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Sample records for frictional contact method

  1. A 3D Frictional Segment-to-Segment Contact Method for Large Deformations and Quadratic Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T; Solberg, J

    2004-04-01

    Node-on-segment contact is the most common form of contact used today but has many deficiencies ranging from potential locking to non-smooth behavior with large sliding. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches are not at all applicable to higher order discretizations (e.g. quadratic elements). In a previous work, [3, 4] we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach for eight node hexahedral elements based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the over-constraint that caused 'locking' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach to treat frictional contact problems. In addition, the method is extended to 3D quadratic tetrahedrals and hexahedrals. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems that demonstrate its effectiveness.

  2. A Mortar Segment-to-Segment Frictional Contact Method for Large Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T

    2003-10-29

    Contact modeling is still one of the most difficult aspects of nonlinear implicit structural analysis. Most 3D contact algorithms employed today use node-on-segment approaches for contacting dissimilar meshes. Two pass node-on-segment contact approaches have the well known deficiency of locking due to over constraint. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches suffer when individual nodes slide out of contact at contact surface boundaries or when contacting nodes slide from facet to facet. This causes jumps in the contact forces due to the discrete nature of the constraint enforcement and difficulties in convergence for implicit solution techniques. In a previous work, we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the overconstraint which caused ''locking'' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach in to treat frictional contact problems. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems which demonstrate its effectiveness.

  3. Computational Methods for Frictional Contact With Applications to the Space Shuttle Orbiter Nose-Gear Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the solution of frictional contact problems for aircraft tires. A Space Shuttle nose-gear tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory which includes the effects of variations in material and geometric parameters, transverse-shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities. Contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with both contact and friction conditions. The contact-friction algorithm is based on a modified Coulomb friction law. A modified two-field, mixed-variational principle is used to obtain elemental arrays. This modification consists of augmenting the functional of that principle by two terms: the Lagrange multiplier vector associated with normal and tangential node contact-load intensities and a regularization term that is quadratic in the Lagrange multiplier vector. These capabilities and computational features are incorporated into an in-house computer code. Experimental measurements were taken to define the response of the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire to inflation-pressure loads and to inflation-pressure loads combined with normal static loads against a rigid flat plate. These experimental results describe the meridional growth of the tire cross section caused by inflation loading, the static load-deflection characteristics of the tire, the geometry of the tire footprint under static loading conditions, and the normal and tangential load-intensity distributions in the tire footprint for the various static vertical loading conditions. Numerical results were obtained for the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire subjected to inflation pressure loads and combined inflation pressure and contact loads against a rigid flat plate. The experimental measurements and the numerical results are compared.

  4. Atomistic effects on friction and contact area in single and multi asperity contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Binquan; Robbins, Mark

    2008-03-01

    Contact and friction are universal phenomena in our daily life. Theoretical studies of macroscopic contact and friction are usually based on continuum theories such as Hertz theory and Amontons's laws. Recent advances in nanotechnology have stimulated research into friction at the nanometer scale where new phenomena emerge. Contact and friction in single- and multi-asperity contacts with nanometer dimensions were studied using molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and a hybrid method. The hybrid method retains a full atomistic treatment near contacts and replaces more distant regions with a more efficient finite element description. Our results demonstrate that atomic-scale changes in surface structure produce huge changes in friction and contact area and substantial deviations from the predictions of continuum theories. Unanticipated surface plasticity is observed near peaks on crystalline surfaces. In the case of multiasperity amorphous systems, the rate of local plastic deformation near the surface is directly related to the frictional dissipation of energy.

  5. 3D BEM for orthotropic frictional contact of piezoelectric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tembleque, Luis; Buroni, Federico C.; Sáez, Andrés

    2015-09-01

    A numerical methodology to model the three-dimensional frictional contact interaction of piezoelectric materials in presence of electric fields is presented in this work. The boundary element method (BEM) is used in order to compute the electro-elastic influence coefficients. The proposed BEM formulation employs an explicit approach for the evaluation of the corresponding fundamental solutions, which are valid for general anisotropic behaviour meanwhile mathematical degeneracies in the context of the Stroh formalism are allowed. The contact methodology is based on an augmented Lagrangian formulation and uses an iterative Uzawa scheme of resolution. An orthotropic frictional law is implemented in this work so anisotropy is present both in the bulk and in the surface. The methodology is validated by comparison with benchmark analytical solutions. Some additional examples are presented and discussed in detail, revealing the importance of considering orthotropic frictional contact conditions in the electro-elastic analysis of this kind of problems.

  6. Effect of time derivative of contact area on dynamic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Kazuo

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated dynamic friction during oblique impact of a golf ball by evaluating the ball's angular velocity, contact force, and the contact area between the ball and target. The effect of the contact area on the angular velocities was evaluated, and the results indicated that the contact area plays an important role in dynamic friction. In this study, the dynamic friction force F was given by F = μN + μη dA/dt, where μ is the coefficient of friction, N is the contact force, dA/dt is the time derivative of the contact area A, and η is a coefficient associated with the contact area.

  7. Implicit frictional-contact model for soft particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezamabadi, Saeid; Radjai, Farhang; Averseng, Julien; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a novel numerical approach for the simulation of soft particles interacting via frictional contacts. This approach is based on an implicit formulation of the Material Point Method, allowing for large particle deformations, combined with the Contact Dynamics method for the treatment of unilateral frictional contacts between particles. This approach is both precise due to the treatment of contacts with no regularization and artificial damping parameters, and robust due to implicit time integration of both bulk degrees of freedom and relative contact velocities at the nodes representing the contact points. By construction, our algorithm is capable of handling arbitrary particle shapes and deformations. We illustrate this approach by two simple 2D examples: a Hertz contact and a rolling particle on an inclined plane. We also investigate the compaction of a packing of circular particles up to a solid fraction well above the jamming limit of hard particles. We find that, for the same level of deformation, the solid fraction in a packing of frictional particles is above that of a packing of frictionless particles as a result of larger particle shape change.

  8. The Frictional Force with Respect to the Actual Contact Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Ragnar

    1944-01-01

    Hardy's statement that the frictional force is largely adhesion, and to a lesser extent, deformation energy is proved by a simple experiment. The actual contact surface of sliding contacts and hence the friction per unit of contact surface was determined in several cases. It was found for contacts in normal atmosphere to be about one-third t-one-half as high as the macroscopic tearing strength of the softest contact link, while contacts annealed in vacuum and then tested, disclosed frictional forces which are greater than the macroscopic strength.

  9. Assessing the accuracy of different simplified frictional rolling contact algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollebregt, E. A. H.; Iwnicki, S. D.; Xie, G.; Shackleton, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for assessing the accuracy of different frictional rolling contact theories. The main characteristic of the approach is that it takes a statistically oriented view. This yields a better insight into the behaviour of the methods in diverse circumstances (varying contact patch ellipticities, mixed longitudinal, lateral and spin creepages) than is obtained when only a small number of (basic) circumstances are used in the comparison. The range of contact parameters that occur for realistic vehicles and tracks are assessed using simulations with the Vampire vehicle system dynamics (VSD) package. This shows that larger values for the spin creepage occur rather frequently. Based on this, our approach is applied to typical cases for which railway VSD packages are used. The results show that particularly the USETAB approach but also FASTSIM give considerably better results than the linear theory, Vermeulen-Johnson, Shen-Hedrick-Elkins and Polach methods, when compared with the 'complete theory' of the CONTACT program.

  10. Contact Hysteresis and Friction of Alkanethiol SAMs on Au

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Kiely, J.D.

    1998-10-14

    Nanoindentation has been combhed with nanometer-scale friction measurements to identi~ dissipative mechanisms responsible for friction in hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayer on Au. We have demonstrated that friction is primarily due to viscoelastic relaxations within the films, which give rise to contact hysteresis when deformation rates are within the ranges of 5 and 200 k. We observe that this contact hysteresis increases with exposure to air such that the friction coefficient increases from 0.004 to 0.075 when films are exposed to air for 40 days. Both hysteresis and friction increase with probe speed, and we present a model of friction that characterizes this speed dependence and which also predicts a linear dependence of friction on normal force in thin organic films. Finally, we identify several short-term wear regimes and identify that wear changes dramatically when fdms age.

  11. Instrument Measures Airflow Friction Without Contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Dual beam laser interferometer determines airflow friction against body by measuring time-varying thickness of wind sheared oil film. Measurements yield skin friction between film and airstream. Errors from prerun oil flow, tunnel starting transients, and initial surface waves therefore eliminated.

  12. Estimation of real contact area during sliding friction from interface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chey, Sung Keun; Tian, Pengyi; Tian, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Frictional heat is one of the most important topics in tribological research. The real contact area of the frictional pair plays a significant role in accurately estimating the interface temperature, which is closely related to the frictional heat. However, conventional methods for measuring the contact area, such as constriction resistance measurements, are not suitable for dynamic frictional motion because of the electrical and thermal interferences at the contact region. In this study, a novel method is presented for estimating the real contact area during sliding friction. First, the average interface temperature was experimentally measured by the dynamic thermocouple method. Then assuming that the total frictional heat power is constant, the measured temperature was used as a constraint to determine the contact area in a finite element model, giving an estimation for the real contact area. The calculation results show that the real contact area increases with increasing normal load as predicted by contact theories, and decreases with increasing sliding speed, which could be attributable to the contact dynamics of asperities at the interface. Additionally, the limits of the proposed method is discussed.

  13. Computational methods for frictional contact with applications to the Space Shuttle orbiter nose-gear tire: Comparisons of experimental measurements and analytical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the solution of frictional contact problems for aircraft tires. A Space Shuttle nose-gear tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory which includes the effects of variations in material and geometric parameters, transverse-shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities. Contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with both contact and friction conditions. The contact-friction algorithm is based on a modified Coulomb friction law. A modified two-field, mixed-variational principle is used to obtain elemental arrays. This modification consists of augmenting the functional of that principle by two terms: the Lagrange multiplier vector associated with normal and tangential node contact-load intensities and a regularization term that is quadratic in the Lagrange multiplier vector. These capabilities and computational features are incorporated into an in-house computer code. Experimental measurements were taken to define the response of the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire to inflation-pressure loads and to inflation-pressure loads combined with normal static loads against a rigid flat plate. These experimental results describe the meridional growth of the tire cross section caused by inflation loading, the static load-deflection characteristics of the tire, the geometry of the tire footprint under static loading conditions, and the normal and tangential load-intensity distributions in the tire footprint for the various static vertical-loading conditions. Numerical results were obtained for the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire subjected to inflation pressure loads and combined inflation pressure and contact loads against a rigid flat plate. The experimental measurements and the numerical results are compared.

  14. Microscopic contact area and friction between medical textiles and skin.

    PubMed

    Derler, S; Rotaru, G-M; Ke, W; El Issawi-Frischknecht, L; Kellenberger, P; Scheel-Sailer, A; Rossi, R M

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical contact between medical textiles and skin is relevant in the health care for patients with vulnerable skin or chronic wounds. In order to gain new insights into the skin-textile contact on the microscopic level, the 3D surface topography of a normal and a new hospital bed sheet with a regular surface structure was measured using a digital microscope. The topographic data was analysed concerning material distribution and real contact area against smooth surfaces as a function of surface deformations. For contact conditions that are relevant for the skin of patients lying in a hospital bed it was found that the order of magnitude of the ratio of real and apparent contact area between textiles and skin or a mechanical skin model lies between 0.02 and 0.1 and that surface deformations, i.e. penetration of the textile surface asperities into skin or a mechanical skin model, range from 10 to 50µm. The performed analyses of textile 3D surface topographies and comparisons with previous friction measurement results provided information on the relationship between microscopic surface properties and macroscopic friction behaviour of medical textiles. In particular, the new bed sheet was found to be characterised by a trend towards a smaller microscopic contact area (up to a factor of two) and by a larger free interfacial volume (more than a factor of two) in addition to a 1.5 times lower shear strength when in contact with counter-surfaces. The applied methods can be useful to develop improved and skin-adapted materials and surfaces for medical applications. PMID:25047353

  15. Kalker's algorithm Fastsim solves tangential contact problems with slip-dependent friction and friction anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents two extensions of Kalker's algorithm Fastsim of the simplified theory of rolling contact. The first extension is for solving tangential contact problems with the coefficient of friction depending on slip velocity. Two friction laws have been considered: with and without recuperation of the static friction. According to the tribological hypothesis for metallic bodies shear failure, the friction law without recuperation of static friction is more suitable for wheel and rail than the other one. Sample results present local quantities inside the contact area (division to slip and adhesion, traction) as well as global ones (creep forces as functions of creepages and rolling velocity). For the coefficient of friction diminishing with slip, the creep forces decay after reaching the maximum and they depend on the rolling velocity. The second extension is for solving tangential contact problems with friction anisotropy characterised by a convex set of the permissible tangential tractions. The effect of the anisotropy has been shown on examples of rolling without spin and in the presence of pure spin for the elliptical set. The friction anisotropy influences tangential tractions and creep forces. Sample results present local and global quantities. Both extensions have been described with the same language of formulation and they may be merged into one, joint algorithm.

  16. Coulomb frictional contact by explicit projection in the cone for finite displacement quasi-static problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Rabczuk, T.; de Melo, F. J. M. Queirós; de Sá, J. César

    2015-01-01

    We propose, in this paper, a distinct perspective on the solution of the Coulomb frictional contact problem. By combining the prediction/correction method for the contact force vector with the correction step being a cone projection and writing the friction cone surface in the quadratic form, we directly calculate the contact force. The distance along the friction cone normal is determined by solving a nonlinear problem in closed form. Numerical advantages of this projection are apparent for large values of friction coefficient. Six problems previously indicated as difficult to solve by the node-to-segment discretization and the operator split algorithm are here solved with the new projection algorithm. Discretization follows node-to segment and node-to-face derivations with gap vector defined in a global frame (without tangential and normal decomposition). In addition, we provide source codes for the 2D and 3D contact cases.

  17. Contact and friction of nanoasperities: effects of adsorbed monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Luan, Binquan; Robbins, Mark O

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study contact between a rigid, nonadhesive, and spherical tip with radius of order 30 nm and a flat elastic substrate covered with a fluid monolayer of adsorbed chain molecules. Previous studies of bare surfaces showed that the atomic scale deviations from a sphere that are present on any tip constructed from discrete atoms lead to significant deviations from continuum theory and dramatic variability in friction forces. Introducing an adsorbed monolayer leads to larger deviations from continuum theory but decreases the variations between tips with different atomic structure. Although the film is fluid, it remains in the contact and behaves qualitatively like a thin elastic coating except for certain tips at high loads. Measures of the contact area based on the moments or outer limits of the pressure distribution and on counting contacting atoms are compared. The number of tip atoms making contact during a time interval Deltat grows as a power of Deltat when the film is present and as the logarithm of Deltat for bare surfaces. Friction is measured by displacing the tip at a constant velocity or pulling the tip with a spring. Both static and kinetic friction rise linearly with load at small loads. Transitions in the state of the film lead to nonlinear behavior at large loads. The friction is less clearly correlated with contact area than load. PMID:20365427

  18. Non-contact friction for ion-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D.; Lach, Grzegorz

    2015-05-01

    Non-contact friction forces are exerted on physical systems through dissipative processes, when the two systems are not in physical contact with each other, or, in quantum mechanical terms, when the overlap of their wave functions is negligible. Non-contact friction is mediated by the exchange of virtual quanta, with the additional requirement that the scattering process needs to have an inelastic component. For finite-temperature ion-surface interactions, the friction is essentially caused by Ohmic resistance due to the motion of the image charge moving in a dielectric material. A conceivable experiment is difficult because the friction force needs to be isolated from the interaction with the image charge, which significantly distorts the ion's flight path. We propose an experimental setup which is designed to minimize the influence of the image charge interaction though a compensation mechanism, and evaluate the energy loss due to non-contact friction for helium ions (He+) interacting with gold, vanadium, titanium and graphite surfaces. Interactions with the infinite series of mirror charges in the plates are summed in terms of the logarithmic derivatives of the Gamma function, and of the Hurwitz zeta function.

  19. Analysis of composite material interface crack face contact and friction effects using a new node-pairs contact algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhi-Peng; He, Yu-Bo; Wan, Shui

    2014-06-01

    A new node-pairs contact algorithm is proposed to deal with a composite material or bi-material interface crack face contact and friction problem (e.g., resistant coating and thermal barrier coatings) subjected to complicated load conditions. To decrease the calculation scale and calculation errors, the local Lagrange multipliers are solved only on a pair of contact nodes using the Jacobi iteration method, and the constraint modification of the tangential multipliers are required. After the calculation of the present node-pairs Lagrange multiplier, it is turned to next contact node-pairs until all node-pairs have finished. Compared with an ordinary contact algorithm, the new local node-pairs contact algorithm is allowed a more precise element on the contact face without the stiffness matrix singularity. The stress intensity factors (SIFs) and the contact region of an infinite plate central crack are calculated and show good agreement with those in the literature. The contact zone near the crack tip as well as its influence on singularity of stress fields are studied. Furthermore, the frictional contacts are also considered and found to have a significant influence on the SIFs. The normalized mode-II stress intensity factors K̂II for the friction coefficient decrease by 16% when f changes from 1 to 0.

  20. Friction drive of an SAW motor. Part IV: physics of contact.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi

    2008-10-01

    A procedure for modeling the frictional heating and electricity of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) motor is proposed. The frictional heat is developed during friction drive when sliding occurs at the frictional interface; the heat is conducted into the solids, resulting in an increase in temperature. The spatial distribution of the heat source was associated with the contact pressure distribution, and the heat conduction from the heat source was formulated. Owing to the piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity of the stator used in the present study, the elastic deformation and temperature increase produce the electric fields. The electric fields in the stator were determined with respect to each cause. Electric discontinuity at the boundary between the stator and the slider, moreover, produces electrostatic force, which was calculated using a Maxwell stress tensor. All the analyses revealed the underlying physical fields in addition to the mechanical fields of the SAW motor. By the use of those analytical methods, the frictional properties of the SAW motor were discussed. We pointed out that another physical phenomenoniquestcontact electrificationiquestcould arise at the contact interface. The electrostatic force due to contact electrification had sufficient strength to change the friction property, which corresponded to the variation of the friction coefficient from 0.1 to 1. PMID:18986875

  1. Direct measurement of friction of a fluctuating contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuo; Gao, Min; Xiong, Xiaomin; Wang, Yong Jian; Wang, Xiaoping; Sheng, Ping; Tong, Penger

    2013-03-01

    What happens at a moving contact line, where one fluid displaces another (immiscible) fluid over a solid surface, is a fundamental issue in fluid dynamics. In this presentation, we report a direct measurement of the friction coefficient in the immediate vicinity of a fluctuating contact line using a micron-sized vertical glass fiber with one end glued to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beam and the other end touching a liquid-air interface. By measuring the broadening of the resonance peak of the cantilever system with varying liquid viscosity η, we obtain the friction coefficient ξc associated with the contact line fluctuations on the glass fiber of diameter d and find it has the universal form, ξc = 0 . 8 πdη , independent of the contact angle. The result is further confirmed by using a soap film system whose bulk effect is negligibly small. This is the first time that the friction coefficient of a fluctuating contact line is measured. *Work supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  2. Direct Measurement of Friction of a Fluctuating Contact Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuo; Gao, Min; Xiong, Xiaomin; Wang, Yong Jian; Wang, Xiaoping; Sheng, Ping; Tong, Penger

    2013-07-01

    We report a direct measurement of the friction coefficient of a fluctuating (and slipping) contact line using a thin vertical glass fiber of diameter d with one end glued onto a cantilever beam and the other end touching a liquid-air interface. By measuring the broadening of the resonant peak of the cantilever system with varying liquid viscosity η, we find the friction coefficient of the contact line has a universal form, ξc≃0.8πdη, independent of the liquid-solid contact angle. The obtained scaling law is further supported by the numerical simulation based on the phase field model under the generalized Navier boundary conditions.

  3. Direct measurement of friction of a fluctuating contact line.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuo; Gao, Min; Xiong, Xiaomin; Wang, Yong Jian; Wang, Xiaoping; Sheng, Ping; Tong, Penger

    2013-07-12

    We report a direct measurement of the friction coefficient of a fluctuating (and slipping) contact line using a thin vertical glass fiber of diameter d with one end glued onto a cantilever beam and the other end touching a liquid-air interface. By measuring the broadening of the resonant peak of the cantilever system with varying liquid viscosity η, we find the friction coefficient of the contact line has a universal form, ξ(c)≃0.8πdη, independent of the liquid-solid contact angle. The obtained scaling law is further supported by the numerical simulation based on the phase field model under the generalized Navier boundary conditions. PMID:23889421

  4. Spanning From Atoms to Micrometers in Simulations of Contact, Adhesion and Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    Improved understanding of the forces between realistic solid surfaces is needed to optimize adhesion and friction. Modeling these forces is challenging because they arise from interactions between atoms separated by less than a nanometer, but the number and spatial distribution of these contacting atoms depends on surface roughness and deformation on micrometer and larger scales. There are also strong scale effects in the role of elastic deformations along the surface. The talk will first describe a seamless Greens function (GF) method that allows a full treatment of elastic deformations and atomic contact for micrometer scale surfaces and multibody potentials. Next applications of the method to calculations of the contact area, contact stiffness, adhesion and friction for a range of geometries and interactions will be described. The results can be captured with simple analytic expressions and explain why most contacting surfaces do not adhere. Theoretical and experimental studies of single nanometer-scale asperities show that the frictional shear stress depends strongly on whether surfaces are commensurate. A large constant stress is obtained for identical, aligned crystalline surfaces, but the stress averages to zero in the more common case of incommensurate surfaces. The resulting ultralow friction is called superlubricity and is found in experiments and simulations of small contacts. Our simulations reveal dramatic changes in this behavior because different parts of the surface are able to advance independently as the contact radius increases towards micrometer scales. The friction between identical surfaces drops with increasing radius and then saturates at a low value. The force between incommensurate surfaces saturates at a similar value that can be related to the Peierls stress for dislocation motion at the interface. Studies of multiasperity contacts also show that incoherent motion along the interface can lead to pronounced changes in the macroscopic

  5. Molecular dynamics investigation of the effect of copper nanoparticle on the solid contact between friction surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chengzhi; Bai, Minli; Lv, Jizu; Liu, Hao; Li, Xiaojie

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of copper (Cu) nanoparticles on the solid contact between friction surfaces by applying a molecular dynamics method to reveal the mechanisms responsible for the favorable friction properties of nanoparticles. Two models were built, which were named model A (without Cu) and model B (with Cu), respectively. The differences in the mechanical properties between these two models were compared. The simulation results demonstrated that the improvement in friction properties by Cu nanoparticles was more obvious at low velocity than at high velocity. At low velocity, a Cu nano-film was formed on the friction surface, which accommodated the velocity gradient and plastic deformation. Due to the good lubrication effect of the nano-film, the plastic deformation, defect structures and friction force of model B were improved compared with model A. Under high velocity conditions, a transfer layer appeared adjacent to the interface in both models. Because of this, the friction forces of the two models decreased with increased velocity. The fluid mechanics theory was used to explain why the friction force in model B was lower than that in model A at high velocity. The effect of the load on friction properties was also analyzed and the results showed that the mechanisms of anti-wear and friction reduction by Cu nanoparticles under a low load were the same as those under a high load.

  6. Friction and shear fracture of an adhesive contact under torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chateauminois, Antoine; Fretigny, Christian; Olanier, Ludovic

    2010-02-01

    The shear failure or stiction of an adhesive contact between a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) rubber and a glass lens has been investigated using a torsional contact configuration. As compared to linear sliding, torsion presents the advantage of inducing a shear failure under a pure mode III condition, while preserving the cylindrical symmetry of the contact. The surface of the transparent PDMS substrate was marked using a network of dots in order to monitor continuously the in-plane surface displacements during the stiction process. Using a previously developed inversion procedure (A. Chateauminois and C. Fretigny, Eur. Phys. J. E 27, 221 (2008)), the corresponding surface shear stress distributions were obtained from the displacement fields. Stiction was found to involve the progressive shrinkage of a central adhesive zone surrounded by an annular microslip region. Adhesion effects were especially evidenced from a stress overshoot at the boundary of the adhesive zone. The experimental data were analysis using an extension to torsional contact of the Maugis-Dugdale approach’s to adhesive contacts which takes into account frictional effects. This model allowed to extract an effective adhesion energy in the presence of friction, which dependence on kinetics effect is briefly discussed.

  7. Evidence for Contact Delocalization in Atomic Scale Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, D. G.; Krylov, S. Yu.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2007-10-01

    We analyze an advanced two-spring model with an ultralow effective tip mass to predict nontrivial and physically rich “fine structure” in the atomic stick-slip motion in friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments. We demonstrate that this fine structure is present in recent, puzzling experiments. This shows that the tip apex can be completely or partially delocalized, thus shedding new light on what is measured in FFM and, possibly, what can happen with the asperities that establish the contact between macroscopic sliding bodies.

  8. A computational study of brush seal contact loads with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksit, Mahmut Faruk

    The brush seal is emerging as a new technology to effectively control cooling and leakage flows in gas turbine engines. With their superior leakage performance, they show the potential to replace current labyrinth seals in gas turbine engines. Because the bristles slide against the rotor surface, wear at the contact becomes a major concern as it determines the life and efficiency of the seal. To optimize seal life and efficiency, an in-depth study of the factors causing the seal stiffness is needed, and a good choice of materials must be made. Although considerable research has been done on material selection and tribopairs, a brief survey reveals the lack of reliable analyses to evaluate contact loads, and to address heat transfer issues. As material pairs have been optimized for most cases, understanding and management of contact loads hold the key for further improvements in seal life. The complicated nature of bristle behavior under various combinations of pressure load and rotor interference requires computer analysis to study details that may not be available through analytical formulations. In an attempt to meet this need, this study presents a 3-D finite element model of a brush seal. The model consists of a representative bristle bundle with a backing plate and a rotor surface. Every bristle is defined by a number of 3-D quadratic beam elements. Bristles are fixed at the top nodes, while they are free to move in any direction at the tip touching the rotor surface. The model consists of 10 to 13 circumferential rows of bristles. The number of rows are based on the actual packing thickness of the seal modeled. Unlike previous analytical studies on brush seal contact loads, this work includes nonlinear frictional effects between the bristles. Frictional effects are known to drastically change the seal behavior, and are crucial in determining the contact forces. The model applies the available published experimental data to define the boundary conditions and

  9. Local origin of global contact numbers in frictional ellipsoid packings.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Fabian M; Neudecker, Max; Saadatfar, Mohammad; Delaney, Gary W; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E; Schröter, Matthias

    2015-04-17

    In particulate soft matter systems the average number of contacts Z of a particle is an important predictor of the mechanical properties of the system. Using x-ray tomography, we analyze packings of frictional, oblate ellipsoids of various aspect ratios α, prepared at different global volume fractions ϕg. We find that Z is a monotonically increasing function of ϕg for all α. We demonstrate that this functional dependence can be explained by a local analysis where each particle is described by its local volume fraction ϕl computed from a Voronoi tessellation. Z can be expressed as an integral over all values of ϕl: Z(ϕg,α,X)=∫Zl(ϕl,α,X)P(ϕl|ϕg)dϕl. The local contact number function Zl(ϕl,α,X) describes the relevant physics in term of locally defined variables only, including possible higher order terms X. The conditional probability P(ϕl|ϕg) to find a specific value of ϕl given a global packing fraction ϕg is found to be independent of α and X. Our results demonstrate that for frictional particles a local approach is not only a theoretical requirement but also feasible. PMID:25933340

  10. Local Origin of Global Contact Numbers in Frictional Ellipsoid Packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Fabian M.; Neudecker, Max; Saadatfar, Mohammad; Delaney, Gary W.; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E.; Schröter, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    In particulate soft matter systems the average number of contacts Z of a particle is an important predictor of the mechanical properties of the system. Using x-ray tomography, we analyze packings of frictional, oblate ellipsoids of various aspect ratios α , prepared at different global volume fractions ϕg. We find that Z is a monotonically increasing function of ϕg for all α . We demonstrate that this functional dependence can be explained by a local analysis where each particle is described by its local volume fraction ϕl computed from a Voronoi tessellation. Z can be expressed as an integral over all values of ϕl: Z (ϕg,α ,X )=∫Zl(ϕl,α ,X )P (ϕl|ϕg)d ϕl . The local contact number function Zl(ϕl,α ,X ) describes the relevant physics in term of locally defined variables only, including possible higher order terms X . The conditional probability P (ϕl|ϕg) to find a specific value of ϕl given a global packing fraction ϕg is found to be independent of α and X . Our results demonstrate that for frictional particles a local approach is not only a theoretical requirement but also feasible.

  11. An alternative formulation for quasi-static frictional and cohesive contact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Pinto da Costa, A.; Rabczuk, T.; Queirós de Melo, F. J. M.; Dias-da-Costa, D.; Bezzeghoud, Mourad

    2014-04-01

    It is known by Engineering practitioners that quasi-static contact problems with friction and cohesive laws often present convergence difficulties in Newton iteration. These are commonly attributed to the non-smoothness of the equilibrium system. However, non-uniqueness of solutions is often an obstacle for convergence. We discuss these conditions in detail and present a general algorithm for 3D which is shown to have quadratic convergence in the Newton-Raphson iteration even for parts of the domain where multiple solutions exist. Chen-Mangasarian replacement functions remove the non-smoothness corresponding to both the stick-slip and normal complementarity conditions. Contrasting with Augmented Lagrangian methods, second-order updating is performed for all degrees-of-freedom. Stick condition is automatically selected by the algorithm for regions with multiple solutions. The resulting Jacobian determinant is independent of the friction coefficient, at the expense of an increased number of nodal degrees-of-freedom. Aspects such as a dedicated pivoting for constrained problems are also of crucial importance for a successful solution finding. The resulting 3D mixed formulation, with 7 degrees-of-freedom in each node (displacement components, friction multiplier, friction force components and normal force) is tested with representative numerical examples (both contact with friction and cohesive force), which show remarkable robustness and generality.

  12. Multigrid contact detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kejing; Dong, Shoubin; Zhou, Zhaoyao

    2007-03-01

    Contact detection is a general problem of many physical simulations. This work presents a O(N) multigrid method for general contact detection problems (MGCD). The multigrid idea is integrated with contact detection problems. Both the time complexity and memory consumption of the MGCD are O(N) . Unlike other methods, whose efficiencies are influenced strongly by the object size distribution, the performance of MGCD is insensitive to the object size distribution. We compare the MGCD with the no binary search (NBS) method and the multilevel boxing method in three dimensions for both time complexity and memory consumption. For objects with similar size, the MGCD is as good as the NBS method, both of which outperform the multilevel boxing method regarding memory consumption. For objects with diverse size, the MGCD outperform both the NBS method and the multilevel boxing method. We use the MGCD to solve the contact detection problem for a granular simulation system based on the discrete element method. From this granular simulation, we get the density property of monosize packing and binary packing with size ratio equal to 10. The packing density for monosize particles is 0.636. For binary packing with size ratio equal to 10, when the number of small particles is 300 times as the number of big particles, the maximal packing density 0.824 is achieved.

  13. Non-Amontons-Coulomb local friction law of randomly rough contact interfaces with rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Danh Toan; Wandersman, Elie; Prevost, Alexis; Le Chenadec, Yohan; Fretigny, Christian; Chateauminois, Antoine

    2013-12-01

    We report on measurements of the local friction law at a multi-contact interface formed between a smooth rubber and statistically rough glass lenses, under steady-state friction. Using contact imaging, surface displacements are measured, and inverted to extract both distributions of frictional shear stress and contact pressure with a spatial resolution of about 10\\ \\mu\\text{m} . For a glass surface whose topography is self-affine with a Gaussian height asperity distribution, the local frictional shear stress is found to vary sub-linearly with the local contact pressure over the whole investigated pressure range. Such sub-linear behavior is also evidenced for a surface with a non-Gaussian height asperity distribution, demonstrating that, for such multi-contact interfaces, Amontons-Coulomb's friction law does not prevail at the local scale.

  14. Water-vapor effects on friction of magnetic tape in contact with nickel-zinc ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of humidity of moist nitrogen on the friction and deformation behavior of magnetic tape in contact with a nickel-zinc ferrite spherical pin were studied. The results indicate that the coefficient of friction is markedly dependent on the ambient relative humidity. Although the coefficient of friction remains low below 40-percent relative humidity, it increases rapidly with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent. The general ambient environment of the tape does not have any effect on the friction behavior if the area where the tape is in sliding contact with the ferrite pin is flooded with controlled nitrogen. The response time for the friction of the tape to humidity changes is about 10 sec. The effect of friction as a function of relative humidity on dehumidifying is very similar to that on humidifying. A surface softening of the tape due to water vapor increases the friction of the tape.

  15. Direct observation of frictional contacts: New insights for state-dependent properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Kilgore, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rocks and many other materials display a rather complicated, but characteristic, dependence of friction on sliding history. These effects are well-described by empirical rate- and state-dependent constitutive formulations which have been utilized for analysis of fault slip and earthquake processes. We present a procedure for direct quantitative microscopic observation of frictional contacts during slip. The observations reveal that frictional state dependence represents an increase of contact area with contact age. Transient changes of sliding resistance correlate with changes in contact area and arise from shifts of contact population age. Displacement-dependent replacement of contact populations is shown to cause the diagnostic evolution of friction over a characteristic sliding distance that occurs whenever slip begins or sliding conditions change. ?? 1994 Birkha??user Verlag.

  16. Friction behavior of glass and metals in contact with glass in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments have been conducted for heat-resistant glass and metals in contact with glass. These experiments were conducted in various environments including vacuum, moist air, dry air, octane, and stearic acid in hexadecane. Glass exhibited a higher friction force in moist air than it did in vacuum when in sliding contact with itself. The metals, aluminum, iron, and gold, all exhibited the same friction coefficient when sliding on glass in vacuum as glass sliding on glass. Gold-to-glass contacts were extremely sensitive to the environment despite the relative chemical inertness of gold.

  17. Correlation between contact surface and friction during the optical glass polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkhir, N.; Aliouane, T.; Bouzid, D.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the correlation between the contact surface, the polishing pressure and the friction coefficient during the optical glass polishing. For this purpose, BK7 optical glass samples were polished and the mentioned parameters were measured to find a correlation between them. Several methods of characterization have been used; the mechanical profilometer, the AFM, and in addition setups for measuring forces and the contact surface have been developed and adapted to the polishing machine. The found results have shown the existence of a close relationship between the three parameters and the influence of each other. This have allowed to deduce that during the polishing process it is very important to control the contact pressure and the polisher form according to the pressure distribution in order to guarantee a very high quality of the polished surface.

  18. The friction behavior of semiconductors Si and GaAs in contact with pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.

    1984-01-01

    The friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals was studied. Five transition and two nontransition metals, titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, platinum, copper, and silver, slid on a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Four metals, indium, nickel, copper and silver, slid on a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Experiments were conducted in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 7th power N/sq cm (10 to the minus 9th power torr). The results indicate that the sliding of silicon on the transition metals exhibits relatively higher friction than for the nontransition metals in contact with silicon. There is a clear correlation between friction and Schottky barrier height formed at the metal silicon interface for the transition metals. Transition metals with a higher barrier height on silicon had a lower friction. The same effect of barrier height was found for the friction of gallium arsenide in contact with metals.

  19. Effect of capillary-condensed water on the dynamic friction force at nanoasperity contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirghi, L.

    2003-05-01

    A single nanoasperity contact in ambient air is usually wetted by capillary condensation of water vapor and is surrounded by a water meniscus. This phenomenon strongly affects the contact friction, not only by the effect of meniscus loading force (superficial tension and capillary forces), but also by a friction force that accounts for the energy loss in the meniscus movement along with the sliding contact. Occurrence of the water-meniscus-generated friction is experimentally proved by atomic force microscopy measurements of the tip-sample friction force at minimum possible external load (before pull-off). A qualitative explanation for the observed dependence of the friction force on air humidity and solid surface wettability is proposed.

  20. Frictional properties of two alkanethiol self assembled monolayers in sliding contact: Odd-even effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramin, Leyla; Jabbarzadeh, Ahmad

    2012-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation, we have investigated the structural effects on the frictional properties of self assembled monolayers (SAM) of n-alkanethiols [CH3(CH2)n-1SH, n = 12-15] in SAM-SAM contacts attached on Au (111) substrates. We have observed an odd-even effect where friction coefficient for SAM-SAM contacts with n = odd showed consistently higher values than those with n = even. This odd-even effect is independent of the sliding velocity and the relative tilt directions of the SAMs, and persists over a much higher pressure range than that reported before for SAM-Au contacts [L. Ramin and A. Jabbarzadeh, Langmuir 28, 4102-4112 (2012), 10.1021/la204701z]. For odd systems higher gauche defects were shown to be the possible source of high friction coefficient. Under the same load and shear rates (comparable sliding velocities), SAM-SAM contacts show mostly higher friction compared to SAM-Au contacts. For SAM-SAM contacts, a more significant increase of friction occurs at higher shear rates due to a shift in the tilt orientation angle. We show SAM-SAM contacts with misaligned relative tilt orientation angle (˜45°-90°) have considerably lower friction compared with those whose tilt orientation angles are almost aligned in the opposite directions and parallel to the shear.

  1. Modeling of contact mechanics and friction limit surfaces for soft fingers in robotics, with experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Xydas, N.; Kao, I.

    1999-09-01

    A new theory in contact mechanics for modeling of soft fingers is proposed to define the relationship between the normal force and the radius of contact for soft fingers by considering general soft-finger materials, including linearly and nonlinearly elastic materials. The results show that the radius of contact is proportional to the normal force raised to the power of {gamma}, which ranges from 0 to 1/3. This new theory subsumes the Hertzian contact model for linear elastic materials, where {gamma} = 1/3. Experiments are conducted to validate the theory using artificial soft fingers made of various materials such as rubber and silicone. Results for human fingers are also compared. This theory provides a basis for numerically constructing friction limit surfaces. The numerical friction limit surface can be approximated by an ellipse, with the major and minor axes as the maximum friction force and the maximum moment with respect to the normal axis of contact, respectively. Combining the results of the contact-mechanics model with the contact-pressure distribution, the normalized friction limit surface can be derived for anthropomorphic soft fingers. The results of the contact-mechanics model and the pressure distribution for soft fingers facilitate the construction of numerical friction limit surfaces, and will enable us to analyze and simulate contact behaviors of grasping and manipulation in robotics.

  2. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, H.B.

    1991-01-01

    A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel`s recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding, process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

  3. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, Harold B.

    1992-01-01

    A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

  4. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, H.B.

    1992-10-13

    A method is described for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical canister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained. 5 figs.

  5. Anisotropic friction and wear of single-crystal manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with itself

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with manganese-zinc ferrite (100), (110), (111), and (211) planes in contact with themselves. Mating the highest-atomic-density directions, (110), of matched crystallographic planes resulted in the lowest coefficients of friction. Mating matched (same) high-atomic-density planes and matched (same)crystallographic directions resulted in low coefficients of friction. Mating dissimilar crystallographic planes, however, did not give significantly different friction results from those with matched planes. Sliding caused cracking and the formation of hexagonal- and rectangular-platelet wear debris on ferrite surfaces, primarily from cleavage of the (110) planes.

  6. Estimation of coefficient of friction for a mechanical system with combined rolling-sliding contact using vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Sriram; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2015-06-01

    A new dynamic experiment is proposed to estimate the coefficient of friction for a mechanical system with a combined rolling-sliding contact under a mixed lubrication regime. The experiment is designed and instrumented based on an analogous contact mechanics model, taking into consideration the constraints to ensure no impact and no sliding velocity reversal. The system consists of a cam (rotating with a constant speed) having a point contact with a follower that oscillates about a frictionless pivot, while maintaining contact with the cam with the help of a well-designed translational spring. The viscous damping elements for contact are identified for two different lubricants from an impulse test using the half-power bandwidth method. Dynamic responses (with the cam providing an input to the system) are measured in terms of the follower acceleration and the reaction forces at the follower pivot. A frequency domain based signal processing technique is proposed to estimate the coefficient of friction using the complex-valued Fourier amplitudes of the measured forces and acceleration. The coefficient of friction is estimated for the mechanical system with different surface roughnesses using two lubricants; these are also compared with similar values for both dry and lubricated cases as reported in the literature. An empirical relationship for the coefficient of friction is suggested based on a prior model under a mixed lubrication regime. Possible sources of errors in the estimation procedure are identified and quantified.

  7. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with titanium. Results indicate that the friction coefficient is greater in vacuum than in argon and that this is due to the greater adhesion or adhesive transfer in vacuum. Thin films of silicon carbide transferred to titanium also adhered to silicon carbide both in argon at atmospheric pressure and in high vacuum. Cohesive bonds fractured on both the silicon carbide and titanium surfaces. The wear debris of silicon carbide created by fracture plowed the silicon carbide surface in a plastic manner. The friction characteristics of titanium in contact with silicon carbide were sensitive to the surface roughness of silicon carbide, and the friction coefficients were higher for a rough surface of silicon carbide than for a smooth one. The difference in friction results was due to plastic deformation (plowing of titanium).

  8. Adhesion and friction of single-crystal diamond in contact with transition metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and friction of single-crystal diamond in contact with various transition metals and the nature of metal transfer to diamond. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with diamond in sliding contact with the metals yttrium, titanium, zirconium, vanadium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium and rhodium. All experiments were conducted with loads of 0.05 to 0.3 N, at a sliding velocity of 0.003 m per minute, in a vacuum of 10 to the -8th Pa, at room temperature, and on the (111) plane of diamond with sliding in the 110 line type direction. The results of the investigation indicate that the coefficient of friction for diamond in contact with various metals is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals in high vacuum. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of diamond in sliding.

  9. Characterization of friction at three contact pairs by photoelastic isotropic point (IP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surendra, K. V. N.; Simha, K. R. Y.

    2015-03-01

    Friction coefficient between a circular-disk periphery and V-block surface was determined by introducing the concept of isotropic point (IP) in isochromatic field of the disk under three-point symmetric loading. IP position on the symmetry axis depends on active coefficient of friction during experiment. We extend this work to asymmetric loading of circular disk in which case two frictional contact pairs out of three loading contacts, independently control the unconstrained IP location. Photoelastic experiment is conducted on particular case of asymmetric three-point loading of circular disk. Basics of digital image processing are used to extract few essential parameters from experimental image, particularly IP location. Analytical solution by Flamant for half plane with a concentrated load, is utilized to derive stress components for required loading configurations of the disk. IP is observed, in analytical simulations of three-point asymmetric normal loading, to move from vertical axis to the boundary along an ellipse-like curve. When friction is included in the analysis, IP approaches the center with increase in loading friction and it goes away with increase in support friction. With all these insights, using experimental IP information, friction angles at three contact pairs of circular disk under asymmetric loading, are determined.

  10. A comparison of Coulomb and pseudo-Coulomb friction implementations: Application to the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M I; Hiley, M J; Yeadon, M R

    2011-10-13

    In the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting both dynamic and static friction act. The purpose of this study was to develop a method of simulating Coulomb friction that incorporated both dynamic and static phases and to compare the results with those obtained using a pseudo-Coulomb implementation of friction when applied to the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting. Kinematic data were obtained from an elite level gymnast performing handspring straight somersault vaults using a Vicon optoelectronic motion capture system. An angle-driven computer model of vaulting that simulated the interaction between a seven segment gymnast and a single segment vaulting table during the table contact phase of the vault was developed. Both dynamic and static friction were incorporated within the model by switching between two implementations of the tangential frictional force. Two vaulting trials were used to determine the model parameters using a genetic algorithm to match simulations to recorded performances. A third independent trial was used to evaluate the model and close agreement was found between the simulation and the recorded performance with an overall difference of 13.5%. The two-state simulation model was found to be capable of replicating performance at take-off and also of replicating key contact phase features such as the normal and tangential motion of the hands. The results of the two-state model were compared to those using a pseudo-Coulomb friction implementation within the simulation model. The two-state model achieved similar overall results to those of the pseudo-Coulomb model but obtained solutions more rapidly. PMID:21889150

  11. Effective two-dimensional frictional contact model for arbitrary curved geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Chen, K.; Chang, Y. P.

    1994-04-01

    A finite element model is developed on the basis of a variational formulation of the perturbed Lagrange type and the classical Coulomb law of friction, for the analysis of frictional contact problems in two dimensions. The model accounts for all geometric/ kinematic non-linearities associated with large sliding motions as well as arbitrary contact-surface curvatures. Explicit forms for the contact force and tangent stiffness operators and a penalty-type format is utilized in the implementation. An extensive number of numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the effectiveness and practical usefulness of the model.

  12. A Method to Apply Friction Modifier in Railway System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kosuke; Suda, Yoshihiro; Iwasa, Takashi; Fujii, Takeshi; Tomeoka, Masao; Tanimoto, Masuhisa; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Nakai, Takuji

    Controlling the friction between wheel and rail is direct and very effective measures to improve the curving performances of bogie trucks, because the curving performances of bogie truck depend much on friction characteristics. Authors have proposed a method, “friction control”, which utilizes friction modifier (KELTRACKTM HPF) with onboard spraying system. With the method, not only friction coefficient, but also friction characteristics are able to be controlled as expected. In this paper, results of fundamental experiments are reported which play an important role to realize the new method.

  13. On the 3D normal tire/off-road vibro-contact problem with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, Ligia; Chiroiu, Veturia; Brişan, Cornel; Dumitriu, Dan; Sireteanu, Tudor; Petre, Simona

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a virtual experiment concerning driving on off-roads is investigated via 3D normal vibro-contact problem with friction. The dynamic road concept is introduced in order to characterize a particular stretch of road by total longitudinal, lateral, and normal forces and their geometric distributions in the contact patches. The off-road profiles are built by image sonification technique. The cross-sectional curves of off-roads before and after deformation, the contact between the tire and the road, the distribution of contact and friction forces in the contact domain, the natural frequencies and modes when the tire is in ground contact, are estimated. The approach is exercised on two particular problems and results compare favorably to existing analytical and numerical solutions. The feasibility of image sonification technique is useful to build a low-cost virtual reality environment with an increased degree of realism for driving simulators and higher user flexibility.

  14. The adhesion, friction, and wear of binary alloys in contact with single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-base alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a single-crystal silicon carbide (0001) surface in vacuum. Results indicate atomic size misfit and concentration of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion, friction, and wear properties of iron-base binary alloys. The controlling mechanism of the alloy properties is an intrinsic effect involving the resistance to shear fracture of cohesive bonding in the alloy. The coefficient of friction generally increases with an increase in solute concentration. The coefficient of friction increases as the solute-to-iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity. Alloys having higher solute concentration produce more transfer to silicon carbide than do alloys having low solute concentrations. The chemical activity of the alloying element is also an important parameter in controlling adhesion and friction of alloys.

  15. Adhesion and friction of iron-base binary alloys in contact with silicon carbide in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Single pass sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron base binary alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a single crystal silicon carbide /0001/ surface in vacuum. Results indicate that atomic size and concentration of alloying elements play an important role in controlling adhesion and friction properties of iron base binary alloys. The coefficient of friction generally increases with an increase in solute concentration. The coefficient of friction increases linearly as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity. The chemical activity of the alloying elements was also an important parameter in controlling adhesion and friction of alloys, as these latter properties are highly dependent upon the d bond character of the elements.

  16. Adhesion, friction, and wear of binary alloys in contact with single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments, conducted with various iron base alloys (alloying elements are Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh and W) in contact with a single crystal silicon carbide /0001/ surface in vacuum are discussed. Results indicate atomic size misfit and concentration of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion, friction, and wear properties of iron-base binary alloys. The controlling mechanism of the alloy properties is as an intrinsic effect involving the resistance to shear fracture of cohesive bonding in the alloy. The coefficient of friction generally increases with an increase in solute concentration. The coefficient of friction increases as the solute-to-iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity. Alloys having higher solute concentration produce more transfer to silicon carbide than do alloys having low solute concentrations. The chemical activity of the alloying element is also an important parameter in controlling adhesion and friction of alloys.

  17. Friction and wear characteristics of iron-chromium alloys in contact with themselves and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-chromium alloys in contact with (1) themselves, (2) single crystal silicon carbide disks, and (3) single crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide. Results indicate the coefficients of friction for the alloys sliding against themselves are between those for pure iron and pure chromium, and are only slightly different with 1, 5, 9, 14, and 19 weight percent chromium in iron. The wear is due, primarily, to shearing, or tearing fracture, of the cohesive bonds in the bulk metal and plowing of the bulk by lumps of wear debris. There are only slight differences in the coefficients of friction for the various alloys when sliding on silicon carbide. The coefficient of friction for the alloys are higher than those for pure iron and pure chromium. Alloy hardening observed in the alloys plays a dominant role in controlling the abrasive friction and wear behavior of the alloys.

  18. Adhesion and friction of iron and gold in contact with elemental semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Adhesion and friction experiments were conducted with single crystals of iron and gold in contact with single crystals of germanium and silicon. Surfaces were examined in the sputter cleaned state and in the presence of oxygen and a lubricant. All experiments were conducted at room temperature with loads of 1 to 50 grams, and sliding friction was at a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min. Results indicate that the friction nature of metals in contact with semiconductors is sensitive to orientation, that strong adhesion of metals to both germanium and silicon occurs, and that friction is lower with silicon than with germanium for the same orientation. Surface effects are highly sensitive to environment. Silicon, for example, behaves in an entirely brittle manner in the clean state, but in the presence of a lubricant the surface deforms plastically.

  19. Friction behavior of silicon in contact with titanium, nickel, silver and copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments are conducted with the semiconductor silicon in contact with the metals titanium, nickel, copper, and silver. Sliding is on the (111) plane of single-crystal silicon in the 112 crystallographic direction both in dry and lubricated (mineral oil) sliding. The friction coefficient in dry sliding is controlled by adhesion and the surface chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal the stronger the adhesion and the higher the friction. In lubricated sliding the lubricant absorbs to the surfaces and reduces the importance of metal chemical effects. In lubricated sliding, silicon ceases to behave in a brittle manner and undergoes plastic deformation under load.

  20. Method for forming metal contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2013-09-17

    Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

  1. A constitutive law for finite element contact problems with unclassical friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesha, M. E.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques for modeling complex, unclassical contact-friction problems arising in solid and structural mechanics are discussed. A constitutive modeling concept is employed whereby analytic relations between increments of contact surface stress (i.e., traction) and contact surface deformation (i.e., relative displacement) are developed. Because of the incremental form of these relations, they are valid for arbitrary load-deformation histories. The motivation for the development of such a constitutive law is that more realistic friction idealizations can be implemented in finite element analysis software in a consistent, straightforward manner. Of particular interest is modeling of two-body (i.e., unlubricated) metal-metal, ceramic-ceramic, and metal-ceramic contact. Interfaces involving ceramics are of engineering importance and are being considered for advanced turbine engines in which higher temperature materials offer potential for higher engine fuel efficiency.

  2. Laboratory-developed contact models controlling instability on frictional faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, Paul A.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-PMMA frictional interface in a direct shear apparatus in order to gain understanding of fault dynamics leading to gross rupture. Actual asperity sizes and locations along the interface were characterized using a pressure-sensitive film. Slow aseismic slip accumulated nonuniformly along the fault and showed dependency on the applied normal force—increased normal force resulted in higher slip gradients. The slow slip front propagated from the trailing (pushed) edge into a region of more densely distributed asperities at rates between 1 and 9.5 mm/s. Foreshocks were detected and displayed impulsive signals with source radii ranging between 0.21 and 1.09 mm; measurements made using the pressure-sensitive film were between 0.05 and 1.2 mm. The spatiotemporal clustering of foreshocks and their relation to the elastodynamic energy released was dependent on the normal force. In the region where foreshocks occurred, qualitative optical measurements of the asperities along the interface were used to visualize dynamic changes occurring during the slow slip phase. To better understand the nucleation process, a quasi-static asperity finite element (FE) model was developed and focused in the region where foreshocks clustered. The FE model consisted of 172 asperities, located and sized based on pressure-sensitive film measurements. The numerical model provides a plausible explanation as to why foreshocks cluster in space and observed a normal force dependency and lend credence to Ohnaka's nucleation model.

  3. Adhesion and friction of transition metals in contact with nonmetallic hard materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the metals yttrium, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, vanadium, neodymium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium, ruthenium, and rhodium in sliding contact with single crystal diamond, silicon carbide, pyrolytic boron nitride, and ferrite. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis was conducted with the metals and nonmetals to determine the surface chemistry and the degree of surface cleanliness. The results of the investigation indicate the adhesion and friction of the transition metals in contact with diamond, silicon carbide, boron nitride, and ferrite are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more chemically active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction and the greater amount of transfer to the nonmetals.

  4. Intelligent tires for identifying coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Kamai, Kazuto; Seki, Ryosuke

    2015-03-01

    Intelligent tires equipped with sensors as well as the monitoring of the tire/road contact conditions are in demand for improving vehicle control and safety. With the aim of identifying the coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces during driving, including during cornering, we develop an identification scheme for the coefficient of friction that involves estimation of the slip angle and applied force by using a single lightweight three-axis accelerometer attached on the inner surface of the tire. To validate the developed scheme, we conduct tire-rolling tests using an accelerometer-equipped tire with various slip angles on various types of road surfaces, including dry and wet surfaces. The results of these tests confirm that the estimated slip angle and applied force are reasonable. Furthermore, the identified coefficient of friction by the developed scheme agreed with that measured by standardized tests.

