanoidestuberculata (snail), Stenocyprismajor (ostracod), Chironomusjavanus (midge larvae), Naiselinguis (annelid), and Duttaphrynusmelanostictus (tadpole), to determine 96-h LC50 values for Cu, Cd, Al, and Mn. The final acute values (FAVs) for Cu, Cd, Al, and Mn were 2.5, 3.0, 977.8, and 78.3 ?gL(-1), respectively. Using an estimated acute-to-chronic ratio (ACR) of 8.3, the value for final chronic value (FCV) was derived. Based on FAV and FCV, a Criterion Maximum Concentration (CMC) and a criterion Continuous Concentration (CCC) for Cu, Cd, Al, and Mn of 1.3, 1.5, 488.9, and 39.1 ?gL(-1) and 0.3, 0.36, 117.8, and 9.4 ?gL(-1), respectively, were derived. The results of this study provide useful data for deriving national or local water quality criteria for Cu, Cd, Al, and Mn based on aquatic biota in Malaysia. Based on LC50 values, this study indicated that R.sumatrana, M.lanchesteri, C.javanus, and N.elinguis were the most sensitive to Cu, Cd, Al, and Mn, respectively. PMID:23246727

  5. Antipredatory behavior as an index of heavy-metal pollution? A test using snails and caddisflies.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, H; Ammann, E; Eiger, S M

    2000-04-01

    The loss of behaviors that organisms use to avoid predation may serve as a sensitive indicator of pollution. We tested the hypothesis that a correlation exists in the field between heavy metal levels and antipredator behaviors. We examined the antipredator behavior of aquatic caddisfly larvae and snails at sites in the Coeur d'Alene basin of Northern Idaho which varied in their levels of heavy metals. We tested the antipredator response of Physella columbiana snails at 10 polluted lakes downstream from the Bunker Hill Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund cleanup site. We then compared their behavior to snails at 14 reference lakes. We placed the snails in a plastic testing apparatus, exposed them to an extract of crushed snail, and then monitored their movements to a normally preferred shaded area. We also tested the behavior of caddisfly larvae from 36 sites from a total of 6 streams/rivers adjacent to the Superfund site. Sites were located upstream and downstream of abandoned mines. We located active larvae of four genera, simulated predation by grasping the animals between thumb and forefinger (the larvae respond to being grasped by withdrawing into their case), lifted them from the water for 3 s, and then placed them in an adjacent, slower section of the stream. We then recorded how long it took each larvae to partially emerge from its case and attempt to move away. Unlike reference site snails, snails from heavy metal-polluted environments failed to exhibit antipredator behaviors in response to crushed conspecifics. These results are consistent with previous laboratory studies. We found no effect of heavy metals on the antipredatory behavior of caddisfly larvae. PMID:10667928

  6. Electrophoretic studies on the digestive gland esterases of some biomphalarid and lymnaeid snails.

    PubMed

    Malek, E A; File, S K

    1971-01-01

    Because of the problems encountered in the classification of snails of medical importance, biochemical methods have been sought to help clarify the situation. Of these, the separation of the enzymes of adult snails by electrophoresis seems the most promising but very few attempts have been made so far to use the results for taxonomic studies. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the use of the enzyme systems of neotropical planorbid and of lymnaeid snails to elucidate their taxonomy and also snail-schistosome relationships at the species and population levels.The findings show the characteristic electrophoretic patterns of digestive gland esterases of the planorbid and lymnaeid snails used, as well as their variation and the level of such variation among certain populations and the consistency of the patterns among others. The results also show that, in general, the extent of variation between some populations of the same species is greater than the differences between species of the same group. However, at the specific level, there are similarities suggesting close relationships between some populations of Biomphalaria glabrata and B. tenagophila on the one hand, and of certain populations of B. peregrina and of B. obstructa on the other hand.The present study has thrown some light on the question of electrophoretic variation in enzymes, and the ways in which this can be applied to studies of the genetics of snails. A correlation is suggested between certain patterns that indicate biochemical similarities or differences among the planorbid snail populations and the susceptibility of the species or the population to infection with the schistosomes. PMID:5317015

  7. Electrophoretic studies on the digestive gland esterases of some biomphalarid and lymnaeid snails

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Emile A.; File, Sharon K.

    1971-01-01

    Because of the problems encountered in the classification of snails of medical importance, biochemical methods have been sought to help clarify the situation. Of these, the separation of the enzymes of adult snails by electrophoresis seems the most promising but very few attempts have been made so far to use the results for taxonomic studies. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the use of the enzyme systems of neotropical planorbid and of lymnaeid snails to elucidate their taxonomy and also snail—schistosome relationships at the species and population levels. The findings show the characteristic electrophoretic patterns of digestive gland esterases of the planorbid and lymnaeid snails used, as well as their variation and the level of such variation among certain populations and the consistency of the patterns among others. The results also show that, in general, the extent of variation between some populations of the same species is greater than the differences between species of the same group. However, at the specific level, there are similarities suggesting close relationships between some populations of Biomphalaria glabrata and B. tenagophila on the one hand, and of certain populations of B. peregrina and of B. obstructa on the other hand. The present study has thrown some light on the question of electrophoretic variation in enzymes, and the ways in which this can be applied to studies of the genetics of snails. A correlation is suggested between certain patterns that indicate biochemical similarities or differences among the planorbid snail populations and the susceptibility of the species or the population to infection with the schistosomes. ImagesFig. 4Fig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 2 PMID:5317015

  8. Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Acanthocephalans, Cestodes, Leeches, & Pentastomes1

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA-114 Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Acanthocephalans, Cestodes, Leeches Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Sessile Ciliates · Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Motile Ciliates · Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Dinoflagellates, Coccidia

  9. The Application of Electric Shock as a Novel Pest Control Method for Apple Snail, Pomacea canaliculata (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagyu, Yoshihito; Tsuji, Satoshi; Satoh, Saburoh; Yamabe, Chobei

    The apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, brought to Japan from Taiwan for human consumption in the 1980s, has come to be considered as deleterious for rice cultivation. The snail is unable to injure young rice plants while receiving electric shock because the snail retracts its entire body into its shell and shuts its aperture with its operculum. Electric shock should be applied intermittently to reduce the amount of energy that is wasted when the snail is in its shell made of one of the insulator. The minimum electric shock required for controlling snails and the time required for movement after application of electric shock to determine the frequency of each electric shock were investigated using two methods; vertical and horizontal application of the electrical stimulation. The results showed that there is a strong correlation between the strength of electric shock and the reaction of the snails, and electric shock made snails inactive when it was applied 0.35 A/m2 in the horizontal direction and 0.45 A/m2 in the vertical direction with water of 11 mS/m. A positive correlation was also found between electric shock and the reaction of the snails and shell height. In comparison with larger snails, the smaller snails had higher threshold levels against electric current density because their shorter feet tended to have lower voltage dorp. Moreover, the frequency of electric shock should be chosen the minimum duration for the inactive condition, and it was approximately 10 seconds. Consequently the direction of electric current should be in the horizontal direction above 0.35 A/m2 and the frequency of electric shock should be less than 10 seconds for practical use. However, electric shock would have to be maintained at greater than 0.35 A/m2 because snails might become habituated to electric shock and water in paddy field would have high electric conductivity.

  10. Greenland Freshwater Input to the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaird, N.; Straneo, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is losing mass at an unprecedented rate. The associated increased freshwater flux directly contributes to sea level rise, but also has dynamical implications for the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and global climate. The freshwater buoyancy forcing from marine terminating outlet glaciers is distributed throughout the depth of coastal fjords. When coupled with strong fjord stratification, this buoyancy forcing can drive significant water mass transformation (WMT) of subsurface waters in the fjord. The WMT differs substantially from a simple freshwater input to the surface ocean. This often overlooked small-scale overturning has potentially important consequences for the influence of GrIS freshwater on large scale ocean circulation and needs to be accounted for in studies of GrIS impact on the ocean. From ship-based and moored hydrographic measurements in East Greenland (2008 to 2013) we describe the character and temporal variability of meltwater driven WMT. While melting always adds freshwater to the ocean, the corresponding WMT causes a seasonally variable vertical redistribution of heat and salt. Observations show that the seasonal cycle of the WMT lags surface air temperatures by several months. We discuss how the WMT and its timing might impact the boundary current system in East Greenland, and implications for its representation in numerical models and impact on North Atlantic deep convection.

  11. AVES.NET: The Freshwater Dinoflagellates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carty, Susan

    Hosted by AVES.NET, this website about Freshwater Dinoflagellates was created by Victor W. Fazio III and Dr. Susan Carty of Heidelberg College (Tiffin, Ohio). Two main attractions of this site are the Freshwater Dinoflagellate Image Archive, and the Recent Additions-Freshwater Dinoflagellate Images 2003 (from the 2003-04 winter field season). Individual Dinoflagellate image pages generally include a ventral view, dorsal view, or both, and the pages featuring species from Ohio include county distribution maps. Site visitors can email Dr. Carty for permission to use any of the images. The website also contains a List of Freshwater Dinoflagellates in Ohio, some of which link to the individual image pages. Additionally, the site offers a Review of Online Images of Freshwater Dinoflagellates including links to many other host sites, and a link to an online article by Dr. Susan Carty and Daniel E. Wujek entitled _A New Species of Peridinium and New Records of Dinoflagellates and Silica-Scaled Chrysophytes from Belize._ [NL

  12. Use of ice water and salt treatments to eliminate an exotic snail, red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus, from small immersible fisheries equipment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ice water and salt treatments were evaluated for disinfection of fisheries equipment contaminated with a non-indigenous tropical snail, the red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus. The snail can displace native snails and can transmit trematodes directly to fishes and indirectly to other animals, i...

