Science.gov

Sample records for frictional contact interfaces

  1. Non-Amontons-Coulomb local friction law of randomly rough contact interfaces with rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Danh Toan; Wandersman, Elie; Prevost, Alexis; Le Chenadec, Yohan; Fretigny, Christian; Chateauminois, Antoine

    2013-12-01

    We report on measurements of the local friction law at a multi-contact interface formed between a smooth rubber and statistically rough glass lenses, under steady-state friction. Using contact imaging, surface displacements are measured, and inverted to extract both distributions of frictional shear stress and contact pressure with a spatial resolution of about 10\\ \\mu\\text{m} . For a glass surface whose topography is self-affine with a Gaussian height asperity distribution, the local frictional shear stress is found to vary sub-linearly with the local contact pressure over the whole investigated pressure range. Such sub-linear behavior is also evidenced for a surface with a non-Gaussian height asperity distribution, demonstrating that, for such multi-contact interfaces, Amontons-Coulomb's friction law does not prevail at the local scale.

  2. Estimation of real contact area during sliding friction from interface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chey, Sung Keun; Tian, Pengyi; Tian, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Frictional heat is one of the most important topics in tribological research. The real contact area of the frictional pair plays a significant role in accurately estimating the interface temperature, which is closely related to the frictional heat. However, conventional methods for measuring the contact area, such as constriction resistance measurements, are not suitable for dynamic frictional motion because of the electrical and thermal interferences at the contact region. In this study, a novel method is presented for estimating the real contact area during sliding friction. First, the average interface temperature was experimentally measured by the dynamic thermocouple method. Then assuming that the total frictional heat power is constant, the measured temperature was used as a constraint to determine the contact area in a finite element model, giving an estimation for the real contact area. The calculation results show that the real contact area increases with increasing normal load as predicted by contact theories, and decreases with increasing sliding speed, which could be attributable to the contact dynamics of asperities at the interface. Additionally, the limits of the proposed method is discussed.

  3. Analysis of composite material interface crack face contact and friction effects using a new node-pairs contact algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhi-Peng; He, Yu-Bo; Wan, Shui

    2014-06-01

    A new node-pairs contact algorithm is proposed to deal with a composite material or bi-material interface crack face contact and friction problem (e.g., resistant coating and thermal barrier coatings) subjected to complicated load conditions. To decrease the calculation scale and calculation errors, the local Lagrange multipliers are solved only on a pair of contact nodes using the Jacobi iteration method, and the constraint modification of the tangential multipliers are required. After the calculation of the present node-pairs Lagrange multiplier, it is turned to next contact node-pairs until all node-pairs have finished. Compared with an ordinary contact algorithm, the new local node-pairs contact algorithm is allowed a more precise element on the contact face without the stiffness matrix singularity. The stress intensity factors (SIFs) and the contact region of an infinite plate central crack are calculated and show good agreement with those in the literature. The contact zone near the crack tip as well as its influence on singularity of stress fields are studied. Furthermore, the frictional contacts are also considered and found to have a significant influence on the SIFs. The normalized mode-II stress intensity factors K̂II for the friction coefficient decrease by 16% when f changes from 1 to 0.

  4. Strength evolution of a reactive frictional interface is controlled by the dynamics of contacts and chemical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, François; Beauprêtre, Sophie; Voisin, Christophe; Zigone, Dimitri; Candela, Thibault; Dysthe, Dag K.; Gratier, Jean-Pierre

    2012-08-01

    Assessing the healing rate of a fault is relevant to the knowledge of the seismic machinery. However, measuring fault healing at the depths where it occurs still remains inaccessible. We have designed an analog laboratory experiment of a simulated rough fault that undergoes healing and investigate the relative roles of interface chemical reactivity and sliding velocity on the healing rate. Slide-hold-slide experiments are conducted on a bare interface with various materials in contact (glass/glass, salt/glass, and salt/salt) with or without the presence of a reactive fluid and the slider-surface pull-off force is measured. Our results show that the interface strengthens with hold time, whatever the conditions of the experiments. In addition, we quantify the effect of chemical reactivity on the healing rate. Considering the glass/glass case as a reference, we show that the healing rate is increased by a factor of 2 for the salt/glass case; by a factor of 3 for the salt/salt case; and by about a factor of 20 when saturated brine is added on a salt/salt interface. We also measure that the sliding velocity affects the healing rate for salt/salt interfaces at room humidity. A careful optical monitoring of the interface allows a direct observation of the contact growth characteristics associated to each type of materials. Finally, the large differences of healing rate are interpreted through a mechanistic approach, where the various experimental conditions allow separating different healing mechanisms: increase of adhesion of the contacts by welding, contact growth due to creep or due to neck growth driven by surface tension.

  5. Tire/runway friction interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  6. Stability and transient dynamics of a propeller-shaft system as induced by nonlinear friction acting on bearing-shaft contact interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Zhang, Zhiyi; Huang, Xiuchang; Hua, Hongxing

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the friction-induced instability and the resulting self-excited vibration of a propeller-shaft system supported by water-lubricated rubber bearing. The system under consideration is modeled with an analytical approach by involving the nonlinear interaction among torsional vibrations of the continuous shaft, tangential vibrations of the rubber bearing and the nonlinear friction acting on the bearing-shaft contact interface. A degenerative two-degree-of-freedom analytical model is also reasonably developed to characterize system dynamics. The stability and vibrational characteristics are then determined by the complex eigenvalues analysis together with the quantitative analysis based on the method of multiple scales. A parametric study is conducted to clarify the roles of friction parameters and different vibration modes on instabilities; both the graphic and analytical expressions of instability boundaries are obtained. To capture the nature of self-excited vibrations and validate the stability analysis, the nonlinear formulations are numerically solved to calculate the transient dynamics in time and frequency domains. Analytical and numerical results reveal that the nonlinear coupling significantly affects the system responses and the bearing vibration plays a dominant role in the dynamic behavior of the present system.

  7. Slippery but Tough: The Rapid Fracture of Lubricated Frictional Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bayart, E; Svetlizky, I; Fineberg, J

    2016-05-13

    We study the onset of friction for rough contacting blocks whose interface is coated with a thin lubrication layer. High speed measurements of the real contact area and stress fields near the interface reveal that propagating shear cracks mediate lubricated frictional motion. While lubricants reduce interface resistances, surprisingly they significantly increase the energy dissipated Γ during rupture. Moreover, lubricant viscosity affects the onset of friction but has no effect on Γ. Fracture mechanics provide a new way to view the otherwise hidden complex dynamics of the lubrication layer. PMID:27232023

  8. Slippery but Tough: The Rapid Fracture of Lubricated Frictional Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, E.; Svetlizky, I.; Fineberg, J.

    2016-05-01

    We study the onset of friction for rough contacting blocks whose interface is coated with a thin lubrication layer. High speed measurements of the real contact area and stress fields near the interface reveal that propagating shear cracks mediate lubricated frictional motion. While lubricants reduce interface resistances, surprisingly they significantly increase the energy dissipated Γ during rupture. Moreover, lubricant viscosity affects the onset of friction but has no effect on Γ . Fracture mechanics provide a new way to view the otherwise hidden complex dynamics of the lubrication layer.

  9. Effect of fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayer films on sidewall adhesion and friction of surface micromachines with impacting and sliding contact interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-06-14

    A self-assembled monolayer film consisting of fluoro-octyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) was vapor-phase deposited on Si(100) substrates and polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) surface micromachines. The hydrophobic behavior and structural composition of the FOTS film deposited on Si(100) were investigated by goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The effects of contact pressure, relative humidity, temperature, and impact/sliding cycles on the adhesive and friction behavior of uncoated and FOTS-coated polysilicon micromachines (referred to as the Si and FOTS/Si micromachines, respectively) were investigated under controlled loading and environmental conditions. FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated much lower and stable adhesion than Si micromachines due to the highly hydrophobic and conformal FOTS film. Contrary to Si micromachines, sidewall adhesion of FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated a weak dependence on relative humidity, temperature, and impact cycles. In addition, FOTS/Si micromachines showed low and stable adhesion and low static friction for significantly more sliding cycles than Si micromachines. The adhesive and static friction characteristics of Si and FOTS/Si micromachines are interpreted in the context of physicochemical surface changes, resulting in the increase of the real area of contact and a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition of the surface chemical characteristics caused by nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of the organic residue (Si micromachines) or the FOTS film (FOTS/Si micromachines) during repetitive impact and oscillatory sliding of the sidewall surfaces.

  10. Direct Measurement of Friction of a Fluctuating Contact Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuo; Gao, Min; Xiong, Xiaomin; Wang, Yong Jian; Wang, Xiaoping; Sheng, Ping; Tong, Penger

    2013-07-01

    We report a direct measurement of the friction coefficient of a fluctuating (and slipping) contact line using a thin vertical glass fiber of diameter d with one end glued onto a cantilever beam and the other end touching a liquid-air interface. By measuring the broadening of the resonant peak of the cantilever system with varying liquid viscosity η, we find the friction coefficient of the contact line has a universal form, ξc≃0.8πdη, independent of the liquid-solid contact angle. The obtained scaling law is further supported by the numerical simulation based on the phase field model under the generalized Navier boundary conditions.

  11. Direct measurement of friction of a fluctuating contact line.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuo; Gao, Min; Xiong, Xiaomin; Wang, Yong Jian; Wang, Xiaoping; Sheng, Ping; Tong, Penger

    2013-07-12

    We report a direct measurement of the friction coefficient of a fluctuating (and slipping) contact line using a thin vertical glass fiber of diameter d with one end glued onto a cantilever beam and the other end touching a liquid-air interface. By measuring the broadening of the resonant peak of the cantilever system with varying liquid viscosity η, we find the friction coefficient of the contact line has a universal form, ξ(c)≃0.8πdη, independent of the liquid-solid contact angle. The obtained scaling law is further supported by the numerical simulation based on the phase field model under the generalized Navier boundary conditions. PMID:23889421

  12. Direct measurement of friction of a fluctuating contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuo; Gao, Min; Xiong, Xiaomin; Wang, Yong Jian; Wang, Xiaoping; Sheng, Ping; Tong, Penger

    2013-03-01

    What happens at a moving contact line, where one fluid displaces another (immiscible) fluid over a solid surface, is a fundamental issue in fluid dynamics. In this presentation, we report a direct measurement of the friction coefficient in the immediate vicinity of a fluctuating contact line using a micron-sized vertical glass fiber with one end glued to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beam and the other end touching a liquid-air interface. By measuring the broadening of the resonance peak of the cantilever system with varying liquid viscosity η, we obtain the friction coefficient ξc associated with the contact line fluctuations on the glass fiber of diameter d and find it has the universal form, ξc = 0 . 8 πdη , independent of the contact angle. The result is further confirmed by using a soap film system whose bulk effect is negligibly small. This is the first time that the friction coefficient of a fluctuating contact line is measured. *Work supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  13. Effect of time derivative of contact area on dynamic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Kazuo

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated dynamic friction during oblique impact of a golf ball by evaluating the ball's angular velocity, contact force, and the contact area between the ball and target. The effect of the contact area on the angular velocities was evaluated, and the results indicated that the contact area plays an important role in dynamic friction. In this study, the dynamic friction force F was given by F = μN + μη dA/dt, where μ is the coefficient of friction, N is the contact force, dA/dt is the time derivative of the contact area A, and η is a coefficient associated with the contact area.

  14. The Frictional Force with Respect to the Actual Contact Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Ragnar

    1944-01-01

    Hardy's statement that the frictional force is largely adhesion, and to a lesser extent, deformation energy is proved by a simple experiment. The actual contact surface of sliding contacts and hence the friction per unit of contact surface was determined in several cases. It was found for contacts in normal atmosphere to be about one-third t-one-half as high as the macroscopic tearing strength of the softest contact link, while contacts annealed in vacuum and then tested, disclosed frictional forces which are greater than the macroscopic strength.

  15. The friction behavior of semiconductors Si and GaAs in contact with pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.

    1984-01-01

    The friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals was studied. Five transition and two nontransition metals, titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, platinum, copper, and silver, slid on a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Four metals, indium, nickel, copper and silver, slid on a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Experiments were conducted in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 7th power N/sq cm (10 to the minus 9th power torr). The results indicate that the sliding of silicon on the transition metals exhibits relatively higher friction than for the nontransition metals in contact with silicon. There is a clear correlation between friction and Schottky barrier height formed at the metal silicon interface for the transition metals. Transition metals with a higher barrier height on silicon had a lower friction. The same effect of barrier height was found for the friction of gallium arsenide in contact with metals.

  16. Contact Hysteresis and Friction of Alkanethiol SAMs on Au

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Kiely, J.D.

    1998-10-14

    Nanoindentation has been combhed with nanometer-scale friction measurements to identi~ dissipative mechanisms responsible for friction in hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayer on Au. We have demonstrated that friction is primarily due to viscoelastic relaxations within the films, which give rise to contact hysteresis when deformation rates are within the ranges of 5 and 200 k. We observe that this contact hysteresis increases with exposure to air such that the friction coefficient increases from 0.004 to 0.075 when films are exposed to air for 40 days. Both hysteresis and friction increase with probe speed, and we present a model of friction that characterizes this speed dependence and which also predicts a linear dependence of friction on normal force in thin organic films. Finally, we identify several short-term wear regimes and identify that wear changes dramatically when fdms age.

  17. Dynamic evolution of interface roughness during friction and wear processes.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, K J; Bigerelle, M; Mathia, T G; Dubois, A; Dubar, L

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic evolution of surface roughness and influence of initial roughness (S(a) = 0.282-6.73 µm) during friction and wear processes has been analyzed experimentally. The mirror polished and rough surfaces (28 samples in total) have been prepared by surface polishing on Ti-6Al-4V and AISI 1045 samples. Friction and wear have been tested in classical sphere/plane configuration using linear reciprocating tribometer with very small displacement from 130 to 200 µm. After an initial period of rapid degradation, dynamic evolution of surface roughness converges to certain level specific to a given tribosystem. However, roughness at such dynamic interface is still increasing and analysis of initial roughness influence revealed that to certain extent, a rheology effect of interface can be observed and dynamic evolution of roughness will depend on initial condition and history of interface roughness evolution. Multiscale analysis shows that morphology created in wear process is composed from nano, micro, and macro scale roughness. Therefore, mechanical parts working under very severe contact conditions, like rotor/blade contact, screws, clutch, etc. with poor initial surface finishing are susceptible to have much shorter lifetime than a quality finished parts. PMID:23440686

  18. Instrument Measures Airflow Friction Without Contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Dual beam laser interferometer determines airflow friction against body by measuring time-varying thickness of wind sheared oil film. Measurements yield skin friction between film and airstream. Errors from prerun oil flow, tunnel starting transients, and initial surface waves therefore eliminated.

  19. Atomistic effects on friction and contact area in single and multi asperity contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Binquan; Robbins, Mark

    2008-03-01

    Contact and friction are universal phenomena in our daily life. Theoretical studies of macroscopic contact and friction are usually based on continuum theories such as Hertz theory and Amontons's laws. Recent advances in nanotechnology have stimulated research into friction at the nanometer scale where new phenomena emerge. Contact and friction in single- and multi-asperity contacts with nanometer dimensions were studied using molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and a hybrid method. The hybrid method retains a full atomistic treatment near contacts and replaces more distant regions with a more efficient finite element description. Our results demonstrate that atomic-scale changes in surface structure produce huge changes in friction and contact area and substantial deviations from the predictions of continuum theories. Unanticipated surface plasticity is observed near peaks on crystalline surfaces. In the case of multiasperity amorphous systems, the rate of local plastic deformation near the surface is directly related to the frictional dissipation of energy.

  20. Friction drive of an SAW motor. Part IV: physics of contact.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi

    2008-10-01

    A procedure for modeling the frictional heating and electricity of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) motor is proposed. The frictional heat is developed during friction drive when sliding occurs at the frictional interface; the heat is conducted into the solids, resulting in an increase in temperature. The spatial distribution of the heat source was associated with the contact pressure distribution, and the heat conduction from the heat source was formulated. Owing to the piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity of the stator used in the present study, the elastic deformation and temperature increase produce the electric fields. The electric fields in the stator were determined with respect to each cause. Electric discontinuity at the boundary between the stator and the slider, moreover, produces electrostatic force, which was calculated using a Maxwell stress tensor. All the analyses revealed the underlying physical fields in addition to the mechanical fields of the SAW motor. By the use of those analytical methods, the frictional properties of the SAW motor were discussed. We pointed out that another physical phenomenoniquestcontact electrificationiquestcould arise at the contact interface. The electrostatic force due to contact electrification had sufficient strength to change the friction property, which corresponded to the variation of the friction coefficient from 0.1 to 1. PMID:18986875

  1. Dynamic instabilities of frictional sliding at a bimaterial interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brener, Efim A.; Weikamp, Marc; Spatschek, Robert; Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the dynamic stability of bodies in frictional contact steadily sliding one over the other is of basic interest in various disciplines such as physics, solid mechanics, materials science and geophysics. Here we report on a two-dimensional linear stability analysis of a deformable solid of a finite height H, steadily sliding on top of a rigid solid within a generic rate-and-state friction type constitutive framework, fully accounting for elastodynamic effects. We derive the linear stability spectrum, quantifying the interplay between stabilization related to the frictional constitutive law and destabilization related both to the elastodynamic bi-material coupling between normal stress variations and interfacial slip, and to finite size effects. The stabilizing effects related to the frictional constitutive law include velocity-strengthening friction (i.e. an increase in frictional resistance with increasing slip velocity, both instantaneous and under steady-state conditions) and a regularized response to normal stress variations. We first consider the small wave-number k limit and demonstrate that homogeneous sliding in this case is universally unstable, independent of the details of the friction law. This universal instability is mediated by propagating waveguide-like modes, whose fastest growing mode is characterized by a wave-number satisfying kH ∼ O(1) and by a growth rate that scales with H-1. We then consider the limit kH → ∞ and derive the stability phase diagram in this case. We show that the dominant instability mode travels at nearly the dilatational wave-speed in the opposite direction to the sliding direction. In a certain parameter range this instability is manifested through unstable modes at all wave-numbers, yet the frictional response is shown to be mathematically well-posed. Instability modes which travel at nearly the shear wave-speed in the sliding direction also exist in some range of physical parameters. Previous results

  2. Effects of water-vapor on friction and deformation of polymeric magnetic media in contact with a ceramic oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of humidity (water-vapor) in nitrogen on the friction and deformation behavior of magnetic tape in contact with a Ni-Zn ferrite spherical pin were studied. The coefficient of friction is markedly dependent on the ambient relative humidity. In elastic contacts the coefficient of friction increased linearly with increasing humidity; it decreased linearly when humidity was lowered. This effect is the result of changes in the chemistry and interaction of tape materials such as degradation of the lubricant. In plastic contacts there was no effect of humidity on friction below 40 percent relative humidity. There is no effect on friction associated with the breakthrough of the adsorbed water-vapor film at the interface of the tape and Ni-Zn ferrite. The coefficient of friction, however, increased rapidly with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent in plastic contacts.

  3. Kalker's algorithm Fastsim solves tangential contact problems with slip-dependent friction and friction anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents two extensions of Kalker's algorithm Fastsim of the simplified theory of rolling contact. The first extension is for solving tangential contact problems with the coefficient of friction depending on slip velocity. Two friction laws have been considered: with and without recuperation of the static friction. According to the tribological hypothesis for metallic bodies shear failure, the friction law without recuperation of static friction is more suitable for wheel and rail than the other one. Sample results present local quantities inside the contact area (division to slip and adhesion, traction) as well as global ones (creep forces as functions of creepages and rolling velocity). For the coefficient of friction diminishing with slip, the creep forces decay after reaching the maximum and they depend on the rolling velocity. The second extension is for solving tangential contact problems with friction anisotropy characterised by a convex set of the permissible tangential tractions. The effect of the anisotropy has been shown on examples of rolling without spin and in the presence of pure spin for the elliptical set. The friction anisotropy influences tangential tractions and creep forces. Sample results present local and global quantities. Both extensions have been described with the same language of formulation and they may be merged into one, joint algorithm.

  4. Local friction at a sliding interface between an elastomer and a rigid spherical probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chateauminois, A.; Fretigny, C.

    2008-10-01

    This paper reports on spatially resolved measurements of the shear stress distribution at a frictional interface between a flat rubber substrate and a glass lens. Silicone rubber specimens marked close to their surface by a colored pattern have been prepared in order to measure the surface displacement field induced by the steady-state friction of the spherical probe. The deconvolution of this displacement field then provides the actual shear stress distribution at the contact interface. When a smooth glass lens is used, a nearly constant shear stress is achieved within the contact. On the other hand, a bell-shaped shear stress distribution is obtained with rough lenses. These first results suggest that simple notions of real contact area and constant interface shear stress cannot account for the observed changes in local friction when roughness is varied.

  5. Spanning From Atoms to Micrometers in Simulations of Contact, Adhesion and Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    Improved understanding of the forces between realistic solid surfaces is needed to optimize adhesion and friction. Modeling these forces is challenging because they arise from interactions between atoms separated by less than a nanometer, but the number and spatial distribution of these contacting atoms depends on surface roughness and deformation on micrometer and larger scales. There are also strong scale effects in the role of elastic deformations along the surface. The talk will first describe a seamless Greens function (GF) method that allows a full treatment of elastic deformations and atomic contact for micrometer scale surfaces and multibody potentials. Next applications of the method to calculations of the contact area, contact stiffness, adhesion and friction for a range of geometries and interactions will be described. The results can be captured with simple analytic expressions and explain why most contacting surfaces do not adhere. Theoretical and experimental studies of single nanometer-scale asperities show that the frictional shear stress depends strongly on whether surfaces are commensurate. A large constant stress is obtained for identical, aligned crystalline surfaces, but the stress averages to zero in the more common case of incommensurate surfaces. The resulting ultralow friction is called superlubricity and is found in experiments and simulations of small contacts. Our simulations reveal dramatic changes in this behavior because different parts of the surface are able to advance independently as the contact radius increases towards micrometer scales. The friction between identical surfaces drops with increasing radius and then saturates at a low value. The force between incommensurate surfaces saturates at a similar value that can be related to the Peierls stress for dislocation motion at the interface. Studies of multiasperity contacts also show that incoherent motion along the interface can lead to pronounced changes in the macroscopic

  6. Speed of fast and slow rupture fronts along frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Scheibert, Julien; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The transition from stick to slip at a dry frictional interface occurs through the breaking of microjunctions between the two contacting surfaces. Typically, interactions between junctions through the bulk lead to rupture fronts propagating from weak and/or highly stressed regions, whose junctions break first. Experiments find rupture fronts ranging from quasistatic fronts, via fronts much slower than elastic wave speeds, to fronts faster than the shear wave speed. The mechanisms behind and selection between these fronts are still imperfectly understood. Here we perform simulations in an elastic two-dimensional spring-block model where the frictional interaction between each interfacial block and the substrate arises from a set of junctions modeled explicitly. We find that material slip speed and rupture front speed are proportional across the full range of front speeds we observe. We revisit a mechanism for slow slip in the model and demonstrate that fast slip and fast fronts have a different, inertial origin. We highlight the long transients in front speed even along homogeneous interfaces, and we study how both the local shear to normal stress ratio and the local strength are involved in the selection of front type and front speed. Last, we introduce an experimentally accessible integrated measure of block slip history, the Gini coefficient, and demonstrate that in the model it is a good predictor of the history-dependent local static friction coefficient of the interface. These results will contribute both to building a physically based classification of the various types of fronts and to identifying the important mechanisms involved in the selection of their propagation speed.

  7. Molecular dynamics investigation of the effect of copper nanoparticle on the solid contact between friction surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chengzhi; Bai, Minli; Lv, Jizu; Liu, Hao; Li, Xiaojie

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of copper (Cu) nanoparticles on the solid contact between friction surfaces by applying a molecular dynamics method to reveal the mechanisms responsible for the favorable friction properties of nanoparticles. Two models were built, which were named model A (without Cu) and model B (with Cu), respectively. The differences in the mechanical properties between these two models were compared. The simulation results demonstrated that the improvement in friction properties by Cu nanoparticles was more obvious at low velocity than at high velocity. At low velocity, a Cu nano-film was formed on the friction surface, which accommodated the velocity gradient and plastic deformation. Due to the good lubrication effect of the nano-film, the plastic deformation, defect structures and friction force of model B were improved compared with model A. Under high velocity conditions, a transfer layer appeared adjacent to the interface in both models. Because of this, the friction forces of the two models decreased with increased velocity. The fluid mechanics theory was used to explain why the friction force in model B was lower than that in model A at high velocity. The effect of the load on friction properties was also analyzed and the results showed that the mechanisms of anti-wear and friction reduction by Cu nanoparticles under a low load were the same as those under a high load.

  8. Modeling of Instabilities and Self-organization at the Frictional Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Vahid

    The field of friction-induced self-organization and its practical importance remains unknown territory to many tribologists. Friction is usually thought of as irreversible dissipation of energy and deterioration; however, under certain conditions, friction can lead to the formation of new structures at the interface, including in-situ tribofilms and various patterns at the interface. This thesis studies self-organization and instabilities at the frictional interface, including the instability due to the temperature-dependency of the coefficient of friction, the transient process of frictional running-in, frictional Turing systems, the stick-and-slip phenomenon, and, finally, contact angle (CA) hysteresis as an example of solid-liquid friction and dissipation. All these problems are chosen to bridge the gap between fundamental interest in understanding the conditions leading to self-organization and practical motivation. We study the relationship between friction-induced instabilities and friction-induced self-organization. Friction is usually thought of as a stabilizing factor; however, sometimes it leads to the instability of sliding, in particular when friction is coupled with another process. Instabilities constitute the main mechanism for pattern formation. At first, a stationary structure loses its stability; after that, vibrations with increasing amplitude occur, leading to a limit cycle corresponding to a periodic pattern. The self-organization is usually beneficial for friction and wear reduction because the tribological systems tend to enter a state with the lowest energy dissipation. The introductory chapter starts with basic definitions related to self-organization, instabilities and friction, literature review, and objectives. We discuss fundamental concepts that provide a methodological tool to investigate, understand and enhance beneficial processes in tribosystems which might lead to self-organization. These processes could result in the ability of a

  9. Numerical and experimental study of the nonlinear interaction between a shear wave and a frictional interface.

    PubMed

    Blanloeuil, Philippe; Croxford, Anthony J; Meziane, Anissa

    2014-04-01

    The nonlinear interaction of shear waves with a frictional interface are presented and modeled using simple Coulomb friction. Analytical and finite difference implementations are proposed with both in agreement and showing a unique trend in terms of the generated nonlinearity. A dimensionless parameter ξ is proposed to uniquely quantify the nonlinearity produced. The trends produced in the numerical study are then validated with good agreement experimentally. This is carried out loading an interface between two steel blocks and exciting this interface with different amplitude normal incidence shear waves. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical results, suggesting the simple friction model does a reasonable job of capturing the fundamental physics. The resulting approach offers a potential way to characterize a contacting interface; however, the difficulty in activating that interface may ultimately limit its applicability. PMID:25234971

  10. Steady-state propagation speed of rupture fronts along one-dimensional frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundsen, David Skâlid; Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Katzav, Eytan; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Scheibert, Julien

    2015-09-01

    The rupture of dry frictional interfaces occurs through the propagation of fronts breaking the contacts at the interface. Recent experiments have shown that the velocities of these rupture fronts range from quasistatic velocities proportional to the external loading rate to velocities larger than the shear wave speed. The way system parameters influence front speed is still poorly understood. Here we study steady-state rupture propagation in a one-dimensional (1D) spring-block model of an extended frictional interface for various friction laws. With the classical Amontons-Coulomb friction law, we derive a closed-form expression for the steady-state rupture velocity as a function of the interfacial shear stress just prior to rupture. We then consider an additional shear stiffness of the interface and show that the softer the interface, the slower the rupture fronts. We provide an approximate closed form expression for this effect. We finally show that adding a bulk viscosity on the relative motion of blocks accelerates steady-state rupture fronts and we give an approximate expression for this effect. We demonstrate that the 1D results are qualitatively valid in 2D. Our results provide insights into the qualitative role of various key parameters of a frictional interface on its rupture dynamics. They will be useful to better understand the many systems in which spring-block models have proved adequate, from friction to granular matter and earthquake dynamics.

  11. 3D BEM for orthotropic frictional contact of piezoelectric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tembleque, Luis; Buroni, Federico C.; Sáez, Andrés

    2015-09-01

    A numerical methodology to model the three-dimensional frictional contact interaction of piezoelectric materials in presence of electric fields is presented in this work. The boundary element method (BEM) is used in order to compute the electro-elastic influence coefficients. The proposed BEM formulation employs an explicit approach for the evaluation of the corresponding fundamental solutions, which are valid for general anisotropic behaviour meanwhile mathematical degeneracies in the context of the Stroh formalism are allowed. The contact methodology is based on an augmented Lagrangian formulation and uses an iterative Uzawa scheme of resolution. An orthotropic frictional law is implemented in this work so anisotropy is present both in the bulk and in the surface. The methodology is validated by comparison with benchmark analytical solutions. Some additional examples are presented and discussed in detail, revealing the importance of considering orthotropic frictional contact conditions in the electro-elastic analysis of this kind of problems.

  12. Contact and friction of nanoasperities: effects of adsorbed monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Luan, Binquan; Robbins, Mark O

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study contact between a rigid, nonadhesive, and spherical tip with radius of order 30 nm and a flat elastic substrate covered with a fluid monolayer of adsorbed chain molecules. Previous studies of bare surfaces showed that the atomic scale deviations from a sphere that are present on any tip constructed from discrete atoms lead to significant deviations from continuum theory and dramatic variability in friction forces. Introducing an adsorbed monolayer leads to larger deviations from continuum theory but decreases the variations between tips with different atomic structure. Although the film is fluid, it remains in the contact and behaves qualitatively like a thin elastic coating except for certain tips at high loads. Measures of the contact area based on the moments or outer limits of the pressure distribution and on counting contacting atoms are compared. The number of tip atoms making contact during a time interval Deltat grows as a power of Deltat when the film is present and as the logarithm of Deltat for bare surfaces. Friction is measured by displacing the tip at a constant velocity or pulling the tip with a spring. Both static and kinetic friction rise linearly with load at small loads. Transitions in the state of the film lead to nonlinear behavior at large loads. The friction is less clearly correlated with contact area than load. PMID:20365427

  13. Non-contact friction for ion-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D.; Lach, Grzegorz

    2015-05-01

    Non-contact friction forces are exerted on physical systems through dissipative processes, when the two systems are not in physical contact with each other, or, in quantum mechanical terms, when the overlap of their wave functions is negligible. Non-contact friction is mediated by the exchange of virtual quanta, with the additional requirement that the scattering process needs to have an inelastic component. For finite-temperature ion-surface interactions, the friction is essentially caused by Ohmic resistance due to the motion of the image charge moving in a dielectric material. A conceivable experiment is difficult because the friction force needs to be isolated from the interaction with the image charge, which significantly distorts the ion's flight path. We propose an experimental setup which is designed to minimize the influence of the image charge interaction though a compensation mechanism, and evaluate the energy loss due to non-contact friction for helium ions (He+) interacting with gold, vanadium, titanium and graphite surfaces. Interactions with the infinite series of mirror charges in the plates are summed in terms of the logarithmic derivatives of the Gamma function, and of the Hurwitz zeta function.