  5. Effects of water-vapor on friction and deformation of polymeric magnetic media in contact with a ceramic oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of humidity (water-vapor) in nitrogen on the friction and deformation behavior of magnetic tape in contact with a Ni-Zn ferrite spherical pin were studied. The coefficient of friction is markedly dependent on the ambient relative humidity. In elastic contacts the coefficient of friction increased linearly with increasing humidity; it decreased linearly when humidity was lowered. This effect is the result of changes in the chemistry and interaction of tape materials such as degradation of the lubricant. In plastic contacts there was no effect of humidity on friction below 40 percent relative humidity. There is no effect on friction associated with the breakthrough of the adsorbed water-vapor film at the interface of the tape and Ni-Zn ferrite. The coefficient of friction, however, increased rapidly with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent in plastic contacts.

  6. Method for lubricating contacting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Dugger, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Asay, David B.; Kim, Seong H.

    2011-12-06

    A method is provided for tribological lubrication of sliding contact surfaces, where two surfaces are in contact and in motion relative to each other, operating in a vapor-phase environment containing at least one alcohol compound at a concentration sufficiently high to provide one monolayer of coverage on at least one of the surfaces, where the alcohol compound continuously reacts at the surface to provide lubrication.

  7. Friction and morphology of magnetic tapes in sliding contact with nickel-zinc ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Bhushan, B.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and morphological studies were conducted with magnetic tapes containing a Ni-Zn ferrite hemispherical pin in laboratory air at a relative humidity of 40 percent and at 23 C. The results indicate that the binder plays a significant role in the friction properties, morphology, and microstructure of the tape. Comparisons were made with four binders: nitrocellulose; poly (vinyledene) chloride; cellulose acetate; and hydroxyl-terminated, low molecular weight polyester added to the base polymer, polyester-polyurethane. The coefficient of friction was lowest for the tape with the nitrocellulose binder and increased in the order hydroxylterminated, low molecular weight polyester resin; poly (vinyledene) chloride; and cellulose acetate. The degree of enclosure of the oxide particles by the binder was highest for hydroxyl-terminated, low molecular weight polyester and decreased in the order cellulose acetate, poly (vinyledene) chloride, and nitrocellulose. The nature of deformation of the tape was a factor in controlling friction. The coefficient of friction under elastic contact conditions was considerably lower than under conditions that produced plastic contacts.

  8. Femtosecond laser full and partial texturing of steel surfaces to reduce friction in lubricated contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, Antonio; Carbone, Giuseppe; De Filippis, Michele; Volpe, Annalisa; Lugarà, Pietro Mario

    2014-12-01

    Minimizing mechanical losses and friction in vehicle engines would have a great impact on reducing fuel consumption and exhaust emissions, to the benefit of environmental protection. With this scope, laser surface texturing (LST) with femtosecond pulses is an emerging technology, which consists of creating, by laser ablation, an array of high-density microdimples on the surface of a mechanical device. The microtexture decreases the effective contact area and, in case of lubricated contact, acts as oil reservoir and trap for wear debris, leading to an overall friction reduction. Depending on the lubrication regime and on the texture geometry, several mechanisms may concur to modify friction such as the local reduction of the shear stress, the generation of a hydrodynamic lift between the surfaces or the formation of eddy-like flows at the bottom of the dimple cavities. All these effects have been investigated by fabricating and characterizing several LST surfaces by femtosecond laser ablation with different features: partial/full texture, circular/elliptical dimples, variable diameters, and depths but equivalent areal density. More than 85% of friction reduction has been obtained from the circular dimple geometry, but the elliptical texture allows adjusting the friction coefficient by changing its orientation with respect to the sliding direction.

  9. Contact compliance effects in the frictional response of bioinspired fibrillar adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piccardo, Marco; Chateauminois, Antoine; Fretigny, Christian; Pugno, Nicola M.; Sitti, Metin

    2013-01-01

    The shear failure and friction mechanisms of bioinspired adhesives consisting of elastomer arrays of microfibres terminated by mushroom-shaped tips are investigated in contact with a rigid lens. In order to reveal the interplay between the vertical and lateral loading directions, experiments are carried out using a custom friction set-up in which normal stiffness can be made either high or low when compared with the stiffness of the contact between the fibrillar adhesive and the lens. Using in situ contact imaging, the shear failure of the adhesive is found to involve two successive mechanisms: (i) cavitation and peeling at the contact interface between the mushroom-shaped fibre tip endings and the lens; and (ii) side re-adhesion of the fibre's stem to the lens. The extent of these mechanisms and their implications regarding static friction forces is found to depend on the crosstalk between the normal and lateral loading directions that can result in contact instabilities associated with fibre buckling. In addition, the effects of the viscoelastic behaviour of the polyurethane material on the rate dependence of the shear response of the adhesive are accounted for. PMID:23554349

  10. Boundary lubrication of heterogeneous surfaces and the onset of cavitation in frictional contacts.

    PubMed

    Savio, Daniele; Pastewka, Lars; Gumbsch, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Surfaces can be slippery or sticky depending on surface chemistry and roughness. We demonstrate in atomistic simulations that regular and random slip patterns on a surface lead to pressure excursions within a lubricated contact that increase quadratically with decreasing contact separation. This is captured well by a simple hydrodynamic model including wall slip. We predict with this model that pressure changes for larger length scales and realistic frictional conditions can easily reach cavitation thresholds and significantly change the load-bearing capacity of a contact. Cavitation may therefore be the norm, not the exception, under boundary lubrication conditions. PMID:27051871

  11. Boundary lubrication of heterogeneous surfaces and the onset of cavitation in frictional contacts

    PubMed Central

    Savio, Daniele; Pastewka, Lars; Gumbsch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Surfaces can be slippery or sticky depending on surface chemistry and roughness. We demonstrate in atomistic simulations that regular and random slip patterns on a surface lead to pressure excursions within a lubricated contact that increase quadratically with decreasing contact separation. This is captured well by a simple hydrodynamic model including wall slip. We predict with this model that pressure changes for larger length scales and realistic frictional conditions can easily reach cavitation thresholds and significantly change the load-bearing capacity of a contact. Cavitation may therefore be the norm, not the exception, under boundary lubrication conditions. PMID:27051871

  12. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  13. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  14. Friction, wear and noise of slip ring and brush contacts for synchronous satellite use.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, N. E.; Cole, S. R.; Glossbrenner, E. W.; Vest, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    A program is being conducted for testing of slip rings for synchronous orbit application. Instrumentation systems necessary for monitoring electrical noise, friction, and brush wear at atmospheric pressure and at less than 50 ntorr have been developed. A multiplex scheme necessary for the simultaneous recording of brush displacement, friction, and electrical noise has also been developed. Composite brushes consisting of silver-molybdenum disulfide-graphite and silver-niobium diselenide-graphite have been employed on rings of coin silver and rhodium plate. Four contact combinations have been tested during an ambient condition run-in at 150 rpm and a humidity sequence at 0.1 rpm. The first six months of the two year vacuum test at 0.1 rpm have been completed. Electrical noise, friction and brush wear data recorded during these periods have been analyzed.

  15. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals. Results indicate the coefficient of friction is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to silicon carbide. The chemical activity of the metal and its shear modulus may play important roles in metal transfer, the form of the wear debris and the surface roughness of the metal wear scar. The more active the metal, and the less resistance to shear, the greater the transfer to silicon carbide and the rougher the wear scar on the surface of the metal. Hexagon shaped cracking and fracturing formed by cleavage of both prismatic and basal planes is observed on the silicon carbide surface.

  16. Influence of surface roughness and contact load on friction coefficient and scratch behavior of thermoplastic olefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Han; Browning, Robert; Fincher, Jason; Gasbarro, Anthony; Jones, Scooter; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-05-01

    To study the effects of surface roughness and contact load on the friction behavior and scratch resistance of polymers, a set of model thermoplastic olefins (TPO) systems with various surface roughness ( Ra) levels were prepared and evaluated. It is found that a higher Ra corresponds to a lower surface friction coefficient ( μs). At each level of Ra, μs gets larger as contact load increases, with a greater increase in μs as Ra level increases. It is also observed that with increasing contact load and increasing Ra, the μs tend to level off. In evaluating TPO scratch resistance, a lower μs would delay the onset of ductile drawing-induced fish-scale surface deformation feature, thereby raising the load required to cause scratch visibility. However, as the contact load is further increased, the μs evolves to become scratch coefficient of friction (SCOF) as significant sub-surface deformation and tip penetration occur and material displacement begins, i.e., ploughing. No dependence of Ra and μs on the critical load for the onset of ploughing is observed. In this work, the distinction between μs and SCOF will be illustrated. Approaches for improving scratch resistance of polymers via control of Ra are also discussed.

  17. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elastic–plastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model ismore » based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elastic–plastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.« less

  18. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elastic–plastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model is based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elastic–plastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.

  19. Surface contact and design of fibrillar ‘friction pads’ in stick insects (Carausius morosus): mechanisms for large friction coefficients and negligible adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Labonte, David; Williams, John A.; Federle, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Many stick insects and mantophasmids possess tarsal ‘heel pads’ (euplantulae) covered by arrays of conical, micrometre-sized hairs (acanthae). These pads are used mainly under compression; they respond to load with increasing shear resistance, and show negligible adhesion. Reflected-light microscopy in stick insects (Carausius morosus) revealed that the contact area of ‘heel pads’ changes with normal load on three hierarchical levels. First, loading brought larger areas of the convex pads into contact. Second, loading increased the density of acanthae in contact. Third, higher loads changed the shape of individual hair contacts gradually from circular (tip contact) to elongated (side contact). The resulting increase in real contact area can explain the load dependence of friction, indicating a constant shear stress between acanthae and substrate. As the euplantula contact area is negligible for small loads (similar to hard materials), but increases sharply with load (resembling soft materials), these pads show high friction coefficients despite little adhesion. This property appears essential for the pads’ use in locomotion. Several morphological characteristics of hairy friction pads are in apparent contrast to hairy pads used for adhesion, highlighting key adaptations for both pad types. Our results are relevant for the design of fibrillar structures with high friction coefficients but small adhesion. PMID:24554580

  20. Bearing material. [composite material with low friction surface for rolling or sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A composite material is described which will provide low friction surfaces for materials in rolling or sliding contact and is self-lubricating and oxidation resistant up to and in excess of about 930 C. The composite is comprised of a metal component which lends strength and elasticity to the structure, a fluoride salt component which provides lubrication and, lastly, a glass component which not only provides oxidation protection to the metal but may also enhance the lubrication qualities of the composite.

  1. Determination of oral mucosal Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction from in-vivo contact pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Suenaga, Hanako; Hogg, Michael; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Despite their considerable importance to biomechanics, there are no existing methods available to directly measure apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient of oral mucosa. This study aimed to develop an inverse procedure to determine these two biomechanical parameters by utilizing in vivo experiment of contact pressure between partial denture and beneath mucosa through nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis and surrogate response surface (RS) modelling technique. First, the in vivo denture-mucosa contact pressure was measured by a tactile electronic sensing sheet. Second, a 3D FE model was constructed based on the patient CT images. Third, a range of apparent Poisson's ratios and the coefficients of friction from literature was considered as the design variables in a series of FE runs for constructing a RS surrogate model. Finally, the discrepancy between computed in silico and measured in vivo results was minimized to identify the best matching Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction. The established non-invasive methodology was demonstrated effective to identify such biomechanical parameters of oral mucosa and can be potentially used for determining the biomaterial properties of other soft biological tissues. PMID:26024011

  2. Numerical Analysis of Piezoelectric Active Repair in the Presence of Frictional Contact Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Andrea; Milazzo, Alberto; Orlando, Calogero; Messineo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The increasing development of smart materials, such as piezoelectric and shape memory alloys, has opened new opportunities for improving repair techniques. Particularly, active repairs, based on the converse piezoelectric effect, can increase the life of a structure by reducing the crack opening. A deep characterization of the electromechanical behavior of delaminated composite structures, actively repaired by piezoelectric patches, can be achieved by considering the adhesive layer between the host structure and the repair and by taking into account the frictional contact between the crack surfaces. In this paper, Boundary Element (BE) analyses performed on delaminated composite structures repaired by active piezoelectric patches are presented. A two-dimensional boundary integral formulation for piezoelectric solids based on the multi-domain technique to model the composite host damaged structures and the bonded piezoelectric patches is employed. An interface spring model is also implemented to take into account the finite stiffness of the bonding layers and to model the frictional contact between the delamination surfaces, by means of an iterative procedure. The effect of the adhesive between the plies of piezoelectric bimorph devices on the electromechanical response is first pointed out for both sensing and actuating behavior. Then, the effect of the frictional contact condition on the fracture mechanics behavior of actively repaired delaminated composite structures is investigated. PMID:23549364

  3. FASTSIM2: a second-order accurate frictional rolling contact algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollebregt, E. A. H.; Wilders, P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider the frictional (tangential) steady rolling contact problem. We confine ourselves to the simplified theory, instead of using full elastostatic theory, in order to be able to compute results fast, as needed for on-line application in vehicle system dynamics simulation packages. The FASTSIM algorithm is the leading technology in this field and is employed in all dominant railway vehicle system dynamics packages (VSD) in the world. The main contribution of this paper is a new version "FASTSIM2" of the FASTSIM algorithm, which is second-order accurate. This is relevant for VSD, because with the new algorithm 16 times less grid points are required for sufficiently accurate computations of the contact forces. The approach is based on new insights in the characteristics of the rolling contact problem when using the simplified theory, and on taking precise care of the contact conditions in the numerical integration scheme employed.

  4. Influence of the Tool Shoulder Contact Conditions on the Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doude, Haley R.; Schneider, Judy A.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2014-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSWing) is a solid-state joining process of special interest in joining alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. In order to optimize the process, various numeric modeling approaches have been pursued. Of importance to furthering modeling efforts is a better understanding of the contact conditions between the workpiece and the weld tool. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate the contact conditions between the workpiece and weld tool are unknown, possibly varying during the FSW process. To provide insight into the contact conditions, this study characterizes the material flow in the FSW nugget by embedding a lead (Pb) wire that melted at the FSWing temperature of aluminum alloy 2195. The Pb trace provided evidence of changes in material flow characteristics which were attributed to changes in the contact conditions between the weld tool and workpiece, as driven by temperature, as the tool travels the length of a weld seam.

  5. Numerical analysis of effects of mold features and contact friction on cavity filling in the nanoimprinting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocheng, H.; Nien, C. C.

    2006-01-01

    Nanoimprinting has been recognized as a highly potential method of volume production for nanoscale devices. In the nanoimprinting process, the filling process of the mold cavity plays a key role in determining the productivity of the nanoimprinting process and the quality of the final imprint product. A defective filling of the mold affects the uniformity, precision, and throughput of the imprint. The mold filling is subjected to the applied imprinting pressure and temperature, repetitive mold use, mold sticking, or factors regarding mold features. It involves physical contact between the mold and the polymer layer on the substrate surface; thus, how the polymer fills up the cavity is of major interest and is vital in pattern transfer. The proposed study employs a finite element model for the single mold cavity to simulate the nanoimprint process. The mold is assumed to be a linear elastic body and the polymer preheated above its glass transition temperature is considered to be nonlinear elastic, described by the Mooney-Rivlin model. The numerical model is able to predict the mold filling at any nanoimprint stage and the mold cavity with various aspect ratios. To study the effects of pattern density and contact friction existing between the mold and polymer during the mold filling of the nanoimprinting process, an imprint mold with mixed pattern density is simulated and a sensitivity analysis of a contact friction coefficient on the mold filling is performed. Both the cavity feature and pattern density have significant effects on mold filling of the nanoimprinting process, while the contact friction coefficient has a mild effect. The obtained results support the development of a process recipe and automatic large-scale industrial production for nanoimprinting.

  6. Normal contact and friction of rubber with model randomly rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yashima, S; Romero, V; Wandersman, E; Frétigny, C; Chaudhury, M K; Chateauminois, A; Prevost, A M

    2015-02-01

    We report on normal contact and friction measurements of model multicontact interfaces formed between smooth surfaces and substrates textured with a statistical distribution of spherical micro-asperities. Contacts are either formed between a rigid textured lens and a smooth rubber, or a flat textured rubber and a smooth rigid lens. Measurements of the real area of contact A versus normal load P are performed by imaging the light transmitted at the microcontacts. For both interfaces, A(P) is found to be sub-linear with a power law behavior. Comparison with two multi-asperity contact models, which extend the Greenwood-Williamson (J. Greenwood and J. Williamson, Proc. Royal Soc. London Ser. A, 295, 300 (1966)) model by taking into account the elastic interaction between asperities at different length scales, is performed, and allows their validation for the first time. We find that long range elastic interactions arising from the curvature of the nominal surfaces are the main source of the non-linearity of A(P). At a shorter range, and except for very low pressures, the pressure dependence of both density and area of microcontacts remains well described by Greenwood-Williamson's model, which neglects any interaction between asperities. In addition, in steady sliding, friction measurements reveal that the mean shear stress at the scale of the asperities is systematically larger than that found for a macroscopic contact between a smooth lens and a rubber. This suggests that frictional stresses measured at macroscopic length scales may not be simply transposed to microscopic multicontact interfaces. PMID:25514137

  7. Effect of barrier height on friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted for the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals. Polycrystalline titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, and platinum were made to contact a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Indium, nickel, copper, and silver were made to contact a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Sliding was conducted both in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 9th power torr. The friction of semiconductors in contact with metals depended on a Schottky barrier height formed at the metal semiconductor interface. Metals with a higher barrier height on semiconductors gave lower friction. The effect of the barrier height on friction behavior for argon sputtered cleaned surfaces in vacuum was more specific than that for the surfaces containing films in room air. With a silicon surface sliding on titanium, many silicon particles back transferred. In contrast, a large quantity of indium transferred to the gallium arsenide surface.

  8. Comprehensive tire-road friction coefficient estimation based on signal fusion method under complex maneuvering operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Yang, K.; Jia, G.; Ran, X.; Song, J.; Han, Z.-Q.

    2015-05-01

    The accurate estimation of the tire-road friction coefficient plays a significant role in the vehicle dynamics control. The estimation method should be timely and reliable for the controlling requirements, which means the contact friction characteristics between the tire and the road should be recognized before the interference to ensure the safety of the driver and passengers from drifting and losing control. In addition, the estimation method should be stable and feasible for complex maneuvering operations to guarantee the control performance as well. A signal fusion method combining the available signals to estimate the road friction is suggested in this paper on the basis of the estimated ones of braking, driving and steering conditions individually. Through the input characteristics and the states of the vehicle and tires from sensors the maneuvering condition may be recognized, by which the certainty factors of the friction of the three conditions mentioned above may be obtained correspondingly, and then the comprehensive road friction may be calculated. Experimental vehicle tests validate the effectiveness of the proposed method through complex maneuvering operations; the estimated road friction coefficient based on the signal fusion method is relatively timely and accurate to satisfy the control demands.

  9. The effect of ligation method on friction in sliding mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hain, Max; Dhopatkar, Ashish; Rock, Peter

    2003-04-01

    During orthodontic tooth movement with the preadjusted edgewise system, friction generated at the bracket/archwire interface tends to impede the desired movement. The method of ligation is an important contributor to this frictional force. This in vitro study investigated the effect of ligation method on friction and evaluated the efficacy of the new slick elastomeric modules from TP Orthodontics (La Porte, Ind), which are claimed to reduce friction at the module/wire interface. Slick modules were compared with regular nonslick modules, stainless steel ligatures, and the SPEED self-ligating bracket system (Strite Industries, Cambridge, Ontario, Canada). The effect of using slick modules with metal-reinforced ceramic (Clarity, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and miniature brackets (Minitwin, 3M Unitek) was also examined. Results showed that, when considering tooth movement along a 0.019 x 0.025-in stainless steel archwire, saliva-lubricated slick modules can reduce static friction at the module/archwire interface by up to 60%, regardless of the bracket system. The SPEED brackets produced the lowest friction compared with the 3 other tested bracket systems when regular modules were used. The use of slick modules, however, with all of the ligated bracket types tested significantly reduced friction to below the values recorded in the SPEED groups. Loosely tied stainless steel ligatures were found to generate the least friction. PMID:12695769

  10. Friction and wear of iron-base binary alloys in sliding contact with silicon carbide in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Multipass sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron base binary alloys in contact with a single crystal silicon carbide surface in vacuum. Results indicate that the atomic size and concentration of alloy elements play important roles in controlling the transfer and friction properties of iron base binary alloys. Alloys having high solute concentration produce more transfer than do alloys having low solute concentration. The coefficient of friction during multipass sliding generally increases with an increase in the concentration of alloying element. The change of friction with succeeding passes after the initial pass also increases as the solute to iron, atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity.

  11. Surface Imaging Skin Friction Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L. (Inventor); Naughton, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A surface imaging skin friction instrument allowing 2D resolution of spatial image by a 2D Hilbert transform and 2D inverse thin-oil film solver, providing an innovation over prior art single point approaches. Incoherent, monochromatic light source can be used. The invention provides accurate, easy to use, economical measurement of larger regions of surface shear stress in a single test.

  12. Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Yoshihiro; Clarke, Daryl D.; Ozeki, Shinichi

    Friction materials such as disk pads, brake linings, and clutch facings are widely used for automotive applications. Friction materials function during braking due to frictional resistance that transforms kinetic energy into thermal energy. There has been a rudimentary evolution, from materials like leather or wood to asbestos fabric or asbestos fabric saturated with various resins such as asphalt or resin combined with pitch. These efforts were further developed by the use of woven asbestos material saturated by either rubber solution or liquid resin binder and functioned as an internal expanding brake, similar to brake lining system. The role of asbestos continued through the use of chopped asbestos saturated by rubber, but none was entirely successful due to the poor rubber heat resistance required for increased speeds and heavy gearing demands of the automobile industry. The use of phenolic resins as binder for asbestos friction materials provided the necessary thermal resistance and performance characteristics. Thus, the utility of asbestos as the main friction component, for over 100 years, has been significantly reduced in friction materials due to asbestos identity as a carcinogen. Steel and other fibrous components have displaced asbestos in disk pads. Currently, non-asbestos organics are the predominate friction material. Phenolic resins continue to be the preferred binder, and increased amounts are necessary to meet the requirements of highly functional asbestos-free disk pads for the automotive industry. With annual automobile production exceeding 70 million vehicles and additional automobile production occurring in developing countries worldwide and increasing yearly, the amount of phenolic resin for friction material is also increasing (Fig. 14.1). Fig. 14.1 Worldwide commercial vehicle production Static and kinetic friction force and surface roughness of different archwire-bracket sliding contacts.

    PubMed

    Carrion-Vilches, Francisco J; Bermudez, María-Dolores; Fructuoso, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the static and kinetic friction forces of the contact bracket-archwire with different dental material compositions in order to select those materials with lower resistance to sliding. We carried out sliding friction tests by means of a universal testing machine following an experimental procedure as described in ASTM D1894 standard. We determined the static and kinetic friction forces under dry and lubricating conditions using an artificial saliva solution at 36.5ºC. The bracket-archwire pairs studied were: stainless steel-stainless steel; stainless steel-glass fiber composite; stainless steel-Nitinol 60; sapphire-stainless steel; sapphire-glass fiber composite; and sapphire-Nitinol 60. The best performance is obtained for Nitinol 60 archwire sliding against a stainless steel bracket, both under dry and lubricated conditions. These results are in agreement with the low surface roughness of Nitinol 60 with respect to the glass fiber composite archwire. The results described here contribute to establishing selection criteria for materials for dental archwire-brackets. PMID:26438988

  13. The effect of friction and impact angle on the spermatozoa-oocyte local contact dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hedrih, Andjelka; Banić, Milan

    2016-03-21

    Although a large proportion of biomolecules involved in spermatozoa-oocyte interaction has been discovered so far, many details of fertilization mechanism remain unknown. Both biochemical and biomechanical components exist in the fertilization process. Mammalian sperm evolved a ZP (zona pelucida) thrust reduction penetration strategy probably in response to the ZP resilient elasticity. Using a biomechanical approach and FEM analysis, local contact stress, ZP deformations during impact and attempt of sperm head penetration relative to different sperm impact angles (SIA) were studied. The sperm-oocyte contact was defined as non-linear frictional contact. A transient structural analysis at 37°C revealed that, from the mechanical standpoint there are SIA that are more favorable for possible ZP penetration due to larger equivalent stress of ZP. An "slip-stick" resembling effect was identified for almost all examined SIA. The sperm head-ZP contact area increases as SIA decreases. Favorable ZP-stress state for sperm penetration regarding SIA are discussed. PMID:26780648

  14. Relationship between the ideal tensile strength and the friction properties of metals in contact with nonmetals and themselves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The adhesion and friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. An estimate of the ideal uniaxial tensile was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the ideal tensile strength of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

  15. Protein Residue Contacts and Prediction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Badri

    2016-01-01

    In the field of computational structural proteomics, contact predictions have shown new prospects of solving the longstanding problem of ab initio protein structure prediction. In the last few years, application of deep learning algorithms and availability of large protein sequence databases, combined with improvement in methods that derive contacts from multiple sequence alignments, have shown a huge increase in the precision of contact prediction. In addition, these predicted contacts have also been used to build three-dimensional models from scratch. In this chapter, we briefly discuss many elements of protein residue–residue contacts and the methods available for prediction, focusing on a state-of-the-art contact prediction tool, DNcon. Illustrating with a case study, we describe how DNcon can be used to make ab initio contact predictions for a given protein sequence and discuss how the predicted contacts may be analyzed and evaluated. PMID:27115648

  16. Protein Residue Contacts and Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Badri; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    In the field of computational structural proteomics, contact predictions have shown new prospects of solving the longstanding problem of ab initio protein structure prediction. In the last few years, application of deep learning algorithms and availability of large protein sequence databases, combined with improvement in methods that derive contacts from multiple sequence alignments, have shown a huge increase in the precision of contact prediction. In addition, these predicted contacts have also been used to build three-dimensional models from scratch.In this chapter, we briefly discuss many elements of protein residue-residue contacts and the methods available for prediction, focusing on a state-of-the-art contact prediction tool, DNcon. Illustrating with a case study, we describe how DNcon can be used to make ab initio contact predictions for a given protein sequence and discuss how the predicted contacts may be analyzed and evaluated. PMID:27115648

  17. Contact stresses in gear teeth: A new method of analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somprakit, Paisan; Huston, Ronald L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1991-01-01

    A new, innovative procedure called point load superposition for determining the contact stresses in mating gear teeth. It is believed that this procedure will greatly extend both the range of applicability and the accuracy of gear contact stress analysis. Point load superposition is based upon fundamental solutions from the theory of elasticity. It is an iterative numerical procedure which has distinct advantages over the classical Hertz method, the finite element method, and over existing applications with the boundary element method. Specifically, friction and sliding effects, which are either excluded from or difficult to study with the classical methods, are routinely handled with the new procedure. Presented here are the basic theory and the algorithms. Several examples are given. Results are consistent with those of the classical theories. Applications to spur gears are discussed.

  18. Contact stresses in gear teeth - A new method of analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somprakit, Paisan; Huston, Ronald L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1991-01-01

    A new, innovative procedure called point load superposition for determining the contact stresses in mating gear teeth is presented. It is believed that this procedure will greatly extend both the range of applicability and the accuracy of gear contact stress analysis. Point load superposition is based upon fundamental solutions from the theory of elasticity. It is an iterative numerical procedure which has distinct advantages over the classical Hertz method, the finite element method, and over existing applications with the boundary element method. Specifically, friction and sliding effects, which are either excluded from or difficult to study with the classical methods, are routinely handled with the new procedure. Presented here are the basic theory and the algorithms. Several examples are given. Results are consistent with those of the classical theories. Applications to spur gears are discussed.

  19. Friction in unconforming grain contacts as a mechanism for tensorial stress strain hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, V.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    2007-04-01

    Materials composed of consolidated grains and/or containing internal contacts are widespread in everyday life (e.g. rocks, geomaterials, concretes, slates, ceramics, composites, etc.). For any simulation of the elastic behavior of this class of solids, be it in seismology, in NDT, or in the modeling of building constructions, the stress-strain constitutive equations are indispensable. Since the most common loading patterns in nature considerably deviate from simple uniaxial compression, the problem of tensorial stress-strain representation arises. In simple loading cases it may be sufficient to use a phenomenological constitutive model. However, in a more general case, phenomenological approaches encounter serious difficulties due to the high number of unknown parameters and the complexity of the model itself. Simplification of the phenomenology can help only partly, since it may require artificial assumptions. For instance, is it enough just to link the volumetric stress to the volumetric strain, or do we have to include shear components as well, and if yes, in what form? We therefore propose a physical tensorial stress-strain model, based on the consideration of plane cracks with friction. To do this, we combine known relations for normal displacements of crack faces given by contact mechanics, the classical Amonton's law of dry friction for lateral displacements, and the equations of elasticity theory for a collection of non-interacting cracks with given orientation. The major advantages of this model consist in the full tensorial representation, the realistic stress-strain curves for uniaxial stress compression and quantitative comparison with experimental data, and a profound account for hysteretic memory effects.

  1. Surface chemistry, friction and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to he surfaces of the ferrites in sliding.

  2. Friction and wear of single-crystal and polycrystalline maganese-zinc ferrite in contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal (SCF) and hot-pressed polycrystalline (HPF) manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with various metals. Results indicate that the coefficients of friction for SCF and HPF are related to the relative chemical activity of those metals in high vacuum. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for both SCF and HPF were the same and much higher in vacuum than in argon at atmospheric pressure. All the metals tested transferred to the surface of both SCF and HPF in sliding. Both SCF and HPF exhibited cracking and fracture with sliding. Cracking in SCF is dependent on crystallographic characteristics. In HPF, cracking depends on the orientation of the individual crystallites.

  3. On the role of scales in contact mechanics and friction between elastomers and randomly rough self-affine surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Valentin L.; Dimaki, Andrey; Psakhie, Sergey; Popov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to a qualitative analysis of friction of elastomers from the point of view of scales contributing to the force of friction. We argue that – contrary to widespread opinion – friction between a randomly rough self-affine fractal surface and an elastomer is not a multiscale phenomenon, but is governed mostly by the interplay of only two scales – as a rule the largest and the smallest scales of roughness of the contacting bodies. The hypothesis of two-scale character of elastomer friction is illustrated by computer simulations in the framework of the paradigm of Greenwood, Tabor and Grosch using a simplified one-dimensional model. PMID:26057466

  4. Intelligent tires for identifying coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces using three-axis accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Kamai, Kazuto; Seki, Ryosuke

    2015-02-01

    Intelligent tires equipped with sensors as well as the monitoring of the tire/road contact conditions are in demand for improving vehicle control and safety. With the aim of identifying the coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces during driving, including during cornering, we develop an identification scheme for the coefficient of friction that involves estimation of the slip angle and applied force by using a single lightweight three-axis accelerometer attached on the inner surface of the tire. To validate the developed scheme, we conduct tire-rolling tests using an accelerometer-equipped tire with various slip angles on various types of road surfaces, including dry and wet surfaces. The results of these tests confirm that the estimated slip angle and applied force are reasonable. Furthermore, the identified coefficient of friction by the developed scheme agreed with that measured by standardized tests.

  5. A nonintrusive laser interferometer method for measurement of skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for monitoring the changing thickness of a thin oil film subject to an aerodynamic shear stress using two focused laser beams. The measurement is then simply analyzed in terms of the surface skin friction of the flow. The analysis includes the effects of arbitrarily large pressure and skin friction gradients, gravity, and time varying oil temperature. It may also be applied to three dimensional flows with unknown direction. Applications are presented for a variety of flows including two dimensional flows, three dimensional swirling flows, separated flow, supersonic high Reynolds number flows, and delta wing vortical flows.

  6. The effect of load in a contact with boundary lubrication. [reduction of coefficient of friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georges, J. M.; Lamy, B.; Daronnat, M.; Moro, S.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the transition load on the wear in a contact with boundary lubrication was investigated. An experimental method was developed for this purpose, and parameters affecting the boundary lubrication under industrial operating conditions were identified. These parameters are the adsorbed boundary film, the contact microgeometry (surface roughness), macrogeometry, and hardness of materials used. It was found that the curve of the tops of the surface protrustion affect the transition load, and thus the boundary lubrication. The transition load also depends on the chemical nature of the contact and its geometrical and mechanical aspects.

  7. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) Contact Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the CBIRD detector is enhanced by using new device contacting methods that have been developed. The detector structure features a narrow gap adsorber sandwiched between a pair of complementary, unipolar barriers that are, in turn, surrounded by contact layers. In this innovation, the contact adjacent to the hole barrier is doped n-type, while the contact adjacent to the electron barrier is doped p-type. The contact layers can have wider bandgaps than the adsorber layer, so long as good electrical contacts are made to them. If good electrical contacts are made to either (or both) of the barriers, then one could contact the barrier(s) directly, obviating the need for additional contact layers. Both the left and right contacts can be doped either n-type or ptype. Having an n-type contact layer next to the electron barrier creates a second p-n junction (the first being the one between the hole barrier and the adsorber) over which applied bias could drop. This reduces the voltage drop over the adsorber, thereby reducing dark current generation in the adsorber region.

  8. Transition from stick to slip in Hertzian contact with ``Griffith'' friction: The Cattaneo-Mindlin problem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavarella, M.

    2015-11-01

    Classically, the transition from stick to slip is modelled with Amonton-Coulomb law, leading to the Cattaneo-Mindlin problem, which is amenable to quite general solutions using the idea of superposing normal contact pressure distributions - in particular superposing the full sliding component of shear with a corrective distribution in the stick region. However, faults model in geophysics and recent high-speed measurements of the real contact area and the strain fields in dry (nominally flat) rough interfaces at macroscopic but laboratory scale, all suggest that the transition from 'static' to 'dynamic' friction can be described, rather than by Coulomb law, by classical fracture mechanics singular solutions of shear cracks. Here, we introduce an 'adhesive' model for friction in a Hertzian spherical contact, maintaining the Hertzian solution for the normal pressures, but where the inception of slip is given by a Griffith condition. In the slip region, the standard Coulomb law continues to hold. This leads to a very simple solution for the Cattaneo-Mindlin problem, in which the "corrective" solution in the stick area is in fact similar to the mode II equivalent of a JKR singular solution for adhesive contact. The model departs from the standard Cattaneo-Mindlin solution, showing an increased size of the stick zone relative to the contact area, and a sudden transition to slip when the stick region reaches a critical size (the equivalent of the pull-off contact size of the JKR solution). The apparent static friction coefficient before sliding can be much higher than the sliding friction coefficient and, for a given friction fracture "energy", the process results in size and normal load dependence of the apparent static friction coefficient. Some qualitative agreement with Fineberg's group experiments for friction exists, namely the stick-slip boundary quasi-static prediction may correspond to the arrest of their slip "precursors", and the rapid collapse to global

  9. Effect of normal load and roughness on the nanoscale friction coefficient in the elastic and plastic contact regime.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aditya; Staedler, Thorsten; Jiang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The influence of applied normal load and roughness on the tribological behavior between the indenter and sample surface during nanoindentation-based scratching has been experimentally investigated by using different surfaces (fused silica and diamond-like carbon) featuring various degrees of roughness. At a sufficiently low applied normal load, wherein the contact is elastic, the friction coefficient is constant. However, at increased normal loads the contact involves plastic deformation and the friction coefficient increases with increasing normal load. The critical load range for a transition from predominantly elastic to plastic contact, between the indenter and sample surface, increases with increasing size of indenter and decreases with roughness. Distinct differences between the present experimental results and the existing theoretical models/predictions are discussed. PMID:23400754

  10. Non-smooth Hopf-type bifurcations arising from impact–friction contact events in rotating machinery

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Karin; Budd, Chris; Glendinning, Paul; Keogh, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the novel dynamics arising in a nonlinear rotor dynamic system by investigating the discontinuity-induced bifurcations corresponding to collisions with the rotor housing (touchdown bearing surface interactions). The simplified Föppl/Jeffcott rotor with clearance and mass unbalance is modelled by a two degree of freedom impact–friction oscillator, as appropriate for a rigid rotor levitated by magnetic bearings. Two types of motion observed in experiments are of interest in this paper: no contact and repeated instantaneous contact. We study how these are affected by damping and stiffness present in the system using analytical and numerical piecewise-smooth dynamical systems methods. By studying the impact map, we show that these types of motion arise at a novel non-smooth Hopf-type bifurcation from a boundary equilibrium bifurcation point for certain parameter values. A local analysis of this bifurcation point allows us a complete understanding of this behaviour in a general setting. The analysis identifies criteria for the existence of such smooth and non-smooth bifurcations, which is an essential step towards achieving reliable and robust controllers that can take compensating action. PMID:25383034

  11. Non-smooth Hopf-type bifurcations arising from impact-friction contact events in rotating machinery.

    PubMed

    Mora, Karin; Budd, Chris; Glendinning, Paul; Keogh, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    We analyse the novel dynamics arising in a nonlinear rotor dynamic system by investigating the discontinuity-induced bifurcations corresponding to collisions with the rotor housing (touchdown bearing surface interactions). The simplified Föppl/Jeffcott rotor with clearance and mass unbalance is modelled by a two degree of freedom impact-friction oscillator, as appropriate for a rigid rotor levitated by magnetic bearings. Two types of motion observed in experiments are of interest in this paper: no contact and repeated instantaneous contact. We study how these are affected by damping and stiffness present in the system using analytical and numerical piecewise-smooth dynamical systems methods. By studying the impact map, we show that these types of motion arise at a novel non-smooth Hopf-type bifurcation from a boundary equilibrium bifurcation point for certain parameter values. A local analysis of this bifurcation point allows us a complete understanding of this behaviour in a general setting. The analysis identifies criteria for the existence of such smooth and non-smooth bifurcations, which is an essential step towards achieving reliable and robust controllers that can take compensating action. PMID:25383034

  12. Statistics of frictional families.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tianqi; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; O'Hern, Corey S; Shattuck, Mark D

    2014-09-19

    We develop a theoretical description for mechanically stable frictional packings in terms of the difference between the total number of contacts required for isostatic packings of frictionless disks and the number of contacts in frictional packings, m=Nc0 - Nc. The saddle order m represents the number of unconstrained degrees of freedom that a static packing would possess if friction were removed. Using a novel numerical method that allows us to enumerate disk packings for each m, we show that the probability to obtain a packing with saddle order m at a given static friction coefficient μ, Pm(μ), can be expressed as a power series in μ. Using this form for Pm(μ), we quantitatively describe the dependence of the average contact number on the friction coefficient for static disk packings obtained from direct simulations of the Cundall-Strack model for all μ and N. PMID:25279647

  13. Real-time deflection and friction force imaging by bimorph-based resonance-type high-speed scanning force microscopy in the contact mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Fan, Haiyun; Zhao, Jianyong; Shang, Guangyi

    2014-12-01

    We report herein an alternative high-speed scanning force microscopy method in the contact mode based on a resonance-type piezoelectric bimorph scanner. The experimental setup, the modified optical beam deflection scheme suitable for smaller cantilevers, and a high-speed control program for simultaneous data capture are described in detail. The feature of the method is that the deflection and friction force images of the sample surface can be obtained simultaneously in real time. Images of various samples (e.g., a test grating, a thin gold film, and fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass slides) are acquired successfully. The imaging rate is 25 frames per second, and the average scan speed reaches a value of approximately 2.5 cm/s. The method combines the advantages of both observing the dynamic processes of the sample surface and monitoring the frictional properties on the nanometer scale.

  14. Experimental Study Of Thermal Sliding Contact With Friction : Application To High Speed Machining Of Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, E.; Bourouga, B.; Garnier, B.; Dubar, L.

    2007-04-01

    In High Speed Machining (HSM), thermomechanical events at the tool-workpiece interface are strongly coupled. They are characterized by extreme conditions of stress and strain as well as heating and heat gradients that it is advisable to control well for a good resolution of the thermomechanical problem. We present a first experimental approach based on friction tests. The conditions are similar to the ones occurring in the orthogonal cutting in terms of pressure at the nose and of the chip sliding velocity. The workpiece pressed on the tool is suddenly moved according to a selected speed and pressure. Experiments are carried out with XC38 metallic sample at the temperature of 900 K and a sliding velocity of 0,2 m/s. The thermal conditions at the workpiece-tool interface are estimated by means of temperature recordings and an inverse heat conduction method. Finally, the estimated heat flux is compared to the one obtained by mechanical way which considers the measured friction coefficient. This comparison is satisfactory.

  15. New method for oblique impact dynamics research of a flexible beam with large overall motion considering impact friction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, W.; Li, L.; Zhang, D. G.; Hong, J. Z.

    2016-08-01

    A flexible beam with large overall rotating motion impacting with a rigid slope is studied in this paper. The tangential friction force caused by the oblique impact is analyzed. The tangential motion of the system is divided into a stick state and a slip state. The contact constraint model and Coulomb friction model are used respectively to deal with the two states. Based on this hybrid modeling method, dynamic equations of the system, which include all states (before, during, and after the collision) are obtained. Simulation results of a concrete example are compared with the results obtained from two other models: a nontangential friction model and a modified Coulomb model. Differences in the results from the three models are discussed. The tangential friction force cannot be ignored when an oblique impact occurs. In addition, the results obtained from the model proposed in this paper are more consistent with real movement.

  16. New method for oblique impact dynamics research of a flexible beam with large overall motion considering impact friction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, W.; Li, L.; Zhang, D. G.; Hong, J. Z.

    2016-06-01

    A flexible beam with large overall rotating motion impacting with a rigid slope is studied in this paper. The tangential friction force caused by the oblique impact is analyzed. The tangential motion of the system is divided into a stick state and a slip state. The contact constraint model and Coulomb friction model are used respectively to deal with the two states. Based on this hybrid modeling method, dynamic equations of the system, which include all states (before, during, and after the collision) are obtained. Simulation results of a concrete example are compared with the results obtained from two other models: a nontangential friction model and a modified Coulomb model. Differences in the results from the three models are discussed. The tangential friction force cannot be ignored when an oblique impact occurs. In addition, the results obtained from the model proposed in this paper are more consistent with real movement.

  17. Friction and metal transfer for single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. Results indicate the coefficient of friction for a silicon carbide-metal system is related to the d bond character and relative chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of silicon carbide in sliding. The chemical activity of metal to silicon and carbon and shear modulus of the metal may play important roles in metal transfer and the form of the wear debris. The less active and greater resistance to shear the metal has, with the exception of rhodium and tungsten, the less transfer to silicon carbide.

  18. A 3D Contact Smoothing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M A; Laursen, T A

    2002-05-02

    Smoothing of contact surfaces can be used to eliminate the chatter typically seen with node on facet contact and give a better representation of the actual contact surface. The latter affect is well demonstrated for problems with interference fits. In this work we present two methods for the smoothing of contact surfaces for 3D finite element contact. In the first method, we employ Gregory patches to smooth the faceted surface in a node on facet implementation. In the second method, we employ a Bezier interpolation of the faceted surface in a mortar method implementation of contact. As is well known, node on facet approaches can exhibit locking due to the failure of the Babuska-Brezzi condition and in some instances fail the patch test. The mortar method implementation is stable and provides optimal convergence in the energy of error. In the this work we demonstrate the superiority of the smoothed versus the non-smoothed node on facet implementations. We also show where the node on facet method fails and some results from the smoothed mortar method implementation.

  19. Impact Damage Evaluation Method of Friction Disc Based on High-Speed Photography and Tooth-Root Stress Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Shao, Y. M.; Liu, J.; Zheng, H. L.

    2015-07-01

    The stability of friction disc could be seriously affected by the tooth surface damage due to poor working conditions of the wet multi-disc brake in heavy trucks. There are few current works focused on the damage of the friction disc caused by torsion-vibration impacts. Hence, it is necessary to investigate its damage mechanisms and evaluation methods. In this paper, a damage mechanism description and evaluation method of a friction disc based on the high-speed photography and tooth-root stress coupling is proposed. According to the HighSpeed Photography, the collision process between the friction disc and hub is recorded, which can be used to determine the contact position and deformation. Combined with the strain-stress data obtained by the strain gauge at the place of the tooth-root, the impact force and property are studied. In order to obtain the evaluation method, the damage surface morphology data of the friction disc extracted by 3D Super Depth Digital Microscope (VH-Z100R) is compared with the impact force and property. The quantitative relationships between the amount of deformation and collision number are obtained using a fitting analysis method. The experimental results show that the damage of the friction disc can be evaluated by the proposed impact damage evaluation method based on the high-speed photography and tooth-root stress coupling.

  20. Study the friction behaviour of poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] brush with AFM probes in contact mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftari, Maryam; Zhang, Zhenyu; Leggett, Graham J.; Geoghegan, Mark

    2011-10-01

    We have studied the frictional behaviour of grafted poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) films using friction force microscopy (FFM). The films were prepared on native oxide-terminated silicon substrates using the technique of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). We show that single asperity contact mechanics (Johnson-Kendall-Roberts(JKR) and Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov(DMT)) as well as a linear (Amontons) relation between applied load and frictional load depending on the pH of the FFM probe. Measurements were made using functionalized and unfunctionalized silicon nitride triangular probes. Functionalized probes included gold-coated probes, and ones coated with a self-assembled monolayer of dodecanethiol (DDT). The frictional behaviour between PDMAEMA and all tips immersed in pH from 3 to 11 are corresponded to the DMT or JKR model and are linear in pH=1, 2, and 12. These results show that contact mechanics of polyelectrolytes in water is complex and strongly dependent on the environmental pH.

  1. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber–glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons’ law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements. PMID:27291939

  2. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber–glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2016-06-01

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons’ law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements.

  3. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber-glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions.

    PubMed

    Tuononen, Ari J

    2016-01-01

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons' law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements. PMID:27291939

  4. A Method for Evaluating Dynamical Friction in Linear Ball Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yusaku; Maru, Koichi; Jin, Tao; Yupapin, Preecha P.; Mitatha, Somsak

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed for evaluating the dynamical friction of linear bearings, whose motion is not perfectly linear due to some play in its internal mechanism. In this method, the moving part of a linear bearing is made to move freely, and the force acting on the moving part is measured as the inertial force given by the product of its mass and the acceleration of its centre of gravity. To evaluate the acceleration of its centre of gravity, the acceleration of two different points on it is measured using a dual-axis optical interferometer. PMID:22163457

  5. Evaluation of Contact Friction in Fracture of Rotationally Bent Nitinol Endodontic Files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimed, Tariq Abu

    2011-12-01

    The high flexibility of rotary Nitinol (Ni-Ti) files has helped clinicians perform root canal treatments with fewer technical errors than seen with stainless steel files. However, intracanal file fracture can occur, compromising the outcome of the treatment. Ni-Ti file fracture incidence is roughly around 4% amongst specialists and higher amongst general practitioners. Therefore, eliminating or reducing this problem should improve patient care. The aim of this project was to isolate and examine the role of friction between files and the canal walls of the glass tube model, and bending-related maximum strain amplitudes, on Ni-Ti file lifetimes-tofracture in the presence of different irrigant solutions and file coatings. A specifically designed device was used to test over 300 electropolished EndoSequenceRTM Ni-Ti files for number of cycles to failure (NCF) in smooth, bent glass tube models at 45 and 60 degrees during dry, coated and liquid-lubricated rotation at 600rpm. Fractured files were examined under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) afterwards. Four different file sizes 25.04, 25.06, 35.04, 35.06 (diameter in mm/taper %) and six surface modification conditions were used independently. These conditions included, three solutions; (1) a surfactant-based solution, Surface-Active-Displacement-Solution (SADS), (2) a mouth wash proven to remove biofilms, Delmopinol 1%(DEL), and (3) Bleach 6% (vol.%), the most common antibacterial endodontic irrigant solution. The conditions also included two low-friction silane-based coating groups, 3-Hepta-fluoroisopropyl-propoxymethyl-dichlorosilane (3-HEPT) and Octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODS), in addition to an as-received file control group (Dry). The coefficient of friction (CF) between the file and the canal walls for each condition was measured as well as the surface tension of the irrigant solutions and the critical surface tension of the coated and uncoated files by contact angle measurements. The radius of curvature and

  6. Use of Textured Surfaces to Mitigate Sliding Friction and Wear of Lubricated and Non-Lubricated Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2012-03-01

    If properly employed, the placement of three-dimensional feature patterns, also referred to as textures, on relatively-moving, load-bearing surfaces can be beneficial to their friction and wear characteristics. For example, geometric patterns can function as lubricant supply channels or depressions in which to trap debris. They can also alter lubricant flow in a manner that produces thicker load-bearing films locally. Considering the area occupied by solid areas and spaces, textures also change the load distribution on surfaces. At least ten different attributes of textures can be specified, and their combinations offer wide latitude in surface engineering. By employing directional machining and grinding procedures, texturing has been used on bearings and seals for well over a half century, and the size scales of texturing vary widely. This report summarizes past work on the texturing of load-bearing surfaces, including past research on laser surface dimpling of ceramics done at ORNL. Textured surfaces generally show most pronounced effects when they are used in conformal or nearly conformal contacts, like that in face seals. Combining textures with other forms of surface modification and lubrication methods can offer additional benefits in surface engineering for tribology. As the literature and past work at ORNL shows, texturing does not always provide benefits. Rather, the selected pattern and arrangement of features must be matched to characteristics of the proposed application, bearing materials, and lubricants.

  7. Effect of oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride on friction behavior of copper-iron contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with an iron rider on a copper disk and a copper rider on an iron disk. The sputter cleaned iron and copper disk surfaces were saturated with oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride at atmospheric pressure. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor the surfaces. Lower friction was obtained in all experiments with the copper rider sliding on the iron disk than when the couple was reversed. For both iron and copper disks, methyl mercaptan gave the best surface coverage and was most effective in reducing friction. For both iron and copper disks, methyl chloride was the least effective in reducing friction. With sliding, copper transferred to iron and iron to copper.

  8. Friction-induced nanofabrication method to produce protrusive nanostructures on quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chenfei; Li, Xiaoying; Yu, Bingjun; Dong, Hanshan; Qian, Linmao; Zhou, Zhongrong

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a new friction-induced nanofabrication method is presented to fabricate protrusive nanostructures on quartz surfaces through scratching a diamond tip under given normal loads. The nanostructures, such as nanodots, nanolines, surface mesas and nanowords, can be produced on the target surface by programming the tip traces according to the demanded patterns. The height of these nanostructures increases with the increase of the number of scratching cycles or the normal load. Transmission electron microscope observations indicated that the lattice distortion and dislocations induced by the mechanical interaction may have played a dominating role in the formation of the protrusive nanostructures on quartz surfaces. Further analysis reveals that during scratching, a contact pressure ranged from 0.4 P y to P y ( P y is the critical yield pressure of quartz) is apt to produce protuberant nanostructures on quartz under the given experimental conditions. Finally, it is of great interest to find that the protrusive nanostructures can be selectively dissolved in 20% KOH solution. Since the nanowords can be easily 'written' by friction-induced fabrication and 'erased' through selective etching on a quartz surface, this friction-induced method opens up new opportunities for future nanofabrication.

  9. Investigation of Wear and Friction Properties Under Sliding Conditions of Some Materials Suitable for Cages of Rolling-Contact Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Bisson, Edmond E

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of wear and friction properties of a number of materials sliding against SAE 52100 steel was conducted. These materials included brass, bronze, beryllium copper, monel, nichrome v, 24s-t aluminum, nodular iron, and gray cast iron. The metals investigated may be useful as possible cage (separator or retainer) materials for rolling-contact bearings of high-speed turbine engines. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding is a most important factor in both dry friction and boundary lubrication. On the basis of wear and resistance to welding only, the cast irons were the most promising materials investigated; they showed the least wear and the least tendency to surface failure when run dry, and when boundary lubricated they showed the highest load capacity. On the basis of mechanical properties, nodular iron is superior to gray cast iron. Bronze had the lowest friction coefficient under dry sliding conditions. The results with brass, beryllium copper, and aluminum were poor and these materials do not appear, with regard to friction and wear, to be suitable for cages.

  10. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and friction studies of nickel-zinc and manganese-zinc ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and sliding friction experiments were conducted with hot-pressed, polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in sliding contact with various transition metals at room temperature in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that the coefficients of friction for Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals are related to the relative chemical activity in these metals: the more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites correlate with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite surfaces increases the coefficients of friction for the Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrite-metal interfaces.

  11. Force-free magnetic fields - The magneto-frictional method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, W. H.; Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    The problem under discussion is that of calculating magnetic field configurations in which the Lorentz force j x B is everywhere zero, subject to specified boundary conditions. We choose to represent the magnetic field in terms of Clebsch variables in the form B = grad alpha x grad beta. These variables are constant on any field line so that each field line is labeled by the corresponding values of alpha and beta. When the field is described in this way, the most appropriate choice of boundary conditions is to specify the values of alpha and beta on the bounding surface. We show that such field configurations may be calculated by a magneto-frictional method. We imagine that the field lines move through a stationary medium, and that each element of magnetic field is subject to a frictional force parallel to and opposing the velocity of the field line. This concept leads to an iteration procedure for modifying the variables alpha and beta, that tends asymptotically towards the force-free state. We apply the method first to a simple problem in two rectangular dimensions, and then to a problem of cylindrical symmetry that was previously discussed by Barnes and Sturrock (1972). In one important respect, our new results differ from the earlier results of Barnes and Sturrock, and we conclude that the earlier article was in error.

  12. Friction, wear, and noise of slip ring and brush contacts for synchronous satellite use.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, N. E.; Cole, S. R.; Glossbrenner, E. W.; Vest, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    A program is being conducted for testing of slip rings for synchronous orbit application. Instrumentation systems necessary for monitoring electrical noise, friction, and brush wear at atmospheric pressure and at less than 50 nanotorr have been developed. A multiplex scheme necessary for the simultaneous recording of brush displacement, friction, and electrical noise has also been developed. Composite brushes consisting of silver-molybdenum disulfide-graphite and silver-niobium diselenide-graphite have been employed on rings of coin silver and rhodium plate. Brush property measurements made included measurement of density, electrical resistivity, shear strength, and microstructure.

