Science.gov

Sample records for front curvature measurements

  1. Kinetic information from detonation front curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-15

    The time constants for time-dependent modeling may be estimated from reaction zone lengths, which are obtained from two sources One is detonation front curvature, where the edge lag is close to being a direct measure The other is the Size Effect, where the detonation velocity decreases with decreasing radius as energy is lost to the cylinder edge A simple theory that interlocks the two effects is given A differential equation for energy flow in the front is used, the front is described by quadratic and sixth-power radius terms The quadratic curvature comes from a constant power source of energy moving sideways to the walls Near the walls, the this energy rises to the total energy of detonation and produces the sixth-power term The presence of defects acting on a short reaction zone can eliminate the quadratic part while leaving the wall portion of the cuvature A collection of TNT data shows that the reaction zone increases with both the radius and the void fraction

  2. Front curvature rate stick measurements and detonation shock dynamics calibration for PBX 9502 over a wide temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Bdzil, J.B.; Aslam, T.D.

    1998-12-31

    Detonation velocity and wave shape are measured for PBX 9502 (95 wt.% TATB, 5 wt.% Kel-F 800) rate sticks at the temperatures {minus}55, 25, and 75 C. At each temperature three different diameters were fired: 50 mm, 18 mm, and 8, 10, and 12 mm respectively for the hot, ambient, and cold sticks. The measured wave shapes are fit with an analytic form and the fitting parameters are tabulated along with thermal expansion and diameter effect data. The simplest detonation shock dynamics (DSD) model assumes a unique calibration function relating the local normal wave speed D{sub n} to the local total curvature {kappa}. The data confirm this notion for sufficiently small curvature, but at large curvature the curves for different charge diameters diverge. Global optimization is used to determine a best single D{sub n}-{kappa} function at each initial temperature T{sub 0}. From these curves a D{sub n}({kappa},T{sub 0}) calibration surface is generated that allows computation of problems with temperature gradients.

  3. Detonation Front Curvatures and Detonation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauderbach, Lisa M.; Lorenz, K. Thomas; Lee, Edward L.; Souers, P. Clark

    2015-06-01

    We have normalized the LLNL library of detonation front curvatures by dividing lags by the edge lag and radii by the edge radius. We then fit the normalized data to the equation L = AR2 + BR8, where L is the normalized lag and R is the normalized radius. We attribute the quadratic term to thermal processes and the 8th-power term to shock processes. We compare the % of the quadratic term J at the edge with detonation rates obtained from the size effect. One class of results is made up of fine-grained, uniform explosives with large lags, where a low detonation rate leads to a high J and vice versa. This provides a rough way of estimating unknown rates if the unknown explosive is of high quality. The other, equally-large class contains rough-grained materials, often with small lags and small radii. These have curves that do not fit the equation but superfically often look quadratic. Some HMX and PETN curvatures even show a ``sombrero'' effect. Code models show that density differences of 0.03 g/cc in ram-pressed parts can cause pseudo-quadratic curves and even sombreros. Modeling is used to illustrate J at the lowest and highest possible detonation rates. This work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Toward assessing the effects of crack front curvature /CFC/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swedlow, J. L.; Ritter, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of the effect of crack front curvature (CFC) on the K calibration of five special geometries in which CFC occurs. The five cases considered include an elliptical crack in an infinite medium, an internal annular crack in a thick-walled cylinder, a through crack in a flat plate, a part-through crack in a plate, and an irregularly shaped crack in a solid. It is shown that K depends on CFC differently in each case.

  5. Theory for the curvature dependence of delta front progradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Wun-Tao; Capart, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    When Gilbert-type deltas respond to uneven sediment supply or advance over irregular basin bathymetry, they develop curved, creased fronts prograding at speeds that vary with location along the shoreline. Relations governing the progradation rate, however, have so far been proposed only for simple special cases. In this paper, we exploit the special properties of solutions to the eikonal equation to derive a general progradation relation, applicable to delta fronts of finite angle of repose and arbitrary shoreline planform. In these circumstances, the theory explicitly relates the progradation rate to the local shoreline curvature. We illustrate the resulting morphodynamics with numerical and analytical solutions for a sinuous delta front. The proposed relation can be used to model deltaic evolution or deduce spanwise distributions of sediment supply rates from observations of foreset evolution.

  6. Effects of curvature and compressibility on the stability of thermal fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez S, Miguel H.; Bessega L, Maria C.; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2006-06-15

    The stability of subsonic thermal fronts against corrugation is analyzed and an exact dispersion relation is obtained taking into account the effects of the curvature of the distorted front as well as the compressibility of the gas. At a certain value of the Mach number ahead of the thermal front, unstable rates show a maximum; these rates drop to zero when a Chapman-Jouguet regime is established behind heat fronts. It is shown that curvature effects tend to stabilize conductive heat fronts propagating in a compressible gas.

  7. Point Diffraction Interferometry to Measure Local Curvatures and Caustics of Noisy Wave Fronts: Application for Determining Optical Properties of Fish Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallmitjana, S.; Ricart, I.; Bosch, S.; Gargallo, A.; Acosta, E.

    2015-02-01

    The study of caustics is important because they contain information about the image formation properties of optical systems. In this work we use the concept of caustic as a set of focal points, and we have developed a second order approach theory to determine local slopes and curvatures of a wavefront emerging from an optical system. The method is based on the use of a point diffraction interferometer, and the analysis of the interferograms allows us to compute the focal region. Experimental results obtained with a plano-convex lens demonstrate the accuracy of the combined theoretical-experimental method here developed. Application to noisy wavefronts such as those produced by biological samples, specifically in crystalline lenses of fish eyes, are also exposed.

  8. Influence of the bonding front propagation on the wafer stack curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, E.; Bréchet, Y.; Barthelemy, A.; Radu, I.; Pardoen, T.; Raskin, J.-P.

    2014-08-11

    The influence of the dynamics of the direct wafer bonding process on the curvature of the final wafer stack is investigated. An analytical model for the final curvature of the bonded wafers is developed, as a function of the different load components acting during the bonding front propagation, using thin plate theory and considering a strain discontinuity locked at the bonding interface. Experimental profiles are measured for different bonding conditions and wafer thicknesses. A very good agreement with the model prediction is obtained and the influence of the thin air layer trapped in-between the two wafers is demonstrated. The proposed model contributes to further improvement of the bonding process, in particular, for the stacking of layers of electronic devices, which requires a high accuracy of wafer-to-wafer alignment and a very low distortion level.

  9. Geometry-specific scaling of detonation parameters from front curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Short, Mark

    2011-01-20

    It has previously been asserted that classical detonation curvature theory predicts that the critical diameter and the diameter-effect curve of a cylindrical high-explosive charge should scale with twice the thickness of an analogous two-dimensional explosive slab. The varied agreement of experimental results with this expectation have led some to question the ability of curvature-based concepts to predict detonation propagation in non-ideal explosives. This study addresses such claims by showing that the expected scaling relationship (hereafter referred to d = 2w) is not consistent with curvature-based Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) theory.

  10. Controllable soliton propagation based on phase-front curvature in asymmetrical nonlocal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huafeng; Lü, Hua; Luo, Jianghua; Sun, Lihui

    2016-08-01

    The influence of phase-front curvature on the dynamical behavior of the fundamental mode soliton during its transmission in asymmetrical nonlocal media is studied in detail and the phase-front curvature can be imposed on the fundamental mode soliton by reshaping or phase imprinting technologies. By changing the phase-front curvature or its imposed position, controllable soliton propagation in asymmetrical nonlocal media can be achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11547007 and 11304024), the Innovation Personnel Training Plan for Excellent Youth of Guangdong University Project (Grant No. 2013LYM_0023), and the Yangtze Fund for Youth Teams of Science and Technology Innovation (Grant No. 2015cqt03).

  11. Fronts propagating with curvature dependent speed: Algorithms based on Hamilton-Jacobi formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, Stanley; Sethian, James A.

    1987-01-01

    New numerical algorithms are devised (PSC algorithms) for following fronts propagating with curvature-dependent speed. The speed may be an arbitrary function of curvature, and the front can also be passively advected by an underlying flow. These algorithms approximate the equations of motion, which resemble Hamilton-Jacobi equations with parabolic right-hand-sides, by using techniques from the hyperbolic conservation laws. Non-oscillatory schemes of various orders of accuracy are used to solve the equations, providing methods that accurately capture the formation of sharp gradients and cusps in the moving fronts. The algorithms handle topological merging and breaking naturally, work in any number of space dimensions, and do not require that the moving surface be written as a function. The methods can be used also for more general Hamilton-Jacobi-type problems. The algorithms are demonstrated by computing the solution to a variety of surface motion problems.

  12. Tube curvature measuring probe and method

    DOEpatents

    Sokol, George J.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a probe and method for measuring the radius of curvature of a bend in a section of tubing. The probe includes a member with a pair of guide means, one located at each end of the member. A strain gauge is operatively connected to the member for detecting bending stress exrted on the member as the probe is drawn through and in engagement with the inner surface of a section of tubing having a bend. The method of the present invention includes steps utilizing a probe, like the aforementioned probe, which can be made to detect bends only in a single plane when having a fixed orientation relative the section of tubing to determine the maximum radius of curvature of the bend.

  13. Curvature sensor for ocular wavefront measurement.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Doutón, Fernando; Pujol, Jaume; Arjona, Montserrat; Luque, Sergio O

    2006-08-01

    We describe a new wavefront sensor for ocular aberration determination, based on the curvature sensing principle, which adapts the classical system used in astronomy for the living eye's measurements. The actual experimental setup is presented and designed following a process guided by computer simulations to adjust the design parameters for optimal performance. We present results for artificial and real young eyes, compared with the Hartmann-Shack estimations. Both methods show a similar performance for these cases. This system will allow for the measurement of higher order aberrations than the currently used wavefront sensors in situations in which they are supposed to be significant, such as postsurgery eyes. PMID:16832447

  14. Applications of variable focus liquid lenses for curvature wave-front sensors in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Cuevas, S.; Alvarez-Nuñez, L. C.; Watson, A. M.

    2014-08-01

    Curvature wavefront sensors obtain the wave-front aberrations from two defocused intensity images at each side of the pupil plane. Typically, when high modulation speeds are required, as it is the case with Adaptive Optics, that defocusing is done with a fast vibrating membrane mirror. We propose an alternative defocusing mechanism based on an electrowetting variable focus liquid lens. The use of such lenses may perform the required focus modulation without the need of extra moving parts, reducing the overall size of the system.

  15. Pulsar Polar Cap Heating and Surface Thermal X-ray Emission. 1; Curvature Radiation Pair Fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the effect of pulsar polar cap (PC) heating produced by positrons returning from the upper pair formation front. Our calculations are based on a self-consistent treatment of the pair dynamics and the effect of electric field screening by the returning positrons. We calculate the resultant X-ray luminosities and discuss the dependence of the PC heating efficiencies on pulsar parameters, such as characteristic spin-down age, spin period, and surface magnetic field strength. In this study we concentrate on the regime where the pairs are produced in a magnetic field by curvature photons emitted by accelerating electrons. Our theoretical results are not in conflict with the available observational x-ray data and suggest that the effect of PC heating should significantly contribute to the thermal x-ray fluxes from middle-aged and old pulsars. The implications for current and future x-ray observations of pulsars are briefly outlined.

  16. Novel imaging system for measuring microscale curvatures at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Haruna; Kumpel, Amy E.; Lathrop, Richard E.; Slanina, John B.; Nieva, Patricia; Zavracky, Paul; Miaoulis, Ioannis N.; Wong, Peter Y.

    2000-01-01

    An innovative system was designed to optically measure the curvature of microelectromechanical system at high temperatures. The system takes advantage of the limited numerical aperture of the imaging system to detect the curvature of cantilever beams. Images of the beam are used to determine beam curvature at high temperatures of up to 850 °C by analyzing the apparent change in beam length as seen by the camera during an experimental trial. The system is designed to operate at very high temperatures, which is difficult in conventional microscale curvature measurement techniques such as scanning electron microscopy or stylus profilometry due to excess heating of peripheral equipment. The system can measure curvatures as small as 300 m-1, which corresponds to tip deflections of 1.5 μm for a 100 μm beam. The resolution of the system is limited by the image resolution of the charge-coupled device camera, and increases at large curvatures. The maximum curvature that can be measured by the system is limited by the increase in system resolution, and is estimated to be 4500 m-1, corresponding to 22 μm deflection for a 100 μm beam. The apparatus was demonstrated to measure the thermally induced curvature of multilayered thin-film cantilever beams. The beams bend at high temperatures due to mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between the layers. One innovative application of such curvature measurement is the determination of thermophysical properties of thin films at elevated temperatures. This article presents the experimental setup and operational theory of apparatus, as well as curvature measurements obtained by the system. The thermal expansion coefficient of polycrystalline silicon, determined from the curvature measurements, are also discussed.

  17. Eddy-Current Measurement Of Turning Or Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Engmin J.

    1993-01-01

    Rotatable conductive plate covers sensing coil to varying degree. Curvature of pipe at remote or otherwise inaccessible location inside pipe measured using relatively simple angular-displacement eddy-current probe. Crawler and sensor assemblies move along inside of pipe on wheels. Conductive plate pivots to follow curvature of pipe, partly covering one of eddy-current coils to degree depending on local curvature on pipe.

  18. Local curvature measurements of a lean, partially premixed swirl-stabilised flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Alan E.; Hardalupas, Yannis; Taylor, Alex M. K. P.

    2012-04-01

    A swirl-stabilised, lean, partially premixed combustor operating at atmospheric conditions has been used to investigate the local curvature distributions in lifted, stable and thermoacoustically oscillating CH4-air partially premixed flames for bulk cold-flow Reynolds numbers of 15,000 and 23,000. Single-shot OH planar laser-induced fluorescence has been used to capture instantaneous images of these three different flame types. Use of binary thresholding to identify the reactant and product regions in the OH planar laser-induced fluorescence images, in order to extract accurate flame-front locations, is shown to be unsatisfactory for the examined flames. The Canny-Deriche edge detection filter has also been examined and is seen to still leave an unacceptable quantity of artificial flame-fronts. A novel approach has been developed for image analysis where a combination of a non-linear diffusion filter, Sobel gradient and threshold-based curve elimination routines have been used to extract traces of the flame-front to obtain local curvature distributions. A visual comparison of the effectiveness of flame-front identification is made between the novel approach, the threshold binarisation filter and the Canny-Deriche filter. The novel approach appears to most accurately identify the flame-fronts. Example histograms of the curvature for six flame conditions and of the total image area are presented and are found to have a broader range of local flame curvatures for increasing bulk Reynolds numbers. Significantly positive values of mean curvature and marginally positive values of skewness of the histogram have been measured for one lifted flame case, but this is generally accounted for by the effect of flame brush curvature. The mean local flame-front curvature reduces with increasing axial distance from the burner exit plane for all flame types. These changes are more pronounced in the lifted flames but are marginal for the thermoacoustically oscillating flames. It is

  19. Electric current measurement using fiber-optic curvature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Haiting; Xin, Ying; Sun, Suping

    2016-02-01

    A novel fiber-optic curvature sensor, which can measure curvature directly, has been developed in recent years. The electric current measurements system based on fiber-optic curvature sensor and electromagnetic principle is developed. A fiber-optic curvature sensor is bonded to a thin-walled cantilever and two circular magnet targets with the same parameters are configured at the tip of the cantilever symmetrically. In this case, the throughput of the sensor will be changed due to the bending deformation of cantilever, which is proportional to the electromagnetic force caused by measured electric current. Direct and alternate characteristics of the proposed measurement system are studied experimentally. The results show that the measurement errors are within the range of ±5.5 mA and the corresponding accuracy is within 1% at the current measurement range from -300 mA to 300 mA, which indicate the feasibility of the proposed measurement system.

  20. Measurement of the gravity-field curvature by atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rosi, G; Cacciapuoti, L; Sorrentino, F; Menchetti, M; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2015-01-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the gravity-field curvature based on three conjugated atom interferometers. Three atomic clouds launched in the vertical direction are simultaneously interrogated by the same atom interferometry sequence and used to probe the gravity field at three equally spaced positions. The vertical component of the gravity-field curvature generated by nearby source masses is measured from the difference between adjacent gravity gradient values. Curvature measurements are of interest in geodesy studies and for the validation of gravitational models of the surrounding environment. The possibility of using such a scheme for a new determination of the Newtonian constant of gravity is also discussed. PMID:25615464

  1. Clinical workflow for spinal curvature measurement with portable ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabanfar, Reza; Yan, Christina; Kempston, Michael; Borschneck, Daniel; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: Spinal curvature monitoring is essential in making treatment decisions in scoliosis. Monitoring entails radiographic examinations, however repeated ionizing radiation exposure has been shown to increase cancer risk. Ultrasound does not emit ionizing radiation and is safer for spinal curvature monitoring. We investigated a clinical sonography protocol and challenges associated with position-tracked ultrasound in spinal curvature measurement in scoliosis. METHODS: Transverse processes were landmarked along each vertebra using tracked ultrasound snapshots. The transverse process angle was used to determine the orientation of each vertebra. We tested our methodology on five patients in a local pediatric scoliosis clinic, comparing ultrasound to radiographic curvature measurements. RESULTS: Despite strong correlation between radiographic and ultrasound curvature angles in phantom studies, we encountered new challenges in the clinical setting. Our main challenge was differentiating transverse processes from ribs and other structures during landmarking. We observed up to 13° angle variability for a single vertebra and a 9.85° +/- 10.81° difference between ultrasound and radiographic Cobb angles for thoracic curvatures. Additionally, we were unable to visualize anatomical landmarks in the lumbar region where soft tissue depth was 25-35mm. In volunteers with large Cobb angles (greater than 40° thoracic and 60° lumbar), we observed spinal protrusions resulting in incomplete probe-skin contact and partial ultrasound images not suitable for landmarking. CONCLUSION: Spinal curvature measurement using tracked ultrasound is viable on phantom spine models. In the clinic, new challenges were encountered which must be resolved before a universal sonography protocol can be developed.

  2. An analytical investigation of delamination front curvature in double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical investigation is conducted to determine the shape of a growing delamination and the distribution of the energy release rate along the delamination front in a laminated composite double cantilever beam specimen. Distributions of the energy release rate for specimens with straight delamination fronts and delamination front contours for delaminations whose growth is governed by the fracture criterion that G = Gc at all points are predicted as a function of material properties and delamination length. The predicted delamination front contours are utilized to ascertain the effect of the changing shape of the delamination front on the value of the critical strain energy release rate as computed from double cantilever beam fracture toughness test data.

  3. Measurement of radius of curvature of spherical optical surfaces with small curvature and aperture by optical profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shuang; Yi, Shengzhen; Chen, Shenghao; Wang, Zhanshan

    2014-11-01

    Monochromatic energy multilayer Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope is one of key diagnostic tools for researches on inertial confinement fusion. It is composed by two orthogonal concave spherical mirrors with small curvature and aperture, and produce the image of an object by collecting X-rays in each orthogonal direction, independently. Accurate measurement of radius of curvature of concave spherical mirrors is very important to achieve its design optical properties including imaging quality, optical throughput and energy resolution. However, it is difficult to measure the radius of curvature of spherical optical surfaces with small curvature and aperture by conventional methods, for the produced reflective intensity of glass is too low to correctly test. In this paper, we propose an improved measuring method of optical profiler to accomplish accurate measurement of radius of curvature of spherical optical surfaces with small curvature and aperture used in the monochromatic energy multilayer Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope. Firstly, we use a standard super-smooth optical flat to calibrate reference mirror before each experiment. Following, deviation of central position between measurement area and interference pattern is corrected by the theory of Newton's rings, and the zero-order fringe position is derived from the principle of interference in which surface roughness has minimum values in the position of zero light path difference. Measured results by optical profiler show the low relative errors and high repeatability. Eventually, an imaging experiment of monochromatic energy multilayer Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope determines the measurement accuracy of radius of curvature.

  4. Direct and alignment-insensitive measurement of cantilever curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Aeppli, Gabriel; Bailey, Joe M.

    2013-07-15

    We analytically derive and experimentally demonstrate a method for the simultaneous measurement of deflection for large arrays of cantilevers. The Fresnel diffraction patterns of a cantilever independently reveal tilt, curvature, cubic, and higher order bending of the cantilever. It provides a calibrated absolute measurement of the polynomial coefficients describing the cantilever shape, without careful alignment and could be applied to several cantilevers simultaneously with no added complexity. We show that the method is easily implemented, works in both liquid media and in air, for a broad range of displacements and is especially suited to the requirements for multi-marker biosensors.

  5. Determination of Thermal Spray Coating Property with Curvature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay

    2013-12-01

    Real-time curvature measurement of a coating-substrate system during deposition has facilitated the monitoring of coating stresses and provided additional insights into thermal spray deposition mechanisms. However, the non-equilibrium state of coating formation along with harsh spray booth environment introduces complexity not only in data interpretation but also in the coating properties estimation. In this paper, a new procedure is proposed to estimate the elastic modulus of thermal sprayed ceramic coatings using in situ curvature and temperature measurements. In order to correlate the measurable parameters to coating elastic modulus, a systematic study is conducted to develop a suitable methodology. First, various finite element model analyses are carried out to formulate suitable relations between the measurements and elastic modulus. Subsequently, experiments are conducted to validate the procedure to estimate coating moduli. The results are compared with more accurate measurements obtained from post-deposition characterization technique under low temperature thermal cycles. The comparison suggests that the moduli estimated using the proposed procedure are in good agreements with those obtained from the post-deposition technique. Further, the nonlinear response of coatings are evaluated from the estimated moduli during deposition and cool down, which offer additional information on the characteristics of thermal spray coatings.

  6. Residual stress determination from a laser-based curvature measurement

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Swank; R. A. Gavalya; J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2000-05-08

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  7. Residual Stress Determination from a Laser-Based Curvature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, William David; Gavalya, Rick Allen; Wright, Julie Knibloe; Wright, Richard Neil

    2000-05-01

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  8. Camera-based curvature measurement of a large incandescent object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollikkala, Arttu V. H.; Kananen, Timo P.; Mäkynen, Anssi J.; Holappa, Markus

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this work was to implement a low-cost machine vision system to help the roller operator to estimate the amount of strip camber during the rolling process. The machine vision system composing of a single camera, a standard PC-computer and a LabVIEW written program using straightforward image analysis determines the magnitude and direction of camber and presents the results both in numerical and graphical form on the computer screen. The system was calibrated with LED set-up which was also used to validate the accuracy of the system by mimicking the strip curvatures. The validation showed that the maximum difference between the true and measured values was less than +/-4 mm (k=0.95) within the 22 meter long test pattern.