  13. Decline and homogenization of Pacific faunas: the land snails of American Samoa ? ? Contribution number 2000-019 of Bishop Museum’s Pacific Biological Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Cowie

    2001-01-01

    Native Pacific island biotas are disappearing rapidly. Among these native biotas the land snails are especially recognized not only for their high diversity and high levels of endemism but also for being under severe threat, with many species already extinct. Many non-indigenous snail species are being introduced, leading to a homogenization of land snail faunas across the Pacific. Field survey

  14. Seasonal dynamics of two mortality-related trematodes using an introduced snail.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Kristin K; Sorensen, Robert E

    2009-08-01

    Seasonal dynamics of 2 trematode species, Cyathocotyle bushiensis and Sphaeridiotrema globulus, were assessed in relation to life history traits of the parasites and their hosts, as well as abundance of host species and abundance of infective stages. Both of these trematodes are associated with recurrent mortality of migrating waterbirds on the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge. An invasive snail species, Bithynia tentaculata, serves as intermediate host for both trematode species. In total, 2,970 snails were collected at 2 study sites. Prevalence and mean abundance of the 2 trematode species varied among dates and was attributed to several factors, including migration patterns of definitive hosts, snail population dynamics, and seasonal changes in temperature. The surge of new infections of both parasites seems to be due to avian hosts foraging at this site during spring migration. The high prevalence and abundance of metacercariae among the snail population promote mortality among molluscivorous birds by increasing the probability of ingestion of a lethal dose. Additionally, mortality of non-molluscivorous birds can be explained by accidental ingestion of a couple of highly infected snails resulting in a lethal dose. PMID:20049988

  15. Fascioliasis Control: In Vivo and In Vitro Phytotherapy of Vector Snail to Kill Fasciola Larva

    PubMed Central

    Sunita, Kumari; Singh, D. K.

    2011-01-01

    Snail is one of the important components of an aquatic ecosystem, it acts as intermediate host of Fasciola species. Control of snail population below a certain threshold level is one of the important methods in the campaign to reduce the incidence of fascioliasis. Life cycle of the parasite can be interrupted by killing the snail or Fasciola larva redia and cercaria in the snail body. In vivo and in vitro toxicity of the plant products and their active component such as citral, ferulic acid, umbelliferone, azadirachtin, and allicin against larva of Fasciola in infected snail Lymnaea acuminata were tested. Mortality of larvae were observed at 2?h, 4?h, 6?h, and 8?h, of treatment. In in vivo treatment, azadirachtin caused highest mortality in redia and cercaria larva (8?h, LC50 0.11, and 0.05?mg/L) whereas in in vitro condition allicin was highly toxic against redia and cercaria (8?h, LC50 0.01, and 0.009?mg/L). Toxicity of citral was lowest against redia and cercaria larva. PMID:22132306

  16. Effects of Deposited Sediment on the Growth and Behavior of Physa Snails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, T. R.; Stelzer, R. S.

    2005-05-01

    Fine sediment loading is one of the leading causes of ecological impairment to rivers and streams in the United States, yet few studies have addressed how deposited silt affects benthic invertebrates. We determined how deposited silt affects the growth and behavior of Physa integra snails from Emmons Creek, WI by exposing them to 3 levels of silt (ambient, low, high) in streamside once-through flumes and recirculating chambers. While there were no significant differences in snail growth rates among silt treatments, the behavioral differences were striking. Snails that received added silt spent less time on algal-covered tiles than those not receiving silt. Elemental analysis of periphyton revealed higher nitrogen, carbon, and phosphorus levels for the silt addition treatments, which may be providing the snails with more nutritious food, although this was not reflected in their growth rates. Per capita egestion rates were significantly higher for the high-silt treatment. These snails may have ingested more of the algae and silt but the presence of silt may have decreased assimilation, nullifying any positive effect on growth. In conclusion, silt addition did not affect Physa integra growth rates but did influence their behavior and egestion rates.

  17. miR-153 inhibits epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting Snail.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenfei; Ma, Xiaopeng; Li, Xingrui; Dong, Hong; Yi, Jilin; Zeng, Weixia; Yang, Zhifang

    2015-08-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been implicated as a dynamic cellular process in embryonic development and invasion of human cancers. Snail1 is a critical convergence hub in EMT regulation which transcriptionally represses E-cadherin expression. Currently, published data indicate that upregulation of Snail is mainly due to transcriptional activation and regulation of protein stability and cellular location. However, whether there is an alternative regulatory mechanism remains unclear. Our study showed that the expression of miR-153 was noticeably downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines and tissues, compared with normal liver epithelial cells (NLCs) and matched adjacent normal HCC tissues. Ectopic expression of miR-153 inhibited the migration and invasion ability of HCC cells, while suppression of miR-153 rescued this inhibitory effect. In addition, upregulation of miR-153 in HCC cells resulted in a decrease in epithelial markers, E-cadherin and ?-catenin, and an increase in mesenchymal markers, N-cadherin and vimentin, and vice versa. Moreover, we demonstrated that miR-153 downregulated Snail expression by directly targeting the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of Snail. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-153 plays a critical role in suppressing EMT and HCC progression by direct suppression of Snail expression. PMID:26035427

  18. Genetic Variation between Biomphalaria alexandrina Snails Susceptible and Resistant to Schistosoma mansoni Infection

    PubMed Central

    El-Nassery, Suzanne M. F.; Abou-El-Naga, Iman F.; Allam, Sonia R.; Shaat, Eman A.; Mady, Rasha F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Much effort has been made to control schistosomiasis infection in Egypt. However, enduring effects from such strategies have not yet been achieved. In this study, we sought to determine the genetic variability related to the interaction between Biomphalaria alexandrina snails and Schistosoma mansoni. Using RAPD-PCR with eight (10?mers) random primers, we were able to determine the polymorphic markers that differed between snails susceptible and resistant to Schistosoma mansoni infection using five primers out of the eight. Our results suggest that the RAPD-PCR technique is an efficient means by which to compare genomes and to detect genetic variations between schistosomiasis intermediate hosts. The RAPD technique with the above-noted primers can identify genomic markers that are specifically related to the Biomphalaria alexandrina/Schistosoma mansoni relationship in the absence of specific nucleotide sequence information. This approach could be used in epidemiologic surveys to investigate genetic diversity among Biomphalaria alexandrina snails. The ability to determine resistant markers in Biomphalaria alexandrina snails could potentially lead to further studies that use refractory snails as agents to control the spread of schistosomiasis. PMID:23878796

  19. Imidacloprid induced alterations in enzyme activities and energy reserves of the land snail, Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    Radwan, M A; Mohamed, M S

    2013-09-01

    The in vivo sublethal toxic effects (0.2 and 0.6 LD50) of topically applied imidacloprid on biochemical biomarkers in the land snail, Helix aspersa was examined. Biochemical perturbations were assessed by measuring the three enzymatic (Acetylcholinesterase, AChE; catalase, CAT and glutathione-S-transferase, GST) activities and three energy reserves (protein, glycogen and lipids) in the snails. Snail samples were taken from each sublethal dose and control groups at 1, 3 and 7 days after treatment. The results revealed that there were overall decrease in AChE activity as well as depletion of lipids and glycogen contents in the imidacloprid-treated snails compared to control groups. The CAT and GST activities of treated snails with the sublethal doses of imidacloprid were significantly higher than those of untreated controls along the three times of exposure. Moreover, an increase in the level of total proteins was observed in animals treated with 0.6 LD50 imidacloprid compared to control groups. The alterations in all tested biochemical perturbations were most pronounced with the 0.6 LD50 than 0.2 LD50. This study suggests that alterations of the enzyme activities and energy reserves in this species that could be useful as biomarkers of imidacloprid exposure in the evaluation of terrestrial impacts of this insecticide. PMID:23756058

  20. Development of the feline lungworms Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior in Helix aspersa snails.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Alessio; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Annoscia, Giada; Di Cesare, Angela; Colella, Vito; Brianti, Emanuele; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Mutafchiev, Yasen; Otranto, Domenico