  13. The friction and wear of metals and binary alloys in contact with an abrasive grit of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various metals and iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh and W) in contact with single crystal silicon carbide riders. Results indicate that the friction force in the plowing of metal and the groove height (corresponding to the wear volume of the groove) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. The coefficient of friction and groove height generally decrease, and the contact pressure increases with an increase in solute content of binary alloys. There appears to be very good correlation of the solute to iron atomic ratio with the decreasing rate of change of coefficient of friction, the decreasing rate of change of groove height and the increasing rate of change of contact pressure with increasing solute content. These rates of change increase as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity.

  14. Unilateral contact induced blade/casing vibratory interactions in impellers: Analysis for flexible casings with friction and abradable coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batailly, Alain; Legrand, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    This contribution addresses the vibratory analysis of unilateral contact induced structural interactions between a bladed impeller and its surrounding flexible casing. It extends the numerical developments exposed in a previous paper to flexible casings. The casing finite element model and the construction of the associated reduced-order model for efficient computations are first exposed in detail along with an extensive presentation of the smoothing strategy implemented on the contact interface. The proposed algorithms embedding unilateral contact conditions together with abradable coating removal are subsequently introduced and validated through a systematic analysis of (1) the nonlinear procedure for the computation of impeller/casing distances, (2) the treatment of three-dimensional friction and contact forces, (3) the correction of the displacements when unilateral contact or abradable removal arises, and (4) the possible hybrid contact scenarii involving localized total removal of the abradable coating. Finally, two illustrative case studies show that the linear interaction condition, commonly considered for the safe design of impellers and casings in turbomachinery, may be advantageously combined with the presented numerical strategy in order to assess the actual importance of predicted critical speeds.

  15. Stability and transient dynamics of a propeller-shaft system as induced by nonlinear friction acting on bearing-shaft contact interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Zhang, Zhiyi; Huang, Xiuchang; Hua, Hongxing

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the friction-induced instability and the resulting self-excited vibration of a propeller-shaft system supported by water-lubricated rubber bearing. The system under consideration is modeled with an analytical approach by involving the nonlinear interaction among torsional vibrations of the continuous shaft, tangential vibrations of the rubber bearing and the nonlinear friction acting on the bearing-shaft contact interface. A degenerative two-degree-of-freedom analytical model is also reasonably developed to characterize system dynamics. The stability and vibrational characteristics are then determined by the complex eigenvalues analysis together with the quantitative analysis based on the method of multiple scales. A parametric study is conducted to clarify the roles of friction parameters and different vibration modes on instabilities; both the graphic and analytical expressions of instability boundaries are obtained. To capture the nature of self-excited vibrations and validate the stability analysis, the nonlinear formulations are numerically solved to calculate the transient dynamics in time and frequency domains. Analytical and numerical results reveal that the nonlinear coupling significantly affects the system responses and the bearing vibration plays a dominant role in the dynamic behavior of the present system.

  16. Adhesive Wear and Frictional Behavior of Multilayered Polyester Composite Based on Betelnut Fiber Mats Under Wet Contact Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, B. F.; Devadas, Alvin; Yusaf, Talal F.

    In the current study, a multilayered polyester composite based on betelnut fiber mats is fabricated. The adhesive wear and frictional performance of the composite was studied against a smooth stainless steel at different sliding distances (0-6.72 km) and applied loads (20-200 N) at 2.8 m/s sliding velocity. Variations in specific wear rate and friction coefficient were evaluated at two different orientations of fiber mat; namely parallel (P-O) and normal (N-O). Results obtained were presented against sliding distance. The worn surfaces of the composite were studied using an optical microscope. The effect of the composite sliding on the stainless steel counterface roughness was investigated. The results revealed that the wear performance of betelnut fiber reinforced polyester (BFRP) composite under wet contact condition was highly dependent on test parameters and fiber mat orientation. The specific wear rate performance for each orientation showed an inverse relationship to sliding distance. BFRP composite in N-O exhibited better wear performance compared with P-O. However, the friction coefficient in N-O was higher than that in P-O at lower range of applied load. The predominant wear mechanism was debonding of fiber with no pullout or ploughing. Moreover, at higher applied loads, micro- and macrocracking and fracture were observed in the resinous region.

  17. Lifetime limitations of ohmic, contacting RF MEMS switches with Au, Pt and Ir contact materials due to accumulation of ‘friction polymer’ on the contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplewski, David A.; Nordquist, Christopher D.; Dyck, Christopher W.; Patrizi, Gary A.; Kraus, Garth M.; Cowan, William D.

    2012-10-01

    We present lifetime limitations and failure analysis of many packaged RF MEMS ohmic contacting switches with Au-Au, Au-Ir, and Au-Pt contact materials operating with 100 µN of contact force per contact in hermetically sealed glass wall packages. All metals were tested using the same switch design in a controlled environment to provide a comparison between the performance of the different materials and their corresponding failure mechanisms. The switch lifetimes of the different contact materials varied from several hundred cycles to 200 million cycles with different mechanisms causing failures for different contact materials. Switches with Au-Au contacts failed due to adhesion when thoroughly cleaned while switches with dissimilar metal contacts (Au-Ir and Au-Pt) operated without adhesion failures but failed due to carbon accumulation on the contacts even in a clean, packaged environment as a result of the catalytic behavior of the contact materials. Switch lifetimes correlated inversely with catalytic behavior of the contact metals. The data suggests the path to increase switch lifetime is to use favorable catalytic materials as contacts, design switches with higher contact forces to break through any residual contamination, and use cleaner, probably smaller, packages.

  18. A substitute model of two-dimensional dry friction exposed to dither generated by rolling contact of wheel and rail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Jerzy

    2012-10-01

    Dither generated by rolling contact of wheel and rail smoothes dry friction damping provided by the primary suspension dampers of freight wagons and it should be taken into account in numerical simulations. But numerically the problem is non-smooth and this leads to long execution time during simulation, especially when the vehicle with friction dampers is modelled in the environment of an multi-body system simulation program, whose solver has to cope with many strong non-linearities. The other difficulty is the necessity of handling within the code a number of big volume files of recorded dither sampled with high frequency. To avoid these difficulties, a substitute model of two-dimensional dry friction exposed to dither is proposed that does not need application of dither during simulation, but it behaves as if dither were applied. Due to this property of the model, the excitation of the vehicle model by track irregularities may be supplied as low-frequency input, which allows fast execution and, the necessity of handling high-volume files of recorded dither is avoided. The substitute model is numerically effective. To identify parameters of the substitute model, a pre-processing employing a sample of the realistic dither is carried-out on a simple two-degrees-of-freedom system. The substitute model is anisotropic, describing anisotropic properties of the two-dimensional friction arising in the presence of one-dimensional dither. The model may be applied in other branches of engineering, for example, in mechatronics and robotics, where application of dither may improve the accuracy of positioning devices.

  19. The friction and wear of metals and binary alloys in contact with an abrasive grit of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various metals and iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with single-crystal silicon carbide riders. Results indicate that the coefficient of friction and groove height (corresponding to the wear volume) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. The coefficient of friction and groove height generally decrease with an increase in solute content of binary alloys. A separate correlation exists between the solute to iron atomic radius ratio and the decreasing rates of change of coefficient of friction and groove height with increasing solute content. These rates of change are minimum at a solute to iron radius ratio of unity. They increase as the atomic ratio increases or decreases linearly from unity. The correlations indicate that atomic size is an important parameter in controlling friction and wear of alloys.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of real contact area and fault normal stiffness during frictional sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, N. M.; Nagata, K.; Kilgore, B. D.; Nakatani, M.

    2010-12-01

    The tectonic stresses that lead to earthquake slip are concentrated in small regions of solid contact between asperities or gouge particles within the fault. Fault strength is proportional to the contact area within the shearing portion of the fault zone and many fault properties of interest to earthquake hazard research, e.g., occurrence time, recurrence interval, precursory slip, triggered earthquake slip, are controlled by processes acting at the highly stressed contact regions. Unfortunately the contact-scale physical processes controlling earthquake occurrence cannot be easily observed or measured directly. In this pilot study we simultaneously directly measure contact area using transmitted light intensity (LI) [Dieterich and Kilgore, 1994; 1996] and continuously monitor the normal stiffness of the fault using acoustic wave transmission (AT) [Nagata et al., 2008]. The objective of our study is to determine relations amongst contacting area, stiffness, strength, normal stress, shear displacement, and time of contact during sliding. Interface stiffness is monitored using acoustic compressive waves transmitted across the fault. Because the fault is more compliant in compression than the surrounding rock, the fault has an elastic wave transmission coefficient that depends on the fault normal stiffness. Contact area is measured by LI: regions in contact transmit light efficiently while light is scattered elsewhere; therefore transmitted light intensity is presumed proportional to contact area. LI and AT are expected to be correlated; e.g., an elastic contact model suggests that stiffness goes as the square root of contact area. We observe LI and AT for sliding at slip speeds between 0.01 and 10 microns/s and normal stresses between 1 and 2.5 MPa while conducting standard velocity-step, normal stress-step and slide-hold-slide tests. AT and LI correlate during all tests, at all conditions. If the physical relationship, or even an empirical calibration between AT and

  1. Real-time deflection and friction force imaging by bimorph-based resonance-type high-speed scanning force microscopy in the contact mode

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report herein an alternative high-speed scanning force microscopy method in the contact mode based on a resonance-type piezoelectric bimorph scanner. The experimental setup, the modified optical beam deflection scheme suitable for smaller cantilevers, and a high-speed control program for simultaneous data capture are described in detail. The feature of the method is that the deflection and friction force images of the sample surface can be obtained simultaneously in real time. Images of various samples (e.g., a test grating, a thin gold film, and fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass slides) are acquired successfully. The imaging rate is 25 frames per second, and the average scan speed reaches a value of approximately 2.5 cm/s. The method combines the advantages of both observing the dynamic processes of the sample surface and monitoring the frictional properties on the nanometer scale. PACS 07.79.Lh; 07.79.Sp; 68.37.Ps PMID:25593555

  2. The extended wedge method: Atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, H. S.; Burris, D. L.

    2013-05-01

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS2 to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS2 had friction coefficients of μ = 0.20 ± 0.04 and μ = 0.006 ± 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS2 had a friction coefficient of μ = 0.005 ± 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).

  3. Experimental Study of the Rolling-Sliding Contact Conditions in a PA66/STEEL Gear Using Twin-Disc Test Rig: Friction and Wear Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbarek, Meftah; Rhaiem, Sadok; Kharrat, Mohamed; Dammak, Maher

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of sliding ratio on the tribological response of the contact between the teeth of a metal/polymer gear in the regions close to the pitch point. For this purpose, a new twin-disc test rig was developed on the basis of two discs of different diameters rotating one above the other at the same angular speed. Two different materials were used: non-alloyed structural steel (C45) and polyamide (PA66). The effect of the slip ratio (4%, 12%, 20% and 28%) was studied at a constant pressure of 34 MPa and a constant angular speed of 300 rpm. In addition, the contact conditions were controlled with measurements of the two discs surface temperatures. The results indicate that the wear and the friction are closely related to the contact temperature generated by the sliding phenomenon. At low slip ratio (4% and 12%), the coefficient of friction and the temperature are characterized by a quasi-linear increase with time, and the wear increases slowly. At higher slip ratio (20% and 28%), the coefficient of friction and the temperature presents a steady state, and the wear increases dramatically. During the test, a film of transferred PA66 is formed on the steel surface causing the development of adhesive interactions between the contacting discs which increase the friction coefficient and the contact temperature. The high thermal conductivity of steel as compared to that of the polymer can reduce enormously the contact temperature generated by the sliding process.

  4. Pressure distribution for patchlike contact in seals with frictional heating, thermal expansion, and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilaparti, S. R.; Burton, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding contact in seals is known to change at high sliding speed from initially uniform pressure to a deformed state where contact is restricted to small patches of the surface. An earlier analysis of such contact was based upon the assumption of uniform pressure on the small patches. The present study draws upon a thermoelastic influence function to provide simultaneous equations for pressure on subdivisions of the patches. The final result is that at high wear rate (and, consequently, high traversal speed of the patch along the surface of the more conductive body of the contacting pair) the pressure distribution becomes roughly triangular with the maximum pressure toward the leading edge of the patch.

  5. Considerations on the moving contact-line singularity, with application to frictional drag on a slender drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the no-slip boundary conditions leads to a singularity at a moving contact line and that this presumes some form of slip. Present considerations on the energetics of slip due to shear stress lead to a yield stress boundary condition. A model for the distortion of the liquid state near solid boundaries gives a physical basis for this boundary condition. The yield stress condition is illustrated by an analysis of a slender drop rolling down an incline. That analysis provides a formula for the frictional drag resisting the drop movement. With the present boundary condition, the length of the slip region becomes a property of the fluid flow.

  6. Segment-based vs. element-based integration for mortar methods in computational contact mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Philipp; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2015-01-01

    Mortar finite element methods provide a very convenient and powerful discretization framework for geometrically nonlinear applications in computational contact mechanics, because they allow for a variationally consistent treatment of contact conditions (mesh tying, non-penetration, frictionless or frictional sliding) despite the fact that the underlying contact surface meshes are non-matching and possibly also geometrically non-conforming. However, one of the major issues with regard to mortar methods is the design of adequate numerical integration schemes for the resulting interface coupling terms, i.e. curve integrals for 2D contact problems and surface integrals for 3D contact problems. The way how mortar integration is performed crucially influences the accuracy of the overall numerical procedure as well as the computational efficiency of contact evaluation. Basically, two different types of mortar integration schemes, which will be termed as segment-based integration and element-based integration here, can be found predominantly in the literature. While almost the entire existing literature focuses on either of the two mentioned mortar integration schemes without questioning this choice, the intention of this paper is to provide a comprehensive and unbiased comparison. The theoretical aspects covered here include the choice of integration rule, the treatment of boundaries of the contact zone, higher-order interpolation and frictional sliding. Moreover, a new hybrid scheme is proposed, which beneficially combines the advantages of segment-based and element-based mortar integration. Several numerical examples are presented for a detailed and critical evaluation of the overall performance of the different schemes within several well-known benchmark problems of computational contact mechanics.

  7. Friction-induced formation of heat with account for heat transfer through the contact surface between homogeneous and piecewise-homogeneous semispaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, A. A.; Kuciej, M.

    2011-05-01

    An analytical solution of the boundary-value heat conduction problem is obtained for a tribosystem consisting of a homogeneous semispace sliding with a constant velocity along the surface of a plane-parallel strip applied to a semi-infinite foundation. The tribosystem is heated as a result of the frictional heat formation on the sliding surface. It is assumed that the thermal contact of the semispace with the strip is not full. With the aid of the Duhamel theorem, a solution for the considered tribosystem, with sliding at a constant deceleration, is also constructed that models heat formation from friction in disk brakes. For the materials of the friction pair "pig iron semispace (disk)-metal-ceramic strip (lining)-steel foundation (frame)," the influence of the coefficient of thermal conductivity of the contact (Biot number) on the temperature distribution was investigated.

  8. Non-contact method for directing electrotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahirwar, Dinesh K.; Nasser, Mohd W.; Jones, Travis H.; Sequin, Emily K.; West, Joseph D.; Henthorne, Timothy L.; Javor, Joshua; Kaushik, Aniruddha M.; Ganju, Ramesh K.; Subramaniam, Vish V.

    2015-06-01

    We present a method to induce electric fields and drive electrotaxis (galvanotaxis) without the need for electrodes to be in contact with the media containing the cell cultures. We report experimental results using a modification of the transmembrane assay, demonstrating the hindrance of migration of breast cancer cells (SCP2) when an induced a.c. electric field is present in the appropriate direction (i.e. in the direction of migration). Of significance is that migration of these cells is hindered at electric field strengths many orders of magnitude (5 to 6) below those previously reported for d.c. electrotaxis, and even in the presence of a chemokine (SDF-1α) or a growth factor (EGF). Induced a.c. electric fields applied in the direction of migration are also shown to hinder motility of non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) in the presence of the growth factor EGF. In addition, we also show how our method can be applied to other cell migration assays (scratch assay), and by changing the coil design and holder, that it is also compatible with commercially available multi-well culture plates.

  9. The influence of fault geometry and frictional contact properties on slip surface behavior and off-fault damage: insights from quasi-static modeling of small strike-slip faults from the Sierra Nevada, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, E.; Pollard, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Geological and geophysical investigations demonstrate that faults are geometrically complex structures, and that the nature and intensity of off-fault damage is spatially correlated with geometric irregularities of the slip surfaces. Geologic observations of exhumed meter-scale strike-slip faults in the Bear Creek drainage, central Sierra Nevada, CA, provide insight into the relationship between non-planar fault geometry and frictional slip at depth. We investigate natural fault geometries in an otherwise homogeneous and isotropic elastic material with a two-dimensional displacement discontinuity method (DDM). Although the DDM is a powerful tool, frictional contact problems are beyond the scope of the elementary implementation because it allows interpenetration of the crack surfaces. By incorporating a complementarity algorithm, we are able to enforce appropriate contact boundary conditions along the model faults and include variable friction and frictional strength. This tool allows us to model quasi-static slip on non-planar faults and the resulting deformation of the surrounding rock. Both field observations and numerical investigations indicate that sliding along geometrically discontinuous or irregular faults may lead to opening of the fault and the formation of new fractures, affecting permeability in the nearby rock mass and consequently impacting pore fluid pressure. Numerical simulations of natural fault geometries provide local stress fields that are correlated to the style and spatial distribution of off-fault damage. We also show how varying the friction and frictional strength along the model faults affects slip surface behavior and consequently influences the stress distributions in the adjacent material.

  10. Friction-Testing Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, F. J.; Dixon, D. S.; Shaw, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Testing machine evaluates wear and ignition characteristics of materials in rubbing contact. Offers advantages over other laboratory methods of measuring wear because it simulates operating conditions under which material will actually be used. Machine used to determine wear characteristics, rank and select materials for service with such active oxidizers as oxygen, halogens, and oxides of nitrogen, measure wear characteristics, and determine coefficients of friction.

  11. Taylor series to solve friction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchet, Fabien; Lejeune, Arnaud; Potier-Ferry, Michel

    2010-06-01

    Thin metallic sheet transportation appears in numerous manufacturing processes such as continuous annealing, levelling or galvanization. It involves various nonlinear phenomena and, in particular, contact with friction. We develop a numerical method to solve this kind of mechanical problem, using shell finite elements and the Asymptotic Numerical Method (ANM). This article focuses on the treatment of the friction equations with ANM.

  12. Friction stir method for forming structures and materials

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Frederick, David Alan

    2011-11-22

    Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

  13. Micro-beam friction liner and method of transferring energy

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana, Charles

    2007-07-17

    A micro-beam friction liner adapted to increase performance and efficiency and reduce wear in a piezoelectric motor or actuator or other device using a traveling or standing wave to transfer energy in the form of torque and momentum. The micro-beam friction liner comprises a dense array of micro-beam projections having first ends fixed relative to a rotor and second ends projecting substantially toward a plurality of teeth of a stator, wherein the micro-beam projections are compressed and bent during piezoelectric movement of the stator teeth, thereby storing the energy, and then react against the stator teeth to convert the stored energy stored to rotational energy in the rotor.

  14. Novel Friction Law for the Static Friction Force based on Local Precursor Slipping

    PubMed Central

    Katano, Yu; Nakano, Ken; Otsuki, Michio; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The sliding of a solid object on a solid substrate requires a shear force that is larger than the maximum static friction force. It is commonly believed that the maximum static friction force is proportional to the loading force and does not depend on the apparent contact area. The ratio of the maximum static friction force to the loading force is called the static friction coefficient µM, which is considered to be a constant. Here, we conduct experiments demonstrating that the static friction force of a slider on a substrate follows a novel friction law under certain conditions. The magnitude of µM decreases as the loading force increases or as the apparent contact area decreases. This behavior is caused by the slip of local precursors before the onset of bulk sliding and is consistent with recent theory. The results of this study will develop novel methods for static friction control. PMID:25205283

  15. Effect of friction on the rheology of dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallier, Stany; Lemaire, Elisabeth; Peters, François; Lobry, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    This work reports three-dimensional numerical simulations of sheared non-Brownian concentrated suspensions using a fictitious domain method. Contacts between particles are modeled using a DEM-like approach (Discrete Element Method), which allows for a more physical description, including roughness and friction. This study emphasizes the effect of friction between particles and its role on rheological properties, especially on normal stress differences. Friction is shown to notably increase viscosity and second normal stress difference | N2 | and decrease | N1 | , in better agreement with experiments. The hydrodynamic and contact contributions to the overall particle stress are particularly investigated and this shows that the effect of friction is mostly due to the additional contact stress since the hydrodynamic stress remains unaffected by friction. Simulation results are also compared with experiments and the agreement is improved when friction is accounted for: this suggests that friction is operative in actual suspensions.

  16. Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Urgen, Mustafa; Cakir, Ali Fuat; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Kazmanli, Kursat; Keles, Ozgul

    2007-05-01

    An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

  17. A computerized method to estimate friction coefficient from orientation distribution of meso-scale faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsushi

    2016-08-01

    The friction coefficient controls the brittle strength of the Earth's crust for deformation recorded by faults. This study proposes a computerized method to determine the friction coefficient of meso-scale faults. The method is based on the analysis of orientation distribution of faults, and the principal stress axes and the stress ratio calculated by a stress tensor inversion technique. The method assumes that faults are activated according to the cohesionless Coulomb's failure criterion, where the fluctuations of fluid pressure and the magnitude of differential stress are assumed to induce faulting. In this case, the orientation distribution of fault planes is described by a probability density function that is visualized as linear contours on a Mohr diagram. The parametric optimization of the function for an observed fault population yields the friction coefficient. A test using an artificial fault-slip dataset successfully determines the internal friction angle (the arctangent of the friction coefficient) with its confidence interval of several degrees estimated by the bootstrap resampling technique. An application to natural faults cutting a Pleistocene forearc basin fill yields a friction coefficient around 0.7 which is experimentally predicted by the Byerlee's law.

  18. The friction-cost method : replacement for nothing and leisure for free?

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Werner B F; Koopmanschap, Marc A

    2005-01-01

    The friction-cost method has been put forward as an alternative to the human-capital method as it allows more realistic estimates of productivity costs to be calculated for use in economic evaluations. The possibility of replacement of (long-term) absentees is at the heart of the friction-cost method. It recognises that society will restore initial production levels after some period of adaptation, the length of which may depend on the availability of labour and, hence, on unemployment. The friction-cost method has received two main criticisms in the literature: (i) it has no theoretical underpinning; and (ii) it treats leisure time as having no value. We demonstrate in a simple 'theoretical' time-allocation model how time use shifts in the friction-cost method and that leisure is not treated as having no value. Rather, it is considered to be valued in terms of QALYs--as is normally the case in economic evaluation. The time-allocation model also demonstrates that when using the friction-cost or human-capital method the changes in the amount of unpaid work and leisure time need to be valued separately. Unpaid production losses from the previously unemployed may be larger than the gain in unpaid production gain of the absentee, resulting in a societal loss of unpaid work or the sacrifice of leisure in order to make up for lost unpaid work. These changes should be incorporated into economic analyses. PMID:15748085

  19. Energy conversion device and method of reducing friction therein

    DOEpatents

    Solovyeva, Lyudmila Mikhaylovna; Jansson, Kyle S; Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim; Zhu, Dong; Milner, Robert; Daughterty, Early Eugene; Higdon, Clifton Baxter; Elagamy, Kamel Abdel-Khalik; Hicks, Aaron Michael

    2013-10-08

    A device configured for converting energy includes a first surface, a second surface configured for moving with respect to the first surface during operation of the device, and a coating disposed on at least one of the first surface and the second surface. The coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy represented by the general formula AlMgB.sub.14--X, wherein X is present in an amount of from 0 to 70 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of the ceramic alloy and is a doping agent selected from the group of Group IV elements and borides and nitrides thereof, and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon in a gradient concentration. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12.

  20. Computing Contact Stresses In Gear Teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Somprakit, Paisan; Huston, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    Improved method of computing contact stresses in gear teeth accounts for complicating effects like those of static and sliding friction. Provides iterative procedure for determination of contact region and nodal contact forces along with contact stresses. Method based on equations and computational procedure incorporating these effects routinely.

  1. Development and validation of a new method for measuring friction between skin and nonwoven materials.

    PubMed

    Cottenden, A M; Wong, W K; Cottenden, D J; Farbrot, A

    2008-07-01

    A new method for measuring the coefficient of friction between nonwoven materials and the curved surface of the volar forearm has been developed and validated. The method was used to measure the coefficient of static friction for three different nonwoven materials on the normal (dry) and over-hydrated volar forearms of five female volunteers (ages 18-44). The method proved simple to run and had good repeatability: the coefficient of variation (standard deviation expressed as a percentage of the mean) for triplets of repeat measurements was usually (80 per cent of the time) less than 10 per cent. Measurements involving the geometrically simpler configuration of pulling a weighted fabric sample horizontally across a quasi-planar area of volar forearm skin proved experimentally more difficult and had poorer repeatability. However, correlations between values of coefficient of static friction derived using the two methods were good (R = 0.81 for normal (dry) skin, and 0.91 for over-hydrated skin). Measurements of the coefficient of static friction for the three nonwovens for normal (dry) and for over-hydrated skin varied in the ranges of about 0.3-0.5 and 0.9-1.3, respectively. In agreement with Amontons' law, coefficients of friction were invariant with normal pressure over the entire experimental range (0.1-8.2 kPa). PMID:18756696

  2. On the contact treatment of non-convex particles in the granular element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Keng-Wit; Krabbenhoft, Kristian; Andrade, José E.

    2014-09-01

    We present a new contact algorithm that endows the granular element method [1] with the ability to model non-convex particles using non-uniform rational basis splines. This significant extension allows for the representation of particle morphological features, namely, sphericity and angularity, to their fullest extent, with local contact rolling resistance and interlocking emanating directly from grain geometry. Both particle elasticity and friction at the contact level are treated implicitly and simultaneously, and the contact algorithm is cast into a mathematical programming-based contact dynamics framework. The framework provides the advantages of implicit time integrators (for e.g., stability and larger time steps) and ability to handle both rigid and highly stiff particles. By allowing for particle non-convexity, modeling flexibility is significantly enhanced, to a level that is comparable with isogeometric methods. As such, the transition from image data to particle shapes is greatly streamlined. More importantly, increased macroscopic strength in granular packings comprising of non-convex particles is fully captured. All the above capabilities are achieved under a very modest implementation effort.

  3. Underwater sediment-contact radiation survey method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.R.; St. Aubin, M.; Welch, S.J. )

    1991-11-01

    The authors are striving to produce a practical system for mapping lateral distributions in gamma activity on submerged sediments. This is in response to the need for quality control and interpretation of data obtainable by sediment sampling and analyses near nuclear utilities. A prototype gamma probe has been constructed and tested. The prototype is essentially a background survey meter packaged in a 53-cm-long {times} 5.4-cm-diam waterproof vehicle. This usage-shaped vehicle is connected to a cable for towing in contact with bottom sediments of lakes, rivers, and coastal waters. This vehicle, or sediment probe as it is called, was initially developed for measuring sediment electrical conductances, a parameter that can be used to locate underwater areas of groundwater and contaminant upwelling. During towing, the probe does not roll or twist around its longitudinal axis by more than 10 deg, so that sensors, which have been fixed within the vehicle, can be oriented to look up, down, or sideways. In over 450 lin-km of underwater survey, only a single sediment probe has been irretrievably snagged on sunken rocks or other debris. Work in the Ottawa River near the Chalk River Laboratories has shown good agreement among point measurements of river sediment with continuous measurements using the moving probe.

  4. Elements of Friction Theory and Nanotribology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnecco, Enrico; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-04-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Dry friction and damped oscillators; Part I. Elastic Contacts: 3. Elements of theory of elasticity; 4. Normal contacts; 5. Tangential contacts; 6. Elastic rolling; 7. Beams, plates and layered materials; Part II. Advanced Contact Mechanics: 8. Rough contacts; 9. Viscoelastic contacts; 10. Adhesive contacts; 11. Thermal and electric effects; 12. Plastic contacts; 13. Fracture; 14. Stick-slip; Part III. Nanotribology: 15. Atomic-scale stick-slip; 16. Atomic-scale stick-slip in two dimensions; 17. Instrumental and computational methods in nanotribology; 18. Experimental results in nanotribology; 19. Nanomanipulation; 20. Wear on the nanoscale; 21. Non-contact friction; Part IV. Lubrication: 22. Drag in a viscous fluid; 23. Lubrication; 24. Viscous phenomena in confined or spreading liquids; Appendix A; Appendix B; Appendix C; Notes; References; Index.

  5. Methods to achieve sub-100-nm contact hole lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Tracy K.; Kavanagh, Robert J.; Pohlers, Gerd; Kanno, Takafumi; Bae, Young C.; Barclay, George G.; Kanagasabapathy, Subbareddy; Mattia, Joseph

    2003-06-01

    There are numerous methods being explored by lithographers to achieve contact holes below 100nm. Regarding optical impact on contact hole imaging, very high numerical aperture tools are becoming available at 193nm (as high as 0.9) and various optical extension techniques such as assist features, focus drilling, phase shift masks, and off-axis illumination are being employed to improve the aerial image. In this paper, the impact of the ArF photoresist is investigated. Polymers capable of thermal reflow of larger (~140nm) to smaller (90nm and below) contact holes are presented. Improved materials to achieve the properties necessary for good contact hole imaging for standard single layer resist (SLR) processing are also discussed. State-of-the-art ultra-thin resists (UTR) for contact holes and 193nm bi-layer resist systems are also studied as viable techniques to achieving very small contact holes.

  6. Methods for modeling contact dynamics of capture mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Philip J.; Tobbe, Patrick A.; Glaese, John

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, an analytical approach for studying the contact dynamics of space-based vehicles during docking/berthing maneuvers is presented. Methods for modeling physical contact between docking/berthing mechanisms, examples of how these models have been used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of automated capture mechanisms, and experimental verification of predicted results are shown.

  7. Effect of fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayer films on sidewall adhesion and friction of surface micromachines with impacting and sliding contact interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-06-14

    A self-assembled monolayer film consisting of fluoro-octyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) was vapor-phase deposited on Si(100) substrates and polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) surface micromachines. The hydrophobic behavior and structural composition of the FOTS film deposited on Si(100) were investigated by goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The effects of contact pressure, relative humidity, temperature, and impact/sliding cycles on the adhesive and friction behavior of uncoated and FOTS-coated polysilicon micromachines (referred to as the Si and FOTS/Si micromachines, respectively) were investigated under controlled loading and environmental conditions. FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated much lower and stable adhesion than Si micromachines due to the highly hydrophobic and conformal FOTS film. Contrary to Si micromachines, sidewall adhesion of FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated a weak dependence on relative humidity, temperature, and impact cycles. In addition, FOTS/Si micromachines showed low and stable adhesion and low static friction for significantly more sliding cycles than Si micromachines. The adhesive and static friction characteristics of Si and FOTS/Si micromachines are interpreted in the context of physicochemical surface changes, resulting in the increase of the real area of contact and a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition of the surface chemical characteristics caused by nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of the organic residue (Si micromachines) or the FOTS film (FOTS/Si micromachines) during repetitive impact and oscillatory sliding of the sidewall surfaces.

  8. An analytical method for computing atomic contact areas in biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-15

    We propose a new analytical method for detecting and computing contacts between atoms in biomolecules. It is based on the alpha shape theory and proceeds in three steps. First, we compute the weighted Delaunay triangulation of the union of spheres representing the molecule. In the second step, the Delaunay complex is filtered to derive the dual complex. Finally, contacts between spheres are collected. In this approach, two atoms i and j are defined to be in contact if their centers are connected by an edge in the dual complex. The contact areas between atom i and its neighbors are computed based on the caps formed by these neighbors on the surface of i; the total area of all these caps is partitioned according to their spherical Laguerre Voronoi diagram on the surface of i. This method is analytical and its implementation in a new program BallContact is fast and robust. We have used BallContact to study contacts in a database of 1551 high resolution protein structures. We show that with this new definition of atomic contacts, we generate realistic representations of the environments of atoms and residues within a protein. In particular, we establish the importance of nonpolar contact areas that complement the information represented by the accessible surface areas. This new method bears similarity to the tessellation methods used to quantify atomic volumes and contacts, with the advantage that it does not require the presence of explicit solvent molecules if the surface of the protein is to be considered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22965816

  9. Adaptive multiscale method for two-dimensional nanoscale adhesive contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Lan; Wu, Liyan

    2013-05-01

    There are two separate traditional approaches to model contact problems: continuum and atomistic theory. Continuum theory is successfully used in many domains, but when the scale of the model comes to nanometer, continuum approximation meets challenges. Atomistic theory can catch the detailed behaviors of an individual atom by using molecular dynamics (MD) or quantum mechanics, although accurately, it is usually time-consuming. A multiscale method coupled MD and finite element (FE) is presented. To mesh the FE region automatically, an adaptive method based on the strain energy gradient is introduced to the multiscale method to constitute an adaptive multiscale method. Utilizing the proposed method, adhesive contacts between a rigid cylinder and an elastic substrate are studied, and the results are compared with full MD simulations. The process of FE meshes refinement shows that adaptive multiscale method can make FE mesh generation more flexible. Comparison of the displacements of boundary atoms in the overlap region with the results from full MD simulations indicates that adaptive multiscale method can transfer displacements effectively. Displacements of atoms and FE nodes on the center line of the multiscale model agree well with that of atoms in full MD simulations, which shows the continuity in the overlap region. Furthermore, the Von Mises stress contours and contact force distributions in the contact region are almost same as full MD simulations. The method presented combines multiscale method and adaptive technique, and can provide a more effective way to multiscale method and to the investigation on nanoscale contact problems.

  10. A simple method to estimate threshold friction velocity of wind erosion in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nearly all wind erosion models require the specification of threshold friction velocity (TFV). Yet determining TFV of wind erosion in field conditions is difficult as it depends on both soil characteristics and distribution of vegetation or other roughness elements. While several reliable methods ha...

  11. Method of forming contacts for a back-contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Jane

    2013-07-23

    Methods of forming contacts for back-contact solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a thin dielectric layer on a substrate, forming a polysilicon layer on the thin dielectric layer, forming and patterning a solid-state p-type dopant source on the polysilicon layer, forming an n-type dopant source layer over exposed regions of the polysilicon layer and over a plurality of regions of the solid-state p-type dopant source, and heating the substrate to provide a plurality of n-type doped polysilicon regions among a plurality of p-type doped polysilicon regions.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Dynamic Contact Angles and Contact Lines in Multiphase Flows using Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendota, Premchand

    Many physical phenomena and industrial applications involve multiphase fluid flows and hence it is of high importance to be able to simulate various aspects of these flows accurately. The Dynamic Contact Angles (DCA) and the contact lines at the wall boundaries are a couple of such important aspects. In the past few decades, many mathematical models were developed for predicting the contact angles of the inter-face with the wall boundary under various flow conditions. These models are used to incorporate the physics of DCA and contact line motion in numerical simulations using various interface capturing/tracking techniques. In the current thesis, a simple approach to incorporate the static and dynamic contact angle boundary conditions using the level set method is developed and implemented in multiphase CFD codes, LIT (Level set Interface Tracking) (Herrmann (2008)) and NGA (flow solver) (Desjardins et al (2008)). Various DCA models and associated boundary conditions are reviewed. In addition, numerical aspects such as the occurrence of a stress singularity at the contact lines and grid convergence of macroscopic interface shape are dealt with in the context of the level set approach.

  13. Various contact approaches for the finite cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyukhov, Alexander; Lorenz, Christian; Schweizerhof, Karl

    2015-08-01

    The finite cell method (FCM) provides a method for the computation of structures which can be described as a mixture of high-order FEM and a special integration technique. The method is one of the novel computational methods and is highly developed within the last decade. One of the major problems of FCM is the description of boundary conditions inside cells as well as in sub-cells. And a completely open problem is the description of contact. Therefore, the motivation of the current work is to develop a set of computational contact mechanics approaches which will be effective for the finite element cell method. Thus, for the FCM method we are developing and testing hereby focusing on the Hertz problem the following algorithms: direct integration in the cell method, allowing the fastest implementation, but suffering from numerical artifacts such as the "stamp effect"; the most efficient scheme concerning approximation properties the cell-surface-to-analytical-surface contact element designed for contact with rigid bodies leading to cell-wisely contact elements; and finally the discrete-cell-to-cell contact approach based on the finite discrete method. All developed methods are carefully verified with the analytical Hertz solution. The cell subdivisions, the order of the shape functions as well as the selection of the classes for shape functions are investigated for all developed contact approaches. This analysis allows to choose the most robust approach depending on the needs of the user such as correct representation of the stresses, or only satisfaction of geometrical non-penetration conditions.

  14. Friction and wear with a single-crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide in contact with iron base binary alloys in oil: Effects of alloying element and its content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a rider of 0.025-millimeter-radius, single-crystal silicon carbide in mineral oil. Results indicate that atomic size and content of alloying element play a dominant role in controlling the abrasive-wear and -friction properties of iron-base binary alloys. The coefficient of friction and groove height (wear volume) general alloy decrease, and the contact pressure increases in solute content. There appears to be very good correlation of the solute to iron atomic radius ratio with the decreasing rate of coefficient of friction, the decreasing rate of groove height (wear volume), and the increasing rate of contact pressure with increasing solute content C. Those rates increase as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases from unity.

  15. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Imaging of Spherical and Flat Counterfaces of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Tribological Contacts: A Correlation of Surface Chemistry and Friction

    SciTech Connect

    A Konicek; C Jaye; M Hamilton; W Sawyer; D Fischer; R Carpick

    2011-12-31

    A recently installed synchrotron radiation near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) full field imaging electron spectrometer was used to spatially resolve the chemical changes of both counterfaces from an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) tribological contact. A silicon flat and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sphere were both coated with UNCD, and employed to form two wear tracks on the flat in a linear reciprocating tribometer. The first wear track was produced using a new, unconditioned sphere whose surface was thus conditioned during this first experiment. This led to faster run-in and lower friction when producing a second wear track using the conditioned sphere. The large depth of field of the magnetically guided NEXAFS imaging detector enabled rapid, large area spectromicroscopic imaging of both the spherical and flat surfaces. Laterally resolved NEXAFS data from the tribological contact area revealed that both substrates had an as-grown surface layer that contained a higher fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and oxygen which was mechanically removed. Unlike the flat, the film on the sphere showed evidence of having graphitic character, both before and after sliding. These results show that the graphitic character of the sphere is not solely responsible for low friction and short run-in. Rather, conditioning the sphere, likely by removing asperities and passivating dangling bonds, leads to lower friction with less chemical modification of the substrate in subsequent tests. The new NEXAFS imaging spectroscopy detector enabled a more complete understanding of the tribological phenomena by imaging, for the first time, the surface chemistry of the spherical counterface which had been in continual contact during wear track formation.

  16. Friction phenomena and their impact on the shear behaviour of granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhr, Bettina; Six, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    In the discrete element simulation of granular materials, the modelling of contacts is crucial for the prediction of the macroscopic material behaviour. From the tribological point of view, friction at contacts needs to be modelled carefully, as it depends on several factors, e.g. contact normal load or temperature to name only two. In discrete element method (DEM) simulations the usage of Coulomb's law of friction is state of the art in modelling particle-particle contacts. Usually in Coulomb's law, for all contacts only one constant coefficient of friction is used, which needs to reflect all tribological effects. Thus, whenever one of the influence factors of friction varies over a wide range, it can be expected that the usage of only one constant coefficient of friction in Coulomb's law is an oversimplification of reality. For certain materials, e.g. steel, it is known that a dependency of the coefficient of friction on the contact normal load exists. A more tribological tangential contact law is implemented in DEM, where the interparticle friction coefficient depends on the averaged normal stress in the contact. Simulations of direct shear tests are conducted, using steel spheres of different size distributions. The strong influence of interparticle friction on the bulk friction is shown via a variation of the constant interparticle friction coefficient. Simulations with constant and stress-dependent interparticle friction are compared. For the stress-dependent interparticle friction, a normal stress dependency of the bulk friction is seen. In the literature, measurements of different granular materials and small normal loads also show a stress dependency of the bulk friction coefficient. With increasing applied normal stress, the bulk friction coefficient reduces both in the experiments and in the simulations.

  17. Micromachine friction test apparatus

    DOEpatents

    deBoer, Maarten P.; Redmond, James M.; Michalske, Terry A.

    2002-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) friction test apparatus is disclosed for determining static or dynamic friction in MEM devices. The friction test apparatus, formed by surface micromachining, is based on a friction pad supported at one end of a cantilevered beam, with the friction pad overlying a contact pad formed on the substrate. A first electrostatic actuator can be used to bring a lower surface of the friction pad into contact with an upper surface of the contact pad with a controlled and adjustable force of contact. A second electrostatic actuator can then be used to bend the cantilevered beam, thereby shortening its length and generating a relative motion between the two contacting surfaces. The displacement of the cantilevered beam can be measured optically and used to determine the static or dynamic friction, including frictional losses and the coefficient of friction between the surfaces. The test apparatus can also be used to assess the reliability of rubbing surfaces in MEM devices by producing and measuring wear of those surfaces. Finally, the friction test apparatus, which is small in size, can be used as an in situ process quality tool for improving the fabrication of MEM devices.

  18. Method and apparatus for high-efficiency direct contact condensation

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Parent, Yves; Hassani, A. Vahab

    1999-01-01

    A direct contact condenser having a downward vapor flow chamber and an upward vapor flow chamber, wherein each of the vapor flow chambers includes a plurality of cooling liquid supplying pipes and a vapor-liquid contact medium disposed thereunder to facilitate contact and direct heat exchange between the vapor and cooling liquid. The contact medium includes a plurality of sheets arranged to form vertical interleaved channels or passageways for the vapor and cooling liquid streams. The upward vapor flow chamber also includes a second set of cooling liquid supplying pipes disposed beneath the vapor-liquid contact medium which operate intermittently in response to a pressure differential within the upward vapor flow chamber. The condenser further includes separate wells for collecting condensate and cooling liquid from each of the vapor flow chambers. In alternate embodiments, the condenser includes a cross-current flow chamber and an upward flow chamber, a plurality of upward flow chambers, or a single upward flow chamber. The method of use of the direct contact condenser of this invention includes passing a vapor stream sequentially through the downward and upward vapor flow chambers, where the vapor is condensed as a result of heat exchange with the cooling liquid in the contact medium. The concentration of noncondensable gases in the resulting condensate-liquid mixtures can be minimized by controlling the partial pressure of the vapor, which depends in part upon the geometry of the vapor-liquid contact medium. In another aspect of this invention, the physical and chemical performance of a direct contact condenser can be predicted based on the vapor and coolant compositions, the condensation conditions. and the geometric properties of the contact medium.

  19. Method and apparatus for high-efficiency direct contact condensation

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, D.; Parent, Y.; Hassani, A.V.

    1999-07-20

    A direct contact condenser having a downward vapor flow chamber and an upward vapor flow chamber, wherein each of the vapor flow chambers includes a plurality of cooling liquid supplying pipes and a vapor-liquid contact medium disposed thereunder to facilitate contact and direct heat exchange between the vapor and cooling liquid. The contact medium includes a plurality of sheets arranged to form vertical interleaved channels or passageways for the vapor and cooling liquid streams. The upward vapor flow chamber also includes a second set of cooling liquid supplying pipes disposed beneath the vapor-liquid contact medium which operate intermittently in response to a pressure differential within the upward vapor flow chamber. The condenser further includes separate wells for collecting condensate and cooling liquid from each of the vapor flow chambers. In alternate embodiments, the condenser includes a cross-current flow chamber and an upward flow chamber, a plurality of upward flow chambers, or a single upward flow chamber. The method of use of the direct contact condenser of this invention includes passing a vapor stream sequentially through the downward and upward vapor flow chambers, where the vapor is condensed as a result of heat exchange with the cooling liquid in the contact medium. The concentration of noncondensable gases in the resulting condensate-liquid mixtures can be minimized by controlling the partial pressure of the vapor, which depends in part upon the geometry of the vapor-liquid contact medium. In another aspect of this invention, the physical and chemical performance of a direct contact condenser can be predicted based on the vapor and coolant compositions, the condensation conditions, and the geometric properties of the contact medium. 39 figs.

  20. A Simple Method for Measuring Linguopalatal Contact Force During Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Ryunosuke; Matsumuta, Masafumi; Niikawa, Takuya; Nohara, Kanji; Tachimura, Takashi; Wada, Takeshi; Chihara, Kunihiro

    This paper proposes a using probe for measuring of contact force between tongue and palatal, during speech. We developed a 0.03 mm-thick stainless steel tongue force probe with a 3x5 mm force sensor at the tip. Linguopalatal contact force was measured by inserting the probe into the oral cavity. Contact force was measured at the following three locations. Based on the coordinate and measurement obtained at the three points, the action point of tongue force was calculated by the weighted mean. Linguopalatal contact force was measured in four adult men and women without articulation disorder and in three adult men with articulation disorders. Results showed that the action point of tongue force in subjects with articulation disorders was further toward the pharynx than that in subjects without articulation disorders. Linguopalatal contact pressure was then measured again by asking the subjects with articulation disorders to wear a palatal augmentation prosthesis (PAP) to compensate for insufficient linguopalatal contact force. The action point of tongue force became better approximated to that of subjects without articulation disorders. Given these results, our simple method for measuring linguopalatal contact force using a tongue force probe appears to be a promising tool for speech therapists treating articulation disorders.

  1. Method of produce ultra-low friction carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Fenske, George R.; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Lee, Richard H.

    2003-04-15

    A method and article of manufacture of amorphous diamond-like carbon. The method involves providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a mixture of a carbon containing gas and hydrogen gas with the mixture adjusted such that the atomic molar ratio of carbon to hydrogen is less than 0.3, including all carbon atoms and all hydrogen atoms in the mixture. A plasma is formed of the mixture and the amorphous diamond-like carbon film is deposited on the substrate. To achieve optimum bonding an intervening bonding layer, such as Si or SiO.sub.2, can be formed from SiH.sub.4 with or without oxidation of the layer formed.

  2. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore » the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  3. Friction welding.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Results of an exploratory study of the structure and properties of friction welds in Udimet 700 (U-700) and TD-nickel (TD-Ni) bar materials, as well as dissimilar U-700/TD-Ni friction welds. Butt welds were prepared by friction welding 12.7-mm-diam U-700 bars and TD-Ni bars. Specimens for elevated temperature tensile and stress rupture testing were machined after a postweld heat treatment. Friction welding of U-700 shows great potential because the welds were found to be as strong as the parent metal in stress rupture and tensile tests at 760 and 980 C. In addition, the weld line was not detectable by metallographic examination after postheating. Friction welds in TD-Ni or between U-700 and TD-Ni were extremely weak at elevated temperatures. The TD-Ni friction welds could support only 9% as much stress as the base metal for 10-hour stress rupture life at 1090 C. The U-700/TD-Ni weld could sustain only 15% as much stress as the TD-Ni parent metal for a 10-hour stress rupture life at 930 C. Thus friction welding is not a suitable joining method for obtaining high-strength TD-Ni or U-700/TD-Ni weldments.

  4. A friction regulation hybrid driving method for backward motion restraint of the smooth impact drive mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Chen, Dong; Cheng, Tinghai; He, Pu; Lu, Xiaohui; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-08-01

    The smooth impact drive mechanism (SIDM) is a type of piezoelectric actuator that has been developed for several decades. As a kind of driving method for the SIDM, the traditional sawtooth (TS) wave is always employed. The kinetic friction force during the rapid contraction stage usually results in the generation of a backward motion. A friction regulation hybrid (FRH) driving method realized by a composite waveform for the backward motion restraint of the SIDM is proposed in this paper. The composite waveform is composed of a sawtooth driving (SD) wave and a sinusoidal friction regulation (SFR) wave which is applied to the rapid deformation stage of the SD wave. A prototype of the SIDM was fabricated and its output performance under the excitation of the FRH driving method and the TS wave driving method was tested. The results indicate that the backward motion can be restrained obviously using the FRH driving method. Compared with the driving effect of the TS wave, the backward rates of the prototype in forward and reverse motions are decreased by 83% and 85%, respectively.

  5. A new solution method for wheel/rail rolling contact.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Song, Hua; Fu, Lihua; Wang, Meng; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problem of wheel/rail rolling contact of nonlinear steady-state curving, a three-dimensional transient finite element (FE) model is developed by the explicit software ANSYS/LS-DYNA. To improve the solving speed and efficiency, an explicit-explicit order solution method is put forward based on analysis of the features of implicit and explicit algorithm. The solution method was first applied to calculate the pre-loading of wheel/rail rolling contact with explicit algorithm, and then the results became the initial conditions in solving the dynamic process of wheel/rail rolling contact with explicit algorithm as well. Simultaneously, the common implicit-explicit order solution method is used to solve the FE model. Results show that the explicit-explicit order solution method has faster operation speed and higher efficiency than the implicit-explicit order solution method while the solution accuracy is almost the same. Hence, the explicit-explicit order solution method is more suitable for the wheel/rail rolling contact model with large scale and high nonlinearity. PMID:27217986

  6. Microstructure analysis in friction welding of copper and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, A. G. Wahyu; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Friction welding is a welding method with utilizing heat generated due to friction. Surfaces of two materials to be joined, one rotates the other being idle, is contacted by a pressure force. Friction on the second contact surface is done continuously so that the heat generated by the continuous friction will continue to rise. With the heat and the pressure force on the second surface to the second meeting of the material reaches its melting temperature then there is the process of welding. This paper examines the influence of the pressure force, rotational speed and contact time on friction welding of Aluminum (Al) and Copper (Cu) to the quality of welded joints. Friction welding process is performed on a friction welding machine that is equipped with the loading mechanism. The parameters used are the pressure force, rotational speed and friction time. Determination of the quality of welding is done by testing the tensile strength, hardness, and micro structure on the weld joint areas. The results showed that the friction welding quality is very good, this is evidenced by the results of a tensile strength test where the fault occurs outside the weld joint and increased violence in the weld joint. On the results visually cuts the welding area did not reveal any porosity so that it can be concluded that each metal contacts have melted perfectly and produce a connection with good quality.

  7. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Qu, Zhihua; Braiman, Yehuda; Zhang, Zhenyu; Barhen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  8. Deciphering viscous flow of frictional melts with the mini-AMS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Eric C.; Chou, Yu-Min; Kuo, Ruo Lin; Yeh, En-Chao; Leibovitz, Natalie R.; Meado, Andrea L.; Campbell, Lucy; Geissman, John W.

    2016-09-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is widely used to analyze magmatic flow in intrusive igneous bodies including plutons, sills and dikes. This method, owing its success to the rapid nature of measurements, provides a proxy for the orientation of markers with shape anisotropy that flow and align in a viscous medium. AMS specimens typically are 25 mm diameter right cylinders or 20 mm on-a-side cubes, representing a volume deemed statistically representative. Here, we present new AMS results, based on significantly smaller cubic specimens, which are 3.5 mm on a side, hence∼250 times volumetrically smaller than conventional specimens. We show that, in the case of frictional melts, which inherently have an extremely small grain size, this small volume is in most cases sufficient to characterize the pseudotachylyte fabric, particularly when magnetite is present. Further, we demonstrate that the mini-AMS method provides new opportunities to investigate the details of frictional melt flow in these coseismic miniature melt bodies. This new method offers significant potential to investigate frictional melt flow in pseudotachylyte veins including contributions to the lubrication of faults at shallow to moderate depths.

  9. Parameter tuning method for dither compensation of a pneumatic proportional valve with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Song, Yang; Huang, Leisheng; Fan, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In the practical application of pneumatic control devices, the nonlinearity of a pneumatic control valve become the main factor affecting the control effect, which comes mainly from the dynamic friction force. The dynamic friction inside the valve may cause hysteresis and a dead zone. In this paper, a dither compensation mechanism is proposed to reduce negative effects on the basis of analyzing the mechanism of friction force. The specific dither signal (using a sinusoidal signal) was superimposed on the control signal of the valve. Based on the relationship between the parameters of the dither signal and the inherent characteristics of the proportional servo valve, a parameter tuning method was proposed, which uses a displacement sensor to measure the maximum static friction inside the valve. According to the experimental results, the proper amplitude ranges are determined for different pressures. In order to get the optimal parameters of the dither signal, some dither compensation experiments have been carried out on different signal amplitude and gas pressure conditions. Optimal parameters are determined under two kinds of pressure conditions. Using tuning parameters the valve spool displacement experiment has been taken. From the experiment results, hysteresis of the proportional servo valve is significantly reduced. And through simulation and experiments, the cut-off frequency of the proportional valve has also been widened. Therefore after adding the dither signal, the static and dynamic characteristics of the proportional valve are both improved to a certain degree. This research proposes a parameter tuning method of dither signal, and the validity of the method is verified experimentally.