  9. Coherent gradient sensing method and system for measuring surface curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosakis, Ares J. (Inventor); Singh, Ramen P. (Inventor); Kolawa, Elizabeth (Inventor); Moore, Jr., Nicholas R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method for determining a curvature of a specularly reflective surface based on optical interference. Two optical gratings are used to produce a spatial displacement in an interference field of two different diffraction components produced by one grating from different diffraction components produced by another grating. Thus, the curvature of the surface can be determined.

  10. Radius of Curvature Measurements: An Independent Look at Accuracy Using Novel Optical Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Bryon; Kahan, Mark; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The AMSD (Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator) program mirror specifications include the ability to manufacture the mirror to a radius of curvature of 10 m +/- 1 mm and to control its radius at 30K to the same specification. Therefore, it is necessary for the Government Team to be able to measure mirror radius of curvature to an accuracy of better than 0.5 mm. This presentation discusses a novel optical metrology system for measuring radius of curvature.

  11. Wave-front measurement errors from restricted concentric subdomains.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, K A; Geary, K

    2001-09-01

    In interferometry and optical testing, system wave-front measurements that are analyzed on a restricted subdomain of the full pupil can include predictable systematic errors. In nearly all cases, the measured rms wave-front error and the magnitudes of the individual aberration polynomial coefficients underestimate the wave-front error magnitudes present in the full-pupil domain. We present an analytic method to determine the relationships between the coefficients of aberration polynomials defined on the full-pupil domain and those defined on a restricted concentric subdomain. In this way, systematic wave-front measurement errors introduced by subregion selection are investigated. Using vector and matrix representations for the wave-front aberration coefficients, we generalize the method to the study of arbitrary input wave fronts and subdomain sizes. While wave-front measurements on a restricted subdomain are insufficient for predicting the wave front of the full-pupil domain, studying the relationship between known full-pupil wave fronts and subdomain wave fronts allows us to set subdomain size limits for arbitrary measurement fidelity. PMID:11551047

  12. Measurement of curvature and twist of a deformed object using digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wen; Quan Chenggen; Cho Jui Tay

    2008-05-20

    Measurement of curvature and twist is an important aspect in the study of object deformation. In recent years, several methods have been proposed to determine curvature and twist of a deformed object using digital shearography. Here we propose a novel method to determine the curvature and twist of a deformed object using digital holography and a complex phasor. A sine/cosine transformation method and two-dimensional short time Fourier transform are proposed subsequently to process the wrapped phase maps. It is shown that high-quality phase maps corresponding to curvature and twist can be obtained. An experiment is conducted to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  13. A Simplified Approach for Simultaneous Measurements of Wavefront Velocity and Curvature in the Heart Using Activation Times.

    PubMed

    Mazeh, Nachaat; Haines, David E; Kay, Matthew W; Roth, Bradley J

    2013-12-01

    The velocity and curvature of a wave front are important factors governing the propagation of electrical activity through cardiac tissue, particularly during heart arrhythmias of clinical importance such as fibrillation. Presently, no simple computational model exists to determine these values simultaneously. The proposed model uses the arrival times at four or five sites to determine the wave front speed (v), direction (θ), and radius of curvature (ROC) (r 0). If the arrival times are measured, then v, θ, and r 0 can be found from differences in arrival times and the distance between these sites. During isotropic conduction, we found good correlation between measured values of the ROC r 0 and the distance from the unipolar stimulus (r = 0.9043 and p < 0.0001). The conduction velocity (m/s) was correlated (r = 0.998, p < 0.0001) using our method (mean = 0.2403, SD = 0.0533) and an empirical method (mean = 0.2352, SD = 0.0560). The model was applied to a condition of anisotropy and a complex case of reentry with a high voltage extra stimulus. Again, results show good correlation between our simplified approach and established methods for multiple wavefront morphologies. In conclusion, insignificant measurement errors were observed between this simplified approach and an approach that was more computationally demanding. Accuracy was maintained when the requirement that ε (ε = b/r 0, ratio of recording site spacing over wave fronts ROC) was between 0.001 and 0.5. The present simplified model can be applied to a variety of clinical conditions to predict behavior of planar, elliptical, and reentrant wave fronts. It may be used to study the genesis and propagation of rotors in human arrhythmias and could lead to rotor mapping using low density endocardial recording electrodes. PMID:24772193

  14. Focal length and radius of curvature measurement using wavefront difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongming; Gao, Zhishan; Wang, Shuai; Cheng, Jinlong; Yuan, Qun

    2015-10-01

    A method for measuring the focal length of the lens and the radius of curvature of the spherical surface using wavefront difference method is proposed. Based on Fizeau interferometer, an experimental system for focal length measurements is set up to verify the principle. Based on the point diffraction interferometer, an experimental system for radius of curvature measurements is proposed to verify the proposed method. With the focal length testing system, both the positive and negative lens experimental results indicate that the measurement accuracy is less than 0.16%under normal experimental environment. With the radius of curvature testing system, the radius of curvature of spherical mirrors and the surface figure can be measured in a higher precision simultaneously. The experimental results indicate that the measurement accuracy is in the order of 10-4 .

  15. Radius of curvature measurement based on wavefront difference method by the point diffraction interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongming; Gao, Zhishan; Yuan, Qun; Ye, Jingfei; Li, Minjue

    2014-05-01

    A method for measuring the radius of curvature with a pinhole point diffraction interferometer (PDI) is proposed. Using the wavefront difference method and the Gaussian imaging equation, the longitudinal displacement of the converging rays passing through a standard plane-parallel-plate sample in PDI interference cavity is determined. Based on this longitudinal displacement, a precise formula for radius of curvature calculation is deduced. An experimental system for radius of curvature measurements is set up to verify the principle. With this testing system, the radius of curvature of spherical mirrors and the surface figure can be measured in a higher precision simultaneously. Some sources of uncertainty in measurement are discussed based on detailed error analysis. The experimental results indicate that the measurement accuracy ΔR/R0 is in the order of 10-4.

  16. A geometric formulation of Higgs Effective Field Theory: Measuring the curvature of scalar field space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Jenkins, Elizabeth E.; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2016-03-01

    A geometric formulation of Higgs Effective Field Theory (HEFT) is presented. Experimental observables are given in terms of geometric invariants of the scalar sigma model sector such as the curvature of the scalar field manifold M. We show how the curvature can be measured experimentally via Higgs cross-sections, WL scattering, and the S parameter. The one-loop action of HEFT is given in terms of geometric invariants of M. The distinction between the Standard Model (SM) and HEFT is whether M is flat or curved, and the curvature is a signal of the scale of new physics.

  17. The coherent gradient sensor for film curvature measurements at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Zhang, Xingyi; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Youhe; Feng, Xue

    2013-11-01

    Coherent Gradient Sensor (CGS) system is presented for measurement of curvatures and nonuniform curvatures changes in film-substrate systems at cryogenic temperature. The influences of the interface of refrigerator and itself on the interferograms which are accounting for the temperature effect are successfully eliminated. Based on the measurement technique, the thermal stresses (including the radial stress, circumferential stress and shear stress) of superconducting YBCO thin-film are obtained by the extended Stoney's formula during the heating process from 30K to 150K. Take the superconducting YBCO thin film as an example, the thermal stresses of which are gained successfully. PMID:24216858

  18. Pulse front tilt measurement of femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Stoyanov, Lyubomir; Stefanov, Ivan; Dreischuh, Alexander; Hansinger, Peter; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we report experimental investigations of an intentionally introduced pulse front tilt on femtosecond laser pulses by using an inverted field correlator/interferometer. A reliable criterion for the precision in aligning (in principle) dispersionless systems for manipulating ultrashort pulses is developed, specifically including cases when the pulse front tilt is a result of a desired spatio-temporal coupling. The results obtained using two low-dispersion diffraction gratings are in good qualitative agreement with the data from a previously developed analytical model and from an independent interferometric measurement.

  19. 4. Photocopy of measured drawing dated January, 1948 FRONT ELEVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of measured drawing dated January, 1948 FRONT ELEVATION An addendum to Hanson-Cramer House, Sea Street, south end, Rockport, Knox County, Maine - Hanson-Cramer House, End of Sea Street (moved from Pascal's Avenue), Rockport, Knox County, ME

  20. Precise curvature measurement of Yb:YAG thin disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzik, Jiri; Chyla, Michal; Nagisetty, Siva S.; Miura, Taisuke; Mann, Klaus; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We are developing an Yb:YAG thin disk regenerative amplifier operating at 1 kHz repetition rate which should deliver output of 100 W of average power which corresponds to the pulse energy of 100 mJ. In order to achieve such high output energy, large size mode matching on a thin-disk is required to avoid optical damage but on the other hand, larger mode area is more susceptible to the influence of optical phase distortions (OPD's) thus limits achievable pulse energy and beam quality. We developed a compact setup allowing precise measurement of the thin-disk deformations by implementation of a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and a single mode probe laser diode. In comparison to the interferometric measurement methods, our approach brings a number of advantages like simplicity of alignment, compactness and robustness, at the same time keeping the high precision of measurement in a range of few nanometers.

  1. Aligning and measuring the curvature and thickness of high-precision lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kun-Huan; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Hsu, Ming-Ying; Huang, Ting-Ming; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Tseng, Shih-Feng

    2015-09-01

    The radius of curvature is one of the most important specifications for spherical optics [1]. There are several methods and devices currently on the market that can be used to measure it, including optical level, non-contact laser interferometer (Interferometer), a probe-contact profiler (Profilometer), the centering machine and three-point contact ball diameter meter (Spherometer). The amount that can be measured with a radius of curvature of the lens aperture range depends on the interferometer standard lens f / number and lens of R / number (radius of curvature divided by the clear aperture of the spherical surface ratio between them). Unfortunately, for lens with diameter greater than 300 mm, the device is limited by the size of the holding fixture lenses or space. This paper aims to provide a novel surface contour detection method and machine, named "CMM spherometry by probe compensation," to measure the radius and thickness of the curvature of the optical surface by a coordinate measurement machine (CMM). In order to obtain more accurate optimization results, we used probe and temperature compensation to discuss the effect. The trace samples and the measurement results of CMM and the centering machine, which has top and bottom autocollimators, are compared.

  2. Graphene on a curved substrate with a controllable curvature: Device fabrication and transport measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yixuan; Mills, Shaun; Liu, Ying

    In monolayer graphene, the local deviation of carbon positions from the perfect lattice has been predicted to lead to a pseudo magnetic field with measurable effects. A striking confirmation of this effect is the observation of Landau levels that are attributed to a pseudo magnetic field in excess of 300 T in graphene nanobubbles. However, typical experimental methods of generating such local deviations in graphene rely on strain accompanied by a surface curvature. Whether a surface curvature alone can produce measurable effects in graphene has not been explored experimentally. It is therefore of interest to study graphene in a system that decouples strain from surface curvature. Of particular interest is its response to an external magnetic field. We developed a grayscale electron beam lithography technique for preparing PMMA substructures with a continuously variable radius of curvature from ~100 nm to ~1 μm. Magnetoelectrical transport measurements on exfoliated graphene supported by these substructures are being carried out. The flexibility of this process may be further exploited in the study of the bilayer and trilayer graphene systems. We will also study hybrid structures of 2D superconductors and graphene.

  3. Front surface thermal property measurements of air plasma spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Ted; Kakuda, Tyler; Kulkarni, Anand

    2009-04-15

    A front-surface measurement for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings has been applied to air plasma spray coatings. The measurement is used to determine all independent thermal properties of the coating simultaneously. Furthermore, with minimal requirements placed on the sample and zero sample preparation, measurements can be made under previously impossible conditions, such as on serviceable engine parts. Previous application of this technique was limited to relatively thin coatings, where a one-dimensional heat transfer model is applied. In this paper, the influence of heat spreading on the measurement of thicker coatings is investigated with the development of a two-dimensional heat transfer model.

  4. Radius of Curvature Measurement of Large Optics Using Interferometry and Laser Tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Connelly, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The determination of radius of curvature (ROC) of optics typically uses either a phase measuring interferometer on an adjustable stage to determine the position of the ROC and the optics surface under test. Alternatively, a spherometer or a profilometer are used for this measurement. The difficulty of this approach is that for large optics, translation of the interferometer or optic under test is problematic because of the distance of translation required and the mass of the optic. Profilometry and spherometry are alternative techniques that can work, but require a profilometer or a measurement of subapertures of the optic. The proposed approach allows a measurement of the optic figure simultaneous with the full aperture radius of curvature.

  5. Searching the best equilibrium moisture equation for lettuce seeds using measures of curvature and bias

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Carolina T; Barrozo, Marcos A S

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, we performed a discrimination analysis of the nonlinear equations used to describe sorption isotherms of the lettuce seeds. The equilibrium data were obtained by the static method using saturated salt solutions. The best model to describe the equilibrium moisture of lettuce seeds was selected using measures of curvature and bias. The obtained results showed that the Copace equation was the best model in terms of nonsignificance for bias and nonlinearity measures. PMID:24804051

  6. Assessment of scoliosis by direct measurement of the curvature of the spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Geoff; Johnson, Michael J.

    2009-02-01

    We present two novel metrics for assessing scoliosis, in which the geometric centers of all the affected vertebrae in an antero-posterior (A-P) radiographic image are used. This is in contradistinction to the existing methods of using selected vertebrae, and determining either their endplates or the intersections of their diagonals, to define a scoliotic angle. Our first metric delivers a scoliotic angle, comparable to the Cobb and Ferguson angles. It measures the sum of the angles between the centers of the affected vertebrae, and avoids the need for an observer to decide on the extent of component curvatures. Our second metric calculates the normalized root-mean-square curvature of the smoothest path comprising piece-wise polynomial splines fitted to the geometric centers of the vertebrae. The smoothest path is useful in modeling the spinal curvature. Our metrics were compared to existing methods using radiographs from a group of twenty subjects with spinal curvatures of varying severity. Their values were strongly correlated with those of the scoliotic angles (r = 0.850 - 0.886), indicating that they are valid surrogates for measuring the severity of scoliosis. Our direct use of positional data removes the vagaries of determining variably shaped endplates, and circumvented the significant interand intra-observer errors of the Cobb and Ferguson methods. Although we applied our metrics to two-dimensional (2- D) data in this paper, they are equally applicable to three-dimensional (3-D) data. We anticipate that they will prove to be the basis for a reliable 3-D measurement and classification system.

  7. Simple yet accurate noncontact device for measuring the radius of curvature of a spherical mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Spiridonov, Maxim; Toebaert, David

    2006-09-10

    An easily reproducible device is demonstrated to be capable of measuring the radii of curvature of spherical mirrors, both convex and concave, without resorting to high-end interferometric or tactile devices. The former are too elaborate for our purposes,and the latter cannot be used due to the delicate nature of the coatings applied to mirrors used in high-power CO2 laser applications. The proposed apparatus is accurate enough to be useful to anyone using curved optics and needing a quick way to assess the values of the radii of curvature, be it for entrance quality control or trouble shooting an apparently malfunctioning optical system. Specifically, the apparatus was designed for checking 50 mm diameter resonator(typically flat or tens of meters concave) and telescope (typically some meters convex and concave) mirrors for a high-power CO2 laser, but it can easily be adapted to any other type of spherical mirror by a straightforward resizing.

  8. Measurement of the curvature of a surface using parallel light beams

    DOEpatents

    Chason, Eric H.; Floro, Jerrold A.; Seager, Carleton H.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring curvature of a surface wherein a beam of collimated light is passed through means for producing a plurality of parallel light beams each separated by a common distance which then reflect off the surface to fall upon a detector that measures the separation of the reflected beams of light. This means can be an etalon and the combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens. The curvature of the surface along the line onto which the multiple beams fall can be calculated from this information. A two-dimensional map of the curvature can be obtained by adding a second etalon (or a second combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens) which is rotated 90.degree. about the optical axis relative to the first etalon and inclined at the same angle. The second etalon creates an individual set of parallel light beams from each of the individual beams created by the first etalon with the sets of parallel light beams from the second etalon rotated 90.degree. relative to the line onto which the single set of parallel beams from the first etalon would have fallen.

  9. Measurement of the curvature of a surface using parallel light beams

    DOEpatents

    Chason, E.H.; Floro, J.A.; Seager, C.H.; Sinclair, M.B.

    1999-06-15

    Apparatus is disclosed for measuring curvature of a surface wherein a beam of collimated light is passed through a means for producing a plurality of parallel light beams each separated by a common distance which then reflect off the surface to fall upon a detector that measures the separation of the reflected beams of light. This means can be an etalon and the combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens. The curvature of the surface along the line onto which the multiple beams fall can be calculated from this information. A two-dimensional map of the curvature can be obtained by adding a second etalon (or a second combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens) which is rotated 90[degree] about the optical axis relative to the first etalon and inclined at the same angle. The second etalon creates an individual set of parallel light beams from each of the individual beams created by the first etalon with the sets of parallel light beams from the second etalon rotated 90[degree] relative to the line onto which the single set of parallel beams from the first etalon would have fallen. 5 figs.

  10. Shock front velocity measurements in a T-tube plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujičić, B.; Ciršan, M.; Djurović, S.; Mijatović, Z.

    2002-12-01

    In the sense of investigation of T-tube shock front influence to the material surfaces, we analysed dependence of shock front velocity on deposited electric energy in capacitor bank i.e. applied voltage to discharge electrodes. A simple, cheap and reliable method for the shock front velocity determination by using a photomultiplier and oscilloscope is described in this paper.

  11. Calibration of a curvature sensor/bimorph mirror AO system: interaction matrix measurement on MACAO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberti, Sylvain; Bonnet, Henri; Fedrigo, Enrico; Ivanescu, Liviu; Kasper, Markus E.; Paufique, Jerome

    2004-10-01

    The accurate calibration of an AO system is fundamental in order to reach the top performance expected from design. To improve this aspect, we propose procedures for calibrating a curvature AO system in view of optimizing performances and robustness, based on the experience accumulated by the ESO AO team through the development of MACAO systems for VLTI and SINFONI. The approach maximizes the quality of the Interaction Matrix (IM) while maintaining the system in its linear regime and minimizing noise and bias on the measurement.

  12. Spine Curvature Analysis between Participants with Obesity and Normal Weight Participants: A Biplanar Electromagnetic Device Measurement

    PubMed Central

    González-Sánchez, Manuel; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I.

    2014-01-01

    To analyse and compare standing thoracolumbar curves in normal weight participants and participants with obesity, using an electromagnetic device, and to analyse the measurement reliability. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study was carried out. 36 individuals were divided into two groups (normal-weight and participants with obesity) according to their waist circumference. The reference points (T1–T8–L1–L5 and both posterior superior iliac spines) were used to perform a description of thoracolumbar curvature in the sagittal and coronal planes. A transformation from the global coordinate system was performed and thoracolumbar curves were adjusted by fifth-order polynomial equations. The tangents of the first and fifth lumbar vertebrae and the first thoracic vertebra were determined from their derivatives. The reliability of the measurement was assessed according to the internal consistency of the measure and the thoracolumbar curvature angles were compared between groups. Results. Cronbach's alpha values ranged between 0.824 (95% CI: 0.776–0.847) and 0.918 (95% CI: 0.903–0.949). In the coronal plane, no significant differences were found between groups; however, in sagittal plane, significant differences were observed for thoracic kyphosis. Conclusion. There were significant differences in thoracic kyphosis in the sagittal plane between two groups of young adults grouped according to their waist circumference. PMID:25276833

  13. 177-207 GHz Radiometer Front End: Single Sideband Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galin, I.; Schnitzer, C. A.; Dengler, R. J.; Quintero, O.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty years of progress in 200 GHz receivers for spaceborne remote sensing has yielded a 180-220 GHz technology with maturing characteristics, as evident by increasing availability of relevant hardware, paralleled by further refinement in receiver performance requirements at this spectrum band. The 177-207 GHz superheterodyne receiver, for the Earth observing system (EOS) microwave limb sounder (MLS), effectively illustrates such technology developments. This MLS receiver simultaneously detects six different signals, located at sidebands below and above its 191.95 GHZ local-oscillator (LO). The paper describes the MLS 177-207 GHz receiver front-end (RFE), and provides measured data for its lower and upper sidebands. Sideband ratio data is provided as a function of IF frequency, at different LO power drive, and for variation in the ambient temperature.

  14. Realization of sub-micron radius of curvature measurement in vertical interferometer workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Erlong; Wang, Rudong; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Shijun

    2014-09-01

    Radius of curvature (ROC) is one of the key parameters for optical elements and it is especially important for high quality optical system, in which the computer-aided integration is wildly used. ROC is one of the main input parameters and its measurement accuracy is a premise for high quality integration. In this paper, sub-micron ROC measurements are realized in a vertical interference workstation based on Fizeau interferometer. The error sources and uncertainty of the system are analyzed. Experiment results based on samples with difference ROC are presented and in accordance with the analysis. At last, a ROC comparing tests between the system and a three-coordinates measuring machine (CMM) are performed on a SiC ball to certify the workstation's measurement uncertainty.