  14. Implicit frictional-contact model for soft particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezamabadi, Saeid; Radjai, Farhang; Averseng, Julien; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a novel numerical approach for the simulation of soft particles interacting via frictional contacts. This approach is based on an implicit formulation of the Material Point Method, allowing for large particle deformations, combined with the Contact Dynamics method for the treatment of unilateral frictional contacts between particles. This approach is both precise due to the treatment of contacts with no regularization and artificial damping parameters, and robust due to implicit time integration of both bulk degrees of freedom and relative contact velocities at the nodes representing the contact points. By construction, our algorithm is capable of handling arbitrary particle shapes and deformations. We illustrate this approach by two simple 2D examples: a Hertz contact and a rolling particle on an inclined plane. We also investigate the compaction of a packing of circular particles up to a solid fraction well above the jamming limit of hard particles. We find that, for the same level of deformation, the solid fraction in a packing of frictional particles is above that of a packing of frictionless particles as a result of larger particle shape change.

  15. A constitutive law for finite element contact problems with unclassical friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesha, M. E.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques for modeling complex, unclassical contact-friction problems arising in solid and structural mechanics are discussed. A constitutive modeling concept is employed whereby analytic relations between increments of contact surface stress (i.e., traction) and contact surface deformation (i.e., relative displacement) are developed. Because of the incremental form of these relations, they are valid for arbitrary load-deformation histories. The motivation for the development of such a constitutive law is that more realistic friction idealizations can be implemented in finite element analysis software in a consistent, straightforward manner. Of particular interest is modeling of two-body (i.e., unlubricated) metal-metal, ceramic-ceramic, and metal-ceramic contact. Interfaces involving ceramics are of engineering importance and are being considered for advanced turbine engines in which higher temperature materials offer potential for higher engine fuel efficiency.

  16. Single-crystal-silicon-based microinstrument to study friction and wear at MEMS sidewall interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, N.; Ashurst, W. R.

    2012-02-01

    Since the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, friction and wear are considered as key factors that determine the lifetime and reliability of MEMS devices that contain contacting interfaces. However, to date, our knowledge of the mechanisms that govern friction and wear in MEMS is insufficient. Therefore, systematically investigating friction and wear at MEMS scale is critical for the commercial success of many potential MEMS devices. Specifically, since many emerging MEMS devices contain more sidewall interfaces, which are topographically and chemically different from in-plane interfaces, studying the friction and wear characteristics of MEMS sidewall surfaces is important. The microinstruments that have been used to date to investigate the friction and wear characteristics of MEMS sidewall surfaces possess several limitations induced either by their design or the structural film used to fabricate them. Therefore, in this paper, we report on a single-crystal-silicon-based microinstrument to study the frictional and wear behavior of MEMS sidewalls, which not only addresses some of the limitations of other microinstruments but is also easy to fabricate. The design, modeling and fabrication of the microinstrument are described in this paper. Additionally, the coefficients of static and dynamic friction of octadecyltrichlorosilane-coated sidewall surfaces as well as sidewall surfaces with only native oxide on them are also reported in this paper.

  17. Finite element modeling of frictionally restrained composite interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Ahmed, Shamim

    1989-01-01

    The use of special interface finite elements to model frictional restraint in composite interfaces is described. These elements simulate Coulomb friction at the interface, and are incorporated into a standard finite element analysis of a two-dimensional isolated fiber pullout test. Various interfacial characteristics, such as the distribution of stresses at the interface, the extent of slip and delamination, load diffusion from fiber to matrix, and the amount of fiber extraction or depression are studied for different friction coefficients. The results are compared to those obtained analytically using a singular integral equation approach, and those obtained by assuming a constant interface shear strength. The usefulness of these elements in micromechanical modeling of fiber-reinforced composite materials is highlighted.

  18. Scale dependence of interface dislocation storage governing the frictional sliding of single asperities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-08-01

    Single-asperity friction tests have found a critical dependence of friction stress on the nanoscale contact size, as successfully explained by the nucleation of interface dislocations as opposed to concurrent sliding of all the interfacial atoms in contact. Modeling and simulation results, however, vary when the motion and interactions of multiple dislocations dominate at a larger scale regime. A Rice–Peierls framework is employed to investigate the multiplication and storage of interface dislocations, and the critical conditions for dislocation initiation and steady-state gliding are determined numerically. Our findings identify the key parameters that govern various friction mechanisms in the Hurtado–Kim and Deshpande–Needleman–van der Giessen models.

  19. Effect of barrier height on friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted for the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals. Polycrystalline titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, and platinum were made to contact a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Indium, nickel, copper, and silver were made to contact a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Sliding was conducted both in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 9th power torr. The friction of semiconductors in contact with metals depended on a Schottky barrier height formed at the metal semiconductor interface. Metals with a higher barrier height on semiconductors gave lower friction. The effect of the barrier height on friction behavior for argon sputtered cleaned surfaces in vacuum was more specific than that for the surfaces containing films in room air. With a silicon surface sliding on titanium, many silicon particles back transferred. In contrast, a large quantity of indium transferred to the gallium arsenide surface.

  20. Contact compliance effects in the frictional response of bioinspired fibrillar adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piccardo, Marco; Chateauminois, Antoine; Fretigny, Christian; Pugno, Nicola M.; Sitti, Metin

    2013-01-01

    The shear failure and friction mechanisms of bioinspired adhesives consisting of elastomer arrays of microfibres terminated by mushroom-shaped tips are investigated in contact with a rigid lens. In order to reveal the interplay between the vertical and lateral loading directions, experiments are carried out using a custom friction set-up in which normal stiffness can be made either high or low when compared with the stiffness of the contact between the fibrillar adhesive and the lens. Using in situ contact imaging, the shear failure of the adhesive is found to involve two successive mechanisms: (i) cavitation and peeling at the contact interface between the mushroom-shaped fibre tip endings and the lens; and (ii) side re-adhesion of the fibre's stem to the lens. The extent of these mechanisms and their implications regarding static friction forces is found to depend on the crosstalk between the normal and lateral loading directions that can result in contact instabilities associated with fibre buckling. In addition, the effects of the viscoelastic behaviour of the polyurethane material on the rate dependence of the shear response of the adhesive are accounted for. PMID:23554349

  1. Friction and shear fracture of an adhesive contact under torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chateauminois, Antoine; Fretigny, Christian; Olanier, Ludovic

    2010-02-01

    The shear failure or stiction of an adhesive contact between a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) rubber and a glass lens has been investigated using a torsional contact configuration. As compared to linear sliding, torsion presents the advantage of inducing a shear failure under a pure mode III condition, while preserving the cylindrical symmetry of the contact. The surface of the transparent PDMS substrate was marked using a network of dots in order to monitor continuously the in-plane surface displacements during the stiction process. Using a previously developed inversion procedure (A. Chateauminois and C. Fretigny, Eur. Phys. J. E 27, 221 (2008)), the corresponding surface shear stress distributions were obtained from the displacement fields. Stiction was found to involve the progressive shrinkage of a central adhesive zone surrounded by an annular microslip region. Adhesion effects were especially evidenced from a stress overshoot at the boundary of the adhesive zone. The experimental data were analysis using an extension to torsional contact of the Maugis-Dugdale approach’s to adhesive contacts which takes into account frictional effects. This model allowed to extract an effective adhesion energy in the presence of friction, which dependence on kinetics effect is briefly discussed.

  2. Assessing the accuracy of different simplified frictional rolling contact algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollebregt, E. A. H.; Iwnicki, S. D.; Xie, G.; Shackleton, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for assessing the accuracy of different frictional rolling contact theories. The main characteristic of the approach is that it takes a statistically oriented view. This yields a better insight into the behaviour of the methods in diverse circumstances (varying contact patch ellipticities, mixed longitudinal, lateral and spin creepages) than is obtained when only a small number of (basic) circumstances are used in the comparison. The range of contact parameters that occur for realistic vehicles and tracks are assessed using simulations with the Vampire vehicle system dynamics (VSD) package. This shows that larger values for the spin creepage occur rather frequently. Based on this, our approach is applied to typical cases for which railway VSD packages are used. The results show that particularly the USETAB approach but also FASTSIM give considerably better results than the linear theory, Vermeulen-Johnson, Shen-Hedrick-Elkins and Polach methods, when compared with the 'complete theory' of the CONTACT program.

  3. Polymer Chain Reinforcement across Narrow Interfaces: Entanglements Versus Chain Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoski, Jason J.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Kramer, Edward J.

    2002-03-01

    It is widely believed that entangled chains that bridge a glassy polymer/polymer interface solely determine its fracture energy (G_c). However, experiments show that while Gc increases with interfacial width (w), Gc vs. w/d_t, where dt is the tube diameter of the melt, is not universal. For some polymer pairs Gc increases dramatically even when w << d_t, while for others Gc does not increase until w >= d_t. We demonstrate that the friction stress for polymer loop pull-out from the interface is given by f_monoρ_merw/2 where f_mono is the static friction coefficient per mer and ρ_mer is the mer number density. Unlike interfaces with short block copolymers, where the friction stress for block pull-out is limited by a maximum areal density of block copolymer, the polymer/polymer friction stress grows linearly with w. For interfaces as narrow as 3 nm, it can be large enough to induce crazing. A model that includes both loop pull-out and chain entanglement shows that modest changes in f_mono can account for the fact that Gc versus w/dt is non-universal. A high areal density of bridging, entangled chains is therefore sufficient, but not necessary, to reinforce polymer interfaces.

  4. Normal contact and friction of rubber with model randomly rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yashima, S; Romero, V; Wandersman, E; Frétigny, C; Chaudhury, M K; Chateauminois, A; Prevost, A M

    2015-02-01

    We report on normal contact and friction measurements of model multicontact interfaces formed between smooth surfaces and substrates textured with a statistical distribution of spherical micro-asperities. Contacts are either formed between a rigid textured lens and a smooth rubber, or a flat textured rubber and a smooth rigid lens. Measurements of the real area of contact A versus normal load P are performed by imaging the light transmitted at the microcontacts. For both interfaces, A(P) is found to be sub-linear with a power law behavior. Comparison with two multi-asperity contact models, which extend the Greenwood-Williamson (J. Greenwood and J. Williamson, Proc. Royal Soc. London Ser. A, 295, 300 (1966)) model by taking into account the elastic interaction between asperities at different length scales, is performed, and allows their validation for the first time. We find that long range elastic interactions arising from the curvature of the nominal surfaces are the main source of the non-linearity of A(P). At a shorter range, and except for very low pressures, the pressure dependence of both density and area of microcontacts remains well described by Greenwood-Williamson's model, which neglects any interaction between asperities. In addition, in steady sliding, friction measurements reveal that the mean shear stress at the scale of the asperities is systematically larger than that found for a macroscopic contact between a smooth lens and a rubber. This suggests that frictional stresses measured at macroscopic length scales may not be simply transposed to microscopic multicontact interfaces. PMID:25514137

  5. Microscopic contact area and friction between medical textiles and skin.

    PubMed

    Derler, S; Rotaru, G-M; Ke, W; El Issawi-Frischknecht, L; Kellenberger, P; Scheel-Sailer, A; Rossi, R M

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical contact between medical textiles and skin is relevant in the health care for patients with vulnerable skin or chronic wounds. In order to gain new insights into the skin-textile contact on the microscopic level, the 3D surface topography of a normal and a new hospital bed sheet with a regular surface structure was measured using a digital microscope. The topographic data was analysed concerning material distribution and real contact area against smooth surfaces as a function of surface deformations. For contact conditions that are relevant for the skin of patients lying in a hospital bed it was found that the order of magnitude of the ratio of real and apparent contact area between textiles and skin or a mechanical skin model lies between 0.02 and 0.1 and that surface deformations, i.e. penetration of the textile surface asperities into skin or a mechanical skin model, range from 10 to 50µm. The performed analyses of textile 3D surface topographies and comparisons with previous friction measurement results provided information on the relationship between microscopic surface properties and macroscopic friction behaviour of medical textiles. In particular, the new bed sheet was found to be characterised by a trend towards a smaller microscopic contact area (up to a factor of two) and by a larger free interfacial volume (more than a factor of two) in addition to a 1.5 times lower shear strength when in contact with counter-surfaces. The applied methods can be useful to develop improved and skin-adapted materials and surfaces for medical applications. PMID:25047353

  6. Evidence for Contact Delocalization in Atomic Scale Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, D. G.; Krylov, S. Yu.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2007-10-01

    We analyze an advanced two-spring model with an ultralow effective tip mass to predict nontrivial and physically rich “fine structure” in the atomic stick-slip motion in friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments. We demonstrate that this fine structure is present in recent, puzzling experiments. This shows that the tip apex can be completely or partially delocalized, thus shedding new light on what is measured in FFM and, possibly, what can happen with the asperities that establish the contact between macroscopic sliding bodies.

  7. Sliding Friction at a Rubber/Brush Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, Lionel

    2004-03-01

    The friction of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) rubber networks sliding, at low velocity (3 nm.s-1friction force measurements. We study systematically the velocity dependence of the friction stress as a function of two molecular parameters which are the grafting density and the molecular weight of the tethered chains. We thus show that frictional dissipation is governed, at high grafting densities, by the rheology of a thin entangled layer confined outside the elastomer, whereas at low grafting density, where chains can be considered as independent, friction enhancement is due to pull-out of the chains ends which penetrate into the network during sliding. This latter result provides a strong evidence for friction controlled by arm retraction relaxation of the grafted chains, as proposed by Rubinstein et al. in a model of slippage at a network/brush interface.

  8. A computational study of brush seal contact loads with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksit, Mahmut Faruk

    The brush seal is emerging as a new technology to effectively control cooling and leakage flows in gas turbine engines. With their superior leakage performance, they show the potential to replace current labyrinth seals in gas turbine engines. Because the bristles slide against the rotor surface, wear at the contact becomes a major concern as it determines the life and efficiency of the seal. To optimize seal life and efficiency, an in-depth study of the factors causing the seal stiffness is needed, and a good choice of materials must be made. Although considerable research has been done on material selection and tribopairs, a brief survey reveals the lack of reliable analyses to evaluate contact loads, and to address heat transfer issues. As material pairs have been optimized for most cases, understanding and management of contact loads hold the key for further improvements in seal life. The complicated nature of bristle behavior under various combinations of pressure load and rotor interference requires computer analysis to study details that may not be available through analytical formulations. In an attempt to meet this need, this study presents a 3-D finite element model of a brush seal. The model consists of a representative bristle bundle with a backing plate and a rotor surface. Every bristle is defined by a number of 3-D quadratic beam elements. Bristles are fixed at the top nodes, while they are free to move in any direction at the tip touching the rotor surface. The model consists of 10 to 13 circumferential rows of bristles. The number of rows are based on the actual packing thickness of the seal modeled. Unlike previous analytical studies on brush seal contact loads, this work includes nonlinear frictional effects between the bristles. Frictional effects are known to drastically change the seal behavior, and are crucial in determining the contact forces. The model applies the available published experimental data to define the boundary conditions and

  9. Numerical Analysis of Piezoelectric Active Repair in the Presence of Frictional Contact Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Andrea; Milazzo, Alberto; Orlando, Calogero; Messineo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The increasing development of smart materials, such as piezoelectric and shape memory alloys, has opened new opportunities for improving repair techniques. Particularly, active repairs, based on the converse piezoelectric effect, can increase the life of a structure by reducing the crack opening. A deep characterization of the electromechanical behavior of delaminated composite structures, actively repaired by piezoelectric patches, can be achieved by considering the adhesive layer between the host structure and the repair and by taking into account the frictional contact between the crack surfaces. In this paper, Boundary Element (BE) analyses performed on delaminated composite structures repaired by active piezoelectric patches are presented. A two-dimensional boundary integral formulation for piezoelectric solids based on the multi-domain technique to model the composite host damaged structures and the bonded piezoelectric patches is employed. An interface spring model is also implemented to take into account the finite stiffness of the bonding layers and to model the frictional contact between the delamination surfaces, by means of an iterative procedure. The effect of the adhesive between the plies of piezoelectric bimorph devices on the electromechanical response is first pointed out for both sensing and actuating behavior. Then, the effect of the frictional contact condition on the fracture mechanics behavior of actively repaired delaminated composite structures is investigated. PMID:23549364

  10. Thermal contact conductance of actuated interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Woo-Bin; Sutton, Michael S.; Talghader, Joseph J.

    2002-08-01

    The thermal contact conductance (TCC) of microactuated mechanical interfaces has been characterized using an electronic technique, where micromachined test structures were heated with a current and the TCC was inferred from the change in resistance. For every device tested, the TCC was higher in vacuum than in air. This is in stark contrast to the behavior of bulk interfaces, and several experiments suggest that it may be the result of a decreased solid-solid contact area in air caused by the pressure of the interstitial gas. The average effective TCC of a polysilicon/nitride interface brought together by electrostatic actuation varies about values of 6.0 x104 W/(K m2) in air and 9.5 x104 W/(K m2) under vacuum for applied pressures of 1 MPa. These values are significantly higher than commonly reported for nonmetallic materials and probably reflect the very smooth surfaces of deposited thin films.

  11. Local Origin of Global Contact Numbers in Frictional Ellipsoid Packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Fabian M.; Neudecker, Max; Saadatfar, Mohammad; Delaney, Gary W.; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E.; Schröter, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    In particulate soft matter systems the average number of contacts Z of a particle is an important predictor of the mechanical properties of the system. Using x-ray tomography, we analyze packings of frictional, oblate ellipsoids of various aspect ratios α , prepared at different global volume fractions ϕg. We find that Z is a monotonically increasing function of ϕg for all α . We demonstrate that this functional dependence can be explained by a local analysis where each particle is described by its local volume fraction ϕl computed from a Voronoi tessellation. Z can be expressed as an integral over all values of ϕl: Z (ϕg,α ,X )=∫Zl(ϕl,α ,X )P (ϕl|ϕg)d ϕl . The local contact number function Zl(ϕl,α ,X ) describes the relevant physics in term of locally defined variables only, including possible higher order terms X . The conditional probability P (ϕl|ϕg) to find a specific value of ϕl given a global packing fraction ϕg is found to be independent of α and X . Our results demonstrate that for frictional particles a local approach is not only a theoretical requirement but also feasible.

  12. Local origin of global contact numbers in frictional ellipsoid packings.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Fabian M; Neudecker, Max; Saadatfar, Mohammad; Delaney, Gary W; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E; Schröter, Matthias

    2015-04-17

    In particulate soft matter systems the average number of contacts Z of a particle is an important predictor of the mechanical properties of the system. Using x-ray tomography, we analyze packings of frictional, oblate ellipsoids of various aspect ratios α, prepared at different global volume fractions ϕg. We find that Z is a monotonically increasing function of ϕg for all α. We demonstrate that this functional dependence can be explained by a local analysis where each particle is described by its local volume fraction ϕl computed from a Voronoi tessellation. Z can be expressed as an integral over all values of ϕl: Z(ϕg,α,X)=∫Zl(ϕl,α,X)P(ϕl|ϕg)dϕl. The local contact number function Zl(ϕl,α,X) describes the relevant physics in term of locally defined variables only, including possible higher order terms X. The conditional probability P(ϕl|ϕg) to find a specific value of ϕl given a global packing fraction ϕg is found to be independent of α and X. Our results demonstrate that for frictional particles a local approach is not only a theoretical requirement but also feasible. PMID:25933340

  13. Laboratory-developed contact models controlling instability on frictional faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, Paul A.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-PMMA frictional interface in a direct shear apparatus in order to gain understanding of fault dynamics leading to gross rupture. Actual asperity sizes and locations along the interface were characterized using a pressure-sensitive film. Slow aseismic slip accumulated nonuniformly along the fault and showed dependency on the applied normal force—increased normal force resulted in higher slip gradients. The slow slip front propagated from the trailing (pushed) edge into a region of more densely distributed asperities at rates between 1 and 9.5 mm/s. Foreshocks were detected and displayed impulsive signals with source radii ranging between 0.21 and 1.09 mm; measurements made using the pressure-sensitive film were between 0.05 and 1.2 mm. The spatiotemporal clustering of foreshocks and their relation to the elastodynamic energy released was dependent on the normal force. In the region where foreshocks occurred, qualitative optical measurements of the asperities along the interface were used to visualize dynamic changes occurring during the slow slip phase. To better understand the nucleation process, a quasi-static asperity finite element (FE) model was developed and focused in the region where foreshocks clustered. The FE model consisted of 172 asperities, located and sized based on pressure-sensitive film measurements. The numerical model provides a plausible explanation as to why foreshocks cluster in space and observed a normal force dependency and lend credence to Ohnaka's nucleation model.

  14. Scale-Dependent Friction and Damage Interface law: implications for effective earthquake rupture dynamics and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, Gaetano; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Raous, Michel; Henninger, Carole

    2010-05-01

    , using high-order Spectral Element Methods and non-smooth contact mechanics. In particular, we investigate the implications of this new interface law in terms of the rupture propagation and arrest. Special attention is focused on radiation and supershear transition. Comparison with the classical slip weakening friction law is provided. Finally, first results toward a dynamic consistent homogeneization of damaged fault zones will be discussed. Raous, M., Cangémi, L. and Cocou, M. (1999). A consistent model coupling adhesion, friction and unilateral contact', Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Vol. 177, pp.383-399.

  15. Stick-slip at soft adhesive interfaces mediated by slow frictional waves.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-28

    Stick-slip is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from squealing automobile brakes to earthquakes. At soft adhesive interfaces, this instability has long been attributed to Schallamach waves, which are a type of slow frictional wave. We use a contact configuration capable of isolating single wave events, coupled with high speed in situ imaging, to demonstrate the existence of two new stick-slip modes. It is shown that these modes also correspond to the passage of slow waves-separation pulse and slip pulse-with distinct nucleation and propagation characteristics. The slip pulse, characterized by a sharp stress front, propagates in the same direction as the Schallamach wave. In contrast, the separation pulse, involving local interface detachment and resembling a tensile neck, travels in exactly the opposite direction. A change in the stick-slip mode from the separation to the slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Taken together, the three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in low-velocity sliding. The detailed observations enable us to present a phase diagram delineating the domains of occurrence of these waves. We suggest a direct analogy between the observed slow frictional waves and well known muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied organisms. Our work answers basic questions about adhesive mechanisms of frictional instabilities in natural and engineered systems, with broader implications for slow surface wave phenomena. PMID:27118236

  16. Nanoscale incipient asperity sliding and interface micro-slip assessed by the measurment of tangential contact stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yanfei; Lucas, Barry N.; Hay, Jack C.; Oliver, Warren C.; Pharr, George Mathews

    2006-01-01

    Experiments with a multidimensional nano-contact system have shown that, prior to kinetic frictional sliding, there is a significant reduction of the tangential contact stiffness relative to the elastic prediction. The reduction occurs at contact sizes below about 50-200 nm for aluminum single crystals and several other materials. Using a cohesive interface model, we find that this reduction corresponds to a transition from a small-scale-slip to large-scale-slip condition of the interface.

  17. Dynamics of Slip Fronts at Frictional Interfaces: Analysis of Slip Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiguet, M.; Kammer, D. S.; Molinari, J.

    2012-12-01

    The transition from sticking to sliding of frictional interfaces is a phenomenon of importance for many physical systems in nature as well as in engineering. This transition is marked by the occurrence of local slip events, often called precursors, which appear before the global sliding is observed. Such precursors to global sliding may occur on segments of geophysical faults subject to non uniform shear loading, for example a fault segment located between a locked and steadily slipping region. Sequences of small earthquakes (foreshocks) of identical seismic characteristics have been observed preceding large earthquakes in several regions. The links between the occurrence of these foreshocks and the nucleation process of large earthquakes remains elusive, but has large implications for earthquake prediction and risk assessment. These precursors have been studied experimentally by Rubinstein et al. [2007]. However, the experimental study of interfaces is challenging due to difficulties to access information at the interface. Therefore, numerical simulations are needed in order to give additional information for accurate analysis. First attempts have been undertaken using simple spring-block systems [Maegawa et al. 2010, Tromborg et al. 2011]. In this study however, we use the finite-element method, which allows us to represent accurately the continuum character of the system, and to investigate the onset and evolution of sliding at a frictional interface. The studied setup is similar to the experimental setup used by Ben-David et al. [2010]. It consists of a block of viscoelastic material in contact with a rigid body. A velocity-weakening friction law controls the friction at the interface. Special care is taken to apply appropriate regularization and viscosity in the simulation. We apply a shear load to the block, either on the top surface of the block or on one side. In both cases, the resulting shear tractions at the interface are non-uniform. The stress

  18. Segment-to-segment contact elements for modelling joint interfaces in finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M. H.; Gaul, L.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents an efficient approach to model contact interfaces of joints in finite element analysis (FEA) with segment-to-segment contact elements like thin layer or zero thickness elements. These elements originate from geomechanics and have been applied recently in modal analysis as an efficient way to define the contact stiffness of fixed joints for model updating. A big advantage of these elements is that no global contact search algorithm is employed as used in master-slave contacts. Contact search algorithms are not necessary for modelling contact interfaces of fixed joints since the interfaces are always in contact and restricted to small relative movements, which saves much computing time. We first give an introduction into the theory of segment-to-segment contact elements leading to zero thickness and thin layer elements. As a new application of zero thickness elements, we demonstrate the implementation of a structural contact damping model, derived from a Masing model, as non-linear constitutive laws for the contact element. This damping model takes into account the non-linear influence of frictional microslip in the contact interface of fixed joints. With this model we simulate the non-linear response of a bolted structure. This approach constitutes a new way to simulate multi-degree-of-freedom systems with structural joints and predict modal damping properties.

  19. Water-vapor effects on friction of magnetic tape in contact with nickel-zinc ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of humidity of moist nitrogen on the friction and deformation behavior of magnetic tape in contact with a nickel-zinc ferrite spherical pin were studied. The results indicate that the coefficient of friction is markedly dependent on the ambient relative humidity. Although the coefficient of friction remains low below 40-percent relative humidity, it increases rapidly with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent. The general ambient environment of the tape does not have any effect on the friction behavior if the area where the tape is in sliding contact with the ferrite pin is flooded with controlled nitrogen. The response time for the friction of the tape to humidity changes is about 10 sec. The effect of friction as a function of relative humidity on dehumidifying is very similar to that on humidifying. A surface softening of the tape due to water vapor increases the friction of the tape.

  20. The metal to metal interface and its effect on adhesion and friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper considers the interface between two bulk metals and the effect of this interface on adhesive bonding, resistance to tangential displacements, friction and the interfacial transport from one surface to another. Using Auger emission spectroscopy, field ion microscopy, and low energy electron diffraction techniques, the influence of surface orientation, lattice registry, crystal lattice structure and defects, metal surface chemistry and alloying on the characteristics of the interface was studied for noble, platinum, transition, and Group 4B metals. With dissimilar metals in contact, epitaxial transfer of the cohesively weaker to the cohesively stronger metal has been observed. Surface chemical activity of the noble and platinum metals is shown to affect interfacial behavior as does a valence bonding in the transition metals, and the degree of metallic nature in the Group 4B elements. Alloying elements, e.g., Si and Fe, can alter interfacial behavior by segregation to the surface of metals or by altering bulk properties such as crystal transformation kinetics.

  1. Pressurized bellows flat contact heat exchanger interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, Fred E. (Inventor); Howell, Harold R. (Inventor); Winkler, Roger V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Disclosed is an interdigitated plate-type heat exchanger interface. The interface includes a modular interconnect to thermally connect a pair or pairs of plate-type heat exchangers to a second single or multiple plate-type heat exchanger. The modular interconnect comprises a series of parallel, plate-type heat exchangers arranged in pairs to form a slot therebetween. The plate-type heat exchangers of the second heat exchanger insert into the slots of the modular interconnect. Bellows are provided between the pairs of fins of the modular interconnect so that when the bellows are pressurized, they drive the plate-type heat exchangers of the modular interconnect toward one another, thus closing upon the second heat exchanger plates. Each end of the bellows has a part thereof a thin, membrane diaphragm which readily conforms to the contours of the heat exchanger plates of the modular interconnect when the bellows is pressurized. This ensures an even distribution of pressure on the heat exchangers of the modular interconnect thus creating substantially planar contact between the two heat exchangers. The effect of the interface of the present invention is to provide a dry connection between two heat exchangers whereby the rate of heat transfer can be varied by varying the pressure within the bellows.

  2. Pressurized bellows flat contact heat exchanger interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Fred E.; Howell, Harold R.; Winkler, Roger V.

    1990-03-01

    Disclosed is an interdigitated plate-type heat exchanger interface. The interface includes a modular interconnect to thermally connect a pair or pairs of plate-type heat exchangers to a second single or multiple plate-type heat exchanger. The modular interconnect comprises a series of parallel, plate-type heat exchangers arranged in pairs to form a slot therebetween. The plate-type heat exchangers of the second heat exchanger insert into the slots of the modular interconnect. Bellows are provided between the pairs of fins of the modular interconnect so that when the bellows are pressurized, they drive the plate-type heat exchangers of the modular interconnect toward one another, thus closing upon the second heat exchanger plates. Each end of the bellows has a part thereof a thin, membrane diaphragm which readily conforms to the contours of the heat exchanger plates of the modular interconnect when the bellows is pressurized. This ensures an even distribution of pressure on the heat exchangers of the modular interconnect thus creating substantially planar contact between the two heat exchangers. The effect of the interface of the present invention is to provide a dry connection between two heat exchangers whereby the rate of heat transfer can be varied by varying the pressure within the bellows.

  3. Direct observation of frictional contacts: New insights for state-dependent properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Kilgore, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rocks and many other materials display a rather complicated, but characteristic, dependence of friction on sliding history. These effects are well-described by empirical rate- and state-dependent constitutive formulations which have been utilized for analysis of fault slip and earthquake processes. We present a procedure for direct quantitative microscopic observation of frictional contacts during slip. The observations reveal that frictional state dependence represents an increase of contact area with contact age. Transient changes of sliding resistance correlate with changes in contact area and arise from shifts of contact population age. Displacement-dependent replacement of contact populations is shown to cause the diagnostic evolution of friction over a characteristic sliding distance that occurs whenever slip begins or sliding conditions change. ?? 1994 Birkha??user Verlag.