  10. Parameter tuning method for dither compensation of a pneumatic proportional valve with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Song, Yang; Huang, Leisheng; Fan, Wei

    2016-05-01

    In the practical application of pneumatic control devices, the nonlinearity of a pneumatic control valve become the main factor affecting the control effect, which comes mainly from the dynamic friction force. The dynamic friction inside the valve may cause hysteresis and a dead zone. In this paper, a dither compensation mechanism is proposed to reduce negative effects on the basis of analyzing the mechanism of friction force. The specific dither signal (using a sinusoidal signal) was superimposed on the control signal of the valve. Based on the relationship between the parameters of the dither signal and the inherent characteristics of the proportional servo valve, a parameter tuning method was proposed, which uses a displacement sensor to measure the maximum static friction inside the valve. According to the experimental results, the proper amplitude ranges are determined for different pressures. In order to get the optimal parameters of the dither signal, some dither compensation experiments have been carried out on different signal amplitude and gas pressure conditions. Optimal parameters are determined under two kinds of pressure conditions. Using tuning parameters the valve spool displacement experiment has been taken. From the experiment results, hysteresis of the proportional servo valve is significantly reduced. And through simulation and experiments, the cut-off frequency of the proportional valve has also been widened. Therefore after adding the dither signal, the static and dynamic characteristics of the proportional valve are both improved to a certain degree. This research proposes a parameter tuning method of dither signal, and the validity of the method is verified experimentally.

  11. Method and apparatus for producing co-current fluid contact

    DOEpatents

    Trutna, W.R.

    1997-12-09

    An improved packing system and method are disclosed wherein a packing section includes a liquid distributor and a separator placed above the distributor so that gas rising through the liquid distributor contacts liquid in the distributor, forming a gas-liquid combination which rises in co-current flow to the separator. Liquid is collected in the separator, from which gas rises. 13 figs.

  12. Method and apparatus for non-contact charge measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Lin, Kuan-Chan (Inventor); Hightower, James C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the accurate non-contact detection and measurement of static electric charge on an object using a reciprocating sensing probe that moves relative to the object. A monitor measures the signal generated as a result of this cyclical movement so as to detect the electrostatic charge on the object.

  13. Method and apparatus for producing co-current fluid contact

    DOEpatents

    Trutna, William R.

    1997-01-01

    An improved packing system and method are disclosed wherein a packing section includes a liquid distributor and a separator placed above the distributor so that gas rising through the liquid distributor contacts liquid in the distributor, forming a gas-liquid combination which rises in co-current flow to the separator. Liquid is collected in the separator, from which gas rises.

  14. Method of forming contacts for a back-contact solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Jane

    2014-07-15

    Methods of forming contacts for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a silicon layer above a substrate, forming and patterning a solid-state p-type dopant source on the silicon layer, forming an n-type dopant source layer over exposed regions of the silicon layer and over a plurality of regions of the solid-state p-type dopant source, and heating the substrate to provide a plurality of n-type doped silicon regions among a plurality of p-type doped silicon regions.

  15. Method of forming contacts for a back-contact solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Jane

    2015-10-20

    Methods of forming contacts for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a silicon layer above a substrate, forming and patterning a solid-state p-type dopant source on the silicon layer, forming an n-type dopant source layer over exposed regions of the silicon layer and over a plurality of regions of the solid-state p-type dopant source, and heating the substrate to provide a plurality of n-type doped silicon regions among a plurality of p-type doped silicon regions.

  16. Development of a standard method to observe the surface friction of high-strength gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kouhei; Watanabe, Yosuke; Yamada, Naoya; Wada, Masato; Gong, Jin; Makino, Masato; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-03-01

    In 2003, the most effective but simple way was proposed to synthesize double network gels, whose compression fracture stress reached about 30MPa, while that of common gels were several tens kPa. Our group has focused on PAMPSPDMAAm DN gel, because it possibly has both biocompatibility and permeability, which are good for developing artificial articular cartilage and artificial blood vessel. It is also possibly used for rapid additive manufacturing with 3D gel printer. Here, we develop a novel apparatus of the ball on disk method to observe the surface friction of the DN gels. We hope to apply this apparatus for various studies about the tribological behavior of the gels, especially about the effect of external electric field on the gel friction.

  17. A measurement method for distinguishing the real contact area of rough surfaces of transparent solids using improved Otsu technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bao-Jiang; Yan, Shao-Ze; Xiang, Wu-Wei-Kai

    2015-01-01

    An experimental method of measuring the real contact area of transparent blocks based on the principle of total internal reflection is presented, intending to support the investigation of friction characteristics, heat conduction, and energy dissipation at the contact interface. A laser sheet illuminates the contact interface, and the transmitted laser sheet is projected onto a screen. Then the contact information is acquired from the screen by a camera. An improved Otsu method is proposed to process the data of experimental images. It can compute the threshold of the overall image and filter out all the pixels one by one. Through analyzing the experimental results, we describe the relationship between the real contact area and the positive pressure during a continuous loading process, at different loading rates, with the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) material. A hysteresis phenomenon in the relationship between the real contact area and the positive pressure is found and explained. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272171), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 3132030), and the Education Ministry Doctoral Fund of China (Grant No. 20120002110070).

  18. Friction and wear of selected metals and alloys in sliding contact with AISI 440 C stainless steel in liquid methane and in liquid natural gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisander, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Aluminum, titanium, beryllium, nickel, iron, copper, and several copper alloys were run in sliding contact with AISI 440C in liquid methane and natural gas. All of the metals run except copper and the copper alloys of tin and tin-lead showed severely galled wear scars. Friction coefficients varied from 0.2 to 1.0, the lowest being for copper, copper-17 wt. % tin, and copper-8 wt. % tin-22 wt. % lead. The wear rate for copper was two orders of magnitude lower than that of the other metals run. An additional order of magnitude of wear reduction was achieved by the addition of tin and/or lead to copper.

  19. Driving- stress waveform and the determination of rock internal friction by the stress-strain curve method.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi-Ping, Liu

    1980-01-01

    Harmonic distortion in the stress-time function applied to rock specimens affects the measurement of rock internal friction in the seismic wave periods by the stress-strain hysteresis loop method. If neglected, the harmonic distortion can cause measurements of rock internal friction to be in error by 3O% in the linear range. The stress-time function therefore must be recorded and Fourier analysed for correct interpretation of the experimental data. Such a procedure would also yield a value for internal friction at the higher harmonic frequencies.-Author

  20. Comparative study of vehicle tyre-road friction coefficient estimation with a novel cost-effective method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Boyuan; Du, Haiping; Li, Weihua

    2014-08-01

    This paper qualitatively and quantitatively reviews and compares three typical tyre-road friction coefficient estimation methods, which are the slip slope method, individual tyre force estimation method and extended Kalman filter method, and then presents a new cost-effective tyre-road friction coefficient estimation method. Based on the qualitative analysis and the numerical comparisons, it is found that all of the three typical methods can successfully estimate the tyre force and friction coefficient in most of the test conditions, but the estimation performance is compromised for some of the methods during different simulation scenarios. In addition, all of these three methods need global positioning system (GPS) to measure the absolute velocity of a vehicle. To overcome the above-mentioned problem, a novel cost-effective estimation method is proposed in this paper. This method requires only the inputs of wheel angular velocity, traction/brake torque and longitudinal acceleration, which are all easy to be measured using available sensors installed in passenger vehicles. By using this method, the vehicle absolute velocity and slip ratio can be estimated by an improved nonlinear observer without using GPS, and the friction force and tyre-road friction coefficient can be obtained from the estimated vehicle velocity and slip ratio. Simulations are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed estimation method.

  1. A hybrid filtering method based on a novel empirical mode decomposition for friction signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengwei; Zhan, Liwei

    2015-12-01

    During a measurement, the measured signal usually contains noise. To remove the noise and preserve the important feature of the signal, we introduce a hybrid filtering method that uses a new intrinsic mode function (NIMF) and a modified Hausdorff distance. The NIMF is defined as the difference between the noisy signal and each intrinsic mode function (IMF), which is obtained by empirical mode decomposition (EMD), ensemble EMD, complementary ensemble EMD, or complete ensemble EMD with adaptive noise (CEEMDAN). The relevant mode selecting is based on the similarity between the first NIMF and the rest of the NIMFs. With this filtering method, the EMD and improved versions are used to filter the simulation and friction signals. The friction signal between an airplane tire and the runaway is recorded during a simulated airplane touchdown and features spikes of various amplitudes and noise. The filtering effectiveness of the four hybrid filtering methods are compared and discussed. The results show that the filtering method based on CEEMDAN outperforms other signal filtering methods.

  2. Optimization of method a load cell calibration for the measurement of coefficient of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, R. M.; Pereira, M.; Sousa, A. R.; Curi, E. I. M.; Izidoro, C. L.; Correa, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The instrumentation of equipment for mechanical testing is used to optimize the time to deliver a result, besides minimizing errors associated with manual measurements. Given this context, this work aims to present a calibration method for a load cell to determine the measurement results of force and friction coefficient, developed from on rotary pin-on-disk tribometer. The results indicate that the procedure provides measurements reliable for the tribological phenomena, resulting in with proximity the values provided by the ASTM G99-04.

  3. Method for producing ceramic composition having low friction coefficient at high operating temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Lankford, Jr., James

    1988-01-01

    A method for producing a stable ceramic composition having a surface with a low friction coefficient and high wear resistance at high operating temperatures. A first deposition of a thin film of a metal ion is made upon the surface of the ceramic composition and then a first ion implantation of at least a portion of the metal ion is made into the near surface region of the composition. The implantation mixes the metal ion and the ceramic composition to form a near surface composite. The near surface composite is then oxidized sufficiently at high oxidizing temperatures to form an oxide gradient layer in the surface of the ceramic composition.

  4. Strength evolution of a reactive frictional interface is controlled by the dynamics of contacts and chemical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, François; Beauprêtre, Sophie; Voisin, Christophe; Zigone, Dimitri; Candela, Thibault; Dysthe, Dag K.; Gratier, Jean-Pierre

    2012-08-01

    Assessing the healing rate of a fault is relevant to the knowledge of the seismic machinery. However, measuring fault healing at the depths where it occurs still remains inaccessible. We have designed an analog laboratory experiment of a simulated rough fault that undergoes healing and investigate the relative roles of interface chemical reactivity and sliding velocity on the healing rate. Slide-hold-slide experiments are conducted on a bare interface with various materials in contact (glass/glass, salt/glass, and salt/salt) with or without the presence of a reactive fluid and the slider-surface pull-off force is measured. Our results show that the interface strengthens with hold time, whatever the conditions of the experiments. In addition, we quantify the effect of chemical reactivity on the healing rate. Considering the glass/glass case as a reference, we show that the healing rate is increased by a factor of 2 for the salt/glass case; by a factor of 3 for the salt/salt case; and by about a factor of 20 when saturated brine is added on a salt/salt interface. We also measure that the sliding velocity affects the healing rate for salt/salt interfaces at room humidity. A careful optical monitoring of the interface allows a direct observation of the contact growth characteristics associated to each type of materials. Finally, the large differences of healing rate are interpreted through a mechanistic approach, where the various experimental conditions allow separating different healing mechanisms: increase of adhesion of the contacts by welding, contact growth due to creep or due to neck growth driven by surface tension.

  5. Is internal friction friction?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Byerlee, J.D.; Lockner, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Mogi [1974] proposed a simple model of the incipient rupture surface to explain the Coulomb failure criterion. We show here that this model can plausibly be extended to explain the Mohr failure criterion. In Mogi's model the incipient rupture surface immediately before fracture consists of areas across which material integrity is maintained (intact areas) and areas across which it is not (cracks). The strength of the incipient rupture surface is made up of the inherent strength of the intact areas plus the frictional resistance to sliding offered by the cracked areas. Although the coefficient of internal friction (slope of the strength versus normal stress curve) depends upon both the frictional and inherent strengths, the phenomenon of internal friction can be identified with the frictional part. The curvature of the Mohr failure envelope is interpreted as a consequence of differences in damage (cracking) accumulated in prefailure loading at different confining pressures.

  6. A simple method to estimate threshold friction velocity of wind erosion in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junran; Okin, Gregory S.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Belnap, Jayne; Munson, Seth M.; Miller, Mark E.

    2010-05-01

    This study provides a fast and easy-to-apply method to estimate threshold friction velocity (TFV) of wind erosion in the field. Wind tunnel experiments and a variety of ground measurements including air gun, pocket penetrometer, torvane, and roughness chain were conducted in Moab, Utah and cross-validated in the Mojave Desert, California. Patterns between TFV and ground measurements were examined to identify the optimum method for estimating TFV. The results show that TFVs were best predicted using the air gun and penetrometer measurements in the Moab sites. This empirical method, however, systematically underestimated TFVs in the Mojave Desert sites. Further analysis showed that TFVs in the Mojave sites can be satisfactorily estimated with a correction for rock cover, which is presumably the main cause of the underestimation of TFVs. The proposed method may be also applied to estimate TFVs in environments where other non-erodible elements such as postharvest residuals are found.

  7. Direct, Robust Technique for the Measurement of Friction between Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Cayer-Barrioz, Juliette; Isa, Lucio; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2015-08-18

    Friction between microscopic objects controls many macroscopic phenomena. For instance, the friction between microasperities determines the tribology of rough surfaces in contact and in relative motion. Additionally, the friction between microparticles is responsible for many aspects of the rheological response of granular media, ranging from microscale contacts at the single-particle level to macroscopic flow properties of sheared, dry granular systems and non-Brownian suspensions. We propose a new, precise, and robust method, based on lateral force microscopy, to measure the coefficient of friction between microspheres quantitatively and without complex data processing. We have successfully applied this method to the contact between silica spheres in liquid with and without a polymer coating. PMID:26196157

  8. Non-Contact Electromagnetic Exciter Design with Linear Control Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Xiong, Xianzhi; Xu, Hua

    2016-04-01

    A non-contact type force actuator is necessary for studying the dynamic performance of a high-speed spindle system owing to its high-speed operating conditions. A non-contact electromagnetic exciter is designed for identifying the dynamic coefficients of journal bearings in high-speed grinding spindles. A linear force control method is developed based on PID controller. The influence of amplitude and frequency of current, misalignment and rotational speed on magnetic field and excitation force is investigated based on two-dimensional finite element analysis. The electromagnetic excitation force is measured with the auxiliary coils and calibrated by load cells. The design is validated by the experimental results. Theoretical and experimental investigations show that the proposed design can accurately generate linear excitation force with sufficiently large amplitude and higher signal to noise ratio. Moreover, the fluctuations in force amplitude are reduced to a greater extent with the designed linear control method even when the air gap changes due to the rotor vibration at high-speed conditions. Besides, it is possible to apply various types of excitations: constant, synchronous, and non-synchronous excitation forces based on the proposed linear control method. This exciter can be used as linear-force exciting and controlling system for dynamic performance study of different high-speed rotor-bearing systems.

  9. Friction at small displacement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. E.; Aronstein, J.

    1972-01-01

    Low contact resistance between metal surfaces is often observed in spite of interposed lubricant and/or oxide films. To study this effect an apparatus is used with which normal force and tangential microdisplacement are applied between a small lead rider and a gold flat with various surface film conditions. Under nonoxidized and nonlubricated conditions, and with either oxide or stearic acid lubricant film alone, friction is high and contact resistance is low. With oxide and lubricant together, friction is much lower and slide is smooth, but contact resistance remains low and Ohm's law is obeyed. The results are consistent with Greenwood's theory of contact resistance for a cluster of minute metallic contact spots within the load-supporting area. The contact resistance of such a cluster is indistinguishable, for practical purposes, from that given by complete metallic contact.

  10. Friction drive of an SAW motor. Part III: modeling.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi

    2008-10-01

    A 2-layer modeling method of friction drive of a surface acoustic wave motor is proposed. The surface layer accounts for the previously proposed point-contact friction drive model, which was generalized to correspond spatially to the underlying layer that is comprised of a 3-D elasticity field. A method to determine stiffness through the use of analytical solutions of 3-D contact problems bridges the 2 layers. Because the determined stiffness expresses the accuracy of the results regarding either layer, the validity of the results concerning the stiffness and the resulting stress field was evaluated by comparison with the results of finite element analysis. Furthermore, we executed numerical simulations by using the friction drive model, which were compared with the measured displacements of the frictional surface of the slider. The simulation accurately represented the normal displacement of the frictional surface; the modeling procedure in the normal direction was found to be reliable. However, because the friction coefficient drastically changes the tangential displacement, we could not discuss the reliability of the modeling procedure in the tangential direction. A thorough discussion of the friction drive would thus require further investigation of the friction phenomena. PMID:18986874

  11. Combined non-contact coordinate measurement system and calibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yiyan; Zhao, Bin

    2015-07-01

    A combined non-contact measurement system comprising attitude angle sensor, angle encoder, laser rangefinder, and total station is adopted to measure the spatial coordinate of the hidden zones in large-scale space. The laser from the total station is aimed at the optical system of the attitude angle sensor to obtain the spatial coordinate and the spatial attitude angles. Then, the angle encoder driven by a stepping motor is rotated to drive the laser rangefinder to direct at the measured point. This approach is used to obtain the distance from the rangefinder to the measured point and the angle of the angle encoder. Finally, the spatial coordinates of the measured point can be calculated by using these measured parameters. For the measurement system, we propose a weighted least squares (WLS) calibration method, in which weights are determined for the angular distribution density. Experimental results show that the measurement system could expand the scale and achieve reliable precision during combined measurement and the measurement error of the weighted least squares method is less than that of the ordinary least square (OLS) method.

  12. Lubricants effects on piston/rings/liner friction in an instrumented single cylinder diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, A.; Constans, B.; Perrin, H.; Roux, F.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive measurements of oil film temperature and mainly of friction losses have been performed on an instrumented single-cylinder diesel engine. To assess the behavior of Newtonian and non-Newtonian oils in the piston/rings/liner contact, several operating conditions (running-in, motoring and firing) have been investigated. An original data processing method is proposed to evaluate the share of boundary friction in piston assembly friction loss.

  13. Automatic optical inspection method for soft contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Li; Wu, Wen-Hong; Hwang, Chi-Chun

    2015-07-01

    In general, the manufacture of contact lenses is conventionally labor intensive, requiring manual handling and inspection of the cast lens during production. This paper is to build an AOI (automatic optical inspection) system, which include suitable light source, camera and image processing algorithms, for contact lenses defect inspection. The mainly defect type are missing lens and surface defect on the contact lenses. An illumination system with fixed focal lens and charge coupled device (CCD) is used to capture the images of contact lenses. After images are captured, an algorithm is employed to check if there are flaws showed on the images. Five kinds of defect can be detected by the designed algorithm. A prototype of the AOI system for contact lenses inspection is implemented. The experimental result shows that the proposed system is robust for in-line inspection.

  14. Application of laser ultrasonic method for on-line monitoring of friction stir spot welding process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhou, Jianghua

    2015-09-01

    Application of a laser ultrasonic method is developed for on-line monitoring of the friction stir spot welding (FSSW) process. Based on the technology of FSSW, laser-generated ultrasonic waves in a good weld and nonweld area are simulated by a finite element method. The reflected and transmitted waves are analyzed to disclose the properties of the welded interface. The noncontact-laser ultrasonic-inspection system was established to verify the numerical results. The reflected waves in the good-weld and nonweld area can be distinguished by time-of-flight. The transmitted waves evidently attenuate in the nonweld area in contrast to signal amplitude in the good weld area because of interfacial impedance difference. Laser ultrasonic C-scan images can sufficiently evaluate the intrinsic character of the weld area in comparison with traditional water-immersion ultrasonic testing results. The research results confirm that laser ultrasonics would be an effective method to realize the characterization of FSSW defects. PMID:26368866

  15. Non-contact method for characterization of a rotational table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Moure Shattuck, Judson, III; Parisi, Vincent M.; Smerdon, Arryn J.

    2007-04-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) uses and evaluates a variety of helmet-mounted trackers for incorporation into their high performance aircraft. The primary head tracker technologies commercially available are magnetic trackers, inertial trackers, and optical trackers. Each head tracker has a unique method of determining the pilot's head position within the cockpit of the aircraft. Magnetic trackers generally have a small head mounted size and minimal head weight. Because they sense a generated magnetic field, their accuracy can be affected by other magnetic fields or ferrous components within the cockpit. Inertial trackers cover the entire head motion box but require constant motion in order to accommodate drifting of the inertial sensors or a secondary system that updates the inertial system, often referred to as a hybrid system. Although optical head trackers (OHT) are immune to magnetic fields some of their limitations may be daylight/night vision goggle (NVG) compatibility issues and, depending on system configuration, may require numerous emitters and/or receivers to cover a large head motion box and provide a wide field of regard. The Dynamic Tracker Test Fixture (DTTF) was designed by the Helmet Mounted Sensory Technology (HMST) laboratory to accurately measure azimuth rotation in both static and dynamic conditions for the purpose of determining the accuracy of a variety of head trackers. Before the DTTF could be used as an evaluation tool, it required characterization to determine the amount and location of any induced elevation or roll as the table rotated in azimuth. Optimally, the characterization method would not affect the DTTF's movement so a non-contact method was devised. This paper describes the characterization process and its results.

  16. Geometrical and Friction Properties of Perennial Grasses and Their Weeds in View of an Electro-Separation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalyshyn, Stepan J.; Dadak, Viktor O.; Sokolyk, Vitalij V.; Grundas, Stanisław; Stasiak, Mateusz; Tys, Jerzy

    2015-04-01

    Many seed mixtures of herbs are difficult to separate. This is confirmed by studies determining the basic geometrical and friction properties of the seeds of perennial grasses and seeds of their weeds. The results show that in most cases the value of their geometrical parameters (length, thickness, and width) and friction properties (friction coefficients for different external surfaces of internal friction coefficients) are substantially similar and differ slightly among each other. This is the evidence that these properties are impractical to use in the process of separation as signs of divisibility. In the paper, a method for electro-separation of seed mixtures of herbs based on the use of complex physical, mechanical properties and electrical components in the separation are presented. The electric field that acts as an additional working body allows considering the surface conditions and biological status of seed mixtures of particles and significantly expands the functionality of the separators. Confirmation of the effectiveness of the proposed method for separation can be seen in the example of purification of red clover and sorrel seeds. By imposition of an electric field on an inclined moving separating plane, we can completely separate weed seeds from the main crop. The results confirm the effectiveness of the electro-separating method.

  17. A method for improved accuracy in three dimensions for determining wheel/rail contact points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinwen; Gu, Shaojie; Zhou, Shunhua; Zhou, Yu; Lian, Songliang

    2015-11-01

    Searching for the contact points between wheels and rails is important because these points represent the points of exerted contact forces. In order to obtain an accurate contact point and an in-depth description of the wheel/rail contact behaviours on a curved track or in a turnout, a method with improved accuracy in three dimensions is proposed to determine the contact points and the contact patches between the wheel and the rail when considering the effect of the yaw angle and the roll angle on the motion of the wheel set. The proposed method, with no need of the curve fitting of the wheel and rail profiles, can accurately, directly, and comprehensively determine the contact interface distances between the wheel and the rail. The range iteration algorithm is used to improve the computation efficiency and reduce the calculation required. The present computation method is applied for the analysis of the contact of rails of CHINA (CHN) 75 kg/m and wheel sets of wearing type tread of China's freight cars. In addition, it can be proved that the results of the proposed method are consistent with that of Kalker's program CONTACT, and the maximum deviation from the wheel/rail contact patch area of this two methods is approximately 5%. The proposed method, can also be used to investigate static wheel/rail contact. Some wheel/rail contact points and contact patch distributions are discussed and assessed, wheel and rail non-worn and worn profiles included.

  18. Low-Friction Joint for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical linkage allows adjacent parts to move relative to each other with low friction and with no chatter, slipping, or backlash. Low-friction joint of two surfaces in rolling contact, held in alinement by taut flexible bands. No sliding friction or "stick-slip" motion: Only rolling-contact and bending friction within bands. Proposed linkage intended for finger joints in mechanical hands for robots and manipulators.

  19. A novel monitoring method of wet friction clutches based on the post-lockup torsional vibration signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ompusunggu, Agusmian Partogi; Papy, Jean-Michel; Vandenplas, Steve; Sas, Paul; Van Brussel, Hendrik

    2013-02-01

    Wet friction clutches play a critical role in vehicles equipped with automatic transmissions, power shift transmissions and limited slip differentials. An unexpected failure occurring in these components can therefore lead to an unexpected total breakdown of the vehicle. This undesirable situation can put human safety at risk, possibly cause long-term vehicle down times, and result in high maintenance costs. In order to minimize the negative impacts caused by the unexpected breakdown, an optimal maintenance scheme driven by accurate condition monitoring and prognostics therefore needs to be developed and implemented for wet friction clutches. In this paper, the development of a condition monitoring system that can serve as a basis for health prognostics of wet friction clutches with a focus in heavy duty vehicle applications is presented. The developed method is based on monitoring the dominant modal parameters extracted from the torsional vibration response occurring in the post-lockup phase, i.e. just after the clutch is fully engaged. These modal parameters, namely the damped torsional natural frequency fd and the decay factor σ, are computed based on the pre-filtered Hankel Total Least Squares (HTLS) method which has an excellent performance in estimating the parameters of transient signals with a relatively short duration. In order to experimentally validate the proposed monitoring method, accelerated life tests were carried out on five different paper-based wet friction clutches using a fully instrumented SAE#2 test setup. The dominant modal parameters extracted from the post-lockup velocity signals are then plotted in function of the service life (duty cycle) of the tested clutches. All the plots exhibit distinct trends that can be associated with the progression of the clutch degradation. Therefore, the proposed quantities can be seen as relevant features that may enable us to monitor and assess the condition of wet friction clutches. Since velocity sensor

  20. Friction damping of two-dimensional motion and its application in vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menq, C.-H.; Chidamparam, P.; Griffin, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an approximate method for analyzing the two-dimensional friction contact problem so as to compute the dynamic response of a structure constrained by friction interfaces. The friction force at the joint is formulated based on the Coulomb model. The single-term harmonic balance scheme, together with the receptance approach of decoupling the effect of the friction force on the structure from those of the external forces has been utilized to obtain the steady state response. The computational efficiency and accuracy of the method are demonstrated by comparing the results with long-term time solutions.

  1. Analysis of Temperature and Plastic Flow during Friction Stir Spot Welding Using Particle Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Shigeki; Badarinarayan, Harsha; Okamoto, Kazutaka; Tomimura, Toshio; Kawanami, Tsuyoshi; Hirano, Shigeki

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a new metal-joining process, and a numerical simulation code to calculate optimal welding conditions is desired. In this paper, we analyzed temperature distribution and plastic deformation flow during the FSSW process with the fluid flow model and the elastic-plastic deformation model using the particle method. Spot welds are made with a cylindrical pin tool having flat shoulder with a fixed tool rotational speed. Simulation results predict an axisymmetric temperature distribution with the temperature below the tool in the region of 300 °C. The material flow predicted by the elastic-plastic deformation model is similar to experimental results. The model predicts the material flow at the pin periphery is in the upward direction. Near the shoulder, there are two flow patterns observed - beneath the shoulder, the material is pushed downward due to the force acting from the shoulder face, whereas on the shoulder periphery the material flows upward and outward due to extrusion of the material that is caused by the shoulder plunge. This extruded material shows up on the specimen surface as burr.

  2. Friction and wear in surface micromachined tribological test devices

    SciTech Connect

    Senft, D.C.; Dugger, M.T.

    1997-08-01

    We report on the design, construction, and initial testing of surface micromachined devices for measuring friction and wear. The devices measure friction coefficients on both horizontal deposited polysilicon surfaces and vertical etched polysilicon surfaces. The contact geometry of the rubbing surfaces is well-defined, and a method is presented for the determination of the normal and frictional forces. Initial observations on test devices which have been dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and devices coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane suggest that the coatings increase the lifetime of the devices and the repeatability of the results.

  3. Rigid Cluster Decomposition Reveals Criticality in Frictional Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, Silke; Quint, David A.; Fily, Yaouen; Schwarz, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of the frictional jamming transition within the framework of rigidity percolation theory. Slowly sheared frictional packings are decomposed into rigid clusters and floppy regions with a generalization of the pebble game including frictional contacts. Our method suggests a second-order transition controlled by the emergence of a system-spanning rigid cluster accompanied by a critical cluster size distribution. Rigid clusters also correlate with common measures of rigidity. We contrast this result with frictionless jamming, where the rigid cluster size distribution is noncritical.

  4. High fidelity frictional models for MEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Carpick, Robert W.; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Bitsie, Fernando; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corwin, Alex David; Ashurst, William Robert; Jones, Reese E.; Subhash, Ghatu S.; Street, Mark D.; Sumali, Anton Hartono; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Starr, Michael James; Redmond, James Michael; Flater, Erin E.

    2004-10-01

    The primary goals of the present study are to: (1) determine how and why MEMS-scale friction differs from friction on the macro-scale, and (2) to begin to develop a capability to perform finite element simulations of MEMS materials and components that accurately predicts response in the presence of adhesion and friction. Regarding the first goal, a newly developed nanotractor actuator was used to measure friction between molecular monolayer-coated, polysilicon surfaces. Amontons law does indeed apply over a wide range of forces. However, at low loads, which are of relevance to MEMS, there is an important adhesive contribution to the normal load that cannot be neglected. More importantly, we found that at short sliding distances, the concept of a coefficient of friction is not relevant; rather, one must invoke the notion of 'pre-sliding tangential deflections' (PSTD). Results of a simple 2-D model suggests that PSTD is a cascade of small-scale slips with a roughly constant number of contacts equilibrating the applied normal load. Regarding the second goal, an Adhesion Model and a Junction Model have been implemented in PRESTO, Sandia's transient dynamics, finite element code to enable asperity-level simulations. The Junction Model includes a tangential shear traction that opposes the relative tangential motion of contacting surfaces. An atomic force microscope (AFM)-based method was used to measure nano-scale, single asperity friction forces as a function of normal force. This data is used to determine Junction Model parameters. An illustrative simulation demonstrates the use of the Junction Model in conjunction with a mesh generated directly from an atomic force microscope (AFM) image to directly predict frictional response of a sliding asperity. Also with regards to the second goal, grid-level, homogenized models were studied. One would like to perform a finite element analysis of a MEMS component assuming nominally flat surfaces and to include the effect of

  5. Back-contact vertical-junction solar cell and method

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, M.W.; Kolesar, E.S. Jr.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes vertical-junction back contact solar cell apparatus. It comprises: a wafer of semiconductor material having upward and downward facing surfaces and predetermined thickness, first conductivity type dopant, crystal orientation, and concentration; an array of radiant energy capturing vertical walled and tilted flat bottomed cavity members disposed in rows across the semiconductor wafer upward facing surface with each of the cavities including an internal surface area received layer of pn-junction forming second conductivity type dopant containing semiconductor; a first grid of electrically interconnected electrodes dispersed across the downward facing wafer surface in surface contact with first electrical polarity current collection regions of each the pn-junction inclusive cavity member; a second grid of electrically interconnected electrodes electrically segregated from the first grid and dispersed across the downward facing wafer surface in surface contact with second electrical polarity current collection regions of each the pn-junction inclusive cavity member.

  6. Non-contact multiband method for emissivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazikowski, Adam; Chrzanowski, Krzysztof

    2003-04-01

    During the last decade an increasing interest in passive multiband systems for temperature measurement was noted and quite a few such systems have been developed. However, recent studies showed that multiband systems are capable of producing accurate results of non-contact temperature measurement only in limited number of applications and that multiband systems will not become a real rival for single band systems in temperature measurement applications. Available literature about passive multiband systems concentrated exclusively on the problem of temperature measurements with these systems in situation when these systems can be used for non-contact emissivity measurements too. A model of a passive multiband system for non-contact emissivity measurement has been developed in this paper. Simulations carried out using this model showed that it is possible to achieve reasonable accuracy of emissivity measurements with passive multiband systems and these systems can be considered as an attractive solution for emissivity measurements in industrial conditions.

  7. Transient three-dimensional contact problems: mortar method. Mixed methods and conserving integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesch, Christian; Betsch, Peter

    2011-10-01

    The present work deals with the development of an energy-momentum conserving method to unilateral contact constraints and is a direct continuation of a previous work (Hesch and Betsch in Comput Mech 2011, doi: 10.1007/s00466-011-0597-2) dealing with the NTS method. In this work, we introduce the mortar method and a newly developed segmentation process for the consistent integration of the contact interface. For the application of the energy-momentum approach to mortar constraints, we extend an approach based on a mixed formulation to the segment definition of the mortar constraints. The enhanced numerical stability of the newly proposed discretization method will be shown in several examples.

  8. Wildlife contact analysis: Emerging methods, questions, and challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; Creech, Tyler G.; Ebinger, Michael R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Creel, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Recent technological advances, such as proximity loggers, allow researchers to collect complete interaction histories, day and night, among sampled individuals over several months to years. Social network analyses are an obvious approach to analyzing interaction data because of their flexibility for fitting many different social structures as well as the ability to assess both direct contacts and indirect associations via intermediaries. For many network properties, however, it is not clear whether estimates based upon a sample of the network are reflective of the entire network. In wildlife applications, networks may be poorly sampled and boundary effects will be common. We present an alternative approach that utilizes a hierarchical modeling framework to assess the individual, dyadic, and environmental factors contributing to variation in the interaction rates and allows us to estimate the underlying process variation in each. In a disease control context, this approach will allow managers to focus efforts on those types of individuals and environments that contribute the most toward super-spreading events. We account for the sampling distribution of proximity loggers and the non-independence of contacts among groups by only using contact data within a group during days when the group membership of proximity loggers was known. This allows us to separate the two mechanisms responsible for a pair not contacting one another: they were not in the same group or they were in the same group but did not come within the specified contact distance. We illustrate our approach with an example dataset of female elk from northwestern Wyoming and conclude with a number of important future research directions.

  9. Frictional conditions between alloy AA6060 aluminium and tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widerøe, Fredrik; Welo, Torgeir

    2011-05-01

    The frictional conditions in the new process of screw extrusion of aluminium have been investigated. The contact behaviour between the aluminum alloy and the tool steel in the extruder is vital for understanding the extrusion process. Using a compressive-rotational method for frictional measurements the conditions for unlubricated sticking friction between aluminum alloy AA6060 and tool steel at different combinations of temperatures and pressures have been investigated. In this method the samples in the form of disks are put under hydrostatic pressure while simultaneously being rotated at one end. Pins made from contrast material have been inserted into the samples to measure the deformation introduced. This approach along with 3D simulations form a method for determining the frictional conditions. The paper describes the test method and the results. It was found that the necessary pressure for sticking to occur between the aluminum AA6060 and the different parts of the extruder is heavily influenced by the temperature.

  10. A contact algorithm for 3D discrete and finite element contact problems based on penalty function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Mengyan; Gao, Wei; Lei, Zhou

    2011-11-01

    A contact algorithm in the context of the combined discrete element (DE) and finite element (FE) method is proposed. The algorithm, which is based on the node-to-surface method used in finite element method, treats each spherical discrete element as a slave node and the surfaces of the finite element domain as the master surfaces. The contact force on the contact interface is processed by using a penalty function method. Afterward, a modification of the combined DE/FE method is proposed. Following that, the corresponding numerical code is implemented into the in-house developed code. To test the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, the impact between two identical bars and the vibration process of a laminated glass plate under impact of elastic sphere are simulated in elastic range. By comparing the results with the analytical solution and/or that calculated by using LS-DYNA, it is found that they agree with each other very well. The accuracy of the algorithm proposed in this paper is proved.

  11. Simple Common Plane contact algorithm for explicit FE/FD methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, O

    2006-12-18

    Common-plane (CP) algorithm is widely used in Discrete Element Method (DEM) to model contact forces between interacting particles or blocks. A new simple contact algorithm is proposed to model contacts in FE/FD methods which is similar to the CP algorithm. The CP is defined as a plane separating interacting faces of FE/FD mesh instead of blocks or particles used in the original CP method. The new method does not require iterations even for very stiff contacts. It is very robust and easy to implement both in 2D and 3D parallel codes.

  12. Method of making a back contacted solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.

    1995-01-01

    A back-contacted solar cell having laser-drilled vias connecting the front-surface carrier-collector junction to an electrode grid on the back surface. The structure may also include a rear surface carrier-collector junction connected to the same grid. The substrate is connected to a second grid which is interdigitated with the first. Both grids are configured for easy series connection with neighboring cells. Several processes are disclosed to produce the cell.

  13. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Furno, A.; Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s-1. We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci ‘laws’ of friction.

  14. Transient 3d contact problems—NTS method: mixed methods and conserving integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesch, Christian; Betsch, Peter

    2011-10-01

    The present work deals with a new formulation for transient large deformation contact problems. It is well known, that one-step implicit time integration schemes for highly non-linear systems fail to conserve the total energy of the system. To deal with this drawback, a mixed method is newly proposed in conjunction with the concept of a discrete gradient. In particular, we reformulate the well known and widely-used node-to-segment methods and establish an energy-momentum scheme. The advocated approach ensures robustness and enhanced numerical stability, demonstrated in several three-dimensional applications of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Fuel cell electrode interconnect contact material encapsulation and method

    DOEpatents

    Derose, Anthony J.; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Gudyka, Russell A.; Bonadies, Joseph V.; Silvis, Thomas W.

    2016-05-31

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of fuel cell cassettes each including a fuel cell with an anode and a cathode. Each fuel cell cassette also includes an electrode interconnect adjacent to the anode or the cathode for providing electrical communication between an adjacent fuel cell cassette and the anode or the cathode. The interconnect includes a plurality of electrode interconnect protrusions defining a flow passage along the anode or the cathode for communicating oxidant or fuel to the anode or the cathode. An electrically conductive material is disposed between at least one of the electrode interconnect protrusions and the anode or the cathode in order to provide a stable electrical contact between the electrode interconnect and the anode or cathode. An encapsulating arrangement segregates the electrically conductive material from the flow passage thereby, preventing volatilization of the electrically conductive material in use of the fuel cell stack.

  16. Screenable contact structure and method for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Bernd

    1980-08-26

    An ink composition for deposition upon the surface of a semiconductor device to provide a contact area for connection to external circuitry is disclosed, the composition comprising an ink system containing a metal powder, a binder and vehicle, and a metal frit. The ink is screened onto the semiconductor surface in the desired pattern and is heated to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal frit to become liquid. The metal frit dissolves some of the metal powder and densifies the structure by transporting the dissolved metal powder in a liquid sintering process. The sintering process typically may be carried out in any type of atmosphere. A small amount of dopant or semiconductor material may be added to the ink systems to achieve particular results if desired.

  17. New energy flux method for inspection of contact layer reticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, William W.; Garcia, Hector I.; Becker, Charika; Chen, George; Watson, Sterling G.

    2002-07-01

    With growing implementation of low k1 lithography on DUV scanners for wafer production, detecting and analyzing photomask critical dimension (CD) errors and semitransparent defects is vital for qualifying photomasks to enable high IC wafer yields for 130nm and 100nm nodes. Using the TeraStarTM pattern inspection system's image computer platform, a new algorithm, TeraFluxTM, has been implemented and tested for the inspection of small 'closed' features. The current algorithm is run in die-to-die mode and compares the energy flux differences on features between die for small closed features, such as, contacts, trenches, and cells on chrome and half-tone reticles. Tests show the new algorithm provides CD error detection to 5 percent energy flux variation with low false defect counts. The dispositioning of very small CD errors typically requires the precision and resolution of a CD-SEM. A new capability has been developed for review of very small CD errors for this application, which displays the energy flux difference between any corresponding closed features on different die. We have characterized the sensitivity and false defect performance of the new energy flux algorithm with production masks and programmed defect test masks. The program defect test mask contains two sets of contacts at 600nm and 800nm design sizes. At each design size there are six defect types in both dense and sparse geometry. The programmed defects are designed to have 1 percent energy increments for defect sizes from 1 percent to 10 percent, and 2 percent energy increments from 10 percent to 30 percent. A sampling of inspection results will be presented. SEM measurements were taken at programmed defect locations to develop a correlation between the energy flux difference and the measured CD.

  18. Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Yi; Dubé, Martin; Grant, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We study the dependence of friction on surface roughness, sliding velocity, and temperature. Expanding on the classic treatment of Greenwood and Williamson, we show that the fractal nature of a surface has little influence on the real area of contact and the static friction coefficient. A simple scaling argument shows that the static friction exhibits a weak anomaly μ˜A0-χ/4 , where A0 is the apparent area and χ is the roughness exponent of the surface. We then develop a method to calculate atomic-scale friction between a microscopic asperity, such as the tip of a friction force microscope (FFM) and a solid substrate. This method, based on the thermal activation of the FFM tip, allows a quantitative extraction of all the relevant microscopic parameters and reveals a universal scaling behavior of atomic friction on velocity and temperature. This method is extended to include a soft atomic substrate in order to simulate FFM scans more realistically. The tip is connected with the support of the cantilever by an ideal spring and the substrate is simulated with a ball-spring model. The tip and substrate are coupled with repulsive potentials. Simulations are done at different temperatures and scanning velocities on substrates with different elastic moduli. Stick-slip motion of the tip is observed, and the numerical results of the friction force and distribution of force maxima match the theoretical framework.

  19. Solid friction between soft filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  20. Solid friction between soft filaments.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes's drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials. PMID:25730393

  1. Friction plug welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Riki (Inventor); Hibbard, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Friction plug welding (FPW) usage is advantageous for friction stir welding (FSW) hole close-outs and weld repairs in 2195 Al--Cu--Li fusion or friction stir welds. Current fusion welding methods of Al--Cu--Li have produced welds containing varied defects. These areas are found by non-destructive examination both after welding and after proof testing. Current techniques for repairing typically small (<0.25) defects weaken the weldment, rely heavily on welders' skill, and are costly. Friction plug welding repairs increase strength, ductility and resistance to cracking over initial weld quality, without requiring much time or operator skill. Friction plug welding while pulling the plug is advantageous because all hardware for performing the weld can be placed on one side of the workpiece.

  2. Implicit Multibody Penalty-BasedDistributed Contact.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyi; Zhao, Yili; Barbic, Jernej

    2014-09-01

    The penalty method is a simple and popular approach to resolving contact in computer graphics and robotics. Penalty-based contact, however, suffers from stability problems due to the highly variable and unpredictable net stiffness, and this is particularly pronounced in simulations with time-varying distributed geometrically complex contact. We employ semi-implicit integration, exact analytical contact gradients, symbolic Gaussian elimination and a SVD solver to simulate stable penalty-based frictional contact with large, time-varying contact areas, involving many rigid objects and articulated rigid objects in complex conforming contact and self-contact. We also derive implicit proportional-derivative control forces for real-time control of articulated structures with loops. We present challenging contact scenarios such as screwing a hexbolt into a hole, bowls stacked in perfectly conforming configurations, and manipulating many objects using actively controlled articulated mechanisms in real time. PMID:26357376

  3. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  4. A METHOD TO MEASURE PROTECTIVE CLOTHING PERMEATION UNDER INTERMITTENT CHEIMCAL CONTACT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A preliminary method was developed to measure chemical permeation under intermittent chemical contact conditions. Protective clothing permeation is presently measured using ASTM Method F739-85. Because this test measures permeation when the clothing material is in continuous cont...

  5. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A. H.; Flores-Johnson, E. A.; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  6. Smart friction driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Rainer; Gaul, Lothar

    2005-02-01

    Vibration properties of most assembled mechanical systems depend on frictional damping in joints. The nonlinear transfer behavior of the frictional interfaces often provides the dominant damping mechanism in a built-up structure and plays an important role in the vibratory response of the structure (Gaul and Nitsche 2001 Appl. Mech. Rev. 54 93-105). For improving the performance of systems, many studies have been carried out to predict, measure and/or enhance the energy dissipation of friction. To enhance the friction damping in joint connections a semi-active joint is investigated. A rotational joint connection is designed and manufactured such that the normal force in the friction interface can be influenced with a piezoelectric stack disc. With the piezoelectric device the normal force and thus the friction damping in the joint connection can be controlled. A control design method, namely semi-active control, is investigated. The recently developed LuGre friction model is used to describe the nonlinear transfer behavior of joints. This model is based on a bristle model and turns out to be highly suitable for systems assembled by such smart joints. Those systems can also be regarded as friction driven systems, since the energy flow is controlled by smart joints. The semi-active method is well suited for large space structures since the friction damping in joints turned out to be a major source of damping. To show the applicability of the proposed concept to large space structures a two-beam system representing a part of a large space structure is considered. Two flexible beams are connected with a semi-active joint connection. It can be shown that the damping of the system can be improved significantly by controlling the normal force in the semi-active joint connection. Experimental results validate the damping improvement due to the semi-active friction damping.

  7. Scalar model for frictional precursors dynamics.

    PubMed

    Taloni, Alessandro; Benassi, Andrea; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments indicate that frictional sliding occurs by nucleation of detachment fronts at the contact interface that may appear well before the onset of global sliding. This intriguing precursory activity is not accounted for by traditional friction theories but is extremely important for friction dominated geophysical phenomena as earthquakes, landslides or avalanches. Here we simulate the onset of slip of a three dimensional elastic body resting on a surface and show that experimentally observed frictional precursors depend in a complex non-universal way on the sample geometry and loading conditions. Our model satisfies Archard's law and Amontons' first and second laws, reproducing with remarkable precision the real contact area dynamics, the precursors' envelope dynamics prior to sliding, and the normal and shear internal stress distributions close to the interfacial surface. Moreover, it allows to assess which features can be attributed to the elastic equilibrium, and which are attributed to the out-of-equilibrium dynamics, suggesting that precursory activity is an intrinsically quasi-static physical process. A direct calculation of the evolution of the Coulomb stress before and during precursors nucleation shows large variations across the sample, explaining why earthquake forecasting methods based only on accumulated slip and Coulomb stress monitoring are often ineffective. PMID:25640079

  8. Scalar model for frictional precursors dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Taloni, Alessandro; Benassi, Andrea; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments indicate that frictional sliding occurs by nucleation of detachment fronts at the contact interface that may appear well before the onset of global sliding. This intriguing precursory activity is not accounted for by traditional friction theories but is extremely important for friction dominated geophysical phenomena as earthquakes, landslides or avalanches. Here we simulate the onset of slip of a three dimensional elastic body resting on a surface and show that experimentally observed frictional precursors depend in a complex non-universal way on the sample geometry and loading conditions. Our model satisfies Archard's law and Amontons' first and second laws, reproducing with remarkable precision the real contact area dynamics, the precursors' envelope dynamics prior to sliding, and the normal and shear internal stress distributions close to the interfacial surface. Moreover, it allows to assess which features can be attributed to the elastic equilibrium, and which are attributed to the out-of-equilibrium dynamics, suggesting that precursory activity is an intrinsically quasi-static physical process. A direct calculation of the evolution of the Coulomb stress before and during precursors nucleation shows large variations across the sample, explaining why earthquake forecasting methods based only on accumulated slip and Coulomb stress monitoring are often ineffective. PMID:25640079

  9. A transmission line method for evaluation of vertical InAs nanowire contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M. Svensson, J. Lind, E. Wernersson, L.-E.

    2015-12-07

    In this paper, we present a method for metal contact characterization to vertical semiconductor nanowires using the transmission line method (TLM) on a cylindrical geometry. InAs nanowire resistors are fabricated on Si substrates using a hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) spacer between the bottom and top contact. The thickness of the HSQ is defined by the dose of an electron beam lithography step, and by varying the separation thickness for a group of resistors, a TLM series is fabricated. Using this method, the resistivity and specific contact resistance are determined for InAs nanowires with different doping and annealing conditions. The contacts are shown to improve with annealing at temperatures up to 300 °C for 1 min, with specific contact resistance values reaching down to below 1 Ω µm{sup 2}.

  10. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  11. Method for manufacturing electrical contacts for a thin-film semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Dickson, Charles R.; D'Aiello, Robert V.

    1988-11-08

    A method of fabricating spaced-apart back contacts on a thin film of semiconductor material by forming strips of buffer material on top of the semiconductor material in locations corresponding to the desired dividing lines between back contacts, forming a film of metal substantially covering the semiconductor material and buffer strips, and scribing portions of the metal film overlying the buffer strips with a laser without contacting the underlying semiconductor material to separate the metal layer into a plurality of back contacts. The buffer material serves to protect the underlying semiconductor material from being damaged during the laser scribing. Back contacts and multi-cell photovoltaic modules incorporating such back contacts also are disclosed.

  12. Method of making cascaded die mountings with springs-loaded contact-bond options

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Adams, Donald J.; Su, Gui-Jia; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.; Coomer, Chester

    2007-06-19

    A cascaded die mounting device and method using spring contacts for die attachment, with or without metallic bonds between the contacts and the dies, is disclosed. One embodiment is for the direct refrigerant cooling of an inverter/converter carrying higher power levels than most of the low power circuits previously taught, and does not require using a heat sink.

  13. Study of Plastic Deformation in Binary Aluminum Alloys by Internal-Friction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, E. C.; Maringer, R. E.; Marsh, L. L.; Manning, G. K.

    1959-01-01

    The damping capacity of several aluminum-copper alloys has been investigated during tensile elongation. This damping is shown to depend on strain rate, strain, temperature, alloy content, and heat treatment. A tentative hypothesis, based on the acceleration of solute atom diffusion by deformation-produced vacancies, is proposed to account for the observed behavior. Internal-friction maxima are observed in deformed aluminum and aluminum-copper alloys at -70 deg and -50 deg C. The peaks appear to be relatively insensitive to frequency and alloy content, but they disappear after annealing at temperatures nearing the recrystallization temperature.

  14. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

    2012-01-31

    Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant

  15. Method for characterizing the contact resistance of metal-vanadium dioxide thin film interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Percy, R.; Stan, M.; Weikle, R. M.; Kittiwatanakul, S.; Lu, J.; Wolf, S.

    2014-07-14

    The standard method for determining the contact resistance of planar metal-semiconductor interfaces can underestimate the true contact resistance under normal operating conditions, as it relies on the resistivity of the semiconductor material remaining constant during measurement. However, the strong temperature dependence of the resistivity of VO{sub 2} requires a modified approach that maintains a constant power density dissipated within the film to account for Joule heating. We develop a method for measuring contact resistance in semiconductors with a high thermal coefficient of resistivity, demonstrate this method with an example, and compare the results with the standard technique.

  16. DYNAMIC PLANE-STRAIN SHEAR RUPTURE WITH A SLIP-WEAKENING FRICTION LAW CALCULATED BY A BOUNDARY INTEGRAL METHOD.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical boundary integral method, relating slip and traction on a plane in an elastic medium by convolution with a discretized Green function, can be linked to a slip-dependent friction law on the fault plane. Such a method is developed here in two-dimensional plane-strain geometry. Spontaneous plane-strain shear ruptures can make a transition from sub-Rayleigh to near-P propagation velocity. Results from the boundary integral method agree with earlier results from a finite difference method on the location of this transition in parameter space. The methods differ in their prediction of rupture velocity following the transition. The trailing edge of the cohesive zone propagates at the P-wave velocity after the transition in the boundary integral calculations. Refs.

  17. A method for measuring skin friction drag on a flat plate in contaminated gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oetting, R. B.; Patterson, G. K.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for measuring friction drag in turbulent gas and gas/particle flows over flat plates is presented, and preliminary results are reported. A 0.25-in.-thick 72 x 6-in. Al plate is suspended by six horizontal support air bearings and four vertical alignment air bearings between fixed dummy plates and leading-edge and trailing-edge fairings in the 32-in.-high 48-in.-wide 11-ft-long test section of a closed-circuit atmospheric wind tunnel operating at 50-150 ft/sec. Particles of Fe and Al oxides of diameter 20-150 microns and density up to 0.3 lb particles per lb air are injected via a 6 x 0.167-in. nozzle; turbulence is induced by a roughened section of the leading-edge fairing; and friction drag is measured using a load-cell pressure transducer. Sample results are shown in a graph, demonstrating good agreement with theoretical drag calculations.

  18. Method for forming low-resistance ohmic contacts on semiconducting oxides

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, J.

    1979-10-01

    The invention provides a new method for the formation of high-quality ohmic contacts on wide-band-gap semiconducting oxides. As exemplified by the formation of an ohmic contact on n-type BaTiO/sub 3/ containing a p-n junction, the invention entails depositing a film of a metallic electroding material on the BaTiO/sub 3/ surface and irradiating the film with a Q-switched laser pulse effecting complete melting of the film and localized melting of the surface layer of oxide immediately underlying the film. The resulting solidified metallic contact is ohmic, has unusually low contact resistance, and is thermally stable, even at elevated temmperatures. The contact does not require cleaning before attachment of any suitable electrical lead. This method is safe, rapid, reproducible, and relatively inexpensive.

  19. Laser method for forming low-resistance ohmic contacts on semiconducting oxides

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, Jagdish

    1981-01-01

    This invention is a new method for the formation of high-quality ohmic contacts on wide-band-gap semiconducting oxides. As exemplified by the formation of an ohmic contact on n-type BaTiO.sub.3 containing a p-n junction, the invention entails depositing a film of a metallic electroding material on the BaTiO.sub.3 surface and irradiating the film with a Q-switched laser pulse effecting complete melting of the film and localized melting of the surface layer of oxide immediately underlying the film. The resulting solidified metallic contact is ohmic, has unusually low contact resistance, and is thermally stable, even at elevated temperatures. The contact does not require cleaning before attachment of any suitable electrical lead. This method is safe, rapid, reproducible, and relatively inexpensive.

  20. Method for contact resistivity measurements on photovoltaic cells and cell adapted for such measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method is disclosed for scribing at least three grid contacts of a photovoltaic cell to electrically isolate them from the grid contact pattern used to collect solar current generated by the cell, and using the scribed segments for determining parameters of the cell by a combination of contact end resistance (CER) measurements using a minimum of three equally or unequally spaced lines, and transmission line modal (TLM) measurements using a minimum of four unequally spaced lines. TLM measurements may be used to determine sheet resistance under the contact, R.sub.sk, while CER measurements are used to determine contact resistivity, .rho..sub.c, from a nomograph of contact resistivity as a function of contact end resistance and sheet resistivity under the contact. In some cases, such as the case of silicon photovoltaic cells, sheet resistivity under the contact may be assumed to be equal to the known sheet resistance, R.sub.s, of the semiconductor material, thereby obviating the need for TLM measurements to determine R.sub.sk.