  15. Measurement of the absolute wavefront curvature radius in a heterodyne interferometer.

    PubMed

    Hechenblaikner, Gerald

    2010-09-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the coupling parameter relating the angle between two interfering beams in a heterodyne interferometer to the differential phase signals detected by a quadrant photodiode. This technique, also referred to as differential wavefront sensing, is commonly used in space-based gravitational wave detectors to determine the attitude of a test mass in one of the interferometer arms from the quadrant diode signals. Successive approximations to the analytical expression are made to simplify the investigation of parameter dependencies. Motivated by our findings, we propose what we believe to be a new measurement method to accurately determine the absolute wavefront curvature of a single measurement beam. We also investigate the change in the coupling parameter when the interferometer "test mirror" is moved from its nominal position, an effect which mediates the coupling of mirror displacement noise into differential phase measurements. PMID:20808419

  16. Comparison of portable and conventional ultrasound imaging in spinal curvature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Christina; Tabanfar, Reza; Kempston, Michael; Borschneck, Daniel; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: In scoliosis monitoring, tracked ultrasound has been explored as a safer imaging alternative to traditional radiography. The use of ultrasound in spinal curvature measurement requires identification of vertebral landmarks, but bones have reduced visibility in ultrasound imaging and high quality ultrasound machines are often expensive and not portable. In this work, we investigate the image quality and measurement accuracy of a low cost and portable ultrasound machine in comparison to a standard ultrasound machine in scoliosis monitoring. METHODS: Two different kinds of ultrasound machines were tested on three human subjects, using the same position tracker and software. Spinal curves were measured in the same reference coordinate system using both ultrasound machines. Lines were defined by connecting two symmetric landmarks identified on the left and right transverse process of the same vertebrae, and spinal curvature was defined as the transverse process angle between two such lines, projected on the coronal plane. RESULTS: Three healthy volunteers were scanned by both ultrasound configurations. Three experienced observers localized transverse processes as skeletal landmarks and obtained transverse process angles in images obtained from both ultrasounds. The mean difference per transverse process angle measured was 3.00 +/-2.1°. 94% of transverse processes visualized in the Sonix Touch were also visible in the Telemed. Inter-observer error in the Telemed was 4.5° and 4.3° in the Sonix Touch. CONCLUSION: Price, convenience and accessibility suggest the Telemed to be a viable alternative in scoliosis monitoring, however further improvements in measurement protocol and image noise reduction must be completed before implementing the Telemed in the clinical setting.

  17. Curvature Radius Measurements From the Ulnar Trochlear Notch in Large Dogs.

    PubMed

    Alves-Pimenta, Sofia; Ginja, Mário Manuel; Colaço, Jorge; Fernandes, Armando Manuel; Melo-Pinto, Pedro; Colaço, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    Assessing the ulnar trochlear notch (UTN) radiographic anatomy has been considered important, but difficult, in the diagnosis of elbow dysplasia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate UTN curvature of natural elbows in radiographs, using a methodology applied to disarticulated joints. The methodology was implemented and validated using dedicated software created by the authors. Mediolateral extended (MLE) and mediolateral flexed (MLF) elbow views were used from 20 joints from canine cadavers that were over 20 kg. After arranging the bones to avoid radiographic overlapping of the bones, an additional mediolateral radioulnar (MLRU) view was made. Curvature radius measurements from the central ridge of the UTN of each elbow were acquired in the MLRU view, using the software. The measurements were repeated in a second session, to determine repeatability. Then similar UTN measurements were taken from the MLE and MLF views, to determine reproducibility. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for repeatability and reproducibility of measurements were above 0.98 (95% confidence interval limits >0.75). The 95% limits of agreement (LA) for repeatability were -2.98 to 3.19 mm. The 95% LA for reproducibility between MLRU and MLE views were -4.32 to 3.75 mm. The 95% LA for reproducibility between MLRU and MLF views were -5.02 to 4.07 mm. The methodology and software are determined to be both precise and suitable to evaluate the UTN in MLE and MLF elbow views of large breed dogs, for anatomical and clinical purposes. In the future it would be useful to characterize normal and dysplastic UTN of different dog breeds. PMID:26138926

  18. Measurement of the shock front velocity produced in a T-tube

    SciTech Connect

    Djurović, S.; Mijatović, Z.; Vujičić, B.; Kobilarov, R.; Savić, I.; Gavanski, L.

    2015-01-15

    A set of shock front velocity measurements is described in this paper. The shock waves were produced in a small electromagnetically driven shock T-tube. Most of the measurements were performed in hydrogen. The shock front velocity measurements in other gases and the velocity of the gas behind the shock front were also analyzed, as well as the velocity dependence on applied input energy. Some measurements with an applied external magnetic field were also performed. The used method of shock front velocity is simple and was shown to be very reliable. Measured values were compared with the calculated ones for the incident and reflected shock waves.

  19. Investigations on the Initial Stress Evolution During Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of YSZ by In Situ Curvature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutter, Markus; Mauer, Georg; Mücke, Robert; Vaßen, Robert; Back, Hyoung Chul; Gibmeier, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The residual stresses within plasma-sprayed coatings are an important factor that can influence the lifetime as well as the performance in operation. The investigation of stresses evolving during deposition and post-deposition cooling for atmospheric plasma spraying of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings using in situ measurement of the samples curvature is a powerful tool for identifying the factors that contribute to stress generation. Under various spray conditions, the first deposition pass leads to a significantly larger increase in samples curvature than the subsequent passes. It is shown in this work that the amount of curvature change at the onset of spraying is significantly influenced by the spray conditions, as well as by the substrate material. More information on the origin of this steep curvature increase at the onset of spraying was obtained by single splat experiments, which yielded information on the splat bonding behavior under various conditions. A comparison of the compressive yield strength for different substrate materials indicated the influence of substrate residual stress relaxation. Residual stress measurements using the incremental hole-drilling method and x-ray diffraction confirmed that the coating deposition affects the substrate residual stress level. The yield strength data were combined with the substrate near-surface temperature during deposition, obtained by finite element simulations, and with the measured residual stress-profile. This revealed that residual stress relaxation is the key factor for the initial curvature increase.

  20. Measurements of Fluorescent Bioaerosol Particles in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Emerson, J. B.; Fierer, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Bioaerosols are of atmospheric interest due to their potential importance as cloud condensation and heterogeneous ice nuclei and because they represent a sizeable fraction of coarse mode aerosol in some locations. Relatively little data exists, however, regarding diurnal, seasonal and annual cycles of bioaerosols and the meteorological processes that control them. Newly developed real-time instrumentation allows for sensitive, high time resolution detection of fluorescent bioaerosols and is uniquely suited to address key uncertainties in the sources, distributions and behavior of these particles in the atmosphere. Here we present observations of ambient fluorescent biological aerosol made on the Front Range of Colorado using a custom-modified Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS) during the summer and fall of 2013. The summertime measurements were made from the roof of the NOAA ESRL David Skaggs Research Center in Boulder and the fall measurements were made both at the surface and aloft at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory Tall Tower. We examine diurnal variations in loading and size distribution of fluorescent bioaerosol at the two locations. We also investigate the relationship between meteorological events and fluorescent bioaerosol. For example, we observe higher concentrations and markedly different number distributions associated with precipitation events. Simultaneous filter samples were collected for DNA sequencing and flow cytometry. To our knowledge this represents the first such comparison for the WIBS under ambient conditions and the microbial identification accomplished with the filters adds significantly to the analysis. This data set will provide useful insight into the sources, loadings and properties of fluorescent bioaerosol and the local and regional processes that drive them.

  1. The Relationship between Corvis ST Tonometry Measured Corneal Parameters and Intraocular Pressure, Corneal Thickness and Corneal Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Ryo; Nakakura, Shunsuke; Tabuchi, Hitoshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Ihara, Noriko; Rimayanti, Ulfah; Aihara, Makoto; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the correlation between Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology (Corvis ST tonometry: CST) parameters and various other ocular parameters, including intraocular pressure (IOP) with Goldmann applanation tonometry. IOP with Goldmann applanation tonometry (IOP-G), central corneal thickness (CCT), axial length (AL), corneal curvature, and CST parameters were measured in 94 eyes of 94 normal subjects. The relationship between ten CST parameters against age, gender, IOP-G, AL, CST-determined CCT and average corneal curvature was investigated using linear modeling. In addition, the relationship between IOP-G versus CST-determined CCT, AL, and other CST parameters was also investigated using linear modeling. Linear modeling showed that the CST measurement ‘A time-1’ is dependent on IOP-G, age, AL, and average corneal curvature; ‘A length-1’ depends on age and average corneal curvature; ‘A velocity-1’ depends on IOP-G and AL; ‘A time-2’ depends on IOP-G, age, and AL; ‘A length-2’ depends on CCT; ‘A velocity-2’ depends on IOP-G, age, AL, CCT, and average corneal curvature; ‘peak distance’ depends on gender; ‘maximum deformation amplitude’ depends on IOP-G, age, and AL. In the optimal model for IOP-G, A time-1, A velocity-1, and highest concavity curvature, but not CCT, were selected as the most important explanatory variables. In conclusion, many CST parameters were not significantly related to CCT, but IOP usually was a significant predictor, suggesting that an adjustment should be made to improve their usefulness for clinical investigations. It was also suggested CST parameters were more influential for IOP-G than CCT and average corneal curvature. PMID:26485129

  2. Experimental research on radius of curvature measurement of spherical lenses based on laser differential confocal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiang; Sun, Ruoduan; Li, Fei; Zhao, Weiqian; Liu, Wenli

    2011-11-01

    A new approach based on laser differential confocal technique is potential to achieve high accuracy in radius of curvature (ROC) measurement. It utilizes two digital microscopes with virtual pinholes on the CCD detectors to precisely locate the cat's-eye and the confocal positions, which can enhance the focus-identification resolution. An instrumental system was established and experimental research was carried out to determine how error sources contribute to the uncertainty of ROC measurement, such as optical axis misalignment, dead path of the interferometer, surface figure error of tested lenses and temperature fluctuation, etc. Suggestions were also proposed on how these factors could be avoided or suppressed. The system performance was tested by employing four pairs of template lenses with a serial of ROC values. The relative expanded uncertainty was analyzed and calculated based on theoretical analysis and experimental determination, which was smaller than 2x10-5 (k=2). The results were supported by comparison measurement between the differential confocal radius measurement (DCRM) system and an ultra-high accuracy three-dimensional profilometer, showing good consistency. It demonstrated that the DCRM system was capable of high-accuracy ROC measurement.

  3. A Comparison of X-Ray Microdiffraction and Coherent Gradientsensing in Measuring Discontinuous Curvatures in Thin Film-Substratesystems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Park, T.-S.; Rosakis, A.; Ustundag, E.; Huang, Y.; Tamura, N.; Valek, B.C.

    2006-01-01

    Background. The Coherent Gradient Sensor (CGS) is a shearing interferometer which has been proposed for the rapid, full-field measurement of deformation states (slopes and curvatures) in thin film-wafer substrate systems, and for the subsequent inference of stresses in the thin films. This approach needs to be verified using a more well-established but time-consuming grain orientation and stress measurement tool, X-ray microdiffraction. Method of Approach. Both CGS and XRD are used to measure the deformation state of the same W film/Si wafer at room temperature. CGS provides a global, wafer-level measurement of slopes while XRD provides a local micromeasurement of lattice rotations. An extreme case of a circular Si wafer with a circular W film island in its center is used because of the presence of discontinuous system curvatures across the wafer. The results are also compared with a theoretical model based on elastic plate analysis of the axisymmetric biomaterial film-substrate system. Results and Conclusions. Slope and curvature measurements by XRD and by CGS compare very well with each other and with theory. The favorable comparison demonstrates that wafer-level CGS metrology provides a quick and accurate alternative to other measurements. It also demonstrates the accuracy of plate theory in modeling thin film-substrate systems, even in the presence of curvature discontinuities.

  4. Measuring the cantilever-position-sensitive detector distance and cantilever curvature for cantilever sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Tian, Ye; Coates, M L; Beaulieu, L Y

    2009-09-01

    Measuring cantilever sensor deflections using an optical beam deflection system is more complicated than often assumed. The direction of the reflected beam is dependent on the surface normal of the cantilever, which in turn is dependent on the state of the cantilever. It is often assumed that the cantilever is both straight and perfectly level before the onset of sensing experiments although this assumption, especially the former, is rarely true. Failure to characterize the initial state of the cantilever can lead to irreproducibility in cantilever sensor measurements. We have developed three new methods for characterizing the initial state of the cantilever. In the first case we show how to define the initial angle of inclination beta of the chip on which the cantilever is attached. This method was tested using an aluminum block with a known angle of inclination. A new method for determining the initial distance L(o) between the cantilever and the position-sensitive detector (PSD) is also presented. This parameter which behaves as an amplification factor of the PSD signal is critical for obtaining precise cantilever sensor data. Lastly, we present a method for determining the initial curvature of the cantilever which often results from depositing the sensing platform on the lever. Experiments conducted using deflected cantilevers showed the model to be accurate. The characterization methods presented in this work are simple to use, easy to implement, and can be incorporated into most cantilever sensor setups. PMID:19791971

  5. CONFIDENCE INTERVALS AND CURVATURE MEASURES IN NONLINEAR REGRESSION USING THE IML AND NLIN PROCEDURES IN SAS SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interval estimates for nonlinear parameters using the linear approximation are sensitive to parameter curvature effects. he adequacy of the linear approximation (Wald) interval is determined using the nonlinearity measures of Bates and Watts (1980), and Clarke (1987b), and the pr...

  6. Measuring the composition-curvature coupling in binary lipid membranes by computer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barragán Vidal, I. A. Müller, M.; Rosetti, C. M.; Pastorino, C.

    2014-11-21

    The coupling between local composition fluctuations in binary lipid membranes and curvature affects the lateral membrane structure. We propose an efficient method to compute the composition-curvature coupling in molecular simulations and apply it to two coarse-grained membrane models—a minimal, implicit-solvent model and the MARTINI model. Both the weak-curvature behavior that is typical for thermal fluctuations of planar bilayer membranes as well as the strong-curvature regime corresponding to narrow cylindrical membrane tubes are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results are analyzed by using a phenomenological model of the thermodynamics of curved, mixed bilayer membranes that accounts for the change of the monolayer area upon bending. Additionally the role of thermodynamic characteristics such as the incompatibility between the two lipid species and asymmetry of composition are investigated.

  7. Measurement of interfacial curvatures in microemulsions using small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. M.; Chen, S. H.; Sottmann, T.; Strey, R.

    A new method for SANS data analysis which enables one to directly compute the average Gaussian and square mean curvatures of the interface in a bicontinuous porous structure is proposed. We present the analysis of an extensive SANS data set of one-phase bicontinuous microemulsions (18 different C iE j/D 2O/n-alkane systems) taken at the minimal specific surface point. Depending on the values of i and j, and the type of oil k, the point of minimal specific surface changes. We interpret the corresponding structural changes in terms of the interfacial curvatures and found that the dependence of the curvatures on i, j, and k cold be summarized by a single scaling law, which has a quadratic dependence of the curvatures on the surfactant volume fraction at the minimal specific surface point.

  8. Measuring the Melt Flow on the Laser Cut Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocorni, Jetro; Petring, Dirk; Powell, John; Deichsel, Eckard; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.

    The flow characteristics on the laser cut front for 10 mm stainless steel AISI 304 (EN 1.4301) are studied in this paper using High Speed Imaging (HSI). The laser cut samples were produced with a 6 kW fiber laser with nitrogen gas assist. Previous work in this field has used unusual cutting parameters to make the experimentation easier. This work presents, for the first time, HSI results from standard commercially viable cutting parameters. This was made possible by the development of a new experimental technique. The results presented here suggest that the cut front produced when cutting stainless steel with a fiber laser and a nitrogen assist gas is covered in bumps which themselves are covered in a thin layer of liquid. Under the conditions shown here the bumps move down the cut front at an average speed of approximately 0.4m/s. The liquid flows at an average speed of approximately 1.1m/s. The average melt depth at the bottom of the cut zone under these conditions is approximately 0.17 mm.

  9. Strain, curvature, and twist measurements in digital holographic interferometry using pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution based method

    SciTech Connect

    Rajshekhar, G.; Gorthi, Sai Siva; Rastogi, Pramod

    2009-09-15

    Measurement of strain, curvature, and twist of a deformed object play an important role in deformation analysis. Strain depends on the first order displacement derivative, whereas curvature and twist are determined by second order displacement derivatives. This paper proposes a pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution based method for measurement of strain, curvature, and twist in digital holographic interferometry where the object deformation or displacement is encoded as interference phase. In the proposed method, the phase derivative is estimated by peak detection of pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution evaluated along each row/column of the reconstructed interference field. A complex exponential signal with unit amplitude and the phase derivative estimate as the argument is then generated and the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution along each row/column of this signal is evaluated. The curvature is estimated by using peak tracking strategy for the new distribution. For estimation of twist, the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution is evaluated along each column/row (i.e., in alternate direction with respect to the previous one) for the generated complex exponential signal and the corresponding peak detection gives the twist estimate.

  10. Asymmetrical in-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer for curvature measurement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Huang, Yijian; Liu, Shen; Wang, Chao; He, Jun; Liao, Changrui; Yin, Guolu; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Yinjie; Tang, Jian; Zhou, Jiangtao; Wang, Yiping

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrated a compact and highly-sensitive curvature sensor based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer created in a photonic crystal fiber. Such a Mach-Zehnder interferometer consisted of a peanut-like section and an abrupt taper achieved by use of an optimized electrical arc discharge technique, where only one dominating cladding mode was excited and interfered with the fundamental mode. The unique structure exhibited a high curvature sensitivity of 50.5 nm/m-1 within a range from 0 to 2.8 m-1, which made it suitable for high-sensitivity curvature sensing in harsh environments. Moreover, it also exhibited a temperature sensitivity of 11.7 pm/°C. PMID:26072819

  11. Measurement of the Earth's Radius Based on Historical Evidence of Its Curvature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roura, Pere; Josep, Calbo

    2005-01-01

    Probably the most direct observation of the Earth's curvature is how objects appear from over the horizon when we approach them and disappear as we get further away from them. Similarly, the portion of a high object (a building or a mountain) that is visible depends on the height of the site where the observation is made. Based upon these very…

  12. Large radius of curvature measurement based on virtual quadratic Newton rings phase-shifting moiré-fringes measurement method in a nonnull interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongming; Wang, Kailiang; Cheng, Jinlong; Gao, Zhishan; Yuan, Qun

    2016-06-10

    We have proposed a virtual quadratic Newton rings phase-shifting moiré-fringes measurement method in a nonnull interferometer to measure the large radius of curvature for a spherical surface. In a quadratic polar coordinate system, linear carrier testing Newton rings interferogram and virtual Newton rings interferogram form the moiré fringes. It is possible to retrieve the wavefront difference data between the testing and standard spherical surface from the moiré fringes after low-pass filtering. Based on the wavefront difference data, we deduced a precise formula to calculate the radius of curvature in the quadratic polar coordinate system. We calculated the retrace error in the nonnull interferometer using the multi-configuration model of the nonnull interferometric system in ZEMAX. Our experimental results indicate that the measurement accuracy is better than 0.18% for a spherical mirror with a radius of curvature of 41,400 mm. PMID:27409038

  13. Mirror with thermally controlled radius of curvature

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2010-06-22

    A radius of curvature controlled mirror for controlling precisely the focal point of a laser beam or other light beam. The radius of curvature controlled mirror provides nearly spherical distortion of the mirror in response to differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces of the mirror. The radius of curvature controlled mirror compensates for changes in other optical components due to heating or other physical changes. The radius of curvature controlled mirror includes an arrangement for adjusting the temperature of the front surface and separately adjusting the temperature of the rear surface to control the radius of curvature. The temperature adjustment arrangements can include cooling channels within the mirror body or convection of a gas upon the surface of the mirror. A control system controls the differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces to achieve the desired radius of curvature.

  14. Optical magnification correction in dynamic size measurements from refraction at conical shock fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D.R.

    1988-09-20

    An analytical formula is derived for the magnification error in optical size measurements of objects inside conically shaped shock fronts. End detonation of a cylindrically shaped explosive immersed in a fluid necessitates a correction due to refraction at the interface between the shocked and unshocked fluids. It is shown that for detonations immersed in a liquid such as water, the correction factor derived for a conical shock front is significantly larger than the simple correction factor derived if the shock front is assumed to be cylindrical. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  15. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  16. Forman curvature for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, R. P.; Mohanraj, Karthikeyan; Jost, Jürgen; Saucan, Emil; Samal, Areejit

    2016-06-01

    We adapt Forman’s discretization of Ricci curvature to the case of undirected networks, both weighted and unweighted, and investigate the measure in a variety of model and real-world networks. We find that most nodes and edges in model and real networks have a negative curvature. Furthermore, the distribution of Forman curvature of nodes and edges is narrow in random and small-world networks, while the distribution is broad in scale-free and real-world networks. In most networks, Forman curvature is found to display significant negative correlation with degree and centrality measures. However, Forman curvature is uncorrelated with clustering coefficient in most networks. Importantly, we find that both model and real networks are vulnerable to targeted deletion of nodes with highly negative Forman curvature. Our results suggest that Forman curvature can be employed to gain novel insights on the organization of complex networks.

  17. Comparing 3D Gyrification Index and area-independent curvature-based measures in quantifying neonatal brain folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Carranza, Claudia E.; Mukherjee, P.; Vigneron, Daniel; Barkovich, James; Studholme, Colin

    2007-03-01

    In this work we compare 3D Gyrification Index and our recently proposed area-independent curvature-based surface measures [26] for the in-vivo quantification of brain surface folding in clinically acquired neonatal MR image data. A meaningful comparison of gyrification across brains of different sizes and their subregions will only be possible through the quantification of folding with measures that are independent of the area of the region of analysis. This work uses a 3D implementation of the classical Gyrification Index, a 2D measure that quantifies folding based on the ratio of the inner and outer contours of the brain and which has been used to study gyral patterns in adults with schizophrenia, among other conditions. The new surface curvature-based measures and the 3D Gyrification Index were calculated on twelve premature infants (age 28-37 weeks) from which surfaces of cerebrospinal fluid/gray matter (CSF/GM) interface and gray matter/white matter (GM/WM) interface were extracted. Experimental results show that our measures better quantify folding on the CSF/GM interface than Gyrification Index, and perform similarly on the GM/WM interface.

  18. Measurement of the Earth's radius based on historical evidence of its curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roura, Pere; Calbó, Josep

    2005-09-01

    Probably the most direct observation of the Earth’s curvature is how objects appear from over the horizon when we approach them and disappear as we get further away from them. Similarly, the portion of a high object (a building or a mountain) that is visible depends on the height of the site where the observation is made. Based upon these very obvious facts, a simple method to estimate the Earth's radius R has been applied. The method does not need either sophisticated instrumentation or complex mathematics. In our application of the method presented here, the result is R = 6600 +/- 600 km in the best case. A discussion is presented about the possible use of this method in ancient times. Surprisingly enough, we have not found any reference to the use of this method despite its being simpler than, for example, the classical approach of Eratosthenes.