  4. Transition from stick to slip in Hertzian contact with ``Griffith'' friction: The Cattaneo-Mindlin problem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavarella, M.

    2015-11-01

    Classically, the transition from stick to slip is modelled with Amonton-Coulomb law, leading to the Cattaneo-Mindlin problem, which is amenable to quite general solutions using the idea of superposing normal contact pressure distributions - in particular superposing the full sliding component of shear with a corrective distribution in the stick region. However, faults model in geophysics and recent high-speed measurements of the real contact area and the strain fields in dry (nominally flat) rough interfaces at macroscopic but laboratory scale, all suggest that the transition from 'static' to 'dynamic' friction can be described, rather than by Coulomb law, by classical fracture mechanics singular solutions of shear cracks. Here, we introduce an 'adhesive' model for friction in a Hertzian spherical contact, maintaining the Hertzian solution for the normal pressures, but where the inception of slip is given by a Griffith condition. In the slip region, the standard Coulomb law continues to hold. This leads to a very simple solution for the Cattaneo-Mindlin problem, in which the "corrective" solution in the stick area is in fact similar to the mode II equivalent of a JKR singular solution for adhesive contact. The model departs from the standard Cattaneo-Mindlin solution, showing an increased size of the stick zone relative to the contact area, and a sudden transition to slip when the stick region reaches a critical size (the equivalent of the pull-off contact size of the JKR solution). The apparent static friction coefficient before sliding can be much higher than the sliding friction coefficient and, for a given friction fracture "energy", the process results in size and normal load dependence of the apparent static friction coefficient. Some qualitative agreement with Fineberg's group experiments for friction exists, namely the stick-slip boundary quasi-static prediction may correspond to the arrest of their slip "precursors", and the rapid collapse to global

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and friction studies of nickel-zinc and manganese-zinc ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and sliding friction experiments were conducted with hot-pressed, polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in sliding contact with various transition metals at room temperature in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that the coefficients of friction for Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals are related to the relative chemical activity in these metals: the more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites correlate with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite surfaces increases the coefficients of friction for the Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrite-metal interfaces.

  6. Reduced contact resistance in top-contact organic field-effect transistors by interface contact doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ji-Ling; Kasemann, Daniel; Widmer, Johannes; Günther, Alrun A.; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2016-03-01

    Emerging organic integrated electronics require capability of high speed and the compatibility with high-resolution structuring processes such as photolithography. When downscaling the channel length, the contact resistance is known to limit the performance of the short channel devices. In this report, orthogonal photolithography is used for the patterning of the source/drain electrodes of the organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) as well as the interface dopant insertion layers for further modifications of the contact resistance. Bottom-gate top-contact pentacene OFETs with different thicknesses of the p-dopant 2,2'-(perfluoronaphthalene-2,6-diylidene)dimalononitrile under the Au electrodes show a significant decrease in threshold voltage from -2.2 V to -0.8 V and in contact resistance from 55 k Ω cm to 10 k Ω cm by adding a 1 nm thin dopant interlayer. The influence of doping on charge carrier injection is directly visible in the temperature-dependent output characteristics and a charge-transfer activation energy of ˜20 meV is obtained. Our results provide a systematic study of interface contact doping and also show the connection between interface contact doping and improved charge carrier injection by the activation of charge transfer process.

  7. Friction behavior of glass and metals in contact with glass in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments have been conducted for heat-resistant glass and metals in contact with glass. These experiments were conducted in various environments including vacuum, moist air, dry air, octane, and stearic acid in hexadecane. Glass exhibited a higher friction force in moist air than it did in vacuum when in sliding contact with itself. The metals, aluminum, iron, and gold, all exhibited the same friction coefficient when sliding on glass in vacuum as glass sliding on glass. Gold-to-glass contacts were extremely sensitive to the environment despite the relative chemical inertness of gold.

  8. Effect of capillary-condensed water on the dynamic friction force at nanoasperity contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirghi, L.

    2003-05-01

    A single nanoasperity contact in ambient air is usually wetted by capillary condensation of water vapor and is surrounded by a water meniscus. This phenomenon strongly affects the contact friction, not only by the effect of meniscus loading force (superficial tension and capillary forces), but also by a friction force that accounts for the energy loss in the meniscus movement along with the sliding contact. Occurrence of the water-meniscus-generated friction is experimentally proved by atomic force microscopy measurements of the tip-sample friction force at minimum possible external load (before pull-off). A qualitative explanation for the observed dependence of the friction force on air humidity and solid surface wettability is proposed.

  9. Power optimization of ultrasonic friction-modulation tactile interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wiertlewski, Michael; Colgate, J Edward

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic friction-modulation devices provide rich tactile sensation on flat surfaces and have the potential to restore tangibility to touchscreens. To date, their adoption into consumer electronics has been in part limited by relatively high power consumption, incompatible with the requirements of battery-powered devices. This paper introduces a method that optimizes the energy efficiency and performance of this class of devices. It considers optimal energy transfer to the impedance provided by the finger interacting with the surface. Constitutive equations are determined from the mode shape of the interface and the piezoelectric coupling of the actuator. The optimization procedure employs a lumped parameter model to simplify the treatment of the problem. Examples and an experimental study show the evolution of the optimal design as a function of the impedance of the finger. PMID:25314710

  10. Frictional properties of two alkanethiol self assembled monolayers in sliding contact: Odd-even effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramin, Leyla; Jabbarzadeh, Ahmad

    2012-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation, we have investigated the structural effects on the frictional properties of self assembled monolayers (SAM) of n-alkanethiols [CH3(CH2)n-1SH, n = 12-15] in SAM-SAM contacts attached on Au (111) substrates. We have observed an odd-even effect where friction coefficient for SAM-SAM contacts with n = odd showed consistently higher values than those with n = even. This odd-even effect is independent of the sliding velocity and the relative tilt directions of the SAMs, and persists over a much higher pressure range than that reported before for SAM-Au contacts [L. Ramin and A. Jabbarzadeh, Langmuir 28, 4102-4112 (2012), 10.1021/la204701z]. For odd systems higher gauche defects were shown to be the possible source of high friction coefficient. Under the same load and shear rates (comparable sliding velocities), SAM-SAM contacts show mostly higher friction compared to SAM-Au contacts. For SAM-SAM contacts, a more significant increase of friction occurs at higher shear rates due to a shift in the tilt orientation angle. We show SAM-SAM contacts with misaligned relative tilt orientation angle (˜45°-90°) have considerably lower friction compared with those whose tilt orientation angles are almost aligned in the opposite directions and parallel to the shear.

  11. Modeling of contact mechanics and friction limit surfaces for soft fingers in robotics, with experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Xydas, N.; Kao, I.

    1999-09-01

    A new theory in contact mechanics for modeling of soft fingers is proposed to define the relationship between the normal force and the radius of contact for soft fingers by considering general soft-finger materials, including linearly and nonlinearly elastic materials. The results show that the radius of contact is proportional to the normal force raised to the power of {gamma}, which ranges from 0 to 1/3. This new theory subsumes the Hertzian contact model for linear elastic materials, where {gamma} = 1/3. Experiments are conducted to validate the theory using artificial soft fingers made of various materials such as rubber and silicone. Results for human fingers are also compared. This theory provides a basis for numerically constructing friction limit surfaces. The numerical friction limit surface can be approximated by an ellipse, with the major and minor axes as the maximum friction force and the maximum moment with respect to the normal axis of contact, respectively. Combining the results of the contact-mechanics model with the contact-pressure distribution, the normalized friction limit surface can be derived for anthropomorphic soft fingers. The results of the contact-mechanics model and the pressure distribution for soft fingers facilitate the construction of numerical friction limit surfaces, and will enable us to analyze and simulate contact behaviors of grasping and manipulation in robotics.

  12. Coulomb frictional contact by explicit projection in the cone for finite displacement quasi-static problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Rabczuk, T.; de Melo, F. J. M. Queirós; de Sá, J. César

    2015-01-01

    We propose, in this paper, a distinct perspective on the solution of the Coulomb frictional contact problem. By combining the prediction/correction method for the contact force vector with the correction step being a cone projection and writing the friction cone surface in the quadratic form, we directly calculate the contact force. The distance along the friction cone normal is determined by solving a nonlinear problem in closed form. Numerical advantages of this projection are apparent for large values of friction coefficient. Six problems previously indicated as difficult to solve by the node-to-segment discretization and the operator split algorithm are here solved with the new projection algorithm. Discretization follows node-to segment and node-to-face derivations with gap vector defined in a global frame (without tangential and normal decomposition). In addition, we provide source codes for the 2D and 3D contact cases.

  13. Anisotropic friction and wear of single-crystal manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with itself

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with manganese-zinc ferrite (100), (110), (111), and (211) planes in contact with themselves. Mating the highest-atomic-density directions, (110), of matched crystallographic planes resulted in the lowest coefficients of friction. Mating matched (same) high-atomic-density planes and matched (same)crystallographic directions resulted in low coefficients of friction. Mating dissimilar crystallographic planes, however, did not give significantly different friction results from those with matched planes. Sliding caused cracking and the formation of hexagonal- and rectangular-platelet wear debris on ferrite surfaces, primarily from cleavage of the (110) planes.

  14. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with titanium. Results indicate that the friction coefficient is greater in vacuum than in argon and that this is due to the greater adhesion or adhesive transfer in vacuum. Thin films of silicon carbide transferred to titanium also adhered to silicon carbide both in argon at atmospheric pressure and in high vacuum. Cohesive bonds fractured on both the silicon carbide and titanium surfaces. The wear debris of silicon carbide created by fracture plowed the silicon carbide surface in a plastic manner. The friction characteristics of titanium in contact with silicon carbide were sensitive to the surface roughness of silicon carbide, and the friction coefficients were higher for a rough surface of silicon carbide than for a smooth one. The difference in friction results was due to plastic deformation (plowing of titanium).

  15. Dust Emission Induced By Friction Modifications At Tool Chip Interface In Dry Machining In MMCp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Arnaud; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between dust emission and tribological conditions at the tool-chip interface when machining Metal Matrix composite reinforced with particles (MMCp) in dry mode. Machining generates aerosols that can easily be inhaled by workers. Aerosols may be composed of oil mist, tool material or alloying elements of workpiece material. Bar turning tests were conducted on a 2009 aluminum alloy reinforced with different level of Silicon Carbide particles (15, 25 and 35% of SiCp). Variety of PCD tools and nanostructured diamond coatings were used to analyze their performances on air pollution. A spectrometer was used to detect airborne aerosol particles in the size range between 0.3μm to 20 μm and to sort them in 15 size channels in real time. It was used to compare the effects of test parameters on dust emission. Observations of tool face and chip morphology reveal the importance of friction phenomena. It was demonstrated that level of friction modifies chip curvature and dust emission. The increase of level of reinforcement increase the chip segmentation and decrease the contact length and friction area. A "running in" phenomenon with important dust emission appeared with PCD tool due to the tool rake face flatness. In addition dust generation is more sensitive to edge integrity than power consumption.

  16. Ruptures along a frictional interface are described by Fracture Mechanics: Experiments in a "Laboratory Earthquake" along both dry and lubricated interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fineberg, J.; Svetlizky, I.; Bayart Schweizer, E.

    2014-12-01

    A dry frictional interface is composed of an ensemble of discrete contacts whose real contact area is orders of magnitude smaller than the nominal one. Slip is initiated when contacts are broken via propagating ruptures. Characterization of the dynamic fields that drive these ruptures and how they couple to the dissipative mechanisms on the interface are critical to our fundamental understanding of both frictional motion and earthquake dynamics. We experimentally investigate ruptures along rough spatially extended interfaces bounded by the same type of material. We perform simultaneous high-speed measurements (at μsec time scale) of the real contact area and the strain fields in the region surrounding propagating rupture tips. These measurements enable us to uncover the breakdown process near the tip of the slipping zone for rapidly propagating ruptures ranging from slow rupture fronts (~0.01CR) to nearly the Rayleigh wave speed, CR~1255m/s. These rupture fronts are quantitatively described by classical singular solutions for rapid shear cracks. These singular solutions, originally derived to describe brittle fracture, are in excellent agreement with the experiments for slow propagation, whereas some significant discrepancies arise as the rupture velocity approaches CR. The energy dissipated by the fracture of the contacts (fracture energy) is nearly constant throughout the entire rupture velocity range, while the size of the dissipative zone undergoes a 'Lorentz-like' contraction as the rupture velocity approaches CR. We then turn to both fully lubricated and partially lubricated interfaces and compare the dynamic strain fields measured to those of dry interfaces. The results of these studies are surprising. We will show that: Rapid rupture fronts still propagate in the stick-slip regime Although decreasing the overall friction coefficient along the interface, the addition of a lubricant significantly increases the fracture energy at the rupture tip In the fully

  17. Adhesion and friction of single-crystal diamond in contact with transition metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and friction of single-crystal diamond in contact with various transition metals and the nature of metal transfer to diamond. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with diamond in sliding contact with the metals yttrium, titanium, zirconium, vanadium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium and rhodium. All experiments were conducted with loads of 0.05 to 0.3 N, at a sliding velocity of 0.003 m per minute, in a vacuum of 10 to the -8th Pa, at room temperature, and on the (111) plane of diamond with sliding in the 110 line type direction. The results of the investigation indicate that the coefficient of friction for diamond in contact with various metals is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals in high vacuum. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of diamond in sliding.

  18. Thermal contact resistance across a copper-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.M.; Chojnowski, D.; Assoufid, L.; Worek, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    The issue of thermal contact resistance across metallic interfaces has been investigated for many situations over the past several decades. The application in the present case is contact cooling of high heat load optical substrates. High heat load x-ray mirrors and other optical components used at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are either internally cooled or contact cooled. In the internally cooled mirrors, a coolant flows through passages configured in the optical substrate. In the contact-cooled case, cooling is provided by placing cooling plates in contact with the mirror to extract the heat. Here, an experimental setup to measure the thermal contact conductance across a silicon-copper (Si-Cu) interface is described, and the results obtained are presented. The resulting thermal contact resistance data are used in estimating the thermo-mechanical and optical performance of optical substrates cooled by interfaced copper cooling blocks. Several factors influence the heat transfer across solid interfaces. These include the material properties, interface pressure, flatness and roughness of the contacting surfaces, temperature, and interstitial material, if any. Results presented show the variation of thermal contact conductance as a function of applied interface pressure for a Cu-Si interface. Various interstitial materials investigated include indium foil, silver foil and a liquid eutectic (Ga-In-Sn). As expected, thermal contact resistance decreases as interface pressure increases, except in the case of the eutectic, in which it was nearly constant. The softer the interstitial material, the lower the thermal contact resistance. Liquid metal provides the lowest thermal contact resistance across the Cu-Si interface, followed by the indium foil, and then the silver foil.

  19. Tribological evaluation of piston skirt/cylinder liner contact interfaces under boundary lubrication conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Demas, N. G.; Erck, R. A.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

    2010-03-01

    The friction and wear between the piston and cylinder liner significantly affects the performance of internal combustion engines. In this paper, segments from a commercial piston/cylinder system were tribologically tested using reciprocating motion. The tribological contact consisted of aluminium alloy piston segments, either uncoated, coated with a graphite/resin coating, or an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C : H) coating, in contact with gray cast iron liner segments. Tests were conducted in commercial synthetic motor oils and base stocks at temperatures up to 120 C with a 2 cm stroke length at reciprocating speeds up to 0.15 m s{sup -1}. The friction dependence of these piston skirt and cylinder liner materials was studied as a function of load, sliding speed and temperature. Specifically, an increase in the sliding speed led to a decrease in the friction coefficient below approximately 70 C, while above this temperature, an increase in sliding speed led to an increase in the friction coefficient. The presence of a coating played an important role. It was found that the graphite/resin coating wore quickly, preventing the formation of a beneficial tribochemical film, while the a-C : H coating exhibited a low friction coefficient and provided significant improvement over the uncoated samples. The effect of additives in the oils was also studied. The tribological behaviour of the interface was explained based on viscosity effects and subsequent changes in the lubrication regime, formation of chemical and tribochemical films.

  20. Characterization of friction at three contact pairs by photoelastic isotropic point (IP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surendra, K. V. N.; Simha, K. R. Y.

    2015-03-01

    Friction coefficient between a circular-disk periphery and V-block surface was determined by introducing the concept of isotropic point (IP) in isochromatic field of the disk under three-point symmetric loading. IP position on the symmetry axis depends on active coefficient of friction during experiment. We extend this work to asymmetric loading of circular disk in which case two frictional contact pairs out of three loading contacts, independently control the unconstrained IP location. Photoelastic experiment is conducted on particular case of asymmetric three-point loading of circular disk. Basics of digital image processing are used to extract few essential parameters from experimental image, particularly IP location. Analytical solution by Flamant for half plane with a concentrated load, is utilized to derive stress components for required loading configurations of the disk. IP is observed, in analytical simulations of three-point asymmetric normal loading, to move from vertical axis to the boundary along an ellipse-like curve. When friction is included in the analysis, IP approaches the center with increase in loading friction and it goes away with increase in support friction. With all these insights, using experimental IP information, friction angles at three contact pairs of circular disk under asymmetric loading, are determined.

  1. Solute Transport Across a Contact Interface in Deformable Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    A finite element formulation of neutral solute transport across a contact interface between deformable porous media is implemented and validated against analytical solutions. By reducing the integral statements of external virtual work on the two contacting surfaces into a single contact integral, the algorithm automatically enforces continuity of solute molar flux across the contact interface, whereas continuity of the effective solute concentration (a measure of the solute mechano-chemical potential) is achieved using a penalty method. This novel formulation facilitates the analysis of problems in biomechanics where the transport of metabolites across contact interfaces of deformable tissues may be of interest. This contact algorithm is the first to address solute transport across deformable interfaces, and is made available in the public domain, open-source finite element code FEBio (http://mrl.sci.utah.edu/software). PMID:22281406

  2. Solute transport across a contact interface in deformable porous media.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-04-01

    A finite element formulation of neutral solute transport across a contact interface between deformable porous media is implemented and validated against analytical solutions. By reducing the integral statements of external virtual work on the two contacting surfaces into a single contact integral, the algorithm automatically enforces continuity of solute molar flux across the contact interface, whereas continuity of the effective solute concentration (a measure of the solute mechano-chemical potential) is achieved using a penalty method. This novel formulation facilitates the analysis of problems in biomechanics where the transport of metabolites across contact interfaces of deformable tissues may be of interest. This contact algorithm is the first to address solute transport across deformable interfaces, and is made available in the public domain, open-source finite element code FEBio (http://www.febio.org). PMID:22281406

  3. Effective two-dimensional frictional contact model for arbitrary curved geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Chen, K.; Chang, Y. P.

    1994-04-01

    A finite element model is developed on the basis of a variational formulation of the perturbed Lagrange type and the classical Coulomb law of friction, for the analysis of frictional contact problems in two dimensions. The model accounts for all geometric/ kinematic non-linearities associated with large sliding motions as well as arbitrary contact-surface curvatures. Explicit forms for the contact force and tangent stiffness operators and a penalty-type format is utilized in the implementation. An extensive number of numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the effectiveness and practical usefulness of the model.

  4. Thermal contact resistance across a copper-silicon interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.; Chojnowski, D.; Assoufid, L.; Worek, W.M.

    1997-10-27

    An experimental setup to measure the thermal contact conductance across a silicon-copper (Si-Cu) interface is described, and the results obtained are presented. The resulting thermal contact resistance data are used in estimating the thermo-mechanical and optical performance of optical substrates cooled by interfaced copper cooling blocks. Several factors influence the heat transfer across solid interfaces. These include the material properties, interface pressure, flatness and roughness of the contacting surfaces, temperature, and interstitial material, if any. Results presented show the variation of thermal contact conductance as a function of applied interface pressure for a Cu-Si interface. Various interstitial materials investigated include iridium foil, silver foil and a liquid eutectic (Ga-In-Sn). As expected, thermal contact resistance decreases as interface pressure increases, except in the case of the eutectic, in which it was nearly constant. The softer the interstitial material, the lower the thermal contact resistance, Liquid metal provides the lowest thermal contact resistance across the Cu-Si interface, followed by the iridium foil, and then the silver foil.

  5. Thermal contact resistance across a copper-silicon interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khounsary, Ali M.; Chojnowski, David; Assoufid, Lahsen; Worek, William M.

    1997-12-01

    An experimental setup to measure the thermal contact conductance across a silicon-copper (Si-Cu) interface is described, and the results obtained are presented. The resulting thermal contact resistance data are used in estimating the thermo-mechanical and optical performance of optical substrates cooled by interfaced copper cooling blocks. Several factors influence the heat transfer across solid interfaces. These include the material properties, interface pressure, flatness and roughness of the contacting surfaces, temperature, and interstitial material, if any. Results presented show the variation of thermal contact conductance as a function of applied interface pressure for a Cu-Si interface. Various interstitial materials investigated include indium foil, silver foil and a liquid eutectic (Ga-In-Sn). As expected, thermal contact resistance decreases as interface pressure increases, except in the case of the eutectic, in which it was nearly constant. The softer the interstitial material, the lower the thermal contact resistance. Liquid metal provides the lowest thermal contact resistance across the Cu-Si interface, followed by the indium foil, and then the silver foil.

  6. Novel Monitoring Techniques for Characterizing Frictional Interfaces in the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Selvadurai, Paul A.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive film was used to characterize the asperity contacts along a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) interface in the laboratory. The film has structural health monitoring (SHM) applications for flanges and other precision fittings and train rail condition monitoring. To calibrate the film, simple spherical indentation tests were performed and validated against a finite element model (FEM) to compare normal stress profiles. Experimental measurements of the normal stress profiles were within −7.7% to 6.6% of the numerical calculations between 12 and 50 MPa asperity normal stress. The film also possessed the capability of quantifying surface roughness, an important parameter when examining wear and attrition in SHM applications. A high definition video camera supplied data for photometric analysis (i.e., the measure of visible light) of asperities along the PMMA-PMMA interface in a direct shear configuration, taking advantage of the transparent nature of the sample material. Normal stress over individual asperities, calculated with the pressure-sensitive film, was compared to the light intensity transmitted through the interface. We found that the luminous intensity transmitted through individual asperities linearly increased 0.05643 ± 0.0012 candelas for an increase of 1 MPa in normal stress between normal stresses ranging from 23 to 33 MPa. PMID:25923930

  7. Novel monitoring techniques for characterizing frictional interfaces in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Selvadurai, Paul A; Glaser, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive film was used to characterize the asperity contacts along a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) interface in the laboratory. The film has structural health monitoring (SHM) applications for flanges and other precision fittings and train rail condition monitoring. To calibrate the film, simple spherical indentation tests were performed and validated against a finite element model (FEM) to compare normal stress profiles. Experimental measurements of the normal stress profiles were within -7.7% to 6.6% of the numerical calculations between 12 and 50 MPa asperity normal stress. The film also possessed the capability of quantifying surface roughness, an important parameter when examining wear and attrition in SHM applications. A high definition video camera supplied data for photometric analysis (i.e., the measure of visible light) of asperities along the PMMA-PMMA interface in a direct shear configuration, taking advantage of the transparent nature of the sample material. Normal stress over individual asperities, calculated with the pressure-sensitive film, was compared to the light intensity transmitted through the interface. We found that the luminous intensity transmitted through individual asperities linearly increased 0.05643 ± 0.0012 candelas for an increase of 1 MPa in normal stress between normal stresses ranging from 23 to 33 MPa. PMID:25923930

  8. The adhesion, friction, and wear of binary alloys in contact with single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-base alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a single-crystal silicon carbide (0001) surface in vacuum. Results indicate atomic size misfit and concentration of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion, friction, and wear properties of iron-base binary alloys. The controlling mechanism of the alloy properties is an intrinsic effect involving the resistance to shear fracture of cohesive bonding in the alloy. The coefficient of friction generally increases with an increase in solute concentration. The coefficient of friction increases as the solute-to-iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity. Alloys having higher solute concentration produce more transfer to silicon carbide than do alloys having low solute concentrations. The chemical activity of the alloying element is also an important parameter in controlling adhesion and friction of alloys.

  9. Adhesion and friction of iron-base binary alloys in contact with silicon carbide in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Single pass sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron base binary alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a single crystal silicon carbide /0001/ surface in vacuum. Results indicate that atomic size and concentration of alloying elements play an important role in controlling adhesion and friction properties of iron base binary alloys. The coefficient of friction generally increases with an increase in solute concentration. The coefficient of friction increases linearly as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity. The chemical activity of the alloying elements was also an important parameter in controlling adhesion and friction of alloys, as these latter properties are highly dependent upon the d bond character of the elements.

  10. Adhesion, friction, and wear of binary alloys in contact with single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments, conducted with various iron base alloys (alloying elements are Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh and W) in contact with a single crystal silicon carbide /0001/ surface in vacuum are discussed. Results indicate atomic size misfit and concentration of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion, friction, and wear properties of iron-base binary alloys. The controlling mechanism of the alloy properties is as an intrinsic effect involving the resistance to shear fracture of cohesive bonding in the alloy. The coefficient of friction generally increases with an increase in solute concentration. The coefficient of friction increases as the solute-to-iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity. Alloys having higher solute concentration produce more transfer to silicon carbide than do alloys having low solute concentrations. The chemical activity of the alloying element is also an important parameter in controlling adhesion and friction of alloys.

  11. Friction and wear characteristics of iron-chromium alloys in contact with themselves and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-chromium alloys in contact with (1) themselves, (2) single crystal silicon carbide disks, and (3) single crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide. Results indicate the coefficients of friction for the alloys sliding against themselves are between those for pure iron and pure chromium, and are only slightly different with 1, 5, 9, 14, and 19 weight percent chromium in iron. The wear is due, primarily, to shearing, or tearing fracture, of the cohesive bonds in the bulk metal and plowing of the bulk by lumps of wear debris. There are only slight differences in the coefficients of friction for the various alloys when sliding on silicon carbide. The coefficient of friction for the alloys are higher than those for pure iron and pure chromium. Alloy hardening observed in the alloys plays a dominant role in controlling the abrasive friction and wear behavior of the alloys.

  12. Adhesion and friction of iron and gold in contact with elemental semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Adhesion and friction experiments were conducted with single crystals of iron and gold in contact with single crystals of germanium and silicon. Surfaces were examined in the sputter cleaned state and in the presence of oxygen and a lubricant. All experiments were conducted at room temperature with loads of 1 to 50 grams, and sliding friction was at a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min. Results indicate that the friction nature of metals in contact with semiconductors is sensitive to orientation, that strong adhesion of metals to both germanium and silicon occurs, and that friction is lower with silicon than with germanium for the same orientation. Surface effects are highly sensitive to environment. Silicon, for example, behaves in an entirely brittle manner in the clean state, but in the presence of a lubricant the surface deforms plastically.

  13. On the 3D normal tire/off-road vibro-contact problem with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, Ligia; Chiroiu, Veturia; Brişan, Cornel; Dumitriu, Dan; Sireteanu, Tudor; Petre, Simona

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a virtual experiment concerning driving on off-roads is investigated via 3D normal vibro-contact problem with friction. The dynamic road concept is introduced in order to characterize a particular stretch of road by total longitudinal, lateral, and normal forces and their geometric distributions in the contact patches. The off-road profiles are built by image sonification technique. The cross-sectional curves of off-roads before and after deformation, the contact between the tire and the road, the distribution of contact and friction forces in the contact domain, the natural frequencies and modes when the tire is in ground contact, are estimated. The approach is exercised on two particular problems and results compare favorably to existing analytical and numerical solutions. The feasibility of image sonification technique is useful to build a low-cost virtual reality environment with an increased degree of realism for driving simulators and higher user flexibility.

  14. Friction of different monolayer lubricants in MEMs interfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Carpick, Robert W. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Street, Mark D.; Ashurst, William Robert; Corwin, Alex David

    2006-01-01

    This report details results from our last year of work (FY2005) on friction in MEMS as funded by the Campaign 6 program for the Microscale Friction project. We have applied different monolayers to a sensitive MEMS friction tester called the nanotractor. The nanotractor is also a useful actuator that can travel {+-}100 {micro}m in 40 nm steps, and is being considered for several MEMS applications. With this tester, we can find static and dynamic coefficients of friction. We can also quantify deviations from Amontons' and Coulomb's friction laws. Because of the huge surface-to-volume ratio at the microscale, surface properties such as adhesion and friction can dominate device performance, and therefore such deviations are important to quantify and understand. We find that static and dynamic friction depend on the monolayer lubricant applied. The friction data can be modeled with a non-zero adhesion force, which represents a deviation from Amontons' Law. Further, we show preliminary data indicating that the adhesion force depends not only on the monolayer, but also on the normal load applied. Finally, we also observe slip deflections before the transition from static to dynamic friction, and find that they depend on the monolayer.

  15. Friction behavior of silicon in contact with titanium, nickel, silver and copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments are conducted with the semiconductor silicon in contact with the metals titanium, nickel, copper, and silver. Sliding is on the (111) plane of single-crystal silicon in the 112 crystallographic direction both in dry and lubricated (mineral oil) sliding. The friction coefficient in dry sliding is controlled by adhesion and the surface chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal the stronger the adhesion and the higher the friction. In lubricated sliding the lubricant absorbs to the surfaces and reduces the importance of metal chemical effects. In lubricated sliding, silicon ceases to behave in a brittle manner and undergoes plastic deformation under load.

  16. Friction and friction-generated temperature at a polymer-metal interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. L.; Burks, H. D.

    1974-01-01

    Results of friction and thermal tests of molded polyimide and pyrrone polymers are presented. The coefficient of sliding friction up to surface velocities of 2 m/sec and the coefficient of thermal expansion from 300 to 500 K were measured. An apparatus was constructed to measure simultaneously the coefficient of sliding friction and the friction-generated temperature. Measurements were made at a nominal pressure-velocity product of 0.25 MN/msec and at temperatures between 300 and 500 K.

  17. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded and Bolted Cold Plates with Al/Cu Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Suresh, M.; Sibi Varshan, M.

    2015-05-01

    An attempt is made to design and fabricate a cold plate with aluminum-copper dissimilar interface joined by friction stir welding. Optimum welding conditions for obtaining sound-quality corner and T joints with an aluminum-copper interface were established. Welded cross sections of the friction stir welded cold plate were analyzed to understand the bonding characteristics. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to evaluate the fluid-flow characteristics and thermal resistance of friction stir welded cold plate and the resulted are compared with the conventional bolted cold plate configuration. For CFD modeling of a cold plate with a dissimilar interface, a new methodology is proposed. From the CFD analysis and experimental results, it is observed that friction stir welded cold plate offered better thermal performance compared to the bolted cold plate and it is due to the metallurgical bonding at the aluminum-copper interface with the dispersion of copper particles.