    2014-04-01

    Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Strongylida, Angiostrongylidae) and Troglostrongylus brevior (Strongylida, Crenosomatidae) are regarded as important lungworm species of domestic felids, with the latter considered an emerging threat in the Mediterranean region. The present study aimed to assess their concurrent development in the mollusc Helix aspersa (Pulmonata, Helicidae). Thirty snails were infested with 100 first-stage larvae (L1) of A. abstrusus and T. brevior, isolated from a naturally infested kitten. Larval development was checked by digesting five specimens at 2, 6 and 11 days post infestation. Larvae retrieved were morphologically described and their identification was confirmed by specific PCR and sequencing. All H. aspersa snails were positive for A. abstrusus and T. brevior, whose larval stages were simultaneously detected at each time point. In addition, snails were exposed to outdoor conditions and examined after overwintering, testing positive up to 120 days post infestation. Data herein presented suggest that A. abstrusus and T. brevior develop in H. aspersa snails and may eventually co-infest cats. Data on the morphology of both parasitic species in H. aspersa provide additional information on their development and identification, to better understand the population dynamics of these lungworms in receptive snails and paratenic hosts. PMID:24477103

  1. How subcellular partitioning can help to understand heavy metal accumulation and elimination kinetics in snails.

    PubMed

    Gimbert, Frédéric; Vijver, Martina G; Coeurdassier, Michaël; Scheifler, Renaud; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Badot, Pierre-Marie; de Vaufleury, Annette

    2008-06-01

    To understand bioaccumulation kinetics of metals within biota inhabiting industrially contaminated soils, toxicokinetic dynamics and subcellular fractionation were carried out with the terrestrial snail Helix aspersa in a long-term (six-month) laboratory experiment. Accumulation and elimination kinetics were determined for Cd, Pb, and Zn in both viscera and foot of snails and were described accurately by one-compartment models. The subcellular fractions were obtained by sequential centrifugations and were analyzed by isolating metal-rich granules, tissue fragments, and cytosolic fractions. Different fractions showed metal-specific binding capacities that might be useful in identifying the biological significance of accumulated metal levels in snails. Cadmium was retrieved mainly from the cytosolic fraction, where it was stored in the long term and not excreted, thus explaining the linear accumulation patterns. Most of the accumulated Pb was found in the granular fraction, and snails appeared able to excrete these concretions, leading to achievement of a steady state in internal Pb body burdens. Significant levels of Pb, however, were retrieved at the end of the depuration phase and retained in the cell debris fraction. Zinc showed affinities for both cytosolic and granular fractions, leading to intermediate uptake and excretion patterns. The dynamics of the different sequestration forms at the subcellular level support the observed kinetics of metal body burdens and, in association with the determination of uptake fluxes, allow precise assessment of metal accumulation in snails. PMID:18229974

  2. Distribution of fasciolosis in Kansas, with results of experimental snail susceptibility studies.

    PubMed

    McKown, R D; Ridley, R K

    1995-02-01

    A total of 278 veterinarians throughout Kansas were sent mail-in survey forms asking specific questions relating to their experience with fasciolosis in their practice area. Replies were received from 178 (64%) veterinarians representing six practice types; one-third reported having seen cases of fasciolosis in their practice. The results of our survey indicate that the majority of the cattle diagnosed with liver fluke disease in Kansas are imported from other areas of the USA. However, in both central and southeastern regions of Kansas, some cattle that had never been out of the state were infected with Fasciola hepatica. Thus, these areas of Kansas should be considered endemic for liver fluke disease. Methods of diagnosis, types of operations, and improvements seen after treatment were also discussed. In order to ascertain the existence of one or more possible snail intermediate hosts within Kansas, five species of lymnaeid snails were collected from central and southeastern parts of the state and tested for their susceptibility to infection by Fasciola hepatica. The snails collected included Pseudosuccinea columella, Fossaria obrussa, Fossaria bulimoides, Fossaria parva and Fossaria dalli. Of these, Pseudosuccinea columella and Fossaria bulimoides proved susceptible to experimental infection by Fasciola hepatica. Metacercariae obtained from experimentally infected snails were used to infect both a weanling calf thereby completing the life cycle of the parasite. This report is the first to identify the existence of suitable snail intermediate hosts for Fasciola hepatica in Kansas. PMID:7754605

  3. Field evaluation of controlled release copper glass as a molluscicide in snail control.

    PubMed

    Chandiwana, S K; Ndamba, J; Makura, O; Taylor, P

    1987-01-01

    Limited field evaluation of a new molluscicide, copper controlled release glass (CRG), was carried out in 4 human water contact sites in shallow and slow flowing streams in the highveld region of Zimbabwe during 1984 to 1986. The results indicate that the copper CRG has great potential as an inexpensive snail control agent to reduce schistosomiasis transmission. There was a marked reduction in snail numbers in the treated sites after application of 2 forms of the copper molluscicide; a "fast" CRG with approximately 24-h solution time in water and a "slow" CRG with about 1-year solution time. Snail numbers remained depressed during the observation period while frogs and fish were not affected. Fluctuations in snail numbers in the untreated sites showed no clear pattern, being erratic and unpredictable and probably attributable to seasonal effects. Problems of the correct amounts of molluscicide to apply to a site are to an extent overcome by knowledge of the copper binding capacity of the mud substrate. The mud sediment can be saturated by the "fast" release copper glass to achieve a snail killing concentration in the water which can be sustained by the "slow" release glass. It appears that the main difficulty in maintaining desirable copper levels in the water is flow, which causes rapid removal of copper from the treated waterbody. Thus, under field conditions on the highveld region of Zimbabwe, the CRG molluscicide is likely to be effective only during the stable conditions of the dry season which is, however, the main transmission period. PMID:3503415

  4. Dispersion Of Crude Oil And Petroleum Products In Freshwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to investigate the relationship between dispersion effectiveness in freshwater and the surfactant composition for fresh and weathered crude oil. Although limited research on the chemical dispersion of crude oil and petroleum products in freshwat...

  5. ASSESSING MACROINVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS: ADVANCES AND CHALLENGES IN

    E-print Network

    Pfrender, Michael

    ASSESSING MACROINVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS: ADVANCES AND CHALLENGES IN DNA, biodiversity, freshwater, next-generation sequencing abstract Assessing the biodiversity of macroinvertebrate. The accuracy and precision of biodiversity assessments based on standard morphological identifications

  6. Conservation status of freshwater gastropods of Canada and the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Paul D.; Bogan, Arthur E.; Brown, Kenneth M.; Burkhead, Noel M.; Cordeiro, James R.; Garner, Jeffrey T.; Hartfield, Paul D.; Lepitzki, Dwayne A.; Mackie, Gerry L.; Pip, Eva; Tarpley, Thomas A.; Tiemann, Jeremy S.; Whelan, Nathan V.; Strong, Ellen E.

    2013-01-01

    This is the first American Fisheries Society conservation assessment of freshwater gastropods (snails) from Canada and the United States by the Gastropod Subcommittee (Endangered Species Committee). This review covers 703 species representing 16 families and 93 genera, of which 67 species are considered extinct, or possibly extinct, 278 are endangered, 102 are threatened, 73 are vulnerable, 157 are currently stable, and 26 species have uncertain taxonomic status. Of the entire fauna, 74% of gastropods are imperiled (vulnerable, threatened, endangered) or extinct, which exceeds imperilment levels in fishes (39%) and crayfishes (48%) but is similar to that of mussels (72%). Comparison of modern to background extinction rates reveals that gastropods have the highest modern extinction rate yet observed, 9,539 times greater than background rates. Gastropods are highly susceptible to habitat loss and degradation, particularly narrow endemics restricted to a single spring or short stream reaches. Compilation of this review was hampered by a paucity of current distributional information and taxonomic uncertainties. Although research on several fronts including basic biology, physiology, conservation strategies, life history, and ecology are needed, systematics and curation of museum collections and databases coupled with comprehensive status surveys (geographic limits, threat identification) are priorities.

  7. First proteome of the egg perivitelline fluid of a freshwater gastropod with aerial oviposition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Zhang, Huoming; Wang, Hao; Heras, Horacio; Dreon, Marcos S; Ituarte, Santiago; Ravasi, Timothy; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2012-08-01

    Pomacea canaliculata is a freshwater snail that deposits eggs on solid substrates above the water surface. Previous studies have emphasized the nutritional and protective functions of the three most abundant perivitelline fluid (PVF) protein complexes (ovorubin, PV2, and PV3) during its embryonic development, but little is known about the structure and function of other less abundant proteins. Using 2-DE, SDS-PAGE, MALDI TOF/TOF, and LC-MS/MS, we identified 59 proteins from the PVF of P. canaliculata, among which 19 are novel. KEGG analysis showed that the functions of the majority of these proteins are "unknown" (n=34), "environmental information processing" (10), 9 of which are related to innate immunity, and "metabolism" (7). Suppressive subtractive hybridization revealed 21 PVF genes to be specific to the albumen gland, indicating this organ is the origin of many of the PVF proteins. Further, the 3 ovorubin subunits were identified with 30.2-35.0% identity among them, indicating their common origin but ancient duplications. Characterization of the PVF proteome has opened the gate for further studies aiming to understand the evolution of the novel proteins and their contribution to the switch to aerial oviposition. PMID:22738194

  8. A peptide-gated ion channel from the freshwater polyp Hydra.

    PubMed

    Golubovic, Andjelko; Kuhn, Anne; Williamson, Michael; Kalbacher, Hubert; Holstein, Thomas W; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Gründer, Stefan