  19. Observing Coastal Upwelling Front Dynamics by AUV Tracking, Remote Sensing, and Mooring Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Ryan, J. P.; Godin, M. A.; Bellingham, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal upwelling is a wind-driven ocean process that brings cooler, saltier, and usually nutrient-rich deep water upward to replace surface water displaced offshore due to Ekman transport. The nutrients carried up by upwelling are important for primary production and fisheries. The boundary between the stratified water column and the upwelling water column is called the "upwelling front". Upwelling fronts support enriched phytoplankton and zooplankton populations, thus having great influences on ocean ecosystems. Variations of wind and ocean circulation cause an upwelling front to move. In particular, as the upwelling favorable wind weakens, upwelling enters the relaxation phase. Frontal dynamics in this phase is not well understood. Satellite sea surface temperature (SST) images can show evolutions of upwelling fronts, but only their surface expressions. To enable in situ high-resolution tracking of upwelling frontal dynamics, we have developed a method for an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to autonomously detect and track an upwelling front over a long duration. During the June 2012 CANON (Controlled, Agile, and Novel Observing Network) field program, the Tethys long-range AUV ran our algorithm to closely track an upwelling front in northern Monterey Bay over four days. The AUV tracking captured the front's westward movement. A series of satellite SST images show that the stratified water in the upwelling shadow (residing in the northeastern corner of the Bay) was transported westward, thus pushing the upwelling front westward. The westward movement of the upwelling filament followed weakening of the northwesterly wind (i.e., upwelling favorable wind). The AUV observations offered a window into frontal dynamics in the relaxation phase of the upwelling process. Temperature, salinity, and current velocity profiles measured at the MBARI M1 mooring (to the south of the AUV tracking line) showed that the westward frontal movement coincided with intrusion of

  20. Front-end Electronics for Unattended Measurement (FEUM). Prototype Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Ryan C.; Morris, Scott J.; Smith, Leon E.; Keller, Daniel T.

    2015-09-16

    The IAEA has requested that PNNL perform an initial set of tests on front-end electronics for unattended measurement (FEUM) prototypes. The FEUM prototype test plan details the tests to be performed, the criteria for evaluation, and the procedures used to execute the tests.

  1. MODEL-INDEPENDENT DETERMINATION OF CURVATURE PARAMETER USING H(z) AND D{sub A} (z) DATA PAIRS FROM BAO MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yun-Long; Li, Ti-Pei; Li, Shi-Yu; Zhang, Tong-Jie

    2014-07-01

    We present a model-independent determination of the curvature parameter Ω {sub k} using the Hubble parameter H(z) and the angular diameter distance D{sub A} (z) from recent baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements. Each H(z) and D{sub A} (z) pair from a BAO measurement can constrain a curvature parameter. The accuracy of the curvature measurement improves with increased redshift of H(z) and D{sub A} (z) data. By using the H(z) and D{sub A} (z) pair derived from a BAO Lyman α forest measurement at z = 2.36, the Ω {sub k} is confined to be –0.05 ± 0.06, which is consistent with the curvature of −0.037{sub −0.042}{sup +0.044} constrained by the nine year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data only. Considering future BAO measurements, at least one order of magnitude improvement of this curvature measurement can be expected.

  2. Approach of the measurement of thermal diffusivity of mural paintings by front face photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candoré, Jean Charles; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, Vincent; Remy, B.; Grossel, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we present, in an experimental way, the possibilities of front face photothermal radiometry to measure, in situ, the longitudinal thermal diffusivity of mural paintings. First, we present the principle of the method of measurement. Then, we present the experimental device implemented for the study. Finally, we show, using the experimental study of a plaster sample, the photothermal method allows in a particular case, a good approximation of the parameter longitudinal thermal diffusivity.

  3. Conversion noise measurement for front and back x-ray intensifying screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauernicht, David P.; Van Metter, Richard L.

    1990-07-01

    Two years ago in these proceedings1 we reported on a new method for measuring the noise associated with the variation in light output of x-ray intensifying screens caused by absorption of x-ray quanta of equal energy, together with data for the Kodak Lanex intensifying screens. We have extended our measurements to screens in the back-screen configuration, in addition to the front-screen configuration previously reported. By back-screen configuration we mean that the x-rays are incident from the same side as that from which the emission will be measured. This has been realized by means of an integrating sphere, which allows screens to be mounted as back or front screens; or even as a pair. The light emission statistics (including the mean light output and the Swank I factor) for some Kodak Lanex intensifying screens in the front and back-screen configurations are given and compared. These data can provide a basis for understanding the depth dependent emission probability which in turn provides a useful test of theories of light propagation within the screen.

  4. Liquid-Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer for Wave-Front Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Creath, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A new instrument, the liquid-crystal point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI), is developed for the measurement of phase objects. This instrument maintains the compact, robust design of Linnik's point-diffraction interferometer and adds to it a phase-stepping capability for quantitative interferogram analysis. The result is a compact, simple to align, environmentally insensitive interferometer capable of accurately measuring optical wave fronts with very high data density and with automated data reduction. We describe the theory and design of the LCPDI. A focus shift was measured with the LCPDI, and the results are compared with theoretical results,

  5. Automated measurement of human body shape and curvature using computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Jeremy D.; Hobson, Clifford A.; Dangerfield, Peter H.

    1993-06-01

    A system to measure the surface shape of the human body has been constructed. The system uses a fringe pattern generated by projection of multi-stripe structured light. The optical methodology used is fully described and the algorithms used to process acquired digital images are outlined. The system has been applied to the measurement of the shape of the human back in scoliosis.

  6. ECG-based frame selection and curvature-based ROI detection for measuring carotid intima-media thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Haripriya; Golla, Ramsri G.; Zhang, Yu; Kendall, Christopher B.; Hurst, R. Todd; Tajbakhsh, Nima; Liang, Jianming

    2014-03-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) has proven to be sensitive for predicting individual risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The CIMT is measured based on region of interest (ROIs) in end-diastolic ultrasound frames (EUFs). To interpret CIMT videos, in the current practice, the EUFs and ROIs must be manually selected, a process that is tedious and time consuming. To reduce CIMT interpretation time, this paper presents a novel method for automatically selecting EUFs and determining ROIs in ultrasound videos. The EUFs are selected based on the QRS complex of the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal associated with the ultrasound video, and the ROI is detected based on image intensity and curvature of the carotid artery bulb. Once a EUF is selected and its corresponding ROI is determined, our system measures CIMT using the snake algorithm extended with hard constraints [1,6-7] by computing the average thickness and maximum thickness, calculating the vascular age, and generating a patient's report. In this study, we utilize 23 subjects. Each subject has 4 videos, and 3 EUFs are selected in each video, resulting in a total of 272 ROIs. By comparing with the reference provided by an expert for both frame selection and ROI detection, we achieve 92.96% sensitivity and 97.62% specificity for EUF selection, and 81.25% accuracy in ROI detection.

  7. Derivative of the light frequency shift as a measure of spacetime curvature for gravitational wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of frequency shifts for light beams exchanged between two test masses nearly in free fall is at the heart of gravitational-wave detection. It is envisaged that the derivative of the frequency shift is in fact limited by differential forces acting on those test masses. We calculate the derivative of the frequency shift with a fully covariant, gauge-independent and coordinate-free method. This method is general and does not require a congruence of nearby beams' null geodesics as done in previous work. We show that the derivative of the parallel transport is the only means by which gravitational effects shows up in the frequency shift. This contribution is given as an integral of the Riemann tensor—the only physical observable of curvature—along the beam's geodesic. The remaining contributions are the difference of velocities, the difference of nongravitational forces, and finally fictitious forces, either locally at the test masses or nonlocally integrated along the beam's geodesic. As an application relevant to gravitational-wave detection, we work out the frequency shift in the local Lorentz frame of nearby geodesics.

  8. Optimizing Reliability of Digital Inclinometer and Flexicurve Ruler Measures of Spine Curvatures in Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis of the Spine: An Illustration of the Use of Generalizability Theory

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, Norma J.; Bennett, Lisa; Bonnyman, Alison M.; Stratford, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    The study illustrates the application of generalizability theory (G-theory) to identify measurement protocols that optimize reliability of two clinical methods for assessing spine curvatures in women with osteoporosis. Triplicate measures of spine curvatures were acquired for 9 postmenopausal women with spine osteoporosis by two raters during a single visit using a digital inclinometer and a flexicurve ruler. G-coefficients were estimated using a G-study, and a measurement protocol that optimized inter-rater and inter-trial reliability was identified using follow-up decision studies. The G-theory provides reliability estimates for measurement devices which can be generalized to different clinical contexts and/or measurement designs. PMID:22482067

  9. Ground based mobile isotopic methane measurements in the Front Range, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, B. H.; Rella, C.; Petron, G.; Sherwood, O.; Mielke-Maday, I.; Schwietzke, S.

    2014-12-01

    Increased development of unconventional oil and gas resources in North America has given rise to attempts to monitor and quantify fugitive emissions of methane from the industry. Emission estimates of methane from oil and gas basins can vary significantly from one study to another as well as from EPA or State estimates. New efforts are aimed at reconciling bottom-up, or inventory-based, emission estimates of methane with top-down estimates based on atmospheric measurements from aircraft, towers, mobile ground-based vehicles, and atmospheric models. Attributing airborne measurements of regional methane fluxes to specific sources is informed by ground-based measurements of methane. Stable isotopic measurements (δ13C) of methane help distinguish between emissions from the O&G industry, Confined Animal Feed Operations (CAFO), and landfills, but analytical challenges typically limit meaningful isotopic measurements to individual point sampling. We are developing a toolbox to use δ13CH4 measurements to assess the partitioning of methane emissions for regions with multiple methane sources. The method was applied to the Denver-Julesberg Basin. Here we present data from continuous isotopic measurements obtained over a wide geographic area by using MegaCore, a 1500 ft. tube that is constantly filled with sample air while driving, then subsequently analyzed at slower rates using cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS). Pressure, flow and calibration are tightly controlled allowing precise attribution of methane enhancements to their point of collection. Comparisons with point measurements are needed to confirm regional values and further constrain flux estimates and models. This effort was made in conjunction with several major field campaigns in the Colorado Front Range in July-August 2014, including FRAPPÉ (Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment), DISCOVER-AQ, and the Air Water Gas NSF Sustainability Research Network at the University of Colorado.

  10. Measurement of the wave-front aberration of the eye by a fast psychophysical procedure

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.C.; Marcos, S.; Webb, R.H.; Burns, S.A.

    1998-09-01

    We used a fast psychophysical procedure to determine the wave-front aberrations of the human eye {ital in vivo}. We measured the angular deviation of light rays entering the eye at different pupillary locations by aligning an image of a point source entering the pupil at different locations to the image of a fixation cross entering the pupil at a fixed location. We fitted the data to a Zernike series to reconstruct the wave-front aberrations of the pupil. With this technique the repeatability of the measurement of the individual coefficients was 0.019 {mu}m. The standard deviation of the overall wave-height estimation across the pupil is less than 0.3 {mu}m. Since this technique does not require the administration of pharmacological agents to dilate the pupil, we were able to measure the changes in the aberrations of the eye during accommodation. We found that administration of even a mild dilating agent causes a change in the aberration structure of the eye. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  11. Canted undulator front-end exit-mask flow-induced vibration measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.; Doose, C. L.; Attig, J. N.; Baehl, M. M.

    2004-11-10

    All of the high-heat-load critical components in the new canted-undulator front-end (CU FE) design use wire-coil inserts inside of the cooling channels to significantly enhance heat transfer. Wire-coil inserts have replaced the copper-mesh inserts used in previous front-end high-heat-load critical-component designs. The exit mask, the most downstream component in the CU FE line relative to the x-ray beam path, has an exit aperture of 2 mm vertical x 3 mm horizontal and is the most sensitive component, in terms of final beam stability, of all of the CU FE components. In general, final beam stability is determined by the storage-ring output-beam stability and not by the CU FE components. Although front-end components are not very sensitive to vibration, several measurements have been performed to assess the flow-induced vibration associated with the CU FE exit mask. Results yield only 0.16 {micro}mrms vertical displacement and 1.0 {micro}mrms horizontal displacement under worst-case conditions. The maximum displacement values are very small compared to the aperture size, and therefore flow-induced vibration has a negligible effect on the CU FE output beam stability. More general measurements have also been performed to directly compare flow-induced vibration in an open, unrestricted tube relative to the same tube containing either a wire-coil insert or a copper-mesh insert. Operational performance data are presented for these heat-transfer-enhancing inserts, and the advantages and disadvantages, in terms of selection criteria, are discussed.

  12. Classification and quantification of leaf curvature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyuan; Jia, Liguo; Mao, Yanfei; He, Yuke

    2010-01-01

    Various mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in polarity, cell division, and auxin response are characterized by certain types of leaf curvature. However, comparison of curvature for clarification of gene function can be difficult without a quantitative measurement of curvature. Here, a novel method for classification and quantification of leaf curvature is reported. Twenty-two mutant alleles from Arabidopsis mutants and transgenic lines deficient in leaf flatness were selected. The mutants were classified according to the direction, axis, position, and extent of leaf curvature. Based on a global measure of whole leaves and a local measure of four regions in the leaves, the curvature index (CI) was proposed to quantify the leaf curvature. The CI values accounted for the direction, axis, position, and extent of leaf curvature in all of the Arabidopsis mutants grown in growth chambers. Comparison of CI values between mutants reveals the spatial and temporal variations of leaf curvature, indicating the strength of the mutant alleles and the activities of the corresponding genes. Using the curvature indices, the extent of curvature in a complicated genetic background becomes quantitative and comparable, thus providing a useful tool for defining the genetic components of leaf development and to breed new varieties with leaf curvature desirable for the efficient capture of sunlight for photosynthesis and high yields. PMID:20400533

  13. ANALOG FRONT-END ELECTRONICS FOR BEAM POSITION MEASUREMENT ON THE BEAM HALO MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. SHURTER; T.J. COTE; J.D. GILPATRICK

    2001-06-01

    Enhancements have been made to the log-ratio analog front-end electronics based on the Analog Devices 8307 logarithmic amplifier as used on the LEDA accelerator. The dynamic range of greater than 85 dB, has been extended to nearly the full capability of the AD8307 from the previous design of approximately 65 dB through the addition of a 350 MHz band-pass filter, careful use of ground and power plane placement, signal routing, and power supply bypassing. Additionally, selection of high-isolation RF switches (55dB) has been an integral part of a new calibration technique, which is fully described in another paper submitted to this conference. Provision has also been made for insertion of a first-stage low-noise amplifier for using the circuit under low-signal conditions.

  14. Sigma models with negative curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Jenkins, Elizabeth E.; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2016-05-01

    We construct Higgs Effective Field Theory (HEFT) based on the scalar manifold Hn, which is a hyperbolic space of constant negative curvature. The Lagrangian has a non-compact O (n , 1) global symmetry group, but it gives a unitary theory as long as only a compact subgroup of the global symmetry is gauged. Whether the HEFT manifold has positive or negative curvature can be tested by measuring the S-parameter, and the cross sections for longitudinal gauge boson and Higgs boson scattering, since the curvature (including its sign) determines deviations from Standard Model values.

  15. Front-end Electronics for Unattended Measurement (FEUM). Results of Prototype Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Ryan C.; Keller, Daniel T.; Morris, Scott J.; Smith, Leon E.

    2015-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) deploys unattended monitoring systems to provide continuous monitoring of nuclear material within safeguarded facilities around the world. As the number of unattended monitoring instruments increases, the IAEA is challenged to become more efficient in the implementation of those systems. In 2010, the IAEA initiated the Front-End Electronics for Unattended Measurement (FEUM) project with the goals of greater flexibility in the interfaces to various sensors and data acquisition systems, and improved capabilities for remotely located sensors (e.g., where sensor and front-end electronics might be separated by tens of meters). In consultation with the IAEA, a technical evaluation of a candidate FEUM device produced by a commercial vendor has been performed. This evaluation assessed the device against the IAEA’s original technical specifications and a broad range of important parameters that include sensor types, cable lengths and types, industrial electromagnetic noise that can degrade signals from remotely located detectors, and high radiation fields. Testing data, interpretation, findings and recommendations are provided.

  16. Measurement and modelling of suprathermal electron bursts generated in front of a lower hybrid antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, J. P.; Fuchs, V.; Petržílka, V.; Ekedahl, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements in the tokamak scrape-off layer show the existence of fast electrons as far as a few centimeters radially in front of a lower hybrid antenna grill, which is one order of magnitude further than earlier predictions of interaction zones not exceeding 5 mm in width (Rantamäki et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 1477). The present contribution aims at understanding these experimental results on the basis of electron Landau damping in a turbulent scrape-off layer. A crucial guiding element from the experiments is the observation of temporal intermittency of the fast electron signal at positions radially away from the grill mouth at a rate comparable with the detachment rate of relatively hot and dense field-aligned plasma filaments, or ‘blobs,’ from the last closed flux surface. When the dynamic character of the scrape-off layer is taken into account, transient low density and low temperature states occur during which the Landau damping can be weak enough to allow the radiated spectrum to penetrate radially deep inward. When the lower hybrid wave intercepts a dense and hot ‘blob’ a few cm in front of the antenna, then strong damping of the high wave number components can occur. This is the scenario we propose for explaining the generation of fast electrons far away from the grill mouth.

  17. Measurement of wave-front aberration in a small telescope remote imaging system using scene-based wave-front sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, Lisa A; Bauman, Brian J

    2015-03-31

    Reference-free compensated imaging makes an estimation of the Fourier phase of a series of images of a target. The Fourier magnitude of the series of images is obtained by dividing the power spectral density of the series of images by an estimate of the power spectral density of atmospheric turbulence from a series of scene based wave front sensor (SBWFS) measurements of the target. A high-resolution image of the target is recovered from the Fourier phase and the Fourier magnitude.

  18. Nitrogen oxides measurements in an Amazon site and enhancements associated with a cold front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova, A. M.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Gatti, L. V.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A.; Silva Dias, M. A. F.; Freitas, E. D.

    2004-05-01

    An intensive atmospheric chemistry study was carried out in a pristine Amazonian forest site (Balbina), Amazonas state, Brazil during the 2001 wet season, as part of the LBA/CLAIRE 2001 (The Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia/Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment) field campaign. Measurements of nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) were performed simultaneously with aerosol particles and black carbon concentrations and meteorological parameters observations. Very low trace gases and aerosol concentrations are typically observed at this pristine tropical site. During the measurement period, there was a three-day episode of enhancement of NO2 and black carbon concentration. NO2 concentration reached a maximum value of 4 ppbv, which corresponds to three times the background concentration observed for this site. Black carbon concentration increased from the approximated 100 ng/m3 average value to a 200 ng/m3 maximum during the same period. Biomass burning spots were detected southward, between latitudes 15 to 10° S, 5-6 days before this episode from GOES-8 WF_ABBA (Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm). An atmospheric numerical simulation of the whole measurement period was carried out using the RAMS model coupled to a biomass burning emission and transport model. The simulation results pictured a smoke transport event from Central Brazil associated to an approach of a mid-latitude cold front, reinforcing the hypothesis of biomass burning products being long-range transported from the South by the cold front and crossing the Equator. This transport event shows how the pristine atmosphere pattern in Amazonia is impacted by biomass burning emissions from sites very far away.

  19. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758)

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, João C. P.; Fujihara, Caroline J.; Fruhvald, Erika; Trevisol, Eduardo; Destro, Flavia C.; Teixeira, Carlos R.; Pantoja, José C. F.; Schmidt, Elizabeth M. S.; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots’ physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva), two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1) and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2): Control (undisturbed), Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM), Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM) and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM). Treatments (always one week apart) were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment). Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations). Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median) at the peak (after 3–9 h), and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  20. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João C P; Fujihara, Caroline J; Fruhvald, Erika; Trevisol, Eduardo; Destro, Flavia C; Teixeira, Carlos R; Pantoja, José C F; Schmidt, Elizabeth M S; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots' physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva), two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1) and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2): Control (undisturbed), Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM), Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM) and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM). Treatments (always one week apart) were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment). Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations). Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median) at the peak (after 3-9 h), and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  1. Soft Tissue Artefacts of the Human Back: Comparison of the Sagittal Curvature of the Spine Measured Using Skin Markers and an Open Upright MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Roland; List, Renate; Gülay, Turgut; Elsig, Jean Pierre; Naxera, Jaroslav; Taylor, William R.; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Soft tissue artefact affects the determination of skeletal kinematics. Thus, it is important to know the accuracy and limitations of kinematic parameters determined and modelled based on skin marker data. Here, the curvature angles, as well as the rotations of the lumbar and thoracic segments, of seven healthy subjects were determined in the sagittal plane using a skin marker set and compared to measurements taken in an open upright MRI scanner in order to understand the influence of soft tissue artefact at the back. The mean STA in the flexed compared to the extended positions were 10.2±6.1 mm (lumbar)/9.3±4.2 mm (thoracic) and 10.7±4.8 mm (lumbar)/9.2±4.9 mm (thoracic) respectively. A linear regression of the lumbar and thoracic curvatures between the marker-based measurements and MRI-based measurements resulted in coefficients of determination, R2, of 0.552 and 0.385 respectively. Skin marker measurements therefore allow for the assessment of changes in the lumbar and thoracic curvature angles, but the absolute values suffer from uncertainty. Nevertheless, this marker set appears to be suitable for quantifying lumbar and thoracic spinal changes between quasi-static whole body postural changes. PMID:24748013

  2. Soft tissue artefacts of the human back: comparison of the sagittal curvature of the spine measured using skin markers and an open upright MRI.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Roland; List, Renate; Gülay, Turgut; Elsig, Jean Pierre; Naxera, Jaroslav; Taylor, William R; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Soft tissue artefact affects the determination of skeletal kinematics. Thus, it is important to know the accuracy and limitations of kinematic parameters determined and modelled based on skin marker data. Here, the curvature angles, as well as the rotations of the lumbar and thoracic segments, of seven healthy subjects were determined in the sagittal plane using a skin marker set and compared to measurements taken in an open upright MRI scanner in order to understand the influence of soft tissue artefact at the back. The mean STA in the flexed compared to the extended positions were 10.2±6.1 mm (lumbar)/9.3±4.2 mm (thoracic) and 10.7±4.8 mm (lumbar)/9.2±4.9 mm (thoracic) respectively. A linear regression of the lumbar and thoracic curvatures between the marker-based measurements and MRI-based measurements resulted in coefficients of determination, R2, of 0.552 and 0.385 respectively. Skin marker measurements therefore allow for the assessment of changes in the lumbar and thoracic curvature angles, but the absolute values suffer from uncertainty. Nevertheless, this marker set appears to be suitable for quantifying lumbar and thoracic spinal changes between quasi-static whole body postural changes. PMID:24748013

  3. Novel front-surface thermal-diffusivity measurement method based on phase analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braggiotti, Alberto; Marinetti, Sergio

    2000-05-01

    The technique described in this paper is for one-side thermal diffusivity measurement. A single stripe-shaped pulse provided by a flash lamp is used to heat the front surface of a specimen slab. Classical methods for estimating a parameter out of a distribution involve fitting the temperature distribution with its theoretical model. With the technique described in this paper the evolution of the temperature distribution along a line perpendicular to the heated stripe is analyzed in the frequency domain. An estimate of the thermal diffusivity is then obtained from comparison of the phase component behavior with an abacus similarly built from the theoretical model. This technique is valid for any shape of flash lamp pulse (i.e. laser spot), and can be used also for estimating the thermal diffusivity of anisotropic materials. The choice of the stripe shape is due to the limitations of the simulation environment used.