  18. A 3D Frictional Segment-to-Segment Contact Method for Large Deformations and Quadratic Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T; Solberg, J

    2004-04-01

    Node-on-segment contact is the most common form of contact used today but has many deficiencies ranging from potential locking to non-smooth behavior with large sliding. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches are not at all applicable to higher order discretizations (e.g. quadratic elements). In a previous work, [3, 4] we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach for eight node hexahedral elements based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the over-constraint that caused 'locking' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach to treat frictional contact problems. In addition, the method is extended to 3D quadratic tetrahedrals and hexahedrals. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems that demonstrate its effectiveness.

  19. A Mortar Segment-to-Segment Frictional Contact Method for Large Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T

    2003-10-29

    Contact modeling is still one of the most difficult aspects of nonlinear implicit structural analysis. Most 3D contact algorithms employed today use node-on-segment approaches for contacting dissimilar meshes. Two pass node-on-segment contact approaches have the well known deficiency of locking due to over constraint. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches suffer when individual nodes slide out of contact at contact surface boundaries or when contacting nodes slide from facet to facet. This causes jumps in the contact forces due to the discrete nature of the constraint enforcement and difficulties in convergence for implicit solution techniques. In a previous work, we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the overconstraint which caused ''locking'' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach in to treat frictional contact problems. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems which demonstrate its effectiveness.

  20. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-07-01

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  1. Intelligent tires for identifying coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Kamai, Kazuto; Seki, Ryosuke

    2015-03-01

    Intelligent tires equipped with sensors as well as the monitoring of the tire/road contact conditions are in demand for improving vehicle control and safety. With the aim of identifying the coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces during driving, including during cornering, we develop an identification scheme for the coefficient of friction that involves estimation of the slip angle and applied force by using a single lightweight three-axis accelerometer attached on the inner surface of the tire. To validate the developed scheme, we conduct tire-rolling tests using an accelerometer-equipped tire with various slip angles on various types of road surfaces, including dry and wet surfaces. The results of these tests confirm that the estimated slip angle and applied force are reasonable. Furthermore, the identified coefficient of friction by the developed scheme agreed with that measured by standardized tests.

  2. Adhesion and friction of transition metals in contact with nonmetallic hard materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the metals yttrium, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, vanadium, neodymium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium, ruthenium, and rhodium in sliding contact with single crystal diamond, silicon carbide, pyrolytic boron nitride, and ferrite. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis was conducted with the metals and nonmetals to determine the surface chemistry and the degree of surface cleanliness. The results of the investigation indicate the adhesion and friction of the transition metals in contact with diamond, silicon carbide, boron nitride, and ferrite are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more chemically active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction and the greater amount of transfer to the nonmetals.

  3. Contact force measurements at the head/disk interface for contact recording heads in magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathi, S. K.; Donovan, Mark; Hsia, Yiao-Tee

    1996-01-01

    As the spacing between the magnetic transducer and media decreases in hard disk drives, one approaches the regime of constant contact between the head and disk. In this regime, conventional measures of the head/disk interface such as 'takeoff velocity' and 'fly height' become less important. Instead, the 'contact force' between the head and the disk is a more relevant parameter to evaluate the performance and reliability of the interface. In this paper, a new contact force measurement technique that uses the acoustic emission (AE) from the interface is introduced. The contact force is modeled as a series of continuous collisions that cause the slider to vibrate at its resonant frequencies. These vibrations generate an AE signal, the magnitude of which is proportional to the contact force. The Read-Rite tripad slider, which is a contact recording head, is used for the measurements. Some intuitive expectations from contact force measurements are presented as validation of the technique. Specifically, it is shown that contact force decreases with increasing disk velocity, that the contact force varies inversely with the flying height measured on a glass disk, and that the contact force decreases with burnishing of the interface.

  4. Unilateral contact induced blade/casing vibratory interactions in impellers: Analysis for flexible casings with friction and abradable coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batailly, Alain; Legrand, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    This contribution addresses the vibratory analysis of unilateral contact induced structural interactions between a bladed impeller and its surrounding flexible casing. It extends the numerical developments exposed in a previous paper to flexible casings. The casing finite element model and the construction of the associated reduced-order model for efficient computations are first exposed in detail along with an extensive presentation of the smoothing strategy implemented on the contact interface. The proposed algorithms embedding unilateral contact conditions together with abradable coating removal are subsequently introduced and validated through a systematic analysis of (1) the nonlinear procedure for the computation of impeller/casing distances, (2) the treatment of three-dimensional friction and contact forces, (3) the correction of the displacements when unilateral contact or abradable removal arises, and (4) the possible hybrid contact scenarii involving localized total removal of the abradable coating. Finally, two illustrative case studies show that the linear interaction condition, commonly considered for the safe design of impellers and casings in turbomachinery, may be advantageously combined with the presented numerical strategy in order to assess the actual importance of predicted critical speeds.

  5. An alternative formulation for quasi-static frictional and cohesive contact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Pinto da Costa, A.; Rabczuk, T.; Queirós de Melo, F. J. M.; Dias-da-Costa, D.; Bezzeghoud, Mourad

    2014-04-01

    It is known by Engineering practitioners that quasi-static contact problems with friction and cohesive laws often present convergence difficulties in Newton iteration. These are commonly attributed to the non-smoothness of the equilibrium system. However, non-uniqueness of solutions is often an obstacle for convergence. We discuss these conditions in detail and present a general algorithm for 3D which is shown to have quadratic convergence in the Newton-Raphson iteration even for parts of the domain where multiple solutions exist. Chen-Mangasarian replacement functions remove the non-smoothness corresponding to both the stick-slip and normal complementarity conditions. Contrasting with Augmented Lagrangian methods, second-order updating is performed for all degrees-of-freedom. Stick condition is automatically selected by the algorithm for regions with multiple solutions. The resulting Jacobian determinant is independent of the friction coefficient, at the expense of an increased number of nodal degrees-of-freedom. Aspects such as a dedicated pivoting for constrained problems are also of crucial importance for a successful solution finding. The resulting 3D mixed formulation, with 7 degrees-of-freedom in each node (displacement components, friction multiplier, friction force components and normal force) is tested with representative numerical examples (both contact with friction and cohesive force), which show remarkable robustness and generality.

  6. Friction and morphology of magnetic tapes in sliding contact with nickel-zinc ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Bhushan, B.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and morphological studies were conducted with magnetic tapes containing a Ni-Zn ferrite hemispherical pin in laboratory air at a relative humidity of 40 percent and at 23 C. The results indicate that the binder plays a significant role in the friction properties, morphology, and microstructure of the tape. Comparisons were made with four binders: nitrocellulose; poly (vinyledene) chloride; cellulose acetate; and hydroxyl-terminated, low molecular weight polyester added to the base polymer, polyester-polyurethane. The coefficient of friction was lowest for the tape with the nitrocellulose binder and increased in the order hydroxylterminated, low molecular weight polyester resin; poly (vinyledene) chloride; and cellulose acetate. The degree of enclosure of the oxide particles by the binder was highest for hydroxyl-terminated, low molecular weight polyester and decreased in the order cellulose acetate, poly (vinyledene) chloride, and nitrocellulose. The nature of deformation of the tape was a factor in controlling friction. The coefficient of friction under elastic contact conditions was considerably lower than under conditions that produced plastic contacts.

  7. Femtosecond laser full and partial texturing of steel surfaces to reduce friction in lubricated contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, Antonio; Carbone, Giuseppe; De Filippis, Michele; Volpe, Annalisa; Lugarà, Pietro Mario

    2014-12-01

    Minimizing mechanical losses and friction in vehicle engines would have a great impact on reducing fuel consumption and exhaust emissions, to the benefit of environmental protection. With this scope, laser surface texturing (LST) with femtosecond pulses is an emerging technology, which consists of creating, by laser ablation, an array of high-density microdimples on the surface of a mechanical device. The microtexture decreases the effective contact area and, in case of lubricated contact, acts as oil reservoir and trap for wear debris, leading to an overall friction reduction. Depending on the lubrication regime and on the texture geometry, several mechanisms may concur to modify friction such as the local reduction of the shear stress, the generation of a hydrodynamic lift between the surfaces or the formation of eddy-like flows at the bottom of the dimple cavities. All these effects have been investigated by fabricating and characterizing several LST surfaces by femtosecond laser ablation with different features: partial/full texture, circular/elliptical dimples, variable diameters, and depths but equivalent areal density. More than 85% of friction reduction has been obtained from the circular dimple geometry, but the elliptical texture allows adjusting the friction coefficient by changing its orientation with respect to the sliding direction.

  8. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  9. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  10. Boundary lubrication of heterogeneous surfaces and the onset of cavitation in frictional contacts

    PubMed Central

    Savio, Daniele; Pastewka, Lars; Gumbsch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Surfaces can be slippery or sticky depending on surface chemistry and roughness. We demonstrate in atomistic simulations that regular and random slip patterns on a surface lead to pressure excursions within a lubricated contact that increase quadratically with decreasing contact separation. This is captured well by a simple hydrodynamic model including wall slip. We predict with this model that pressure changes for larger length scales and realistic frictional conditions can easily reach cavitation thresholds and significantly change the load-bearing capacity of a contact. Cavitation may therefore be the norm, not the exception, under boundary lubrication conditions. PMID:27051871

  11. Boundary lubrication of heterogeneous surfaces and the onset of cavitation in frictional contacts.

    PubMed

    Savio, Daniele; Pastewka, Lars; Gumbsch, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Surfaces can be slippery or sticky depending on surface chemistry and roughness. We demonstrate in atomistic simulations that regular and random slip patterns on a surface lead to pressure excursions within a lubricated contact that increase quadratically with decreasing contact separation. This is captured well by a simple hydrodynamic model including wall slip. We predict with this model that pressure changes for larger length scales and realistic frictional conditions can easily reach cavitation thresholds and significantly change the load-bearing capacity of a contact. Cavitation may therefore be the norm, not the exception, under boundary lubrication conditions. PMID:27051871

  12. Computational Methods for Frictional Contact With Applications to the Space Shuttle Orbiter Nose-Gear Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the solution of frictional contact problems for aircraft tires. A Space Shuttle nose-gear tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory which includes the effects of variations in material and geometric parameters, transverse-shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities. Contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with both contact and friction conditions. The contact-friction algorithm is based on a modified Coulomb friction law. A modified two-field, mixed-variational principle is used to obtain elemental arrays. This modification consists of augmenting the functional of that principle by two terms: the Lagrange multiplier vector associated with normal and tangential node contact-load intensities and a regularization term that is quadratic in the Lagrange multiplier vector. These capabilities and computational features are incorporated into an in-house computer code. Experimental measurements were taken to define the response of the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire to inflation-pressure loads and to inflation-pressure loads combined with normal static loads against a rigid flat plate. These experimental results describe the meridional growth of the tire cross section caused by inflation loading, the static load-deflection characteristics of the tire, the geometry of the tire footprint under static loading conditions, and the normal and tangential load-intensity distributions in the tire footprint for the various static vertical loading conditions. Numerical results were obtained for the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire subjected to inflation pressure loads and combined inflation pressure and contact loads against a rigid flat plate. The experimental measurements and the numerical results are compared.

  13. Contact damage failure analyses of fretting wear behavior of the metal stem titanium alloy-bone cement interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanfeng; Ge, Shirong; Liu, Hongtao; Wang, Qingliang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-11-01

    Although cemented titanium alloy is not favored currently in the Western world for its poor clinical and radiography outcomes, its lower modulus of elasticity and good biocompatibility are instrumental for its ability supporting and transforming physical load, and it is more suitable for usage in Chinese and Japanese populations due to their lower body weights and unique femoral characteristics. Through various friction tests of different cycles, loads and conditions and by examining fretting hysteresis loops, fatigue process curves and wear surfaces, the current study investigated fretting wear characteristics and wear mechanism of titanium alloy stem-bone cement interface. It was found that the combination of loads and displacement affected the wear quantity. Friction coefficient, which was in an inverse relationship to load under the same amplitude, was proportional to amplitudes under the same load. Additionally, calf serum was found to both lubricate and erode the wear interface. Moreover, cement fatigue contact areas appeared black/oxidative in dry and gruel in 25% calf serum. Fatigue scratches were detected within contact areas, and wear scars were found on cement and titanium surfaces, which were concave-shaped and ring concave/ convex-shaped, respectively. The coupling of thermoplastic effect and minimal torque damage has been proposed to be the major reason of contact damage. These data will be important for further studies analyzing metal-cement interface failure performance and solving interface friction and wear debris production issues. PMID:26241891

  14. Diffuse interface simulation of ternary fluids in contact with solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Yu; Ding, Hang; Gao, Peng; Wu, Yan-Ling

    2016-03-01

    In this article we developed a geometrical wetting condition for diffuse-interface simulation of ternary fluid flows with moving contact lines. The wettability of the substrate in the presence of ternary fluid flows is represented by multiple contact angles, corresponding to the different material properties between the respective fluid and the substrate. Displacement of ternary fluid flows on the substrate leads to the occurrence of moving contact point, at which three moving contact lines meet. We proposed a weighted contact angle model, to replace the jump in contact angle at the contact point by a relatively smooth transition of contact angle over a region of 'diffuse contact point' of finite size. Based on this model, we extended the geometrical formulation of wetting condition for two-phase flows with moving contact lines to ternary flows with moving contact lines. Combining this wetting condition, a Navier-Stokes solver and a ternary-fluid model, we simulated two-dimensional spreading of a compound droplet on a substrate, and validated the numerical results of the drop shape at equilibrium by comparing against the analytical solution. We also checked the convergence rate of the simulation by investigating the axisymmetric drop spreading in a capillary tube. Finally, we applied the model to a variety of applications of practical importance, including impact of a circular cylinder into a pool of two layers of different fluids and sliding of a three-dimensional compound droplet in shear flows.

  15. MoS2-Titanium Contact Interface Reactions.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Stephen; Smyth, Christopher; Hinkle, Christopher L; Wallace, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    The formation of the Ti-MoS2 interface, which is heavily utilized in nanoelectronic device research, is studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that, if deposition under high vacuum (∼1 × 10(-6) mbar) as opposed to ultrahigh vacuum (∼1 × 10(-9) mbar) conditions are used, TiO2 forms at the interface rather than Ti. The high vacuum deposition results in an interface free of any detectable reaction between the semiconductor and the deposited contact. In contrast, when metallic titanium is successfully deposited by carrying out depositions in ultrahigh vacuum, the titanium reacts with MoS2 forming Ti(x)S(y) and metallic Mo at the interface. These results have far reaching implications as many prior studies assuming Ti contacts may have actually used TiO2 due to the nature of the deposition tools used. PMID:26967016

  16. Friction, wear and noise of slip ring and brush contacts for synchronous satellite use.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, N. E.; Cole, S. R.; Glossbrenner, E. W.; Vest, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    A program is being conducted for testing of slip rings for synchronous orbit application. Instrumentation systems necessary for monitoring electrical noise, friction, and brush wear at atmospheric pressure and at less than 50 ntorr have been developed. A multiplex scheme necessary for the simultaneous recording of brush displacement, friction, and electrical noise has also been developed. Composite brushes consisting of silver-molybdenum disulfide-graphite and silver-niobium diselenide-graphite have been employed on rings of coin silver and rhodium plate. Four contact combinations have been tested during an ambient condition run-in at 150 rpm and a humidity sequence at 0.1 rpm. The first six months of the two year vacuum test at 0.1 rpm have been completed. Electrical noise, friction and brush wear data recorded during these periods have been analyzed.

  17. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals. Results indicate the coefficient of friction is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to silicon carbide. The chemical activity of the metal and its shear modulus may play important roles in metal transfer, the form of the wear debris and the surface roughness of the metal wear scar. The more active the metal, and the less resistance to shear, the greater the transfer to silicon carbide and the rougher the wear scar on the surface of the metal. Hexagon shaped cracking and fracturing formed by cleavage of both prismatic and basal planes is observed on the silicon carbide surface.

  18. Influence of surface roughness and contact load on friction coefficient and scratch behavior of thermoplastic olefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Han; Browning, Robert; Fincher, Jason; Gasbarro, Anthony; Jones, Scooter; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-05-01

    To study the effects of surface roughness and contact load on the friction behavior and scratch resistance of polymers, a set of model thermoplastic olefins (TPO) systems with various surface roughness ( Ra) levels were prepared and evaluated. It is found that a higher Ra corresponds to a lower surface friction coefficient ( μs). At each level of Ra, μs gets larger as contact load increases, with a greater increase in μs as Ra level increases. It is also observed that with increasing contact load and increasing Ra, the μs tend to level off. In evaluating TPO scratch resistance, a lower μs would delay the onset of ductile drawing-induced fish-scale surface deformation feature, thereby raising the load required to cause scratch visibility. However, as the contact load is further increased, the μs evolves to become scratch coefficient of friction (SCOF) as significant sub-surface deformation and tip penetration occur and material displacement begins, i.e., ploughing. No dependence of Ra and μs on the critical load for the onset of ploughing is observed. In this work, the distinction between μs and SCOF will be illustrated. Approaches for improving scratch resistance of polymers via control of Ra are also discussed.

  19. Survival of Heterogeneous Stress Distributions Created by Precursory Slip at Frictional Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiguet, Mathilde; Kammer, David S.; Gillet, Philippe; Molinari, Jean-François

    2013-10-01

    We study the dynamics of successive slip events at a frictional interface with finite-element simulations. Because of the viscous properties of the material, the stress concentrations created by the arrest of precursory slip are not erased by the propagation of the following rupture but reappear with the relaxation of the material. We show that the amplitude of the stress concentrations follows an exponential decay, which is controlled by the bulk material properties. These results highlight the importance of viscosity in the heterogeneous stress state of a frictional interface and reveal the “memory effect” that affects successive ruptures.

  20. Surface contact and design of fibrillar ‘friction pads’ in stick insects (Carausius morosus): mechanisms for large friction coefficients and negligible adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Labonte, David; Williams, John A.; Federle, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Many stick insects and mantophasmids possess tarsal ‘heel pads’ (euplantulae) covered by arrays of conical, micrometre-sized hairs (acanthae). These pads are used mainly under compression; they respond to load with increasing shear resistance, and show negligible adhesion. Reflected-light microscopy in stick insects (Carausius morosus) revealed that the contact area of ‘heel pads’ changes with normal load on three hierarchical levels. First, loading brought larger areas of the convex pads into contact. Second, loading increased the density of acanthae in contact. Third, higher loads changed the shape of individual hair contacts gradually from circular (tip contact) to elongated (side contact). The resulting increase in real contact area can explain the load dependence of friction, indicating a constant shear stress between acanthae and substrate. As the euplantula contact area is negligible for small loads (similar to hard materials), but increases sharply with load (resembling soft materials), these pads show high friction coefficients despite little adhesion. This property appears essential for the pads’ use in locomotion. Several morphological characteristics of hairy friction pads are in apparent contrast to hairy pads used for adhesion, highlighting key adaptations for both pad types. Our results are relevant for the design of fibrillar structures with high friction coefficients but small adhesion. PMID:24554580

  1. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elastic–plastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model ismore » based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elastic–plastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.« less

  2. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elastic–plastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model is based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elastic–plastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.

  3. Friction behavior of a multi-interface system and improved performance by AlMgB14–TiB2–C and diamond-like-carbon coatings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter J.; Higdon, Clifton; Cook, Bruce A.

    2016-03-29

    We investigated friction behavior of a bearing system with two interfaces involved: a roller component experiencing rolling–sliding interaction against twin cylinders under point contacts while simultaneously undergoing pure sliding interaction against a socket under a conformal contact. Lubrication modeling predicted a strong correlation between the roller's rolling condition and the system's friction behavior. Experimental observations first validated the analytical predictions using steel and iron components. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) coating and AlMgB14–TiB2 coating with a carbon topcoat (BAMC) were then applied to the roller and twin cylinders, respectively. In conclusion, testing and analysis results suggest that the coatings effectively decreased the slipmore » ratio for the roller–cylinder contact and the sliding friction at both bearing interfaces and, as a result, significantly reduced the system frictional torque.« less

  4. Effects of Transitional Buffering Interface coatings on thermal contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, K. C.; Sheffield, J. W.; Sauer, H. J., Jr.; O'Keefe, T. J.; Zhang, J.

    1991-06-01

    Enhancing thermal contact conductance by a reliable and durable coating technique, Transitional Buffering Interface (TBI), has been investigated. A phase mixed coatings, Cu/C, and pure copper coatings on both primary surfaces of specimens were evaluated using four different surface roughnesses. All the samples are being tested at the following contact pressure sequence 125, 250, 375, 500, 375, 250 and 125 kPa. The test results of thermal contact conductance are presented in terms of coating thickness, surface texture and properties of coating materials. Vickers microhardness correlations are also presented for phase mixture copper and carbon and pure copper coatings. Using the experimental data, dimensionless expressions were developed that related the contact conductance of phase mixture copper-carbon and pure copper coatings to the coating thickness, the surface roughness, the contact pressure and the properties of aluminum substrate. The adhesive test indicated good durability of TBI coating surfaces.

  5. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 1: Basic Contact

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems address the basic functionality of the contact algorithms, including the behavior of various kinematic, penalty, and Lagrangian enforcement formulations. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions for each contact algorithm being verified. Most of the contact algorithms currently available in DYNA3D are examined; the exceptions are the Type 4--Single Surface Contact and Type 11--SAND algorithms. It is likely that these algorithms will be removed since their functionality is embodied in other, more robust, contact algorithms. The automatic contact algorithm is evaluated using the Type 12 interface. Two other variations of automatic contact, Type 13 and Type 14, offer additional means to adapt the interface domain, but share the same search and restoration algorithms as Type 12. The contact algorithms are summarized in Table 1. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where one contact surface exists between two

  6. Bearing material. [composite material with low friction surface for rolling or sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A composite material is described which will provide low friction surfaces for materials in rolling or sliding contact and is self-lubricating and oxidation resistant up to and in excess of about 930 C. The composite is comprised of a metal component which lends strength and elasticity to the structure, a fluoride salt component which provides lubrication and, lastly, a glass component which not only provides oxidation protection to the metal but may also enhance the lubrication qualities of the composite.

  7. Friction and stem stiffness affect dynamic interface motion in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, J H; Huiskes, R

    1996-01-01

    Large cyclic movements between the femoral stem and bone during the first weeks after total hip arthroplasty may hamper bone ingrowth and adversely affect the eventual success of the arthroplasty. Little is known, however, about the magnitude of the motions and its relationship to design and surgical factors. A two-dimensional finite element model of a cementless prosthesis inserted into the proximal femur was constructed to study the effects of two mechanical variables--the stiffness of the implant and the coefficient of friction between bone and implant--on the magnitude of the motions. We investigated the influences of these variables on the subsidence of the prosthesis, the magnitudes of the cyclic motions, and the level of the interface stresses. The presence of friction reduced cyclic motions by about 85% compared with a frictionless interface. Once friction was assumed, varying the coefficient of friction had little effect. The effect of friction on the interface stress state and gross subsidence of the prosthesis was not as great as on cyclic motion. Implant stiffness also affected the magnitudes and distributions of the cyclic motions along the interface. A flexible stem generated motions about three to four times larger proximally than those of a stiff stem, which generated larger motions distally. The influence of stem stiffness on interface stresses and prosthetic subsidence was less than on cyclic motion. The location of the peak shear stresses at the interface around a bonded prosthesis corresponded to the location where cyclic interface motion was maximal for an unbonded prosthesis. However, no direct relationship was found between the magnitudes of peak stresses and the amplitudes of cyclic motions. PMID:8618164

  8. Poly(ethylene oxide) Mushrooms Adsorbed at Silica-Ionic Liquid Interfaces Reduce Friction.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, James; Webber, Grant B; Atkin, Rob

    2016-03-01

    The adsorbed layer conformation and lubricity of 35, 100, and 300 kDa PEO adsorbed to ionic liquid (IL)-silica interfaces from 0.01 wt % solutions have been investigated using colloid probe atomic force microscopy. The ILs used were propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]), which are protic and aprotic ILs, respectively. Normal force curves reveal steric interactions consistent with adsorbed polymer layers which are best fit using the mushroom model. Friction measurements show that the adsorbed polymer layer markedly reduces friction compared to surfaces sliding in the pure ILs and that lubricity increases with polymer length. When polymer is adsorbed to the sliding surfaces, friction is controlled by the creation and disruption of intermolecular interactions between entangled chains and the dragging of polymer chains through the interpenetration region. These experiments show that added polymer can reduce friction while maintaining the useful properties of ILs as lubricants. PMID:26844589

  9. Influence of the Tool Shoulder Contact Conditions on the Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doude, Haley R.; Schneider, Judy A.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2014-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSWing) is a solid-state joining process of special interest in joining alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. In order to optimize the process, various numeric modeling approaches have been pursued. Of importance to furthering modeling efforts is a better understanding of the contact conditions between the workpiece and the weld tool. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate the contact conditions between the workpiece and weld tool are unknown, possibly varying during the FSW process. To provide insight into the contact conditions, this study characterizes the material flow in the FSW nugget by embedding a lead (Pb) wire that melted at the FSWing temperature of aluminum alloy 2195. The Pb trace provided evidence of changes in material flow characteristics which were attributed to changes in the contact conditions between the weld tool and workpiece, as driven by temperature, as the tool travels the length of a weld seam.

  10. FASTSIM2: a second-order accurate frictional rolling contact algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollebregt, E. A. H.; Wilders, P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider the frictional (tangential) steady rolling contact problem. We confine ourselves to the simplified theory, instead of using full elastostatic theory, in order to be able to compute results fast, as needed for on-line application in vehicle system dynamics simulation packages. The FASTSIM algorithm is the leading technology in this field and is employed in all dominant railway vehicle system dynamics packages (VSD) in the world. The main contribution of this paper is a new version "FASTSIM2" of the FASTSIM algorithm, which is second-order accurate. This is relevant for VSD, because with the new algorithm 16 times less grid points are required for sufficiently accurate computations of the contact forces. The approach is based on new insights in the characteristics of the rolling contact problem when using the simplified theory, and on taking precise care of the contact conditions in the numerical integration scheme employed.

  11. Slipping and friction at the interface between two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivas, Vijayashree Parsi; Nicholl, Ryan; Bolotin, Kirill

    Friction at the macroscopic scale is primarily due to the surface roughness while at the atomic scale it is governed by commensurability and environmental conditions. Here, we investigate slipping and friction at the interface between two dissimilar two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and monolayer molybdenum disulfide. Such a system provides a powerful platform to study frictional forces at the atomic scale as chemical nature of the interface and commensurability between the layers can be varied with ease. To carry out such a study, a monolayer of e.g. graphene is exfoliated onto a flexible substrate material - polypropylene - and clamped down by evaporating titanium to avoid slippage. A monolayer of e.g. MoS2 is then transferred on top of graphene and the entire stack is strained using a four point bending apparatus. By measuring strain vs. bending via Raman spectroscopy, we detect slippage at graphene/MoS2 interface and characterize frictional forces as a function of interface parameters.

  12. Contact Force Compensated Thermal Stimulators for Holistic Haptic Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jai Kyoung; Cho, Young-Ho

    2016-05-01

    We present a contact force compensated thermal stimulator that can provide a consistent tempera- ture sensation on the human skin independent of the contact force between the thermal stimulator and the skin. Previous passive thermal stimulators were not capable of providing a consistent tem- perature on the human skin even when using identical heat source voltage due to an inconsistency of the heat conduction, which changes due to the force-dependent thermal contact resistance. We propose a force-based feedback method that monitors the contact force and controls the heat source voltage according to this contact force, thus providing consistent temperature on the skin. We composed a heat circuit model equivalent to the skin heat-transfer rate as it is changed by the contact forces; we obtained the optimal voltage condition for the constant skin heat-transfer rate independent of the contact force using a numerical estimation simulation tool. Then, in the experiment, we heated real human skin at the obtained heat source voltage condition, and investigated the skin heat transfer-rate by measuring the skin temperature at various times at different levels of contact force. In the numerical estimation results, the skin heat-transfer rate for the contact forces showed a linear profile in the contact force range of 1-3 N; from this profile we obtained the voltage equation for heat source control. In the experimental study, we adjusted the heat source voltage according to the contact force based on the obtained equation. As a result, without the heat source voltage control for the contact forces, the coefficients of variation (CV) of the skin heat-transfer rate in the contact force range of 1-3 N was found to be 11.9%. On the other hand, with the heat source voltage control for the contact forces, the CV of the skin heat-transfer rate in the contact force range of 1-3 N was found to be barely 2.0%, which indicate an 83.2% improvement in consistency compared to the skin heat

  13. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 2: Multi-Surface Contact

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems use multiple interfaces and a combination of enforcement methods to assess the basic functionality of the contact algorithms. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions during contact. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where multiple bodies interact with each other via multiple interfaces. The test problems focus on whether any ordering issues exist in the contact logic by using a combination of interface types, contact enforcement options (i.e., penalty, Lagrange, and kinematic), and element interactions within each problem. The influence of rigid materials on interface behavior is also examined. The companion report (McMichael, 2006) and associated test problems address the basic contact scenario where one contact surface exists between two disjoint bodies. The test problems are analyzed using version 5.2 (compiled on 12/22/2005) of DYNA3D. The analytical results are used to form baseline solutions for

  14. Friction and wear of iron-base binary alloys in sliding contact with silicon carbide in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Multipass sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron base binary alloys in contact with a single crystal silicon carbide surface in vacuum. Results indicate that the atomic size and concentration of alloy elements play important roles in controlling the transfer and friction properties of iron base binary alloys. Alloys having high solute concentration produce more transfer than do alloys having low solute concentration. The coefficient of friction during multipass sliding generally increases with an increase in the concentration of alloying element. The change of friction with succeeding passes after the initial pass also increases as the solute to iron, atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity.

  15. Dust Emission Induced By Friction Modifications At Tool Chip Interface In Dry Machining In MMC{sub p}

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Arnaud; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2011-01-17

    This paper investigates the relationship between dust emission and tribological conditions at the tool-chip interface when machining Metal Matrix composite reinforced with particles (MMCp) in dry mode. Machining generates aerosols that can easily be inhaled by workers. Aerosols may be composed of oil mist, tool material or alloying elements of workpiece material. Bar turning tests were conducted on a 2009 aluminum alloy reinforced with different level of Silicon Carbide particles (15, 25 and 35% of SiCp). Variety of PCD tools and nanostructured diamond coatings were used to analyze their performances on air pollution. A spectrometer was used to detect airborne aerosol particles in the size range between 0.3{mu}m to 20 {mu}m and to sort them in 15 size channels in real time. It was used to compare the effects of test parameters on dust emission. Observations of tool face and chip morphology reveal the importance of friction phenomena. It was demonstrated that level of friction modifies chip curvature and dust emission. The increase of level of reinforcement increase the chip segmentation and decrease the contact length and friction area. A ''running in'' phenomenon with important dust emission appeared with PCD tool due to the tool rake face flatness. In addition dust generation is more sensitive to edge integrity than power consumption.