    2007-11-30

    Chemical transmitters are either low molecular weight molecules or neuropeptides. As a general rule, neuropeptides activate only slow metabotropic receptors. To date, only one exception to this rule is known, the FMRFamide-activated Na(+) channel (FaNaC) from snails. Until now FaNaC has been regarded as a curiosity, and it was not known whether peptide-gated ionotropic receptors are also present in other animal groups. Nervous systems first evolved in cnidarians, which extensively use neuropeptides. Here we report cloning from the freshwater cnidarian Hydra of a novel ion channel (Hydra sodium channel, HyNaC) that is directly gated by the neuropeptides Hydra-RFamides I and II and is related to FaNaC. The cells expressing HyNaC localize to the base of the tentacles, adjacent to the neurons producing the Hydra-RFamides, suggesting that the peptides are the natural ligands for this channel. Our results suggest that neuropeptides were already used for fast transmission in ancient nervous systems. PMID:17911098

  9. Environmental and physiological factors contributing to tissue lead concentrations in freshwater molluscs

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    Environmental and physiological factors contibuting to lead concentrations in selected freshwater molluscs were examined. Field investigation demonstrated that lead concentrations in Physa integra, Pseudosuccinea columella and Campeloma decisum reflected the lead levels at the two study sites. However, molluscs sharing a common habitat displayed widely differing lead levels. Lead concentrations in P. integra, P. columella and Helisoma trivolvis were correlated with dissolved lead in the water. Lead concentrations in P. integra were also correlated with those in the dominant macrophyte at the study sites. The lead levels in these gastropods were not correlated with concentrations of Aufwuchs-associated lead. Lead levels in C. decisum were not correlated with the lead concentrations in any of the measured potential sources. Lead contributions in P. integra were independent of size. Lead levels in C. decisum were greatest in small snails. In laboratory experiments, P. integra accumulated lead rapidly from plant tissue and more slowly from the Aufwuchs. This species also eliminated lead rapidly. C. decisum neither accumulated lead rapidly from sediments nor eliminated lead rapidly from its body when exposed to a lead-free environment.

  10. A new cercaria and metacercaria of Acanthoparyphium (Echinostomatidae) found in an intertidal snail Zeacumantus subcarinatus (Batillaridae) from

    E-print Network

    Poulin, Robert

    A new cercaria and metacercaria of Acanthoparyphium (Echinostomatidae) found in an intertidal snail Abstract A new 23-collar-spined cercaria and metacercaria are described from intertidal molluscs of the coast of New Zealand. The new cercaria found emerging from the mud snails Zeacumantus subcarinatus

  11. Molecular and Cellular Pathobiology 14-3-3 Binding Sites in the Snail Protein Are Essential for

    E-print Network

    Lieberman, Judy

    cells results in the acqui- sition of mesenchymal traits and properties of stem cells (8). In mice for Snail-Mediated Transcriptional Repression and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Differentiation Zhaoyuan Hou1 expression of Snail in epithelial cells induces the EMT trans- differentiation event accompanied by increased

  12. Antigenic Community between Opisthorchis viverrini Adult Worms and Their Intermediate Hosts, Bithynia Snails as a Support for Concomitant Antigens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorn Watthanakulpanich; Jitra Waikagul; Paron Dekumyoy; Malinee Thairungroj Anantaphruti

    he concept that parasites share antigens with their snail intermediate hosts has received considerable experimental support. In this study, comparison between three species of Bithynia snails: B. funiculata, B. siamensis siamensis, B. siamensis goniomphalos and crude somatic antigens of Opisthorchis viverrini adult worms were immunologically characterized with antibodies (IgG) in sera of opisthorchiasis patients by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis.

  13. Introduction of the land snail Eobania vermiculata as a bioindicator organism of terrestrial pollution using a battery of biomarkers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Itziou; V. K. Dimitriadis

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed to enrich the group of sentinel organisms of terrestrial pollution biomonitoring, by investigating the efficacy of the land snail Eobania vermiculata. For this reason, a package of biomarkers was performed on land snails E. vermiculata collected from polluted areas in the field or treated with heavy metals in the laboratory. The biomarkers used were neutral red

  14. RNA Interference Targeting Snail Inhibits the Transforming Growth Factor ?2-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Human Lens Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Jing, Jiaona; Hu, Jianyan; Guan, Huaijin

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial-msenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to posterior capsule opacification (PCO) type of cataract. Transcription factors Snail is a key trigger of EMT activated by transforming growth factor ? (TGF?). This study was done to investigate the effect of Snail targeting siRNA on TGF?2-induced EMT in human lens epithelial cells. TGF?2 treatment of cultured human epithelial cell line (HLEB3) upregulated the expression of Snail and the EMT relevant molecules such as vimentin and ?-SMA but downregulated the expression of keratin and E-cadherin. After the stimulation of TGF?2, the HLEB3 cells became fibroblast-like in morphology, and the junctions of cell-cell disappeared. TGF?2 treatment also enhanced migration ability of HLEB3 cells. TGF?2-induced Snail expression and EMT were significantly inhibited by Snail siRNA. By analyzing the response characteristics of HLEB3 in TGF?2-induced EMT model with/without Snail-specific siRNA, we concluded that Snail is an element in the EMT of HLEB3 cells induced by TGF?2. Snail siRNA targeting can block the induced EMT and therefore has the potential to suppress the development of PCO. PMID:24163761

  15. BIOTIC INTERACTIONS MODIFY THE TRANSFER OF CESIUM137 IN A SOIL–EARTHWORM–PLANT–SNAIL FOOD WEB

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clémentine Fritsch; Renaud Scheifler; Karine Beaugelin-Seiller; Philippe Hubert; Michaël Cśurdassier; Annette de Vaufleury; Pierre-Marie Badot

    2008-01-01

    137 Cs) from a contaminated (130 Bq\\/kg) deciduous forest soil to the lettuce Lactuca sativa and to the snail Cantareus aspersus (formerly Helix aspersa) in two laboratory experiments. In the first experiment, the International Organization for Stan- dardization 15952 test was used to expose snails for five weeks to contaminated soil with or without earthworms. In these conditions, the presence

  16. From triphenyltins to integrated management of the `pest' snail Cerithidea cingulata in mangrove-derived milkfish ponds in the Philippines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Bagarinao; I. Lantin-Olaguer

    2000-01-01

    The potamidid snail Cerithidea cingulata is considered a pest in brackishwater milkfish ponds in the Philippines and has been controlled by the triphenyltin (TPT) compounds Aquatin and Brestan. But TPT is also toxic to other invertebrates, fishes, algae, bacteria and people, and high TPT residues occur in sea foods including milkfish. Thus, control of snails in milkfish ponds should be

  17. Land Snail Fauna of Me Aure Cave (WMD007), Moindou, New Caledonia: Human Introductions and Faunal Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Cowie; J. A. Grant-Mackie

    2004-01-01

    The land snail fauna excavated from a cave at MeAureon the central southwestern coast of New Caledonia represents a period of over 3000 yr, from before human arrival in the island to the present. The material excavated rep- resents 20 terrestrial species in nine families. The fauna reflects the overall land snail fauna of New Caledonia in being dominated by

  18. Land Snail Fauna of Me Aure Cave (WMD007), Moindou, New Caledonia: Human Introductions and Faunal Changel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Cowie; A. Grant-Mackie

    The land snail fauna excavated from a cave at Me Aure on the central southwestern coast of New Caledonia represents a period of over 3000 yr, from before human arrival in the island to the present. The material excavated rep­ resents 20 terrestrial species in nine families. The fauna reflects the overall land snail fauna of New Caledonia in being

  19. Effect of water plants and non-target snails on the infectivity of Bulinus truncatus with Schistosoma haematobium.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Fayez A; Abd-el-Monem, Sayed

    2005-12-01

    The application of the water plant (Ceratophyllum demersum, Eichhornia crassipes and Lemna gibba) and/or non-target snails (Planorbis planorbis, Physa acuta and Melanoides tuberculata) gave a significant degree of reduction in the infection rate of B. truncatus subjected to S. haematobium miracidia. The data also indicated a reduction in mean total number of cercarial production/snail. However, no significant difference was detected in the prepatent period and duration of cercarial shedding of the parasite when compared with the control group. So, the results revealed that the snails exhibited a competitive ability against B. truncatus. Both survival rate and egg production of B. truncatus were greatly reduced when existed in mixed cultures with non-target snails and the magnitude of this reduction increased by increasing the number of the non-target snails. PMID:16333895

  20. Dynamics of freshwater plumes: observations and numerical modeling of the wind-forced response and alongshore freshwater transport

    E-print Network

    Fong, Derek Allen

    1988-01-01

    A freshwater plume often forms when a river or an estuary discharges water onto the continental shelf. Freshwater plumes are ubiquitous features of the coastal ocean and usually leave a striking signature in the coastal ...