  4. Measures of the environmental footprint of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle (FEFC) have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. This work builds upon reports from operating facilities and other primary data sources to build a database of front end environmental impacts. This work also addresses land transformation and water withdrawals associated with the processes of the FEFC. These processes include uranium extraction, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, depleted uranium disposition, and transportation. To allow summing the impacts across processes, all impacts were normalized per tonne of natural uranium mined as well as per MWh(e) of electricity produced, a more conventional unit for measuring environmental impacts that facilitates comparison with other studies. This conversion was based on mass balances and process efficiencies associated with the current once-through LWR fuel cycle. Total energy input is calculated at 8.7 x 10- 3 GJ(e)/MWh(e) of electricity and 5.9 x 10- 3 GJ(t)/MWh(e) of thermal energy. It is dominated by the energy required for uranium extraction, conversion to fluoride compound for subsequent enrichment, and enrichment. An estimate of the carbon footprint is made from the direct energy consumption at 1.7 kg CO2/MWh(e). Water use is likewise dominated by requirements of uranium extraction, totaling 154 L/MWh(e). Land use is calculated at 8 x 10- 3 m2/MWh(e), over 90% of which is due to uranium extraction. Quantified impacts are limited to those resulting from activities performed within the FEFC process facilities (i.e. within the plant gates). Energy embodied in material inputs such as process chemicals and fuel cladding is identified but not explicitly quantified in this study. Inclusion of indirect energy associated with embodied energy as well as construction and decommissioning of facilities could increase the FEFC energy intensity estimate by a factor of up

  5. Spatial curvature falsifies eternal inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew; Schillo, Marjorie

    2012-06-01

    Inflation creates large-scale cosmological density perturbations that are characterized by an isotropic, homogeneous, and Gaussian random distribution about a locally flat background. Even in a flat universe, the spatial curvature measured within one Hubble volume receives contributions from long wavelength perturbations, and will not in general be zero. These same perturbations determine the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature fluctuations, which are Script O(10-5). Consequently, the low-l multipole moments in the CMB temperature map predict the value of the measured spatial curvature Ωk. On this basis we argue that a measurement of |Ωk| > 10-4 would rule out slow-roll eternal inflation in our past with high confidence, while a measurement of Ωk < -10-4 (which is positive curvature, a locally closed universe) rules out false-vacuum eternal inflation as well, at the same confidence level. In other words, negative curvature (a locally open universe) is consistent with false-vacuum eternal inflation but not with slow-roll eternal inflation, and positive curvature falsifies both. Near-future experiments will dramatically extend the sensitivity of Ωk measurements and constitute a sharp test of these predictions.

  6. Excitation ahead of shock fronts in krypton measured by single line laser absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boetticher, W.; Kilpin, D.

    1984-12-01

    The absorption of single-mode radiation (from a dye laser tuned to 587.25 and 557.18 nm) by Kr in front of shock waves with Mach numbers 12-21 in a 50-mm-diameter 4.4-m-long free-position driver shock tube at preshock pressures 0.7-2.7 kPa is measured to determine the number densities of the metastable 5s(1 1/2)2 and 5s(1 1/2)1 precursor states (1s5 and 1s4 in Paschen notation, respectively). The measurement technique and calculations follow those of Ernst (1982). The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in comparison with previous findings. The time constant of the exponential rise of the precursor is found to be about 8 microsec, and the concentration of 1s5 + 1s4 for Mach 20 is calculated as about 10 ppm, in agreement (to within a factor of 5) with model predictions for Ar and Xe.

  7. Seasonal thermal fronts on the northern South China Sea shelf: Satellite measurements and three repeated field surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhiyou; Qi, Yiquan; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Du, Yan; Lian, Shumin

    2016-03-01

    Seasonal thermal fronts associated with wind-driven coastal downwelling/upwelling in the northern South China Sea are investigated using satellite measurements and three repeated fine-resolution mapping surveys in winter, spring, and summer. The results show that vigorous thermal fronts develop over the broad shelf with variable widths and intensities in different seasons, which tend to be approximately aligned with the 20-100 m isobaths. Driven by the prevailing winter/summer monsoon, the band-shaped fronts were observed with a magnitude exceeding 0.1°C/km in the subsurface, and accompanied by energetic coastal downwelling/upwelling due to shoreward/offshore Ekman transport. The downward/upward tilting of seasonal thermoclines across the shelf exceeds 20 m, significantly contributing to the development of thermal fronts over the shelf. In addition, the diagnostic analysis of Potential Vorticity (PV) suggests that the summer frontal activities induced by the coastal upwelling are more stable to convection and symmetric instabilities in comparison to the winter fronts associated with downwelling-favorable monsoon forcing. This is primarily due to their essential differences in the upper ocean stratification and horizontal buoyancy gradients arising from wind forcing. At the same time, the coastal currents are substantially regulated by the seasonal winds. An expected lag correlation between the velocity from mooring measurements and alongshore wind stress is detected near the frontal region. These results indicate that seasonal wind forcing plays an important role in the frontal activities and coastal water transport over the shelf.

  8. Spatial curvature endgame: Reaching the limit of curvature determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, C. Danielle; Bull, Philip; Allison, Rupert

    2016-07-01

    Current constraints on spatial curvature show that it is dynamically negligible: |ΩK|≲5 ×10-3 (95% C.L.). Neglecting it as a cosmological parameter would be premature however, as more stringent constraints on ΩK at around the 10-4 level would offer valuable tests of eternal inflation models and probe novel large-scale structure phenomena. This precision also represents the "curvature floor," beyond which constraints cannot be meaningfully improved due to the cosmic variance of horizon-scale perturbations. In this paper, we discuss what future experiments will need to do in order to measure spatial curvature to this maximum accuracy. Our conservative forecasts show that the curvature floor is unreachable—by an order of magnitude—even with Stage IV experiments, unless strong assumptions are made about dark energy evolution and the Λ CDM parameter values. We also discuss some of the novel problems that arise when attempting to constrain a global cosmological parameter like ΩK with such high precision. Measuring curvature down to this level would be an important validation of systematics characterization in high-precision cosmological analyses.

  9. Measuring Kinematic Variables in Front Crawl Swimming Using Accelerometers: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Callaway, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective data on swimming performance is needed to meet the demands of the swimming coach and athlete. The purpose of this study is to use a multiple inertial measurement units to calculate Lap Time, Velocity, Stroke Count, Stroke Duration, Stroke Rate and Phases of the Stroke (Entry, Pull, Push, Recovery) in front crawl swimming. Using multiple units on the body, an algorithm was developed to calculate the phases of the stroke based on the relative position of the body roll. Twelve swimmers, equipped with these devices on the body, performed fatiguing trials. The calculated factors were compared to the same data derived to video data showing strong positive results for all factors. Four swimmers required individual adaptation to the stroke phase calculation method. The developed algorithm was developed using a search window relative to the body roll (peak/trough). This customization requirement demonstrates that single based devices will not be able to determine these phases of the stroke with sufficient accuracy. PMID:26007718

  10. Wide Dynamic Range Front-end Electronics for Beam Current and Position Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rawnsley, W. R.; Potter, R. J.; Verzilov, V. A.; Root, L.

    2006-11-20

    An Analog Devices log detector, AD8306, and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP), ADSP-21992, have been found useful for building wide dynamic range, accurate and inexpensive front-end electronics to measure and process the RF signals from TRIUMF's beam monitors. The high-precision log detector has a useful dynamic range of over 100 dB. The 160 MHz mixed-signal DSP is used to digitize the log detector output, linearize it via a lookup table, perform temperature compensation, and remove the variable duty cycle 1 kHz pulse structure of the beam. This approach has been applied to two types of devices in a 500 MeV proton beamline. The 0.1% DC to CW total current monitor is based on a capacitive pickup resonant at 46.11 MHz, the second harmonic of the bunch frequency. The DSP software provides low pass filtering, calculates the antilog of the data and passes the output to a CAMAC input register. The BPM electronics process data from inductive pickup loops. The DSP controls a GaAs switch which multiplexes signals from four adjacent pickups to a single log detector. The DSP performs difference-over-sum or log-ratio data analysis along with averaging over an arbitrary number of samples.

  11. Measurement of the geometric characteristics of a fire front by stereovision techniques on field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, L.; Molinier, T.; Pieri, A.; Akhloufi, M.; Tison, Y.; Bosseur, F.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents stereovision techniques for measurement of the geometrical properties (position, rate of spread, fire height, fire inclination angle, fire base width, view factor) of fires obtained by experimental burnings at field scale. The system consists of two synchronized and pre-calibrated multi-baseline stereo cameras operating in the visible spectrum. The cameras are positioned in the back and the lateral positions relatively to the direction of fire propagation. Algorithms have been developed in order to (i) register these cameras, (ii) model in three dimensions the fire front from the back stereoscopic images and (iii) estimate some geometrical properties of fire such as the inclination angle and the fire base width from the lateral stereoscopic images. A user graphical interface was developed as a practical tool to estimate fire propagation features and to display the obtained results. Fire spread experiments were conducted at field scale (about 20 m wide and 3 m high). The fuel consists of Mediterranean shrub vegetation. The obtained results are promising and show interesting performance achieved by the proposed system in operational and complex fire scenarios.

  12. Generalizing the flash technique in the front-face configuration to measure the thermal diffusivity of semitransparent solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pech-May, Nelson Wilbur; Mendioroz, Arantza; Salazar, Agustín

    2014-10-15

    In this work, we have extended the front-face flash method to retrieve simultaneously the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient of semitransparent plates. A complete theoretical model that allows calculating the front surface temperature rise of the sample has been developed. It takes into consideration additional effects, such as multiple reflections of the heating light beam inside the sample, heat losses by convection and radiation, transparency of the sample to infrared wavelengths, and heating pulse duration. Measurements performed on calibrated solids, covering a wide range of absorption coefficients (from transparent to opaque) and thermal diffusivities, validate the proposed method.

  13. Generalizing the flash technique in the front-face configuration to measure the thermal diffusivity of semitransparent solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech-May, Nelson Wilbur; Mendioroz, Arantza; Salazar, Agustín

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we have extended the front-face flash method to retrieve simultaneously the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient of semitransparent plates. A complete theoretical model that allows calculating the front surface temperature rise of the sample has been developed. It takes into consideration additional effects, such as multiple reflections of the heating light beam inside the sample, heat losses by convection and radiation, transparency of the sample to infrared wavelengths, and heating pulse duration. Measurements performed on calibrated solids, covering a wide range of absorption coefficients (from transparent to opaque) and thermal diffusivities, validate the proposed method.

  14. Refractive index change and curvature in shock waves by angled beam refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, J. H.; Manson, A. C.

    1981-09-01

    Observations of front geometry and refractive index jump across shock waves in rare gases have been made with a new particularly simple technique. The technique involves determination of the angular deflection of a narrow laser beam intersecting the shock front at a shallow angle. Measured refractive index jumps in rare gases are in excellent agreement with those calculated using Snell's law and ideal shock theory. The apparent shock curvature is in close accord with deBoer's theory for loading pressures below 20 Torr, but above this pressure there is evidence of an indentation near tube center.

  15. Application of HARLIE Measurements in Mesoscale Studies: Measurements of Aerosol Backscatter and Winds During A Gust Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoz, Belay; Miller, David; Schwemmer, Geary; Starr, David OC (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lidar atmospheric systems have required large telescope for receiving atmospheric backscatter signals. Thus, the relative complexity in size and ease of operation has limited their wider use in the atmospheric science and meteorology community. The Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE) uses a scanning holographic receiver and demonstrates that these issues can be overcome. HARLIE participated at the DOE-ARM Southern Great Plains site (CART) during the Water Vapor Intensive Operation Period (WVIOP2000) held September-October 2000. It provided exceptional high temporal and spatial resolution measurements of aerosol and cloud backscatter in three dimensions. HARLIE recorded over 110 hours of data were recorded on 16 days between 17 September and 6 October 2000. Placed in a ground-based trailer for upward looking scanning measurements of clouds and aerosols, HARLIE provided a unique record of time-resolved atmospheric backscatter at 1-micron wavelength. The conical scanning lidar measures atmospheric backscatter on the surface of an inverted 90 degree (full angle) cone up to an altitude of 20 km, 360-degree scans having spatial resolutions of 20 meters in the vertical and 1 degree in azimuth were obtained every 36 seconds during the daily, operating period. In this study we present highlights of HARLIE-based measurements of the boundary layer and cloud parameters as well as atmospheric wind vectors where there is sufficiently resolved structure in the backscatter. In particular we present data and discussions from a bore-front case observed on 23 September 2000.

  16. Choice of scalar measure for crystal curvature to image dislocation substructure in terms of discrete orientation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisman, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Starting from Nye's tensor, alternative characteristics of crystal curvature indicative of dislocation content are considered subject to very low thickness of investigated matter under the free surface and discreteness of orientation sampling. Analysis within the framework of continuum mechanics, undertaken to allow for such conditions peculiar to the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique, has shown the variable part of orientations expressed in a vector form to be most sensitive to lattice defects when projected to the free surface plane. Hence, as verified with EBSD data on a grain junction in a low deformed IF steel, magnitude of the projected field allows one to map plastic strains inhomogeneous within grains whereas divergence of this field distinctly images and quantifies low-angle dislocation boundaries formed at low strains.

  17. An Analysis of Non-Uniform Stress States in Finite Thin Film/Substrate System: The Need of Full-Field Curvature Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Duc Minh

    2009-01-01

    Current methodologies used for the inference of thin film stresses through curvatures are strictly restricted to stress and curvature states which are assumed to remain uniform over the entire film/substrate system. In this dissertation, we extend these methodologies to non-uniform stress and curvature states for the single layer of thin film or…

  18. A three-dimensional validation of crack curvature in muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect

    J. C. Hill; J. W. Foulk III; P. A. Klein; E. P. Chen

    2001-01-07

    Experimental and computational efforts focused on characterizing crack tip curvature in muscovite mica. Wedge-driven cracks were propagated under monochromatic light. Micrographs verified the subtle curvature of the crack front near the free surface. A cohesive approach was employed to model mixed-mode fracture in a three-dimensional framework. Finite element calculations captured the crack curvature observed in experiment.

  19. Measurement of diffusion length and surface recombination velocity in Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) and Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinden, Pierre; Van de Wiele, Fernand

    1985-03-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cells by means of a simple linear regression on experimental quantum efficiency values versus the inverse of the absorption coefficient. This method is extended to the case of Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells. Under certain conditions, the real or the effective surface recombination velocity may be measured.

  20. Measures of the Environmental Footprint of the Front End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Brett Carlsen; Emily Tavrides; Erich Schneider

    2010-08-01

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. Section 2 of this report provides a summary of historical estimates. This study revises existing empirical correlations and their underlying assumptions to fit to a more complete set of existing data. This study also addresses land transformation, water withdrawals, and occupational and public health impacts associated with the processes of the front end of the once-through nuclear fuel cycle. These processes include uranium mining, milling, refining, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication. Metrics are developed to allow environmental impacts to be summed across the full set of front end processes, including transportation and disposition of the resulting depleted uranium.

  1. Spatial curvature, spacetime curvature, and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.

    2016-08-01

    The belief that curved spacetime gravity cannot be simply and correctly presented results in such misleading presentations as elastic two-dimensional sheets deformed as they support heavy objects. This article attempts to show that the conceptual basis of curved spacetime gravity can be simply and correctly presented, and that the spatial curvature of a deformed elastic sheet is very different from the spacetime curvature underlying gravity. This article introduces the idea of a "splittable" spacetime that has spatial curvature, but is missing most of the manifestations of gravity. A section in which no mathematics is used is directed at students who have studied no more than introductory physics. A separate section, for students who have taken only an introductory course in general relativity, gives mathematical arguments centering on splittable spacetimes.

  2. Using Cosmogenic Nuclides and Geochemical Mass Balance Measurements to Characterize Millennial-Scale Denudation Rates in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, J. L.; Wohl, E. E.; Riebe, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    Multiple authors have delineated the CO Front Range landscape into distinct elevational zones with respect to contemporary geomorphologic processes, landscape development, and sediment dynamics in bedrock canyons. Several studies have estimated denudation rates using rates of post-fire erosion, alpine soil erosion, beaver dam sedimentation, and cosmogenic tor erosion, but comparison is limited due to differences in the time scale captured by different measurements. We address this gap by using cosmogenic 10Be to measure denudation rates in three process domains: flat Front Range summits, five unglaciated watersheds above the terminal moraine, and five watersheds below the moraine. These data are coupled with soil and rock geochemistry data from the flats, and a basin of homogenous bedrock type, to constrain long-term chemical erosion rates and eolian dust influx into the headwaters of the Front Range. Two paired bedrock outcrop and soil samples were taken on flat summits in Rocky Mountain National Park. Bedrock samples were taken from a low-lying bedrock outcrop and large boulder with accompanying colluvial soil samples from the surrounding surface. Fluvial sediment was collected for 10Be analysis from the outlets of 10 watersheds. We also conducted soil surveys in each basin to examine relationships between physical characteristics and depths of soil, and hillslope position. To constrain long-term chemical weathering rates and estimate eolian inputs, we analyzed 30 soil and 5 bedrock samples using X Ray Fluorescence (XRF) in each basin. We estimated eolian input by assuming the silt fraction of peak soils were derived from dust, as well as using dust chemistry reported in the literature. Basin-averaged denudation rates will be compared to basin morphometric parameters. These data will provide insight into long term landscape evolution of the Front Range, as well as sequestration of atmospheric carbon via chemical weathering, and eolian deposition.

  3. Determining wave direction using curvature parameters.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Eduardo Vitarelli; de Carvalho, João Luiz Baptista

    2016-01-01

    The curvature of the sea wave was tested as a parameter for estimating wave direction in the search for better results in estimates of wave direction in shallow waters, where waves of different sizes, frequencies and directions intersect and it is difficult to characterize. We used numerical simulations of the sea surface to determine wave direction calculated from the curvature of the waves. Using 1000 numerical simulations, the statistical variability of the wave direction was determined. The results showed good performance by the curvature parameter for estimating wave direction. Accuracy in the estimates was improved by including wave slope parameters in addition to curvature. The results indicate that the curvature is a promising technique to estimate wave directions.•In this study, the accuracy and precision of curvature parameters to measure wave direction are analyzed using a model simulation that generates 1000 wave records with directional resolution.•The model allows the simultaneous simulation of time-series wave properties such as sea surface elevation, slope and curvature and they were used to analyze the variability of estimated directions.•The simultaneous acquisition of slope and curvature parameters can contribute to estimates wave direction, thus increasing accuracy and precision of results. PMID:27408830

  4. Curvature of the penis

    MedlinePlus

    Curvature of the penis is an abnormal bend in the penis that occurs during erection. It is also called Peyronie's disease. ... tissue develops in the deep tissues of the penis. The cause of this fibrous tissue is often ...

  5. Automatic Framework for Extraction and Characterization of Wetting Front Propagation Using Tomographic Image Sequences of Water Infiltrated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Dionicio; Scharcanski, Jacob; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new automatic framework for extracting and characterizing the dynamic shape of the 3D wetting front and its propagation, based in a sequence of tomographic images acquired as water (moisture) infiltrates in unsaturated soils. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the shape of the 3D wetting front and its propagation and progress over time has not been previously produced as a whole by methods in existing literature. The proposed automatic framework is composed two important and integrated modules: i) extraction of the 3D wetting front, and ii) characterization and description of the 3D wetting front to obtain important information about infiltration process. The 3D wetting front surface is segmented from 3D CT imagery provided as input via a 3D stochastic region merging strategy using quadric-regressed bilateral space-scale representations. Based on the 3D segmentation results, the normal directions at local curvature maxima of the wetting front surface are computed for 3D images of soil moisture, and its propagation is analyzed at the local directions in sites of maximal water adsorption, and described using histograms of curvature changes over time in response to sample saturation. These curvature change descriptors provide indirect measurements of moisture infiltration in soils, and soil saturation. Results using a field tomograph equipment specific for soil studies are encouraging, and suggest that the proposed automatic framework can be applied to estimate the infiltration of water in soils in 3D and in time. PMID:25602498

  6. Front lighted optical tooling method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Stone, William J.

    1985-06-18

    An optical tooling method and apparatus uses a front lighted shadowgraphic technique to enhance visual contrast of reflected light. The apparatus includes an optical assembly including a fiducial mark, such as cross hairs, reflecting polarized light with a first polarization, a polarizing element backing the fiducial mark and a reflective surface backing the polarizing element for reflecting polarized light bypassing the fiducial mark and traveling through the polarizing element. The light reflected by the reflecting surface is directed through a second pass of the polarizing element toward the frontal direction with a polarization differing from the polarization of the light reflected by the fiducial mark. When used as a tooling target, the optical assembly may be mounted directly to a reference surface or may be secured in a mounting, such as a magnetic mounting. The optical assembly may also be mounted in a plane defining structure and used as a spherometer in conjunction with an optical depth measuring instrument. A method of measuring a radius of curvature of an unknown surface includes positioning the spherometer on a surface between the surface and a depth measuring optical instrument. As the spherometer is frontally illuminated, the distance from the depth measuring instrument to the fiducial mark and the underlying surface are alternately measured and the difference in these measurements is used as the sagittal height to calculate a radius of curvature.