  1. The formulation of dynamical contact problems with friction in the case of systems of rigid bodies and general discrete mechanical systems—Painlevé and Kane paradoxes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Alexandre; Ballard, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of mechanical systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom (discrete mechanical systems) is governed by the Lagrange equation which is a second-order differential equation on a Riemannian manifold (the configuration manifold). The handling of perfect (frictionless) unilateral constraints in this framework (that of Lagrange's analytical dynamics) was undertaken by Schatzman and Moreau at the beginning of the 1980s. A mathematically sound and consistent evolution problem was obtained, paving the road for many subsequent theoretical investigations. In this general evolution problem, the only reaction force which is involved is a generalized reaction force, consistently with the virtual power philosophy of Lagrange. Surprisingly, such a general formulation was never derived in the case of frictional unilateral multibody dynamics. Instead, the paradigm of the Coulomb law applying to reaction forces in the real world is generally invoked. So far, this paradigm has only enabled to obtain a consistent evolution problem in only some very few specific examples and to suggest numerical algorithms to produce computational examples (numerical modeling). In particular, it is not clear what is the evolution problem underlying the computational examples. Moreover, some of the few specific cases in which this paradigm enables to write down a precise evolution problem are known to show paradoxes: the Painlevé paradox (indeterminacy) and the Kane paradox (increase in kinetic energy due to friction). In this paper, we follow Lagrange's philosophy and formulate the frictional unilateral multibody dynamics in terms of the generalized reaction force and not in terms of the real-world reaction force. A general evolution problem that governs the dynamics is obtained for the first time. We prove that all the solutions are dissipative; that is, this new formulation is free of Kane paradox. We also prove that some indeterminacy of the Painlevé paradox is fixed in this

  2. Non-contact capacitance based image sensing method and system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, James L.; Wiczer, James J.

    1994-01-01

    A system and a method for imaging desired surfaces of a workpiece. A sensor having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece is positioned above and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of the sensor in response to input signals being applied thereto and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of any disturbances in the electric field as a result of the workpiece. An image signal of the workpiece may be developed by processing the capacitance signals. The image signals may provide necessary control information to a machining device for machining the desired surfaces of the workpiece in processes such as deburring or chamfering. Also, the method and system may be used to image dimensions of weld pools on a workpiece and surfaces of glass vials. The sensor may include first and second preview sensors used to determine the feed rate of a workpiece with respect to the machining device.

  3. Non-contact capacitance based image sensing method and system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, James L.; Wiczer, James J.

    1995-01-01

    A system and a method is provided for imaging desired surfaces of a workpiece. A sensor having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece is positioned above and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of the sensor in response to input signals being applied thereto and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of any disturbances in the electric field as a result of the workpiece. An image signal of the workpiece may be developed by processing the capacitance signals. The image signals may provide necessary control information to a machining device for machining the desired surfaces of the workpiece in processes such as deburring or chamfering. Also, the method and system may be used to image dimensions of weld pools on a workpiece and surfaces of glass vials. The sensor may include first and second preview sensors used to determine the feed rate of a workpiece with respect to the machining device.

  4. Non-contact capacitance based image sensing method and system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, J.L.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1994-01-25

    A system and a method for imaging desired surfaces of a workpiece is described. A sensor having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece is positioned above and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of the sensor in response to input signals being applied thereto and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of any disturbances in the electric field as a result of the workpiece. An image signal of the workpiece may be developed by processing the capacitance signals. The image signals may provide necessary control information to a machining device for machining the desired surfaces of the workpiece in processes such as deburring or chamfering. Also, the method and system may be used to image dimensions of weld pools on a workpiece and surfaces of glass vials. The sensor may include first and second preview sensors used to determine the feed rate of a workpiece with respect to the machining device. 18 figures.

  5. Non-contact capacitance based image sensing method and system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, J.L.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1995-01-03

    A system and a method is provided for imaging desired surfaces of a workpiece. A sensor having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece is positioned above and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of the sensor in response to input signals being applied thereto and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of any disturbances in the electric field as a result of the workpiece. An image signal of the workpiece may be developed by processing the capacitance signals. The image signals may provide necessary control information to a machining device for machining the desired surfaces of the workpiece in processes such as deburring or chamfering. Also, the method and system may be used to image dimensions of weld pools on a workpiece and surfaces of glass vials. The sensor may include first and second preview sensors used to determine the feed rate of a workpiece with respect to the machining device. 18 figures.

  6. Electron transport in extended carbon-nanotube/metal contacts: Ab initio based Green function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediai, Artem; Ryndyk, Dmitry A.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a new method that is able to predict the electrical properties of the source and drain contacts in realistic carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs). It is based on large-scale ab initio calculations combined with a Green function approach. For the first time, both internal and external parts of a realistic CNT-metal contact are taken into account at the ab initio level. We have developed the procedure allowing direct calculation of the self-energy for an extended contact. Within the method, it is possible to calculate the transmission coefficient through a contact of both finite and infinite length; the local density of states can be determined in both free and embedded CNT segments. We found perfect agreement with the experimental data for Pd and Al contacts. We have explained why CNTFETs with Pd electrodes are p -type FETs with ohmic contacts, which can carry current close to the ballistic limit (provided contact length is large enough), whereas in CNT-Al contacts transmission is suppressed to a significant extent, especially for holes.

  7. Pose and motion from contact

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.B.; Erdmann, M.

    1999-05-01

    In the absence of vision, grasping an object often relies on tactile feedback from the fingertips. As the finger pushes the object, the fingertip can feel the contact point move. If the object is known in advance, from this motion the finger may infer the location of the contact point on the object, and thereby, the object pose. This paper primarily investigates the problem of determining the pose (orientation and position) and motion (velocity and angular velocity) of a planar object with known geometry from such contact motion generated by pushing. A dynamic analysis of pushing yields a nonlinear system that relates through contact the object pose and motion to the finger motion. The contact motion on the fingertip thus encodes certain information about the object pose. Nonlinear observability theory is employed to show that such information is sufficient for the finger to observe not only the pose, but also the motion of the object. Therefore, a sensing strategy can be realized as an observer of the nonlinear dynamic system. Two observers are subsequently introduced. The first observer, based on the work of Gautheir, Hammouri, and Othman (1992), has its gain determined by the solution of a Lyapunov-like equation; it can be activated at any time instant during a push. The second observer, based on Newton`s method, solves for the initial (motionless) object pose from three intermediate contact points during a push. Under the Coulomb-friction model, the paper deals with support friction in the plane and/or contact friction between the finger and the object. Extensive simulations have been done to demonstrate the feasibility of the two observers. Preliminary experiments (with an Adept robot) have also been conducted. A contact sensor has been implemented using strain gauges.

  8. Friction drive of an SAW motor. Part II: analyses.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi

    2008-09-01

    The mechanics of the friction drive of a surface acoustic wave motor were investigated by means of contact mechanics theory. As a means to control the contact condition, the motor's slider had projections on its frictional surface. Assuming the projection was a rigid circular punch and the slider body was an elastic half-space allowed application of contact mechanics formulae to the analyses of the friction drive. Because the projection contacted the Rayleigh wave vibration, the projection's responses were considered dynamic; thus, the dynamics were also analyzed in the same framework of contact mechanics formulae. Moreover, the analyses were applied to measurements of the projection's displacement to examine the detailed mechanics during the friction drive. We calculated the contact/frictional forces based on the measurement and indicated the necessity of further investigation of the surface acoustic wave motor's friction drive, because the usual friction law was unable to explain the measurement. PMID:18986897

  9. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Solid-solid thermal contact problems: current understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesnyankin, Sergei Yu; Vikulov, Aleksei G.; Vikulov, Dmitrii G.

    2009-09-01

    The past 40 years of theoretical and experimental research on contact heat transfer are reviewed. Thermophysical and mechanical processes involved in heat flow propagation through various kinds of solid-solid joints are considered. Analytical and semiempirical expressions are presented, which simulate these processes both under vacuum conditions and in the presence of a heat-conducting medium in gaps. Reasons for the experimentally examined heat flux rectification are explained. Studies on thermal contact under a nonstationary regime are covered, as is the possibility of applying classical heat conduction theory to describing the contact thermal properties. A thermodynamic interpretation of the thermal contact resistance is suggested and basic approaches to the study of contact phenomena are described. The heat conduction in nanosystems is briefly reviewed. Theoretical problems yet to be solved are pointed out and possible solution methods suggested.

  10. Size Scaling of Static Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, O. M.; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-02-01

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Here we formulate a scaling law of the static friction force, which for a soft lubricant is predicted to decrease as fm+Δf/Aγ for increasing contact area A, with γ>0. Our main finding is that the value of fm, controlling the survival of stick slip at large size, can be evaluated by simulations of comparably small size. MD simulations of soft lubricant sliding are presented, which verify this theory.

  11. Coupled thermoelastic analysis of fretting contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Harish

    Fretting fatigue is the contact phenomenon occurring when two bodies in contact experience oscillatory loads. The surface tribology and contact stress evolution in a fretting contact has been studied using coupled thermoelastic analysis. Both, an aluminum and titanium alloy have been studied. Full-field real-time in-situ temperature maps of the contact region and its vicinity have been obtained using a multi-element infrared camera. The distinguishing features of the contact including the sliding regime, partial slip contact, bulk stress effects, boundary conditions effects etc. have been successfully captured using temperature measurement of the order of millikelvin. The coupled thermoclastic response of aluminum and titanium alloy has been successfully characterized, including the mean stress effect. A full coupled thermoelastic finite element model with Coulomb friction, frictional heating and gap conductance, has been used to predict the experimental temperatures. Changes in loads and changes in the coefficient of friction produce changes in different areas of the temperature field. The coupled thermoelastic effect may be used as a powerful tool to guide the march towards the complete understanding of the phenomenon of fretting. The method has been successfully used to guide the finite element analysis of a lap joint specimen.

  12. Aid for electrical contacting of high-temperature fuel cells and method for production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Ines; Schillig, Cora

    2014-03-18

    A double-sided adhesive metal-based tape for use as contacting aid for SOFC fuel cells is provided. The double-sided metal-based adhesive tape is suitable for simplifying the construction of cell bundles. The double-sided metal-based adhesive tape is used for electrical contacting of the cell connector with the anode and for electrical contacting of the interconnector of the fuel cells with the cell connector. A method for producing the double-sided adhesive metal-base tape is also provided.

  13. General Retarded Contact Self-energies in and beyond the Non-equilibrium Green's Functions Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubis, Tillmann; He, Yu; Andrawis, Robert; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    Retarded contact self-energies in the framework of nonequilibrium Green's functions allow to model the impact of lead structures on the device without explicitly including the leads in the actual device calculation. Most of the contact self-energy algorithms are limited to homogeneous or periodic, semi-infinite lead structures. In this work, the complex absorbing potential method is extended to solve retarded contact self-energies for arbitrary lead structures, including irregular and randomly disordered leads. This method is verified for regular leads against common approaches and on physically equivalent, but numerically different irregular leads. Transmission results on randomly alloyed In0.5Ga0.5As structures show the importance of disorder in the leads. The concept of retarded contact self-energies is expanded to model passivation of atomically resolved surfaces without explicitly increasing the device's Hamiltonian.

  14. Validation of a new method to measure contact and flight times during treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Ogueta-Alday, Ana; Morante, Juan C; Rodríguez-Marroyo, Jose A; García-López, Juan

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a new method to measure contact and flight times during treadmill running and to test its reliability and sensitivity. Fifteen well-trained runners performed 7 sets of running at different speeds (from 10 to 22 km·h). Contact and flight times were simultaneously recorded by a high-speed video system (gold standard method) and a new method based on laser technology (SportJump System Pro). Athletes were classified according to their foot strike pattern (rearfoot vs. midfoot and forefoot). The new method overestimated the contact time and underestimated the flight time with respect to the gold standard method (p < 0.001). However, relationships and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between both systems were very strong (r and ICC > 0.99, p < 0.001). Contact time differences between the 2 systems depended on running speed (p < 0.001) but not on foot strike pattern or runners' body mass. This allowed to correct the differences in contact time and flight time. The new method was sensitive for detecting small differences in contact time (<20 ms) when the running speed increased and when the type of foot strike patterns changed. Additionally, a low intraindividual step variability (coefficient of variation = 2.0 ± 0.5%) and high intra- (ICC = 0.998) and interobserver (ICC = 0.977) reliability were shown. In conclusion, the new method was validated, being reliable and sensitive for detecting small differences in contact and flight times during treadmill running. Therefore, it could be used to compare biomechanical variables between groups in cross-sectional studies and to verify the influence of some independent variables (i.e., training, running economy, or performance) on running biomechanics. PMID:22836607

  15. Numerical implementation of a state variable model for friction

    SciTech Connect

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Boyce, D.E.

    1995-03-01

    A general state variable model for friction has been incorporated into a finite element code for viscoplasticity. A contact area evolution model is used in a finite element model of a sheet forming friction test. The results show that a state variable model can be used to capture complex friction behavior in metal forming simulations. It is proposed that simulations can play an important role in the analysis of friction experiments and the development of friction models.

  16. A New Discrete Element Analysis Method for Predicting Hip Joint Contact Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Christine L.; Maas, Steve A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Peters, Christopher L.; Anderson, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying cartilage contact stress is paramount to understanding hip osteoarthritis. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a computationally efficient method to estimate cartilage contact stresses. Previous applications of DEA have underestimated cartilage stresses and yielded unrealistic contact patterns because they assumed constant cartilage thickness and/or concentric joint geometry. The study objectives were to: 1) develop a DEA model of the hip joint with subject-specific bone and cartilage geometry, 2) validate the DEA model by comparing DEA predictions to those of a validated finite element analysis (FEA) model, and 3) verify both the DEA and FEA models with a linear-elastic boundary value problem. Springs representing cartilage in the DEA model were given lengths equivalent to the sum of acetabular and femoral cartilage thickness and joint space in the FEA model. Material properties and boundary/loading conditions were equivalent. Walking, descending, and ascending stairs were simulated. Solution times for DEA and FEA models were ~7 seconds and ~65 minutes, respectively. Irregular, complex contact patterns predicted by DEA were in excellent agreement with FEA. DEA contact areas were 7.5%, 9.7% and 3.7% less than FEA for walking, descending stairs, and ascending stairs, respectively. DEA models predicted higher peak contact stresses (9.8–13.6 MPa) and average contact stresses (3.0–3.7 MPa) than FEA (6.2–9.8 and 2.0–2.5 MPa, respectively). DEA overestimated stresses due to the absence of the Poisson’s effect and a direct contact interface between cartilage layers. Nevertheless, DEA predicted realistic contact patterns when subject-specific bone geometry and cartilage thickness were used. This DEA method may have application as an alternative to FEA for pre-operative planning of joint-preserving surgery such as acetabular reorientation during peri-acetabular osteotomy. PMID:23453394

  17. Dynamic measurements of gear tooth friction and load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a program to study fundamental mechanisms of gear noise, static and dynamic gear tooth strain measurements were made on the NASA gear-noise rig. Tooth-fillet strains from low-contact ratio-spur gears were recorded for 28 operating conditions. A method is introduced whereby strain gage measurements taken from both the tension and compression sides of a gear tooth can be transformed into the normal and frictional loads on the tooth. This technique was applied to both the static and dynamic strain data. The static case results showed close agreement with expected results. For the dynamic case, the normal-force computation produced very good results, but the friction results, although promising, were not as accurate. Tooth sliding friction strongly affected the signal from the strain gage on the tensionside of the tooth. The compression gage was affected by friction to a much lesser degree. The potential of the method to measure friction force was demonstrated, but further refinement will be required before this technique can be used to measure friction forces dynamically with an acceptable degree of accuracy.

  18. SLF27 energy difference method to specify printability of contact hole defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleni, T. M.; Peng, T. Y.

    2003-12-01

    The CD measurement method has been long used by the industry to specify contact hole mis-sizing defects on reticles. However with the shrinking of feature size beyond sub-wavelength, it has been found that this method of specifying contact hole defects do not always correlate well to CD differences on wafers. A better correlation can be achieved by using the energy difference (total flux energy) review tool available on the SLF27. The energy difference review tool measures the total energy transmitted through a manually drawn box. In this paper, defects from production reticles are used to compare the sizes of these defects with their energy differences on reticle against the CD measurements on wafers. Defect data from Binary reticles of undersized and oversized contacts holes are evaluated. Strong correlation between mis-sized contact holes measurement on wafer SEM and energy difference review tool on the SLF27 (Reticle Inspection tool with 365nm UV wavelength) is observed. The correlation is particularly strong for undersized contact holes. The correlation is helpful in identifying good repair and bad repair, since the correlation still holds true on contact holes with repair stain. Though it is believed the correlation stays true for PSM, a more thorough evaluation is required for PSM reticles at this time. From these data, a new defect control specification on reticles, using the energy difference method has been determined and used to specify mis-sizing or acceptable localized CD error on reticle to prevent yield impact on wafer.

  19. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  20. Development and Application of Non-linear Friction Models for Metal Forming Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Sugitomo, Nobuhiko

    2011-08-01

    Friction has a significant effect on the formability of stamping parts. A constant friction coefficient between stamping tools and blank is often employed in the metal forming simulating. In this presented work, several non-linear friction models which considers of the change of friction coefficient with contact pressure, sliding velocity, sliding distance, frictional work, plastic strain and temperature were developed using LS-DYNA customized friction subroutine. The validity was verified by numerical friction testing models and deep drawing model.

  1. Three Three-Axis IEPE Accelerometers on the Inner Liner of a Tire for Finding the Tire-Road Friction Potential Indicators †

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Arto; Tuononen, Ari J.

    2015-01-01

    Direct tire-road contact friction estimation is essential for future autonomous cars and active safety systems. Friction estimation methods have been proposed earlier for driving conditions in the presence of a slip angle or slip ratio. However, the estimation of the friction from a freely-rolling tire is still an unsolved topic. Knowing the existing friction potential would be beneficial since vehicle control systems could be adjusted before any remarkable tire force has been produced. Since accelerometers are well-known and robust, and thus a promising sensor type for intelligent tires, this study uses three three-axis IEPE accelerometers on the inner liner of a tire to detect friction potential indicators on two equally smooth surfaces with different friction levels. The equal roughness was chosen for both surfaces in order to study the friction phenomena by neglecting the effect of surface texture on vibrations. The acceleration data before the contact is used to differentiate the two friction levels between the tire and the road. In addition, the contact lengths from the three accelerometers are used to validate the acceleration data. A method to differentiate the friction levels on the basis of the acceleration signal is also introduced. PMID:26251914

  2. Three Three-Axis IEPE Accelerometers on the Inner Liner of a Tire for Finding the Tire-Road Friction Potential Indicators.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Arto; Tuononen, Ari J

    2015-01-01

    Direct tire-road contact friction estimation is essential for future autonomous cars and active safety systems. Friction estimation methods have been proposed earlier for driving conditions in the presence of a slip angle or slip ratio. However, the estimation of the friction from a freely-rolling tire is still an unsolved topic. Knowing the existing friction potential would be beneficial since vehicle control systems could be adjusted before any remarkable tire force has been produced. Since accelerometers are well-known and robust, and thus a promising sensor type for intelligent tires, this study uses three three-axis IEPE accelerometers on the inner liner of a tire to detect friction potential indicators on two equally smooth surfaces with different friction levels. The equal roughness was chosen for both surfaces in order to study the friction phenomena by neglecting the effect of surface texture on vibrations. The acceleration data before the contact is used to differentiate the two friction levels between the tire and the road. In addition, the contact lengths from the three accelerometers are used to validate the acceleration data. A method to differentiate the friction levels on the basis of the acceleration signal is also introduced. PMID:26251914

  3. Low-frequency internal friction as express-method for identification of cryocrystals in pores of the solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erenburg, A. I.; Zakharov, A. Yu.; Leont'eva, A. V.; Prokhorov, A. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    We show that studying of low-frequency internal friction (LFIF) of solid samples at low temperatures allows determining the presence of various gases absorbed, for some reasons, in pores and caverns of the solids. The gases come over to a solid state (cryocrystals) and exist in the pores under corresponding thermodynamic conditions giving an additional contribution to the LFIF spectra. The spectra reflect the special points of the gases (temperatures of melting or phase transitions). This information gives a real opportunity for identification of gas in the matrix, i.e. the studied solids. This may be of great importance for investigations of cosmic or geological samples, for instance, asteroids, meteorites, rock formations, etc. The LFIF method allows identification of gas media surrounding the studied sample.

  4. A Parallel Multigrid Method for the Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical Contact

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J D; Parsons, I D

    2002-03-21

    A geometrical multigrid method for solving the linearized matrix equations arising from node-on-face three-dimensional finite element contact is described. The development of an efficient implementation of this combination that minimizes both the memory requirements and the computational cost requires careful construction and storage of the portion of the coarse mesh stiffness matrices that are associated with the contact stiffness on the fine mesh. The multigrid contact algorithm is parallelized in a manner suitable for distributed memory architectures: results are presented that demonstrates the scheme's scalability. The solution of a large contact problem derived from an analysis of the factory joints present in the Space Shuttle reusable solid rocket motor demonstrates the usefulness of the general approach.

  5. Method of forming emitters for a back-contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bo; Cousins, Peter J; Smith, David D

    2014-12-16

    Methods of forming emitters for back-contact solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a first solid-state dopant source above a substrate. The first solid-state dopant source includes a plurality of regions separated by gaps. Regions of a second solid-state dopant source are formed above the substrate by printing.

  6. Method or forming emitters for a back-contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bo; Cousins, Peter J.; Smith, David D.

    2014-08-12

    Methods of forming emitters for back-contact solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a first solid-state dopant source above a substrate. The first solid-state dopant source includes a plurality of regions separated by gaps. Regions of a second solid-state dopant source are formed above the substrate by printing.

  7. Method of forming emitters for a back-contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bo; Cousins, Peter J.; Smith, David D.

    2015-09-29

    Methods of forming emitters for back-contact solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a first solid-state dopant source above a substrate. The first solid-state dopant source includes a plurality of regions separated by gaps. Regions of a second solid-state dopant source are formed above the substrate by printing.

  8. Friction Anisotropy with Respect to Topographic Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chengjiao; Wang, Q. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Friction characteristics with respect to surface topographic orientation were investigated using surfaces of different materials and fabricated with grooves of different scales. Scratching friction tests were conducted using a nano-indentation-scratching system with the tip motion parallel or perpendicular to the groove orientation. Similar friction anisotropy trends were observed for all the surfaces studied, which are (1) under a light load and for surfaces with narrow grooves, the tip motion parallel to the grooves offers higher friction coefficients than does that perpendicular to them, (2) otherwise, equal or lower friction coefficients are found under this motion. The influences of groove size relative to the diameter of the mating tip (as a representative asperity), surface contact stiffness, contact area, and the characteristic stiction length are discussed. The appearance of this friction anisotropy is independent of material; however, the boundary and the point of trend transition depend on material properties. PMID:23248751

  9. Frictional ageing from interfacial bonding and the origins of rate and state friction.

    PubMed

    Li, Qunyang; Tullis, Terry E; Goldsby, David; Carpick, Robert W

    2011-12-01

    Earthquakes have long been recognized as being the result of stick-slip frictional instabilities. Over the past few decades, laboratory studies of rock friction have elucidated many aspects of tectonic fault zone processes and earthquake phenomena. Typically, the static friction of rocks grows logarithmically with time when they are held in stationary contact, but the mechanism responsible for this strengthening is not understood. This time-dependent increase of frictional strength, or frictional ageing, is one manifestation of the 'evolution effect' in rate and state friction theory. A prevailing view is that the time dependence of rock friction results from increases in contact area caused by creep of contacting asperities. Here we present the results of atomic force microscopy experiments that instead show that frictional ageing arises from the formation of interfacial chemical bonds, and the large magnitude of ageing at the nanometre scale is quantitatively consistent with what is required to explain observations in macroscopic rock friction experiments. The relative magnitude of the evolution effect compared with that of the 'direct effect'--the dependence of friction on instantaneous changes in slip velocity--determine whether unstable slip, leading to earthquakes, is possible. Understanding the mechanism underlying the evolution effect would enable us to formulate physically based frictional constitutive laws, rather than the current empirically based 'laws', allowing more confident extrapolation to natural faults. PMID:22139421

  10. Friction and wear of TPS fibers: A study of the adhesion and friction of high modulus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.; Lee, Ilzoo

    1990-01-01

    The adhesional and frictional forces between filaments in a woven fabric or felt, strongly influenced the processability of the fiber and the mechanical durability of the final product. Even though the contact loads between fibers are low, the area of contact is extremely small giving rise to very high stresses; principally shear stresses. One consequence of these strong adhesional and frictional forces is the resistance of fibers to slide past each other during weaving or when processed into nonwoven mats or felts. Furthermore, the interfiber frictional forces may cause surface damage and thereby reduce the fiber strength. Once formed into fabrics, flexural handling and manipulation of the material again causes individual filaments to rub against each other resulting in modulus, brittle fibers such as those used in thermal protection systems (TPS). The adhesion and friction of organic fibers, notably polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers, have been extensively studied, but there has been very little work reported on high modulus inorganic fibers. An extensive study was made of the adhesion and friction of flame drawn silica fibers in order to develop experimental techniques and a scientific basis for data interpretation. Subsequently, these methods were applied to fibers of interest in TPS materials.

  11. Method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell and device thereof

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bo; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2014-07-29

    Methods of fabricating back-contact solar cells and devices thereof are described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming an N-type dopant source layer and a P-type dopant source layer above a material layer disposed above a substrate. The N-type dopant source layer is spaced apart from the P-type dopant source layer. The N-type dopant source layer and the P-type dopant source layer are heated. Subsequently, a trench is formed in the material layer, between the N-type and P-type dopant source layers.

  12. Method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell and device thereof

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bo; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2016-08-02

    Methods of fabricating back-contact solar cells and devices thereof are described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming an N-type dopant source layer and a P-type dopant source layer above a material layer disposed above a substrate. The N-type dopant source layer is spaced apart from the P-type dopant source layer. The N-type dopant source layer and the P-type dopant source layer are heated. Subsequently, a trench is formed in the material layer, between the N-type and P-type dopant source layers.

  13. Generalized four-point characterization method using capacitive and ohmic contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Brian S.; Zhou, Wang; Shah, Yash D.; Zhou, Chuanle; Işık, N.; Grayson, M.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a four-point characterization method is developed for samples that have either capacitive or ohmic contacts. When capacitive contacts are used, capacitive current- and voltage-dividers result in a capacitive scaling factor not present in four-point measurements with only ohmic contacts. From a circuit equivalent of the complete measurement system, one can determine both the measurement frequency band and capacitive scaling factor for various four-point characterization configurations. This technique is first demonstrated with a discrete element four-point test device and then with a capacitively and ohmically contacted Hall bar sample over a wide frequency range (1 Hz-100 kHz) using lock-in measurement techniques. In all the cases, data fit well to a circuit simulation of the entire measurement system, and best results are achieved with large area capacitive contacts and a high input-impedance preamplifier stage. An undesirable asymmetry offset in the measurement signal is described which can arise due to asymmetric voltage contacts.

  14. Studying the Transient Thermal Contact Conductance Between the Exhaust Valve and Its Seat Using the Inverse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhad, Mohsen Motahari; Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hassan; Shahraki, Saeid

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the experiments aimed at analyzing thermally the exhaust valve in an air-cooled internal combustion engine and estimating the thermal contact conductance in fixed and periodic contacts. Due to the nature of internal combustion engines, the duration of contact between the valve and its seat is too short, and much time is needed to reach the quasi-steady state in the periodic contact between the exhaust valve and its seat. Using the methods of linear extrapolation and the inverse solution, the surface contact temperatures and the fixed and periodic thermal contact conductance were calculated. The results of linear extrapolation and inverse methods have similar trends, and based on the error analysis, they are accurate enough to estimate the thermal contact conductance. Moreover, due to the error analysis, a linear extrapolation method using inverse ratio is preferred. The effects of pressure, contact frequency, heat flux, and cooling air speed on thermal contact conductance have been investigated. The results show that by increasing the contact pressure the thermal contact conductance increases substantially. In addition, by increasing the engine speed the thermal contact conductance decreases. On the other hand, by boosting the air speed the thermal contact conductance increases, and by raising the heat flux the thermal contact conductance reduces. The average calculated error equals to 12.9 %.

  15. New Method Developed to Measure Contact Angles of a Sessile Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2002-01-01

    The spreading of an evaporating liquid on a solid surface occurs in many practical processes and is of importance in a number of practical situations such as painting, textile dyeing, coating, gluing, and thermal engineering. Typical processes involving heat transfer where the contact angle plays an important role are film cooling, boiling, and the heat transfer through heat pipes. The biological phenomenon of cell spreading also is analogous to a drop spreading (ref. 1). In the study of spreading, the dynamic contact angle describes the interfacial properties on solid substrates and, therefore, has been studied by physicists and fluid mechanics investigators. The dynamic contact angle of a spreading nonvolatile liquid drop provides a simple tool in the study of the free-boundary problem, but the study of the spreading of a volatile liquid drop is of more practical interest because the evaporation of common liquids is inevitable in practical processes. The most common method to measure the contact angle, the contact radius, and the height of a sessile drop on a solid surface is to view the drop from its edge through an optical microscope. However, this method gives only local information in the view direction. Zhang and Yang (ref. 2) developed a laser shadowgraphy method to investigate the evaporation of sessile drop on a glass plate. As described here, Zhang and Chao (refs. 3 and 4) improved the method and suggested a new optical arrangement to measure the dynamic contact angle and the instant evaporation rate of a sessile drop with much higher accuracy (less than 1 percent). With this method, any fluid motion in the evaporating drop can be visualized through shadowgraphy without using a tracer, which often affects the field under investigation.

  16. A simple criterion for determining the static friction force between nanowires and flat substrates using the most-bent-state method.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lizhen; Wang, Shiliang; Huang, Han

    2015-04-24

    A simple criterion was developed to assess the appropriateness of the currently available models that estimate the static friction force between nanowires and substrates using the 'most-bent-state' method. Our experimental testing of the static friction force between Al2O3 nanowires and Si substrate verified our theoretical analysis, as well as the establishment of the criterion. It was found that the models are valid only for the bent nanowires with the ratio of wire length over the minimum curvature radius [Formula: see text] no greater than 1. For the cases with [Formula: see text] greater than 1, the static friction force was overestimated as it neglected the effect of its tangential component. PMID:25815772

  17. Investigation of squeal noise under positive friction characteristics condition provided by friction modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaogang; Meehan, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Field application of friction modifiers on the top of rail has been shown to effectively curb squeal and reduce lateral forces, but performance can be variable, according to other relevant research. Up to now, most investigations of friction modifiers were conducted in the field, where it is difficult to control or measure important parameters such as angle of attack, rolling speed, adhesion ratio etc. In the present investigation, the effect of different friction modifiers on the occurrence of squeal was investigated on a rolling contact two disk test rig. In particular, friction-creep curves and squeal sound pressure levels were measured under different rolling speeds and friction modifiers. The results show friction modifiers can eliminate or reduce the negative slope of friction-creep curves, but squeal noise still exists. Theoretical modelling of instantaneous creep behaviours reveals a possible reason why wheel squeal still exists after the application of friction modifiers.

  18. On the dependency of friction on load: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, O. M.; Steenwyk, B.; Warhadpande, A.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-03-01

    In rubber friction studies it is often observed that the kinetic friction coefficient depends on the nominal contact pressure. This is usually due to frictional heating, which softens the rubber, increases the area of contact, and (in most cases) reduces the viscoelastic contribution to the friction. In this paper we present experimental results showing that the rubber friction also depends on the nominal contact pressure at such low sliding speed that frictional heating is negligible. This effect has important implications for rubber sliding dynamics, e.g., in the context of the tire-road grip. We attribute this effect to the viscoelastic coupling between the macroasperity contact regions, and present a simple earthquakelike model and numerical simulations supporting this picture. The mechanism for the dependency of the friction coefficient on the load considered is very general, and is relevant for non-rubber materials as well.

  19. Initial Friction Compensation by Disturbance Observer Based on Rolling Friction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshihiro; Iwasaki, Makoto

    This paper presents a rolling friction model-based initial friction compensation (IFC) by a disturbance observer for the fast and precise positioning of ball-screw-driven table systems. The effects of rolling friction in mechanisms should be suppressed in order to the achieve required control performance. In this study, therefore, a rolling friction model is adopted to compensate for the initial friction, so that delay-free friction estimation becomes possible. The proposed initial friction compensation method has been verified experimentally by using a prototype of industrial positioning devices.

  20. Evaluation of Non-Ozone-Depleting-Chemical Cleaning Methods for Space Mechanisms Using a Vacuum Spiral Orbit Rolling Contact Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark J.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Wheeler, Donald R.; Keller, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Because CFC 113, an ozone depleting chemical (ODC), can no longer be produced, alternative bearing cleaning methods must be studied. The objective of this work was to study the effect of the new cleaning methods on lubricant lifetime using a vacuum bearing simulator (spiral orbit rolling contact tribometer). Four alternative cleaning methods were studied: ultra-violet (UV) ozone, aqueous levigated alumina slurry (ALAS), super critical fluid (SCF) CO2 and aqueous Brulin 815GD. Baseline tests were done using CFC 113. Test conditions were the following: a vacuum of at least 1.3 x 10(exp -6) Pa, 440C steel components, a rotational speed of 10 RPM, a lubricant charge of between 60-75 micrograms, a perfluoropolyalkylether lubricant (Z-25), and a load of 200N (44.6 lbs., a mean Hertzian stress of 1.5 GPa). Normalized lubricant lifetime was determined by dividing the total number of ball orbits by the amount of lubricant. The failure condition was a friction coefficient of 0.38. Post-test XPS analysis was also performed, showing slight variations in post-cleaning surface chemistry. Statistical analysis of the resultant data was conducted and it was determined that the data sets were most directly comparable when subjected to a natural log transformation. The natural log life (NL-Life) data for each cleaning method were reasonably normally (statistically) distributed and yielded standard deviations that were not significantly different among the five cleaning methods investigated. This made comparison of their NL-Life means very straightforward using a Bonferroni multiple comparison of means procedure. This procedure showed that the ALAS, UV-ozone and CFC 113 methods were not statistically significantly different from one another with respect to mean NL-Life. It also found that the SCF CO2 method yielded a significantly higher mean NL-Life than the mean NL-Lives of the ALAS, UV-ozone and CFC 113 methods. It also determined that the aqueous Brulin 815GD method yielded a mean

  1. A novel non-contact measurement method of the inner diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bingtian; Liu, Changjie; Li, Xingqiang; Fu, Luhua; Wang, Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High accuracy automatic measurement of engine box is significant for enhancing the quality and performance of the engine. To complete the fast automatic measurement of the engine box shaft hole diameter, a new non-contact methods for inner hole diameter measuring is proposed in this paper, a mathematic model is built according to this method. A probe based on laser displacement sensors is developed to meet the method by distributing the laser displacement sensors in the probe cross-section uniformly. By this method, shaft hole diameter can be got with single measurement. This method eliminates some defects involved in existing shaft hole diameter non-contact measuring methods, it does not need the rotation of the probe and accurate locating of the probe center and the shaft hole center. Experiments proved that the methods can be used to complete the task of the shaft hole diameter measuring with simple operation and accurate result. Experiments have also shown that the proposed method is an effective method of non-contact high accuracy diameter measurement.

  2. Spur gears: Optimal geometry, methods for generation and Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Zhang, Jiao

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this report include the following: (1) development of optimal geometry for crowned spur gears; (2) methods for their generation; and (3) tooth contact analysis (TCA) computer programs for the analysis of meshing and bearing contact on the crowned spur gears. The method developed for synthesis is used for the determination of the optimal geometry for crowned pinion surface and is directed to reduce the sensitivity of the gears to misalignment, localize the bearing contact, and guarantee the favorable shape and low level of the transmission errors. A new method for the generation of the crowned pinion surface has been proposed. This method is based on application of the tool with a surface of revolution that slightly deviates from a regular cone surface. The tool can be used as a grinding wheel or as a shaver. The crowned pinion surface can also be generated by a generating plane whose motion is provided by an automatic grinding machine controlled by a computer. The TCA program simulates the meshing and bearing contact of the misaligned gears. The transmission errors are also determined.

  3. A Mixed-Method Study of Language-Learning Motivation and Intercultural Contact of International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kormos, Judit; Csizér, Kata; Iwaniec, Janina

    2014-01-01

    The mixed-method study presented in this paper investigates the changes in direct and indirect intercultural contact and language-learning attitudes and effort of international students in the United Kingdom. Seventy international learners of English were asked to fill in a questionnaire three times during one academic year in an international…

  4. Research on torsional friction behavior and fluid load support of PVA/HA composite hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Zhang, Dekun; Yang, Xuehui; Cui, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qingliang

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogels have been extensively studied for use as synthetic articular cartilage. This study aimed to investigate (1) the torsional friction contact state and the transformation mechanism of PVA/HA composite hydrogel against CoCrMo femoral head and (2) effects of load and torsional angle on torsional friction behavior. The finite element method was used to study fluid load support of PVA/HA composite hydrogel. Results show fluid loss increases gradually of PVA/HA composite hydrogel with torsional friction time, leading to fluid load support decreases. The contact state changes from full slip state to stick-slip mixed state. As the load increases, friction coefficient and adhesion zone increase gradually. As the torsional angle increases, friction coefficient and slip trend of the contact interface increase, resulting in the increase of the slip zone and the reduction of the adhesion zone. Fluid loss increases of PVA/HA composite hydrogel as the load and the torsional angle increase, which causes the decrease of fluid load support and the increase of friction coefficient. PMID:27209115

  5. Weak solvability via bipotential method for contact models with nonmonotone boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costea, Nicuşor; Csirik, Mihály; Varga, Csaba

    2015-10-01

    We consider a general mathematical model which describes the contact between a body and a foundation, under the small deformations hypothesis. The behavior of the material is modeled by a monotone constitutive law, while on the potential contact zone nonmonotone boundary conditions are imposed. We propose a variational formulation in terms of bipotentials, whose unknown is a pair consisting of the displacement field and the Cauchy stress field. The existence of weak solutions is proved using a recent result due to Costea and Varga (Topol Methods Nonlinear Anal 41:39-67, 2013) concerning the solvability of nonlinear hemivariational inequality systems.

  6. 77 FR 43087 - Nomination of an In Vitro Test Method for the Identification of Contact Allergens: Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Nomination of an In Vitro Test Method for the Identification of Contact Allergens... identify electrophilic substances that have the potential to produce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD... CONTACT: Dr. William S. Stokes, Director, NICEATM, NIEHS, P.O. Box 12233, Mail Stop: K2-16,...

  7. Non-contact SQUID-NDT method using a ferrite core for carbon-fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Kasai, Naoko; Takashima, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Atsushi

    2002-12-01

    Carbon-fibre composites (CFCs), such as carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP), are promising composite materials for aerospace structures. However, there is no reliable non-contact NDT method for the detection of deep-lying cracks in thick CFCs at the present time. In this study a non-contact eddy-current-based SQUID-NDT method for thick CFCs was developed. Because CFC is conductively low (electrically), and the target CFC is thick, an induction coil with a U-shaped ferrite core was employed to generate a strong induction field while supplying a low frequency current to the coil. This method was applied to 20 mm thick CFRP specimens with hidden slots at various depths. All signal responses due to the slots located at 5 mm up to 17.5 mm in depth were successfully detected while supplying 150 mA at 300 Hz. The peak amplitude of the response obtained by the method was the same as, or larger than, that of previous results on the same specimens by the current injection method. It shows that the developed method can efficiently induce a large eddy current in the conductively low specimen. It is concluded that this method has the potential to be applicable to the non-contact NDT on very thick CFCs.

  8. Non-contact method for characterization of small size thermoelectric modules.

    PubMed

    Manno, Michael; Yang, Bao; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional techniques for characterization of thermoelectric performance require bringing measurement equipment into direct contact with the thermoelectric device, which is increasingly error prone as device size decreases. Therefore, the novel work presented here describes a non-contact technique, capable of accurately measuring the maximum ΔT and maximum heat pumping of mini to micro sized thin film thermoelectric coolers. The non-contact characterization method eliminates the measurement errors associated with using thermocouples and traditional heat flux sensors to test small samples and large heat fluxes. Using the non-contact approach, an infrared camera, rather than thermocouples, measures the temperature of the hot and cold sides of the device to determine the device ΔT and a laser is used to heat to the cold side of the thermoelectric module to characterize its heat pumping capacity. As a demonstration of the general applicability of the non-contact characterization technique, testing of a thin film thermoelectric module is presented and the results agree well with those published in the literature. PMID:26329215

  9. Energy flux method for inspection of contact and VIA layer reticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Hector I.; Volk, William W.; Xiong, Yalin; Watson, Sterling G.; Yu, Zongchang; Guo, Zhian; Wang, Lantian

    2003-05-01

    Contacts and VIAs are features whose integrity are very susceptible to reticle CD defects or in general, to defects that produce a change of total energy (flux) projected through the reticle. As lithography is extended beyond the 130nm node, the problem becomes more critical. Detecting and analyzing photomask critical dimension (CD) errors and semitransparent defects is vital for qualifying reticles to enable high IC wafer yield for the 90nm node. The current state of the art inspection methods are unable to meet the industry requirements for contact and via features. Using the TeraStarTM pattern inspection system's image computer platform, a new algorithm, TeraFluxTM, has been implemented and tested for the inspection of small 'closed' features. The algorithm compares the transmitted energy flux difference between a test contact (or a group of contacts) and a reference image for small closed features, such as, contacts, trenches, and cells on chrome and half-tone reticles. The algorithm is applicable to both clear and dark field reticles. Sensitivity characterization tests show that the new algorithm provides CD error detection to 6% energy flux variation with low false defect counts. We performed experiments to correlate the sensitivity performance of the new algorithm with wafer printability results. The results will be presented together with results of inspections results of programmed defect plates and production reticles.

  10. Non-contact method for characterization of small size thermoelectric modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manno, Michael; Yang, Bao; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional techniques for characterization of thermoelectric performance require bringing measurement equipment into direct contact with the thermoelectric device, which is increasingly error prone as device size decreases. Therefore, the novel work presented here describes a non-contact technique, capable of accurately measuring the maximum ΔT and maximum heat pumping of mini to micro sized thin film thermoelectric coolers. The non-contact characterization method eliminates the measurement errors associated with using thermocouples and traditional heat flux sensors to test small samples and large heat fluxes. Using the non-contact approach, an infrared camera, rather than thermocouples, measures the temperature of the hot and cold sides of the device to determine the device ΔT and a laser is used to heat to the cold side of the thermoelectric module to characterize its heat pumping capacity. As a demonstration of the general applicability of the non-contact characterization technique, testing of a thin film thermoelectric module is presented and the results agree well with those published in the literature.

  11. A study of friction mechanisms between a surrogate skin (Lorica soft) and nonwoven fabrics.

    PubMed

    Cottenden, David J; Cottenden, Alan M

    2013-12-01

    Hygiene products such as incontinence pads bring nonwoven fabrics into contact with users' skin, which can cause damage in various ways, including the nonwoven abrading the skin by friction. The aim of the work described here was to develop and use methods for understanding the origin of friction between nonwoven fabrics and skin by relating measured normal and friction forces to the nature and area of the contact (fibre footprint) between them. The method development work reported here used a skin surrogate (Lorica Soft) in place of skin for reproducibility. The work was primarily experimental in nature, and involved two separate approaches. In the first, a microscope with a shallow depth of field was used to determine the length of nonwoven fibre in contact with a facing surface as a function of pressure, from which the contact area could be inferred; and, in the second, friction between chosen nonwoven fabrics and Lorica Soft was measured at a variety of anatomically relevant pressures (0.25-32.1kPa) and speeds (0.05-5mms(-1)). Both techniques were extensively validated, and showed reproducibility of about 5% in length and force, respectively. Straightforward inspection of the data for Lorica Soft against the nonwovens showed that Amontons' law (with respect to load) was obeyed to high precision (R(2)>0.999 in all cases), though there was the suggestion of sub-linearity at low loads. More detailed consideration of the friction traces suggested that two different friction mechanisms are important, and comparison with the contact data suggests tentatively that they may correspond to adhesion between two different populations of contacts, one "rough" and one "smooth". This additional insight is a good illustration of how these techniques may prove valuable in studying other, similar interfaces. In particular, they could be used to investigate interfaces between nonwovens and skin, which was the primary motivation for developing them. PMID:23768960

  12. Solutions of contact problems by the assumed stress hybrid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubomura, K.; Pian, T. H. H.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for contact problems which may be either frictional or frictionless and may involve extensive sliding between deformable bodies. It was based on an assumed stress hybrid approach and on an incremental variational principle for which the Euler's equations of the functional include the equilibrium and compatibility conditions at the contact surface. The tractions at an assumed contact surface were introduced as Lagrangian multipliers in the formulation. It was concluded from the results of several example solutions that the extensive sliding contact between deformable bodies can be solved by the present method.

  13. A partly-contacted epitaxial lateral overgrowth method applied to GaN material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ming; Zhang, Jincheng; Duan, Xiaoling; Shan, Hengsheng; Yu, Ting; Ning, Jing; Hao, Yue

    2016-04-01

    We have discussed a new crystal epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) method, partly-contacted ELO (PC-ELO) method, of which the overgrowth layer partly-contacts with underlying seed layer. The passage also illustrates special mask structures with and without lithography and provides three essential conditions to achieve the PC-ELO method. What is remarkable in PC-ELO method is that the tilt angle of overgrowth stripes could be eliminated by contacting with seed layer. Moreover, we report an improved monolayer microsphere mask method without lithography of PC-ELO method, which was used to grow GaN. From the results of scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope (AFM), overgrowth layer shows no tilt angle relative to the seed layer and high quality coalescence front (with average linear dislocation density <6.4 × 103 cm‑1). Wing stripes peak splitting of the XRD rocking curve due to tilt is no longer detectable. After coalescence, surface steps of AFM show rare discontinuities due to the low misorientation of the overgrowth regions.

  14. A partly-contacted epitaxial lateral overgrowth method applied to GaN material

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ming; Zhang, Jincheng; Duan, Xiaoling; Shan, Hengsheng; Yu, Ting; Ning, Jing; Hao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    We have discussed a new crystal epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) method, partly-contacted ELO (PC-ELO) method, of which the overgrowth layer partly-contacts with underlying seed layer. The passage also illustrates special mask structures with and without lithography and provides three essential conditions to achieve the PC-ELO method. What is remarkable in PC-ELO method is that the tilt angle of overgrowth stripes could be eliminated by contacting with seed layer. Moreover, we report an improved monolayer microsphere mask method without lithography of PC-ELO method, which was used to grow GaN. From the results of scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope (AFM), overgrowth layer shows no tilt angle relative to the seed layer and high quality coalescence front (with average linear dislocation density <6.4 × 103 cm−1). Wing stripes peak splitting of the XRD rocking curve due to tilt is no longer detectable. After coalescence, surface steps of AFM show rare discontinuities due to the low misorientation of the overgrowth regions. PMID:27033154

  15. A partly-contacted epitaxial lateral overgrowth method applied to GaN material.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Zhang, Jincheng; Duan, Xiaoling; Shan, Hengsheng; Yu, Ting; Ning, Jing; Hao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    We have discussed a new crystal epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) method, partly-contacted ELO (PC-ELO) method, of which the overgrowth layer partly-contacts with underlying seed layer. The passage also illustrates special mask structures with and without lithography and provides three essential conditions to achieve the PC-ELO method. What is remarkable in PC-ELO method is that the tilt angle of overgrowth stripes could be eliminated by contacting with seed layer. Moreover, we report an improved monolayer microsphere mask method without lithography of PC-ELO method, which was used to grow GaN. From the results of scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope (AFM), overgrowth layer shows no tilt angle relative to the seed layer and high quality coalescence front (with average linear dislocation density <6.4 × 10(3) cm(-1)). Wing stripes peak splitting of the XRD rocking curve due to tilt is no longer detectable. After coalescence, surface steps of AFM show rare discontinuities due to the low misorientation of the overgrowth regions. PMID:27033154

  16. A robust post-processing method to determine skin friction in turbulent boundary layers from the velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2015-04-01

    The present paper describes a method to extrapolate the mean wall shear stress, , and the accurate relative position of a velocity probe with respect to the wall, , from an experimentally measured mean velocity profile in a turbulent boundary layer. Validation is made between experimental and direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer flows with independent measurement of the shear stress. The set of parameters which minimize the residual error with respect to the canonical description of the boundary layer profile is taken as the solution. Several methods are compared, testing different descriptions of the canonical mean velocity profile (with and without overshoot over the logarithmic law) and different definitions of the residual function of the optimization. The von Kármán constant is used as a parameter of the fitting process in order to avoid any hypothesis regarding its value that may be affected by different initial or boundary conditions of the flow. Results show that the best method provides an accuracy of for the estimation of the friction velocity and for the position of the wall. The robustness of the method is tested including unconverged near-wall measurements, pressure gradient, and reduced number of points; the importance of the location of the first point is also tested, and it is shown that the method presents a high robustness even in highly distorted flows, keeping the aforementioned accuracies if one acquires at least one data point in . The wake component and the thickness of the boundary layer are also simultaneously extrapolated from the mean velocity profile. This results in the first study, to the knowledge of the authors, where a five-parameter fitting is carried out without any assumption on the von Kármán constant and the limits of the logarithmic layer further from its existence.

  17. Thermodynamics of a Block Sliding across a Frictional Surface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2007-01-01

    The following idealized problem is intended to illustrate some basic thermodynamic concepts involved in kinetic friction. A block of mass m is sliding on top of a frictional, flat-topped table of mass M. The table is magnetically levitated, so that it can move without thermal contact and friction across a horizontal floor. The table is initially…

  18. Measurement of Gear Tooth Dynamic Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic friction forces at the gear tooth contact were undertaken using strain gages at the root fillets of two successive teeth. Results are presented from two gear sets over a range of speeds and loads. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient does not appear to be significantly influenced by the sliding reversal at the pitch point, and that the friction coefficient values found are in accord with those in general use. The friction coefficient was found to increase at low sliding speeds. This agrees with the results of disc machine testing.

  19. 1001 optimal PDB structure alignments: integer programming methods for finding the maximum contact map overlap.

    PubMed

    Caprara, Alberto; Carr, Robert; Istrail, Sorin; Lancia, Giuseppe; Walenz, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Protein structure comparison is a fundamental problem for structural genomics, with applications to drug design, fold prediction, protein clustering, and evolutionary studies. Despite its importance, there are very few rigorous methods and widely accepted similarity measures known for this problem. In this paper we describe the last few years of developments on the study of an emerging measure, the contact map overlap (CMO), for protein structure comparison. A contact map is a list of pairs of residues which lie in three-dimensional proximity in the protein's native fold. Although this measure is in principle computationally hard to optimize, we show how it can in fact be computed with great accuracy for related proteins by integer linear programming techniques. These methods have the advantage of providing certificates of near-optimality by means of upper bounds to the optimal alignment value. We also illustrate effective heuristics, such as local search and genetic algorithms. We were able to obtain for the first time optimal alignments for large similar proteins (about 1,000 residues and 2,000 contacts) and used the CMO measure to cluster proteins in families. The clusters obtained were compared to SCOP classification in order to validate the measure. Extensive computational experiments showed that alignments which are off by at most 10% from the optimal value can be computed in a short time. Further experiments showed how this measure reacts to the choice of the threshold defining a contact and how to choose this threshold in a sensible way. PMID:15072687

  20. A volume of fluid method for simulating fluid/fluid interfaces in contact with solid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Kondic, Lou

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to model the fluid/solid interaction forces in a direct solver of the Navier-Stokes equations based on the volume of fluid interface tracking method. The key ingredient of the model is the explicit inclusion of the fluid/solid interaction forces into the governing equations. We show that the interaction forces lead to a partial wetting condition and in particular to a natural definition of the equilibrium contact angle. We present two numerical methods to discretize the interaction forces that enter the model; these two approaches differ in complexity and convergence. To validate the computational framework, we consider the application of these models to simulate two-dimensional drops at equilibrium, as well as drop spreading. We demonstrate that the model, by including the underlying physics, captures contact line dynamics for arbitrary contact angles. More generally, the approach permits novel means to study contact lines, as well as a diverse range of phenomena that previously could not be addressed in direct simulations.