  1. FRESHWATER BIOLOGY SPECIAL REVIEW Diel horizontal migration of zooplankton

    E-print Network

    Burks, Romi

    FRESHWATER BIOLOGY SPECIAL REVIEW Diel horizontal migration of zooplankton: costs and benefits's freshwater resources are declining rapidly (Naiman et al., 1995; Brown et al., 2000). Changes in land use degrade natural freshwaters and reduce biodiversity by elim- inating valuable habitats and adding excess

  2. Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Monogeneans1

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA-111 Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Monogeneans1 Deborah B. Pouder, Eric W of pictorial guides that is designed to assist in the identification of common freshwater fish parasites. The publications included in this series are: · Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Sessile Ciliates

  3. Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Digenean Trematodes1

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA-112 Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Digenean Trematodes1 Deborah B. Pouder in a series of pictorial guides that is designed to assist in the identification of common freshwater fish parasites. The publications included in this series are: · Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide

  4. Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Motile Ciliates1

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA108 Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Motile Ciliates1 Deborah B. Pouder, Eric W of pictorial guides that is designed to assist in the identification of common freshwater fish parasites. The publications included in this series are: · Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Sessile Ciliates

  5. REVISING THE BERING STRAIT FRESHWATER FLUX INTO THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    REVISING THE BERING STRAIT FRESHWATER FLUX INTO THE ARCTIC OCEAN Rebecca A. Woodgate and Knut98105, USA, woodgate@apl.washington.edu ABSTRACT The freshwater flux through the Bering Strait and Carmack [1989] estimated the Bering Strait freshwater flux as 1670 km3 /yr (relative to 34.8 psu

  6. STUDY ABROADFOR MARINE AND FRESHWATER BIOLOGY MAJORS study abroad

    E-print Network

    John, Lizy Kurian

    STUDY ABROADFOR MARINE AND FRESHWATER BIOLOGY MAJORS study abroad #12;WHY YOU SHOULD STUDY ABROAD 2 STUDY ABROAD FOR MARINE AND FRESHWATER BIOLOGY MAJORS Study abroad programs provide Marine financial aid? STUDY ABROAD FOR MARINE AND FRESHWATER BIOLOGY MAJORS 3 · How will I get credit

  7. Bugs as drugs, part two: worms, leeches, scorpions, snails, ticks, centipedes, and spiders.

    PubMed

    Cherniack, E Paul

    2011-03-01

    In this second of a two-part series analyzing the evidence for the use of organisms as medicine, the use of a number of different "bugs" (worms, leeches, snails, ticks, centipedes, and spiders) is detailed. Several live organisms are used as treatments: leeches for plastic surgery and osteoarthritis and the helminths Trichuris suis and Necator americanus for inflammatory bowel disease. Leech saliva is the source of a number of anticoagulants, including the antithrombin agent hirudin and its synthetic analogues, which have been approved for human use. Predatory arthropods, such as certain species of snails, spiders, scorpions, centipedes, and ticks provide a trove of potential analgesic peptides in their venom. A synthetic analogue of a snail venom peptide, ziconotide, has been approved for human use and is used as an alternative to opioids in severe pain cases. Arthropods, such as ticks, have venom that contains anticoagulants and centipede venom has a protein that corrects abnormalities in lipid metabolism. PMID:21438646

  8. Infectivity of Echinostoma friedi miracidia to different snail species under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Muńoz-Antoli, C; Trelis, M; Toledo, R; Esteban, J G

    2006-09-01

    The infectivity of Echinostoma friedi (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) miracidia was studied experimentally in a range of laboratory-reared snails that coexist in the same natural locality, namely Radix peregra, Lymnaea fuscus, L. truncatula (Lymnaeidae), Gyraulus chinensis, Helisoma duryi (Planorbidae) and Physella acuta (Physidae), and snails from different geographical origins acting naturally or experimentally as intermediate hosts of Schistosoma spp., namely Planorbarius metidjensis (from Málaga, Spain), Biomphalaria glabrata (Guadeloupe), B. alexandrina (Egypt) (Planorbidae), Bulinus cernicus (Mauritius), B. globosus (Zambia), B. natalensis (South Africa) and B. truncatus (Niger) (Bulinidae). Six species of snails were found to be susceptible, with the rate of infection ranging from 0 to 36.7%. The highest infection was detected in R. peregra. The low host specificity of E. friedi might have an epidemiological significance as a requisite for a recent establishment in a new geographical area. PMID:16923279

  9. Prevalence of Haplorchis taichui in Field-Collected Snails: A Molecular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chontananarth, Thapana

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of the cercarial stage of an intestinal trematode, Haplorchis taichui, in thiarid snails (Gastropoda: Thiaridae) was investigated using light microscope and species-specific PCR procedures. A total of 988 snails were collected from Mae Taeng district, Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand, which comprised of 3 species; Melanoides tuberculata, Tarebia granifera, and Thiara scabra. The overall prevalence of pleurolophocercous cercariae was 21.7% as determined by the morphology. For genetic detection of H. taichui infection in snails, 2 primers Hapt_F (5'-GGCCAACGCAATCGTCATCC-3') and Hapt_R (5'-GCGTCGGGTTTCAGACATGG-3'), were used. The genomic DNA of H. taichui, which was used as a positive control, gave an amplification of the 256 bp fragment. The overall prevalence of H. taichui from specific PCR was 9.7%. The proportion of H. taichui among the pleurolophocercous cercariae in this study was 44.9%. PMID:21234240

  10. A novel molecular pathway for Snail-dependent, SPARC-mediated invasion in non-small cell lung cancer pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jeanette L.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Hong, Long-Sheng; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Minna, John D.; Shay, Jerry W.; Walser, Tonya C.; Dubinett, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Definition of the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer allows investigators an enhanced understanding of the natural history of the disease, thus fostering development of new prevention strategies. In addition to regulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the transcription factor Snail exerts global effects on gene expression. Our recent studies reveal that Snail is upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is associated with poor prognosis, and promotes tumor progression in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate that overexpression of Snail leads to upregulation of Secreted Protein, Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) in models of premalignancy and established disease, as well as in lung carcinoma tissues in situ. Snail overexpression leads to increased SPARC-dependent invasion in vitro, indicating that SPARC may play a role in lung cancer progression. Bioinformatic analysis implicates TGF-?, ERK1/2, and miR-29b as potential intermediaries in Snail-mediated upregulation of SPARC. Both the TGF-?1 ligand and TGF-?R2 are upregulated following Snail overexpression. Treatment of human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) lines with TGF-?1 and inhibition of TGF-?1 mRNA expression modulated SPARC expression. Inhibition of MEK phosphorylation downregulated SPARC. MiR-29b is downregulated in Snail overexpressing cell lines, while overexpression of miR-29b inhibited SPARC expression. In addition, miR-29b was upregulated following ERK inhibition, suggesting a Snail-dependent pathway by which Snail activation of TGF-? and ERK signaling results in downregulation of miR-29b and subsequent upregulation of SPARC. Our discovery of pathways responsible for Snail-induced SPARC expression contributes to the definition of NSCLC pathogenesis. PMID:24253315

  11. A novel molecular pathway for Snail-dependent, SPARC-mediated invasion in non-small cell lung cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jeanette L; Fishbein, Michael C; Hong, Long-Sheng; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Minna, John D; Shay, Jerry W; Walser, Tonya C; Dubinett, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Definition of the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer allows investigators an enhanced understanding of the natural history of the disease, thus fostering development of new prevention strategies. In addition to regulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the transcription factor Snail exerts global effects on gene expression. Our recent studies reveal that Snail is upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is associated with poor prognosis, and promotes tumor progression in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate that overexpression of Snail leads to the upregulation of secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) in models of premalignancy and established disease, as well as in lung carcinoma tissues in situ. Snail overexpression leads to increased SPARC-dependent invasion in vitro, indicating that SPARC may play a role in lung cancer progression. Bioinformatic analysis implicates transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and miR-29b as potential intermediaries in Snail-mediated upregulation of SPARC. Both the TGF-?1 ligand and TGF-? receptor 2 (TGF-?R2) are upregulated following Snail overexpression. Treatment of human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) lines with TGF-?1 and inhibition of TGF-?1 mRNA expression modulates SPARC expression. Inhibition of MAP-ERK kinase (MEK) phosphorylation downregulates SPARC. MiR-29b is downregulated in Snail-overexpressing cell lines, whereas overexpression of miR-29b inhibits SPARC expression. In addition, miR-29b is upregulated following ERK inhibition, suggesting a Snail-dependent pathway by which Snail activation of TGF-? and ERK signaling results in downregulation of miR-29b and subsequent upregulation of SPARC. Our discovery of pathways responsible for Snail-induced SPARC expression contributes to the definition of NSCLC pathogenesis. PMID:24253315