  7. Optical in-situ monitoring system for simultaneous measurement of thickness and curvature of thick layer stacks during hydride vapor phase epitaxy growth of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmelroth, K.; Berwian, P.; Schröter, C.; Leibiger, G.; Schönleber, M.; Friedrich, J.

    2015-10-01

    For improved real-time process control we integrated a novel optical in-situ monitoring system in a vertical reactor for hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) bulk crystals. The in-situ monitoring system consists of a fiber-optical interferometric sensor in combination with an optimized differential measuring head. The system only needs one small optical path perpendicular to the center of the layer stack typically consisting of sapphire as substrate and GaN. It can handle sample distances up to 1 m without difficulty. The in-situ monitoring system is simultaneously measuring the optical layer thicknesses of the GaN/sapphire layer stack and the absolute change of the distance between the measuring head and the backside of the layer stack. From this data it is possible to calculate the thickness of the growing GaN up to a thickness of about 1000 μm and the absolute change in curvature of the layer stack. The performance of the in-situ monitoring system is shown and discussed based on the measured interference signals recorded during a short-time and a long-time HVPE growth run.

  8. Analog front-end measuring biopotential signal with effective offset rejection loop.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seunghyun; Kim, Hyunho; Song, Haryong; Cho, Dong-il Dan; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analog front-end (AFE) IC design for recording biopotential signals. The AFE employs a capacitively coupled instrumentation amplifier to achieve a low-noise and high-common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) system. A ripple reduction loop is proposed to reduce the ripple generated by the up-modulating chopper. The low frequency noise is attenuated by an input AC coupling capacitor, and is attenuated again by a DC servo loop. The proposed AFE features a differential gain of 71 dB, and a CMRR of 89 dB, at 50 Hz. Furthermore, the proposed AFE can robustly acquire biopotential signals even in the presence of an input offset and ripples. PMID:26406095

  9. Pixel front-end with synchronous discriminator and fast charge measurement for the upgrades of HL-LHC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteil, E.; Demaria, N.; Pacher, L.; Rivetti, A.; Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Rotondo, F.; Leng, C.

    2016-03-01

    The upgrade of the silicon pixel sensors for the HL-LHC experiments requires the development of new readout integrated circuits due to unprecedented radiation levels, very high hit rates and increased pixel granularity. The design of a very compact, low power, low threshold analog very front-end in CMOS 65 nm technology is described. It contains a synchronous comparator which uses an offset compensation technique based on storing the offset in output. The latch can be turned into a local oscillator using an asynchronous logic feedback loop to implement a fast time-over-threshold counting. This design has been submitted and the measurement results are presented.

  10. Experimental measurements of estimator bias and the signal-to-noise ratio for deconvolution from wave-front sensing.

    PubMed

    Dayton, D; Gonglewski, J; Rogers, S

    1997-06-10

    Deconvolution from wave-front sensing (DWFS) has been proposed as a method for achieving high-resolution images of astronomical objects from ground-based telescopes. The technique consists of the simultaneous measurement of a short-exposure focal-plane speckled image, as well as the wave front, by use of a Shack-Hartmann sensor placed at the pupil plane. In early studies it was suspected that some problems would occur in poor seeing conditions; however, it was usually assumed that the technique would work well as long as the wave-front sensor subaperture spacing was less than r(0) (L/r(0) < 1). Atmosphere-induced phase errors in the pupil of a telescope imaging system produce both phase errors and magnitude errors in the effective short-exposure optical transfer function (OTF) of the system. Recently it has been shown that the commonly used estimator for this technique produces biased estimates of the magnitude errors. The significance of this bias problem is that one cannot properly estimate or correct for the frame-to-frame fluctuations in the magnitude of the OTF but can do so only for fluctuations in the phase. An auxiliary estimate must also be used to correct for the mean value of the magnitude error. The inability to compensate for the magnitude fluctuations results in a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that is less favorable for the technique than was previously thought. In some situations simpler techniques, such as the Knox-Thompson and bispectrum methods, which require only speckle gram data from the focal plane of the imaging system, can produce better results. We present experimental measurements based on observations of bright stars and the Jovian moon Ganymede that confirm previous theoretical predictions. PMID:18253416

  11. The dark side of curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Martínez, Enrique Fernández; Mena, Olga; Verde, Licia E-mail: enfmarti@mppmu.mpg.de E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu

    2010-03-01

    Geometrical tests such as the combination of the Hubble parameter H(z) and the angular diameter distance d{sub A}(z) can, in principle, break the degeneracy between the dark energy equation of state parameter w(z), and the spatial curvature Ω{sub k} in a direct, model-independent way. In practice, constraints on these quantities achievable from realistic experiments, such as those to be provided by Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) galaxy surveys in combination with CMB data, can resolve the cosmic confusion between the dark energy equation of state parameter and curvature only statistically and within a parameterized model for w(z). Combining measurements of both H(z) and d{sub A}(z) up to sufficiently high redshifts z ∼ 2 and employing a parameterization of the redshift evolution of the dark energy equation of state are the keys to resolve the w(z)−Ω{sub k} degeneracy.

  12. Slope, curvature, and higher parameters in p p and p ¯p scattering, and the extrapolation of measurements of d σ (s ,t )/d t to t =0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Martin M.; Durand, Loyal; Ha, Phuoc; Halzen, Francis

    2016-06-01

    We study the effects of curvature in the expansion of the logarithm of the differential elastic scattering cross section near t =0 as d σ (s ,t )/d t =d σ (s ,0 )/d t ×exp (B t +C t2+D t3⋯) in an eikonal model for p p and p ¯p scattering, and use the results to discuss the extrapolation of measured differential cross sections and the slope parameters B to t =-q2=0 . We find that the curvature effects represented by the parameters C and D , while small, lead to significant changes in the forward slope parameter relative to that determined in a purely exponential fit, and to smaller but still significant changes in the forward elastic scattering and total cross sections. Curvature effects should therefore be considered in future analyses or reanalyses of the elastic scattering data.

  13. Orthonormal curvature polynomials over a unit circle: basis set derived from curvatures of Zernike polynomials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunyu; Burge, James H

    2013-12-16

    Zernike polynomials are an orthonormal set of scalar functions over a circular domain, and are commonly used to represent wavefront phase or surface irregularity. In optical testing, slope or curvature of a surface or wavefront is sometimes measured instead, from which the surface or wavefront map is obtained. Previously we derived an orthonormal set of vector polynomials that fit to slope measurement data and yield the surface or wavefront map represented by Zernike polynomials. Here we define a 3-element curvature vector used to represent the second derivatives of a continuous surface, and derive a set of orthonormal curvature basis functions that are written in terms of Zernike polynomials. We call the new curvature functions the C polynomials. Closed form relations for the complete basis set are provided, and we show how to determine Zernike surface coefficients from the curvature data as represented by the C polynomials. PMID:24514717

  14. A new front-end ASIC for GEM detectors with time and charge measurement capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciciriello, F.; Corsi, F.; De Robertis, G.; Felici, G.; Loddo, F.; Marzocca, C.; Matarrese, G.; Ranieri, A.

    2016-07-01

    A 32 channel CMOS front-end ASIC has been designed to read out the GEM detectors intended to be used for beam monitoring in a new proton-therapy facility currently under construction. In order to improve the spatial resolution by exploiting charge centroid algorithms, the analog channels, based on the classic CSA+shaper architecture, are equipped with a peak detector (PD) which works as an analog memory during the read-out phase. The outputs of the PDs are multiplexed towards an integrated 8-bit subranging ADC. An accurate trigger signal marks the arrival of a valid event and is generated by fast-ORing the outputs of 32 voltage discriminators which compare the shaper outputs with a programmable threshold. The digital part of the ASIC manages the read-out of the channels, the A/D conversion and the configuration of the ASIC. A 100 Mbit/s LVDS serial link is used for data communication. The sensitivity of the analog channel is 15 mV/fC and the dynamic range is 80 fC. The simulated ENC is about 650 e- for a detector capacitance of 10 pF. © 2001 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved

  15. Distributed curvature and stability of fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Patrick W; Nikolić, Sonja; De Los Reyes, Rasthy; Myrvold, Wendy

    2015-09-21

    Energies of non-planar conjugated π systems are typically described qualitatively in terms of the balance of π stabilisation and the steric strain associated with geometric curvature. Curvature also has a purely graph-theoretical description: combinatorial curvature at a vertex of a polyhedral graph is defined as one minus half the vertex degree plus the sum of reciprocal sizes of the faces meeting at that vertex. Prisms and antiprisms have positive combinatorial vertex curvature at every vertex. Excluding these two infinite families, we call any other polyhedron with everywhere positive combinatorial curvature a PCC polyhedron. Cubic PCC polyhedra are initially common, but must eventually die out with increasing vertex count; the largest example constructed so far has 132 vertices. The fullerenes Cn have cubic polyhedral molecular graphs with n vertices, 12 pentagonal and (n/2 - 10) hexagonal faces. We show that there are exactly 39 PCC fullerenes, all in the range 20 ≤n≤ 60. In this range, there is only partial correlation between PCC status and stability as defined by minimum pentagon adjacency. The sum of vertex curvatures is 2 for any polyhedron; for fullerenes the sum of squared vertex curvatures is linearly related to the number of pentagon adjacencies and hence is a direct measure of relative stability of the lower (n≤ 60) fullerenes. For n≥ 62, non-PCC fullerenes with a minimum number of pentagon adjacencies minimise mean-square curvature. For n≥ 70, minimum mean-square curvature implies isolation of pentagons, which is the strongest indicator of stability for a bare fullerene. PMID:26283188

  16. Pore-by-pore capillary pressure measurements using X-ray microtomography at reservoir conditions: Curvature, snap-off, and remobilization of residual CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, Matthew; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2014-11-01

    X-ray microtomography was used to image the shape and size of residual ganglia of supercritical CO2 at resolutions of 3.5 and 2 μm and at representative subsurface conditions of temperature and pressure. The capillary pressure for each ganglion was found by measuring the curvature of the CO2-brine interface, while the pore structure was parameterized using distance maps of the pore space. The formation of the residual clusters by snap-off was examined by comparing the ganglion capillary pressure to local pore topography. The capillary pressure was found to be inversely proportional to the radius of the largest restriction (throat) surrounding the ganglion, which validates the imbibition mechanisms used in pore-network modeling. The potential mobilization of residual ganglia was assessed using a reformulation of both the capillary (Ncmacro) and Bond numbers (Nbmacro), rigorously based on a balance of pore-scale forces, with the majority of ganglia remobilized at Ncmacro around 1. Buoyancy forces were found to be small in this system (Nbmacro << 1), meaning the gravitational remobilization of CO2 after residual trapping would be extremely difficult.

  17. Spline-Based Smoothing of Airfoil Curvatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Krist, S.

    2008-01-01

    Constrained fitting for airfoil curvature smoothing (CFACS) is a splinebased method of interpolating airfoil surface coordinates (and, concomitantly, airfoil thicknesses) between specified discrete design points so as to obtain smoothing of surface-curvature profiles in addition to basic smoothing of surfaces. CFACS was developed in recognition of the fact that the performance of a transonic airfoil is directly related to both the curvature profile and the smoothness of the airfoil surface. Older methods of interpolation of airfoil surfaces involve various compromises between smoothing of surfaces and exact fitting of surfaces to specified discrete design points. While some of the older methods take curvature profiles into account, they nevertheless sometimes yield unfavorable results, including curvature oscillations near end points and substantial deviations from desired leading-edge shapes. In CFACS as in most of the older methods, one seeks a compromise between smoothing and exact fitting. Unlike in the older methods, the airfoil surface is modified as little as possible from its original specified form and, instead, is smoothed in such a way that the curvature profile becomes a smooth fit of the curvature profile of the original airfoil specification. CFACS involves a combination of rigorous mathematical modeling and knowledge-based heuristics. Rigorous mathematical formulation provides assurance of removal of undesirable curvature oscillations with minimum modification of the airfoil geometry. Knowledge-based heuristics bridge the gap between theory and designers best practices. In CFACS, one of the measures of the deviation of an airfoil surface from smoothness is the sum of squares of the jumps in the third derivatives of a cubicspline interpolation of the airfoil data. This measure is incorporated into a formulation for minimizing an overall deviation- from-smoothness measure of the airfoil data within a specified fitting error tolerance. CFACS has been

  18. Curvature calculations with GEOCALC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussiaux, A.; Tombal, Ph.

    1987-04-01

    A new method for calculating the curvature tensor has been recently proposed by D. Hestenes. This method is a particular application of geometric calculus, which has been implemented in an algebraic programming language on the form of a package called GEOCALC. We show how to apply this package to the Schwarzchild case and we discuss the different results.

  19. Curvature calculations with GEOCALC

    SciTech Connect

    Moussiaux, A.; Tombal, P.

    1987-04-01

    A new method for calculating the curvature tensor has been recently proposed by D. Hestenes. This method is a particular application of geometric calculus, which has been implemented in an algebraic programming language on the form of a package called GEOCALC. They show how to apply this package to the Schwarzchild case and they discuss the different results.

  20. Curvature-induced radiation of surface plasmon polaritons propagating around bends

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Keisuke; Noeckel, Jens U.; Deutsch, Miriam

    2007-06-15

    We present a theoretical study of the curvature-induced radiation of surface plasmon polaritons propagating around bends at metal-dielectric interfaces. We explain qualitatively how the curvature leads to distortion of the phase front, causing the fields to radiate energy away from the metal-dielectric interface. We then quantify, both analytically and numerically, radiation losses and energy transmission efficiencies of surface plasmon polaritons propagating around bends with varying radii as well as sign of curvature.

  1. Front matter.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The second KES International Conference on Innovation in Medicine and Healthcare (InMed-14) was held over 9-11 July 2014 in San Sebastian, Spain, organised by KES International in partnership with the University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU and the Institute of Knowledge Transfer. InMed-14 gathered researchers and engineers, managers, students and practitioners from a broad medically-related arena. This multi-disciplinary group met to discuss the ways that technological and methodological innovation, knowledge exchange and enterprise can be applied to issues relating to medicine, surgery, healthcare and the issues of an ageing population. A central theme of the conference was Smart Medical and Healthcare Systems which covered the ways in which modern intelligent systems contribute to the solution of problems faced by healthcare and medical practitioners today, addressing the application of these systems. The conference featured five excellent keynote talks from internationally renowned experts, namely: • Edward J. Ciaccio, Columbia University, NY (talk entitled 'Model of Reentrant Ventricular Tachycardia based on Wavefront Curvature'); • Jesus Cortes, Biocruces, Ikerbasque, Spain (talk entitled 'Computational Neuroimaging for Health and Disease'); • Juan Manuel Gorriz, University of Granada, Spain (talk entitled 'DiagnoSIS: Diagnosis by means of Statistical and Intelligent Systems'); • Ricardo Sanchez Peña, ITBA & CONICET, Argentina (talk entitled 'Automatic Control of Diabetes type 1'); and • Sebastiano Stramaglia, Ikerbasque Visiting Professor, Spain (talk entitled 'Causality measures for Brain Computation'). In addition to the General Track, chaired by Prof Manuel Grana, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU and the Workshop on Smart Medical and Healthcare, chaired by Dr Carlos Toro, Vicomtech-IK4, Systems, there were special sessions on Medical Decision-Support Systems chaired by Dr Elena Hernández-Pereira, University of La Coruña, Spain

  2. Shearlet-based detection of flame fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenhofer, Rafael; Kiefer, Johannes; King, Emily J.

    2016-03-01

    Identifying and characterizing flame fronts is the most common task in the computer-assisted analysis of data obtained from imaging techniques such as planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), laser Rayleigh scattering (LRS), or particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). We present Complex Shearlet-Based Ridge and Edge Measure (CoShREM), a novel edge and ridge (line) detection algorithm based on complex-valued wavelet-like analyzing functions—so-called complex shearlets—displaying several traits useful for the extraction of flame fronts. In addition to providing a unified approach to the detection of edges and ridges, our method inherently yields estimates of local tangent orientations and local curvatures. To examine the applicability for high-frequency recordings of combustion processes, the algorithm is applied to mock images distorted with varying degrees of noise and real-world PLIF images of both OH and CH radicals. Furthermore, we compare the performance of the newly proposed complex shearlet-based measure to well-established edge and ridge detection techniques such as the Canny edge detector, another shearlet-based edge detector, and the phase congruency measure.

  3. Measured and computed induced body currents in front of an experimental RF dielectric heater.

    PubMed

    Kännälä, Sami; Puranen, Lauri; Sihvonen, Ari-Pekka; Jokela, Kari

    2008-02-01

    Operators of industrial high-frequency dielectric heaters are exposed to electromagnetic fields that are high enough to significantly increase body temperature. The assessment of exposure based on the measurement of external field strengths is, however, inaccurate due to the non-uniformity of the fields. This paper presents an exposure assessment method based on the measurement of the current induced by the external electric field in the body of the operator. Body current distributions were measured at 27.12 MHz using various current meters under a condition simulating the exposure to stray fields emitted by a dielectric heater. The specific absorption rates and induced body currents were computed with the finite-difference time-domain method using heterogeneous and homogeneous human models. The numerical analysis indicated that the basic restrictions for occupational exposure are not exceeded when the current induced in the limbs is lower than the action level (100 mA), even though the maximum electric field significantly exceeds the action value (61 V m(-1)). For the heterogeneous human model the exposure limit for local specific absorption rate was exceeded when the current induced in the ankle was 166 mA at a distance of 0.3 m from the electrode of the device. The vertical component of current density proved to be much more significant than the horizontal components. The importance of the horizontal components was highest near the electrode. The computations showed no concentration of the induced current to the superficial tissues due to the skin effect. PMID:18188050

  4. Wavefront reconstruction from tangential and sagittal curvature.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Barbero, Sergio; Portilla, Javier; López-Alonso, José Manuel

    2014-12-10

    In a previous contribution [Appl. Opt.51, 8599 (2012)], a coauthor of this work presented a method for reconstructing the wavefront aberration from tangential refractive power data measured using dynamic skiascopy. Here we propose a new regularized least squares method where the wavefront is reconstructed not only using tangential but also sagittal curvature data. We prove that our new method provides improved quality reconstruction for typical and also for highly aberrated wavefronts, under a wide range of experimental error levels. Our method may be applied to any type of wavefront sensor (not only dynamic skiascopy) able to measure either just tangential or tangential plus sagittal curvature data. PMID:25608069

  5. Hybrid curvature and modal wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shihao; Haist, Tobias; Dietrich, Tom; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    The crosstalk effect considerably limits the capability of holography-based modal wavefront sensing (HMWS) when measuring wavefronts with large aberrations. In this contribution, we introduce a curvature-based measurement technique into HMWS to extend the dynamic range and the sensitivity of HMWS via a compact holographic design. If the input aberrations are large, the dominating aberration modes are first detected via curvature sensing and compensated using a wavefront correcting device, e.g. a membrane mirror. The system then switches to HMWS to obtain better sensitivity and accuracy with reduced aberrations. Different approaches for the reconstruction of the wavefront have been tested and extensive simulations for different aberrations have been analyzed.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of thermal diffusivity and effusivity of solids using the flash technique in the front-face configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbur Pech-May, Nelson; Cifuentes, Ángel; Mendioroz, Arantza; Oleaga, Alberto; Salazar, Agustín

    2015-08-01

    Both thermal diffusivity and effusivity (or conductivity) are necessary to characterize the thermal transport properties of a material. The flash method is the most recognized procedure to measure the thermal diffusivity of free-standing opaque plates. However, it fails to simultaneously obtain the thermal effusivity (or conductivity). This is due to the difficulty of knowing the total energy absorbed by the sample surface after the light pulse. In this work, we propose using the flash method in the front-face configuration on a two-layer system made of the unknown plate and a fluid of known thermal properties. We demonstrate that the surface temperature is sensitive to the thermal mismatch between the plate and the fluid, which is governed by their thermal effusivity ratio. In order to verify the validity of the method and to establish its application limits we have performed flash measurements, using a pulsed laser and an infrared camera, on a set of calibrated materials (metals, alloys, ceramics and polymers) covering a wide range of thermal transport properties. These results confirm the ability of the flash method to simultaneously retrieve thermal diffusivity and effusivity in a fast manner in samples whose effusivities are lower than three times the effusivity of the liquid used as backing fluid.

  7. Turbulent boundary layers subjected to multiple curvatures and pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Ahmed, Anwar

    1993-01-01

    The effects of abruptly applied cycles of curvatures and pressure gradients on turbulent boundary layers are examined experimentally. Two two-dimensional curved test surfaces are considered: one has a sequence of concave and convex longitudinal surface curvatures and the other has a sequence of convex and concave curvatures. The choice of the curvature sequences were motivated by a desire to study the asymmetric response of turbulent boundary layers to convex and concave curvatures. The relaxation of a boundary layer from the effects of these two opposite sequences has been compared. The effect of the accompaying sequences of pressure gradient has also been examined but the effect of curvature dominates. The growth of internal layers at the curvature junctions have been studied. Measurements of the Gortler and corner vortex systems have been made. The boundary layer recovering from the sequence of concave to convex curvature has a sustained lower skin friction level than in that recovering from the sequence of convex to concave curvature. The amplification and suppression of turbulence due to the curvature sequences have also been studied.

  8. Methods for testing high voltage connectors in vacuum, measurements of thermal stresses in encapsulated assemblies, and measurement of dielectric strength of electrodes in encapsulants versus radius of curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bever, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Internal embedment stress measurements were performed, using tiny ferrite core transformers, whose voltage output was calibrated versus pressure by the manufacturer. Comparative internal strain measurements were made by attaching conventional strain gages to the same type of resistors and encapsulating these in various potting compounds. Both types of determinations were carried out while temperature cycling from 77 C to -50 C.