  16. A damage mechanics based general purpose interface/contact element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengyong

    Most of the microelectronics packaging structures consist of layered substrates connected with bonding materials, such as solder or epoxy. Predicting the thermomechanical behavior of these multilayered structures is a challenging task in electronic packaging engineering. In a layered structure the most complex part is always the interfaces between the strates. Simulating the thermo-mechanical behavior of such interfaces, is the main theme of this dissertation. The most commonly used solder material, Pb-Sn alloy, has a very low melting temperature 180sp°C, so that the material demonstrates a highly viscous behavior. And, creep usually dominates the failure mechanism. Hence, the theory of viscoplasticity is adapted to describe the constitutive behavior. In a multilayered assembly each layer has a different coefficient of thermal expansion. Under thermal cycling, due to heat dissipated from circuits, interfaces and interconnects experience low cycle fatigue. Presently, the state-of-the art damage mechanics model used for fatigue life predictions is based on Kachanov (1986) continuum damage model. This model uses plastic strain as a damage criterion. Since plastic strain is a stress path dependent value, the criterion does not yield unique damage values for the same state of stress. In this dissertation a new damage evolution equation based on the second law of thermodynamic is proposed. The new criterion is based on the entropy of the system and it yields unique damage values for all stress paths to the final state of stress. In the electronics industry, there is a strong desire to develop fatigue free interconnections. The proposed interface/contact element can also simulate the behavior of the fatigue free Z-direction thin film interconnections as well as traditional layered interconnects. The proposed interface element can simulate behavior of a bonded interface or unbonded sliding interface, also called contact element. The proposed element was verified against

  17. Correlation between contact surface and friction during the optical glass polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkhir, N.; Aliouane, T.; Bouzid, D.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the correlation between the contact surface, the polishing pressure and the friction coefficient during the optical glass polishing. For this purpose, BK7 optical glass samples were polished and the mentioned parameters were measured to find a correlation between them. Several methods of characterization have been used; the mechanical profilometer, the AFM, and in addition setups for measuring forces and the contact surface have been developed and adapted to the polishing machine. The found results have shown the existence of a close relationship between the three parameters and the influence of each other. This have allowed to deduce that during the polishing process it is very important to control the contact pressure and the polisher form according to the pressure distribution in order to guarantee a very high quality of the polished surface.

  18. The metal to metal interface and its effect on adhesion and friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the interface, adhesion and friction properties of noble metals, platinum metals, Group IV (B) metals and transition metals were considered. The surface chemical activity of the noble and platinum metals is shown to effect metal to metal interfaces as does a valance bonding in the transition metals. With the Group IV (B) metals the degree of metallic nature of the elements is shown to effect interfacial behavior. The effect of surface segregation of alloy constituents such as silicon in iron and its influence on the metal to metal interface is discussed. In addition the effect of alloy constituents on changes in bulk properties such as transformations in tin are shown to effect interfacial adhesion and friction behavior.

  19. Modeling the Electrical Contact Resistance at Steel-Carbon Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimmo, Ayoola T.; Hassan, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    In the aluminum smelting industry, electrical contact resistance at the stub-carbon (steel-carbon) interface has been recurrently reported to be of magnitudes that legitimately necessitate concern. Mitigating this via finite element modeling has been the focus of a number of investigations, with the pressure- and temperature-dependent contact resistance relation frequently cited as a factor that limits the accuracy of such models. In this study, pressure- and temperature-dependent relations are derived from the most extensively cited works that have experimentally characterized the electrical contact resistance at these contacts. These relations are applied in a validated thermo-electro-mechanical finite element model used to estimate the voltage drop across a steel-carbon laboratory setup. By comparing the models' estimate of the contact electrical resistance with experimental measurements, we deduce the applicability of the different relations over a range of temperatures. The ultimate goal of this study is to apply mathematical modeling in providing pressure- and temperature-dependent relations that best describe the steel-carbon electrical contact resistance and identify the best fit relation at specific thermodynamic conditions.

  20. Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Yoshihiro; Clarke, Daryl D.; Ozeki, Shinichi

    Friction materials such as disk pads, brake linings, and clutch facings are widely used for automotive applications. Friction materials function during braking due to frictional resistance that transforms kinetic energy into thermal energy. There has been a rudimentary evolution, from materials like leather or wood to asbestos fabric or asbestos fabric saturated with various resins such as asphalt or resin combined with pitch. These efforts were further developed by the use of woven asbestos material saturated by either rubber solution or liquid resin binder and functioned as an internal expanding brake, similar to brake lining system. The role of asbestos continued through the use of chopped asbestos saturated by rubber, but none was entirely successful due to the poor rubber heat resistance required for increased speeds and heavy gearing demands of the automobile industry. The use of phenolic resins as binder for asbestos friction materials provided the necessary thermal resistance and performance characteristics. Thus, the utility of asbestos as the main friction component, for over 100 years, has been significantly reduced in friction materials due to asbestos identity as a carcinogen. Steel and other fibrous components have displaced asbestos in disk pads. Currently, non-asbestos organics are the predominate friction material. Phenolic resins continue to be the preferred binder, and increased amounts are necessary to meet the requirements of highly functional asbestos-free disk pads for the automotive industry. With annual automobile production exceeding 70 million vehicles and additional automobile production occurring in developing countries worldwide and increasing yearly, the amount of phenolic resin for friction material is also increasing (Fig. 14.1). Fig. 14.1 Worldwide commercial vehicle production

  1. Comninou contact zones for a crack parallel to an interface

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, P.F.; Gadi, K.S.; Erdogen, F.

    1995-12-31

    One of the interesting features in studying the state of stress in elastic solids near singular points, is the so called complex singularity that gives rise to an apparent local oscillatory behavior in the stress and displacement fields. The region in which this occurs is very small, much smaller than any plastic zone would be, and therefore the oscillations can be ignored in practical applications. Nevertheless, it is a matter of interesting theoretical investigation. The Comninou model of a small contact zone near the crack tip appears to correct for this anomaly within the framework of the linear theory. This model seems to make sense out of a {open_quotes}solution{close_quotes} that violates the boundary conditions. Erdogan and Joseph, showed (to themselves anyway) that the Comninou model actually has a physical basis. They considered a crack parallel to an interface where the order of the singularity is always real. With great care in solving the singular integral equations, it was shown that as the crack approaches the interface, a pinching effect is observed at the crack tip. This pinching effect proves that in the limit as the crack approaches the interface, the correct way to handle the problem is to consider crack surface contact. In this way, the issue of {open_quotes}oscillations{close_quotes} is never encountered for the interface crack problem. In the present study, the value of h/a that corresponds to crack closure (zero value of the stress intensity factor) will be determined for a given material pair for tensile loading. An asymptotic numerical method for the solution of singular integral equations making use of is used to obtain this result. Results for the crack opening displacement near the tip of the crack and the behavior of the stress intensity factor for cracks very close to the interface are presented. Among other interesting issues to be discussed, this solution shows that the semi-infinite crack parallel to an interface is closed.

  2. From flash heating to frictional melting: capturing the incipient microstructural development of experimental fault interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Kathryn; Cox, Stephen; Slagmolen, Bram; Forsyth, Perry; Shaddock, Daniel; Hawkins, Rhys; Fitz Gerald, John

    2016-04-01

    The propagation of seismic slip is often attributed to the activation of weakening mechanisms at high slip velocities, resulting from complex thermo-mechanical changes to asperities at the slip interface. Despite considerable experimental effort being directed towards understanding high-velocity fault behaviour, the mechanisms that drive the onset of instability and formative stages of weakening remain an area of considerable uncertainty. Here we present new evidence for the very rapid onset of microstructural changes on experimental faults surfaces that have been sheared over a range of slip velocities and under stress conditions comparable to upper- to mid-crustal conditions (σn = 92-320MPa). Experiments have been undertaken using pre-ground fault surfaces of Fontainebleau sandstone in a classic triaxial configuration. The traditional high-precision mechanical data of the gas-medium apparatus has been supplemented by the installation of a custom built interferometric sensor that provides microsecond resolution of displacement during stick-slip events. Deformed samples have been analysed using multiple techniques, including FE-SEM and FIB-TEM, that provide insights into physical and structural changes to asperity contacts over a range of scales. Significant findings include recognition of textures that capture the transition from mechanical amorphisation, to flash heating and the early stages of frictional melting. Our results include the formation of a partially amorphous nano-gouge layer during aseismic sliding, the development of amorphous zones at asperity tips and the generation of frictional melt during stick-slip. While the average fault temperature is estimated to remain well below the quartz solidus (~1700°C), we show that extreme localised heating occurs during all stick-slip events, with a clear correlation between slip velocity and the morphology of the amorphous material produced. These microstructural changes occur over slip distances that are

  3. Static and kinetic friction force and surface roughness of different archwire-bracket sliding contacts.

    PubMed

    Carrion-Vilches, Francisco J; Bermudez, María-Dolores; Fructuoso, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the static and kinetic friction forces of the contact bracket-archwire with different dental material compositions in order to select those materials with lower resistance to sliding. We carried out sliding friction tests by means of a universal testing machine following an experimental procedure as described in ASTM D1894 standard. We determined the static and kinetic friction forces under dry and lubricating conditions using an artificial saliva solution at 36.5ºC. The bracket-archwire pairs studied were: stainless steel-stainless steel; stainless steel-glass fiber composite; stainless steel-Nitinol 60; sapphire-stainless steel; sapphire-glass fiber composite; and sapphire-Nitinol 60. The best performance is obtained for Nitinol 60 archwire sliding against a stainless steel bracket, both under dry and lubricated conditions. These results are in agreement with the low surface roughness of Nitinol 60 with respect to the glass fiber composite archwire. The results described here contribute to establishing selection criteria for materials for dental archwire-brackets. PMID:26438988

  4. Experimental Study Of Thermal Sliding Contact With Friction : Application To High Speed Machining Of Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, E.; Bourouga, B.; Garnier, B.; Dubar, L.

    2007-04-01

    In High Speed Machining (HSM), thermomechanical events at the tool-workpiece interface are strongly coupled. They are characterized by extreme conditions of stress and strain as well as heating and heat gradients that it is advisable to control well for a good resolution of the thermomechanical problem. We present a first experimental approach based on friction tests. The conditions are similar to the ones occurring in the orthogonal cutting in terms of pressure at the nose and of the chip sliding velocity. The workpiece pressed on the tool is suddenly moved according to a selected speed and pressure. Experiments are carried out with XC38 metallic sample at the temperature of 900 K and a sliding velocity of 0,2 m/s. The thermal conditions at the workpiece-tool interface are estimated by means of temperature recordings and an inverse heat conduction method. Finally, the estimated heat flux is compared to the one obtained by mechanical way which considers the measured friction coefficient. This comparison is satisfactory.

  5. The effect of friction and impact angle on the spermatozoa-oocyte local contact dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hedrih, Andjelka; Banić, Milan

    2016-03-21

    Although a large proportion of biomolecules involved in spermatozoa-oocyte interaction has been discovered so far, many details of fertilization mechanism remain unknown. Both biochemical and biomechanical components exist in the fertilization process. Mammalian sperm evolved a ZP (zona pelucida) thrust reduction penetration strategy probably in response to the ZP resilient elasticity. Using a biomechanical approach and FEM analysis, local contact stress, ZP deformations during impact and attempt of sperm head penetration relative to different sperm impact angles (SIA) were studied. The sperm-oocyte contact was defined as non-linear frictional contact. A transient structural analysis at 37°C revealed that, from the mechanical standpoint there are SIA that are more favorable for possible ZP penetration due to larger equivalent stress of ZP. An "slip-stick" resembling effect was identified for almost all examined SIA. The sperm head-ZP contact area increases as SIA decreases. Favorable ZP-stress state for sperm penetration regarding SIA are discussed. PMID:26780648

  6. Relationship between the ideal tensile strength and the friction properties of metals in contact with nonmetals and themselves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The adhesion and friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. An estimate of the ideal uniaxial tensile was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the ideal tensile strength of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of real contact area and fault normal stiffness during frictional sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, N. M.; Nagata, K.; Kilgore, B. D.; Nakatani, M.

    2010-12-01

    The tectonic stresses that lead to earthquake slip are concentrated in small regions of solid contact between asperities or gouge particles within the fault. Fault strength is proportional to the contact area within the shearing portion of the fault zone and many fault properties of interest to earthquake hazard research, e.g., occurrence time, recurrence interval, precursory slip, triggered earthquake slip, are controlled by processes acting at the highly stressed contact regions. Unfortunately the contact-scale physical processes controlling earthquake occurrence cannot be easily observed or measured directly. In this pilot study we simultaneously directly measure contact area using transmitted light intensity (LI) [Dieterich and Kilgore, 1994; 1996] and continuously monitor the normal stiffness of the fault using acoustic wave transmission (AT) [Nagata et al., 2008]. The objective of our study is to determine relations amongst contacting area, stiffness, strength, normal stress, shear displacement, and time of contact during sliding. Interface stiffness is monitored using acoustic compressive waves transmitted across the fault. Because the fault is more compliant in compression than the surrounding rock, the fault has an elastic wave transmission coefficient that depends on the fault normal stiffness. Contact area is measured by LI: regions in contact transmit light efficiently while light is scattered elsewhere; therefore transmitted light intensity is presumed proportional to contact area. LI and AT are expected to be correlated; e.g., an elastic contact model suggests that stiffness goes as the square root of contact area. We observe LI and AT for sliding at slip speeds between 0.01 and 10 microns/s and normal stresses between 1 and 2.5 MPa while conducting standard velocity-step, normal stress-step and slide-hold-slide tests. AT and LI correlate during all tests, at all conditions. If the physical relationship, or even an empirical calibration between AT and

  8. A two-sided interface model for dissipation in structural systems with frictional joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jason D.; Dane Quinn, D.

    2009-03-01

    Modeling mechanical joints in an accurate and computationally efficient manner is of great importance in the analysis of structural systems, which can be composed of a large number of connected components. This work presents an interface model that can be decomposed into a series-series Iwan model together with an elastic chain, subject to interfacial shear loads. A reduced-order formulation of the resulting model is developed that significantly reduces the computational requirements for the simulation of frictional damping. Results are presented as the interface is subject to harmonic loading of varying amplitude. The models presented are able to qualitatively reproduce experimentally observed dissipation scalings. Finally, the interface models are embedded within a larger structural system to illustrate there effectiveness in capturing the structural damping induced by mechanical joints.

  9. Friction in unconforming grain contacts as a mechanism for tensorial stress strain hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, V.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    2007-04-01

    Materials composed of consolidated grains and/or containing internal contacts are widespread in everyday life (e.g. rocks, geomaterials, concretes, slates, ceramics, composites, etc.). For any simulation of the elastic behavior of this class of solids, be it in seismology, in NDT, or in the modeling of building constructions, the stress-strain constitutive equations are indispensable. Since the most common loading patterns in nature considerably deviate from simple uniaxial compression, the problem of tensorial stress-strain representation arises. In simple loading cases it may be sufficient to use a phenomenological constitutive model. However, in a more general case, phenomenological approaches encounter serious difficulties due to the high number of unknown parameters and the complexity of the model itself. Simplification of the phenomenology can help only partly, since it may require artificial assumptions. For instance, is it enough just to link the volumetric stress to the volumetric strain, or do we have to include shear components as well, and if yes, in what form? We therefore propose a physical tensorial stress-strain model, based on the consideration of plane cracks with friction. To do this, we combine known relations for normal displacements of crack faces given by contact mechanics, the classical Amonton's law of dry friction for lateral displacements, and the equations of elasticity theory for a collection of non-interacting cracks with given orientation. The major advantages of this model consist in the full tensorial representation, the realistic stress-strain curves for uniaxial stress compression and quantitative comparison with experimental data, and a profound account for hysteretic memory effects.

  10. Estimation of coefficient of friction for a mechanical system with combined rolling-sliding contact using vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Sriram; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2015-06-01

    A new dynamic experiment is proposed to estimate the coefficient of friction for a mechanical system with a combined rolling-sliding contact under a mixed lubrication regime. The experiment is designed and instrumented based on an analogous contact mechanics model, taking into consideration the constraints to ensure no impact and no sliding velocity reversal. The system consists of a cam (rotating with a constant speed) having a point contact with a follower that oscillates about a frictionless pivot, while maintaining contact with the cam with the help of a well-designed translational spring. The viscous damping elements for contact are identified for two different lubricants from an impulse test using the half-power bandwidth method. Dynamic responses (with the cam providing an input to the system) are measured in terms of the follower acceleration and the reaction forces at the follower pivot. A frequency domain based signal processing technique is proposed to estimate the coefficient of friction using the complex-valued Fourier amplitudes of the measured forces and acceleration. The coefficient of friction is estimated for the mechanical system with different surface roughnesses using two lubricants; these are also compared with similar values for both dry and lubricated cases as reported in the literature. An empirical relationship for the coefficient of friction is suggested based on a prior model under a mixed lubrication regime. Possible sources of errors in the estimation procedure are identified and quantified.

  11. Surface chemistry, friction and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to he surfaces of the ferrites in sliding.

  12. Friction and wear of single-crystal and polycrystalline maganese-zinc ferrite in contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal (SCF) and hot-pressed polycrystalline (HPF) manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with various metals. Results indicate that the coefficients of friction for SCF and HPF are related to the relative chemical activity of those metals in high vacuum. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for both SCF and HPF were the same and much higher in vacuum than in argon at atmospheric pressure. All the metals tested transferred to the surface of both SCF and HPF in sliding. Both SCF and HPF exhibited cracking and fracture with sliding. Cracking in SCF is dependent on crystallographic characteristics. In HPF, cracking depends on the orientation of the individual crystallites.

  13. On the role of scales in contact mechanics and friction between elastomers and randomly rough self-affine surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Valentin L.; Dimaki, Andrey; Psakhie, Sergey; Popov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to a qualitative analysis of friction of elastomers from the point of view of scales contributing to the force of friction. We argue that – contrary to widespread opinion – friction between a randomly rough self-affine fractal surface and an elastomer is not a multiscale phenomenon, but is governed mostly by the interplay of only two scales – as a rule the largest and the smallest scales of roughness of the contacting bodies. The hypothesis of two-scale character of elastomer friction is illustrated by computer simulations in the framework of the paradigm of Greenwood, Tabor and Grosch using a simplified one-dimensional model. PMID:26057466

  14. Analysis of cementless implants using interface nonlinear friction--experimental and finite element studies.

    PubMed

    Dammak, M; Shirazi-Adl, A; Zukor, D J

    1997-02-01

    Measured interface nonlinear friction properties are used to develop models to study the short-term fixation response of smooth- and porous-surfaced posts, bone screws, and plates fixed with and without posts/screws. Experimental studies are carried out to validate the model predictions and identify the relative role of posts and screws in fixation of a plate on a polyurethane block under symmetric/eccentric axial compression loads. The idealized Coulomb's friction is also used for the sake of comparison. The incorporation of measured nonlinear, rather than the idealized Coulomb, friction is essential to compute realistic results. For plate fixation, the experimental and finite element results show that the screw fixation yields the stiffest response followed by the smooth- and then porous-coated post fixation. For example, under 1000 N eccentric axial compression, the edge of the plate opposite the loaded edge is measured to lift by 1147 +/- 72, 244 +/- 38, or 112 +/- 28 microns, respectively, for the cases with no fixation, with smooth-surfaced posts, or with screws. The corresponding models predict, respectively, values of 1538, 347, or 259 microns and also 556 microns for the plate fixed with porous coated posts. The satisfactory agreement between numerical and experimental results confirms the importance of proper interface modelling for the analysis of posts, screws, and complex fixation systems. This becomes further evident when considering cementless implants in which the bone-implant interface exhibits relatively large displacements as the maximum resistance force is reached. The developed models can be used to investigate the post-operative short-term stability of various cementless implant designs. PMID:9001932

  15. Intelligent tires for identifying coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces using three-axis accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Kamai, Kazuto; Seki, Ryosuke

    2015-02-01

    Intelligent tires equipped with sensors as well as the monitoring of the tire/road contact conditions are in demand for improving vehicle control and safety. With the aim of identifying the coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces during driving, including during cornering, we develop an identification scheme for the coefficient of friction that involves estimation of the slip angle and applied force by using a single lightweight three-axis accelerometer attached on the inner surface of the tire. To validate the developed scheme, we conduct tire-rolling tests using an accelerometer-equipped tire with various slip angles on various types of road surfaces, including dry and wet surfaces. The results of these tests confirm that the estimated slip angle and applied force are reasonable. Furthermore, the identified coefficient of friction by the developed scheme agreed with that measured by standardized tests.

  16. A comparison of Coulomb and pseudo-Coulomb friction implementations: Application to the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M I; Hiley, M J; Yeadon, M R

    2011-10-13

    In the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting both dynamic and static friction act. The purpose of this study was to develop a method of simulating Coulomb friction that incorporated both dynamic and static phases and to compare the results with those obtained using a pseudo-Coulomb implementation of friction when applied to the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting. Kinematic data were obtained from an elite level gymnast performing handspring straight somersault vaults using a Vicon optoelectronic motion capture system. An angle-driven computer model of vaulting that simulated the interaction between a seven segment gymnast and a single segment vaulting table during the table contact phase of the vault was developed. Both dynamic and static friction were incorporated within the model by switching between two implementations of the tangential frictional force. Two vaulting trials were used to determine the model parameters using a genetic algorithm to match simulations to recorded performances. A third independent trial was used to evaluate the model and close agreement was found between the simulation and the recorded performance with an overall difference of 13.5%. The two-state simulation model was found to be capable of replicating performance at take-off and also of replicating key contact phase features such as the normal and tangential motion of the hands. The results of the two-state model were compared to those using a pseudo-Coulomb friction implementation within the simulation model. The two-state model achieved similar overall results to those of the pseudo-Coulomb model but obtained solutions more rapidly. PMID:21889150

  17. In vitro investigation of friction at the interface between bone and a surgical instrument.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Jugal; Shepherd, Duncan E T; Hukins, David W L; Hingley, Carl; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the friction between surgical instruments and bone to aid improvements to instrument design. The bases of orthopaedic surgical instruments are usually made of metal, especially stainless steel. Silicone elastomer was chosen as an alternate biocompatible material, which would be compliant on the bone surface when used as the base of an instrument. The coefficient of static friction was calculated at the bone/material interface in the presence of a synthetic solution that had a comparable viscosity to that of blood, to assess the friction provided by each base material. Three types of silicone elastomers with different hardnesses (Shore A hardness 23, 50 and 77) and three distinct stainless steel surfaces (obtained by spark erosion, sand blasting and surface grinding) were used to assess the friction provided by the materials on slippery bone. The bone specimens were taken from the flattest region of the femoral shaft of a bovine femur; the outer surfaces of the specimens were kept intact. In general, the stainless steel surfaces exhibited higher values of coefficient of static friction, compared to the silicone elastomer samples. The stainless steel surface finished by spark erosion (surface roughness Ra  = 8.9 ± 1.6 µm) had the highest coefficient value of 0.74 ± 0.04. The coefficient values for the silicone elastomer sample with the highest hardness (Dow Corning Silastic Q7-4780, Shore A hardness 77) was not significantly different to values provided by the stainless steel surface finished by sand blasting (surface roughness Ra  = 2.2 ± 0.1 µm) or surface grinding (surface roughness Ra  = 0.1 ± 0.0 µm). Based on the results of this study, it is concluded that silicone could be a potentially useful material for the design of bases of orthopaedic instruments that interface with bone. PMID:23636757

  18. Effect of normal load and roughness on the nanoscale friction coefficient in the elastic and plastic contact regime.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aditya; Staedler, Thorsten; Jiang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The influence of applied normal load and roughness on the tribological behavior between the indenter and sample surface during nanoindentation-based scratching has been experimentally investigated by using different surfaces (fused silica and diamond-like carbon) featuring various degrees of roughness. At a sufficiently low applied normal load, wherein the contact is elastic, the friction coefficient is constant. However, at increased normal loads the contact involves plastic deformation and the friction coefficient increases with increasing normal load. The critical load range for a transition from predominantly elastic to plastic contact, between the indenter and sample surface, increases with increasing size of indenter and decreases with roughness. Distinct differences between the present experimental results and the existing theoretical models/predictions are discussed. PMID:23400754

  19. Combined friction force microscopy and quantum chemical investigation of the tribotronic response at the propylammonium nitrate-graphite interface.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Atkin, R; Page, A J

    2015-06-28

    The energetic origins of the variation in friction with potential at the propylammonium nitrate-graphite interface are revealed using friction force microscopy (FFM) in combination with quantum chemical simulations. For boundary layer lubrication, as the FFM tip slides energy is dissipated via (1) boundary layer ions and (2) expulsion of near-surface ion layers from the space between the surface and advancing tip. Simulations reveal how changing the surface potential changes the ion composition of the boundary and near surface layer, which controls energy dissipation through both pathways, and thus the friction. PMID:26027558

  20. Micromechanical modeling of the cement-bone interface: the effect of friction, morphology and material properties on the micromechanical response

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface, the effect of parametric variations of frictional, morphological and material properties on the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface were analyzed using a finite element approach. Finite element models of a cement-bone interface specimen were created from micro-computed tomography data of a physical specimen that was sectioned from an in vitro cemented total hip arthroplasty. In five models the friction coefficient was varied (μ= 0.0; 0.3; 0.7; 1.0 and 3.0), while in one model an ideally bonded interface was assumed. In two models cement interface gaps and an optimal cement penetration were simulated. Finally, the effect of bone cement stiffness variations was simulated (2.0 and 2.5 GPa, relative to the default 3.0 GPa). All models were loaded for a cycle of fully reversible tension-compression. From the simulated stress-displacement curves the interface deformation, stiffness and hysteresis were calculated. The results indicate that in the current model the mechanical properties of the cement-bone interface were caused by frictional phenomena at the shape-closed interlock rather than by adhesive properties of the cement. Our findings furthermore show that in our model maximizing cement penetration improved the micromechanical response of the cement-bone interface stiffness, while interface gaps had a detrimental effect. Relative to the frictional and morphological variations, variations in the cement stiffness had only a modest effect on the micromechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface. The current study provides information that may help to better understand the load transfer mechanisms taking place at the cement-bone interface. PMID:18848699

  1. Simulations of solid-liquid friction at ice-Ih/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louden, Patrick B.; Gezelter, J. Daniel

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated the structural and dynamic properties of the basal and prismatic facets of the ice Ih/water interface when the solid phase is drawn through the liquid (i.e., sheared relative to the fluid phase). To impose the shear, we utilized a velocity-shearing and scaling approach to reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. This method can create simultaneous temperature and velocity gradients and allow the measurement of transport properties at interfaces. The interfacial width was found to be independent of the relative velocity of the ice and liquid layers over a wide range of shear rates. Decays of molecular orientational time correlation functions gave similar estimates for the width of the interfaces, although the short- and longer-time decay components behave differently closer to the interface. Although both facets of ice are in "stick" boundary conditions in liquid water, the solid-liquid friction coefficients were found to be significantly different for the basal and prismatic facets of ice.

  2. Friction and metal transfer for single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. Results indicate the coefficient of friction for a silicon carbide-metal system is related to the d bond character and relative chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of silicon carbide in sliding. The chemical activity of metal to silicon and carbon and shear modulus of the metal may play important roles in metal transfer and the form of the wear debris. The less active and greater resistance to shear the metal has, with the exception of rhodium and tungsten, the less transfer to silicon carbide.

  3. Adaptive contact elements for three-dimensional fluid-structure interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element method is developed for treating the mechanics of contact between two deformable bodies which occurs, for example, at fluid-structure interfaces. The method uses a family of adaptive contact elements, which are based upon the penalty method, to handle all of the possible contact configurations that can occur between the discretized contacting bodies. The contact element's nodal connectivity is allowed to change during the computations in order to accommodate finite sliding. The infusion of these elements in the interface results in satisfying the force equilibrium condition during contact. The methodology has been implemented into the NEPTUNE code. Results are presented for an illustrative problem.

  4. Study the friction behaviour of poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] brush with AFM probes in contact mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftari, Maryam; Zhang, Zhenyu; Leggett, Graham J.; Geoghegan, Mark

    2011-10-01

    We have studied the frictional behaviour of grafted poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) films using friction force microscopy (FFM). The films were prepared on native oxide-terminated silicon substrates using the technique of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). We show that single asperity contact mechanics (Johnson-Kendall-Roberts(JKR) and Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov(DMT)) as well as a linear (Amontons) relation between applied load and frictional load depending on the pH of the FFM probe. Measurements were made using functionalized and unfunctionalized silicon nitride triangular probes. Functionalized probes included gold-coated probes, and ones coated with a self-assembled monolayer of dodecanethiol (DDT). The frictional behaviour between PDMAEMA and all tips immersed in pH from 3 to 11 are corresponded to the DMT or JKR model and are linear in pH=1, 2, and 12. These results show that contact mechanics of polyelectrolytes in water is complex and strongly dependent on the environmental pH.

  5. Frictional sliding at a compressed polycrystalline 50 nm grain size Al-Al interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Ravelo, R. J.; Germann, T. C.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of large-scale NEMD simulations for a polycrystalline Al-Al interface sliding at a relative velocity of 60 m/s and a pressure of 15 GPa with a boundary temperature of 300K. The sample consisted of annealed grains, 125 grains on either side of the initial sliding interface, with dimensions of 2x(236) nm in the normal direction and 236 nm in the periodic sliding and transverse directions. Simulation times were of order 20 ns and the sample had 1.8B atoms interacting with an Al-EAM potential. The initial grain structure evolves to a complex dynamic steady state grain morphology that is very different from the initial grain structure and is characterized by large plastic strains and strain rates in a deformation region of thickness 150 nm at the interface in the normal direction. The steady state shows a sequence of grain growth and refinement and a highly strained graded microstructure. This behavior is similar to that seen in simulations for 13 and 20 nm grains and a mesoscale model that takes into account the large plastic strains and strain rates, and the size of the deformation region is able to reproduce the values of the frictional force per unit area. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. The support of the LANL ASC-PEM program is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Thermal contact conductance between solid interfaces under low temperature and vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Youming; Sun, Heng; Xu, Lie; Feng, Haidong; Zhu, Hongmei

    2004-09-01

    In this article, an experimental device used for thermal contact conductance tests under low temperature and vacuum was demonstrated in detail, which may be used to simulate the real environment of some solid materials, such as stainless steel, or aluminum in a space satellite. Thermal contact conductance experiments of stainless steel, of aluminum, and between stainless steel and aluminum were made for 0.02 Pa and 100-330 K. The relationships of thermal contact conductance to the contact loading pressure and to the temperature were measured. It is demonstrated that the thermal contact conductance between stainless steel, aluminum, between stainless steel, and aluminum contacts rises with the temperature increase of the contact interface, as well as the loading pressure increase of the contact interface. The thermal contact conductance of aluminum is larger than that of stainless steel for the same temperature and same loading pressure of the contact interface. The thermal contact conductance between stainless steel and aluminum is close to that between aluminum contacts at the same temperature and same loading pressure of the contact interface.