  1. A novel analytical approach for determining the frictional moments and torques acting on modular femoral components in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Farhoudi, H; Oskouei, R H; Jones, C F; Taylor, M

    2015-04-13

    A three dimensional analytical approach was developed to determine the frictional moment vector generated by the relative sliding of the head-cup bearing couple of a total hip replacement. The frictional moment projection onto the femoral neck was also determined over the loading cycle. Predicted frictional moments for nine combinations of bearing materials and diameters were in close agreement with existing in vitro data. The analytical method was then applied to simplified gait (lubrication conditions of dry and serum), ISO standard gait and physiological level gait loading cycles. ISO standard gait had a total contact force of about two fold of physiological level gait and there was a corresponding increase in the maximum frictional torque on neck from 0.66×BW%m to 0.88×BW%m. For the ISO standard gait, the maximum frictional torque occurred at the same instance of maximum frictional moment and the maximum contact force. In contrast, for the physiological level gait, the frictional torque did not occur at the same instance as the peak load. This suggests that the neck frictional torque is a function of other parameters, such as angle between neck axis and frictional moment vector, as well as the magnitude of the contact force and frictional moment. The developed methodology was able to predict the maximum magnitude and change of directions of moments and the variation of torque at the head neck interface. The data will be useful for experimental studies assessing the fretting behaviour of the head neck junction, by providing appropriate loading data. PMID:25721768

  2. Calculation of friction coefficient and analysis of fluid flow in a stepped micro-channel for wide range of Knudsen number using Lattice Boltzmann (MRT) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshan, Younes; Omidvar, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Micro scale gas flows have attracted significant research interest in the last two decades. In this research, the fluid flow of gases in a stepped micro-channel has been conducted. Wide range of Knudsen number has been implemented using the Lattice Boltzmann (MRT) method in this study. A modified second-order slip boundary condition and a Bosanquet-type effective viscosity are used to consider the velocity slip at the boundaries and to cover the slip and transition regimes of flow to obtain an accurate simulation of rarefied gases. The flow specifications such as pressure loss, velocity profile, stream lines and friction coefficient at different conditions have been presented. The results show, good agreement with available experimental data. The calculation shows, that the friction coefficient decreases with increasing the Knudsen number and stepping the micro-channel has an inverse effect on the friction coefficient value. Furthermore, a new correlation is suggested for calculation of the friction coefficient in the stepped micro-channel flows as below;

  3. Method for analyzing the chemical composition of liquid effluent from a direct contact condenser

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Parent, Yves; Hassani, A. Vahab

    2001-01-01

    A computational modeling method for predicting the chemical, physical, and thermodynamic performance of a condenser using calculations based on equations of physics for heat, momentum and mass transfer and equations of equilibrium thermodynamics to determine steady state profiles of parameters throughout the condenser. The method includes providing a set of input values relating to a condenser including liquid loading, vapor loading, and geometric characteristics of the contact medium in the condenser. The geometric and packing characteristics of the contact medium include the dimensions and orientation of a channel in the contact medium. The method further includes simulating performance of the condenser using the set of input values to determine a related set of output values such as outlet liquid temperature, outlet flow rates, pressures, and the concentration(s) of one or more dissolved noncondensable gas species in the outlet liquid. The method may also include iteratively performing the above computation steps using a plurality of sets of input values and then determining whether each of the resulting output values and performance profiles satisfies acceptance criteria.

  4. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    PubMed Central

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers. PMID:23934227

  5. High-Quality Cross-Sectioning Method: Examples of Applications in Optimizing Solar Cell Contact Firing

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Sahoo, S.; Mehta, V.; Guhabiswas, D.; Spiller, S.; Moutinho, H.

    2011-01-01

    A damage-free polishing method is developed to prepare a high-quality cross-section of a large length of a solar cell. A 1-inch-long sample is diced from the solar cell and embedded in wax using a specially designed chuck. The sample edge is sequentially polished by progressively reducing the grit sizes. The final polishing is done by Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP). This polishing procedure produces a highly flat edge, with excellent interfaces between metal contacts and the Si cell. The planarity of the wafer edge makes it possible to perform a variety of analyses of various regions and the interfaces of the cell, using optical microscopy, EDX, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and conductive AFM (C-AFM). Here, we will discuss some details of the chuck and the polishing procedure, and present some applications for optimizing the contact firing process. This method has an added advantage of delineating the back surface field for optical observation.

  6. Friction welding method of hot isostatic press can closure for the ICPP calcine immobilization program

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, S.M.; Reed, T.R.; Swainston, R.C

    1993-09-01

    An investigation of various closure techniques was performed in an effort to meet requirements for closure of evacuated waste cans to be used at Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company`s Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Although other sealing techniques are available, welding was considered to be the best for sealing the cans. For various reasons. techniques other than welding are not suitable for cans that are subject to the Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) process. For example. elastomeric seals. solders. and brazing would,not withstand the temperature associated (approximately 1000 degrees centigrade) with the HIP process. Mechanical joining techniques such as threading, crimping, and swaging could result in the joint opening as the can wall is deformed during HIP process. Unlike the above joint methods, welding results in physical joining of the lid or plug to the can itself, thus the wall would have to be ruptured before leakage would occur. This document investigates welding techniques for application to the can closure.

  7. Solid friction between soft filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A.W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments1,2. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials. PMID:25730393

  8. Real data assimilation for optimization of frictional parameters and prediction of afterslip in the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake inferred from slip velocity by an adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Shin'ichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Hiyoshi, Yoshihisa; Ito, Kosuke; Hirahara, Kazuro

    2015-10-01

    Data assimilation is a technique that optimizes the parameters used in a numerical model with a constraint of model dynamics achieving the better fit to observations. Optimized parameters can be utilized for the subsequent prediction with a numerical model and predicted physical variables are presumably closer to observations that will be available in the future, at least, comparing to those obtained without the optimization through data assimilation. In this work, an adjoint data assimilation system is developed for optimizing a relatively large number of spatially inhomogeneous frictional parameters during the afterslip period in which the physical constraints are a quasi-dynamic equation of motion and a laboratory derived rate and state dependent friction law that describe the temporal evolution of slip velocity at subduction zones. The observed variable is estimated slip velocity on the plate interface. Before applying this method to the real data assimilation for the afterslip of the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, a synthetic data assimilation experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of optimizing the frictional parameters in the afterslip area. It is confirmed that the current system is capable of optimizing the frictional parameters A-B, A and L by adopting the physical constraint based on a numerical model if observations capture the acceleration and decaying phases of slip on the plate interface. On the other hand, it is unlikely to constrain the frictional parameters in the region where the amplitude of afterslip is less than 1.0 cm d-1. Next, real data assimilation for the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake is conducted to incorporate slip velocity data inferred from time dependent inversion of Global Navigation Satellite System time-series. The optimized values of A-B, A and L are O(10 kPa), O(102 kPa) and O(10 mm), respectively. The optimized frictional parameters yield the better fit to the observations and the better prediction skill of slip

  9. Noncontact friction via capillary shear interaction at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Manhee; Kim, Bongsu; Kim, Jongwoo; Jhe, Wonho

    2015-06-01

    Friction in an ambient condition involves highly nonlinear interactions of capillary force, induced by the capillary-condensed water nanobridges between contact or noncontact asperities of two sliding surfaces. Since the real contact area of sliding solids is much smaller than the apparent contact area, the nanobridges formed on the distant asperities can contribute significantly to the overall friction. Therefore, it is essential to understand how the water nanobridges mediate the `noncontact' friction, which helps narrow the gap between our knowledge of friction on the microscopic and macroscopic scales. Here we show, by using noncontact dynamic force spectroscopy, the single capillary bridge generates noncontact friction via its shear interaction. The pinning-depinning dynamics of the nanobridge's contact line produces nonviscous damping, which occurs even without normal load and dominates the capillary-induced hydrodynamic damping. The novel nanofriction mechanism may provide a deeper microscopic view of macroscopic friction in air where numerous asperities exist.

  10. Noncontact friction via capillary shear interaction at nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Manhee; Kim, Bongsu; Kim, Jongwoo; Jhe, Wonho

    2015-01-01

    Friction in an ambient condition involves highly nonlinear interactions of capillary force, induced by the capillary-condensed water nanobridges between contact or noncontact asperities of two sliding surfaces. Since the real contact area of sliding solids is much smaller than the apparent contact area, the nanobridges formed on the distant asperities can contribute significantly to the overall friction. Therefore, it is essential to understand how the water nanobridges mediate the ‘noncontact' friction, which helps narrow the gap between our knowledge of friction on the microscopic and macroscopic scales. Here we show, by using noncontact dynamic force spectroscopy, the single capillary bridge generates noncontact friction via its shear interaction. The pinning–depinning dynamics of the nanobridge's contact line produces nonviscous damping, which occurs even without normal load and dominates the capillary-induced hydrodynamic damping. The novel nanofriction mechanism may provide a deeper microscopic view of macroscopic friction in air where numerous asperities exist. PMID:26066909

  11. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Bares, Jonathan; Dijksman, Joshua; Ren, Jie; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient μ ~ 0 . 6 (Bi et al. Nature (2011)). Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how changing friction affects shear jamming. By applying a homogeneous simple shear, we study the effect of friction by using photoelastic disks either wrapped with Teflon to reduce friction or with fine teeth on the edge to increase friction. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger fluctuations due to initial configurations both at the lowest and the highest friction systems studied. Ongoing work is to use particles made of gelatin to reduce the friction coefficient to the order of 0.01. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant DMR1206351, NASA Grant NNX15AD38G and the William M. Keck Foundation.

  12. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Bares, Jonathan; Dijksman, Joshua; Ren, Jie; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient μ ~ 0 . 6. Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how changing friction affects shear jamming. By applying a homogeneous simple shear, we study the effect of friction by using photoelastic disks either wrapped with Teflon to reduce friction or with fine teeth on the edge to increase friction. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger fluctuations due to initial configurations both at the lowest and the highest friction systems studied. Ongoing work is to characterize response from different friction systems under shear with information at local scale. We acknowledge support from NSF-DMR1206351, NASA NNX15AD38G and W.M. Keck Foundation.

  13. A comparative study to evaluate the effects of ligation methods on friction in sliding mechanics using 0.022" slot brackets in dry state: An In-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Vinay, K; Venkatesh, M J; Nayak, Rabindra S; Pasha, Azam; Rajesh, M; Kumar, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Background: Friction between archwires and brackets is assuming greater importance for finishing with increased use of sliding mechanics in orthodontics as friction impedes the desired tooth movement. The following study is conducted to compare and evaluate the effect of ligation on friction in sliding mechanics using 0.022" slot bracket in dry condition. Materials & Methods: In the study 48 combinations of brackets, archwires and different ligation techniques were tested in order to provide best combination that offers less friction during sliding mechanics. Instron- 4467 machine was used to evaluate static and kinetic friction force values and the results were subjected to Statistical Analysis and Anova test. Results: The results of the study showed that 0.022" metal brackets, Stainless steel wires and Slick modules provided the optimum frictional resistance to sliding mechanics. It is observed that frictional forces of 0.019" x 0.025" were higher when compared with 0.016" x 0.022" Stainless steel archwire due to the increase in dimension. Self-ligating brackets offered least friction followed by mini twin, variable force, regular stainless steel, ceramic with metal insert bracket and ceramic brackets. The stainless steel ligature offered less resistance than slick and grey modules, and TMA wires recorded maximum friction. Conclusion: The stainless steel archwire of 0.019" x 0.025" dimension are preferred during sliding mechanics, these archwires with variable force brackets ligated with Slick Modules offer decreased friction and is cost effective combination which can be utilized during sliding mechanics. How to cite the article: Vinay K, Venkatesh MJ, Nayak RS, Pasha A, Rajesh M, Kumar P. A comparative study to evaluate the effects of ligation methods on friction in sliding mechanics using 0.022" slot brackets in dry state: An In-vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):76-83. PMID:24876706

  14. Two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Tianxiang

    2016-05-01

    Detailed behaviors of nanoscale textured surfaces during the reciprocating sliding contacts are still unknown although they are widely used in mechanical components to improve tribological characteristics. The current research of sliding contacts of textured surfaces mainly focuses on the experimental studies, while the cost is too high. Molecular dynamics(MD) simulation is widely used in the studies of nanoscale single-pass sliding contacts, but the CPU cost of MD simulation is also too high to simulate the reciprocating sliding contacts. In this paper, employing multiscale method which couples molecular dynamics simulation and finite element method, two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces are investigated. Four textured surfaces with different texture shapes are designed, and a rigid cylindrical tip is used to slide on these textured surfaces. For different textured surfaces, average potential energies and average friction forces of the corresponding sliding processes are analyzed. The analyzing results show that "running-in" stages are different for each texture, and steady friction processes are discovered for textured surfaces II, III and IV. Texture shape and sliding direction play important roles in reciprocating sliding contacts, which influence average friction forces greatly. This research can help to design textured surfaces to improve tribological behaviors in nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts.

  15. Two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Tianxiang

    2016-04-01

    Detailed behaviors of nanoscale textured surfaces during the reciprocating sliding contacts are still unknown although they are widely used in mechanical components to improve tribological characteristics. The current research of sliding contacts of textured surfaces mainly focuses on the experimental studies, while the cost is too high. Molecular dynamics(MD) simulation is widely used in the studies of nanoscale single-pass sliding contacts, but the CPU cost of MD simulation is also too high to simulate the reciprocating sliding contacts. In this paper, employing multiscale method which couples molecular dynamics simulation and finite element method, two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces are investigated. Four textured surfaces with different texture shapes are designed, and a rigid cylindrical tip is used to slide on these textured surfaces. For different textured surfaces, average potential energies and average friction forces of the corresponding sliding processes are analyzed. The analyzing results show that "running-in" stages are different for each texture, and steady friction processes are discovered for textured surfaces II, III and IV. Texture shape and sliding direction play important roles in reciprocating sliding contacts, which influence average friction forces greatly. This research can help to design textured surfaces to improve tribological behaviors in nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts.

  16. Note: A rigid piezo motor with large output force and an effective method to reduce sliding friction force

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Ying; Lu, Qingyou; Hou, Yubin

    2014-05-15

    We present a completely practical TunaDrive piezo motor. It consists of a central piezo stack sandwiched by two arm piezo stacks and two leg piezo stacks, respectively, which is then sandwiched and spring-clamped by a pair of parallel polished sapphire rods. It works by alternatively fast expanding and contracting the arm/leg stacks while slowly expanding/contracting the central stack simultaneously. The key point is that sufficiently fast expanding and contracting a limb stack can make its two sliding friction forces well cancel, resulting in the total sliding friction force is <10% of the total static friction force, which can help increase output force greatly. The piezo motor's high compactness, precision, and output force make it perfect in building a high-quality harsh-condition (vibration resistant) atomic resolution scanning probe microscope.

  17. Contact stresses in meshing spur gear teeth: Use of an incremental finite element procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Huston, Ronald L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Contact stresses in meshing spur gear teeth are examined. The analysis is based upon an incremental finite element procedure that simultaneously determines the stresses in the contact region between the meshing teeth. The teeth themselves are modeled by two dimensional plain strain elements. Friction effects are included, with the friction forces assumed to obey Coulomb's law. The analysis assumes that the displacements are small and that the tooth materials are linearly elastic. The analysis procedure is validated by comparing its results with those for the classical two contacting semicylinders obtained from the Hertz method. Agreement is excellent.

  18. An improved method for simultaneous determination of frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in vertical flow boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klausner, J. F.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in the vertical boiling and adiabatic flow of the refrigerant, R11, have been simultaneously measured by a liquid balancing column and differential magnetic reluctance pressure transducers. An account is given of the experimental apparatus and procedure, data acquisition and analysis, and error estimation employed. All values of two-phase multipliers evaluated on the basis of the measured frictional pressure drop data in vertical upflow fall in the range bounded by the predictions of the Chisholm correlation and the homogeneous model.

  19. Changes in the structure of the surface layer of metal materials upon friction and electric current loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    Dependences of the electric conductivity of a contact and wear intensity of metal materials on the electric current density in sliding friction are obtained. It is established that alloying of the material basis leads to faster damage of the friction surface. The presence of about 40 аt.% oxygen in the surface layer is detected by the Auger spectrometry method. It is demonstrated by the x-ray diffraction method that FeO formed in the surface layer leads to an increase in the electric conductivity of the contact.

  20. Simulation of flows with moving contact lines on curved substrates by immersed boundary methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang; Liu, Hao-Ran

    2014-11-01

    We propose an approach to simulate flows with moving contact lines (MCLs) on curved substrates. The approach combines an immersed boundary method with a three-component diffuse-interface model and a characteristic MCL model. The immersed boundary method circumvents the penetration of the gas and the liquid into the solid by convection while the three-component diffuse-interface model can prevent the diffusive fluxes of the gas and liquid from infiltrating into the solid substrate. The characteristic MCL model not only allows for the motion of contact lines, but makes the gas-liquid interface to intersect the solid object at an angle in consistence with the prescribed contact angle, even with tangent variation at the solid surface. We examine the performance of the approach through a variety of numerical experiments: mass conservation and interface shapes at equilibrium were tested through the simulation of drop spreading on a circular cylinder, while the dynamic behavior of MCLs on the curved boundaries was investigated by simulating water entry of and drop impact on a sphere, respectively. At last, we studied the penetration process of a drop into a cluster of circular cylinders. This article was supported by 100 Talents Program of The Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11172294).

  1. Modular correction method of bending elastic modulus based on sliding behavior of contact point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Qixun; Liu, Changyi

    2015-08-01

    During the three-point bending test, the sliding behavior of the contact point between the specimen and supports was observed, the sliding behavior was verified to affect the measurements of both deflection and span length, which directly affect the calculation of the bending elastic modulus. Based on the Hertz formula to calculate the elastic contact deformation and the theoretical calculation of the sliding behavior of the contact point, a theoretical model to precisely describe the deflection and span length as a function of bending load was established. Moreover, a modular correction method of bending elastic modulus was proposed, via the comparison between the corrected elastic modulus of three materials (H63 copper-zinc alloy, AZ31B magnesium alloy and 2026 aluminum alloy) and the standard modulus obtained from standard uniaxial tensile tests, the universal feasibility of the proposed correction method was verified. Also, the ratio of corrected to raw elastic modulus presented a monotonically decreasing tendency as the raw elastic modulus of materials increased.

  2. Non-Contact Plant Growth Measurement Method and System Based on Ubiquitous Sensor Network Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jinweon; Kim, Seokhoon; Ryoo, Intae

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a non-contact plant growth measurement system using infrared sensors based on the ubiquitous sensor network (USN) technology. The proposed system measures plant growth parameters such as the stem radius of plants using real-time non-contact methods, and generates diameter, cross-sectional area and thickening form of plant stems using this measured data. Non-contact sensors have been used not to cause any damage to plants during measurement of the growth parameters. Once the growth parameters are measured, they are transmitted to a remote server using the sensor network technology and analyzed in the application program server. The analyzed data are then provided for administrators and a group of interested users. The proposed plant growth measurement system has been designed and implemented using fixed-type and rotary-type infrared sensor based measurement methods and devices. Finally, the system performance is compared and verified with the measurement data that have been obtained by practical field experiments. PMID:22163849

  3. An elastography method based on the scanning contact resonance of a piezoelectric cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Ji; Li, Faxin

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Most tissues may become significantly stiffer than their normal states when there are lesions inside. The tissue's modulus can then act as an identification parameter for clinic diagnosis of tumors or fibrosis, which leads to elastography. This study introduces a novel elastography method that can be used for modulus imaging of superficial organs. Methods: This method is based on the scanning contact-resonance of a unimorph piezoelectric cantilever. The cantilever vibrates in its bending mode with the tip pressed tightly on the sample. The contact resonance frequency of the cantilever-sample system is tracked at each scanning point, from which the sample's modulus can be derived based on a beam dynamic model and a contact mechanics model. Scanning is performed by a three-dimensional motorized stage and the whole system is controlled by a homemade software program based on LabVIEW. Results: Testing onin vitro beef tissues indicates that the fat and the muscle can be easily distinguished using this system, and the accuracy of the modulus measurement can be comparable with that of nanoindentation. Imaging on homemade gelatin phantoms shows that the depth information of the abnormalities can be qualitatively obtained by varying the pressing force. The detection limit of this elastography method is specially examined both experimentally and numerically. Results show that it can detect the typical lesions in superficial organs with the depth of several centimeters. The lateral resolution of this elastography method/system is better than 0.5 mm, and could be further enhanced by using more scanning points. Conclusions: The proposed elastography system can be regarded as a sensitive palpation robot, which may be very promising in early diagnosis of tumors in superficial organs such as breast and thyroid.

  4. Frictional properties of the end-grafted polymer layer in presence of salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftari, Maryam; Zhang, Zhenyu; Leggett, Graham J.; Geoghegan, Mark

    2012-02-01

    We have studied the frictional behaviour of grafted poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) films using friction force microscopy (FFM). The films were prepared on native oxide-terminated silicon substrates using the technique of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). These brushes had constant grafting density (1.18 nm2), and of a thickness of ˜66 nm, as measured by ellipsometry. We show that single asperity contact mechanics (Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) and Derjaguin-M"uller-Toporov (DMT) models) as well as a linear (Amontons) relation between applied load and frictional load all apply to these systems depending on the concentration of salt and the nature of the FFM probe. Measurements were made using gold-coating and polymer functionalized silicon nitride triangular probes. Polymer functionalized probe included growth the PDMAEMA with same method on tips. The frictional behaviour are investigated between PDMAEMA and gold coated and PDMAEMA tips immersed in different concentrations of KCl, KBr and KI.

  5. Effect of nature of oxygen interactions on friction of titanium, aluminum, and molybdenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Friction studies were conducted with a gold pin contacting titanium, aluminum, and molybdenum surfaces after exposure to oxygen with various methods. Oxygen was adsorbed on the surface, it reacted with the surface, and the surface was ion bombarded with oxygen. The presence of oxygen was monitored with Auger spectroscopy. Titanium friction varied with the mode of the metal-oxygen interaction. It was highest with the adsorbed oxygen and least with ion bombardment using oxygen. Aluminum exhibited lower friction values for the reacted and the ion bombarded surfaces than for the surface having the adsorbed layer. With molybdenum the friction coefficients were generally the same despite the nature of the surface treatment with oxygen.

  6. Simulation of granular packing of frictional cohesive particles with Gaussian size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tao; Gao, Di

    2016-09-01

    The granular packing of frictional cohesive particles with Gaussian distribution is investigated based on distinct element method. Different sliding frictional coefficients are considered in the simulation. Due to the inelastic collision between the particles, the agglomeration of the particles occurs and the packing structure is formed finally. The range of the diameter of the particle is between 50 and 100 μm, and the distribution of the particle diameter is Gaussian. The inelastic interaction is caused by the viscoelastic force and the frictional force. The internal structure of the granular matter is quantified by the coordination number, packing density, and the force distribution. It is found that the increase in the sliding frictional coefficient looses the packing structure, and the distribution range of the contact force is larger than that of the van der Waals force.

  7. Influence of Surface Texture and Roughness of Softer and Harder Counter Materials on Friction During Sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Pradeep L.; Kishore; Kailas, Satish V.; Lovell, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Surface texture influences friction during sliding contact conditions. In the present investigation, the effect of surface texture and roughness of softer and harder counter materials on friction during sliding was analyzed using an inclined scratch testing system. In the experiments, two test configurations, namely (a) steel balls against aluminum alloy flats of different surface textures and (b) aluminum alloy pins against steel flats of different surface textures, are utilized. The surface textures were classified into unidirectionally ground, 8-ground, and randomly polished. For a given texture, the roughness of the flat surfaces was varied using grinding or polishing methods. Optical profilometer and scanning electron microscope were used to characterize the contact surfaces before and after the experiments. Experimental results showed that the surface textures of both harder and softer materials are important in controlling the frictional behavior. The softer material surface textures showed larger variations in friction between ground and polished surfaces. However, the harder material surface textures demonstrated a better control over friction among the ground surfaces. Although the effect of roughness on friction was less significant when compared to textures, the harder material roughness showed better correlations when compared to the softer material roughness.

  8. Verification of two minimally invasive methods for the estimation of the contact pressure in human vocal folds during phonation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Jen; Mongeau, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The contact pressure on the vocal fold surface during high pitch or amplitude voice production is believed to be one major source of phonotrauma. Models for the quantitative estimate of the contact pressure may be valuable for prevention and treatment. Various indirect and minimally invasive approaches have been purported to estimate contact pressure. But the accuracy of these methods has not yet been objectively verified in controlled laboratory settings. In the present study, two indirect approaches for the estimation of the contact pressure were investigated. One is based on a Hertzian impact model, and the other on a finite element model. A probe microphone was used for direct measurements of the contact pressure and verifications of the indirect approaches. A silicone replica of human vocal folds was used as a test bed. Consistent contact pressure estimations were obtained using all three methods. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach for eventual clinical applications are described. PMID:21895099

  9. Time-dependent friction and the mechanics of stick-slip

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Time-dependent increase of static friction is characteristic of rock friction undera variety of experimental circumstances. Data presented here show an analogous velocity-dependent effect. A theor of friction is proposed that establishes a common basis for static and sliding friction. Creep at points of contact causes increases in friction that are proportional to the logarithm of the time that the population of points of contact exist. For static friction that time is the time of stationary contact. For sliding friction the time of contact is determined by the critical displacement required to change the population of contacts and the slip velocity. An analysis of a one-dimensional spring and slider system shows that experimental observations establishing the transition from stable sliding to stick-slip to be a function of normal stress, stiffness and surface finish are a consequence of time-dependent friction. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  10. Sliding of two smooth indenters on a viscoelastic foundation in the presence of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, F. I.

    2015-11-01

    The axisymmetric contact problem of sliding of two solid parabolic indenters on a viscoelastic half-space with constant velocity is considered. Shear stresses modeling the adhesive component of the friction force act in the contact area. The model of the foundation material is described by an integral operator with an exponential kernel characterized by one relaxation time. The problem is solved by the boundary element method. The dependences of the contact characteristics on the sliding velocity, the normal load, and the distance between the centers of the indenters is analyzed. The results can be used to study the effect of the roughness elements modeled by two indenters on the contact characteristics and the deformation component of the friction force.

  11. Influence of Particle Velocity of Copper on Emitter Contact by Cold-Spray Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byungjun; Lee, Kyung Dong; Lee, Jong-gun; Choi, Jae-Wook; Yoon, Sam S.; Kang, Yoonmook; Lee, Hae-seok; Kim, Donghwan

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated cold-sprayed copper as a front contact for crystalline silicon solar cells. Copper powder was deposited on a monocrystalline silicon wafer with variation of the particle velocity during deposition. The particle velocity was varied by varying the heating temperature from 250 to 400 °C using a gas pressure of 0.45 MPa. The particle velocities were calculated using empirical equations, and were found to increase with an increase in the carrier gas temperature. Grid patterns were formed on a phosphorus-doped n-type emitter of a p-type silicon substrate. The electrode thickness increased with increasing particle velocity. The electrical properties of the grids were evaluated using the transfer length method. The specific contact resistance of the n-type emitter was in the range of 2.6-26.4 mΩ-cm2. Damage to the p- n junction was investigated via minority carrier lifetime measurement of the substrate. The copper-silicon interface was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. The contact properties were affected by the interface conditions.

  12. Measuring stream discharge by non-contact methods: A proof-of-concept experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.; Spicer, K.R.; Cheng, R.T.; Haeni, F.P.; Melcher, N.B.; Thurman, E.M.; Plant, W.J.; Keller, W.C.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an experiment to make a completely non-contact open-channel discharge measurement. A van-mounted, pulsed doppler (10GHz) radar collected surface-velocity data across the 183-m wide Skagit River, Washington at a USGS streamgaging station using Bragg scattering from short waves produced by turbulent boils on the surface of the river. Surface velocities were converted to mean velocities for 25 sub-sections by assuming a normal open-channel velocity profile (surface velocity times 0.85). Channel cross-sectional area was measured using a 100 MHz ground-penetrating radar antenna suspended from a cableway car over the river. Seven acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements and a conventional current-meter discharge measurement were also made. Three non-contact discharge measurements completed in about a 1-hour period were within 1 % of the gaging station rating curve discharge values. With further refinements, it is thought that open-channel flow can be measured reliably by non-contact methods.

  13. On laminar and turbulent friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH

    1946-01-01

    Report deals, first with the theory of the laminar friction flow, where the basic concepts of Prandtl's boundary layer theory are represented from mathematical and physical points of view, and a method is indicated by means of which even more complicated cases can be treated with simple mathematical means, at least approximately. An attempt is also made to secure a basis for the computation of the turbulent friction by means of formulas through which the empirical laws of the turbulent pipe resistance can be applied to other problems on friction drag. (author)

  14. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-03-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  15. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  16. A New Method to Scan Genomes for Introgression in a Secondary Contact Model

    PubMed Central

    Geneva, Anthony J.; Muirhead, Christina A.; Kingan, Sarah B.; Garrigan, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Secondary contact between divergent populations or incipient species may result in the exchange and introgression of genomic material. We develop a simple DNA sequence measure, called Gmin, which is designed to identify genomic regions experiencing introgression in a secondary contact model. Gmin is defined as the ratio of the minimum between-population number of nucleotide differences in a genomic window to the average number of between-population differences. Although it is conceptually simple, one advantage of Gmin is that it is computationally inexpensive relative to model-based methods for detecting gene flow and it scales easily to the level of whole-genome analysis. We compare the sensitivity and specificity of Gmin to those of the widely used index of population differentiation, FST, and suggest a simple statistical test for identifying genomic outliers. Extensive computer simulations demonstrate that Gmin has both greater sensitivity and specificity for detecting recent introgression than does FST. Furthermore, we find that the sensitivity of Gmin is robust with respect to both the population mutation and recombination rates. Finally, a scan of Gmin across the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster identifies candidate regions of introgression between sub-Saharan African and cosmopolitan populations that were previously missed by other methods. These results show that Gmin is a biologically straightforward, yet powerful, alternative to FST, as well as to more computationally intensive model-based methods for detecting gene flow. PMID:25874895

  17. 3D modeling for solving forward model of no-contact fluorescence diffuse optical tomography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouizi, F.; Chabrier, R.; Torregrossa, M.; Poulet, P.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents detailed computational aspects of a new 3D modeling for solving the direct problem in a no-contact time-resolved Fluorescent Diffuse Optical Tomography (FDOT) method that rely on near-infrared scattered and fluorescent photons to image the optical properties and distribution of fluorescent probes in small laboratory animals. An optical scanner allowing performing in-vivo measurements in no-contact scheme was built in our laboratory and is presented. We use the three-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) to solve the coupled diffusion equations of excitation and fluorescence photons in highly scattering objects. The computed results allowed yielding photon density maps and the temporal profiles of photons on the surface of the small animal. Our 3D modeling of propagation of photons in the void space between the surface of the object and the detectors allows calculating the quantity of photons reaching the optodes. Simulations were carried-out on two test objects: a resin cylinder and a mouse phantom. The results demonstrate the potential applications of the method to pre-clinical imaging.

  18. Velocity Dependence of the Kinetic Friction of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzel, Dirk; Feldmann, Michael; Schirmeisen, Andre

    2010-03-01

    The velocity dependence of interfacial friction is of high interest to unveil the fundamental processes in nanoscopic friction. So far, different forms of velocity dependence have been observed for contacts between friction force microscope (FFM) tips and a substrate surface. In this work we present velocity-dependent friction measurements performed by nanoparticle manipulation of antimony nanoparticles on atomically flat HOPG substrates under UHV conditions. This allows to analyze interfacial friction for very well defined and clean surface contacts. A novel approach to nanoparticle manipulation, the so called 'tip-on-top' technique [1], made it possible to manipulate the same particle many times while varying the velocity. The antimony particles exhibit a qualitatively different velocity dependence on friction in comparison to direct tip-HOPG contacts. A characteristic change in velocity dependence was observed when comparing freshly prepared particles to contaminated specimen, which were exposed to air before the manipulation experiments. [1] Dietzel et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 53104 (2009)

  19. Mesh Size Control of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitenis, Angela; Uruena, Juan Manuel; Schulze, Kyle D.; Cooper, Andrew C.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Sawyer, W. Gregory

    Soft, permeable sliding interfaces in aqueous environments are ubiquitous in nature but their ability to maintain high lubricity in a poor lubricant (water) has not been well understood. Hydrogels are excellent materials for fundamental soft matter and biotribology studies due to their high water content. While mesh size controls the material and transport properties of a hydrogel, its effects on friction were only recently explored. Polyacrylamide hydrogels slid in a Gemini (self-mated) interface produced low friction under low speeds, low pressures, macroscopic contact areas, and room temperature aqueous environments. The friction coefficients at these interfaces are lowest at low speeds and are speed-independent. This behavior is due to thermal fluctuations at the interface separating the surfaces, with water shearing in this region being the main source of dissipation. We found that mesh size had an inverse correlation with friction. We further investigated a transition from this behavior at higher speeds, and found that the transition speed correlated with the mesh size and relaxation time of the polymer network. Very soft and correspondingly large mesh size Gemini hydrogels show superlubricity under specific conditions with friction being less than 0.005.

  20. Method for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael Eugene (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination. In operation, an imaging detector is provided. Additionally, a back surface contact (e.g. a delta-doped layer, etc.) is grown on the imaging detector utilizing a process that is performed at a temperature less than 450 degrees Celsius.

  1. The artificial compression method for computation of shocks and contact discontinuities. I - Single conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses the use of the artificial compression method for the computation of discontinuous solutions of a single conservation law by finite difference methods. The single conservation law has either a shock or a contact discontinuity. Any monotone finite difference scheme applied to the original equation smears the discontinuity, while the same scheme applied to the equation modified by an artificial compression flux produces steady progressing profiles. If L is any finite difference scheme in conservation form and C is an artificial compressor, the split flux artificial compression method CL is a corrective scheme: L smears the discontinuity while propagating it; C compresses the smeared transition toward a sharp discontinuity. Numerical implementation of artificial compression is described.

  2. Differences in glenohumeral translations calculated with three methods: Comparison of relative positions and contact point.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Keisuke; Kenmoku, Tomonori; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Banks, Scott A

    2016-06-14

    Several published articles have reported 3-dimensional glenohumeral kinematics using model-image registration techniques. However, different methods to compute the translations were used in these articles. The purpose of this study was to compare glenohumeral translations calculated with three different methods. Fifteen healthy males with a mean age of 31 years (range, 27-36 years old) were enrolled in this study. Fluoroscopic images during scapular plane elevation were recorded at 30 frames per second for the right shoulder in each subject, and CT-derived models of the humerus and the scapula were matched with the silhouette of the bones in the fluoroscopic images using model-image registration techniques. Glenohumeral translations were computed with three methods: relative position of the origins of the humeral and scapular models, contact points of the two models, and relative positions based upon the calculated glenohumeral center of rotation (CoR). In the supero-inferior direction, translations calculated with the three methods were roughly parallel, with the maximum difference of 1.6mm (P<0.001). In the antero-posterior direction, translations with the origins and CoR were parallel; however, translations computed with the origins and contact point describe arcs that differ by almost 2mm at low humeral elevation angles and converge at higher degrees of humeral elevation (P<0.001). Glenohumeral translations calculated using three methods showed statistically significant differences that may be important when comparing detailed results of different studies. However, these relatively small differences are likely subclinical, so that all three methods can reasonably be used for description of glenohumeral translations. PMID:27083061

  3. Mechanisms of friction in diamondlike nanocomposite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, T. W.; Ohlhausen, J. A.; Tallant, D. R.; Prasad, S. V.

    2007-03-15

    Diamondlike nanocomposite (DLN) coatings (C:H:Si:O) processed from siloxane precursors by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition are well known for their low friction and wear behaviors. In the current study, we have investigated the fundamental mechanisms of friction and interfacial shear strength in DLN coatings and the roles of contact stress and environment on their tribological behavior. Friction and wear measurements were performed from 0.25 to 0.6 GPa contact pressures in three environments: dry (<1% RH) nitrogen, dry (<1% RH) air, and humid (50% RH) air, with precise control of dew point and oxygen content. At 0.3 GPa contact stress, the coefficient of friction (COF) in dry nitrogen was extremely low, {approx}0.02, whereas in humid air it increased to {approx}0.2, with minimal amount of wear in both environments. The coatings also exhibited non-Amontonian friction behavior, with COF decreasing with an increase in Hertzian contact stress. The main mechanism responsible for low friction and wear under varying contact stresses and environments is governed by the interfacial sliding between the DLN coating and the friction-induced transfer film adhered to the ball counterface. This interfacial shear strength, computed from COF-inverse Hertzian contact stress plots, was found to be 9 MPa in dry nitrogen and 78 MPa in humid air. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis of the interfaces (wear tracks and transfer films) was used to explain the tribochemical effects in both environments. The transfer films generated in humid air were found to be enriched with SiO{sub 2} containing fragments, whereas those formed in dry nitrogen had hydrogenated and long range ordered carbons with practically no SiO{sub 2} fragments, ultimately resulting in much lower interfacial shear strength and COF.

  4. The estimation of dynamic contact angle of ultra-hydrophobic surfaces using inclined surface and impinging droplet methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, Darina; Kotek, Michal

    2014-03-01

    The development of industrial technology also brings with optimized surface quality, particularly where there is contact with food. Application ultra-hydrophobic surface significantly reduces the growth of bacteria and facilitates cleaning processes. Testing and evaluation of surface quality are used two methods: impinging droplet and inclined surface method optimized with high speed shadowgraphy, which give information about dynamic contact angle. This article presents the results of research into new methods of measuring ultra-hydrophobic patented technology.

  5. Mechanical properties of Cu sbnd Cr sbnd Zr alloy and SS316 joints fabricated by friction welding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1996-10-01

    Copper alloys with high-strength and high-conductivity are being considered for several magnetic fusion energy applications such as the first wall in high power-density devices, resistive magnetic coils, and high-heat flux components. For example, the stainless steel is a structural material while Cu-alloy acts as a heat sink material for the surface heat flux in the first wall. Therefore, development of reliable joints between Cu-alloys and stainless steel (SS316) is required. In the present work, joining tests on Cu—1%Cr—1%Zr/SS316 by friction welding were performed, and optimum fabricating conditions of the Cu-alloy/SS316 joint were determined. Additionally, the characteristics of tensile strength, hardness, metallographical observation and SEM/EPMA analyses on Cu—1%Cr—1%Zr/SS316 fabricated by friction welding were evaluated.

  6. Internally mounted thin-liquid-film skin-friction meter - Comparison with floating element method with and without pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Hans; Seto, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    A new, robust oil film skin friction meter was designed and constructed. This enables skin friction measurements remotely and from within the model, as well as avoiding the need to know the location of the leading edge of the film. The instrument was tested by comparing measurements with those given by a floating element gage in a zero pressure gradient flat plate turbulent boundary layer. Both instruments agreed satisfactorily with the well-known curve for this case. Significant discrepancies between the two instruments were observed in the case of adverse and favorable pressure gradients. The discrepancies were of opposite sign for opposite-sign pressure gradients as is consistent with the error expected from floating-element gages. Additional confidence in the oil film technique is supplied by the good agreement of the behavior of the film profile with predictions from lubrication theory.

  7. Finite element analysis of the contact forces between viscoelastic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Q. J.; Zhu, H. P.; Yu, A. B.

    2013-06-01

    The normal and tangential force-displacement (NFD and TFD) relations as well as the rolling friction between viscoelastic particles are investigated by means of finite element method (FEM). A new set of semi-theoretical models are proposed for the NFD, TFD and rolling friction based on the contact mechanics and the FEM results. Compared with previous empirical models (e.g. Linear-Spring-Dashpot model), the new models have an advantage that all parameters can be directly determined from the material properties. Therefore they can eliminate the uncertainty in parameter selection and should be more effective in discrete element method (DEM) simulations of viscoelastic granular materials.

  8. Reproducibility of contact lens power measurements using the phase shifting schlieren method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joannes, Luc; Hough, Tony; Hutsebaut, Xavier; Dubois, Xavier; Ligot, Renaud; Saoul, Bruno; Van Donink, Philip; De Coninck, Kris

    2009-06-01

    PURPOSE. To assess a new method of power measurement of soft and rigid contact lenses. The method is the phase shifting schlieren method, as embodied in the Nimo TR1504 instrument. MATERIALS and METHODS. Three Nimo TR1504 instruments were used to measure the power related dimensions of: a) a range of custom toric rigid lenses; b) a range of commercially available spherical hydrogel lenses; and c) a commercially available range of toric silicone hydrogel lenses. The measurements were carried out using a standard ISO ring test protocol where independent tests were carried out under conditions of reproducibility. The analysis of the measurements was carried out using ISO methods which enabled the reproducibility standard deviation, SR, of the method to be calculated. RESULTS. The results show that this new method has a reproducibility standard deviation SR of 0.048D for spherical soft (hydrogel) lenses. This means the back vertex power of spherical soft lenses having a power in the range +/-20.0D can be determined to current ISO product tolerances with a single measurement. The method has SR of 0.059D for sphere power and 0.093D for cylinder power for toric soft lenses having powers in the range +/-10.0D and cylinder powers in the range +/-2.0D. A single measurement will determine sphere power to current ISO tolerance limits with 95% confidence while two measurements are required to determine the cylinder power to the same confidence level.

  9. [Enhanced bio-contact oxidation method to treat petrochemical wastewater by tourmaline].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kan; Ma, Fang; Sun, Tie-Heng; Feng, Zhi-Yun

    2009-06-15

    Aiming at the complexity and poor biochemical degradability of petrochemical wastewater, the effect of tourmaline on bio-contact oxidation method was investigated. The influent and effluent of petrochemical wastewater were analyzed by GC-MS, and the carrier was observed in reactor by scanning electron microscope (SEM). As the loading rates of influent were COD 0.64-0.72 kg/(m3 x d) and NH4(+) -N 0.058-0.072 kg/(m3 x d), the start up of pilot system supported tourmaline were improved, and the removal rate of COD and NH4(+) -N of effluent was increased 8.7% and 6.4%, respectively. Organic pollutants of 100 kinds were detected in influent, mainly including aromatic hydrocarbon, acids, lipids, phenols, alcohols, and alkanes compounds. The removal efficiency of organic pollutant of reactor 1 with tourmaline was higher than reactor 2 without tourmaline. The number of organic pollutant in effluent from reactor 1 and 2 were 14 and 28, respectively. Zoogloea can be observed on carrier supported tourmaline, and the biomass of bacteria was predominant. The efficiency of bio-contact oxidation method on petrochemical wastewater treatment can be enhanced by tourmaline. PMID:19662849

  10. Imaging geological contact utilizing 2D resistivity method for light rail transit (LRT) track alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nisa'; Saad, Rosli; Muztaza, Nordiana M.; Ismail, Noer E. H.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to locate the geological contact using 2D resistivity method for Light Rail Transit (LRT) track alignment. The resistivity method was conducted on eight survey lines with the length of line 1 was 600m. The length of line 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 were 200m each while line 8 is 115m. All the survey used minimum electrode spacing of 5m and using Pole-dipole array with minimum current is 2mA and maximum was 20mA. The result obtained from the pseudosection showed that the area generally divided into three main zones, fill materials/residual soil with a resistivity value of <500 Ωm, saturated zone with a resistivity value of 30-100 Ωm and bedrock with a resistivity value of >2000 Ωm. Three fractured zones were detected along line L1 and a lot of boulders were detected at L1, L3, L4, L5 and L6. The geological contact was between the residual soil and granite bedrock.

  11. A simple method for the assessment of the contact modulus for coated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, S. J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a simple method to determine the elastic modulus of a coating on a substrate using nanoindentation based on the load support of a truncated cone of material beneath the indenter. The cone angle is shown to be 32.48° in all cases. The effect of the coating on the measured contact modulus increases more rapidly as the contact scale is reduced. The model describes the behaviour of a range of coating substrate systems very well, but deviations are observed in cases where pile-up or tip end-shape variations affect the experimental data. It is possible to use a fit of a simplified form of the model to experimental data for coatings on stiff substrates to determine the elastic properties of the coating independent of the substrate. The model can be generalized for multilayer coatings; this is essential when compliant coating layers are sandwiched between stiffer layers. The model shows that the mechanical properties of thin stiff coatings on compliant substrates cannot be successfully determined from indentation data. The ISO14577 extrapolation method should therefore not be used in such circumstances.

  12. Rheological effects on friction in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachman, E. G.; Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation is presented of the friction in a rolling and sliding elastohydrodynamic lubricated contact. The rheological behavior of the lubricant is described in terms of two viscoelastic models. These models represent the separate effects of non-Newtonian behavior and the transient response of the fluid. A unified description of the non-Newtonian shear rate dependence of the viscosity is presented as a new hyperbolic liquid model. The transient response of viscosity, following the rapid pressure rise encountered in the contact, is described by a compressional viscoelastic model of the volume response of a liquid to an applied pressure step. The resulting momentum and energy equations are solved by an iterative numerical technique, and a friction coefficient is calculated. The experimental study was performed, with two synthetic paraffinic lubricants, to verify the friction predictions of the analysis. The values of friction coefficient from theory and experiment are in close agreement.

  13. Adjustments to Local Friction in Multifinger Prehension

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Tomoko; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    The authors studied the effects of surface friction at the digit–object interface on digit forces and moments when 12 participants statically held an object in a 5-digit grasp. The authors changed low-friction contact (LFC) with rayon and high-friction contact (HFC) with sandpaper independently for each digit in all 32 possible combinations. Normal forces of the thumb and virtual finger (VF), an imagined finger with a mechanical effect equal to that of the 4 fingers, increased with the thumb at LFC or with an increase in the number of fingers at LFC. When the thumb was at LFC, the thumb tangential force decreased. The VF tangential force decreased when the number of fingers at LFC increased. The interaction of the local responses to friction and the synergic responses necessary to maintain the equilibrium explain the coordination of individual digit forces. PMID:17664170

  14. Friction and Wear on the Atomic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnecco, Enrico; Bennewitz, Roland; Pfeiffer, Oliver; Socoliuc, Anisoara; Meyer, Ernst

    Friction is an old subject of research: the empirical da Vinci-Amontons laws are common knowledge. Macroscopic experiments systematically performed by the school of Bowden and Tabor have revealed that macroscopic friction can be related to the collective action of small asperities. During the last 15 years, experiments performed with the atomic force microscope gave new insight into the physics of single asperities sliding over surfaces. This development, together with complementary experiments by means of surface force apparatus and quartz microbalance, established the new field of nanotribology. At the same time, increasing computing power allowed for the simulation of the processes in sliding contacts consisting of several hundred atoms. It became clear that atomic processes cannot be neglected in the interpretation of nanotribology experiments. Experiments on even well-defined surfaces directly revealed atomic structures in friction forces. This chapter will describe friction force microscopy experiments that reveal, more or less directly, atomic processes in the sliding contact.

  15. Method of detecting tissue contact for fiber-optic probes to automate data acquisition without hardware modification

    PubMed Central

    Ruderman, Sarah; Mueller, Scott; Gomes, Andrew; Rogers, Jeremy; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm to detect contact with tissue and automate data acquisition. Contact fiber-optic probe systems are useful in noninvasive applications and real-time analysis of tissue properties. However, applications of these technologies are limited to procedures with visualization to ensure probe-tissue contact and individual user techniques can introduce variability. The software design exploits the system previously designed by our group as an optical method to automatically detect tissue contact and trigger acquisition. This method detected tissue contact with 91% accuracy, detected removal from tissue with 83% accuracy and reduced user variability by > 8%. Without the need for additional hardware, this software algorithm can easily integrate into any fiber-optic system and expands applications where visualization is difficult. PMID:24010002

  16. DOE assay methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J. ); Caldwell, J.T. )

    1991-08-01

    US Department of Energy methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste prior to shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are described and listed by contractor site. The methods described are part of the certification process. All CH-TRU waste must be assayed for determination of fissile material content and decay heat values prior to shipment and prior to storage on-site. Both nondestructive assay (NDA) and destructive assay methods are discussed, and new NDA developments such as passive-action neutron (PAN) crate counter improvements and neutron imaging are detailed. Specifically addressed are assay method physics; applicability to CH-TRU wastes; calibration standards and implementation; operator training requirements and practices; assay procedures; assay precision, bias, and limit of detection; and assay limitation. While PAN is a new technique and does not yet have established American Society for Testing and Materials. American National Standards Institute, or Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidelines or methods describing proper calibration procedures, equipment setup, etc., comparisons of PAN data with the more established assay methods (e.g., segmented gamma scanning) have demonstrated its reliability and accuracy. Assay methods employed by DOE have been shown to reliable and accurate in determining fissile, radionuclide, alpha-curie content, and decay heat values of CH-TRU wastes. These parameters are therefore used to characterize packaged waste for use in certification programs such as that used in shipment of CH-TRU waste to the WIPP. 36 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Characteristics of Friction Welding Between Solid Bar of 6061 Al Alloy and Pipe of Al-Si12CuNi Al Cast Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Sakaguchi, H.; Kusaka, M.; Kaizu, K.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of friction welding between a solid bar of 6061 Al alloy and a pipe of Al-Si12CuNi (AC8A) Al cast alloy. When the joint was made by a continuous drive friction welding machine (conventional method), the AC8A portion of the joint showed heavy deformation and the AA6061 showed minimal deformation. In particular, the joint could not be successfully made with following conditions, because AC8A pipe side crushed due to insufficient friction heat or high pressure: a short friction time such as 0.3 s, high friction pressure such as 100 MPa, or high forge pressure such as 150 MPa. The heavy deformation of AC8A side was caused by increasing friction torque during braking. To prevent braking deformation until rotation stops, a joint was made by a continuous drive friction welding machine that has an electromagnetic clutch. When the clutch was released, the relative speed between both specimens simultaneously decreased to zero. When the joint was made with friction pressure of 25 MPa, friction time of 0.3 s, and forge pressure of 125 MPa, the joining could be successfully achieved and that had approximately 16% efficiency. In addition, when the joint was made with friction pressure of 25 MPa, friction time of 0.7 s, and forge pressure of 125 MPa, it had approximately 54% efficiency. However, all joints showed the fracture between the traveled weld interface and the AC8A side, because the weld interface traveled in the longitudinal direction of AC8A side from the first contacted position of both weld faying surfaces. Hence, it was clarified that the friction welding between a solid bar of AA6061 and a cast pipe of AC8A was not desirable since the traveling phenomena of the weld interface were caused by the combination of the shapes of the friction welding specimens.

  18. Direct contact raining bed counterflow cullet preheater and method for using

    SciTech Connect

    DeSaro, R.; Doyle, E.F.; Metcalfe, C.I.; Patch, K.D.

    1989-10-24

    This patent describes a method of preheating cullet for use in a glass furnace. The method comprising: introducing cullet into a preheater near the top thereof; allowing glass cullet to fall downward through the preheater to form a raining bed while hot gases are introduced near the bottom of the preheater and allowed to flow upward to directly contact the cullet to thereby heat the cullet to temperature below the agglomeration temperature of the cullet but above 700{sup 0}F.; controlling the residence time of the cullet in the preheater by deterring the cullet's fall through the preheater with a series of deflectors arranged within the preheater; and introducing the heated cullet into a furnace containing molten glass.

  19. Laser surgery in dermatology with application of superthin optical fiber by contact and noncontact method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garipova, A.; Denissov, I. A.; Solodovnikov, Vladimir; Digilova, I.

    1999-06-01

    At present nobody doubts the advantages of minor laser surgery over the conventional one.Bloodless manipulations, ablation, minor injury to the tissues while using laser equipment ensures its wide application in such fields as dermatology and cosmetology, especially since the semiconductor lasers because available at the technological market. No doubt CO2 and solid laser are still playing an important role, however, their imperfect fiber optic qualities limit their use in these field,s where advantages of diode lasers with flexible and fine quartz-polymeric optical fiber are obvious. The elaboration of new diode surgical lasers made it possible to invent new surgical equipment for solving many medical problems in the optimal way. Application of contact and noncontact laser methods in dermatology, gynecological plastic surgery and otolaryngology is discussed. A combined use of these methods demonstrates a positive effect on therapy results and healing time.

  20. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  1. The Pv product required for the frictional ignition of alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Benz, Frank J.; Homa, John

    1989-01-01

    NASA-White Sands has developed a frictional heating tester capable of evaluating the ignition properties of alloys in oxygen under friction conditions which involve rubbing. Sixteen alloys have been thus evaluated, yielding determinations of the product of the contact pressure and surface speed required for ignition in oxygen at 6.9 MPa; those which contained large Ni fractions manifested the greatest resistance to rubbing-induced ignition. The effect of the coefficient of friction is noted to be a major influence on ignition, and the results obtained indicate the value of frictional heating tests for environments involving frictional heating.

  2. Tactile texture and friction of soft sponge surfaces.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akira; Suzuki, Makoto; Imai, Yumi; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the tactile texture and frictional properties of five soft sponges with various cell sizes. The frictional forces were measured by a friction meter containing a contact probe with human-finger-like geometry and mechanical properties. When the subjects touched these sponges with their fingers, hard-textured sponges were deemed unpleasant. This tactile feeling changed with friction factors including friction coefficients, their temporal patterns, as well as mechanical and shape factors. These findings provide useful information on how to control the tactile textures of various sponges. PMID:25884490

  3. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  4. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading. PMID:27110836

  5. An evaluation and adjustment method for natural proximal contacts of crowns using diamond dental strips: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel S; Rothchild, John A; Suh, Kyu-Won

    2013-08-01

    The best way to adjust proximal contacts of newly fabricated indirect restorations has been a long-standing unresolved issue in dentistry. Excessively tight contacts cause incomplete seating of indirect restorations and intrusion of adjacent teeth, which leads to patient discomfort, hypersensitivity, and recurrent dental caries at the crown margins. When seating indirect restorations, interproximal relief should be restored as it exists in natural dentition. This article presents an innovative method of crown seating using diamond strips. This simple, consistent, method makes it easier for clinicians to provide comfortable and long-lasting restorations with minimal time and effort. Laboratory technicians utilize diamond strips to provide properly fitting indirect restorations that require minimal adjustment upon clinical delivery. Diamond strips also allow for accurate determination of heavier proximal contacts, allowing dentists to adjust the proximal contact properly in the patients' mouths. Clinically, restoring natural proximal contacts is a critical factor to the success of indirect restorations. Using this method standardizes proper proximal contact adjustments of laboratory-fabricated indirect restorations between dental labs and dental offices. The method also helps to limit or eliminate the lingering proximal contact issue between clinicians and laboratory technicians. PMID:23928442

  6. Numerical analysis of tire/contact pressure using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranoto, Sarwo Edy; Hidayat, Royan; Tauviqirrahman, Mohammad; Bayuseno, Athanasius P.