  9. A methodology for quantifying seated lumbar curvatures.

    PubMed

    Leitkam, Samuel T; Bush, Tamara Reid; Li, Mingfei

    2011-11-01

    To understand the role seating plays in the support of posture and spinal articulation, it is necessary to study the interface between a human and the seat. However, a method to quantify lumbar curvature in commercially available unmodified seats does not currently exist. This work sought to determine if the lumbar curvature for normal ranges of seated posture could be documented by using body landmarks located on the anterior portion of the body. The development of such a methodology will allow researchers to evaluate spinal articulation of a seated subject while in standard, commercially available seats and chairs. Anterior measurements of boney landmarks were used to quantify the relative positions of the ribcage and pelvis while simultaneous posterior measurements were made of lumbar curvature. The relationship between the anterior and the posterior measures was compared. The predictive capacity of this approach was evaluated by determining linear and second-order regressions for each of the four postures across all subjects and conducting a leave-one-out cross validation. The relationships between the anterior and posterior measures were approximated by linear and second-order polynomial regressions (r(2 ) =  0.829, 0.935 respectively) across all postures. The quantitative analysis showed that openness had a significant relationship with lumbar curvature, and a first-order regression was superior to a second-order regression. Average standard errors in the prediction were 5.9° for the maximum kyphotic posture, 9.9° for the comfortable posture, 12.8° for the straight and tall, and 22.2° for the maximum lordotic posture. These results show predictions of lumbar curvature are possible in seated postures by using a motion capture system and anterior measures. This method of lumbar curvature prediction shows potential for use in the assessment of seated spinal curvatures and the corresponding design of seating to accommodate those curvatures; however

  10. Curvature constraints from large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, Enea; Montanari, Francesco; Raccanelli, Alvise; Durrer, Ruth; Kamionkowski, Marc; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2016-06-01

    We modified the CLASS code in order to include relativistic galaxy number counts in spatially curved geometries; we present the formalism and study the effect of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature. The new version of the code is now publicly available. Using a Fisher matrix analysis, we investigate how measurements of the spatial curvature parameter ΩK with future galaxy surveys are affected by relativistic effects, which influence observations of the large scale galaxy distribution. These effects include contributions from cosmic magnification, Doppler terms and terms involving the gravitational potential. As an application, we consider angle and redshift dependent power spectra, which are especially well suited for model independent cosmological constraints. We compute our results for a representative deep, wide and spectroscopic survey, and our results show the impact of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature parameter estimation. We show that constraints on the curvature parameter may be strongly biased if, in particular, cosmic magnification is not included in the analysis. Other relativistic effects turn out to be subdominant in the studied configuration. We analyze how the shift in the estimated best-fit value for the curvature and other cosmological parameters depends on the magnification bias parameter, and find that significant biases are to be expected if this term is not properly considered in the analysis.

  11. Curvature-dependent excitation propagation in cultured cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadota, S.; Kay, M. W.; Magome, N.; Agladze, K.

    2012-02-01

    The geometry of excitation wave front may play an important role on the propagation block and spiral wave formation. The wave front which is bent over the critical value due to interaction with the obstacles may partially cease to propagate and appearing wave breaks evolve into rotating waves or reentry. This scenario may explain how reentry spontaneously originates in a heart. We studied highly curved excitation wave fronts in the cardiac tissue culture and found that in the conditions of normal, non-inhibited excitability the curvature effects do not play essential role in the propagation. Neither narrow isthmuses nor sharp corners of the obstacles, being classical objects for production of extremely curved wave front, affect non-inhibited wave propagation. The curvature-related phenomena of the propagation block and wave detachment from the obstacle boundary were observed only after partial suppression of the sodium channels with Lidocaine. Computer simulations confirmed the experimental observations. The explanation of the observed phenomena refers to the fact that the heart tissue is made of finite size cells so that curvature radii smaller than the cardiomyocyte size loses sense, and in non-inhibited tissue the single cell is capable to transmit excitation to its neighbors.

  12. Dissecting the Gravitational Lens B1608 656. II. Precision Measurements of the Hubble Constant, Spatial Curvature, and the Dark Energy Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Suyu, S.H.; Marshall, P.J.; Auger, M.W.; Hilbert, S.; Blandford, R.D.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Fassnacht, C.D.; Treu, T.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2009-12-11

    Strong gravitational lens systems with measured time delays between the multiple images provide a method for measuring the 'time-delay distance' to the lens, and thus the Hubble constant. We present a Bayesian analysis of the strong gravitational lens system B1608+656, incorporating (1) new, deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations, (2) a new velocity dispersion measurement of 260 {+-} 15 km s{sup -1} for the primary lens galaxy, and (3) an updated study of the lens environment. Our analysis of the HST images takes into account the extended source surface brightness, and the dust extinction and optical emission by the interacting lens galaxies. When modeling the stellar dynamics of the primary lens galaxy, the lensing effect, and the environment of the lens, we explicitly include the total mass distribution profile logarithmic slope {gamma}{prime} and the external convergence {kappa}{sub ext}; we marginalize over these parameters, assigning well-motivated priors for them, and so turn the major systematic errors into statistical ones. The HST images provide one such prior, constraining the lens mass density profile logarithmic slope to be {gamma}{prime} = 2.08 {+-} 0.03; a combination of numerical simulations and photometric observations of the B1608+656 field provides an estimate of the prior for {kappa}{sub ext}: 0.10{sub -0.05}{sup +0.08}. This latter distribution dominates the final uncertainty on H{sub 0}. Fixing the cosmological parameters at {Omega}{sub m} = 0.3, {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7, and w = -1 in order to compare with previous work on this system, we find H{sub 0} = 70.6{sub -3.1}{sup +3.1} km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}. The new data provide an increase in precision of more than a factor of two, even including the marginalization over {kappa}{sub ext}. Relaxing the prior probability density function for the cosmological parameters to that derived from the WMAP 5-year data set, we find that the B1608+656 data set breaks the degeneracy between {Omega

  13. DISSECTING THE GRAVITATIONAL LENS B1608+656. II. PRECISION MEASUREMENTS OF THE HUBBLE CONSTANT, SPATIAL CURVATURE, AND THE DARK ENERGY EQUATION OF STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Suyu, S. H.; Hilbert, S.; Marshall, P. J.; Blandford, R. D.; Auger, M. W.; Treu, T.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Fassnacht, C. D.

    2010-03-01

    Strong gravitational lens systems with measured time delays between the multiple images provide a method for measuring the 'time-delay distance' to the lens, and thus the Hubble constant. We present a Bayesian analysis of the strong gravitational lens system B1608+656, incorporating (1) new, deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations, (2) a new velocity-dispersion measurement of 260 +- 15 km s{sup -1} for the primary lens galaxy, and (3) an updated study of the lens' environment. Our analysis of the HST images takes into account the extended source surface brightness, and the dust extinction and optical emission by the interacting lens galaxies. When modeling the stellar dynamics of the primary lens galaxy, the lensing effect, and the environment of the lens, we explicitly include the total mass distribution profile logarithmic slope gamma' and the external convergence kappa{sub ext}; we marginalize over these parameters, assigning well-motivated priors for them, and so turn the major systematic errors into statistical ones. The HST images provide one such prior, constraining the lens mass density profile logarithmic slope to be gamma' = 2.08 +- 0.03; a combination of numerical simulations and photometric observations of the B1608+656 field provides an estimate of the prior for kappa{sub ext}: 0.10{sup +0.08}{sub -0.05}. This latter distribution dominates the final uncertainty on H{sub 0}. Fixing the cosmological parameters at OMEGA{sub m} = 0.3, OMEGA{sub L}AMBDA = 0.7, and w = -1 in order to compare with previous work on this system, we find H{sub 0} = 70.6{sup +3.1}{sub -3.1} km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}. The new data provide an increase in precision of more than a factor of 2, even including the marginalization over kappa{sub ext}. Relaxing the prior probability density function for the cosmological parameters to that derived from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) five-year data set, we find that the B1608+656 data set breaks the degeneracy

  14. Improving the Sensitivity of Astronomical Curvature Wavefront Sensor Using Dual-Stroke Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Blain, Celia; Takami, Hideki; Hayano, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2008-06-01

    Curvature wavefront sensors measure wavefront phase aberration by acquiring two intensity images on either side of the pupil plane. Low-order adaptive optics (AO) systems using curvature wavefront sensing (CWFS) have proved to be highly efficient for astronomical applications: they are more sensitive, use fewer detector elements, and achieve, for the same number of actuators, higher Strehl ratios than AO systems using more traditional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. In higher-order systems, however, curvature wavefront sensors lose sensitivity to low spatial frequencies wavefront aberrations. This effect, often described as "noise propagation," limits the usefulness of curvature wavefront sensing for high-order AO systems and/or large telescopes. In this paper, we first explain how this noise propagation effect occurs and then show that this limitation can be overcome by acquiring four defocused images of the pupil instead of two. This solution can be implemented without significant technology development and can run with a simple linear wavefront reconstruction algorithm at >kHz speed. We have successfully demonstrated in the laboratory that the four conjugation planes can be sequentially obtained at >kHz speed using a speaker-vibrating membrane assembly commonly used in current curvature AO systems. Closed loop simulations show that implementing this scheme is equivalent to making the guide star 1 to 1.5 magnitude brighter for the configuration tested (188 actuator elements on 8-m telescope). Higher sensitivity gains are expected on curvature systems with higher number of actuators.

  15. Measurement of the front-end dead-time of the LHCb muon detector and evaluation of its contribution to the muon detection inefficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Anelli, M.; Archilli, F.; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, W.; Bencivenni, G.; Bizzeti, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bochin, B.; Bozzi, C.; Brundu, D.; Cadeddu, S.; Campana, P.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Carletti, M.; Casu, L.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Dané, E.; De Simone, P.; Falabella, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, M.; Fontana, M.; Fresch, P.; Furfaro, E.; Graziani, G.; Kashchuk, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Loi, A.; Maev, O.; Manca, G.; Martellotti, G.; Neustroev, P.; Oldeman, R. G. C.; Palutan, M.; Passaleva, G.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Saitta, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Tellarini, G.; Vacca, C.; Vazquez-Gomez, R.; Vecchi, S.; Veltri, M.; Vorobyev, A.

    2016-04-01

    A method is described which allows to deduce the dead-time of the front-end electronics of the LHCb muon detector from a series of measurements performed at different luminosities at a bunch-crossing rate of 20 MHz. The measured values of the dead-time range from ~ 70 ns to ~ 100 ns. These results allow to estimate the performance of the muon detector at the future bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz and at higher luminosity.

  16. Predicting Progression of ABCA4-Associated Retinal Degenerations Based on Longitudinal Measurements of the Leading Disease Front

    PubMed Central

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Swider, Malgorzata; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Stone, Edwin M.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the progression of the earliest stage of disease in ABCA4-associated retinal degenerations (RDs). Methods Near-infrared excited reduced-illuminance autofluorescence imaging was acquired across the retina up to 80 degrees eccentricity in 44 patients with two ABCA4 alleles. The eccentricity of the leading disease front (LDF) corresponding to the earliest stage of disease was measured along the four meridians. A mathematical model describing the expansion of the LDF was developed based on 6 years of longitudinal follow-up. Results The extent of LDF along the superior, inferior, and temporal meridians showed a wide spectrum from 3.5 to 70 degrees. In patients with longitudinal data, the average centrifugal expansion rate was 2 degrees per year. The nasal extent of LDF between the fovea and ONH ranged from 4.3 to 16.5 degrees and expanded at 0.35 degrees per year. The extent of LDF beyond ONH ranged from 19 to 75 degrees and expanded on average at 2 degrees per year. A mathematical model fit well to the longitudinal data describing the expansion of the LDF. Conclusions The eccentricity of the LDF in ABCA4-RD shows a continuum from parafovea to far periphery along all four meridians consistent with a wide spectrum of severity observed clinically. The model of progression may provide a quantitative prediction of the LDF expansion based on the age and eccentricity of the LDF at a baseline visit, and thus contribute significantly to the enrollment of candidates appropriate for clinical trials planning specific interventions, efficacy outcomes, and durations. PMID:26377081

  17. Cosmic curvature and condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, Martin

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the universe may consist of a patchwork of domains with different Riemann curvature constants k = 0, +/-1. Features of a phase transition in which flat space breaks up in a transition 2k0 - k(-) + k(+) with initial scale factors R(-) = R(+) are postulated and explored. It is shown that such a transition is energetically permitted, has the equivalent of a Curie temperature, and can lead in a natural way to the formation of voids and galaxies. It is predicted that, if the ambient universe on average is well fitted by a purely k(-) space, with only occasional domains of k(+) containing galaxies, a density parameter of (A(z sub c + 1)) super -1 should be expected, where z sub c represents the redshift of the earliest objects to have condensed, and A takes on values ranging from about 5 to 3. Present observations of quasars would suggest a density of about 0.03 or 0.05, respectively, but it could be lower if earlier condensation took place.

  18. Curvature, Hydrogen, Q

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John Paul; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Pike, Robert

    2011-03-31

    The manufacturing of niobium SRF accelerator cavities is plagued by a mobile point defect, hydrogen. For efficient accelerator operation, niobium must function at both high electric and magnetic fields, and is compromised if magnetic impurities are located in the surface regions of the material. The finding that trace hydrogen in niobium can produce structures with magnetic properties is a feature that is not acceptable for a high performance cavity. X-ray diffraction has proved to be the key tool in assessing irreversible process damage to the niobium substrate. In future generations of accelerators, niobium will actually be merely the substrate for more effective superconductors that will allow for more efficient operation. The substrate analogy to the silicon wafer industry is useful since for niobium it may be possible to avoid some of the mistakes made in silicon technology. Because hydrogen attacks niobium on a number of different size scales, there is an inherent complexity in the trouble sources. There are also features in cavity design that are benign, such as local curvature considerations, requiring a fully non symmetric analysis of current flow to be appreciated.

  19. Curvature, Hydrogen, Q

    SciTech Connect

    John Paul Wallace, Ganapati Rao Myneni, and Robert Pike

    2011-03-01

    The manufacturing of niobium SRF accelerator cavities is plagued by a mobile point defect, hydrogen. For efficient accelerator operation, niobium must function at both high electric and magnetic fields, and is compromised if magnetic impurities are located in the surface regions of the material. The finding that trace hydrogen in niobium can produce structures with magnetic properties is a feature that is not acceptable for a high performance cavity. X-ray diffraction has proved to be the key tool in assessing irreversible process damage to the niobium substrate. In future generations of accelerators, niobium will actually be merely the substrate for more effective superconductors that will allow for more efficient operation. The substrate analogy to the silicon wafer industry is useful since for niobium it may be possible to avoid some of the mistakes made in silicon technology. Because hydrogen attacks niobium on a number of different size scales, there is an inherent complexity in the trouble sources. There are also features in cavity design that are benign, such as local curvature considerations, requiring a fully non symmetric analysis of current flow to be appreciated.

  20. Geometrical constraint on curvature with BAO experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Masahiro; Doré, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    The spatial curvature (K or ΩK) is one of the most fundamental parameters of an isotropic and homogeneous universe and has a close link to the physics of the early Universe. Combining the radial and angular diameter distances measured via the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) experiments allows us to unambiguously constrain the curvature. The method is primarily based on the metric theory, and is less sensitive to the theory of structure formation (other than the existence of the BAO scale) and is free of any model of dark energy. In this paper, we estimate a best achievable accuracy of constraining the curvature with the BAO experiments. We show that an all-sky, cosmic-variance-limited galaxy survey covering the Universe up to z ≳4 enables a precise determination of the curvature to an accuracy of σ (ΩK)≃1 0-3. When we assume a model of dark energy—either the cosmological constraint or the (w0,wa) model—it can achieve a precision of σ (ΩK)≃a few×10-4. These forecasts require a high sampling density of galaxies, and are degraded by up to a factor of a few for a survey with a finite number density of ˜10-3 (h /Mpc )3 .

  1. Graph Curvature for Differentiating Cancer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Romeil; Georgiou, Tryphon; Reznik, Ed; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Cellular interactions can be modeled as complex dynamical systems represented by weighted graphs. The functionality of such networks, including measures of robustness, reliability, performance, and efficiency, are intrinsically tied to the topology and geometry of the underlying graph. Utilizing recently proposed geometric notions of curvature on weighted graphs, we investigate the features of gene co-expression networks derived from large-scale genomic studies of cancer. We find that the curvature of these networks reliably distinguishes between cancer and normal samples, with cancer networks exhibiting higher curvature than their normal counterparts. We establish a quantitative relationship between our findings and prior investigations of network entropy. Furthermore, we demonstrate how our approach yields additional, non-trivial pair-wise (i.e. gene-gene) interactions which may be disrupted in cancer samples. The mathematical formulation of our approach yields an exact solution to calculating pair-wise changes in curvature which was computationally infeasible using prior methods. As such, our findings lay the foundation for an analytical approach to studying complex biological networks. PMID:26169480

  2. Membrane Curvature Sensing by Amphipathic Helices

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Martin Borch; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Jao, Christine C.; Rasmussen, Jakob Ewald; Pedersen, Søren L.; Jensen, Knud J.; Langen, Ralf; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Preferential binding of proteins on curved membranes (membrane curvature sensing) is increasingly emerging as a general mechanism whereby cells may effect protein localization and trafficking. Here we use a novel single liposome fluorescence microscopy assay to examine a common sensing motif, the amphipathic helix (AH), and provide quantitative measures describing and distinguishing membrane binding and sensing behavior. By studying two AH-containing proteins, α-synuclein and annexin B12, as well as a range of AH peptide mutants, we reveal that both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces of the helix greatly influence binding and sensing. Although increased hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions with the membrane both lead to greater densities of bound protein, the former yields membrane curvature-sensitive binding, whereas the latter is not curvature-dependent. However, the relative contributions of both components determine the sensing of AHs. In contrast, charge density in the lipid membrane seems important primarily in attracting AHs to the membrane but does not significantly influence sensing. These observations were made possible by the ability of our assay to distinguish within our samples liposomes with and without bound protein as well as the density of bound protein. Our findings suggest that the description of membrane curvature-sensing requires consideration of several factors such as short and long range electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding, and the volume and structure of inserted hydrophobic residues. PMID:21953452

  3. Graph Curvature for Differentiating Cancer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Romeil; Georgiou, Tryphon; Reznik, Ed; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-07-01

    Cellular interactions can be modeled as complex dynamical systems represented by weighted graphs. The functionality of such networks, including measures of robustness, reliability, performance, and efficiency, are intrinsically tied to the topology and geometry of the underlying graph. Utilizing recently proposed geometric notions of curvature on weighted graphs, we investigate the features of gene co-expression networks derived from large-scale genomic studies of cancer. We find that the curvature of these networks reliably distinguishes between cancer and normal samples, with cancer networks exhibiting higher curvature than their normal counterparts. We establish a quantitative relationship between our findings and prior investigations of network entropy. Furthermore, we demonstrate how our approach yields additional, non-trivial pair-wise (i.e. gene-gene) interactions which may be disrupted in cancer samples. The mathematical formulation of our approach yields an exact solution to calculating pair-wise changes in curvature which was computationally infeasible using prior methods. As such, our findings lay the foundation for an analytical approach to studying complex biological networks.

  4. The curvature adaptive optics system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiang

    A curvature adaptive optics (AO) simulation system has been built. The simulation is based on the Hokupa'a-36 AO system for the NASA IRTF 3m telescope and the Hokupa'a-85 AO system for the Gemini Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager. Several sub-models are built separately for the AO simulation system, and they are: (1) generation and propagation of atmospheric phase screens, (2) the bimorph deformable mirror (DM), (3) the curvature wave-front sensor (CWFS), (4) generation of response functions, interaction matrices and calculation of command matrices, (5) Fresnel propagation from the DM pupil to the lenslet pupil, (6) AO servo loop, and (7) post processing. The AO simulation system is then applied to the effects of DM hysteresis, and to the optimization of DM actuator patterns for the Hokupa'a-85 and Hokupa'a-36 AO systems. In the first application, an enhancing Coleman-Hodgdon model is introduced to approximate the hysteresis curves, and then the Lambert W function is introduced to calculate the inverse of the Coleman-Hodgdon equation. Step response, transfer functions and Strehl Ratios from the AO system have been compared under the cases with/without DM hysteresis. The servo-loop results show that the bandwidth of an AO system is improved greatly after the DM hysteresis is corrected. In the second application, many issues of the bimorph mirror will be considered to optimize the DM patterns, and they include the type and length of the edge benders, gap size of electrodes, DM size, and DM curvature limit.

  5. Effects of Iris Surface Curvature on Iris Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Joseph T; Flynn, Patrick J; Bowyer, Kevin W; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2013-01-01

    To focus on objects at various distances, the lens of the eye must change shape to adjust its refractive power. This change in lens shape causes a change in the shape of the iris surface which can be measured by examining the curvature of the iris. This work isolates the variable of iris curvature in the recognition process and shows that differences in iris curvature degrade matching ability. To our knowledge, no other work has examined the effects of varying iris curvature on matching ability. To examine this degradation, we conduct a matching experiment across pairs of images with varying degrees of iris curvature differences. The results show a statistically signi cant degradation in matching ability. Finally, the real world impact of these ndings is discussed

  6. Modeling Normal Shock Velocity Curvature Relation for Heterogeneous Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sunhee; Crochet, Michael; Pemberton, Steve

    2015-06-01

    The normal shock velocity and curvature, Dn(κ) , relation on a detonation shock surface has been an important functional quantity to measure to understand the shock strength exerted against the material interface between a main explosive charge and the case of an explosive munition. The Dn(κ) relation is considered an intrinsic property of an explosive, and can be experimentally deduced by rate stick tests at various charge diameters. However, experimental measurements of the Dn(κ) relation for heterogeneous explosives such as PBXN-111 are challenging due to the non-smoothness and asymmetry usually observed in the experimental streak records of explosion fronts. Out of the many possibilities, the asymmetric character may be attributed to the heterogeneity of the explosives, a hypothesis which begs two questions: (1) is there any simple hydrodynamic model that can explain such an asymmetric shock evolution, and (2) what statistics can be derived for the asymmetry using simulations with defined structural heterogeneity in the unreacted explosive? Saenz, Taylor and Stewart studied constitutive models for derivation of the Dn(κ) relation on porous `homogeneous' explosives and carried out simulations in a spherical coordinate frame. In this paper, we extend their model to account for `heterogeneity' and present shock evolutions in heterogeneous explosives using 2-D hydrodynamic simulations with some statistical examination. (96TW-2015-0004)

  7. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (more » $${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$$), image-to-image timing ($${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$$ ps) and absolute timing ($${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement of$${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$$and an error in velocity of$${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.« less

  8. Front-end circuit for position sensitive silicon and vacuum tube photomultipliers with gain control and depth of interaction measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, Vicente; Colom, Ricardo; Gadea, Rafael; Lerche, Christoph W.; Cerdá, Joaquín; Sebastiá, Ángel; Benlloch, José M.