  7. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber–glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2016-06-01

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons’ law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements.

  8. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber–glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons’ law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements. PMID:27291939

  9. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber-glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions.

    PubMed

    Tuononen, Ari J

    2016-01-01

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons' law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements. PMID:27291939

  10. Head-disk interface nanotribology for Tbit/inch2 recording densities: near-contact and contact recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakis, Antonis I.; Polycarpou, Andreas A.

    2010-06-01

    In the effort to achieve Tbit/inch2 recording densities, thermal fly-height control (TFC) nanotechnology was developed to effectively reduce the clearance (which is of the order of a few nanometres) at the head-disk interface (HDI) of hard-disk drives. In this work, we present a model of the HDI that can predict the dynamic flying and nanotribological contacting behaviour, allowing for accurate predictions and characterization of the operating regime as a function of TFC actuation. A geometric model for TFC is presented and an improved definition of contact at the interface is developed in the presence of nanoscale topographical roughness and dynamic microwaviness. A new methodology is proposed for the calculation of the nominal area of contact, which affects both near- and at-contact behaviour, while the stiffening of the air bearing force with TFC actuation is also accounted for. Slider behaviour is analysed by quantifying the approach, jump-to-contact, lubricant and solid contact regimes of operation and identifying the critical and optimum TFC actuations. The feasibility of near-contact, light molecularly thin lubricant contact versus solid contact recording is explored under the effect of the interfacial forces and stresses present at the HDI. The clearance and the state of vibrations are analysed and design guidelines are proposed for improved performance.

  11. Overall contact conductance of a prototype Parallel Fin Thermal Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stobb, C. A.; Limardo, Jose G.

    1992-01-01

    The Parallel Fin Thermal Interface has been developed and tested as an orbital replaceable interface. The interface consists of two identical plates with pairs of opposing parallel straight fins. Each pair of fins is sandwiched between two insert plates pressed against the fins with enough force for good heat transfer through the interface. Two prototype parallel fin interfaces were built (Model 140 and 380) with different fin and insert plate dimensions. Samples of the interfacing surfaces were found to have roughness values ranging from 22 to 35 microinches. Overall interface conductance (Hc) values of 46.7 to 74.2 Btu/hr sq ft-F were obtained for the 140 model in vacuum with an interface pressure from 18.8 to 37.5 psi, respectively. The Model 380 exhibited Hc values from 31.2 to 46.8 Btu/hr sq ft-F in vacuum, with respective interface pressures of 14.2 and 22.0 psi. Several correlations were found to agree with test data to within 20 percent.

  12. Optical modeling of a-Si:H solar cells with rough interfaces: Effect of back contact and interface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, M.; van Swaaij, R. A. C. M. M.; Metselaar, J. W.; Schropp, R. E. I.

    2000-12-01

    An approach to study the optical behavior of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells with rough interfaces using computer modeling is presented. In this approach the descriptive haze parameters of a light scattering interface are related to the root mean square roughness of the interface. Using this approach we investigated the effect of front window contact roughness and back contact material on the optical properties of a single junction a-Si:H superstrate solar cell. The simulation results for a-Si:H solar cells with SnO2:F as a front contact and ideal Ag, ZnO/Ag, and Al/Ag as a back contact are shown. For cells with an absorber layer thickness of 150-600 nm the simulations demonstrate that the gain in photogenerated current density due to the use of a textured superstrate is around 2.3 mA cm-2 in comparison to solar cells with flat interfaces. The effect of the front and back contact roughness on the external quantum efficiency (QE) of the solar cell for different parts of the light spectrum was determined. The choice of the back contact strongly influences the QE and the absorption in the nonactive layers for the wavelengths above 650 nm. A practical Ag back contact can be successfully simulated by introducing a thin buffer layer between the n-type a-Si:H and Ag back contact, which has optical properties similar to Al, indicating that the actual reflection at the n-type a-Si:H/Ag interface is smaller than what is expected from the respective bulk optical parameters. In comparison to the practical Ag contact the QE of the cell can be strongly improved by using a ZnO layer at the Ag back contact or an ideal Ag contact. The photogenerated current densities for a solar cell with a 450 nm thick intrinsic a-Si:H layer with ZnO/Ag and ideal Ag are 16.7 and 17.3 mA cm-2, respectively, compared to 14.4 mA cm-2 for the practical Ag back contact. The effect of increasing the roughness of the contact interfaces was investigated for both superstrate and substrate types

  13. Evaluation of Contact Friction in Fracture of Rotationally Bent Nitinol Endodontic Files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimed, Tariq Abu

    2011-12-01

    The high flexibility of rotary Nitinol (Ni-Ti) files has helped clinicians perform root canal treatments with fewer technical errors than seen with stainless steel files. However, intracanal file fracture can occur, compromising the outcome of the treatment. Ni-Ti file fracture incidence is roughly around 4% amongst specialists and higher amongst general practitioners. Therefore, eliminating or reducing this problem should improve patient care. The aim of this project was to isolate and examine the role of friction between files and the canal walls of the glass tube model, and bending-related maximum strain amplitudes, on Ni-Ti file lifetimes-tofracture in the presence of different irrigant solutions and file coatings. A specifically designed device was used to test over 300 electropolished EndoSequenceRTM Ni-Ti files for number of cycles to failure (NCF) in smooth, bent glass tube models at 45 and 60 degrees during dry, coated and liquid-lubricated rotation at 600rpm. Fractured files were examined under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) afterwards. Four different file sizes 25.04, 25.06, 35.04, 35.06 (diameter in mm/taper %) and six surface modification conditions were used independently. These conditions included, three solutions; (1) a surfactant-based solution, Surface-Active-Displacement-Solution (SADS), (2) a mouth wash proven to remove biofilms, Delmopinol 1%(DEL), and (3) Bleach 6% (vol.%), the most common antibacterial endodontic irrigant solution. The conditions also included two low-friction silane-based coating groups, 3-Hepta-fluoroisopropyl-propoxymethyl-dichlorosilane (3-HEPT) and Octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODS), in addition to an as-received file control group (Dry). The coefficient of friction (CF) between the file and the canal walls for each condition was measured as well as the surface tension of the irrigant solutions and the critical surface tension of the coated and uncoated files by contact angle measurements. The radius of curvature and

  14. Slow slip and the transition from fast to slow fronts in the rupture of frictional interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Scheibert, Julien; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Amundsen, David Skålid; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The failure of the population of microjunctions forming the frictional interface between two solids is central to fields ranging from biomechanics to seismology. This failure is mediated by the propagation along the interface of various types of rupture fronts, covering a wide range of velocities. Among them are the so-called slow fronts, which are recently discovered fronts much slower than the materials’ sound speeds. Despite intense modeling activity, the mechanisms underlying slow fronts remain elusive. Here, we introduce a multiscale model capable of reproducing both the transition from fast to slow fronts in a single rupture event and the short-time slip dynamics observed in recent experiments. We identify slow slip immediately following the arrest of a fast front as a phenomenon sufficient for the front to propagate further at a much slower pace. Whether slow fronts are actually observed is controlled both by the interfacial stresses and by the width of the local distribution of forces among microjunctions. Our results show that slow fronts are qualitatively different from faster fronts. Because the transition from fast to slow fronts is potentially as generic as slow slip, we anticipate that it might occur in the wide range of systems in which slow slip has been reported, including seismic faults. PMID:24889640

  15. Slow slip and the transition from fast to slow fronts in the rupture of frictional interfaces.

    PubMed

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Scheibert, Julien; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Amundsen, David Skålid; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-06-17

    The failure of the population of microjunctions forming the frictional interface between two solids is central to fields ranging from biomechanics to seismology. This failure is mediated by the propagation along the interface of various types of rupture fronts, covering a wide range of velocities. Among them are the so-called slow fronts, which are recently discovered fronts much slower than the materials' sound speeds. Despite intense modeling activity, the mechanisms underlying slow fronts remain elusive. Here, we introduce a multiscale model capable of reproducing both the transition from fast to slow fronts in a single rupture event and the short-time slip dynamics observed in recent experiments. We identify slow slip immediately following the arrest of a fast front as a phenomenon sufficient for the front to propagate further at a much slower pace. Whether slow fronts are actually observed is controlled both by the interfacial stresses and by the width of the local distribution of forces among microjunctions. Our results show that slow fronts are qualitatively different from faster fronts. Because the transition from fast to slow fronts is potentially as generic as slow slip, we anticipate that it might occur in the wide range of systems in which slow slip has been reported, including seismic faults. PMID:24889640

  16. Effect of oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride on friction behavior of copper-iron contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with an iron rider on a copper disk and a copper rider on an iron disk. The sputter cleaned iron and copper disk surfaces were saturated with oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride at atmospheric pressure. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor the surfaces. Lower friction was obtained in all experiments with the copper rider sliding on the iron disk than when the couple was reversed. For both iron and copper disks, methyl mercaptan gave the best surface coverage and was most effective in reducing friction. For both iron and copper disks, methyl chloride was the least effective in reducing friction. With sliding, copper transferred to iron and iron to copper.

  17. Investigation of Wear and Friction Properties Under Sliding Conditions of Some Materials Suitable for Cages of Rolling-Contact Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Bisson, Edmond E

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of wear and friction properties of a number of materials sliding against SAE 52100 steel was conducted. These materials included brass, bronze, beryllium copper, monel, nichrome v, 24s-t aluminum, nodular iron, and gray cast iron. The metals investigated may be useful as possible cage (separator or retainer) materials for rolling-contact bearings of high-speed turbine engines. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding is a most important factor in both dry friction and boundary lubrication. On the basis of wear and resistance to welding only, the cast irons were the most promising materials investigated; they showed the least wear and the least tendency to surface failure when run dry, and when boundary lubricated they showed the highest load capacity. On the basis of mechanical properties, nodular iron is superior to gray cast iron. Bronze had the lowest friction coefficient under dry sliding conditions. The results with brass, beryllium copper, and aluminum were poor and these materials do not appear, with regard to friction and wear, to be suitable for cages.

  18. Determination of oral mucosal Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction from in-vivo contact pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Suenaga, Hanako; Hogg, Michael; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Despite their considerable importance to biomechanics, there are no existing methods available to directly measure apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient of oral mucosa. This study aimed to develop an inverse procedure to determine these two biomechanical parameters by utilizing in vivo experiment of contact pressure between partial denture and beneath mucosa through nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis and surrogate response surface (RS) modelling technique. First, the in vivo denture-mucosa contact pressure was measured by a tactile electronic sensing sheet. Second, a 3D FE model was constructed based on the patient CT images. Third, a range of apparent Poisson's ratios and the coefficients of friction from literature was considered as the design variables in a series of FE runs for constructing a RS surrogate model. Finally, the discrepancy between computed in silico and measured in vivo results was minimized to identify the best matching Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction. The established non-invasive methodology was demonstrated effective to identify such biomechanical parameters of oral mucosa and can be potentially used for determining the biomaterial properties of other soft biological tissues. PMID:26024011

  19. Numerical analysis of effects of mold features and contact friction on cavity filling in the nanoimprinting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocheng, H.; Nien, C. C.

    2006-01-01

    Nanoimprinting has been recognized as a highly potential method of volume production for nanoscale devices. In the nanoimprinting process, the filling process of the mold cavity plays a key role in determining the productivity of the nanoimprinting process and the quality of the final imprint product. A defective filling of the mold affects the uniformity, precision, and throughput of the imprint. The mold filling is subjected to the applied imprinting pressure and temperature, repetitive mold use, mold sticking, or factors regarding mold features. It involves physical contact between the mold and the polymer layer on the substrate surface; thus, how the polymer fills up the cavity is of major interest and is vital in pattern transfer. The proposed study employs a finite element model for the single mold cavity to simulate the nanoimprint process. The mold is assumed to be a linear elastic body and the polymer preheated above its glass transition temperature is considered to be nonlinear elastic, described by the Mooney-Rivlin model. The numerical model is able to predict the mold filling at any nanoimprint stage and the mold cavity with various aspect ratios. To study the effects of pattern density and contact friction existing between the mold and polymer during the mold filling of the nanoimprinting process, an imprint mold with mixed pattern density is simulated and a sensitivity analysis of a contact friction coefficient on the mold filling is performed. Both the cavity feature and pattern density have significant effects on mold filling of the nanoimprinting process, while the contact friction coefficient has a mild effect. The obtained results support the development of a process recipe and automatic large-scale industrial production for nanoimprinting.

  20. Friction, wear, and noise of slip ring and brush contacts for synchronous satellite use.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, N. E.; Cole, S. R.; Glossbrenner, E. W.; Vest, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    A program is being conducted for testing of slip rings for synchronous orbit application. Instrumentation systems necessary for monitoring electrical noise, friction, and brush wear at atmospheric pressure and at less than 50 nanotorr have been developed. A multiplex scheme necessary for the simultaneous recording of brush displacement, friction, and electrical noise has also been developed. Composite brushes consisting of silver-molybdenum disulfide-graphite and silver-niobium diselenide-graphite have been employed on rings of coin silver and rhodium plate. Brush property measurements made included measurement of density, electrical resistivity, shear strength, and microstructure.

  1. The friction and wear of metals and binary alloys in contact with an abrasive grit of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various metals and iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh and W) in contact with single crystal silicon carbide riders. Results indicate that the friction force in the plowing of metal and the groove height (corresponding to the wear volume of the groove) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. The coefficient of friction and groove height generally decrease, and the contact pressure increases with an increase in solute content of binary alloys. There appears to be very good correlation of the solute to iron atomic ratio with the decreasing rate of change of coefficient of friction, the decreasing rate of change of groove height and the increasing rate of change of contact pressure with increasing solute content. These rates of change increase as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity.

  2. Sugary interfaces mitigate contact damage where stiff meets soft

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hee Young; Iordachescu, Mihaela; Huang, Jun; Hennebert, Elise; Kim, Sangsik; Rho, Sangchul; Foo, Mathias; Flammang, Patrick; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Daehee; Waite, J. Herbert; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    The byssal threads of the fan shell Atrina pectinata are non-living functional materials intimately associated with living tissue, which provide an intriguing paradigm of bionic interface for robust load-bearing device. An interfacial load-bearing protein (A. pectinata foot protein-1, apfp-1) with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-containing and mannose-binding domains has been characterized from Atrina's foot. apfp-1 was localized at the interface between stiff byssus and the soft tissue by immunochemical staining and confocal Raman imaging, implying that apfp-1 is an interfacial linker between the byssus and soft tissue, that is, the DOPA-containing domain interacts with itself and other byssal proteins via Fe3+–DOPA complexes, and the mannose-binding domain interacts with the soft tissue and cell membranes. Both DOPA- and sugar-mediated bindings are reversible and robust under wet conditions. This work shows the combination of DOPA and sugar chemistry at asymmetric interfaces is unprecedented and highly relevant to bionic interface design for tissue engineering and bionic devices. PMID:27305949

  3. Sugary interfaces mitigate contact damage where stiff meets soft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hee Young; Iordachescu, Mihaela; Huang, Jun; Hennebert, Elise; Kim, Sangsik; Rho, Sangchul; Foo, Mathias; Flammang, Patrick; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Daehee; Waite, J. Herbert; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-06-01

    The byssal threads of the fan shell Atrina pectinata are non-living functional materials intimately associated with living tissue, which provide an intriguing paradigm of bionic interface for robust load-bearing device. An interfacial load-bearing protein (A. pectinata foot protein-1, apfp-1) with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-containing and mannose-binding domains has been characterized from Atrina's foot. apfp-1 was localized at the interface between stiff byssus and the soft tissue by immunochemical staining and confocal Raman imaging, implying that apfp-1 is an interfacial linker between the byssus and soft tissue, that is, the DOPA-containing domain interacts with itself and other byssal proteins via Fe3+-DOPA complexes, and the mannose-binding domain interacts with the soft tissue and cell membranes. Both DOPA- and sugar-mediated bindings are reversible and robust under wet conditions. This work shows the combination of DOPA and sugar chemistry at asymmetric interfaces is unprecedented and highly relevant to bionic interface design for tissue engineering and bionic devices.

  4. Sugary interfaces mitigate contact damage where stiff meets soft.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hee Young; Iordachescu, Mihaela; Huang, Jun; Hennebert, Elise; Kim, Sangsik; Rho, Sangchul; Foo, Mathias; Flammang, Patrick; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Daehee; Waite, J Herbert; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    The byssal threads of the fan shell Atrina pectinata are non-living functional materials intimately associated with living tissue, which provide an intriguing paradigm of bionic interface for robust load-bearing device. An interfacial load-bearing protein (A. pectinata foot protein-1, apfp-1) with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-containing and mannose-binding domains has been characterized from Atrina's foot. apfp-1 was localized at the interface between stiff byssus and the soft tissue by immunochemical staining and confocal Raman imaging, implying that apfp-1 is an interfacial linker between the byssus and soft tissue, that is, the DOPA-containing domain interacts with itself and other byssal proteins via Fe3(+)-DOPA complexes, and the mannose-binding domain interacts with the soft tissue and cell membranes. Both DOPA- and sugar-mediated bindings are reversible and robust under wet conditions. This work shows the combination of DOPA and sugar chemistry at asymmetric interfaces is unprecedented and highly relevant to bionic interface design for tissue engineering and bionic devices. PMID:27305949

  5. Adhesive Wear and Frictional Behavior of Multilayered Polyester Composite Based on Betelnut Fiber Mats Under Wet Contact Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, B. F.; Devadas, Alvin; Yusaf, Talal F.

    In the current study, a multilayered polyester composite based on betelnut fiber mats is fabricated. The adhesive wear and frictional performance of the composite was studied against a smooth stainless steel at different sliding distances (0-6.72 km) and applied loads (20-200 N) at 2.8 m/s sliding velocity. Variations in specific wear rate and friction coefficient were evaluated at two different orientations of fiber mat; namely parallel (P-O) and normal (N-O). Results obtained were presented against sliding distance. The worn surfaces of the composite were studied using an optical microscope. The effect of the composite sliding on the stainless steel counterface roughness was investigated. The results revealed that the wear performance of betelnut fiber reinforced polyester (BFRP) composite under wet contact condition was highly dependent on test parameters and fiber mat orientation. The specific wear rate performance for each orientation showed an inverse relationship to sliding distance. BFRP composite in N-O exhibited better wear performance compared with P-O. However, the friction coefficient in N-O was higher than that in P-O at lower range of applied load. The predominant wear mechanism was debonding of fiber with no pullout or ploughing. Moreover, at higher applied loads, micro- and macrocracking and fracture were observed in the resinous region.

  6. Lifetime limitations of ohmic, contacting RF MEMS switches with Au, Pt and Ir contact materials due to accumulation of ‘friction polymer’ on the contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplewski, David A.; Nordquist, Christopher D.; Dyck, Christopher W.; Patrizi, Gary A.; Kraus, Garth M.; Cowan, William D.

    2012-10-01

    We present lifetime limitations and failure analysis of many packaged RF MEMS ohmic contacting switches with Au-Au, Au-Ir, and Au-Pt contact materials operating with 100 µN of contact force per contact in hermetically sealed glass wall packages. All metals were tested using the same switch design in a controlled environment to provide a comparison between the performance of the different materials and their corresponding failure mechanisms. The switch lifetimes of the different contact materials varied from several hundred cycles to 200 million cycles with different mechanisms causing failures for different contact materials. Switches with Au-Au contacts failed due to adhesion when thoroughly cleaned while switches with dissimilar metal contacts (Au-Ir and Au-Pt) operated without adhesion failures but failed due to carbon accumulation on the contacts even in a clean, packaged environment as a result of the catalytic behavior of the contact materials. Switch lifetimes correlated inversely with catalytic behavior of the contact metals. The data suggests the path to increase switch lifetime is to use favorable catalytic materials as contacts, design switches with higher contact forces to break through any residual contamination, and use cleaner, probably smaller, packages.

  7. Role of bulk and of interface contacts in the behavior of lattice model dimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Tiana, G; Provasi, D; Broglia, R A

    2003-05-01

    Some dimeric proteins first fold and then dimerize (three-state dimers) while others first dimerize and then fold (two-state dimers). Within the framework of a minimal lattice model, we can distinguish between sequences following one or the other mechanism on the basis of the distribution of the ground state energy between bulk and interface contacts. The topology of contacts is very different for the bulk than for the interface: while the bulk displays a rich network of interactions, the dimer interface is built up of a set of essentially independent contacts. Consequently, the two sets of interactions play very different roles both, in the folding and in the evolutionary history of the protein. Three-state dimers, where a large fraction of energy is concentrated in few contacts buried in the bulk, and where the relative contact energy of interface contacts is considerably smaller than that associated with bulk contacts, fold according to a hierarchical pathway controlled by local elementary structures, as also happens in the folding of single-domain monomeric proteins. On the other hand, two-state dimers display a relative contact energy of interface contacts, which is larger than the corresponding quantity associated with the bulk. In this case, the assembly of the interface stabilizes the system and leads the two chains to fold. The specific properties of three-state dimers acquired through evolution are expected to be more robust than those of two-state dimers; a fact that has consequences on proteins connected with viral diseases. PMID:12786180

  8. On the moving contact line singularity: asymptotics of a diffuse-interface model.

    PubMed

    Sibley, David N; Nold, Andreas; Savva, Nikos; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2013-03-01

    The behaviour of a solid-liquid-gas system near the three-phase contact line is considered using a diffuse-interface model with no-slip at the solid and where the fluid phase is specified by a continuous density field. Relaxation of the classical approach of a sharp liquid-gas interface and careful examination of the asymptotic behaviour as the contact line is approached is shown to resolve the stress and pressure singularities associated with the moving contact line problem. Various features of the model are scrutinised, alongside extensions to incorporate slip, finite-time relaxation of the chemical potential, or a precursor film at the wall. PMID:23515762

  9. A substitute model of two-dimensional dry friction exposed to dither generated by rolling contact of wheel and rail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Jerzy

    2012-10-01

    Dither generated by rolling contact of wheel and rail smoothes dry friction damping provided by the primary suspension dampers of freight wagons and it should be taken into account in numerical simulations. But numerically the problem is non-smooth and this leads to long execution time during simulation, especially when the vehicle with friction dampers is modelled in the environment of an multi-body system simulation program, whose solver has to cope with many strong non-linearities. The other difficulty is the necessity of handling within the code a number of big volume files of recorded dither sampled with high frequency. To avoid these difficulties, a substitute model of two-dimensional dry friction exposed to dither is proposed that does not need application of dither during simulation, but it behaves as if dither were applied. Due to this property of the model, the excitation of the vehicle model by track irregularities may be supplied as low-frequency input, which allows fast execution and, the necessity of handling high-volume files of recorded dither is avoided. The substitute model is numerically effective. To identify parameters of the substitute model, a pre-processing employing a sample of the realistic dither is carried-out on a simple two-degrees-of-freedom system. The substitute model is anisotropic, describing anisotropic properties of the two-dimensional friction arising in the presence of one-dimensional dither. The model may be applied in other branches of engineering, for example, in mechatronics and robotics, where application of dither may improve the accuracy of positioning devices.

  10. Physical ageing of the contact line on colloidal particles at liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaz, David M.; McGorty, Ryan; Mani, Madhav; Brenner, Michael P.; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2012-02-01

    Young’s law predicts that a colloidal sphere in equilibrium with a liquid interface will straddle the two fluids, its height above the interface defined by an equilibrium contact angle. This has been used to explain why colloids often bind to liquid interfaces, and has been exploited in emulsification, water purification, mineral recovery, encapsulation and the making of nanostructured materials. However, little is known about the dynamics of binding. Here we show that the adsorption of polystyrene microspheres to a water/oil interface is characterized by a sudden breach and an unexpectedly slow relaxation. The relaxation appears logarithmic in time, indicating that complete equilibration may take months. Surprisingly, viscous dissipation appears to play little role. Instead, the observed dynamics, which bear strong resemblance to ageing in glassy systems, agree well with a model describing activated hopping of the contact line over nanoscale surface heterogeneities. These results may provide clues to longstanding questions on colloidal interactions at an interface.

  11. The friction and wear of metals and binary alloys in contact with an abrasive grit of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various metals and iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with single-crystal silicon carbide riders. Results indicate that the coefficient of friction and groove height (corresponding to the wear volume) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. The coefficient of friction and groove height generally decrease with an increase in solute content of binary alloys. A separate correlation exists between the solute to iron atomic radius ratio and the decreasing rates of change of coefficient of friction and groove height with increasing solute content. These rates of change are minimum at a solute to iron radius ratio of unity. They increase as the atomic ratio increases or decreases linearly from unity. The correlations indicate that atomic size is an important parameter in controlling friction and wear of alloys.

  12. Particle contact angles at fluid interfaces: pushing the boundary beyond hard uniform spherical colloids.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Michele; Isa, Lucio

    2016-08-10

    Micro and nanoparticles at fluid interfaces have been attracting increasing interest in the last few decades as building blocks for materials, as mechanical and structural probes for complex interfaces and as models for two-dimensional systems. The three-phase contact angle enters practically all aspects of the particle behavior at the interface: its thermodynamics (binding energy to the interface), dynamics (motion and drag at the interface) and interactions with the interface (adsorption and wetting). Moreover, many interactions among particles at the interface also strongly depend on the contact angle. These concepts have been extensively discussed for non-deformable, homogeneous and mostly spherical particles, but recent progress in particle synthesis and fabrication has instead moved in the direction of producing more complex micro and nanoscale objects, which can be responsive, deformable, heterogenous and/or anisotropic in shape, surface chemistry and material properties. These new particles have a much greater potential for applications and new science, and the study of their behavior at interfaces has only very recently started. In this paper, we critically review the current state of the art of the experimental methods available to measure the contact angle of micro and nanoparticles at fluid interfaces, indicating their strengths and limitations. We then comment on new particle systems that are currently attracting increasing interest in relation to their adsorption and assembly at fluid interfaces and discuss if and which ones of the current techniques are suited to investigate their properties at interfaces. Based on this discussion, we will finally try to indicate a direction in which new experimental methods should develop in the future to tackle the new challenges posed by the novel types of particles that more and more often are used at interfaces. PMID:27299800

  13. Particle contact angles at fluid interfaces: pushing the boundary beyond hard uniform spherical colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, Michele; Isa, Lucio

    2016-08-01

    Micro and nanoparticles at fluid interfaces have been attracting increasing interest in the last few decades as building blocks for materials, as mechanical and structural probes for complex interfaces and as models for two-dimensional systems. The three-phase contact angle enters practically all aspects of the particle behavior at the interface: its thermodynamics (binding energy to the interface), dynamics (motion and drag at the interface) and interactions with the interface (adsorption and wetting). Moreover, many interactions among particles at the interface also strongly depend on the contact angle. These concepts have been extensively discussed for non-deformable, homogeneous and mostly spherical particles, but recent progress in particle synthesis and fabrication has instead moved in the direction of producing more complex micro and nanoscale objects, which can be responsive, deformable, heterogenous and/or anisotropic in shape, surface chemistry and material properties. These new particles have a much greater potential for applications and new science, and the study of their behavior at interfaces has only very recently started. In this paper, we critically review the current state of the art of the experimental methods available to measure the contact angle of micro and nanoparticles at fluid interfaces, indicating their strengths and limitations. We then comment on new particle systems that are currently attracting increasing interest in relation to their adsorption and assembly at fluid interfaces and discuss if and which ones of the current techniques are suited to investigate their properties at interfaces. Based on this discussion, we will finally try to indicate a direction in which new experimental methods should develop in the future to tackle the new challenges posed by the novel types of particles that more and more often are used at interfaces.

  14. Contact conductance evaluation for a full scale space erectable radiator pressurized interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duschatko, R. John

    1989-01-01

    The baseline thermal control configuration for the Space Station Freedom includes a contact heat exchanger to provide efficient heat transfer between the two-phase thermal bus heat collection/delivery system and the radiator panel heat rejection system. The contact heat exchanger provides a dry interface for a modular radiator system with easy on-orbit panel replacement. July 1988 testing of the Space Erectable Radiator System (SERS) at NASA-JSC provided thermal/vacuum data for three full-scale prototype units of a pressurized dry contact heat exchanger design. Derived contact conductance values agreed with predictions and previous element tests and demonstrated high conductance for relatively low pressure levels. A limited amount of data was also obtained below the operating pressure, resulting in contact conductance trends with respect to interface pressure.

  15. Equivalent series system to model a multiple friction pendulum system with numerous sliding interfaces for seismic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. S.; Su, H. C.; Chiang, T. C.

    2014-03-01

    Current structural analysis software programs offer few if any applicable device-specific hysteresis rules or nonlinear elements to simulate the precise mechanical behavior of a multiple friction pendulum system (MFPS) with numerous sliding interfaces. Based on the concept of subsystems, an equivalent series system that adopts existing nonlinear elements with parameters systematically calculated and mathematically proven through rigorous derivations is proposed. The aim is to simulate the characteristics of sliding motions for an MFPS isolation system with numerous concave sliding interfaces without prior knowledge of detailed information on the mobilized forces at various sliding stages. An MFPS with numerous concave sliding interfaces and one articulated or rigid slider located between these interfaces is divided into two subsystems: the first represents the concave sliding interfaces above the slider, and the second represents those below the slider. The equivalent series system for the entire system is then obtained by connecting those for each subsystem in series. The equivalent series system is validated by comparing numerical results for an MFPS with four sliding interfaces obtained from the proposed method with those from a previous study by Fenz and Constantinou. Furthermore, these numerical results demonstrate that an MFPS isolator with numerous concave sliding interfaces, which may have any number of sliding interfaces, is a good isolation device to protect structures from earthquake damage through appropriate designs with controllable mechanisms.