  12. Experimental Quantification of Long Distance Dispersal Potential of Aquatic Snails in the Gut of Migratory Birds

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Casper H. A.; van der Velde, Gerard; van Lith, Bart; Klaassen, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Many plant seeds and invertebrates can survive passage through the digestive system of birds, which may lead to long distance dispersal (endozoochory) in case of prolonged retention by moving vectors. Endozoochorous dispersal by waterbirds has nowadays been documented for many aquatic plant seeds, algae and dormant life stages of aquatic invertebrates. Anecdotal information indicates that endozoochory is also possible for fully functional, active aquatic organisms, a phenomenon that we here address experimentally using aquatic snails. We fed four species of aquatic snails to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and monitored snail retrieval and survival over time. One of the snail species tested was found to survive passage through the digestive tract of mallards as fully functional adults. Hydrobia (Peringia) ulvae survived up to five hours in the digestive tract. This suggests a maximum potential transport distance of up to 300 km may be possible if these snails are taken by flying birds, although the actual dispersal distance greatly depends on additional factors such as the behavior of the vectors. We put forward that more organisms that acquired traits for survival in stochastic environments such as wetlands, but not specifically adapted for endozoochory, may be sufficiently equipped to successfully pass a bird's digestive system. This may be explained by a digestive trade-off in birds, which maximize their net energy intake rate rather than digestive efficiency, since higher efficiency comes with the cost of prolonged retention times and hence reduces food intake. The resulting lower digestive efficiency allows species like aquatic snails, and potentially other fully functional organisms without obvious dispersal adaptations, to be transported internally. Adopting this view, endozoochorous dispersal may be more common than up to now thought. PMID:22403642

  13. Differential spatial repositioning of activated genes in Biomphalaria glabrata snails infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Arican-Goktas, Halime D; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Bridger, Joanna M; Knight, Matty

    2014-09-01

    Schistosomiasis is an infectious disease infecting mammals as the definitive host and fresh water snails as the intermediate host. Understanding the molecular and biochemical relationship between the causative schistosome parasite and its hosts will be key to understanding and ultimately treating and/or eradicating the disease. There is increasing evidence that pathogens that have co-evolved with their hosts can manipulate their hosts' behaviour at various levels to augment an infection. Bacteria, for example, can induce beneficial chromatin remodelling of the host genome. We have previously shown in vitro that Biomphalaria glabrata embryonic cells co-cultured with schistosome miracidia display genes changing their nuclear location and becoming up-regulated. This also happens in vivo in live intact snails, where early exposure to miracidia also elicits non-random repositioning of genes. We reveal differences in the nuclear repositioning between the response of parasite susceptible snails as compared to resistant snails and with normal or live, attenuated parasites. Interestingly, the stress response gene heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 is only repositioned and then up-regulated in susceptible snails with the normal parasite. This movement and change in gene expression seems to be controlled by the parasite. Other differences in the behaviour of genes support the view that some genes are responding to tissue damage, for example the ferritin genes move and are up-regulated whether the snails are either susceptible or resistant and upon exposure to either normal or attenuated parasite. This is the first time host genome reorganisation has been seen in a parasitic host and only the second time for any pathogen. We believe that the parasite elicits a spatio-epigenetic reorganisation of the host genome to induce favourable gene expression for itself and this might represent a fundamental mechanism present in the human host infected with schistosome cercariae as well as in other host-pathogen relationships. PMID:25211244

  14. Temperature relations of aerial and aquatic respiration in six littoral snails in respiration in six littoral snails in relation to their vertical zonation.

    PubMed

    McMahon, R F; Russell-Hunter, W D

    1977-04-01

    Aerial and aquatic rates of oxygen consumption were determined over a range of 5 degrees to 45 degrees C at 5 degrees C intervals for six species of marine littoral snails: including the sublittoral species, Acmaea testudinalis, Mitrella lunata, and Lacuna vincta; and the truly intertidal species, Littorina obtusata, L. littorea, and L. saxatilis. Polarographic oxygen electrodes were used with normally active snails collected from populations on Nobska and Manomet Points, Massachusetts. Three subtidal species, A. testudinalis, Lacuna vincta, and M. lunata, do not display any metabolic adjustment to increasing temperature, with thermal limits reached at 30 degrees to 35 degrees C. Aerial respiration in A. testudinalis is similar to aquatic O2 uptake, but rates average only 36.4% of aquatic rates. The intertidal congeners, Littorina obtusata, L. littorea and L. saxatilis, have varying degrees of aerial and aquatic metabolic regulation with increasing temperature. L. obtusata, a low intertidal snail exposed to air for 15% to 45% of the tidal cycle, displays a respiratory pattern of "passive endurance" to high temperatures both in air and in water. L. littorea, the dominant snail of the midlittoral region, remains active when exposed to air (30% to 75% of the tidal cycle) and has a zone of metabolic regulation between 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Over this, the normal ambient temperature range, the Q10 closely approximates one, and nearly equivalent O2 uptake rates occur in air and in water. L. saxatilis from the upper littoral region is exposed to air for 70% to 95% of the tidal cycle and is characterized by reduced aerial and aquatic O2 uptake rates above 25 degrees C, representing a reversible torpor up to its thermal maximum at 44 degrees C. For these six snail species, respiratory responses to increasing temperature are thus directly related to the pattern of vertical distribution in the intertidal environment. Discussion of this relationship stresses that the evolution of other nearterrestrial structures and functions in littoral snails has proceeded in a discontinuous fashion. Despite this, the temperature responses in respiration parallel the functional morphology of the pallial structures and the physiological patterns of response to low oxygen stress, as well as adaptive features of reproduction, larval development, water-control, and nitrogenous excretion. PMID:856295

  15. Glyphosate and glufosinate-based herbicides: fate in soil, transfer to, and effects on land snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Coline Druart; Maurice Millet; Renaud Scheifler; Olivier Delhomme; Annette de Vaufleury

    Purpose  The aim of this work was to assess the transfer and effects of two widely used herbicides on the land snail Helix aspersa during long-term exposure under laboratory conditions.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Newly hatched snails were exposed for 168 days to soil and\\/or food contaminated with a formulation of glyphosate (Bypass®)\\u000a or glufosinate (Basta®) at the recommended field doses and also at

  16. Mathematical Explorations: Freshwater Scarcity: A Proportional Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Middle school students' mathematical understanding benefits from connecting mathematics to other content areas in the curriculum. This month's activity explores the issue of the scarcity of freshwater, a natural resource (activity sheets are included). This activity concentrates on the critical areas mentioned in the Common Core State…

  17. Effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Buikema

    1982-06-01

    The biological effects of acid rain, chlorination, heavy metals and other forms of pollution on freshwater invertebrates are examined in this review. Several methods for evaluating chronic toxicity to pesticide residues and synthetic fuels components are reviewed. The effects of pollutants is reviewed in detail for cladocera, amphipods, isopods, decapods, aquatic insects, molluscs, worms, and protozoa.(KRM)

  18. Sexual Dimorphism in Growth of Freshwater Drum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew L. Rypel

    2007-01-01

    I examined sexual dimorphism in the long-lived Aplodinotus grunniens (freshwater drum) from five lakes and four rivers in Alabama. Using the Von Bertalanffy growth function combined with nonparametric statistics, I found males and females had similar annual growth rates from years 0-4 years of age, but then showed significantly different growth rates across subsequent ages. Female drum grew signifi- cantly

  19. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Invertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buikema, A. L., Jr.; Herricks, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) toxicant effects on invertebrates; (2) microcosm and community effects, and (3) biological control of aquatic life. A list of 123 references is also presented. (HM)

  20. Macrophytes: Freshwater Forests of Lakes and Rivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermid, Karla J.; Naiman, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological effects on macrophytes (aquatic plants) on the freshwater ecosystem are discussed. Research questions and issues related to these organisms are also discussed, including adaptations for survival in a wet environment, ecological consequences of large-scale macrophyte eradication, seasonal changes in plant…

  1. FISH 315 FRESHWATER FISHERIES TECHNIQUES MAYMESTER 2014

    E-print Network

    Sikes, Derek S.

    FISH 315 FRESHWATER FISHERIES TECHNIQUES MAYMESTER 2014 Instructor Teaching Assistant Dr. Trent M in aquaculture, limnology, and fisheries biology. An emphasis will be placed on the proper care and use for collecting representative, non-biased fisheries and aquatic sciences data. Prerequisites: Fish 101, Stat 200

  2. Role of fungi in freshwater ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle K. M. Wong; Teik-Khiang Goh; I. John Hodgkiss; Kevin D. Hyde; V. Mala Ranghoo; Clement K. M. Tsui; Wai-Hong Ho; Wilson S. W. Wong; Tsz-Kit Yuen

    1998-01-01

    There are more than 600 species of freshwater fungi with a greater number known from temperate, as compared to tropical, regions. Three main groups can be considered which include Ingoldian fungi, aquatic ascomycetes and non-Ingoldian hyphomycetes, chytrids and, oomycetes. The fungi occurring in lentic habitats mostly differ from those occurring in lotic habitats. Although there is no comprehensive work dealing

  3. Toxicity of vanadium to different freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Beusen, J.M.; Neven, B.

    1987-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the acute and subchronic toxicity of vanadium for various species of freshwater fish. The long-term toxicity and the effect of vanadium on the reproduction of Daphnia magna is also evaluated and compared with the toxicity of other metals.