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between the road surface and vehicle's tire may significantly determine the stability of a vehicle. We could study the tire contact-pressure to road surfaces through a numerical simulation in this present study. In particular, the main purpose of the study was to present an illustration of the effect of the varied loads to the tire, which would affect the contact pressure on the road surface sand stress distribution on the tire by employing a commercial ABAQUS software, based on the finite element method. To make the process of data analysis easier, the tire was assumed to be made from natural rubber which composition consisted of 2 layers of the inner tire and 1 layer of carcass. In pre-conditions, the tire was given air pressure as much as 17 psi, and loads as much as 2 KN, 6 KN, and 10 KN; then, the air pressure was increased to be 30 psi; consequently, the simulation results of stress distribution and deformation on each of loads condition would be acquired. The simulation results indicated that the loads carried by the tire on the vehicle were an important factor to determine the tire-stress profile.

  7. Biphasic Finite Element Contact Analysis of the Knee Joint using an Augmented Lagrangian Method

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A.; Spilker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Biphasic contact analysis is essential to obtain a more complete understanding of soft tissue biomechanics; however, only a limited number of studies have addressed these types of problems. In this paper, a theoretically consistent biphasic finite element solution of the 2D axisymmetric human knee was developed, and an augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the biphasic continuity across the contact interface. The interaction between the fluid and solid matrices of the soft tissues of the knee joint, the stress and strain distributions within the meniscus, and the changes in stress and strain distributions in the articular cartilage of the femur and tibia after complete meniscectomy were investigated. It was found that (i) the fluid phase carries more than 60% of the load, which reinforces the need for the biphasic model for knee biomechanics; (ii) the inner third and outer two-thirds of the meniscus had different strain distributions; and (iii) the distributions of both maximum shear stress and maximum principal strain in articular cartilage changed after complete meniscectomy - with peak values increasing by over 350%. PMID:23498852

  8. Looking to the Future: Non-contact Methods for Measuring Streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.; Cheng, R.T.; Haeni, F.P.; Melcher, N.B.; Spicer, K.R.; Plant, J.; Keller, W.C.; Hayes, K.

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate whether it is possible to make completely non-contact open-channel discharge measurements. After an extensive evaluation of potential technologies, we concluded a combination of high-frequency (microwave) radar (for measuring surface velocity) and low-frequency radar (ground-penetrating radar) for measuring channel cross-section, had the best chance for success. The first experiment in 1999 on the Skagit River, Washington, using non-contact methods, produced a discharge value nearly exactly the same as from an ADCP and current meter. Surface-velocity data were converted to mean velocity based on measurements of the velocity profile (multiplied by 0.85), and radar signal speed in impure fresh water was measured to be 0.11-0.12 ft/ns. The weak link was thought to be the requirement to suspend the GPR antenna over the water, which required a bridge or cableway. Two contractors, expert with radar, were unsuccessful in field experiments to measure channel cross-section from the riverbank. Another series of experiments were designed to demonstrate whether both radar systems could be mounted on a helicopter, flown back and forth across a river, and provide data to compute flow. In Sept. 2000 and May 2001, a series of helicopter flights with mounted radar systems successfully measured surface velocity and channel cross-section of the Cowlitz River, Washington.

  9. [Study on Chaotic Detection Method of Pacemaker Contact-Less Power Supply].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenghu; Huang, Mingming; Li, Songtao

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the reliability of cardiac pacemaker contact-less power supply technology, this paper proposes a novel application of wireless feedback voltage stabilizing technology to adjust heart disease patients with inner power supply filter circuit output voltage and current control method, to keep the output voltage stability, and to ensure that the super capacitor and cardiac pacemaker to get a stable power supply. To implement the real-time accurate voltage control with considering the primary and secondary side inductance coupling coefficient changes, the change of the external power supply voltage and load, it is necessary to test thee real-time and accurate output voltage and current value after rectifying filtering. Therefore, based on the chaotic control theory, we adopted method of phase diagram on the basis of the quick observation after rectifying filtering, so that the method of voltage and current could improve the detection time of the circuit. The phase diagram of proposed control method can be divided into 8 segments, and we got 7 zero-extreme points. When these zero-extreme points are detected, according to extreme points of the zero instantaneous values, the corresponding average values of voltage and current were obtained. Simulation and experimental results showed that using the above method can shorten the response time to less than switch devices 1/2 switching cycles, thus validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed detection algorithm. PMID:27079110

  10. An efficient formulation based on the Lagrangian method for contact-impact analysis of flexible multi-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Liu, Jin-Yang; Hong, Jia-Zhen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an efficient formulation based on the Lagrangian method is presented to investigate the contact-impact problems of flexible multi-body systems. Generally, the penalty method and the Hertz contact law are the most commonly used methods in engineering applications. However, these methods are highly dependent on various non-physical parameters, which have great effects on the simulation results. Moreover, a tremendous number of degrees of freedom in the contact-impact problems will influence the numerical efficiency significantly. With the consideration of these two problems, a formulation combining the component mode synthesis method and the Lagrangian method is presented to investigate the contact-impact problems in flexible multi-body system numerically. Meanwhile, the finite element meshing laws of the contact bodies will be studied preliminarily. A numerical example with experimental verification will certify the reliability of the presented formulation in contact-impact analysis. Furthermore, a series of numerical investigations explain how great the influence of the finite element meshing has on the simulation results. Finally the limitations of the element size in different regions are summarized to satisfy both the accuracy and efficiency.

  11. Effect of Friction on Shear Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient μ ~ 0 . 6 (Bi et al. Nature (2011)). Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how reducing friction affects shear jamming. We put the Teflon-wrapped photoelastic disks, lowering the friction substantially from previous experiments, in a well-studied 2D shear apparatus (Ren et al. PRL (2013)), which provides a uniform simple shear. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger anisotropies in fragile states compared to experiments with higher friction particles at the same density. In ongoing work we are studying systems using photoelastic disks with fine gears on the edge to generate very large effective friction. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant DMR1206351, NSF Grant DMS-1248071, NASA Grant NNX10AU01G and William M. Keck Foundation.

  12. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Behringer, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Shear Jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficients μs ~= 0 . 6 . Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕS <= ϕ <=ϕJ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of ``force chains,'' which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. The issue that we address experimentally is how reducing friction affects shear jamming. We use photoelastic disks that have been wrapped with Teflon, lowering the friction coefficient substantially from previous experiments. The Teflon-wrapped disks were placed in a well-studied 2D shear apparatus (Ren et al., PRL, 110, 018302 (2013)), which provides uniform simple shear without generating shear bands. Shear jamming is still observed, but the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller than for higher friction particles. With Teflon-wrapped disks, we observe larger anisotropies compared to the previous experiment with higher friction particles at the same packing fraction, which indicates force chains tending to be straight in the low friction system. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant No. DMR12-06351, ARO Grant No. W911NF-1-11-0110, and NASA Grant No. NNX10AU01G.

  13. Adhesion, friction and micromechanical properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and micromechanical properties of ceramics, both in monolithic and coating form, are reviewed. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials, and metals. For the simplicity of discussion, the tribological properties of concern in the processes are separated into two parts. The first part discusses the pull-off force (adhesion) and the shear force required to break the interfacial junctions between contacting surfaces. The role of chemical bonding in adhesion and friction, and the effects of surface contaminant films and temperature on tribological response with respect to adhesion and friction are discussed. The second part deals with abrasion of ceramics. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The scratch technique of determining the critical load needed to fracture interfacial adhesive bonds of ceramic deposited on substrates is also addressed.

  14. Novel experimental methods for investigating high speed friction of titanium-aluminum-vanadium/tool steel interface and dynamic failure of extrinsically toughened DRA composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Mohammad Abdulaziz

    Dynamic deformation, flow, and failure are integral parts of all dynamic processes in materials. Invariably, dynamic failure also involves the relative sliding of one component of the material over the other. Advances in elucidation of these failure mechanisms under high loading rates has been of great interest to scientists working in this area. The need to develop new dynamic mechanical property tests for materials under well characterized and controllable loading conditions has always been a challenge to experimentalists. The current study focuses on the development of two experimental methods to study some aspects of dynamic material response. The first part focuses on the development of a single stage gas gun facility for investigating high-speed metal to metal interfacial friction with applications to high speed machining. During the course of this investigation a gas gun was designed and built capable of accelerating projectiles upto velocities of 1 km/s. Using this gas gun pressure-shear plate impact friction experiments were conducted to simulate conditions similar to high speed machining at the tool-workpiece interface. The impacting plates were fabricated from materials representing the tribo-pair of interest. Accurate measurements of the interfacial tractions, i.e. the normal pressure and the frictional stress at the tribo-pair interface, and the interfacial slip velocity could be made by employing laser interferometry. Normal pressures of the order of 1-2 MPa were generated and slipping velocities of the order of 50 m/s were obtained. In order to illustrate the structure of the constitutive law governing friction, the study included experimental investigation of frictional response to step changes in normal pressure and interfacial shear stress. The results of these experiments indicate that sliding resistance for Ti6Al4V/CH steel interface is much lower than measured under quasi-static sliding conditions. Also the temperature at the interface strongly

  15. A Diffuse Interface Method with Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Simulation of Incompressible Multi-Phase Flows with Moving Contact Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Yi; Spelt, Peter D. M.; Ding, Hang

    2010-11-01

    Diffuse Interface (DI) methods are employed widely for the numerical simulation of two-phase flows, even with moving contact lines. In a DI method, the interface thickness should be as thin as possible to simulate spreading phenomena under realistic flow conditions, so a fine grid is required, beyond the reach of current methods that employ a uniform grid. Here we have integrated a DI method based on a uniform mesh, to a block-based adaptive mesh refinement method, so that only the regions near the interface are resolved by a fine mesh. The performance of the present method is tested by simulations including drop deformation in shear flow, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and drop spreading on a flat surface, et al. The results show that the present method can give accurate results with much smaller computational cost, compared to the original DI method based on a uniform mesh. Based on the present method, simulation of drop spreading is carried out with Cahn number of 0.001 and the contact line region is well resolved. The flow field near the contact line, the contact line speed as well as the apparent contact angle are investigated in detail and compared with previous analytical work.

  16. Calculation of contact angles at triple phase boundary in solid oxide fuel cell anode using the level set method

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaojun; Hasegawa, Yosuke; Kohno, Haruhiko; Jiao, Zhenjun; Hayakawa, Koji; Okita, Kohei; Shikazono, Naoki

    2014-10-15

    A level set method is applied to characterize the three dimensional structures of nickel, yttria stabilized zirconia and pore phases in solid oxide fuel cell anode reconstructed by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope. A numerical algorithm is developed to evaluate the contact angles at the triple phase boundary based on interfacial normal vectors which can be calculated from the signed distance functions defined for each of the three phases. Furthermore, surface tension force is estimated from the contact angles by assuming the interfacial force balance at the triple phase boundary. The average contact angle values of nickel, yttria stabilized zirconia and pore are found to be 143°–156°, 83°–138° and 82°–123°, respectively. The mean contact angles remained nearly unchanged after 100 hour operation. However, the contact angles just after reduction are different for the cells with different sintering temperatures. In addition, standard deviations of the contact angles are very large especially for yttria stabilized zirconia and pore phases. The calculated surface tension forces from mean contact angles were close to the experimental values found in the literature. Slight increase of surface tensions of nickel/pore and nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia were observed after operation. Present data are expected to be used not only for the understanding of the degradation mechanism, but also for the quantitative prediction of the microstructural temporal evolution of solid oxide fuel cell anode. - Highlights: • A level set method is applied to characterize the 3D structures of SOFC anode. • A numerical algorithm is developed to evaluate the contact angles at the TPB. • Surface tension force is estimated from the contact angles. • The average contact angle values are found to be 143o-156o, 83o-138o and 82o-123o. • Present data are expected to understand degradation and predict evolution of SOFC.

  17. A multibody knee model with discrete cartilage prediction of tibio-femoral contact mechanics.

    PubMed

    Guess, Trent M; Liu, Hongzeng; Bhashyam, Sampath; Thiagarajan, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Combining musculoskeletal simulations with anatomical joint models capable of predicting cartilage contact mechanics would provide a valuable tool for studying the relationships between muscle force and cartilage loading. As a step towards producing multibody musculoskeletal models that include representation of cartilage tissue mechanics, this research developed a subject-specific multibody knee model that represented the tibia plateau cartilage as discrete rigid bodies that interacted with the femur through deformable contacts. Parameters for the compliant contact law were derived using three methods: (1) simplified Hertzian contact theory, (2) simplified elastic foundation contact theory and (3) parameter optimisation from a finite element (FE) solution. The contact parameters and contact friction were evaluated during a simulated walk in a virtual dynamic knee simulator, and the resulting kinematics were compared with measured in vitro kinematics. The effects on predicted contact pressures and cartilage-bone interface shear forces during the simulated walk were also evaluated. The compliant contact stiffness parameters had a statistically significant effect on predicted contact pressures as well as all tibio-femoral motions except flexion-extension. The contact friction was not statistically significant to contact pressures, but was statistically significant to medial-lateral translation and all rotations except flexion-extension. The magnitude of kinematic differences between model formulations was relatively small, but contact pressure predictions were sensitive to model formulation. The developed multibody knee model was computationally efficient and had a computation time 283 times faster than a FE simulation using the same geometries and boundary conditions. PMID:21970765

  18. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, A.; Fontaine, J.; Martin, J.-M.; Mogne, T. L.; Nevshupa, R.

    2008-03-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H2 and CH4. During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it was

  19. Scale effects in single-asperity friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark O.; Sharp, Tristan; Ligneres, Vincent; Pastewka, Lars

    2014-03-01

    Simulations are used to examine the static friction in model single-asperity contacts between a sphere and a flat elastic substrate. The two surfaces have the same crystalline structure. The radius R of the sphere and a of the contact are varied from nanometers to micrometers. For small contacts the atoms move coherently and the coefficient of friction μ is independent of load. As contact size increases, μ begins to drop. Results from a wide range of systems can be collapsed when μ is plotted against a2 / Ra0 where a0 nearest-neighbor spacing. The results are compared to Cattaneo-Mindlin continuum theory and dislocation-based models of contact-size effects from Hurtado and Kim and Gao. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant DMR 1006805 and IGERT 0801471.

  20. Acid-Base Interactions at the Molecular Level: Adhesion and Friction Studies with Interfacial Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, A.R.; Carpick, R.W.; Houston, J.E.; Michalske, T.A.

    1998-12-09

    To examine the forces of acid-base adhesive interactions at the molecular level, we utilize the scanning probe Interracial Force Microscope (IFM). Unlike cantilever-based atomic force microscopes, the EM is a non-compliant, mechanically stable probe that provides a complete adhesive profile without jump-to-contact. In this way, we are able to quantitatively measure the work of adhesion and bond energies at well-defined, nanometer-scale single asperity contacts. In particular, we will discuss the displacement-controlled adhesive forces between self-assembled monolayer of functionalized alkanethiols strongly bound to a gold substrate and a similarly functionalized tip. We also discuss a method utilizing decoupled lateral and normal force sensors to simultaneously observe the onset of both friction and chemical bond formation. Measurements show that friction can be directly attributed to bond formation and rupture well before repulsive contact.

  1. Wet etch methods for InAs nanowire patterning and self-aligned electrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fülöp, G.; d’Hollosy, S.; Hofstetter, L.; Baumgartner, A.; Nygård, J.; Schönenberger, C.; Csonka, S.

    2016-05-01

    Advanced synthesis of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) enables their application in diverse fields, notably in chemical and electrical sensing, photovoltaics, or quantum electronic devices. In particular, indium arsenide (InAs) NWs are an ideal platform for quantum devices, e.g. they may host topological Majorana states. While the synthesis has been continously perfected, only a few techniques have been developed to tailor individual NWs after growth. Here we present three wet chemical etch methods for the post-growth morphological engineering of InAs NWs on the sub-100 nm scale. The first two methods allow the formation of self-aligned electrical contacts to etched NWs, while the third method results in conical shaped NW profiles ideal for creating smooth electrical potential gradients and shallow barriers. Low temperature experiments show that NWs with etched segments have stable transport characteristics and can serve as building blocks of quantum electronic devices. As an example we report the formation of a single electrically stable quantum dot between two etched NW segments.

  2. Wet etch methods for InAs nanowire patterning and self-aligned electrical contacts.

    PubMed

    Fülöp, G; d'Hollosy, S; Hofstetter, L; Baumgartner, A; Nygård, J; Schönenberger, C; Csonka, S

    2016-05-13

    Advanced synthesis of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) enables their application in diverse fields, notably in chemical and electrical sensing, photovoltaics, or quantum electronic devices. In particular, indium arsenide (InAs) NWs are an ideal platform for quantum devices, e.g. they may host topological Majorana states. While the synthesis has been continously perfected, only a few techniques have been developed to tailor individual NWs after growth. Here we present three wet chemical etch methods for the post-growth morphological engineering of InAs NWs on the sub-100 nm scale. The first two methods allow the formation of self-aligned electrical contacts to etched NWs, while the third method results in conical shaped NW profiles ideal for creating smooth electrical potential gradients and shallow barriers. Low temperature experiments show that NWs with etched segments have stable transport characteristics and can serve as building blocks of quantum electronic devices. As an example we report the formation of a single electrically stable quantum dot between two etched NW segments. PMID:27040175

  3. IR-Sensography™—expanding the scope of contact-free sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Jens; Schunk, Stephan A.

    2005-01-01

    Capturing the response of one or more sensor materials is conventionally performed by the direct transformation of a chemical or physico-chemical signal into an electrical one. With an increasing number of sensor materials within an arrangement of sensor elements or a sensor array, problems such as contacting each single sensor, signal processing and resistance against cross-talk, harsh conditions such as corrosive atmospheres, etc are limiting factors for the further development of so-called 'chemical noses'. State-of-the-art and commercially available are arrays of eight different sensor materials, literature known in another context are sensor arrays with 256 materials on a silicon wafer, which are contacted via electrical conduits. We present here the concept of the IR-Sensography™, the use of an IR-camera as an external detector system for sensor libraries. Acting like an optical detection method, the IR-camera detects small temperature changes due to physisorption, chemisorption or other forms of interaction or reaction as an output signal in the form of radiation emitted by the multiplicity of sensor materials simultaneously. The temperature resolution of commercially available IR-camera systems can be tuned to the range below 0.1 K. Due to the separation of sensors and the detector device, reaction conditions at the sensor locus can be adapted to the analytical problem and do not need to take care of other boundary conditions which come into play with the analytical device, e.g. the IR-camera. Calibration or regeneration steps can as well be performed over the multiplicity of all sensor materials. Any given chemical compound that comes into contact with the sensor through the passing fluids will result in a specific activity pattern on a spatially fixed library of sensor materials that is unique for the given compound. While the pattern therefore serves as an identifier, the intensity of the pattern represents the quantitative amount of this compound in

  4. Solution of dynamic contact problems by implicit/explicit methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Salveson, M.W.; Taylor, R.L.

    1996-10-14

    The solution of dynamic contact problems within an explicit finite element program such as the LLNL DYNA programs is addressed in the report. The approach is to represent the solution for the deformation of bodies using the explicit algorithm but to solve the contact part of the problem using an implicit approach. Thus, the contact conditions at the next solution state are considered when computing the acceleration state for each explicit time step.

  5. Improved Contact X-Ray Microradiographic Method to Measure Mineral Density of Hard Dental Tissues.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, B D; Carey, C M

    2010-03-01

    Contact X-ray microradiography is the current gold standard for measuring mineral densities of partially demineralized tooth specimens. The X-ray sensitive film specified in the last J Res NIST publication on the subject is no longer commercially available. OBJECTIVES: Develop a new microradiographic method by identifying a commercially available film with greater than 3000 lines per millimeter resolution, which is sensitive to X rays, and develop correct film processing for X-ray microradiographic application. METHODS: A holographic film was identified as a potential replacement film. Proper exposure was determined utilizing a thick nickel plate to create test-strips. Film development was bracketed around manufacturer suggestions. Film linearity was determined with aluminum step-wedges. Microradiographs of 100 µm thick tooth sections, before and after acidic challenges, were a final test for film. Magnified images were captured with a digital microscope camera with 0.305 micrometers per pixel resolution. RESULTS: The appropriate film exposure was 30 minutes at 80 kV(p) and 3 mA with a development time of 2 minutes. Step-wedge experiments show the system to be linear in terms of pixel intensities with respect to x-ray attenuation for normalized pixel intensity values that are 10% to 90% of full scale (r(2) = 0.997) which encompasses the full exposure region of tooth tissue. Enamel sections were analyzed and show distinctive differences between erosion and demineralization. The image capture device resolution of 0.305 micrometers per pixel limits the system resolution. CONCLUSION: Use of the identified holographic film when combined with the described processing modifications has resulted in an improved X-ray microradiographic method for the measurement of mineral density of dental hard tissues. The method described can be further improved by using a higher resolution digitization system. The method is appropriate for quantitatively measuring changes in mineral

  6. Is frictional healing slip-dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Rubin, A. M.; Ryan, K. L.; Riviere, J. V.; Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    Frictional re-strengthening of bare rock surfaces at very low stresses and near zero slip rate, as observed in the laboratory, is traditionally interpreted as showing support for purely time-dependent healing as embodied in the Aging law. However, while slide-hold-slide experiments on bare surfaces do show an apparent (purely) time-dependent increase in the static friction upon reslide, we show that the stress minima attained during the preceding holds show a strong slip-dependence which contradict the Aging law. A velocity strengthening Slip law explains such data much better. We also show that, large velocity step decreases, which drive the system far below steady state just like long holds, clearly support the slip-dependent response of the Slip law over the time-dependent healing contained in the Aging law. But, while time-dependent healing has an intuitive physical picture in terms of growth of the 'real contact area' with time, it is more difficult to ascribe one to slip-dependent healing. Here, we explore the possibility that the slip-dependence arises out of an interplay between contact `quality' and `quantity' at the scale of the asperity contacts. First, to further study the slip-dependence of healing, we carry out large velocity step decreases and sequences of long slide-hold-slides on both bare rock and gouge. Secondly, to probe the micro-mechanical origins of healing, we complement our mechanical data with amplitudes and travel time data of ultrasonic P- and S- waves transmitted across the sliding interface. While ultrasonic P-wave transmissivity has been used as a proxy for 'real contact area' in friction experiments by Nagata et al. (2012, 2014) before, the simultaneous use of P- and S-phases in our experiments is designed specifically to probe contact rheology. Initial results show strong correlations between changes in friction, transmitted wave amplitudes and travel times in response to changes in slip rate. We also observe important differences

  7. Universal Aging Mechanism for Static and Sliding Friction of Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Michael; Dietzel, Dirk; Tekiel, Antoni; Topple, Jessica; Grütter, Peter; Schirmeisen, André

    2016-07-01

    The term "contact aging" refers to the temporal evolution of the interface between a slider and a substrate usually resulting in increasing friction with time. Current phenomenological models for multiasperity contacts anticipate that such aging is not only the driving force behind the transition from static to sliding friction, but at the same time influences the general dynamics of the sliding friction process. To correlate static and sliding friction on the nanoscale, we show experimental evidence of stick-slip friction for nanoparticles sliding on graphite over a wide dynamic range. We can assign defined periods of aging to the stick phases of the particles, which agree with simulations explicitly including contact aging. Additional slide-hold-slide experiments for the same system allow linking the sliding friction results to static friction measurements, where both friction mechanisms can be universally described by a common aging formalism.

  8. Universal Aging Mechanism for Static and Sliding Friction of Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Michael; Dietzel, Dirk; Tekiel, Antoni; Topple, Jessica; Grütter, Peter; Schirmeisen, André

    2016-07-01

    The term "contact aging" refers to the temporal evolution of the interface between a slider and a substrate usually resulting in increasing friction with time. Current phenomenological models for multiasperity contacts anticipate that such aging is not only the driving force behind the transition from static to sliding friction, but at the same time influences the general dynamics of the sliding friction process. To correlate static and sliding friction on the nanoscale, we show experimental evidence of stick-slip friction for nanoparticles sliding on graphite over a wide dynamic range. We can assign defined periods of aging to the stick phases of the particles, which agree with simulations explicitly including contact aging. Additional slide-hold-slide experiments for the same system allow linking the sliding friction results to static friction measurements, where both friction mechanisms can be universally described by a common aging formalism. PMID:27447515

  9. Effect of contact stiffness on wedge calibration of lateral force in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fei; Zhao Xuezeng

    2007-04-15

    Quantitative friction measurement of nanomaterials in atomic force microscope requires accurate calibration method for lateral force. The effect of contact stiffness on lateral force calibration of atomic force microscope is discussed in detail and an improved calibration method is presented. The calibration factor derived from the original method increased with the applied normal load, which indicates that separate calibration should be required for every given applied normal load to keep the accuracy of friction measurement. We improve the original method by introducing the contact factor, which is derived from the contact stiffness between the tip and the sample, to the calculation of calibration factors. The improved method makes the calculation of calibration factors under different applied normal loads possible without repeating the calibration procedure. Comparative experiments on a silicon wafer have been done by both the two methods to validate the method in this article.

  10. Novel microscopy-based screening method reveals regulators of contact-dependent intercellular transfer

    PubMed Central

    Michael Frei, Dominik; Hodneland, Erlend; Rios-Mondragon, Ivan; Burtey, Anne; Neumann, Beate; Bulkescher, Jutta; Schölermann, Julia; Pepperkok, Rainer; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann; Kögel, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Contact-dependent intercellular transfer (codeIT) of cellular constituents can have functional consequences for recipient cells, such as enhanced survival and drug resistance. Pathogenic viruses, prions and bacteria can also utilize this mechanism to spread to adjacent cells and potentially evade immune detection. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying this intercellular transfer process. Here, we present a novel microscopy-based screening method to identify regulators and cargo of codeIT. Single donor cells, carrying fluorescently labelled endocytic organelles or proteins, are co-cultured with excess acceptor cells. CodeIT is quantified by confocal microscopy and image analysis in 3D, preserving spatial information. An siRNA-based screening using this method revealed the involvement of several myosins and small GTPases as codeIT regulators. Our data indicates that cellular protrusions and tubular recycling endosomes are important for codeIT. We automated image acquisition and analysis to facilitate large-scale chemical and genetic screening efforts to identify key regulators of codeIT. PMID:26271723

  11. Structure of perfluorinated membranes investigated by method of standard contact porosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kononenko, N A; Fomenko, M A; Volfkovich, Yu M

    2015-08-01

    The results of investigation of various factors influencing water distribution in perfluorinated membrane structure by method of standard contact porosimetry are summarized. The Nafion membranes (Dupon de Nemoure, USA) and MF-4SK membranes ("Plastpolymer", Russia) were the objects of the research. The influence of production process and conditioning method on porosimetric curves of perfluorinated membrane is discussed. New results related to the porosity of perfluorinated membranes after reinforcing fabric introduction and processing by organic solvents are reported. The role of the modifying components of various nature in the shaping of transport channels in perfluorinated membrane is studied. The influence of polyaniline and hydrogen zirconium phosphate on water distribution in membrane structure is revealed. The correlation between the maximum porosity value of the membrane and its diffusion and electroosmotic permeability, as well as between the fraction of the gel pore volume and membrane selectivity is established. It allows the prediction of possible changes in the structural characteristics and also in the transport properties of the membranes under the influence of the modifying components of different types and various operating conditions. PMID:25132223

  12. PREFACE: The International Conference on Science of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kouji; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    The first international conference on the science of friction in Japan was held at Irago, Aichi on 9-13 September 2007. The conference focused on the elementary process of friction phenomena from the atomic and molecular scale view. Topics covered in the conference are shown below.:

  13. Superlubricity and friction>
  14. Electronic and phononic contributions to friction>
  15. Friction on the atomic and molecular scales
  16. van der Waals friction and Casimir force
  17. Molecular motor and friction>
  18. Friction and adhesion in soft matter systems
  19. Wear and crack on the nanoscale
  20. Theoretical studies on the atomic scale friction and energy dissipation
  21. Friction and chaos
  22. Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts
  23. Friction of powder
  24. The number of participants in the conference was approximately 100, registered from 11 countries. 48 oral and 29 poster talks were presented at the conference. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 23 papers devoted to the above topics of friction. The successful organization of the conference was made possible by the contribution of the members of the Organizing Committee and International Advisory Committee. The conference was made possible thanks to the financial support from Aichi University of Education and the Taihokogyo Tribology Research Foundation (TTRF), and moreover thanks to the approval societies of The Physical Society of Japan, The Surface Science Society of Japan, The Japanese Society of Tribologists and Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute. The details of the conference are available at http://www.science-of-friction.com . Finally we want to thank the speakers for the high quality of their talks and all participants for coming to Irago, Japan and actively contributing to the conference. Kouji Miura and Hiroshi Matsukawa Editors

  25. Phase analysis study of the copper-aluminum contact pair obtained by plasma dynamic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivkov, A.; Saygash, A.; Kolganova, J.; Shanenkov, I.

    2014-10-01

    We obtained the contact pair copper-aluminum copper coating by using a magneto plasma accelerator. The process is realized during supersonic copper plasma jet flowing into the chamber filled with the air atmosphere. Copper jet is carried out of the accelerating channel towards the aluminum target. Plasma jet is generated by coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator (CMPA) based on copper electrode system. The CMPA is supplied from the pulsed capacitive energy storage with the maximum value of stored energy of 360 kJ. The obtained copper-aluminum contact pairs have been analyzed by X-ray diffractometry and Nano hardness tester. The copper coating on the aluminum surface is uniform with thickness about 100 gm. Also in this paper it is shown that transitional contact resistance of copper-aluminum contact pair is at 2,5 times less than a direct connection of copper and aluminum (test contact pair).

  26. A numerical investigation of curve squeal in the case of constant wheel/rail friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieringer, A.

    2014-09-01

    Curve squeal is commonly attributed to self-excited vibrations of the railway wheel, which arise due to a large lateral creepage of the wheel tyre on the top of the rail during curving. The phenomenon involves stick/slip oscillations in the wheel/rail contact and is therefore strongly dependent on the prevailing friction conditions. The mechanism causing the instability is, however, still a subject of controversial discussion. Most authors introduce the negative slope of the friction characteristic as a source of the instability, while others have found that squeal can also occur in the case of constant friction due to the coupling between normal and tangential dynamics. As a contribution to this discussion, a detailed model for high-frequency wheel/rail interaction during curving is presented in this paper and evaluated in the case of constant friction. The interaction model is formulated in the time domain and includes the coupling between normal and tangential directions. Track and wheel are described as linear systems using pre-calculated impulse response functions that are derived from detailed finite element models. The nonlinear, non-steady state contact model is based on an influence function method for the elastic half-space. Real measured wheel and rail profiles are used. Numerical results from the interaction model confirm that stick/slip oscillations occur also in the case of constant friction. The choice of the lateral creepage, the value of the friction coefficient and the lateral contact position on the wheel tread are seen to have a strong influence on the occurrence and amplitude of the stick/slip oscillations. The results from the interaction model are in good qualitative agreement with previously published findings on curve squeal.

  27. A novel method for discovering local spatial clusters of genomic regions with functional relationships from DNA contact maps

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xihao; Shi, Christina Huan; Yip, Kevin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The three-dimensional structure of genomes makes it possible for genomic regions not adjacent in the primary sequence to be spatially proximal. These DNA contacts have been found to be related to various molecular activities. Previous methods for analyzing DNA contact maps obtained from Hi-C experiments have largely focused on studying individual interactions, forming spatial clusters composed of contiguous blocks of genomic locations, or classifying these clusters into general categories based on some global properties of the contact maps. Results: Here, we describe a novel computational method that can flexibly identify small clusters of spatially proximal genomic regions based on their local contact patterns. Using simulated data that highly resemble Hi-C data obtained from real genome structures, we demonstrate that our method identifies spatial clusters that are more compact than methods previously used for clustering genomic regions based on DNA contact maps. The clusters identified by our method enable us to confirm functionally related genomic regions previously reported to be spatially proximal in different species. We further show that each genomic region can be assigned a numeric affinity value that indicates its degree of participation in each local cluster, and these affinity values correlate quantitatively with DNase I hypersensitivity, gene expression, super enhancer activities and replication timing in a cell type specific manner. We also show that these cluster affinity values can precisely define boundaries of reported topologically associating domains, and further define local sub-domains within each domain. Availability and implementation: The source code of BNMF and tutorials on how to use the software to extract local clusters from contact maps are available at http://yiplab.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/bnmf/. Contact: kevinyip@cse.cuhk.edu.hk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307607

  28. Classical shear cracks drive the onset of dry frictional motion.

    PubMed

    Svetlizky, Ilya; Fineberg, Jay

    2014-05-01

    Frictional processes entail the rupture of the ensemble of discrete contacts defining a frictional interface. There are a variety of views on how best to describe the onset of dry frictional motion. These range from modelling friction with a single degree of freedom, a 'friction coefficient', to theoretical treatments using dynamic fracture to account for spatial and temporal dynamics along the interface. We investigated the onset of dry frictional motion by performing simultaneous high-speed measurements of the real contact area and the strain fields in the region surrounding propagating rupture tips within the dry (nominally flat) rough interfaces formed by brittle polymer blocks. Here we show that the transition from 'static' to 'dynamic' friction is quantitatively described by classical singular solutions for the motion of a rapid shear crack. We find that these singular solutions, originally derived to describe brittle fracture, are in excellent agreement with the experiments for slow propagation, whereas some significant discrepancies arise as the rupture velocity approaches the Rayleigh wave speed. In addition, the energy dissipated in the fracture of the contacts remains nearly constant throughout the entire range in which the rupture velocity is less than the Rayleigh wave speed, whereas the size of the dissipative zone undergoes a Lorentz-like contraction as the rupture velocity approaches the Rayleigh wave speed. This coupling between friction and fracture is critical to our fundamental understanding of frictional motion and related processes, such as earthquake dynamics. PMID:24805344

  29. Friction Effects in Atom-Surface Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D.

    2016-05-01

    Atom-surface interactions both have a conservative as well as a dissipative component. A treatment of the dissipative terms requires the use of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, and the calculation of the imaginary part of the polarizability of an atom is required. The paper will review the recent resolution of a long-standing question regarding the low-frequency asymptotics of the imaginary part, as summarized in and, together with K. Pachucki, G. Lach and M. De Kieviet. The surprising conclusion is that the precise form of the imaginary part for low driving frequency is dominated by a so-called quantum electrodynamic loop correction, where ``correction'' here is not to be taken literally. The one-loop QED term dominates over the tree-level contribution! The findings drastically alter theoretical predictions for non-contact friction, and blackbody friction (due to the atom's interaction with a bath of thermal photons). The basic principle behind the calculation and the methods of nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics will be discussed. Supported by the NSF (Grant PHY-1403973).

  30. Single-asperity friction during quasi-static sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Tristan; Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The static friction of an asperity is investigated using atomic-scale simulations. We explore scale effects by varying the sphere radius R and the contact radius a from nanometers to micrometers. We first consider commensurate contact between bare lattices with repulsive interactions across the interface. In small contacts, all contacting atoms move coherently and the friction coefficient μ is independent of contact radius and load. In larger contacts, interfacial slip is mediated by localized dislocations, and the static friction coefficient μ ~ (Ra0/a2) 2 / 3 , where a0 is the nearest-neighbor spacing. In very large contacts μ stops decreasing and begins to increase with a, at fixed R. The results are in sharp contrast to Cattaneo-Mindlin continuum theory where μ is independent of contact size. Separate simulations are performed to connect the results to the dislocation-based models of contact-size effects due to Hurtado and Kim, and Gao, which assume adhesive interactions between surfaces and find μ ~ (a0/a)1/2. Simulations for incommensurate contacts show a transition from superlubricity for rigid contacts to a finite friction associated with the Peierls stress in very large contacts. Support from: DMR-1006805; NSF IGERT-0801471; OCI-0963185; CMMI-0923018

  31. A Simple Measurement of the Sliding Friction Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Luigi M.; Defrancesco, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple computer-aided experiment for investigating Coulomb's law of sliding friction in a classroom. It provides a way of testing the possible dependence of the friction coefficient on various parameters, such as types of materials, normal force, apparent area of contact and sliding velocity.

  32. Instantaneous engine frictional torque, its components and piston assembly friction

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A. ); Henein, N.A. . Center for Automotive Research)

    1992-05-01

    The overall goal of this report is to document the work done to determine the instantaneous frictional torque of internal combustion engine by using a new approach known as (P-[omega]) method developed at Wayne State University. The emphasis has been to improve the accuracy of the method, and apply it to both diesel and gasoline engines under different operating conditions. Also work included an investigation to determine the effect of using advanced materials and techniques to coat the piston rings on the instantaneous engine frictional torque and the piston assembly friction. The errors in measuring the angular velocity, [omega], have been determined and found to be caused by variations in the divisions within one encoder, encoder-to-encoder variations, misalignment within the encoder itself and misalignment between the encoder and crankshaft. The errors in measuring the cylinder gas pressure, P, have been determined and found to be caused by transducer-to-transducer variations, zero drift, thermal stresses and lack of linearity. The ability of the (P-[omega]) method in determining the frictional torque of many engine components has been demonstrated. These components include valve train, fuel injection pump with and without fuel injection, and piston with and without different ring combinations. The emphasis in this part of the research program has been on the piston-ring assembly friction. The effects of load and other operating variables on IFT have been determined. The motoring test, which is widely used in industry to measure engine friction has been found to be inaccurate. The errors have been determined at different loads.

  1. A precise integration method for solving coupled vehicle-track dynamics with nonlinear wheel-rail contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Gao, Q.; Tan, S. J.; Zhong, W. X.

    2012-10-01

    A new method is proposed as a solution for the large-scale coupled vehicle-track dynamic model with nonlinear wheel-rail contact. The vehicle is simplified as a multi-rigid-body model, and the track is treated as a three-layer beam model. In the track model, the rail is assumed to be an Euler-Bernoulli beam supported by discrete sleepers. The vehicle model and the track model are coupled using Hertzian nonlinear contact theory, and the contact forces of the vehicle subsystem and the track subsystem are approximated by the Lagrange interpolation polynomial. The response of the large-scale coupled vehicle-track model is calculated using the precise integration method. A more efficient algorithm based on the periodic property of the track is applied to calculate the exponential matrix and certain matrices related to the solution of the track subsystem. Numerical examples demonstrate the computational accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  2. Surveillance of contact allergies: methods and results of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK).

    PubMed

    Schnuch, A; Geier, J; Lessmann, H; Arnold, R; Uter, W

    2012-07-01

    Contact allergy (CA) surveillance networks provide information to a multitude of stakeholders, which is indispensable for evidence-based decision-making in the field of prevention. Methods and results of the German surveillance system on CA are reviewed and discussed with reference to other systems. The German network structure comprises 56 departments of dermatology and includes all patients who are patch-tested for suspected CA. Data analysis considers the results of patch testing and further pertinent information for each patient. Following aspects are addressed: (i) the description of the clinical population, (ii) evaluation of patch test reactions, (iii) relationship between patch test results and population characteristics. Trend analyses on chromate (decreasing), epoxy resin (increasing) and nickel (heterogeneous) served as examples for surveillance system analyses, with the identification of sentinel events, as well as proof of success or failure of prevention. In addition, external data sources can be used such as sales data of patch test preparations to estimate frequencies of sensitization on a population level. National prescription data of drugs and statistics of labelling of preservatives on cosmetics can be included, the latter two approaches allowing for risk estimates conferred by specific allergens. PMID:22563651

  3. Method for non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis

    DOEpatents

    Goddard, Gregory Russ; Kaduchak, Gregory; Jett, James Hubert; Graves, Steven Wayde

    2013-09-10

    One or more of the embodiments of the present invention provide for a method of non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis which includes axial and radial acoustic standing wave fields. Particles are suspended in an aqueous solution, and this solution then flows into the cylindrical flow channel. While the solution flows through the flow channel, the outer structure of the flow channel is vibrated at a resonant frequency, causing a radial acoustic standing wave field to form inside the flow channel in the solution. These radial acoustic standing waves focus the particles suspended in the solution to the center axis of the cylindrical flow channel. At the same time, a transducer is used to create an axial acoustic standing wave field in the flow channel parallel to the axis of the flow channel. This drives the particles, which are already being focused to the center axis of the flow channel, to nodes or anti-nodes of the axial standing wave at half-wavelength intervals, depending on whether the particles are more or less dense and more or less compressible than the surrounding fluid.

  4. [Study of microcirculation of the human mouth mucosa by the method of contact microscopy].

    PubMed

    Belen'kaia, I M; Zarubina, I L; Spitkovskaia, L V

    1977-01-01

    The work presents a new installation and a method for intravital investigation of microcirculation in man. The installation is a modification of the contact fluorescent microscope MLK-1 produced by the Leningrad Optico-Mechanical Amalgamation which consists of the introduction of a polarization light-dividing prism into the optical scheme of the microscope for examination of the object in polarized falling rays and of substitution of the illumination source of the microscope (lamp KLM9-75) for the xenon lamp DKSSh-120, working both in the standard and given impulse regimen. The latter opens opportunties for determination of the blood flow rate in capillaries. The determination principle is that the effect of bloodflow "stop" is observed in the case of "coincidence" of the bloodflow in the capillary and the lamp modulation rate. The mucouse membrane of the oral cavity (cheek) was used as the object for investigation. It has been shown that its microcirculatory bed in normality is represented by capillary loops in the shape of a hair-pin having the diameter of 2;92--7,74 mkm. Their amount in the view field fluctuates between 8 and 20. The average blood flow rate in the capillaries under study is 0,4 mm/sec. PMID:869725

  5. Friction measurement in a hip wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2016-05-01

    A torque measurement system was added to a widely used hip wear simulator, the biaxial rocking motion device. With the rotary transducer, the frictional torque about the drive axis of the biaxial rocking motion mechanism was measured. The principle of measuring the torque about the vertical axis above the prosthetic joint, used earlier in commercial biaxial rocking motion simulators, was shown to sense only a minor part of the total frictional torque. With the present method, the total frictional torque of the prosthetic hip was measured. This was shown to consist of the torques about the vertical axis above the joint and about the leaning axis. Femoral heads made from different materials were run against conventional and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups in serum lubrication. Regarding the femoral head material and the type of polyethylene, there were no categorical differences in frictional torque with the exception of zirconia heads, with which the lowest values were obtained. Diamond-like carbon coating of the CoCr femoral head did not reduce friction. The friction factor was found to always decrease with increasing load. High wear could increase the frictional torque by 75%. With the present system, friction can be continuously recorded during long wear tests, so the effect of wear on friction with different prosthetic hips can be evaluated. PMID:27160557

  6. Finite element modelling of frictional instability between deformable rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, H. L.; Makinouchi, A.

    2003-10-01

    Earthquakes are recognized as resulting from a stick-slip frictional instability along faults. Based on the node-to-point contact element strategy (an arbitrarily shaped contact element strategy applied with the static-explicit algorithm for modelling non-linear frictional contact problems proposed by authors), a finite element code for modelling the 3-D non-linear friction contact between deformable bodies has been developed and extended here to analyse the non-linear stick-slip frictional instability between deformable rocks with a rate- and state-dependent friction law. A typical fault bend model is taken as an application example to be analysed here. The variations of the normal contact force, the frictional force, the transition of stick-slip instable state and the related relative slip velocity along the fault between the deformable rocks and the stress evolution in the total bodies during the different stages are investigated, respectively. The calculated results demonstrate the usefulness of this code for simulating the non-linear frictional instability between deformable rocks. Copyright

  7. A new procedure for calculating contact stresses in gear teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somprakit, Paisan; Huston, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical procedure for evaluating and monitoring contact stresses in meshing gear teeth is discussed. The procedure is intended to extend the range of applicability and to improve the accuracy of gear contact stress analysis. The procedure is based upon fundamental solution from the theory of elasticity. It is an iterative numerical procedure. The method is believed to have distinct advantages over the classical Hertz method, the finite-element method, and over existing approaches with the boundary element method. Unlike many classical contact stress analyses, friction effects and sliding are included. Slipping and sticking in the contact region are studied. Several examples are discussed. The results are in agreement with classical results. Applications are presented for spur gears.

  8. Method for formation of high quality back contact with screen-printed local back surface field

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Meemongkolkiat, Vichai

    2010-11-30

    A thin silicon solar cell having a back dielectric passivation and rear contact with local back surface field is described. Specifically, the solar cell may be fabricated from a crystalline silicon wafer having a thickness from 50 to 500 micrometers. A barrier layer and a dielectric layer are applied at least to the back surface of the silicon wafer to protect the silicon wafer from deformation when the rear contact is formed. At least one opening is made to the dielectric layer. An aluminum contact that provides a back surface field is formed in the opening and on the dielectric layer. The aluminum contact may be applied by screen printing an aluminum paste having from one to 12 atomic percent silicon and then applying a heat treatment at 750 degrees Celsius.

  9. Frictional Characteristics of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changgu; Carpick, Robert; Hone, James

    2009-03-01

    The frictional characteristics of graphene were characterized using friction force microscopy (FFM). The frictional force for monolayer graphene is more than twice that of bulk graphite, with 2,3, and 4 layer samples showing a monotonic decrease in friction with increasing sample thickness. Measurements on suspended graphene membranes show identical results, ruling out substrate effects as the cause of the observed variation. Likewise, the adhesion force is identical for all samples. The frictional force is independent of load within experimental uncertainty, consistent with previous measurements on graphite. We consider several possible explanations for the origin of the observed thickness dependence.

  10. Influence of the ARC patterning method and annealing on the contact adhesion of Ni/Cu-plated solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jong Wook; Lee, Sang Hee; Lee, Doo Won; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-05-01

    Ni/Cu two-step plating is a promising metallization technique because low contact resistance and improved contact adhesion can be achieved after the Ni annealing process. Also, narrow fingers, which are required for high-efficiency solar cells, can be formed by plating. However, the reliability of contact adhesion is still considered one obstacle to industrializing solar cells with plated metal contacts. In this experiment, the influence of ARC opening methods on plated contact adhesion was investigated because the roughnesses of the Si surfaces produced by using pico-second laser ablation and photolithography may be different. Also, the annealing process was conducted before and after plating Cu/Ag metal stacks. The sequence of the annealing can be significant for efficient production because plating is a wet process while annealing is a dry process. The contact adhesion was measured by using a peel-off test. The test was conducted on a 1.5-mm-wide by a 60 ~ 70- mm-long bus bar area. A 3.2-N/mm adhesion force was recorded as a highest average value along the bus bar.

  11. Studying the TEM response of a 3-D conductor at a geological contact using the FDTD method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Tripp, A.C.; Hohmann, G.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many mineral targets are located near contact zones. Since the change of resistivity across the contact can distort or obscure the transient electromagnetic (TEM) response of the target, it is important to understand the possible effects. Previous investigators have examined similar problems using scale models. For example, Spies and Parker (1984) studied the TEM responses of fixed-loop and moving-loop configurations to geological contacts with lateral resistivity variations. More recently, Wilt (1991) systematically studied TEM soundings near a geological contact and observed that different survey systems respond to the contact in different ways. This paper will illustrate the use of the finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) algorithm of Wang and Hohmann (1993) for calculating the TEM response of a 3-D conductive body at a geological contact. The algorithm is based on the Yee staggered grid FDTD method for solving the transient electrical nonmagnetic field responses of a 3-D model. On a suitable computer, a wide range of model responses can be readily calculated, a versatility that scale modeling does not share. This study uses a fixed transmitter loop, roving-receiver configuration. Many other configurations can be regarded as special cases of this survey. It is commonly employed, for instance, by the Newmont EMP (Body and Wiles, 1984), UTEM (West et al., 1984), and Geonics EM37 systems. The configuration also facilitates finite-difference, time-domain modeling because it does not require frequent movement of the source.

  12. Ice friction: Role of non-uniform frictional heating and ice premelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.

    2015-12-01

    The low friction of ice is usually attributed to the formation of a thin water film due to melting of ice by frictional heating. Melting of ice is a first order phase transition where physical quantities like mass density, the elastic modulus or the shear strength changes abruptly at the transition temperature. Thus, one may expect the friction coefficient to change abruptly at some characteristic sliding speed, when the melt water film is produced. We show that taking into account that, due to non-uniform frictional heating, melting does not occur simultaneously in all the ice contact regions, the transition is not abrupt but still more rapid (as a function of sliding speed) than observed experimentally. The slower than expected drop in the friction with increasing sliding speed may be a consequence of the following paradoxical phenomena: before the melt-water film is formed, the friction of ice is high and a large frictional heating occur which may result in the melting of the ice. If a thin (nanometer) water film would form, the friction becomes low which results in small frictional heating and the freezing of the water film. This suggests a region in sliding speed where a thin (nanometer) surface layer of the ice may be in a mixed state with small ice-like and water-like domains, which fluctuate rapidly in space and time. Alternatively, and more likely, heat-softening of the ice may occur resulting in a thin, statistically homogeneous (in the lateral direction) layer of disordered ice, with a shear strength which decreases continuously as the ice surface temperature approaches the bulk melting temperature. This layer could be related to surface premelting of ice. Using a phenomenological expression for the frictional shear stress, I show that the calculated ice friction is in good agreement with experimental observations.

  13. AFRODITE - passive flow control for skin-friction drag reduction using the method of spanwise mean velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallenius, Bengt; Sattarzadeh, Sohrab; Downs, Robert; Shahinfar, Shahab; Fransson, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations have shown that steady spanwise mean velocity gradients are able to attenuate the growth of different types of boundary layer disturbances. Within the AFRODITE research program different techniques to setup the spanwise mean velocity variations have been studied and their stabilizing effect leading to transition delay quantified. A successful boundary-layer modulator for transition delay has turned out to be the miniature-vortex generator and has been well documented during the past years. More recent ideas of setting up spanwise mean velocity gradients will be presented here. We show that, the non-linear interaction between a pair of oblique disturbance waves creating a streaky base flow, as well as the direct surface modulation by means of applying wavy surfaces in the spanwise direction, can both successfully be utilized for transition delay and hence skin-friction drag reduction. The European Research Council is gratefully acknowledged (ERC-StG-2010- 258339).

  14. A frictional work predictive method for the initiation of solid high explosives from low-pressure impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S.K.; Green, L.G.; Lee, C.G.

    1993-07-01

    The goal of these tests was to provide information that would aid in the prediction of HE response in accident situations where the initiating stimulus was less than that required for direct shock initiation. Before these tests were run, a prediction of threshold impact velocity was made (70m/s) using a rough average of previously reported threshold factional work from skid tests (1 cal/cm{sub 2}) and the experimental value for coefficient of friction of 0.5({plus_minus}) measured in the same tests for PBX-9404. The actual testing proved the threshold impact velocity to be much less, and the pretest prediction was not only wrong, it was not conservative. This work presents a methodology for more accurately predicting the reaction threshold for HE involved in an accident such as an airplane crash or a severe land transportation accident. The main focus of this work is on LX-10-1 (94.5% 5.5% Viton A binder, density 1.86g/cm{sup 3}). Additional work was done on LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% KelF binder, density 1.90g/cm{sub 3}), a very insensitive explosive. The explicit two-dimensional finite element code, DYNA2D, was used to model the tests and predict the HE response. The finite element mesh of the projectile and target were generated using MAZE. The post-processing of the DYNA2D analysis was done with ORION.

  15. Hydrodynamic skin-friction reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason C.; Bushnell, Dennis M.; Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1989-10-01

    A process for reducing skin friction, inhibiting the effects of liquid turbulence, and decreasing heat transfer in a system involving flow of a liquid along a surface of a body includes applying a substantially integral sheet of a gas, e.g., air, immediately adjacent to the surface of the body; a marine vehicle, which has a longitudinally grooved surface in proximity with the liquid and with a surface material having high contact angle between the liquid and said wall to reduce interaction of the liquid; water, with the surface of the body; and the hull of the marine vehicle.

  16. Hydrodynamic skin-friction reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Jason C. (Inventor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Inventor); Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for reducing skin friction, inhibiting the effects of liquid turbulence, and decreasing heat transfer in a system involving flow of a liquid along a surface of a body includes applying a substantially integral sheet of a gas, e.g., air, immediately adjacent to the surface of the body, e.g., a marine vehicle, which has a longitudinally grooved surface in proximity with the liquid and with a surface material having high contact angle between the liquid and said wall to reduce interaction of the liquid, e.g., water, with the surface of the body, e.g., the hull of the marine vehicle.

  17. A new parallel algorithm for contact detection in finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Plimpton, S.; Attaway, S.; Vaughan, C.; Gardner, D.

    1996-03-01

    In finite-element, transient dynamics simulations, physical objects are typically modeled as Lagrangian meshes because the meshes can move and deform with the objects as they undergo stress. In many simulations, such as computations of impacts or explosions, portions of the deforming mesh come in contact with each other as the simulation progresses. These contacts must be detected and the forces they impart to the mesh must be computed at each timestep to accurately capture the physics of interest. While the finite-element portion of these computations is readily parallelized, the contact detection problem is difficult to implement efficiently on parallel computers and has been a bottleneck to achieving high performance on large parallel machines. In this paper we describe a new parallel algorithm for detecting contacts. Our approach differs from previous work in that we use two different parallel decompositions, a static one for the finite element analysis and dynamic one for contact detection. We present results for this algorithm in a parallel version of the transient dynamics code PRONTO-3D running on a large Intel Paragon.

  18. A method to quantitatively evaluate the Hamaker constant using the jump-into-contact effect in atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Soma; Sreeram, P. A.; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    We find that the 'jump-into-contact' of the cantilever in the atomic force microscope (AFM) is caused by an inherent instability in the motion of the AFM cantilever. The analysis is based on a simple model of the cantilever moving in a nonlinear force field. We show that the 'jump-into-contact' distance can be used to find the interaction of the cantilever tip with the surface. In the specific context of the attractive van der Waals interaction, this method can be realized as a new method of measuring the Hamaker constant for materials. The Hamaker constant is determined from the deflection of the cantilever at the 'jump-into-contact' using the force constant of the cantilever and the tip radius of curvature, all of which can be obtained by measurements. The results have been verified experimentally on a sample of cleaved mica, a sample of Si wafer with natural oxide and a silver film, using a number of cantilevers with different spring constants. We emphasize that the method described here is applicable only to surfaces that have van der Waals interaction as the tip-sample interaction. We also find that the tip to sample separation at the 'jump-into-contact' is simply related to the cantilever deflection at this point, and this provides a method to exactly locate the surface.