  16. Contact angle and detachment energy of shape anisotropic particles at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Anjali, Thriveni G; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2016-09-15

    The three phase contact angle of particles, a measure of its wettability, is an important factor that greatly influences their behaviour at interfaces. It is one of the principal design parameters for potential applications of particles as emulsion/foam stabilizers, functional coatings and other novel materials. In the present work, the effect of size, shape and surface chemistry of particles on their contact angle is investigated using the gel trapping technique, which facilitates the direct visualization of the equilibrium position of particles at interfaces. The contact angle of hematite particles of spherocylindrical, peanut and cuboidal shapes, hematite-silica core-shell and silica shells is reported at a single particle level. The spherocylindrical and peanut shaped particles are always positioned with their major axis parallel to the interface. However, for cuboidal particles at air-water as well as decane-water interfaces, different orientations namely - face-up, edge-up and the vertex-up - are observed. The influence of gravity on the equilibrium position of the colloidal particles at the interface is studied using the hematite-silica core-shell particles and the silica shells. The measured contact angle values are utilized in the calculations of the detachment and surface energies of the hematite particles adsorbed at the interface. PMID:27285780

  17. Understanding the fabric of protein crystals: computational classification of biological interfaces and crystal contacts

    PubMed Central

    Capitani, Guido; Duarte, Jose M.; Baskaran, Kumaran; Bliven, Spencer; Somody, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    Modern structural biology still draws the vast majority of information from crystallography, a technique where the objects being investigated are embedded in a crystal lattice. Given the complexity and variety of those objects, it becomes fundamental to computationally assess which of the interfaces in the lattice are biologically relevant and which are simply crystal contacts. Since the mid-1990s, several approaches have been applied to obtain high-accuracy classification of crystal contacts and biological protein–protein interfaces. This review provides an overview of the concepts and main approaches to protein interface classification: thermodynamic estimation of interface stability, evolutionary approaches based on conservation of interface residues, and co-occurrence of the interface across different crystal forms. Among the three categories, evolutionary approaches offer the strongest promise for improvement, thanks to the incessant growth in sequence knowledge. Importantly, protein interface classification algorithms can also be used on multimeric structures obtained using other high-resolution techniques or for protein assembly design or validation purposes. A key issue linked to protein interface classification is the identification of the biological assembly of a crystal structure and the analysis of its symmetry. Here, we highlight the most important concepts and problems to be overcome in assembly prediction. Over the next few years, tools and concepts of interface classification will probably become more frequently used and integrated in several areas of structural biology and structural bioinformatics. Among the main challenges for the future are better addressing of weak interfaces and the application of interface classification concepts to prediction problems like protein–protein docking. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: guido.capitani@psi.ch PMID:26508758

  18. The effect of load in a contact with boundary lubrication. [reduction of coefficient of friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georges, J. M.; Lamy, B.; Daronnat, M.; Moro, S.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the transition load on the wear in a contact with boundary lubrication was investigated. An experimental method was developed for this purpose, and parameters affecting the boundary lubrication under industrial operating conditions were identified. These parameters are the adsorbed boundary film, the contact microgeometry (surface roughness), macrogeometry, and hardness of materials used. It was found that the curve of the tops of the surface protrustion affect the transition load, and thus the boundary lubrication. The transition load also depends on the chemical nature of the contact and its geometrical and mechanical aspects.

  19. Atomic Scale Interface Manipulation, Structural Engineering, and Their Impact on Ultrathin Carbon Films in Controlling Wear, Friction, and Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Yak, Leonard J K; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Dhand, Chetna; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2016-07-13

    Reducing friction, wear, and corrosion of diverse materials/devices using <2 nm thick protective carbon films remains challenging, which limits the developments of many technologies, such as magnetic data storage systems. Here, we present a novel approach based on atomic scale interface manipulation to engineer and control the friction, wear, corrosion, and structural characteristics of 0.7-1.7 nm carbon-based films on CoCrPt:oxide-based magnetic media. We demonstrate that when an atomically thin (∼0.5 nm) chromium nitride (CrNx) layer is sandwiched between the magnetic media and an ultrathin carbon overlayer (1.2 nm), it modifies the film-substrate interface, creates various types of interfacial bonding, increases the interfacial adhesion, and tunes the structure of carbon in terms of its sp(3) bonding. These contribute to its remarkable functional properties, such as stable and lowest coefficient of friction (∼0.15-0.2), highest wear resistance and better corrosion resistance despite being only ∼1.7 nm thick, surpassing those of ∼2.7 nm thick current commercial carbon overcoat (COC) and other overcoats in this work. While this approach has direct implications for advancing current magnetic storage technology with its ultralow thickness, it can also be applied to advance the protective and barrier capabilities of other ultrathin materials for associated technologies. PMID:27267790

  20. Experimental Study of the Rolling-Sliding Contact Conditions in a PA66/STEEL Gear Using Twin-Disc Test Rig: Friction and Wear Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbarek, Meftah; Rhaiem, Sadok; Kharrat, Mohamed; Dammak, Maher

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of sliding ratio on the tribological response of the contact between the teeth of a metal/polymer gear in the regions close to the pitch point. For this purpose, a new twin-disc test rig was developed on the basis of two discs of different diameters rotating one above the other at the same angular speed. Two different materials were used: non-alloyed structural steel (C45) and polyamide (PA66). The effect of the slip ratio (4%, 12%, 20% and 28%) was studied at a constant pressure of 34 MPa and a constant angular speed of 300 rpm. In addition, the contact conditions were controlled with measurements of the two discs surface temperatures. The results indicate that the wear and the friction are closely related to the contact temperature generated by the sliding phenomenon. At low slip ratio (4% and 12%), the coefficient of friction and the temperature are characterized by a quasi-linear increase with time, and the wear increases slowly. At higher slip ratio (20% and 28%), the coefficient of friction and the temperature presents a steady state, and the wear increases dramatically. During the test, a film of transferred PA66 is formed on the steel surface causing the development of adhesive interactions between the contacting discs which increase the friction coefficient and the contact temperature. The high thermal conductivity of steel as compared to that of the polymer can reduce enormously the contact temperature generated by the sliding process.

  1. Pressure distribution for patchlike contact in seals with frictional heating, thermal expansion, and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilaparti, S. R.; Burton, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding contact in seals is known to change at high sliding speed from initially uniform pressure to a deformed state where contact is restricted to small patches of the surface. An earlier analysis of such contact was based upon the assumption of uniform pressure on the small patches. The present study draws upon a thermoelastic influence function to provide simultaneous equations for pressure on subdivisions of the patches. The final result is that at high wear rate (and, consequently, high traversal speed of the patch along the surface of the more conductive body of the contacting pair) the pressure distribution becomes roughly triangular with the maximum pressure toward the leading edge of the patch.

  2. Evaporation, viscous flow, and electrostatic interaction of charged interfaces in the apparent contact line region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelaar, Christiaan; Ajaev, Vladimir S.

    2015-11-01

    We consider evaporation of an aqueous solution near an apparent contact line separating a macroscopically dry area of a heated solid substrate and a constant-curvature meniscus far away from the substrate. Viscous flow, described by a lubrication-type model, is coupled to the interaction of electrical double layers formed near the solid-liquid and liquid-vapor interfaces. The electrostatic interaction is described using the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and is shown to affect both normal and shear stress balances at the deformable interface. For steady configurations, we find that the apparent contact line region becomes wider and the total evaporation rate there increases as the substrate potential is increased. Motion of the apparent contact line in response to changes in the substrate temperature is also investigated. The contact line speed is found to increase when the electrostatic effects are incorporated into the model.

  3. Improving Contact Interfaces in Fully Printed Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changyong; Andrews, Joseph B; Kumar, Abhinay; Franklin, Aaron D

    2016-05-24

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) printed into thin films have been shown to yield high mobility, thermal conductivity, mechanical flexibility, and chemical stability as semiconducting channels in field-effect, thin-film transistors (TFTs). Printed CNT-TFTs of many varieties have been studied; however, there has been limited effort toward improving overall CNT-TFT performance. In particular, contact resistance plays a dominant role in determining the performance and degree of variability in the TFTs, especially in fully printed devices where the contacts and channel are both printed. In this work, we have systematically investigated the contact resistance and overall performance of fully printed CNT-TFTs employing three different printed contact materials-Ag nanoparticles, Au nanoparticles, and metallic CNTs-each in the following distinct contact geometries: top, bottom, and double. The active channel for each device was printed from the dispersion of high-purity (>99%) semiconducting CNTs, and all printing was carried out using an aerosol jet printer. Hundreds of devices with different channel lengths (from 20 to 500 μm) were fabricated for extracting contact resistance and determining related contact effects. Printed bottom contacts are shown to be advantageous compared to the more common top contacts, regardless of contact material. Further, compared to single (top or bottom) contacts, double contacts offer a significant decrease (>35%) in contact resistance for all types of contact materials, with the metallic CNTs yielding the best overall performance. These findings underscore the impact of printed contact materials and structures when interfacing with CNT thin films, providing key guidance for the further development of printed nanomaterial electronics. PMID:27097302

  4. Does p-type ohmic contact exist in WSe2-metal interfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangyang; Yang, Ruo Xi; Quhe, Ruge; Zhong, Hongxia; Cong, Linxiao; Ye, Meng; Ni, Zeyuan; Song, Zhigang; Yang, Jinbo; Shi, Junjie; Li, Ju; Lu, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Formation of low-resistance metal contacts is the biggest challenge that masks the intrinsic exceptional electronic properties of two dimensional WSe2 devices. We present the first comparative study of the interfacial properties between monolayer/bilayer (ML/BL) WSe2 and Sc, Al, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt contacts by using ab initio energy band calculations with inclusion of the spin-orbital coupling (SOC) effects and quantum transport simulations. The interlayer coupling tends to reduce both the electron and hole Schottky barrier heights (SBHs) and alters the polarity for the WSe2-Au contact, while the SOC chiefly reduces the hole SBH. In the absence of the SOC, the Pd contact has the smallest hole SBH. Dramatically, the Pt contact surpasses the Pd contact and becomes the p-type ohmic or quasi-ohmic contact with inclusion of the SOC. Therefore, p-type ohmic or quasi-ohmic contact exists in WSe2-metal interfaces. Our study provides a theoretical foundation for the selection of favorable metal electrodes in ML/BL WSe2 devices.Formation of low-resistance metal contacts is the biggest challenge that masks the intrinsic exceptional electronic properties of two dimensional WSe2 devices. We present the first comparative study of the interfacial properties between monolayer/bilayer (ML/BL) WSe2 and Sc, Al, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt contacts by using ab initio energy band calculations with inclusion of the spin-orbital coupling (SOC) effects and quantum transport simulations. The interlayer coupling tends to reduce both the electron and hole Schottky barrier heights (SBHs) and alters the polarity for the WSe2-Au contact, while the SOC chiefly reduces the hole SBH. In the absence of the SOC, the Pd contact has the smallest hole SBH. Dramatically, the Pt contact surpasses the Pd contact and becomes the p-type ohmic or quasi-ohmic contact with inclusion of the SOC. Therefore, p-type ohmic or quasi-ohmic contact exists in WSe2-metal interfaces. Our study provides a theoretical foundation for

  5. Prediction of bead area contact load at the tire-wheel interface using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H. S.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical prediction of the bead area contact load at the tire wheel interface using NASTRAN is reported. The application of the linear code to a basically nonlinear problem results in excessive deformation of the structure and the tire-wheel contact conditions become impossible to achieve. A psuedo-nonlinear approach was adopted in which the moduli of the cord reinforced composite are increased so that the computed key deformations matched that of the experiment. Numerical results presented are discussed.

  6. Considerations on the moving contact-line singularity, with application to frictional drag on a slender drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the no-slip boundary conditions leads to a singularity at a moving contact line and that this presumes some form of slip. Present considerations on the energetics of slip due to shear stress lead to a yield stress boundary condition. A model for the distortion of the liquid state near solid boundaries gives a physical basis for this boundary condition. The yield stress condition is illustrated by an analysis of a slender drop rolling down an incline. That analysis provides a formula for the frictional drag resisting the drop movement. With the present boundary condition, the length of the slip region becomes a property of the fluid flow.

  7. Understanding the fabric of protein crystals: computational classification of biological interfaces and crystal contacts.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Guido; Duarte, Jose M; Baskaran, Kumaran; Bliven, Spencer; Somody, Joseph C

    2016-02-15

    Modern structural biology still draws the vast majority of information from crystallography, a technique where the objects being investigated are embedded in a crystal lattice. Given the complexity and variety of those objects, it becomes fundamental to computationally assess which of the interfaces in the lattice are biologically relevant and which are simply crystal contacts. Since the mid-1990s, several approaches have been applied to obtain high-accuracy classification of crystal contacts and biological protein-protein interfaces. This review provides an overview of the concepts and main approaches to protein interface classification: thermodynamic estimation of interface stability, evolutionary approaches based on conservation of interface residues, and co-occurrence of the interface across different crystal forms. Among the three categories, evolutionary approaches offer the strongest promise for improvement, thanks to the incessant growth in sequence knowledge. Importantly, protein interface classification algorithms can also be used on multimeric structures obtained using other high-resolution techniques or for protein assembly design or validation purposes. A key issue linked to protein interface classification is the identification of the biological assembly of a crystal structure and the analysis of its symmetry. Here, we highlight the most important concepts and problems to be overcome in assembly prediction. Over the next few years, tools and concepts of interface classification will probably become more frequently used and integrated in several areas of structural biology and structural bioinformatics. Among the main challenges for the future are better addressing of weak interfaces and the application of interface classification concepts to prediction problems like protein-protein docking. PMID:26508758

  8. Method for characterizing the contact resistance of metal-vanadium dioxide thin film interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Percy, R.; Stan, M.; Weikle, R. M.; Kittiwatanakul, S.; Lu, J.; Wolf, S.

    2014-07-14

    The standard method for determining the contact resistance of planar metal-semiconductor interfaces can underestimate the true contact resistance under normal operating conditions, as it relies on the resistivity of the semiconductor material remaining constant during measurement. However, the strong temperature dependence of the resistivity of VO{sub 2} requires a modified approach that maintains a constant power density dissipated within the film to account for Joule heating. We develop a method for measuring contact resistance in semiconductors with a high thermal coefficient of resistivity, demonstrate this method with an example, and compare the results with the standard technique.

  9. Electrical contact at the interface between silicon and transfer-printed gold films by eutectic joining.

    PubMed

    Keum, Hohyun; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Kim, Seok

    2013-07-10

    This paper presents the electrical and morphological properties at the interface between a metal (Au) and a semiconductor (Si) formed by a novel transfer-printing technology. This work shows that a transfer-printed thin (hundreds of nanometers) Au film forms excellent electrical contact on a Si substrate when appropriate thermal treatment is applied. The successful electrical contact is attributed to eutectic joining, which allows for the right amount of atomic level mass transport between Au and Si. The outcomes suggest that transfer-printing-based micromanufacturing can realize not only strong mechanical bonding but also high-quality electrical contact via eutectic joining. PMID:23751269

  10. Reducing contact resistance in ferroelectric organic transistors by buffering the semiconductor/dielectric interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Huabin; Yin, Yao; Wang, Qijing; Jun, Qian; Wang, Yu; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng; Pan, Lijia; Zheng, Youdou; Shi, Yi; Li, Yun

    2015-08-01

    The reduction of contact resistance in ferroelectric organic field-effect transistors (Fe-OFETs) by buffering the interfacial polarization fluctuation was reported. An ultrathin poly(methyl methacrylate) layer was inserted between the ferroelectric polymer and organic semiconductor layers. The contact resistance was significantly reduced to 55 kΩ cm. By contrast, Fe-OFETs without buffering exhibited a significantly larger contact resistance of 260 kΩ cm. Results showed that such an enhanced charge injection was attributed to the buffering effect at the semiconductor/ferroelectric interface, which narrowed the trap distribution of the organic semiconductor in the contact region. The presented work provided an efficient method of lowering the contact resistance in Fe-OFETs, which is beneficial for the further development of Fe-OFETs.

  11. Vibration transfer in the ball-stem contact interface of artificial hips.

    PubMed

    Hothan, Arne; Lewerenz, Kathrin; Weiss, Cornelius; Hoffmann, Norbert; Morlock, Michael; Huber, Gerd

    2013-10-01

    Audible squeaking has put the reputation of ceramic bearings for total hip replacements into question. Inter-articular friction induces vibrations in the ceramic head which are transferred through the head-taper interface to the femoral stem. If excited to sufficient amplitudes, squeaking can be emitted by the stem. Hence, the damping and amplification properties of this interface have a crucial influence on stem vibrations. The aim of this study was to determine the vibration transfer behavior between the head and the taper of a femoral stem and its dependence on the assembly force, in order to assess its influence on the development of audible squeaking. A ceramic head was assembled on a titanium femoral stem taper with high and low forces. Frequency response functions characterizing the head-stem interface were determined experimentally. The interface demonstrated negligible influence on vibration transfer in the squeaking frequency range (1-5 kHz). However its damping effect in lower and higher frequency ranges was significant and some areas of amplification were also found. Although squeaking vibration was not influenced by the particular interface studied, the method established can be utilized to trace taper designs with dynamic properties that decrease the susceptibility to squeaking. PMID:23707143

  12. Universal Aging Mechanism for Static and Sliding Friction of Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Michael; Dietzel, Dirk; Tekiel, Antoni; Topple, Jessica; Grütter, Peter; Schirmeisen, André

    2016-07-01

    The term "contact aging" refers to the temporal evolution of the interface between a slider and a substrate usually resulting in increasing friction with time. Current phenomenological models for multiasperity contacts anticipate that such aging is not only the driving force behind the transition from static to sliding friction, but at the same time influences the general dynamics of the sliding friction process. To correlate static and sliding friction on the nanoscale, we show experimental evidence of stick-slip friction for nanoparticles sliding on graphite over a wide dynamic range. We can assign defined periods of aging to the stick phases of the particles, which agree with simulations explicitly including contact aging. Additional slide-hold-slide experiments for the same system allow linking the sliding friction results to static friction measurements, where both friction mechanisms can be universally described by a common aging formalism.

  13. Universal Aging Mechanism for Static and Sliding Friction of Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Michael; Dietzel, Dirk; Tekiel, Antoni; Topple, Jessica; Grütter, Peter; Schirmeisen, André

    2016-07-01

    The term "contact aging" refers to the temporal evolution of the interface between a slider and a substrate usually resulting in increasing friction with time. Current phenomenological models for multiasperity contacts anticipate that such aging is not only the driving force behind the transition from static to sliding friction, but at the same time influences the general dynamics of the sliding friction process. To correlate static and sliding friction on the nanoscale, we show experimental evidence of stick-slip friction for nanoparticles sliding on graphite over a wide dynamic range. We can assign defined periods of aging to the stick phases of the particles, which agree with simulations explicitly including contact aging. Additional slide-hold-slide experiments for the same system allow linking the sliding friction results to static friction measurements, where both friction mechanisms can be universally described by a common aging formalism. PMID:27447515

  14. Improvement and evaluation of thermal, electrical, sealing and mechanical contacts, and their interface materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiangcheng

    Material contacts, including thermal, electrical, seating (fluid sealing and electromagnetic sealing) and mechanical (pressure) contacts, together with their interface materials, were, evaluated, and in some cases, improved beyond the state of the art. The evaluation involved the use of thermal, electrical and mechanical methods. For thermal contacts, this work evaluated and improved the heat transfer efficiency between two contacting components by developing various thermal interface pastes. Sodium silicate based thermal pastes (with boron nitride particles as the thermally conductive filler) as well as polyethylene glycol (PEG) based thermal pastes were developed and evaluated. The optimum volume fractions of BN in sodium silicate based pastes and PEG based pastes were 16% and 18% respectively. The contribution of Li+ ions to the thermal contact conductance in the PEG-based paste was confirmed. For electrical contacts, the relationship between the mechanical reliability and electrical reliability of solder/copper and silver-epoxy/copper joints was addressed. Mechanical pull-out testing was conducted on solder/copper and silver-epoxy/copper joints, while the contact electrical resistivity was measured. Cleansing of the copper surface was more effective for the reliability of silver-epoxy/copper joint than that of solder/copper joint. For sealing contacts, this work evaluated flexible graphite as an electromagnetic shielding gasket material. Flexible graphite was found to be at least comparable to conductive filled silicone (the state of the art) in terms of the shielding effectiveness. The conformability of flexible graphite with its mating metal surface under repeated compression was characterized by monitoring the contact electrical resistance, as the conformability is important to both electromagnetic scaling and fluid waling using flexible graphite. For mechanical contacts, this work focused on the correlation of the interface structure (such as elastic

  15. Classical shear cracks drive the onset of dry frictional motion.

    PubMed

    Svetlizky, Ilya; Fineberg, Jay

    2014-05-01

    Frictional processes entail the rupture of the ensemble of discrete contacts defining a frictional interface. There are a variety of views on how best to describe the onset of dry frictional motion. These range from modelling friction with a single degree of freedom, a 'friction coefficient', to theoretical treatments using dynamic fracture to account for spatial and temporal dynamics along the interface. We investigated the onset of dry frictional motion by performing simultaneous high-speed measurements of the real contact area and the strain fields in the region surrounding propagating rupture tips within the dry (nominally flat) rough interfaces formed by brittle polymer blocks. Here we show that the transition from 'static' to 'dynamic' friction is quantitatively described by classical singular solutions for the motion of a rapid shear crack. We find that these singular solutions, originally derived to describe brittle fracture, are in excellent agreement with the experiments for slow propagation, whereas some significant discrepancies arise as the rupture velocity approaches the Rayleigh wave speed. In addition, the energy dissipated in the fracture of the contacts remains nearly constant throughout the entire range in which the rupture velocity is less than the Rayleigh wave speed, whereas the size of the dissipative zone undergoes a Lorentz-like contraction as the rupture velocity approaches the Rayleigh wave speed. This coupling between friction and fracture is critical to our fundamental understanding of frictional motion and related processes, such as earthquake dynamics. PMID:24805344

  16. Friction-induced formation of heat with account for heat transfer through the contact surface between homogeneous and piecewise-homogeneous semispaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, A. A.; Kuciej, M.

    2011-05-01

    An analytical solution of the boundary-value heat conduction problem is obtained for a tribosystem consisting of a homogeneous semispace sliding with a constant velocity along the surface of a plane-parallel strip applied to a semi-infinite foundation. The tribosystem is heated as a result of the frictional heat formation on the sliding surface. It is assumed that the thermal contact of the semispace with the strip is not full. With the aid of the Duhamel theorem, a solution for the considered tribosystem, with sliding at a constant deceleration, is also constructed that models heat formation from friction in disk brakes. For the materials of the friction pair "pig iron semispace (disk)-metal-ceramic strip (lining)-steel foundation (frame)," the influence of the coefficient of thermal conductivity of the contact (Biot number) on the temperature distribution was investigated.

  17. Non-smooth Hopf-type bifurcations arising from impact–friction contact events in rotating machinery

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Karin; Budd, Chris; Glendinning, Paul; Keogh, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the novel dynamics arising in a nonlinear rotor dynamic system by investigating the discontinuity-induced bifurcations corresponding to collisions with the rotor housing (touchdown bearing surface interactions). The simplified Föppl/Jeffcott rotor with clearance and mass unbalance is modelled by a two degree of freedom impact–friction oscillator, as appropriate for a rigid rotor levitated by magnetic bearings. Two types of motion observed in experiments are of interest in this paper: no contact and repeated instantaneous contact. We study how these are affected by damping and stiffness present in the system using analytical and numerical piecewise-smooth dynamical systems methods. By studying the impact map, we show that these types of motion arise at a novel non-smooth Hopf-type bifurcation from a boundary equilibrium bifurcation point for certain parameter values. A local analysis of this bifurcation point allows us a complete understanding of this behaviour in a general setting. The analysis identifies criteria for the existence of such smooth and non-smooth bifurcations, which is an essential step towards achieving reliable and robust controllers that can take compensating action. PMID:25383034

  18. Non-smooth Hopf-type bifurcations arising from impact-friction contact events in rotating machinery.

    PubMed

    Mora, Karin; Budd, Chris; Glendinning, Paul; Keogh, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    We analyse the novel dynamics arising in a nonlinear rotor dynamic system by investigating the discontinuity-induced bifurcations corresponding to collisions with the rotor housing (touchdown bearing surface interactions). The simplified Föppl/Jeffcott rotor with clearance and mass unbalance is modelled by a two degree of freedom impact-friction oscillator, as appropriate for a rigid rotor levitated by magnetic bearings. Two types of motion observed in experiments are of interest in this paper: no contact and repeated instantaneous contact. We study how these are affected by damping and stiffness present in the system using analytical and numerical piecewise-smooth dynamical systems methods. By studying the impact map, we show that these types of motion arise at a novel non-smooth Hopf-type bifurcation from a boundary equilibrium bifurcation point for certain parameter values. A local analysis of this bifurcation point allows us a complete understanding of this behaviour in a general setting. The analysis identifies criteria for the existence of such smooth and non-smooth bifurcations, which is an essential step towards achieving reliable and robust controllers that can take compensating action. PMID:25383034

  19. Mesh Size Control of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitenis, Angela; Uruena, Juan Manuel; Schulze, Kyle D.; Cooper, Andrew C.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Sawyer, W. Gregory

    Soft, permeable sliding interfaces in aqueous environments are ubiquitous in nature but their ability to maintain high lubricity in a poor lubricant (water) has not been well understood. Hydrogels are excellent materials for fundamental soft matter and biotribology studies due to their high water content. While mesh size controls the material and transport properties of a hydrogel, its effects on friction were only recently explored. Polyacrylamide hydrogels slid in a Gemini (self-mated) interface produced low friction under low speeds, low pressures, macroscopic contact areas, and room temperature aqueous environments. The friction coefficients at these interfaces are lowest at low speeds and are speed-independent. This behavior is due to thermal fluctuations at the interface separating the surfaces, with water shearing in this region being the main source of dissipation. We found that mesh size had an inverse correlation with friction. We further investigated a transition from this behavior at higher speeds, and found that the transition speed correlated with the mesh size and relaxation time of the polymer network. Very soft and correspondingly large mesh size Gemini hydrogels show superlubricity under specific conditions with friction being less than 0.005.

  20. Thermal contact conductance of a bone-dry paper handsheet/metal interface

    SciTech Connect

    Seyed-Yagoobi, J.; Ng, K.H.; Fletcher, L.S. )

    1992-05-01

    An apparatus was constructed for determination of the thermal contact conductance for a paper handsheet/metal interface and for measurement of the effective thermal conductivity of handsheet samples. Bone-dry Bleached Southern Mixed Kraft handsheets with a water retention value of 1.832 were used to study the effect of pressure on thermal contact conductance and to measure the effective thermal conductivity of samples at various sheet density levels. A regression model describing the interface thermal contact conductance as a function of pressure and basis weight was derived. The contact conductance increases with increasing pressure or with decreasing basis weight. At a pressure of 2.3 kPa, the value of the interface contact conductance for the bone-dry samples considered ranges from approximately 97 W/m{sup 2}K for a sheet of 348.7 g/m{sup 2} basis weight to 200 W/m{sup 2}K for a sheet of 68.0 g/m{sup 2} basis weight. For pressures near 300 kPa, these values increase to 146 and 452 W/m{sup 2}K, respectively. The effective thermal conductivity of the handsheet samples was derived from measured values of overall joint conductance and interface contact conductance. The results indicate that the thermal conductivity of the bone-dry samples increases with increasing sheet density, ranging from 0.14 W/mK to 0.70 W/mK for sheet densities of 90 kg/m{sup 3} to 500 kg/m{sup 3}, respectively, for the samples considered.

  1. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading. PMID:27110836

  2. Interface Reactions and Electrical Characteristics of Au/GaSb Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    H. Ehsani; R.J. Gutmann; G.W. Charache

    2000-07-07

    The reaction of Au with GaSb occurs at a relatively low temperature (100 C). Upon annealing, a AuSb{sub 2} compound and several Au-Ga phases are produced. Phase transitions occur toward higher Ga concentration with increasing annealing temperatures. Furthermore, the depth of the contact also increases with increased annealing temperature. They found that the AuSb{sub 2} compound forms on the GaSb surface, with the compound crystal partially ordered with respect to the substrate. The transition of Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior in Au/n-type GaSb occurs simultaneously with the formation of the AuGa compound at about a 250 C annealing temperature. This ohmic contact forms without the segregation of dopants at the metallic compound/GaSb interface. Therefore it is postulated that transition from Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior is obtained through a series of tunneling transitions of electrons through defects in the depletion region in the Au/n-type GaSb contacts. Contact resistivities of 6-7 x 10{sup -6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} were obtained with the annealing temperature between 300 and 350 C for 30 seconds. In Au/p-type GaSb contacts, the resistivity was independent of the annealing temperature. This suggested that the carrier transport in p-type contact dominated by thermionic emission.

  3. Contact-angle hysteresis on periodic microtextured surfaces: Strongly corrugated liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina

    2016-06-01

    We study numerically the shapes of a liquid meniscus in contact with ultrahydrophobic pillar surfaces in Cassie's wetting regime, when the surface is covered with identical and periodically distributed micropillars. Using the full capillary model we obtain the advancing and the receding equilibrium meniscus shapes when the cross-sections of the pillars are both of square and circular shapes, for a broad interval of pillar concentrations. The bending of the liquid interface in the area between the pillars is studied in the framework of the full capillary model and compared to the results of the heterogeneous approximation model. The contact angle hysteresis is obtained when the three-phase contact line is located on one row (block case) or several rows (kink case) of pillars. It is found that the contact angle hysteresis is proportional to the line fraction of the contact line on pillars tops in the block case and to the surface fraction for pillar concentrations 0.1 -0.5 in the kink case. The contact angle hysteresis does not depend on the shape (circular or square) of the pillars cross-section. The expression for the proportionality of the receding contact angle to the line fraction [Raj et al., Langmuir 28, 15777 (2012), 10.1021/la303070s] in the case of block depinning is theoretically substantiated through the capillary force, acting on the solid plate at the meniscus contact line.