  4. Freshwater savings from marine protein consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gephart, Jessica A.; Pace, Michael L.; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Marine fisheries provide an essential source of protein for many people around the world. Unlike alternative terrestrial sources of protein, marine fish production requires little to no freshwater inputs. Consuming marine fish protein instead of terrestrial protein therefore represents freshwater savings (equivalent to an avoided water cost) and contributes to a low water footprint diet. These water savings are realized by the producers of alternative protein sources, rather than the consumers of marine protein. This study quantifies freshwater savings from marine fish consumption around the world by estimating the water footprint of replacing marine fish with terrestrial protein based on current consumption patterns. An estimated 7 600 km3 yr-1 of water is used for human food production. Replacing marine protein with terrestrial protein would require an additional 350 km3 yr-1 of water, meaning that marine protein provides current water savings of 4.6%. The importance of these freshwater savings is highly uneven around the globe, with savings ranging from as little as 0 to as much as 50%. The largest savings as a per cent of current water footprints occur in Asia, Oceania, and several coastal African nations. The greatest national water savings from marine fish protein occur in Southeast Asia and the United States. As the human population increases, future water savings from marine fish consumption will be increasingly important to food and water security and depend on sustainable harvest of capture fisheries and low water footprint growth of marine aquaculture.

  5. Schistosoma haematobium detection in snails by DraI PCR and Sh110/Sm-Sl PCR: further evidence of the interruption of schistosomiasis transmission in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This is the first study in Morocco to estimate snail infection rates at the last historic transmission sites of schistosomiasis, known to be free from new infection among humans since 2004. Screening of large numbers of snails for infection is one way to confirm that Schistosoma haematobium transmission has stopped and does not resurge. Methods A total of 2703 Bulinus truncatus snails were collected from 24 snail habitats in five provinces of Morocco: Errachidia, El Kelaa des Sraghna, Tata, Beni Mellal, and Chtouka Ait Baha. All visible snails were collected with a scoop net or by hand. We used waders and gloves as simple precautions. Snails were morphologically identified according to Moroccan Health Ministry guide of schistosomiasis (1982). All snails were analyzed in pools by molecular tool, using primers from the newly identified repeated DNA sequence, termed DraI, in the S. haematobium group. To distinguish S. bovis and S. haematobium, the snails were analyzed by Sh110/Sm-Sl PCR that was specific of S. haematobium. Results The results showed that snails from Errachidia, Chtouka Ait Baha, sector of Agoujgal in Tata and sector of Mbarkiya in El kelaa des Sraghna were negative for DraI PCR; but, snails from remaining snail habitats of El Kelaa des Sraghna, Tata and Beni Mellal were positive. This led to suggest the presence of circulating schistosome species (S. haematobium, S. bovis or others) within these positive snail habitats. Subsequently, confirmation with S. haematobium species specific molecular assay, Sh110/Sm-Sl PCR, showed that none of the collected snails were infected by S. haematobium in all historic endemic areas. Conclusion The absence of S. haematobium infection in snails supports the argument of S. haematobium transmission interruption in Morocco. PMID:24962624

  6. Role of the lymnaeid snail Pseudosuccinea columella in the transmission of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Dar, Y; Vignoles, P; Rondelaud, D; Dreyfuss, G

    2014-05-27

    Experimental infections of three Egyptian Pseudosuccinea columella populations with sympatric miracidia of Fasciola sp., coming from cattle- or sheep-collected eggs, were carried out to determine the capacity of this lymnaeid to support larval development of the parasite. Using microsatellite markers, the isolates of Egyptian miracidia were identified as Fasciola hepatica. Apart from being independent of snail origin, prevalences ranging from 60.4 to 75.5% in snails infected with five miracidia of F. hepatica were significantly higher than values of 30.4 to 42.2% in snails with bi-miracidial infections. The number of metacercariae ranged from 243 to 472 per cercarial-shedding snail and was independent of snail origin, parasite origin and miracidial dose used for infection. If P. columella was subjected to two successive bi-miracidial infections with F. hepatica, prevalence of infection was 63.3%, with a mean of 311 metacercariae per snail. These values were clearly greater than those already reported for Radix natalensis infected with the same parasite and the same protocol. Successful experimental infection of P. columella with F. hepatica suggests that this lymnaeid snail is an important intermediate host for the transmission of fascioliasis in Egypt. PMID:24865184

  7. Survival of the faucet snail after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, A.J.; Cole, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata, a nonindigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia, was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871 and has spread to the mid-Atlantic states, the Great Lakes region, Montana, and most recently, the Mississippi River. The faucet snail serves as intermediate host for several trematodes that have caused large-scale mortality among water birds, primarily in the Great Lakes region and Montana. It is important to limit the spread of the faucet snail; small fisheries equipment can serve as a method of snail distribution. Treatments with chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water baths were tested to determine their effectiveness as a disinfectant for small fisheries equipment. Two treatments eliminated all test snails: (1) a 24-h exposure to Hydrothol 191 at a concentration of at least 20 mg/L and (2) a treatment with 50??C heated water for 1 min or longer. Faucet snails were highly resistant to ethanol, NaCl, formalin, Lysol, potassium permanganate, copper sulfate, Baquacil, Virkon, household bleach, and pH extremes (as low as 1 and as high as 13).

  8. Stable isotope ecology of land snails from a high-latitude site near Fairbanks, interior Alaska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanes, Yurena

    2015-05-01

    Land snails have been investigated isotopically in tropical islands and mid-latitude continental settings, while high-latitude locales, where snails grow only during the summer, have been overlooked. This study presents the first isotopic baseline of live snails from Fairbanks, Alaska (64°51?N), a proxy calibration necessary prior to paleoenvironmental inferences using fossils. ?13C values of the shell (- 10.4 ± 0.4‰) and the body (- 25.5 ± 1.0‰) indicate that snails consumed fresh and decayed C3-plants and fungi. A flux-balance mixing model suggests that specimens differed in metabolic rates, which may complicate paleovegetation inferences. Shell ?18O values (- 10.8 ± 0.4‰) were ~ 4‰ higher than local summer rain ?18O. If calcification occurred during summer, a flux-balance mixing model suggests that snails grew at temperatures of ~ 13°C, rainwater ?18O values of ~- 15‰ and relative humidity of ~ 93%. Results from Fairbanks were compared to shells from San Salvador (Bahamas), at 24°51?N. Average (annual) ?18O values of shells and rainwater samples from The Bahamas were both ~ 10‰ 18O-enriched with respect to seasonal (summer) Alaskan samples. At a coarse latitudinal scale, shell ?18O values overwhelmingly record the signature of the rainfall during snail active periods. While tropical snails record annual average environmental information, high-latitude specimens only trace summer season climatic data.

  9. The life cycle of Echinostoma bolschewense (Kotova, 1939) (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae).

    PubMed

    Nasincová, V

    1991-01-01

    The life cycle of E. bolschewense, the species with 37 collar spines and closely related to E. revolutum, was experimentally studied. The following developmental stages are described: mother and daughter rediae, cercaria, metacercaria, and adult. The freshwater prosobranchiate snail Viviparus contectus was found to be the first intermediate host in nature. Under experimental conditions, the miracidia developed in V. contectus. They did not, however, penetrate into Bithynia tentaculata or into any of the pulmonate snails tested. The cercariae encysted in various Prosobranchia and Pulmonata. Adult worms were commonly obtained from hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) and only exceptionally from chickens (Gallus gallus f. dom.). The species studied is considered to be conspecific with Cercaria bolschewensis described by Kotova (1939). PMID:1937273

  10. Notocotylus biomphalariae n. sp. (Digenea: Notocotylidae)from Biomphalaria peregrina (Gastropoda: Pulmonata) in Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Flores, Verónica; Brugni, Norma

    2005-07-01

    A new species of Notocotylus was found parasiting a freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria peregrina. Naturally infected snails were collected from two temporary ponds in the Nahuel Huapí National Park in Patagonia. The characteristics of the larval stages are presented. Experimental adults were recovered from the intestinal caeca of ducks and chicks. Adults of Notocotylus biomphalariae n. sp. exhibit an aspinose tegument, two lateral rows of 11 ventral glands and a median row of four, a uterus with 12-16 coils of which 2-4 are previtelline, a metraterm equivalent in size to 65-68% of the cirrus-sac length, a previtelline field which extends to the middle of the body, a lobed testis and a genital pore closely posterior to the intestinal bifurcation. The rediae have one to three cercariae. The cercariae, when shed, are trioculate and have a long tail; they encyst in the environment and become infective 12 days after encystment. PMID:16025211

  11. Snail Involves in the Transforming Growth Factor ?1-Mediated Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Fang; Gu, Qing; Xu, Xun