  19. Sulfur passivation and contact methods for GaAs nanowire solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, N.; Peng, Z.; Kuyanov, P.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of sulfur passivation on core-shell p-n junction GaAs nanowire (NW) solar cells has been investigated. Devices of two types were investigated, consisting of indium tin oxide contact dots or opaque Au finger electrodes. Lateral carrier transport from the NWs to the contact fingers was achieved via a p-doped GaAs surface conduction layer. NWs between the opaque contact fingers had sidewall surfaces exposed for passivation by sulfur. The relative cell efficiency increased by 19% upon passivation. The contribution of the thin film grown between the NWs to the total cell efficiency was estimated by removing the NWs using a sonication procedure. Mechanisms of carrier transport and photovoltaic effects are discussed on the basis of spatially resolved laser scanning measurements.

  20. Sulfur passivation and contact methods for GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tajik, N; Peng, Z; Kuyanov, P; LaPierre, R R

    2011-06-01

    The effect of sulfur passivation on core-shell p-n junction GaAs nanowire (NW) solar cells has been investigated. Devices of two types were investigated, consisting of indium tin oxide contact dots or opaque Au finger electrodes. Lateral carrier transport from the NWs to the contact fingers was achieved via a p-doped GaAs surface conduction layer. NWs between the opaque contact fingers had sidewall surfaces exposed for passivation by sulfur. The relative cell efficiency increased by 19% upon passivation. The contribution of the thin film grown between the NWs to the total cell efficiency was estimated by removing the NWs using a sonication procedure. Mechanisms of carrier transport and photovoltaic effects are discussed on the basis of spatially resolved laser scanning measurements. PMID:21454946

  1. In-situ studies of cartilage microtribology: roles of speed and contact area

    PubMed Central

    Bonnevie, E.D.; Baro, V.; Wang, L.; Burris, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The progression of local cartilage surface damage toward early stage osteoarthritis (OA) likely depends on the severity of the damage and its impact on the local lubrication and stress distribution in the surrounding tissue. It is difficult to study the local responses using traditional methods; in-situ microtribological methods are being pursued here as a means to elucidate the mechanical aspects of OA progression. While decades of research have been dedicated to the macrotribological properties of articular cartilage, the microscale response is unclear. An experimental study of healthy cartilage microtribology was undertaken to assess the physiological relevance of a microscale friction probe. Normal forces were on the orderof50 mN. Sliding speed varied from 0 to 5 mm/s, and two probes radii, 0.8 mm and 3.2 mm, were used in the study. In-situ measurements of the indentation depth into the cartilage enabled calculations of contact area, effective elastic modulus, elastic and fluid normal force contributions, and the interfacial friction coefficient. This work resulted in the following findings: 1) at high sliding speed (V=1–5 mm/s), the friction coefficient was low (μ = 0.025) and insensitive to probe radius (0.8 mm 3.2 mm) despite the 4-folddifference in the resulting contact areas; 2) The contact area was a strong function of the probe radius and sliding speed; 3) the friction coefficient was proportional to contact area when sliding speed varied from 0.05mm/s-5mm/s; 4) the fluid load support was greater than 85% for all sliding conditions (0% fluid support when V=0) and was insensitive to both probe radius and sliding speed. The findings were consistent with the adhesive theory of friction; as speed increased, increased effective hardness reduced the area of solid-solid contact which subsequently reduced the friction force. Where the severity of the sliding conditions dominates the wear and degradation of typical engineering tribomaterials, the results

  2. Contact dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Dermatitis - contact; Allergic dermatitis; Dermatitis - allergic; Irritant contact dermatitis; Skin rash - contact dermatitis ... There are 2 types of contact dermatitis. Irritant dermatitis: This ... can be by contact with acids, alkaline materials such as soaps ...

  3. Slippery but Tough: The Rapid Fracture of Lubricated Frictional Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, E.; Svetlizky, I.; Fineberg, J.

    2016-05-01

    We study the onset of friction for rough contacting blocks whose interface is coated with a thin lubrication layer. High speed measurements of the real contact area and stress fields near the interface reveal that propagating shear cracks mediate lubricated frictional motion. While lubricants reduce interface resistances, surprisingly they significantly increase the energy dissipated Γ during rupture. Moreover, lubricant viscosity affects the onset of friction but has no effect on Γ . Fracture mechanics provide a new way to view the otherwise hidden complex dynamics of the lubrication layer.

  4. Slippery but Tough: The Rapid Fracture of Lubricated Frictional Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bayart, E; Svetlizky, I; Fineberg, J

    2016-05-13

    We study the onset of friction for rough contacting blocks whose interface is coated with a thin lubrication layer. High speed measurements of the real contact area and stress fields near the interface reveal that propagating shear cracks mediate lubricated frictional motion. While lubricants reduce interface resistances, surprisingly they significantly increase the energy dissipated Γ during rupture. Moreover, lubricant viscosity affects the onset of friction but has no effect on Γ. Fracture mechanics provide a new way to view the otherwise hidden complex dynamics of the lubrication layer. PMID:27232023

  5. Friction Properties of Bio-mimetic Nano-fibrillar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Hua; Mi, Chun-Hui

    2009-10-01

    Nano-fibrillar arrays are fabricated using polystyrene materials. The average diameter of each fiber is about 300nm. Experiments show that such a fibrillar surface possesses a relatively hydrophobic feature with a water contact angle of 142°. Nanoscale friction properties are mainly focused on. It is found that the friction force of polystyrene nano-fibrillar surfaces is obviously enhanced in contrast to polystyrene smooth surfaces. The apparent coefficient of friction increases with the applied load, but is independent of the scanning speed. An interesting observation is that the friction force increases almost linearly with the real contact area, which abides by the fundamental Bowden-Tabor law of nano-scale friction.

  6. Lateral-deflection-controlled friction force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Kenji; Hamaoka, Satoshi; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Itoh, Shintaro; Zhang, Hedong

    2014-08-01

    Lateral-deflection-controlled dual-axis friction force microscopy (FFM) is presented. In this method, an electrostatic force generated with a probe-incorporated micro-actuator compensates for friction force in real time during probe scanning using feedback control. This equivalently large rigidity can eliminate apparent boundary width and lateral snap-in, which are caused by lateral probe deflection. The method can evolve FFM as a method for quantifying local frictional properties on the micro/nanometer-scale by overcoming essential problems to dual-axis FFM.

  7. The friction and wear of TPS fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, W. D.; Wong, S.

    1987-01-01

    The sliding friction behavior of single filaments of SiO2, SiC, and an aluminoborosilicate has been determined. These fibers are used in thermal protection systems (TPS) and are subject to damage during weaving and aero-maneuvering. All fibers exhibited stick-slip friction indicating the successive formation and rupture of strong junctions between the contacting filaments. The static frictional resistance of the sized SiC filament was 4X greater than for the same filament after heat cleaning. This result suggests that the sizing is an organic polymer with a high shear yield strength. Heat cleaning exposes the SiC surface and/or leaves an inorganic residue so that the adhesional contact between filaments has a low fracture energy and frictional sliding occurs by brittle fracture. The frictional resistances of the sized and heat cleaned SiO2 and glass filaments were all comparable to that of the heat cleaned SiC. It would appear that the sizings as well as the heat cleaned surfaces of the silica and glass have low fracture energies so that the sliding resistance is determined by brittle fracture.

  8. Friction and Wear on the Atomic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnecco, Enrico; Bennewitz, Roland; Pfeiffer, Oliver; Socoliuc, Anisoara; Meyer, Ernst

    Friction has long been the subject of research: the empirical da Vinci-Amontons friction laws have been common knowledge for centuries. Macroscopic experiments performed by the school of Bowden and Tabor revealed that macroscopic friction can be related to the collective action of small asperities. Over the last 15 years, experiments performed with the atomic force microscope have provided new insights into the physics of single asperities sliding over surfaces. This development, together with the results from complementary experiments using surface force apparatus and the quartz microbalance, have led to the new field of nanotribology. At the same time, increasing computing power has permitted the simulation of processes that occur during sliding contact involving several hundreds of atoms. It has become clear that atomic processes cannot be neglected when interpreting nanotribology experiments. Even on well-defined surfaces, experiments have revealed that atomic structure is directly linked to friction force. This chapter will describe friction force microscopy experiments that reveal, more or less directly, atomic processes during sliding contact.

  9. Using Design of Experiments Methods for Assessing Peak Contact Pressure to Material Properties of Soft Tissue in Human Knee

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Ali; Arumugam, Manohar; Hassan, Mohd Roshdi

    2013-01-01

    Contact pressure in the knee joint is a key element in the mechanisms of knee pain and osteoarthritis. Assessing the contact pressure in tibiofemoral joint is a challenging mechanical problem due to uncertainty in material properties. In this study, a sensitivity analysis of tibiofemoral peak contact pressure to the material properties of the soft tissue was carried out through fractional factorial and Box-Behnken designs. The cartilage was modeled as linear elastic material, and in addition to its elastic modulus, interaction effects of soft tissue material properties were added compared to previous research. The results indicated that elastic modulus of the cartilage is the most effective factor. Interaction effects of axial/radial modulus with elastic modulus of cartilage, circumferential and axial/radial moduli of meniscus were other influential factors. Furthermore this study showed how design of experiment methods can help designers to reduce the number of finite element analyses and to better interpret the results. PMID:27006925

  10. Locating of normal transitions in a Bi2223 high temperature superconducting coil by non-contact voltage measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, N.; Nishiyama, K.

    2015-12-01

    Locating of normal transitions in high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for protection and safety design of HTS apparatus. A general method to locate the normal transitions is to measure resistive voltages along HTS windings by many voltage taps directly soldered to the HTS coils. However, electrical insulation characteristics of the HTS coils are deteriorated because it is necessary to remove electrical insulations of the HTS wires for the soldering. It is a serious problem especially for AC HTS coils to which high voltages are applied. Therefore the authors have presented a non-contact voltage measurement method that can detect the resistive voltages without removing the insulations by voltage dividing capacitors. So far the authors have verified the principle of the non-contact method. In this paper, a method to locate the normal transitions in a Bi2223 HTS coil based on the non-contact method is proposed. The proposed method can not only detect the normal transitions but also locate their positions. It is experimentally confirmed that the proposed method is useful for locating the normal transitions.

  11. Changes in flexibility upon binding: Application of the self-consistent pair contact probability method to protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canino, Lawrence S.; Shen, Tongye; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2002-12-01

    We extend the self-consistent pair contact probability method to the evaluation of the partition function for a protein complex at thermodynamic equilibrium. Specifically, we adapt the method for multichain models and introduce a parametrization for amino acid-specific pairwise interactions. This method is similar to the Gaussian network model but allows for the adjusting of the strengths of native state contacts. The method is first validated on a high resolution x-ray crystal structure of bovine Pancreatic Phospholipase A2 by comparing calculated B-factors with reported values. We then examine binding-induced changes in flexibility in protein-protein complexes, comparing computed results with those obtained from x-ray crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we focus on the mouse acetylcholinesterase:fasciculin II and the human α-thrombin:thrombomodulin complexes.

  12. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-15

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  13. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  14. A thermal, thermoelastic, and wear simulation of a high-energy sliding contact problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, F. E., Jr.; Ling, F. F.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the sliding contact problem encountered in high-energy disk brakes. The analysis includes a simulation modeling, using the finite element method, of the thermoelastic instabilities that cause transient changes in contact to occur on the friction surface. In order to include the effect of wear of the concentrated contacts on the friction surface, a wear criterion is proposed that results in prediction of wear rates for disk brakes that are quite close to experimentally determined wear rates. The thermal analysis shows that the transient temperature distribution in a disk brake can be determined more accurately by use of this thermomechanical analysis than by a more conventional analysis that assumes constant contact conditions. It is also shown that lower, more desirable, temperatures in disk brakes can be attained by increasing the volume, the thermal conductivity, and especially, the heat capacity of the brake components.

  15. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Behringer, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Shear Jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficients μs ~= 0 . 6 . Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕS <= ϕ <=ϕJ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of ``force chains,'' which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. We address experimentally how reducing friction affects shear jamming by using either teflon disks of teflon wrapped photoelastic particles. The teflon disks were placed in a wall driven 2D shear apparatus, in which we can probe shear stresses mechanically. Teflon-wrapped disks were placed in a bottom driven 2D shear apparatus (Ren et al., PRL 2013). Both apparatuses provide uniform simple shear. In all low- μ experiments, the shear jamming occurred, as observed through stress increases on the packing. However, the low- μ differences observed for ϕJ -ϕS were smaller than for higher friction particles. Ongoing work is studying systems using hydrogel disks, which have a lower friction coefficient than teflon. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant No. DMR12-06351, ARO Grant No. W911NF-1-11-0110, and NASA Grant No. NNX10AU01G.

  16. Friction of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results in the published literature show that at low normal stress the shear stress required to slide one rock over another varies widely between experiments. This is because at low stress rock friction is strongly dependent on surface roughness. At high normal stress that effect is diminished and the friction is nearly independent of rock type. If the sliding surfaces are separated by gouge composed of Montmorillonite or vermiculite the friction can be very low. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  17. Analysis and numerical simulation of rolling contact between sphere and cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanling; Xia, Chengtao; Wang, Hongbo; Xuan, Jiaping; Xiang, Jingzhong; Liu, Xianli; Su, Xiangguo

    2015-05-01

    In non-conforming rolling contact, the contact stress is highly concentrated in the contact area. However, there are some limitations of the special contact model and stress model used for the theoretical study of the phenomenon, and this has prevented in-depth analysis of the associated friction, wear, and failure. This paper is particularly aimed at investigating the area of rolling contact between a sphere and a cone, for which purpose the boundary is determined by the Hertz theory and the geometries of the non-conforming surfaces. The phenomenon of stick-slip contact is observed to occur in the contact area under the condition of no-full-slip (Q < μ · P). Using the two-dimensional rolling contact theory developed by CARTER, the relative positions of the stick and slip regions and the distribution of the tangential force over the contact area are analyzed. Furthermore, each stress component is calculated based on the McEwen theory and the idea of narrow band. The stress equations for the three-dimensional rolling contact between the sphere and the cone are obtained by the principle of superposition, and are used to perform some numerical simulations. The results show that the stress components have a large gradient along the boundary between the stick and slip regions, and that the maximum stress is inversely proportional to the contact coefficient and proportional to the friction coefficient. A new method for investigating the stress during non-classical three-dimensional rolling contact is proposed as a theoretical foundation for the analysis of the associated friction, wear, and failure.

  18. A Study on Tactile Friction and Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugishita, Junji; Usami, Hatsuhiko; Hattori, Tomokazu

    The tactile wear (“tezure” in Japanese) is an abrasion phenomenon of material surfaces caused by the contact of human hand over a long period of time. Though this phenomenon has been the focus of various articles, an extensive study with regard to the wear characteristics is of a profound importance. To date, we have several remarkable examples such as the statue of Pindola Bharadvaja (Buddhist) and the St. Peter statue (Christian). Followers of the respective religions who are deeply attached and rooted have been touching the statues as part of their rituals for many generations over centuries. In this study, an attempt is done to verify the friction and wear characteristics of various soft metals with contact of human finger. The results of our experiments show that the friction coefficient upon the contact of the human finger and pure copper are very high and thus proving tactile wear of soft metals can be generated easily.

  19. Modeling of rock friction 1. Experimental results and constitutive equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Direct shear experiments on ground surfaces of a granodiorite from Raymond, California, at normal stresses of ??6 MPa demonstrate that competing time, displacement, and velocity effects control rock friction. It is proposed that the strength of the population of points of contacts between sliding surfaces determines frictional strength and that the population of contacts changes continuously with displacements. Previous experiments demonstrate that the strength of the contacts increases with the age of the contacts. The present experiments establish that a characteristic displacement, proportional to surface roughness, is required to change the population of contacts. Hence during slip the average age of the points of contact and therefore frictional strength decrease as slip velocity increases. Displacement weakening and consequently the potential for unstable slip occur whenever displacement reduces the average age of the contacts. In addition to this velocity dependency, which arises from displacement dependency and time dependency, the experiments also show a competing but transient increase in friction whenever slip velocity increases. Creep of the sliding surface at stresses below that for steady state slip is also observed. Constitutive relationships are developed that permit quantitative simulation of the friction versus displacement data as a function of surface roughness and for different time and velocity histories. Unstable slip in experiments is controlled by these constitutive effects and by the stiffness of the experimental system. It is argued that analogous properties control earthquake instability. Copyright ?? 1979 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. On surface structure and friction regulation in reptilian limbless locomotion.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, Hisham A

    2013-06-01

    One way of controlling friction and associated energy losses is to engineer a deterministic structural pattern on the surface of the rubbing parts (i.e., texture engineering). Custom texturing enhances the quality of lubrication, reduces friction, and allows the use of lubricants of lower viscosity. To date, a standardized procedure to generate deterministic texture constructs is virtually non-existent. Many engineers, therefore, study natural species to explore surface construction and to probe the role that surface topography assumes in friction control. Snakes offer rich examples of surfaces where topological features allow the optimization and control of frictional behavior. In this paper, we investigate the frictional behavior of a constrictor type reptile, Python regius. The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakeskin. The coefficient of friction depends on the direction of sliding: the value in forward motion is lower than that in the converse direction. Detailed analysis of the surface metrological feature reveals that tuning frictional response in snakes originates from the hierarchical nature of surface topology combined to the profile asymmetry of the surface micro-features, and the variation of the curvature of the contacting scales at different body regions. Such a combination affords the reptile the ability to optimize the frictional response. PMID:23582565

  1. Nondestructive, in-process inspection of inertia friction welding : an investigation into a new sensing technique.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D. A.; Cola, M. J.; Dave, V. R.; Dozhier, N. G.; Carpenter, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the capabilities of a new sensor for in-process monitoring of quality during friction welding. The non-contact sensor is composed of microphones that are mounted in an aluminum ring which surrounds the weld joint. The sensor collects the acoustical energy (in the form of sound pressure) that is emitted during the plastic deformation and phase transformations (if applicable) in friction welding processes. The focus in this preliminary investigation is to search for and identify features within the acoustical emission that are indicative of bond quality. Bar-to-bar inertia friction welding (one form of friction welding) of copper to 304L stainless steel is used in this proof-of-concept study. This material combination exhibits only marginal weldability and is ideally suited for validating the capabilities of this new sensing technique. A probabilistic neural network is employed in this work to analyze the acoustical emission's frequency spectrum in an attempt to classify acceptable, conditional, and unacceptable welds. Our preliminary findings indicate that quality-based process features do exist within the frequency spectrum of the acoustical signature. The results from this analysis are presented. Future work in improving the sensing and interpretation of the data is discussed in an effort to develop a robust method of quality-based, in-process monitoring of friction welds.

  2. Frictional resistance of self-ligating versus conventional brackets in different bracket-archwire-angle combinations

    PubMed Central

    MONTEIRO, Maria Regina Guerra; da SILVA, Licinio Esmeraldo; ELIAS, Carlos Nelson; VILELLA, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the influence of archwire material (NiTi, beta-Ti and stainless steel) and brackets design (self-ligating and conventional) on the frictional force resistance. Material and Methods Two types of brackets (self-ligating brackets - Smartclip, 3M/Unitek - and conventional brackets - Gemini, 3M/Unitek) with three (0, 5, and 10 degrees) slot angulation attached with elastomeric ligatures (TP Orthodontics) were tested. All brackets were tested with archwire 0.019"x0.025" nickel-titanium, beta-titanium, and stainless steel (Unitek/3M). The mechanical testing was performed with a universal testing machine eMIC DL 10000 (eMIC Co, Brazil). The wires were pulled from the bracket slots at a cross-head speed of 3 mm/min until 2 mm displacement. Results Self-ligating brackets produced significantly lower friction values compared with those of conventional brackets. Frictional force resistance values were directly proportional to the increase in the bracket/ wire angulation. With regard to conventional brackets, stainless steel wires had the lowest friction force values, followed by nickel-titanium and beta-titanium ones. With regard to self-ligating brackets, the nickel-titanium wires had the lowest friction values, significantly lower than those of other materials. Conclusion even at different angulations, the self-ligating brackets showed significantly lower friction force values than the conventional brackets. Combined with nickel-titanium wires, the self-ligating brackets exhibit much lower friction, possibly due to the contact between nickel-titanium clips and wires of the same material. PMID:25025564

  3. Breakdown of Amontons' Law of Friction in Sheared-Elastomer with Local Amontons' Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukawa, Hiroshi; Otsuki, Michio

    2012-02-01

    It is well known that Amontons' law of friction i.e. the frictional force against the sliding motion of solid object is proportional to the loading force and not dependent on the contact area, holds well for various systems. Here we show, however, the breakdown of the Amontons' law for the elastic object which have local friction obeying Amontons' law and is under uniform pressure by FEM calculation The external shearing force applied to the trailing edge of the sample induces local slip. The range of the slip increases with the increasing external force adiabatically at first. When the range reaches the critical magnitude, the slips moves rapidly and reaches the leading edge of the sample then the whole system slides. These behaviors are consistent with the experiment by Rubinstein et.al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 226103). The static frictional coefficient, the ratio between the static frictional force for the whole system and the loading force, decreases with the increasing pressure. This means the breakdown of Amontons' law. The pressure dependence of the frictional coefficient is caused by the change of the critical length of the local slip. The behaviors of the local slip and the frictional coefficient are well explained by the 1 dimensional model analytically.

  4. Assessing a novel contact heater as a new method of recovering explosives traces from porous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Holly A; Lewis, Simon W; Beardah, Matthew S; NicDaeid, Niamh

    2016-02-01

    It can be very challenging to recover explosives traces from porous surfaces, such as clothing and car seats, compared to non-porous surfaces. The contact heater has been developed as a novel instrument designed to recover explosives traces from porous surfaces. Samples are taken by heating and drawing air across a surface, with the air flowing through a sampling cartridge containing adsorbent polymer beads, which act to trap any recovered explosive material. Any collected explosive can then be eluted from this cartridge using a solvent, prior to analysis. This paper outlines work performed to evaluate the usefulness of the contact heater with regards to the recovery of explosives traces from porous materials. Ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) were chosen as two representative explosives for this study. Quantification was performed using GC-MS for EGDN and LC-MS/MS for TATP. Different sampling temperatures, sampling times and elution solvents were investigated. Recovery was trialled from leather, carpet and denim. Recoveries of up to 71% were obtained following optimisation. It was also possible to recover TATP from fabrics exposed to TATP vapour in a vapour-laden jar up to two hours after exposure. The contact heater therefore appears to be a very useful tool for the recovery of explosives traces from porous materials. PMID:26653508

  5. The effect of elastic modulus and friction coefficient on rubber tube sealing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhimiao; Xu, Siyuan; Ren, Fushen; Liu, Jubao

    2015-03-01

    The packer is the key element in separating geosphere layers of water injection, water plugging and fracturing operations in the oilfield. The sealing ability of the packer is depending on the contact pressure between rubber tube and the casing. The circumferential strain of casing wall was tested by the strain gauge to get the contact pressure distribution along axial direction of the tube. The friction force between the casing and the rubber tube was taken by the pressure sensor in compression process. Under the 20,60 and 100 degrees Celsius conditions, the friction forces and the contact pressure distribution were taken in work condition of single rubber tube, double rubber tubes and combination rubber tubes after oil immersion .The result shows that elastic modulus of rubber tube has little effect on the friction force and contact pressure. With elastic modulus decreasing, the friction forces has gradually decreasing trend; The friction coefficient has much impact on friction force: the friction forces under the condition of dry friction and wet friction are respectively equivalent to 48.27% and 5.38% axial compression forces. At wet friction condition, the contact pressure distribution is more uniform and the sealing effect is better.

  6. Experimental Measurement of the Static Coefficient of Friction at the Ti-Ti Taper Connection in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bitter, T; Khan, I; Marriott, T; Schreurs, B W; Verdonschot, N; Janssen, D

    2016-03-01

    The modular taper junction in total hip replacements has been implicated as a possible source of wear. The finite-element (FE) method can be used to study the wear potential at the taper junction. For such simulations it is important to implement representative contact parameters, in order to achieve accurate results. One of the main parameters in FE simulations is the coefficient of friction. However, in current literature, there is quite a wide spread in coefficient of friction values (0.15 - 0.8), which has a significant effect on the outcome of the FE simulations. Therefore, to obtain more accurate results, one should use a coefficient of friction that is determined for the specific material couple being analyzed. In this study, the static coefficient of friction was determined for two types of titanium-on-titanium stem-adaptor couples, using actual cut-outs of the final implants, to ensure that the coefficient of friction was determined consistently for the actual implant material and surface finish characteristics. Two types of tapers were examined, Biomet type-1 and 12/14, where type-1 has a polished surface finish and the 12/14 is a microgrooved system. We found static coefficients of friction of 0.19 and 0.29 for the 12/14 and type-1 stem-adaptor couples, respectively. PMID:26747129

  7. Turbine blade friction damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A lumped parameter method, implemented on a VAX 11/780 computer shows that the primary parameters affecting the performance of the friction damper of the first stage turbine of the SSME high pressure fuel pump are: the damper-blade coefficient of friction; the normal force applied to the friction interface; the amplitude of the periodic forcing function; the relative phase angle of the forcing functions for adjacent blades bridged by a damper (effectively, the engine order of the forcing function); and the amount of hysteretic damping that acts to limit the vibration amplitude of the blade in its resonance modes. The low order flexural resonance vibration modes of HPFTP blades without dampers, with production dampers, and with two types of lightweight experimental dampers were evaluated in high speed spin pit tests. Results agree with those of the analytical study in that blades fitted with production friction dampers experienced the airfoil-alone flexural resonance mode, while those without dampers or with lighter weight dampers did not. No blades fitted with dampers experienced the whole blade flexural resonance mode during high speed tests, while those without dampers did.

  8. Friction and nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manini, N.; Braun, O. M.; Tosatti, E.; Guerra, R.; Vanossi, A.

    2016-07-01

    The nonlinear dynamics associated with sliding friction forms a broad interdisciplinary research field that involves complex dynamical processes and patterns covering a broad range of time and length scales. Progress in experimental techniques and computational resources has stimulated the development of more refined and accurate mathematical and numerical models, capable of capturing many of the essentially nonlinear phenomena involved in friction.

  9. Friction and nonlinear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Manini, N; Braun, O M; Tosatti, E; Guerra, R; Vanossi, A

    2016-07-27

    The nonlinear dynamics associated with sliding friction forms a broad interdisciplinary research field that involves complex dynamical processes and patterns covering a broad range of time and length scales. Progress in experimental techniques and computational resources has stimulated the development of more refined and accurate mathematical and numerical models, capable of capturing many of the essentially nonlinear phenomena involved in friction. PMID:27249652

  10. Analysis of Parameter Estimation Possibilities of the Thermal Contact Resistance Using the Laser Flash Method with Two-Layer Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czél, Balázs; Woodbury, Keith A.; Woolley, Jonathan; Gróf, Gyula

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents a curve-fitting-based calculation of the thermal contact resistance and other parameters (absorbed energy and material properties) from laser flash measurements considering a two-layer specimen (aluminum substrate and stainless-steel film). Sensitivity analysis of different cases was used to examine the sensitivities of the unknown parameters: thermal contact resistance, absorbed energy, specific heat of the film, and thermal conductivity of the film. A nonlinear curve-fitting method was applied to perform the estimation of the unknown parameters using simulated measurements generated by the solution of the direct problem. An extensive analysis was performed to examine which parameters might be estimated simultaneously with the contact resistance for different noise levels of the simulated measurement. It was concluded that in the noiseless case all four unknown parameters can be estimated simultaneously with high accuracy. The noise has a significant effect on the accuracy of the parameter estimation, but even when a reasonable noise level is present, it is still possible to accurately estimate one or two parameters together with the thermal contact resistance.

  11. Friction in orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Prashant, P. S.; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology used hardly simulates the oral conditions. Lately studies have concluded that more emphasis should be laid on binding and notching of archwires as these are considered to be the primary factors involved in retarding the tooth movement. This article reviews the various components involved in RS and the factors affecting friction. Further, research work should be carried out to provide cost effective alternatives aimed at reducing friction. PMID:26538873

  12. Lincos: An interplanetary language. [mathematical method for cosmic radio contact with extraterrestrial life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudenthal, H.

    1974-01-01

    A language for cosmic contacts is envisioned that utilizes radio signals of different wavelengths as sounds to form words. These words are in most cases abbreviations of Latin words understood from their English and French cognates. The logistic syntax uses pauses for punctuation in a binary system; pairs of algebraic formulas are transmitted where in a such pair the second element is always derived from the first; between them is transmitted a word that is understood as -follows- by the listener. The concepts of difference in position, of motion, of space, and of mass can be mathematically described by this language.

  13. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  14. Adhesion and friction of thin metal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in vacuum with thin films of titanium, chromium, iron, and platinum sputter deposited on quartz or mica substrates. A single crystal hemispherically tipped gold slider was used in contact with the films at loads of 1.0 to 30.0 and at a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min at 23 C. Test results indicate that the friction coefficient is dependent on the adhesion of two interfaces, that between the film and its substrate and the slider and the film. There exists a relationship between the percent d bond character of metals in bulk and in thin film form and the friction coefficient. Oxygen can increase adhesive bonding of a metal film (platinum) to a substrate.

  15. Effect of frictional heating on brake materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, T.-L.; Peterson, M. B.; Ling, F. F.

    1974-01-01

    An exploratory study of the properties of aircraft brake materials was made to determine ways of improving friction and wear behavior while minimizing surface temperatures. It is found that frictional variation at high temperature involves material softening and metal transfer, formation of oxides, and surface melting. The choice of proper materials to combat these effects is discussed. Minimum surface temperatures are found to result from use of materials with large density-specific heat and density-specific heat-conductivity factors, use of a higher load-lower friction system, and maximization of the contact area. Some useful trade-off criteria for the size of brake disks against weight considerations are suggested. Additional information on material behavior and peak braking temperatures was gathered from an inspection of used brake pads and rotor disks.

  16. Hybrid Broad Phase Contact Detection Method for Lunar/Mars Regolith Modeling Designed for Use on Heterogeneous Computer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchitsky, A. V.; Johnson, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    Discrete element method (DEM) simulation is used for the modeling of mobility and excavation on Mars and the Moon, due to many prohibitive limitations of continuum models. One of the most computationally expensive parts of all DEM codes is contact detection between different particles and objects in the system. Taking a naive approach, the operation costs grow as a square of the number of elements. This is prohibitive even for a small number of particles. Instead, most of the impossible contacts are filtered by broad phase contact detection systems. However, such systems are generally hard to run on parallel heterogeneous systems due to many conditionals and to large global memory transactions. In this work, we report on a new broad phase contact detection system, suitable for heterogeneous computational systems such as the IBM Cell and CPU/GPU systems. The approach is based on space partitioning and sweep and prune methods. The particle space is divided by regular columns, where every column is filled with particles. Each particle belongs to up to 4 columns. A sweep and prune method is used in every column. Due to every column containing number of particles proportional to a cubic root of total number of particles, the column fits in small messages or in small memory chunks and can be independently processed on a small operational unit, such as an SPU on the IBM Cell processor. The special method used to enforce the contact list produced by this procedure, so that it contain no duplicates of collisions. Further parallelization is allowed on other stages due to this feature of the method, as well. We discuss the usage and performance of this method on an IBM Cell QS22 cluster with 12 blades, available at Arctic Region Supercomputing Center. We compare to CPU based supercomputers. To make the code portable between different systems, we abstract the parallel level to a separate software library. The main code is "aware" it needs to run in a parallel mode. However

  17. Assessment of non-contacting optical methods to measure wear and surface roughness in ceramic total disc replacements.

    PubMed

    Green, Naomi C; Bowen, James; Hukins, David W L; Shepherd, Duncan E T

    2015-03-01

    This study presents a method for measuring the low volumetric wear expected in ceramic total disc replacements, which can be used to replace intervertebral discs in the spine, using non-contacting optical methods. Alumina-on-alumina ball-on-disc tests were conducted with test conditions approximating those of cervical (neck region of the spine) total disc replacement wear tests. The samples were then scanned using a three-dimensional non-contacting optical profilometer and the data used to measure surface roughness and develop a method for measuring the wear volume. The results showed that the magnification of the optical lens affected the accuracy of both the surface roughness and wear volume measurements. The method was able to successfully measure wear volumes of 0.0001 mm(3), which corresponds to a mass of 0.0001 mg, which would have been undetectable using the gravimetric method. A further advantage of this method is that with one scan the user can measure changes in surface topography, volumetric wear and the location of the wear on the implant surface. This method could also be applied to more severe wear, other types of orthopaedic implants and different materials. PMID:25834000

  18. The Double Hierarchy Method. A parallel 3D contact method for the interaction of spherical particles with rigid FE boundaries using the DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santasusana, Miquel; Irazábal, Joaquín; Oñate, Eugenio; Carbonell, Josep Maria

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a new methodology for the treatment of the contact interaction between rigid boundaries and spherical discrete elements (DE). Rigid body parts are present in most of large-scale simulations. The surfaces of the rigid parts are commonly meshed with a finite element-like (FE) discretization. The contact detection and calculation between those DE and the discretized boundaries is not straightforward and has been addressed by different approaches. The algorithm presented in this paper considers the contact of the DEs with the geometric primitives of a FE mesh, i.e. facet, edge or vertex. To do so, the original hierarchical method presented by Horner et al. (J Eng Mech 127(10):1027-1032, 2001) is extended with a new insight leading to a robust, fast and accurate 3D contact algorithm which is fully parallelizable. The implementation of the method has been developed in order to deal ideally with triangles and quadrilaterals. If the boundaries are discretized with another type of geometries, the method can be easily extended to higher order planar convex polyhedra. A detailed description of the procedure followed to treat a wide range of cases is presented. The description of the developed algorithm and its validation is verified with several practical examples. The parallelization capabilities and the obtained performance are presented with the study of an industrial application example.

  19. The Double Hierarchy Method. A parallel 3D contact method for the interaction of spherical particles with rigid FE boundaries using the DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santasusana, Miquel; Irazábal, Joaquín; Oñate, Eugenio; Carbonell, Josep Maria

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new methodology for the treatment of the contact interaction between rigid boundaries and spherical discrete elements (DE). Rigid body parts are present in most of large-scale simulations. The surfaces of the rigid parts are commonly meshed with a finite element-like (FE) discretization. The contact detection and calculation between those DE and the discretized boundaries is not straightforward and has been addressed by different approaches. The algorithm presented in this paper considers the contact of the DEs with the geometric primitives of a FE mesh, i.e. facet, edge or vertex. To do so, the original hierarchical method presented by Horner et al. (J Eng Mech 127(10):1027-1032, 2001) is extended with a new insight leading to a robust, fast and accurate 3D contact algorithm which is fully parallelizable. The implementation of the method has been developed in order to deal ideally with triangles and quadrilaterals. If the boundaries are discretized with another type of geometries, the method can be easily extended to higher order planar convex polyhedra. A detailed description of the procedure followed to treat a wide range of cases is presented. The description of the developed algorithm and its validation is verified with several practical examples. The parallelization capabilities and the obtained performance are presented with the study of an industrial application example.

  20. Atomistic Simulation of Single Asperity Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip; Kromer; Marder, Michael

    2003-03-01

    In the standard (Bowden and Tabor) model of friction, the macroscopic behavior of sliding results from the deformation of microscopic asperities in contact. A recent idea instead extracts macroscopic friction from the aggregate behavior of traveling, self-healing interfacial cracks: certain families of cracks are found to be mathematically forbidden, and the envelope of allowed cracks dictates the familiar Coulomb law of friction. To explore the connection between the new and traditional pictures of friction, we conducted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of single-asperity contact subjected to an oscillatory sliding force -- a geometry important for the problem of fretting (damage due to small-scale vibratory contact). Our simulations reveal the importance of traveling interface cracks to the dynamics of slip at the interface, and illuminate the dynamics of crack initiation and suppression.

  1. Preface: Friction at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusc, Claudio; Smith, Roger; Urbakh, Michael; Vanossi, Andrea

    2008-09-01

    Interfacial friction is one of the oldest problems in physics and chemistry, and certainly one of the most important from a practical point of view. Everyday operations on a broad range of scales, from nanometer and up, depend upon the smooth and satisfactory functioning of countless tribological systems. Friction imposes serious constraints and limitations on the performance and lifetime of micro-machines and, undoubtedly, will impose even more severe constraints on the emerging technology of nano-machines. Standard lubrication techniques used for large objects are expected to be less effective in the nano-world. Novel methods for control and manipulation are therefore needed. What has been missing is a molecular level understanding of processes occurring between and close to interacting surfaces to help understand, and later manipulate friction. Friction is intimately related to both adhesion and wear, and all three require an understanding of highly non-equilibrium processes occurring at the molecular level to determine what happens at the macroscopic level. Due to its practical importance and the relevance to basic scientific questions there has been major increase in activity in the study of interfacial friction on the microscopic level during the last decade. Intriguing structural and dynamical features have been observed experimentally. These observations have motivated theoretical efforts, both numerical and analytical. This special issue focusses primarily on discussion of microscopic mechanisms of friction and adhesion at the nanoscale level. The contributions cover many important aspects of frictional behaviour, including the origin of stick-slip motion, the dependence of measured forces on the material properties, effects of thermal fluctuations, surface roughness and instabilities in boundary lubricants on both static and kinetic friction. An important problem that has been raised in this issue, and which has still to be resolved, concerns the

  2. A method to determine the two-point contact zone and transfer of wheel-rail forces in a turnout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zunsong; Sun, Shouguang; Xie, Gang

    2010-10-01

    A practical method to determine the zone of two contact points and the transfer of wheel-rail forces between two rails in a turnout is presented in this paper. The method is based on a wheel-rail elastic penetration assumption and used to study a turnout system for a 200 km/h high-speed railway in China. Rail profiles in a number of key sections in the turnout are identified first, and profiles in other sections are then obtained by interpolation between key sections. The track is modelled as flexible with rails and sleepers represented by beams and the interaction between the vehicle and turnout is simulated for cases of the vehicle passing the turnout. Results are mainly presented for two-point contact positions and the characteristics of the wheel-rail forces transference. It is found that the heights of the switch and crossing rail top have significant effects on the wheel-rail contact forces. Finally, the optimised top height for the crossing rails is proposed to reduce the system dynamic force in the turnout system.

  3. Attachment of marine fasteners utilizing portable friction stud welding systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grey, I.C.; Steel, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    A fast, economical and structurally reliable method for attachment of fasteners in marine environments has long been sought by engineers and marine structure owners. A new portable friction stud welding system is one possible solution. The paper will present an explanation of friction welding, a description of portable friction stud welding equipment, as well as laboratory test results evidencing the integrity of this method of material joining. A method of providing improved electrical continuity is also presented.

  4. Tribology behavior during indentation and scratch of thin films on substrates: effects of plastic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Biao; Chen, Zhitong

    2015-05-01

    When friction stress on a contact surface reaches material yield strength in shear, contact slippage can occur even if the slipping condition for Coulomb friction is not satisfied. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3-D) scratch model is proposed, which considers combined Coulomb and plastic friction. Influences of plastic friction are discussed for two continuous displacement loading steps: indentation and scratch. For indentation, initially the sliding on the contact surface can not take place and the complete cohesion condition should be employed; then as the indenter is further compressed down to the coating surface, plastic friction instead of Coulomb friction prevails in most of the contact region. For scratch, the previous complete cohesion at the initial indentation is substituted by plastic or Coulomb slipping, and the slippage becomes plastic-sliding governed for a slightly large indentation depth. The effects of the indentation depth and the Coulomb friction coefficient on the scratch friction coefficient are discussed in detail. Several experimental phenomena are interpreted, which include that with an increase of the normal loading, the scratch friction coefficient reduces for the soft coating but grows for the hard coating; and with the growth of hardness after heat treatment, the scratch friction coefficient increases due to weak plastic slippage. Obtained results help to elucidate tribological behaviors during scratch and are helpful for the interpretation of experimental phenomena and the improvement of numerical simulations for the scratch process.

  5. Non-contact passive temperature measuring system and method of operation using micro-mechanical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    2000-04-18

    A non-contact infrared thermometer measures target temperatures remotely without requiring the ratio of the target size to the target distance to the thermometer. A collection means collects and focuses target IR radiation on an IR detector. The detector measures thermal energy of the target over a spectrum using micromechanical sensors. A processor means calculates the collected thermal energy in at least two different spectral regions using a first algorithm in program form and further calculates the ratio of the thermal energy in the at least two different spectral regions to obtain the target temperature independent of the target size, distance to the target and emissivity using a second algorithm in program form.

  6. Non-contact passive temperature measuring system and method of operation using micro-mechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Oden, Patrick I.; Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2000-01-01

    A non-contact infrared thermometer measures target temperatures remotely without requiring the ratio of the target size to the target distance to the thermometer. A collection means collects and focusses target IR radiation on an IR detector. The detector measures thermal energy of the target over a spectrum using micromechanical sensors. A processor means calculates the collected thermal energy in at least two different spectral regions using a first algorithm in program form and further calculates the ratio of the thermal energy in the at least two different spectral regions to obtain the target temperature independent of the target size, distance to the target and emissivity using a second algorithm in program form.

  7. Edge-defined contact heater apparatus and method for floating zone crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kou, Sindo (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for growing a monocrystalline body (30) from a polycrystalline feed rod (22) includes a heater (20) that is positioned to heat a short section of the polycrystalline rod (22) to create a molten zone (34). The heater (20) is formed to include a shaper (40) that contacts the polycrystalline rod (22) in the molten zone (34) and has a hole (46) to allow flow in the molten zone (34) between the polycrystalline rod (22) side and the monocrystalline body (30) side of the shaper. The shaper (40) has an edge (42) that defines the boundary of the cross-section of the monocrystalline body (30) that is formed as the molten material solidifies.

  8. A Simple Method for Determining Heat Transfer, Skin Friction, and Boundary-Layer Thickness for Hypersonic Laminar Boundary-Layer Flows in a Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertram, Mitchel H.; Feller, William V.

    1959-01-01

    A procedure based on the method of similar solutions is presented by which the skin friction, heat transfer, and boundary-layer thickness in a laminar hypersonic flow with pressure gradient may be rapidly evaluated if the pressure distribution is known. This solution, which at present is. restricted to power-law variations of pressure with surface distance, is presented for a wide range of exponents in the power law corresponding to both favorable and adverse pressure gradients. This theory has been compared to results from heat-transfer experiments on blunt-nose flat plates and a hemisphere cylinder at free-stream Mach numbers of 4 and 6.8. The flat-plate experiments included tests made at a Mach number of 6.8 over a range of angle of attack of +/- 10 deg. Reasonable agreement of the experimental and theoretical heat-transfer coefficients has been obtained as well as good correlation of the experimental results over the entire range of angle of attack studied. A similar comparison of theory with experiment was not feasible for boundary-layer-thickness data; however, the hypersonic similarity theory was found to account satisfactorily for the variation in boundary-layer thickness due to local pressure distribution for several sets of measurements.

  9. Correlation of Lithium Ionic Diffusion with Nb Concentration in Li7-xLa3Zr2-xNbxO12 Evaluated by an Internal Friction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Wang, Xian-Ping; Gao, Yun-Xia; Hu, Jing; Zhuang, Zhong; Guo, Li-Jun; Fang, Qian-Feng; Liu, Chang-Song

    2014-01-01

    Solid lithium-ion conductors Li7-xLa3Zr2-xNbxO12 (x = 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5) with cubic garnet structure are successfully prepared by a solid state reaction method, and the effects of Nb concentration on lithium ion diffusion are investigated by means of internal friction (IF) technique. A prominent relaxation-type IF peak (actually composed of two components) is observed in each Nb doped Li7La3Zr2O12 compound: with apeak PL at lower temperature and a peak PH at higher temperature. The mechanisms of the two components are suggested to be associated with two diffusion processes of lithium ions via vacancies: 48g ↔ 48g and 48g ↔ 24d. The relaxational strength of the IF peak gradually decreases, which is accompanied by the activation energy increasing from 0.45 eV to 0.64 eV with the increasing Nb doping level. The corresponding mechanism is ascribed to originate from lattice contraction as well as the lower concentration of diffusion ions induced by the substitution of Zr4+ by Nb5+.

  10. Slip-stick and the evolution of frictional strength.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Oded; Rubinstein, Shmuel M; Fineberg, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of frictional strength has great fundamental and practical importance. Applications range from earthquake dynamics to hard-drive read/write cycles. Frictional strength is governed by the resistance to shear of the large ensemble of discrete contacts that forms the interface that separates two sliding bodies. An interface's overall strength is determined by both the real contact area and the contacts' shear strength. Whereas the average motion of large, slowly sliding bodies is well-described by empirical friction laws, interface strength is a dynamic entity that is inherently related to both fast processes such as detachment/re-attachment and the slow process of contact area rejuvenation. Here we show how frictional strength evolves from extremely short to long timescales, by continuous measurements of the concurrent local evolution of the real contact area and the corresponding interface motion (slip) from the first microseconds when contact detachment occurs to large (100-second) timescales. We identify four distinct and inter-related phases of evolution. First, all of the local contact area reduction occurs within a few microseconds, on the passage of a crack-like front. This is followed by the onset of rapid slip over a characteristic time, the value of which suggests a fracture-induced reduction of contact strength before any slip occurs. This rapid slip phase culminates with a sharp transition to slip at velocities an order of magnitude slower. At slip arrest, 'ageing' immediately commences as contact area increases on a characteristic timescale determined by the system's local memory of its effective contact time before slip arrest. We show how the singular logarithmic behaviour generally associated with ageing is cut off at short times. These results provide a comprehensive picture of how frictional strength evolves from the short times and rapid slip velocities at the onset of motion to ageing at the long times following slip arrest. PMID

  11. Friction Tests in Magnesium Tube Hydroforming at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Wang, Kuo-Hsing; Kuo, Tsung-Yu

    2011-05-04

    In metal forming, lubricants have a variety of functions. The top priority is usually reduction of friction in order to increase the formability of the materials and reduce tool wear. Because magnesium alloys have very poor formability at room temperature, it is essential to manufacture a part from Magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. The aim of this paper is to present a friction test method to evaluate the performance of different kinds of lubricants and determine their coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures in tube hydroforming of magnesium alloys. A self-designed experimental apparatus is used to carry out the experiments of friction tests. The coefficient of friction between the tube and die at guiding zone is determined. The effects of the internal pressure, the axial feeding velocity and temperatures on the friction forces and coefficients of friction for different lubricants are discussed.

  12. Temperature-Dependent Friction and Wear Behavior of PTFE and MoS2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Babuska, T. F.; Pitenis, A. A.; Jones, M. R.; Nation, B. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Argibay, N.

    2016-06-16

    We present an investigation of the temperature-dependent friction behavior of PTFE, MoS2, and PTFE-on- MoS2. Friction behavior was measured while continuously varying contact temperature in the range -150 to 175°C while sliding in dry nitrogen, as well as for self-mated PTFE immersed in liquid nitrogen. These results contrast with previous reports of monotonic inverse temperature dependent friction behavior, as well as reported high-friction transitions and plateaus at temperatures below about -20°C that were not observed, providing new insights about the molecular mechanisms of macro-scale friction. The temperature-dependent friction behavior characteristic of self-mated PTFE was found also on the PTFE-on-MoS2 slidingmore » contact, suggesting that PTFE friction was defined by sub-surface deformation mechanisms and internal friction even when sliding against a lamellar lubricant with extremely low friction coefficient (μ ~ 0.02). The various relaxation temperatures of PTFE were found in the temperature-dependent friction behavior, showing excellent agreement with reported values acquired using torsional techniques measuring internal friction. Additionally, hysteresis in friction behavior suggests an increase in near-surface crystallinity at upon exceeding the high temperature relaxation, Tα~ 116°C.« less

  13. Lateral position detection and control for friction stir systems

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Paul; Lammlein, David H.; Cook, George E.; Wilkes, Don Mitchell; Strauss, Alvin M.; Delapp, David R.; Hartman, Daniel A.

    2011-11-08

    Friction stir methods are disclosed for processing at least one workpiece using a rotary tool with rotating member for contacting and processing the workpiece. The methods include oscillating the rotary tool laterally with respect to a selected propagation path for the rotating member with respect to the workpiece to define an oscillation path for the rotating member. The methods further include obtaining force signals or parameters related to the force experienced by the rotary tool at least while the rotating member is disposed at the extremes of the oscillation. The force signals or parameters associated with the extremes can then be analyzed to determine a lateral position of the selected path with respect to a target path and a lateral offset value can be determined based on the lateral position. The lateral distance between the selected path and the target path can be decreased based on the lateral offset value.

  14. Friction and deformation behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and deformation studies were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with diamond. When the radius of curvature of the spherical diamond rider was large (0.3), deformation of silicon carbide was primarily elastic. Under these conditions the friction coefficient was low and did not show a dependence on the silicon carbide orientation. Further, there was no detectable cracking of the silicon carbide surfaces. When smaller radii of curvature of the spherical diamond riders (0.15 and 0.02 mm) or a conical diamond rider was used, plastic grooving occured and the silicon carbide exhibited anisotropic friction and deformation behavior. Under these conditions the friction coefficient depended on load. Anisotropic friction and deformation of the basal plane of silicon carbide was controlled by the slip system. 10101120and cleavage of1010.

  15. Temperature dependence of nanoscale friction for Fe on YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altfeder, Igor; Krim, Jacqueline

    2012-05-01

    A magnetic probe microscopy study of levitation and atomic-scale friction is reported for Fe on YBCO (Tc = 92.5 K) in the temperature range 65-293 K. Below Tc, the friction coefficient is constant and exhibits no correlation with the strength of superconducting levitation forces. Above Tc, the friction coefficient increases progressively, and nearly doubles between Tc and room temperature. The results are discussed within the context of the underlying atomic-scale electronic and phononic mechanisms that give rise to friction, and it is concluded that contact electrification and static electricity may play a significant role in the non-superconducting phase. Given that the properties of YBCO can be finely tuned, the results point the way to a variety of interesting studies of friction and superconductors.

  16. Friction Anisotropy: A unique and intrinsic property of decagonal quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mulleregan, Alice; Park, Jeong Young; Salmeron, Miquel; Ogetree, D.F.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.; Brenner, J.; Dubois, J.M.

    2008-06-25

    We show that friction anisotropy is an intrinsic property of the atomic structure of Al-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystals and not only of clean and well-ordered surfaces that can be prepared in vacuum [J.Y. Park et al., Science (2005)]. Friction anisotropy is manifested both in nanometer size contacts obtained with sharp atomic force microscope (AFM) tips as well as in macroscopic contacts produced in pin-on-disc tribometers. We show that the friction anisotropy, which is not observed when an amorphous oxide film covers the surface, is recovered when the film is removed due to wear. Equally important is the loss of the friction anisotropy when the quasicrystalline order is destroyed due to cumulative wear. These results reveal the intimate connection between the mechanical properties of these materials and their peculiar atomic structure.

  17. On damping characteristics of frictional hysteresis in pre-sliding range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, Michael; Iwasaki, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Frictional hysteresis at relative motion in the pre-sliding range is considered. This effect is characterized by an elasto-plastic interaction, and that on the micro-scale, between two rubbing surfaces in contact that gives rise to nonlinear friction force. The pre-sliding friction force yields hysteresis in displacement. In this study, the damping characteristics of frictional hysteresis are analyzed. It is worth noting that we exclude the viscous damping mechanisms and focus on the pure hysteresis damping to be accounted in the friction modeling. The general properties of pre-sliding friction hysteresis are demonstrated and then compared with the limit case of discontinuous Coulomb friction. Further we consider two advanced dynamic friction models, LuGre and Maxwell-slip, so as demonstrate their damping properties and convergence of the motion system to equilibrium state. Experimental observations of the free motion in pre-sliding range are also shown and discussed.

  18. Frictional melt and seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-01-01

    Frictional melt is implied in a variety of processes such as seismic slip, ice skating, and meteorite combustion. A steady state can be reached when melt is continuously produced and extruded from the sliding interface, as shown recently in a number of laboratory rock friction experiments. A thin, low-viscosity, high-temperature melt layer is formed resulting in low shear resistance. A theoretical solution describing the coupling of shear heating, thermal diffusion, and extrusion is obtained, without imposing a priori the melt thickness. The steady state shear traction can be approximated at high slip rates by the theoretical form τss = σn1/4 (A/?) ? under a normal stress σn, slip rate V, radius of contact area R (A is a dimensional normalizing factor and W is a characteristic rate). Although the model offers a rather simplified view of a complex process, the predictions are compatible with experimental observations. In particular, we consider laboratory simulations of seismic slip on earthquake faults. A series of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on rocks, performed for σn in the range 1-20 MPa and slip rates in the range 0.5-2 m s-1, is confronted to the theoretical model. The behavior is reasonably well reproduced, though the effect of radiation loss taking place in the experiment somewhat alters the data. The scaling of friction with σn, R, and V in the presence of melt suggests that extrapolation of laboratory measures to real Earth is a highly nonlinear, nontrivial exercise.

  19. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  20. Aftershocks in a frictional earthquake model.

    PubMed

    Braun, O M; Tosatti, Erio

    2014-09-01

    Inspired by spring-block models, we elaborate a "minimal" physical model of earthquakes which reproduces two main empirical seismological laws, the Gutenberg-Richter law and the Omori aftershock law. Our point is to demonstrate that the simultaneous incorporation of aging of contacts in the sliding interface and of elasticity of the sliding plates constitutes the minimal ingredients to account for both laws within the same frictional model. PMID:25314453