  4. Exploring the Interface Between Religion and Contact with the Dead Among Older Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal; Bastida, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to examine the relationship between religion and post death contact among older Mexican Americans. Four major themes emerged from 52 in-depth interviews that were conducted with Older Mexican Americans residing in Texas. First, many older study participants told us they had contact with the dead, but others indicated this was not possible. Second, the form in which contact with the dead was made varied greatly. Some older Mexican Americans reported they had visual contact with the dead, while others said they only made contact with the dead through dreams. Third, although some older Mexican American study participants believed that it was in the best interests of the dead to contact the living, others felt the dead should instead be in Heaven with God. Fourth, the participants in our study reported that having contact with the dead provides a number of important social and psychological benefits. In the process of discussing these themes, an emphasis is placed on how beliefs and experiences with the dead interface with religion. In addition, we also explore how post death contact may be associated with health and well-being in late life. PMID:21399735

  5. Does p-type ohmic contact exist in WSe2-metal interfaces?

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangyang; Yang, Ruo Xi; Quhe, Ruge; Zhong, Hongxia; Cong, Linxiao; Ye, Meng; Ni, Zeyuan; Song, Zhigang; Yang, Jinbo; Shi, Junjie; Li, Ju; Lu, Jing

    2016-01-14

    Formation of low-resistance metal contacts is the biggest challenge that masks the intrinsic exceptional electronic properties of two dimensional WSe2 devices. We present the first comparative study of the interfacial properties between monolayer/bilayer (ML/BL) WSe2 and Sc, Al, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt contacts by using ab initio energy band calculations with inclusion of the spin-orbital coupling (SOC) effects and quantum transport simulations. The interlayer coupling tends to reduce both the electron and hole Schottky barrier heights (SBHs) and alters the polarity for the WSe2-Au contact, while the SOC chiefly reduces the hole SBH. In the absence of the SOC, the Pd contact has the smallest hole SBH. Dramatically, the Pt contact surpasses the Pd contact and becomes the p-type ohmic or quasi-ohmic contact with inclusion of the SOC. Therefore, p-type ohmic or quasi-ohmic contact exists in WSe2-metal interfaces. Our study provides a theoretical foundation for the selection of favorable metal electrodes in ML/BL WSe2 devices. PMID:26666570

  6. Exploring the Interface Between Religion and Contact with the Dead Among Older Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Krause, Neal; Bastida, Elena

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to examine the relationship between religion and post death contact among older Mexican Americans. Four major themes emerged from 52 in-depth interviews that were conducted with Older Mexican Americans residing in Texas. First, many older study participants told us they had contact with the dead, but others indicated this was not possible. Second, the form in which contact with the dead was made varied greatly. Some older Mexican Americans reported they had visual contact with the dead, while others said they only made contact with the dead through dreams. Third, although some older Mexican American study participants believed that it was in the best interests of the dead to contact the living, others felt the dead should instead be in Heaven with God. Fourth, the participants in our study reported that having contact with the dead provides a number of important social and psychological benefits. In the process of discussing these themes, an emphasis is placed on how beliefs and experiences with the dead interface with religion. In addition, we also explore how post death contact may be associated with health and well-being in late life. PMID:21399735

  7. Numerical simulations of the moving contact line problem using a diffuse-interface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzaal, Muhammad; Sibley, David; Duncan, Andrew; Yatsyshin, Petr; Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Nold, Andreas; Savva, Nikos; Schmuck, Markus; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-11-01

    Moving contact lines are a ubiquitous phenomenon both in nature and in many modern technologies. One prevalent way of numerically tackling the problem is with diffuse-interface (phase-field) models, where the classical sharp-interface model of continuum mechanics is relaxed to one with a finite thickness fluid-fluid interface, capturing physics from mesoscopic lengthscales. The present work is devoted to the study of the contact line between two fluids confined by two parallel plates, i.e. a dynamically moving meniscus. Our approach is based on a coupled Navier-Stokes/Cahn-Hilliard model. This system of partial differential equations allows a tractable numerical solution to be computed, capturing diffusive and advective effects in a prototypical case study in a finite-element framework. Particular attention is paid to the static and dynamic contact angle of the meniscus advancing or receding between the plates. The results obtained from our approach are compared to the classical sharp-interface model to elicit the importance of considering diffusion and associated effects. We acknowledge financial support from European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031.

  8. Tuning back contact property via artificial interface dipoles in Si/organic hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Sheng, Jiang; Wu, Sudong; Zhu, Juye; Chen, Shaojie; Gao, Pingqi; Ye, Jichun

    2016-07-01

    Back contact property plays a key role in the charge collection efficiency of c-Si/poly(3,4-ethylthiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) hybrid solar cells (Si-HSCs), as an alternative for the high-efficiency and low-cost photovoltaic devices. In this letter, we utilize the water soluble poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) to modify the Al/Si interface to be an Ohmic contact via interface dipole tuning, decreasing the work function of the Al film. This Ohmic contact improves the electron collection efficiency of the rear electrode, increasing the short circuit current density (Jsc). Furthermore, the interface dipoles make the band bending downward to increase the total barrier height of built-in electric field of the solar cell, enhancing the open circuit voltage (Voc). The PEO solar cell exhibits an excellent performance, 12.29% power conversion efficiency, a 25.28% increase from the reference solar cell without a PEO interlayer. The simple and water soluble method as a promising alternative is used to develop the interfacial contact quality of the rear electrode for the high photovoltaic performance of Si-HSCs.

  9. Universal Regimes in the Relaxation of Stepped Liquid Interfaces near Contact Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeumchen, Oliver; Salez, Thomas; Benzaquen, Michael; Raphael, Elie; Rivetti, Marco

    2015-03-01

    A liquid droplet on a perfectly smooth surface wets or dewets the substrate according to the difference between initial and equilibrium contact angles. Such a scenario, however, becomes much less intuitive whenever the initial shape of the interface is non-spherical. Indeed, the capillary-driven relaxation of the liquid surface may be in competition with the relaxation of the contact angle at the three-phase contact line. Here, we study the dynamics of stepped interfaces of thin polystyrene films on hydrophilic substrates. Annealing the polymeric film above its glass transition temperature induces flow which is precisely monitored using ex- and in-situ atomic force microscopy. Both pinned and receding contact line regimes are observed, corresponding to capillary levelling and dewetting of the liquid film. Rescaling with regard to the viscosity, surface tension and film thickness collapses the data on a master curve, providing a universal time for the transition between both regimes. In addition, we prove that the pinned interface exhibits self-similar height profiles which are captured by a thin film model in lubrication approximation.

  10. Energetics and Solvation Effects at the Photoanode/Catalyst Interface: Ohmic Contact versus Schottky Barrier.

    PubMed

    Ping, Yuan; Goddard, William A; Galli, Giulia A

    2015-04-29

    The design of optimal interfaces between photoelectrodes and catalysts is a key challenge in building photoelectrochemical cells to split water. Iridium dioxide (IrO2) is an efficient catalyst for oxygen evolution, stable in acidic conditions, and hence a good candidate to be interfaced with photoanodes. Using first-principles quantum mechanical calculations, we investigated the structural and electronic properties of tungsten trioxide (WO3) surfaces interfaced with an IrO2 thin film. We built a microscopic model of the interface that exhibits a formation energy lower than the surface energy of the most stable IrO2 surface, in spite of a large lattice mismatch, and has no impurity states pinning the Fermi level. We found that, upon full coverage of WO3 by IrO2, the two oxides form undesirable Ohmic contacts. However, our calculations predicted that if both oxides are partially exposed to water solvent, the relative position of the absorber conduction band and the catalyst Fermi level favors charge transfer to the catalyst and hence water splitting. We propose that, for oxide photoelectrodes interfaced with IrO2, it is advantageous to form rough interfaces with the catalyst, e.g., by depositing nanoparticles, instead of sharp interfaces with thin films. PMID:25867053

  11. Computational methods for frictional contact with applications to the Space Shuttle orbiter nose-gear tire: Comparisons of experimental measurements and analytical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the solution of frictional contact problems for aircraft tires. A Space Shuttle nose-gear tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory which includes the effects of variations in material and geometric parameters, transverse-shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities. Contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with both contact and friction conditions. The contact-friction algorithm is based on a modified Coulomb friction law. A modified two-field, mixed-variational principle is used to obtain elemental arrays. This modification consists of augmenting the functional of that principle by two terms: the Lagrange multiplier vector associated with normal and tangential node contact-load intensities and a regularization term that is quadratic in the Lagrange multiplier vector. These capabilities and computational features are incorporated into an in-house computer code. Experimental measurements were taken to define the response of the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire to inflation-pressure loads and to inflation-pressure loads combined with normal static loads against a rigid flat plate. These experimental results describe the meridional growth of the tire cross section caused by inflation loading, the static load-deflection characteristics of the tire, the geometry of the tire footprint under static loading conditions, and the normal and tangential load-intensity distributions in the tire footprint for the various static vertical-loading conditions. Numerical results were obtained for the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire subjected to inflation pressure loads and combined inflation pressure and contact loads against a rigid flat plate. The experimental measurements and the numerical results are compared.

  12. Material properties of commonly-used interface materials and their static coefficients of friction with skin and socks.

    PubMed

    Sanders, J E; Greve, J M; Mitchell, S B; Zachariah, S G

    1998-06-01

    Compressive stiffness (CS) of different supporting materials used in prosthetics and orthotics and their static coefficients of friction (COF) with skin and socks were characterized. Materials tested included Spenco, Poron, nylon-reinforced silicone, Soft Pelite, Medium Pelite, Firm Plastazote, Regular Plastazote, and Nickelplast. A displacement-controlled testing device was constructed to assess the CS of 11.1 mm diameter material specimens under cyclic loading (1 Hz) to 220 kPa over 10- and 60-min periods. Results demonstrated local CS ranging from 687 kPa (Poron) to 3,990 kPa (Soft Pelite). To fit the cyclic stress-strain (S-S) data within an error of 4.0 percent full-scale output, the minimum order of fit required for Spenco, Poron, and nylon-reinforced silicone was a third-order polynomial; for Soft Pelite, Medium Pelite, Firm Plastazote, and Regular Plastazote, a second-order polynomial; and for Nickelplast, a linear fit. For all materials, the nonrecovered strains were related to loading time using an exponential fit. A biaxial force-controlled load applicator device was used to assess COF at skin-material, sock-material, and skin-sock interfaces for shear forces of 1 to 4 N applied to a 10.2 x 7.8 mm loading pad. COFs ranged from 0.48 (+/- 0.05) to 0.89 (+/- 0.09). COFs at skin-material interfaces were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those at skin-sock interfaces. There was a trend of a higher COF at sock-material interfaces than at skin-sock interfaces. These data are of potential utility in finite element modeling sensitivity analysis of residual limb-prosthetic socket systems or body-orthosis systems to characterize effects of material features on interface pressure and shear stress distributions. PMID:9651888

  13. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  14. Use of Textured Surfaces to Mitigate Sliding Friction and Wear of Lubricated and Non-Lubricated Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2012-03-01

    If properly employed, the placement of three-dimensional feature patterns, also referred to as textures, on relatively-moving, load-bearing surfaces can be beneficial to their friction and wear characteristics. For example, geometric patterns can function as lubricant supply channels or depressions in which to trap debris. They can also alter lubricant flow in a manner that produces thicker load-bearing films locally. Considering the area occupied by solid areas and spaces, textures also change the load distribution on surfaces. At least ten different attributes of textures can be specified, and their combinations offer wide latitude in surface engineering. By employing directional machining and grinding procedures, texturing has been used on bearings and seals for well over a half century, and the size scales of texturing vary widely. This report summarizes past work on the texturing of load-bearing surfaces, including past research on laser surface dimpling of ceramics done at ORNL. Textured surfaces generally show most pronounced effects when they are used in conformal or nearly conformal contacts, like that in face seals. Combining textures with other forms of surface modification and lubrication methods can offer additional benefits in surface engineering for tribology. As the literature and past work at ORNL shows, texturing does not always provide benefits. Rather, the selected pattern and arrangement of features must be matched to characteristics of the proposed application, bearing materials, and lubricants.

  15. Healing of Experimentally Simulated Fractures: Contact Neck Growth, and Strength Evolution of the Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, F.; Dysthe, D.; Voisin, C.

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the physical processes operating in active fault zones, we conduct analogue laboratory experiments where we simulated a rough fracture that undergoes healing/shear cycles under dry condition or in the presence of a reactive fluid. This set-up is a surrogate for the healing/sealing of fractures and faults rocks, where fluid-rock interactions are operative at the millennium time scale. A rough slider of sodium chloride was left in contact with a flat glass plate under a constant normal load. The whole set-up was mounted on a microscope and left in a temperature-controlled box. The closure of the interface through several days was measured using high resolution displacement sensors and the contact surface was continuously imaged with a CCD camera. Under dry conditions, a small transient creep displacement perpendicularly to the fracture plane was measured. This deformation last for several minutes and finally stopped. Under fluid saturated conditions, a slow closure of the rough interface was measured over several days. This closure was concomitant with the growth of contact points, driven by surface tension forces. After 50 hours, up to 10% of the fracture surface was healed by this process. The force necessary to break the adhesion forces, allowing the sample to slide, was also measured after several periods of increasing holding times and showed a power law dependence with time. After each experiment, the fracture interface roughness was measured to nanometer resolution using white light interferometry. The morphology of the contacts was characterized by scaling relationships. Finally, we propose a macroscopic constitutive model of fracture closure and strength recovery, related to the dynamics of the contact asperities, which are seen to flatten and expand through time.

  16. Atomic-Scale Engineering of Abrupt Interface for Direct Spin Contact of Ferromagnetic Semiconductor with Silicon.

    PubMed

    Averyanov, Dmitry V; Karateeva, Christina G; Karateev, Igor A; Tokmachev, Andrey M; Vasiliev, Alexander L; Zolotarev, Sergey I; Likhachev, Igor A; Storchak, Vyacheslav G

    2016-01-01

    Control and manipulation of the spin of conduction electrons in industrial semiconductors such as silicon are suggested as an operating principle for a new generation of spintronic devices. Coherent injection of spin-polarized carriers into Si is a key to this novel technology. It is contingent on our ability to engineer flawless interfaces of Si with a spin injector to prevent spin-flip scattering. The unique properties of the ferromagnetic semiconductor EuO make it a prospective spin injector into silicon. Recent advances in the epitaxial integration of EuO with Si bring the manufacturing of a direct spin contact within reach. Here we employ transmission electron microscopy to study the interface EuO/Si with atomic-scale resolution. We report techniques for interface control on a submonolayer scale through surface reconstruction. Thus we prevent formation of alien phases and imperfections detrimental to spin injection. This development opens a new avenue for semiconductor spintronics. PMID:26957146

  17. Improvement of the electrical contact resistance at rough interfaces using two dimensional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianchen; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario; Li, Heng; Shen, Panpan; Sun, Hui; Duan, Huiling

    2015-12-07

    Reducing the electronic contact resistance at the interfaces of nanostructured materials is a major goal for many kinds of planar and three dimensional devices. In this work, we develop a method to enhance the electronic transport at rough interfaces by inserting a two dimensional flexible and conductive graphene sheet. We observe that an ultra-thin graphene layer with a thickness of 0.35 nm can remarkably reduce the roughness of a sample in a factor of 40%, avoiding the use of thick coatings, leading to a more homogeneous current flow, and extraordinarily increasing the total current compared to the graphene-free counterpart. Due to its simplicity and performance enhancement, this methodology can be of interest to many interface and device designers.

  18. Atomic-Scale Engineering of Abrupt Interface for Direct Spin Contact of Ferromagnetic Semiconductor with Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Averyanov, Dmitry V.; Karateeva, Christina G.; Karateev, Igor A.; Tokmachev, Andrey M.; Vasiliev, Alexander L.; Zolotarev, Sergey I.; Likhachev, Igor A.; Storchak, Vyacheslav G.

    2016-01-01

    Control and manipulation of the spin of conduction electrons in industrial semiconductors such as silicon are suggested as an operating principle for a new generation of spintronic devices. Coherent injection of spin-polarized carriers into Si is a key to this novel technology. It is contingent on our ability to engineer flawless interfaces of Si with a spin injector to prevent spin-flip scattering. The unique properties of the ferromagnetic semiconductor EuO make it a prospective spin injector into silicon. Recent advances in the epitaxial integration of EuO with Si bring the manufacturing of a direct spin contact within reach. Here we employ transmission electron microscopy to study the interface EuO/Si with atomic-scale resolution. We report techniques for interface control on a submonolayer scale through surface reconstruction. Thus we prevent formation of alien phases and imperfections detrimental to spin injection. This development opens a new avenue for semiconductor spintronics. PMID:26957146

  19. Atomic-Scale Engineering of Abrupt Interface for Direct Spin Contact of Ferromagnetic Semiconductor with Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, Dmitry V.; Karateeva, Christina G.; Karateev, Igor A.; Tokmachev, Andrey M.; Vasiliev, Alexander L.; Zolotarev, Sergey I.; Likhachev, Igor A.; Storchak, Vyacheslav G.

    2016-03-01

    Control and manipulation of the spin of conduction electrons in industrial semiconductors such as silicon are suggested as an operating principle for a new generation of spintronic devices. Coherent injection of spin-polarized carriers into Si is a key to this novel technology. It is contingent on our ability to engineer flawless interfaces of Si with a spin injector to prevent spin-flip scattering. The unique properties of the ferromagnetic semiconductor EuO make it a prospective spin injector into silicon. Recent advances in the epitaxial integration of EuO with Si bring the manufacturing of a direct spin contact within reach. Here we employ transmission electron microscopy to study the interface EuO/Si with atomic-scale resolution. We report techniques for interface control on a submonolayer scale through surface reconstruction. Thus we prevent formation of alien phases and imperfections detrimental to spin injection. This development opens a new avenue for semiconductor spintronics.

  20. Quantification of the Contact Area at the Head-Stem Taper Interface of Modular Hip Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Witt, Florian; Gührs, Julian; Morlock, Michael M; Bishop, Nicholas E

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of modular taper junctions of hip implants may be associated with clinical failure. Taper design parameters, as well as the intraoperatively applied assembly forces, have been proposed to affect corrosion. Fretting corrosion is related to relative interface shear motion and fluid ingress, which may vary with contact force and area. It was hypothesised in this study that assembly forces modify the extent and distribution of the surface contact area at the taper interface between a cobalt chrome head and titanium stem taper with a standard threaded surface profile. Local abrasion of a thin gold coating applied to the stem taper prior to assembly was used to determine the contact area after disassembly. Profilometry was then used to assess permanent deformation of the stem taper surface profile. With increasing assembly force (500 N, 2000 N, 4000 N and 8000 N) the number of stem taper surface profile ridges in contact with the head taper was found to increase (9.2±9.3%, 65.4±10.8%, 92.8±6.0% and 100%) and the overall taper area in contact was also found to increase (0.6±0.7%, 5.5±1.0%, 9.9±1.1% and 16.1±0.9%). Contact was inconsistently distributed over the length of the taper. An increase in plastic radial deformation of the surface ridges (-0.05±0.14 μm, 0.1±0.14 μm, 0.21±0.22 μm and 0.96±0.25 μm) was also observed with increasing assembly force. The limited contact of the taper surface ridges at lower assembly forces may influence corrosion rates, suggesting that the magnitude of the assembly force may affect clinical outcome. The method presented provides a simple and practical assessment of the contact area at the taper interface. PMID:26280914

  1. Quantification of the Contact Area at the Head-Stem Taper Interface of Modular Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Florian; Gührs, Julian; Morlock, Michael M.; Bishop, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of modular taper junctions of hip implants may be associated with clinical failure. Taper design parameters, as well as the intraoperatively applied assembly forces, have been proposed to affect corrosion. Fretting corrosion is related to relative interface shear motion and fluid ingress, which may vary with contact force and area. It was hypothesised in this study that assembly forces modify the extent and distribution of the surface contact area at the taper interface between a cobalt chrome head and titanium stem taper with a standard threaded surface profile. Local abrasion of a thin gold coating applied to the stem taper prior to assembly was used to determine the contact area after disassembly. Profilometry was then used to assess permanent deformation of the stem taper surface profile. With increasing assembly force (500 N, 2000 N, 4000 N and 8000 N) the number of stem taper surface profile ridges in contact with the head taper was found to increase (9.2±9.3%, 65.4±10.8%, 92.8±6.0% and 100%) and the overall taper area in contact was also found to increase (0.6±0.7%, 5.5±1.0%, 9.9±1.1% and 16.1±0.9%). Contact was inconsistently distributed over the length of the taper. An increase in plastic radial deformation of the surface ridges (-0.05±0.14 μm, 0.1±0.14 μm, 0.21±0.22 μm and 0.96±0.25 μm) was also observed with increasing assembly force. The limited contact of the taper surface ridges at lower assembly forces may influence corrosion rates, suggesting that the magnitude of the assembly force may affect clinical outcome. The method presented provides a simple and practical assessment of the contact area at the taper interface. PMID:26280914

  2. Effect of Surface Chemistry on the Mechanisms and Governing Laws of Friction and Wear.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ling; Sorkin, Viacheslav; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that interface chemistry, that is, the formation and breaking of chemical bonds across contacting interfaces, is closely related to the wear and friction behavior at the nanoscale. In reality, the dangling bond density (DBD) at contacting surfaces can vary greatly. Currently, it remains unclear how friction and wear mechanisms depend on DBDs and whether the Archard's law for wear and Amonton's law for friction are still applicable for contacting surfaces with different DBDs. In this work, we address these issues by studying the wear and friction behavior between two sliding diamond-like carbon surfaces by controlling DBDs via hydrogenation using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the chemical bond breaking and remaking across the contacting interface play the key role in determining the friction and wear behavior. During the sliding, a higher DBD leads to more chemical bond formations across the interface, causing stronger wear via either atom or cluster detachments. With the same DBD, a mechanism transition from an atom-by-atom to cluster detachments is observed by increasing the normal load. Remarkably, a fully saturated surface can exhibit a wearless friction. We further show that after necessary modifications, the Archard's law for wear and the Amonton's law for friction may be applicable at the nanoscale. The present work reveals insights into the effect of interface chemistry on the friction and wear, and it provides guidelines for effective antiwear design. PMID:27004415

  3. Bubble departure in the direct-contact boiling field with a continuous liquid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoguchi, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-15

    Behavior of vapor bubbles was experimentally investigated in the boiling field where a volatile liquid layer of per-fluorocarbon PF5050 (boiling point 306K) was directly in contact with an immiscible hot liquid layer of water above it. Heat was supplied to the continuous liquid-liquid interface by the impingement of the downward hot water jet. Vapor bubbles were generated not only from this continuous interface but from a large number of PF5050 droplets floating on it. According to precise observation, incipience of boiling did not occur at the liquid-liquid interface but in the PF5050 liquid close to the interface in both cases of continuous and dispersed interfaces. As a result, the bubbles broke up the thin PF5050 liquid film above them and rose up into the water layer. This bubble departure phenomenon, which does not occur in the ordinary pool boiling field on the solid heating wall, is very important to evaluate the heat transfer performance in the present direct-contact boiling system. For modeling this behavior, sizes of the bubbles were measured at the moment just after they were released into the water pool. Volumes of the bubbles were larger in the case of departing from the continuous liquid-liquid interface than from the droplets. This tendency could be explained by taking into account the buoyancy force acting on unit area of the thin PF5050 liquid film above the bubble before departure, which was one of the most important parameters for the liquid film breakdown. (author)

  4. Thermal Contact Conductance Analysis of Nitride and Carbonitride Thin Film Coatings for Thermal Interface Material Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramani, Shanmugan; Thing, Lee Yuan; Devarajan, Mutharasu

    2015-12-01

    In order to reduce and maintain the bond line thickness between substrate and LED package, solid thin film with good thermal conductivity is suggested as thermal interface material and the proposed film thickness is about less than 1 µ. The surface parameter such as roughness and hardness is a key factor which alters the contact conductance between the two matt surfaces. Consequently, filtered vacuum cathodic arc deposited nitride thin films (CrN, TiN, AlTiN, and TiCN) on copper substrate were tested for thermal interface material applications in electronic packaging. The thermal contact conductance of the prepared thin films was evaluated using surface properties such as microhardness and surface roughness. The results were verified with the theoretical model. The measured microhardness and surface roughness of CrN thin film are 17 GPa (low) and 0.768 µm (high), respectively. The measured thermal contact conductance of all thin films showed linear properties for applied pressure and very close to the values of theoretical model. High value in thermal contact conductance of about 256 W/m2 K was noticed with CrN thin film at 1100 kPa. The percentage of deviation for our measured contact conductance value from the theoretical model value was decreasing for the increased contact pressure and observed low value (7 pct) for CrN thin film at 1100 kPa. The thermal conductivity of all thin films was also calculated from the conductance model and observed high value (19.34 W/mK) with CrN thin film.

  5. Adjustments to Local Friction in Multifinger Prehension

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Tomoko; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    The authors studied the effects of surface friction at the digit–object interface on digit forces and moments when 12 participants statically held an object in a 5-digit grasp. The authors changed low-friction contact (LFC) with rayon and high-friction contact (HFC) with sandpaper independently for each digit in all 32 possible combinations. Normal forces of the thumb and virtual finger (VF), an imagined finger with a mechanical effect equal to that of the 4 fingers, increased with the thumb at LFC or with an increase in the number of fingers at LFC. When the thumb was at LFC, the thumb tangential force decreased. The VF tangential force decreased when the number of fingers at LFC increased. The interaction of the local responses to friction and the synergic responses necessary to maintain the equilibrium explain the coordination of individual digit forces. PMID:17664170

  6. Tuning thermal contact conductance at graphene-copper interface via surface nanoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yang; Li, Lei; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Zhang, Jingchao

    2015-03-01

    Due to rapidly increasing power densities in nanoelectronics, efficient heat removal has become one of the most critical issues in thermal management and nanocircuit design. In this study, we report a surface nanoengineering design that can reduce the interfacial thermal resistance between graphene and copper substrate by 17%. Contrary to the conventional view that a rough surface tends to give higher thermal contact resistances, we find that by engraving the copper substrate with nanopillared patterns, an optimized hybrid structure can effectively facilitate the thermal transport across the graphene-copper interface. This counterintuitive behavior is due to the enhanced phonon interactions with the optimal nanopillared pattern. For pliable 2D materials like graphene, the structures can be easily bent to fit the surface formations of the substrate. The suspended areas of graphene are pulled towards the substrate via an attractive interatomic force, causing high local pressures (~2.9 MPa) on the top region of nanopillars. The high local pressures can greatly enhance the thermal energy coupling between graphene and copper, thereby lowering the thermal contact resistances. Our study provides a practical way to manipulate the thermal contact resistance between graphene and copper for the improvement of nano-device performance through engineering optimal nanoscale contact.Due to rapidly increasing power densities in nanoelectronics, efficient heat removal has become one of the most critical issues in thermal management and nanocircuit design. In this study, we report a surface nanoengineering design that can reduce the interfacial thermal resistance between graphene and copper substrate by 17%. Contrary to the conventional view that a rough surface tends to give higher thermal contact resistances, we find that by engraving the copper substrate with nanopillared patterns, an optimized hybrid structure can effectively facilitate the thermal transport across the graphene

  7. Organic heterojunctions: Contact-induced molecular reorientation, interface states, and charge re-distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opitz, Andreas; Wilke, Andreas; Amsalem, Patrick; Oehzelt, Martin; Blum, Ralf-Peter; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Mizokuro, Toshiko; Hörmann, Ulrich; Hansson, Rickard; Moons, Ellen; Koch, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    We reveal the rather complex interplay of contact-induced re-orientation and interfacial electronic structure - in the presence of Fermi-level pinning - at prototypical molecular heterojunctions comprising copper phthalocyanine (H16CuPc) and its perfluorinated analogue (F16CuPc), by employing ultraviolet photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For both layer sequences, we find that Fermi-level (EF) pinning of the first layer on the conductive polymer substrate modifies the work function encountered by the second layer such that it also becomes EF-pinned, however, at the interface towards the first molecular layer. This results in a charge transfer accompanied by a sheet charge density at the organic/organic interface. While molecules in the bulk of the films exhibit upright orientation, contact formation at the heterojunction results in an interfacial bilayer with lying and co-facial orientation. This interfacial layer is not EF-pinned, but provides for an additional density of states at the interface that is not present in the bulk. With reliable knowledge of the organic heterojunction’s electronic structure we can explain the poor performance of these in photovoltaic cells as well as their valuable function as charge generation layer in electronic devices.

  8. Organic heterojunctions: Contact-induced molecular reorientation, interface states, and charge re-distribution.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Andreas; Wilke, Andreas; Amsalem, Patrick; Oehzelt, Martin; Blum, Ralf-Peter; Rabe, Jürgen P; Mizokuro, Toshiko; Hörmann, Ulrich; Hansson, Rickard; Moons, Ellen; Koch, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the rather complex interplay of contact-induced re-orientation and interfacial electronic structure - in the presence of Fermi-level pinning - at prototypical molecular heterojunctions comprising copper phthalocyanine (H16CuPc) and its perfluorinated analogue (F16CuPc), by employing ultraviolet photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For both layer sequences, we find that Fermi-level (EF) pinning of the first layer on the conductive polymer substrate modifies the work function encountered by the second layer such that it also becomes EF-pinned, however, at the interface towards the first molecular layer. This results in a charge transfer accompanied by a sheet charge density at the organic/organic interface. While molecules in the bulk of the films exhibit upright orientation, contact formation at the heterojunction results in an interfacial bilayer with lying and co-facial orientation. This interfacial layer is not EF-pinned, but provides for an additional density of states at the interface that is not present in the bulk. With reliable knowledge of the organic heterojunction's electronic structure we can explain the poor performance of these in photovoltaic cells as well as their valuable function as charge generation layer in electronic devices. PMID:26887445

  9. Organic heterojunctions: Contact-induced molecular reorientation, interface states, and charge re-distribution

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Andreas; Wilke, Andreas; Amsalem, Patrick; Oehzelt, Martin; Blum, Ralf-Peter; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Mizokuro, Toshiko; Hörmann, Ulrich; Hansson, Rickard; Moons, Ellen; Koch, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the rather complex interplay of contact-induced re-orientation and interfacial electronic structure – in the presence of Fermi-level pinning – at prototypical molecular heterojunctions comprising copper phthalocyanine (H16CuPc) and its perfluorinated analogue (F16CuPc), by employing ultraviolet photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For both layer sequences, we find that Fermi-level (EF) pinning of the first layer on the conductive polymer substrate modifies the work function encountered by the second layer such that it also becomes EF-pinned, however, at the interface towards the first molecular layer. This results in a charge transfer accompanied by a sheet charge density at the organic/organic interface. While molecules in the bulk of the films exhibit upright orientation, contact formation at the heterojunction results in an interfacial bilayer with lying and co-facial orientation. This interfacial layer is not EF-pinned, but provides for an additional density of states at the interface that is not present in the bulk. With reliable knowledge of the organic heterojunction’s electronic structure we can explain the poor performance of these in photovoltaic cells as well as their valuable function as charge generation layer in electronic devices. PMID:26887445

  10. Atomistic Simulation of Single Asperity Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip; Kromer; Marder, Michael

    2003-03-01

    In the standard (Bowden and Tabor) model of friction, the macroscopic behavior of sliding results from the deformation of microscopic asperities in contact. A recent idea instead extracts macroscopic friction from the aggregate behavior of traveling, self-healing interfacial cracks: certain families of cracks are found to be mathematically forbidden, and the envelope of allowed cracks dictates the familiar Coulomb law of friction. To explore the connection between the new and traditional pictures of friction, we conducted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of single-asperity contact subjected to an oscillatory sliding force -- a geometry important for the problem of fretting (damage due to small-scale vibratory contact). Our simulations reveal the importance of traveling interface cracks to the dynamics of slip at the interface, and illuminate the dynamics of crack initiation and suppression.