    2011-01-01

    Background The proliferation of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells resulting from an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a key role in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), which leads to complex retinal detachment and the loss of vision. Genes of Snail family encode the zinc finger transcription factors that have been reported to be essential in EMT during embryonic development and cancer metastasis. However, the function of Snail in RPE cells undergoing EMT is largely unknown. Principal Findings Transforming growth factor beta(TGF-?)-1 resulted in EMT in human RPE cells (ARPE-19), which was characterized by the expected decrease in E-cadherin and Zona occludin-1(ZO-1) expression, and the increase in fibronectin and ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) expression, as well as the associated increase of Snail expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, TGF-?1 treatment caused a significant change in ARPE-19 cells morphology, with transition from a typical epithelial morphology to mesenchymal spindle-shaped. More interestingly, Snail silencing significantly attenuated TGF-?1-induced EMT in ARPE-19 cells by decreasing the mesenchymal markers fibronectin and a-SMA and increasing the epithelial marker E-cadherin and ZO-1. Snail knockdown could effectively suppress ARPE-19 cell migration. Finally, Snail was activated in epiretinal membranes from PVR patients. Taken together, Snail plays very important roles in TGF-?-1-induced EMT in human RPE cells and may contribute to the development of PVR. Significance Snail transcription factor plays a critical role in TGF-?1-induced EMT in human RPE cells, which provides deep insight into the pathogenesis of human PVR disease. The specific inhibition of Snail may provide a new approach to treat and prevent PVR. PMID:21853110

  12. Zeb1 and Snail1 engage miR-200f transcriptional and epigenetic regulation during EMT.

    PubMed

    Díaz-López, Antonio; Díaz-Martín, Juan; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Cuevas, Eva P; Santos, Vanesa; Olmeda, David; Portillo, Francisco; Palacios, José; Cano, Amparo

    2015-02-15

    Cell plasticity is emerging as a key regulator of tumor progression and metastasis. During carcinoma dissemination epithelial cells undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes characterized by the acquisition of migratory/invasive properties, while the reverse, mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) process, is also essential for metastasis outgrowth. Different transcription factors, called EMT-TFs, including Snail, bHLH and Zeb families are drivers of the EMT branch of epithelial plasticity, and can be post-transcriptionally downregulated by several miRNAs, as the miR-200 family. The specific or redundant role of different EMT-TFs and their functional interrelations are not fully understood. To study the interplay between different EMT-TFs, comprehensive gain and loss-of-function studies of Snail1, Snail2 and/or Zeb1 factors were performed in the prototypical MDCK cell model system. We here describe that Snail1 and Zeb1 are mutually required for EMT induction while continuous Snail1 and Snail2 expression, but not Zeb1, is needed for maintenance of the mesenchymal phenotype in MDCK cells. In this model system, EMT is coordinated by Snail1 and Zeb1 through transcriptional and epigenetic downregulation of the miR-200 family. Interestingly, Snail1 is involved in epigenetic CpG DNA methylation of the miR-200 loci, essential to maintain the mesenchymal phenotype. The present results thus define a novel functional interplay between Snail and Zeb EMT-TFs in miR-200 family regulation providing a molecular link to their previous involvement in the generation of EMT process in vivo. PMID:25178837

  13. Biotic interactions modify the transfer of cesium-137 in a soil-earthworm-plant-snail food web.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Clémentine; Scheifler, Renaud; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Hubert, Philippe; Coeurdassier, Michaël; de Vaufleury, Annette; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2008-08-01

    The present study investigated the possible influence of the earthworm Aporrectodea tuberculata on the transfer of cesium-137 ((137)Cs) from a contaminated (130 Bq/kg) deciduous forest soil to the lettuce Lactuca sativa and to the snail Cantareus aspersus (formerly Helix aspersa) in two laboratory experiments. In the first experiment, the International Organization for Standardization 15952 test was used to expose snails for five weeks to contaminated soil with or without earthworms. In these conditions, the presence of earthworms caused a two- to threefold increase in (137)Cs concentrations in snails. Transfer was low in earthworms as well as in snails, with transfer factors (TFs) lower than 3.7 x 10(-2). Activity concentrations were higher in earthworms (2.8- 4.8 Bq/kg dry mass) than in snails (<1.5 Bq/kg). In the second experiment, microcosms were used to determine the contribution of soil and lettuce in the accumulation of (137)Cs in snails. Results suggest that the contribution of lettuce and soil is 80 and 20%, respectively. Microcosms also were used to study the influence of earthworms on (137)Cs accumulation in snail tissues in the most ecologically relevant treatment (soil-earthworm-plant-snail food web). In this case, soil-to-plant transfer was high, with a TF of 0.8, and was not significantly modified by earthworms. Conversely, soil-to-snail transfer was lower (TF, approximately 0.1) but was significantly increased in presence of earthworms. Dose rates were determined in the microcosm study with the EDEN (elementary dose evaluation for natural environment) model. Dose rates were lower than 5.5 x 10(-4) mGy/d, far from values considered to have effects on terrestrial organisms (1 mGy/d). PMID:18266477

  14. Field and laboratory evaluation of the influence of copper-diquat on apple snails in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Imlay, M.J.; McMillan, W.E.; Martin, T.W.; Takekawa, J.; Johnson, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    The recent decline of apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) populations in canals surrounding Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in southern Florida coincided with the use of copper-diquat for the control of the aquatic weed hydrilla (Hydrilla ver/icillara). Field and laboratory studies were designed to assess the effects of copper-diquat on apple snails, which are the primary food of the endangered snail kite Rostrhamus sociabilis (formerly known as the Everglade kite). Acute toxicities (96-h LC50 values) of Cutrine-Plus and Komeen (chelated formulations of copper) to immature apple snails were 22 and 241-?g/L, respectively. Diquat was toxic at a concentration of 1,800 I-?g/L and did not increase the toxicity of copper when the chemicals were used in combination. Evaluation of field samples indicated that copper concentrations were higher in detritus than in water. plants and mud, and that there was a gradient of copper concentration from the canal to the interior, the highest residues being in samples from the canal. Copper associated with detritus (up to 150 ?g/g) had no effect on growth or survival of apple snails in field cage and tank studies. Also, field applications of copper.diquat to hydrilla had no effect on survival of caged adult and immature snails. Copper from field applications was rapidly taken out of solution by plants and organic material in the water and subsequently incorporated into the bottom detritus. Although the effects of repeated applications of copper-diquat and high body burdens of copper (accumulated during exposure to herbicidal treatment) on survival and reproduction of apple snails are not known, the information available indicates that treatment of hydrilla with copper-diquat was probably not responsible for the decline in the apple snail population. Application at recommended rates should pose no threat to these snails in the organically rich waters of southern Florida.

  15. FACTORS AFFECTING HATCHING SUCCESS OF GOLDEN APPLE SNAIL EGGS: EFFECTS OF WATER IMMERSION AND CANNIBALISM

    E-print Network

    Siemann, Evan

    -mail: khorn@rice.edu Abstract: The golden apple snail (Pomacea maculata Perry) is an invasive species, invasive management, invasive species, Pomacea INTRODUCTION Invasive species are present in many ecosystems, Henderson et al. 2006). Invasive species impact community composition and habitat struc- ture in both

  16. Distribution and speciation of cadmium in the terrestrial snail, Helix aspersa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Cooke; Andrew Jackson; Graham Nickless; David James Roberts

    1979-01-01

    Conclusions Cadmium is taken up by terrestrial snails living in an environment with a relatively high cadmium concentration. The metal becomes bound to protein with a molecular weight of approximately 22,000 daltons. This cadmium-protein complex concentrates in the digestive gland and is present in a form which is soluble in water, (though difficult to extract efficiently). That no efficient excretion

  17. Dart receipt promotes sperm storage in the garden snail Helix aspersa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David W. Rogers; Ronald Chase

    2001-01-01

    During courtship, many helicid snails attempt to pierce the body walls of their mating partners with mucus-coated calcareous darts. The mucus covering the dart induces conformational changes in the female reproductive tract of the recipient, closing off the entrance to the gametolytic bursa copulatrix. We have tested the effect of dart receipt on the number of sperm stored by once-mated

  18. Stages of oogenesis in the snail, Helix aspersa : cytological, cytochemical and ultrastructural studies

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stages of oogenesis in the snail, Helix aspersa : cytological, cytochemical and ultrastructural, France. Summary. Oogenesis was studied in adult Helix aspersa using light and electron micros- copy recently reexamined oogenesis in Helix aspersa. The aim of the present work was to deter- mine by some

  19. Metapopulation genetic structure and migration pathways in the land snail Helix aspersa: influence of landscape heterogeneity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-François Arnaud

    2003-01-01

    The spatial genetic structuring of the land snail Helix aspersa was investigated for 32 colonies within an intensive agricultural area, the polders of the Bay of Mont-Saint-Michel (France). Given the habitat patchiness and envi- ronmental instability, the setting of H. aspersa colonies meets the broader view of a metapopulation structure. The identification of extrinsic barriers to migration and their impact

  20. Evidence for Genetic Control of Adult Weight Plasticity in the Snail Helix aspersa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mathieu Ros; Daniel Sorensen; Rasmus Waagepetersen; Mathilde Dupont-Nivet; Magali SanCristobal; Jean-Claude Bonnet; Jacques Mallard

    2004-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity and canalization are important topics in quantitative genetics and evolution. Both concepts are related to environmental sensitivity. The latter can be modeled using a model with genetically structured environmental variance. This work reports the results of a genetic analysis of adult weight in the snail Helix aspersa. Several models of heterogeneous variance are fitted using a Bayesian, MCMC