    2007-06-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers, though still under development for mass production, may be an alternative to traditional Vacuum Photomultipliers Tubes (VPMT). As a consequence, electronic front-ends initially designed for VPMT will need to be modified. In this simulation, an improved architecture is presented which is able to obtain impact position and depth of interaction of a gamma ray within a continuous scintillation crystal, using either kind of PM. A current sensitive preamplifier stage with individual gain adjustment interfaces the multi-anode PM outputs with a current division resistor network. The preamplifier stage allows to improve front-end processing delay and temporal resolution behavior as well as to increase impact position calculation resolution. Depth of interaction (DOI) is calculated from the width of the scintillation light distribution, which is related to the sum of voltages in resistor network input nodes. This operation is done by means of a high-speed current mode scheme.

  9. Cloud Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02171 Cloud Front

    These clouds formed in the south polar region. The faintness of the cloud system likely indicates that these are mainly ice clouds, with relatively little dust content.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -86.7N, Longitude 212.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Shearlet-based edge detection: flame fronts and tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Emily J.; Reisenhofer, Rafael; Kiefer, Johannes; Lim, Wang-Q.; Li, Zhen; Heygster, Georg

    2015-09-01

    Shearlets are wavelet-like systems which are better suited for handling geometric features in multi-dimensional data than traditional wavelets. A novel method for edge and line detection which is in the spirit of phase congruency but is based on a complex shearlet transform will be presented. This approach to detection yields an approximate tangent direction of detected discontinuities as a byproduct of the computation, which then yields local curvature estimates. Two applications of the edge detection method will be discussed. First, the tracking and classification of flame fronts is a critical component of research in technical thermodynamics. Quite often, the flame fronts are transient or weak and the images are noisy. The standard methods used in the field for the detection of flame fronts do not handle such data well. Fortunately, using the shearlet-based edge measure yields good results as well as an accurate approximation of local curvature. Furthermore, a modification of the method will yield line detection, which is important for certain imaging modalities. Second, the Wadden tidal flats are a biodiverse region along the North Sea coast. One approach to surveying the delicate region and tracking the topographical changes is to use pre-existing Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. Unfortunately, SAR data suffers from multiplicative noise as well as sensitivity to environmental factors. The first large-scale mapping project of that type showed good results but only with a tremendous amount of manual interaction because there are many edges in the data which are not boundaries of the tidal flats but are edges of features like fields or islands. Preliminary results will be presented.

  11. An Optical Method For Surface Curvature Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarisch, W.

    1985-01-01

    Inspection and measurement of surface quality play increasingly an important role in most machining and polishing processes. A typical example is the manufacturing of magnetic disks. The quality of a disk file essentially depends on the surface flatness of the substrate material. For many measurement aspects largearea topography variations are of less interest than high local changes of slope and curvature of the surface to be tested. Mathematically, the surface curvature is expressed as the second derivative of the profile function of the substrate, while the first derivative is known as the slope. Rapid local variations of the slope, that means high curvature values, cause high vertical accelerations of the magnetic head flying over the disk surface in fractions of a micrometer flight-height. Such irregularities of the substrate in the azimuthal disk direction would lead to uncontrolled fluctuations of the air gap between disk and head causing an attenuation of the write/read signal, to head vibrations, or even to a direct contact of the head with the disk (head crash). In the radial direction, the high-speed radial positioning of the head by voice coil driven motors also may cause a head crash at high local changes of the disk slope. Limits of the tolerable head accelerations, found by experience and theoretically by calculations, are listed in manufacturing specifications. For a fast, large area disk quality inspection and evaluation, a compact and highly sensitive measuring method has been developed. A testing tool based on this method displays the test area superimposed with a clear fringe pattern on a TV screen. The fringe pattern represents the surface curvature. From this, both components of the disk curvature, the azimuthal as well as the radial component, can be measured. Coherent optical interference and Moire techniques are the basic principles of the method providing the fringe pattern of the surface area under test. Each fringe interconnects

  12. Curvature calculations with spacetime algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Hestenes, D.

    1986-06-01

    A new method for calculating the curvature tensor is developed and applied to the Scharzschild case. The method employs Clifford algebra and has definite advantages over conventional methods using differential forms or tensor analysis.

  13. On the Weyl curvature hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Ovidiu Cristinel

    2013-11-01

    The Weyl curvature hypothesis of Penrose attempts to explain the high homogeneity and isotropy, and the very low entropy of the early universe, by conjecturing the vanishing of the Weyl tensor at the Big-Bang singularity.

  14. Linear thermal expansion coefficient determination using in situ curvature and temperature dependent X-ray diffraction measurements applied to metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy-grown AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaßdorf, A.; Zeimer, U.; Grenzer, J.; Weyers, M.

    2013-07-01

    AlxGa1-xAs grown on GaAs is known to be almost perfectly lattice matched with a maximum lattice mismatch of 0.14% at room temperature and even less at temperatures of 700 °C-800 °C. However, as layer structures for edge-emitting diode lasers exhibit an increasing overall thickness of several microns of AlxGa1-xAs, e.g., diode lasers comprising a super-large optical cavity, the accumulated elastic strain energy increases as well. Depending on the growth temperature the formation energy of dislocations can be reached, which is limiting the pseudomorphic growth. In this regard, the thermal expansion coefficient difference between layer and substrate is an important parameter. We utilize in situ curvature measurements during growth of AlxGa1-xAs by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy to determine the thermal expansion coefficient α. The curvature change with increasing layer thickness, as well as with wafer temperature at constant layer thickness is used to assess α. This is compared to ex situ temperature dependent X-ray diffraction measurements to obtain α. All determined values for α are in good agreement, yielding αAlAs=4.1×10-6 K-1 for a given GaAs linear thermal expansion coefficient of αGaAs=5.73×10-6 K-1.

  15. Curvature wavefront sensing performance simulations for active correction of the Javalambre wide-field telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chueca, Sergio; Marín-Franch, Antonio; Cenarro, Andrés. Javier; Varela, Jesús; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Cristóbal-Hornillos, David; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Gruel, Nicolás.; Moles, Mariano; Yanes, Axel; Rueda, Fernando; Rueda, Sergio; Luis-Simoes, Roberto; Hernández-Fuertes, Javier; López-Sainz, Angel; Maícas-Sacristán, Natalio; Lamadrid, José Luis; Díaz-Martín, Miguel Chioare; Taylor, Keith

    2012-09-01

    In order to maintain image quality during Javalambre wide field telescope operations, deformations and rigid body motions must be actively controlled to minimize optical disturbances. For JST/T250 the aberrations of the telescope will be measured with four curvature sensors at the focal plane. To correct the measured distortions, the secondary mirror position (with a hexapod support) and the camera position can be modified in a control closed loop. Multiple software tools have been developed to accomplish this goal, constituting the "Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre" (OAJ) Active Optics Pipeline. We present a comprehensive analysis of the wave-front sensing system, including the availability of reference stars, pupil registration, wavefront estimators and the iteration matrix evaluation techniques. Some preliminary simulations have been made using a telescope model with a Optical Ray Tracing Software.

  16. Direct measurement of wave-front distortion induced during second-harmonic generation: application to breakup-integral compensation.

    PubMed

    Caumes, Jean Pascal; Videau, Laurent; Rouyer, Claude; Freysz, Eric

    2004-04-15

    The wave-front distortion of femtosecond laser pulses recorded with a Shack-Hartmann analyzer makes it possible to retrieve the nonlinear index of refraction of different glasses and the nonlinear phase shift induced during second-harmonic generation in beta-barium borate (BBO) crystal versus the phase mismatch. It is shown that the nonlinear phase shift induced in a 2-mm-thick BBO crystal allows compensation for up to a 2pi breakup-integral induced in a 4-cm fused-silica glass. The stability of the compensation is reported to be from 10 to 100 GW cm(-2). PMID:15119415

  17. Ionic liquid tunes microemulsion curvature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liping; Bauduin, Pierre; Zemb, Thomas; Eastoe, Julian; Hao, Jingcheng

    2009-02-17

    Middle-phase microemulsions formed from cationic dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODMAC), anionic sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), n-butanol, and n-heptane were studied. An ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF4]), was employed as the electrolyte in the aqueous media instead of inorganic salts usually used in microemulsion formulation. Studies have been carried out as a function of the concentrations of [bmim][BF4], n-butanol, total surfactant (cDODMAC+SDS), and temperature on the phase behavior and the ultralow interfacial tensions in which the anionic component is present in excess in the catanionic film. Ultralow interfacial tension measurements confirmed the formation of middle-phase microemulsions and the necessary conditions for stabilizing middle-phase microemulsions. Electrical conductivity, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments were also performed, indicating that the typical heptane domain size has an average radius of 360 A and the ionic liquid induces softening of the charged catanionic film. Most interestingly, the IL concentration (cIL) is shown to act as an effective interfacial curvature-control parameter, representing a new approach to tuning the formulation of microemulsions and emulsions. The results expand the potential uses of ILs but also point to the design of new ILs that may achieve superefficient control over interfacial and self-assembly systems. PMID:19161325

  18. Magnetophoretic Induction of Root Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.

    1997-01-01

    The last year of the grant period concerned the consolidation of previous experiments to ascertain that the theoretical premise apply not just to root but also to shoots. In addition, we verified that high gradient magnetic fields do not interfere with regular cellular activities. Previous results have established that: (1) intracellular magnetophoresis is possible; and (2) HGMF lead to root curvature. In order to investigate whether HGMF affect the assembly and/or organization of structural proteins, we examined the arrangement of microtubules in roots exposed to HGMF. The cytoskeletal investigations were performed with fomaldehyde-fixed, nonembedded tissue segments that were cut with a vibratome. Microtubules (MTs) were stained with rat anti-yeast tubulin (YOL 1/34) and DTAF-labeled antibody against rat IgG. Microfilaments (MFs) were visualized by incubation in rhodamine-labeled phalloidin. The distribution and arrangement of both components of the cytoskeleton were examined with a confocal microscope. Measurements of growth rates and graviresponse were done using a video-digitizer. Since HGMF repel diamagnetic substances including starch-filled amyloplasts and most The second aspect of the work includes studies of the effect of cytoskeletal inhibitors on MTs and MFs. The analysis of the effect of micotubular inhibitors on the auxin transport in roots showed that there is very little effect of MT-depolymerizing or stabilizing drugs on auxin transport. This is in line with observations that application of such drugs is not immediately affecting the graviresponsiveness of roots.

  19. Spontaneous Curvature of Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; da Silva, Marcelo; Shirvaniants, David; Rodrigues, Carlos; Beers, Kathryn; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Potemkin, Igor; Moeller, Martin

    2003-03-01

    Experimental studies of cylindrical brushes on surfaces revealed peculiar shape of brush molecules with a curved backbone. According to scaling analysis, spontaneous bending of the backbone can be driven by entropic elasticity of the side chains: smaller extension of the chains is attained due to their asymmetric distribution with respect to the backbone. An equilibrium, i.e. spontaneous curvature results from the balance of the elasticity of the side chains and the elasticity of the interface. The curvature is predicted to increase with the side chain length. The system is of general interest because cylindrical brushes confined to a flat surface represent a two-dimensional cross-section of a planar brush grafted on both sides. Here we present systematic studies of cylindrical brushes with different length of the side chains. The curvature of cylindrical brushes confined to a flat substrate was investigated by atomic force microscopy. The method allowed visualization of individual molecules and quantitative analysis of their conformation. In agreement with theory, adsorbed brushes demonstrated spontaneous curvature, however the curvature was shown to decrease with the side chain length.

  20. Membrane curvature at a glance.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Harvey T; Boucrot, Emmanuel

    2015-03-15

    Membrane curvature is an important parameter in defining the morphology of cells, organelles and local membrane subdomains. Transport intermediates have simpler shapes, being either spheres or tubules. The generation and maintenance of curvature is of central importance for maintaining trafficking and cellular functions. It is possible that local shapes in complex membranes could help to define local subregions. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we summarize how generating, sensing and maintaining high local membrane curvature is an active process that is mediated and controlled by specialized proteins using general mechanisms: (i) changes in lipid composition and asymmetry, (ii) partitioning of shaped transmembrane domains of integral membrane proteins or protein or domain crowding, (iii) reversible insertion of hydrophobic protein motifs, (iv) nanoscopic scaffolding by oligomerized hydrophilic protein domains and, finally, (v) macroscopic scaffolding by the cytoskeleton with forces generated by polymerization and by molecular motors. We also summarize some of the discoveries about the functions of membrane curvature, where in addition to providing cell or organelle shape, local curvature can affect processes like membrane scission and fusion as well as protein concentration and enzyme activation on membranes. PMID:25774051

  1. On the Weyl curvature hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, Ovidiu Cristinel

    2013-11-15

    The Weyl curvature hypothesis of Penrose attempts to explain the high homogeneity and isotropy, and the very low entropy of the early universe, by conjecturing the vanishing of the Weyl tensor at the Big-Bang singularity. In previous papers it has been proposed an equivalent form of Einstein’s equation, which extends it and remains valid at an important class of singularities (including in particular the Schwarzschild, FLRW, and isotropic singularities). Here it is shown that if the Big-Bang singularity is from this class, it also satisfies the Weyl curvature hypothesis. As an application, we study a very general example of cosmological models, which generalizes the FLRW model by dropping the isotropy and homogeneity constraints. This model also generalizes isotropic singularities, and a class of singularities occurring in Bianchi cosmologies. We show that the Big-Bang singularity of this model is of the type under consideration, and satisfies therefore the Weyl curvature hypothesis. -- Highlights: •The singularities we introduce are described by finite geometric/physical objects. •Our singularities have smooth Riemann and Weyl curvatures. •We show they satisfy Penrose’s Weyl curvature hypothesis (Weyl=0 at singularities). •Examples: FLRW, isotropic singularities, an extension of Schwarzschild’s metric. •Example: a large class of singularities which may be anisotropic and inhomogeneous.

  2. Spontaneous curvature of phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Chupin, Vladimir; Fuller, Nola L; Kozlov, Michael M; de Kruijff, Ben; Burger, Koert N J; Rand, Peter R

    2005-02-15

    The formation of phosphatidic acid (PA) from lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), diacylglycerol, or phosphatidylcholine plays a key role in the regulation of intracellular membrane fission events, but the underlying molecular mechanism has not been resolved. A likely possibility is that PA affects local membrane curvature facilitating membrane bending and fission. To examine this possibility, we determined the spontaneous radius of curvature (R(0p)) of PA and LPA, carrying oleoyl fatty acids, using well-established X-ray diffraction methods. We found that, under physiological conditions of pH and salt concentration (pH 7.0, 150 mM NaCl), the R(0p) values of PA and LPA were -46 A and +20 A, respectively. Thus PA has considerable negative spontaneous curvature while LPA has the most positive spontaneous curvature of any membrane lipid measured to date. The further addition of Ca(2+) did not significantly affect lipid spontaneous curvature; however, omitting NaCl from the hydration buffer greatly reduced the spontaneous curvature of PA, turning it into a cylindrically shaped lipid molecule (R(0p) of -1.3 x 10(2) A). Our quantitative data on the spontaneous radius of curvature of PA and LPA at a physiological pH and salt concentration will be instrumental in developing future models of biomembrane fission. PMID:15697235

  3. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Sorce, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$), image-to-image timing (${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$ ps) and absolute timing (${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement of${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$and an error in velocity of${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.

  4. Effect of crack curvature on stress intensity factors for ASTM standard compact tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, J.; Mendelson, A.

    1983-01-01

    The stress intensity factors (SIF) are calculated using the method of lines for the compact tension specimen in tensile and shear loading for curved crack fronts. For the purely elastic case, it was found that as the crack front curvature increases, the SIF value at the center of the specimen decreases while increasing at the surface. For the higher values of crack front curvatures, the maximum value of the SIF occurs at an interior point located adjacent to the surface. A thickness average SIF was computed for parabolically applied shear loading. These results were used to assess the requirements of ASTM standards E399-71 and E399-81 on the shape of crack fronts. The SIF is assumed to reflect the average stress environment near the crack edge.

  5. Curvature generation in nematic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostajeran, Cyrus

    2015-06-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the study of shape formation using modern responsive materials that can be preprogrammed to undergo spatially inhomogeneous local deformations. In particular, nematic liquid crystalline solids offer exciting possibilities in this context. Considerable recent progress has been made in achieving a variety of shape transitions in thin sheets of nematic solids by engineering isolated points of concentrated Gaussian curvature using topological defects in the nematic director field across textured surfaces. In this paper, we consider ways of achieving shape transitions in thin sheets of nematic glass by generation of nonlocalized Gaussian curvature in the absence of topological defects in the director field. We show how one can blueprint any desired Gaussian curvature in a thin nematic sheet by controlling the nematic alignment angle across the surface and highlight specific patterns which present feasible initial targets for experimental verification of the theory.

  6. Cosmic strings with curvature corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisseau, Bruno; Letelier, Patricio S.

    1992-08-01

    A generic model of string described by a Lagrangian density that depends on the extrinsic curvature of the string worldsheet is studied. Using a system of coordinates adapted to the string world sheet the equation of motion and the energy-momentum tensor are derived for strings evolving in curved spacetime. We find that the curvature corrections may change the relation between the string energy density and the tension. It can also introduce heat propagation along the string. We also find for the Polyakov as well as Nambu strings with a topological term that the open string end points can travel with a speed less than the velocity of light.

  7. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-07-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  8. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures. PMID:26204806

  9. Curvature sensors: noise and its propagation.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglae

    2010-11-01

    The signal measured with a curvature sensor is analyzed. At the outset, we derive the required minimum number of sensing elements at the pupil edges, depending on the total number of sensing elements. The distribution of the sensor signal is further characterized in terms of its mean, variance, kurtosis, and skewness. It is established that while the approximation in terms of a Gaussian distribution is correct down to fairly low photon numbers, much higher numbers are required to obtain meaningful sensor measurements for small wavefront distortions. Finally, we indicate a closed expression for the error propagation factor and for the photon-noise-induced Strehl loss. PMID:21045888

  10. Formation of x-ray vortex dipoles using a single diffraction pattern and direct phase measurement using interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sawada, Kei; Taguchi, Munetaka; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Ohigashi, Takuji; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2009-03-09

    We have devised a method for generating x-ray vortices by using a diffraction pattern from a simple aperture with illumination wave fronts with spherical curvatures. The interferometry visualized the x-ray vortex dipoles by the direct phase measurement. Our interference technique enabled us to sensitively detect and quantitatively measure various phase dislocations on the x-ray wave fronts, providing useful methodologies for beam diagnostics and materials science.

  11. PEAPOD regulates lamina size and curvature in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    White, Derek W. R.

    2006-01-01

    Although a complex pattern of interspersed cell proliferation and cell differentiation is known to occur during leaf blade development in eudicot plants, the genetic mechanisms coordinating this growth are unclear. In Arabidopsis, deletion of the PEAPOD (PPD) locus increases leaf lamina size and results in dome-shaped rather than flat leaves. Siliques are also altered in shape because of extra lamina growth. The curvature of a Δppd leaf reflects the difference between excess growth of the lamina and a limitation to the extension capacity of its perimeter. Excess lamina growth in Δppd plants is due to a prolonged phase of dispersed meristematic cell (DMC) proliferation (for example, the meristemoid and procambium cells that form stomatal stem cells and vascular cells, respectively) during blade development. The PPD locus is composed of two homologous genes, PPD1 and PPD2, which encode plant-specific putative DNA-binding proteins. Overexpression of PPD reduces lamina size by promoting the early arrest of DMC proliferation during leaf and silique development. Therefore, by regulating the arrest of DMC proliferation, the PPD genes coordinate tissue growth, modulate lamina size, and limit curvature of the leaf blade. I propose a revised model of leaf development with two cell-cycle arrest fronts progressing from the tip to the base: the known primary front, which determines arrest of general cell proliferation, followed by a secondary front that involves PPD and arrests DMC division. PMID:16916932

  12. Monomeric Synucleins Generate Membrane Curvature*

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Christopher H.; Chandra, Sreeganga S.

    2013-01-01

    Synucleins are a family of presynaptic membrane binding proteins. α-Synuclein, the principal member of this family, is mutated in familial Parkinson disease. To gain insight into the molecular functions of synucleins, we performed an unbiased proteomic screen and identified synaptic protein changes in αβγ-synuclein knock-out brains. We observed increases in the levels of select membrane curvature sensing/generating proteins. One of the most prominent changes was for the N-BAR protein endophilin A1. Here we demonstrate that the levels of synucleins and endophilin A1 are reciprocally regulated and that they are functionally related. We show that all synucleins can robustly generate membrane curvature similar to endophilins. However, only monomeric but not tetrameric α-synuclein can bend membranes. Further, A30P α-synuclein, a Parkinson disease mutant that disrupts protein folding, is also deficient in this activity. This suggests that synucleins generate membrane curvature through the asymmetric insertion of their N-terminal amphipathic helix. Based on our findings, we propose to include synucleins in the class of amphipathic helix-containing proteins that sense and generate membrane curvature. These results advance our understanding of the physiological function of synucleins. PMID:23184946

  13. A conditioned level-set method with block-division strategy to flame front extraction based on OH-PLIF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yue; Cai, Guo-Biao; Xu, Xu; Renou, Bruno; Boukhalfa, Abdelkrim

    2014-05-01

    A novel approach to extract flame fronts, which is called the conditioned level-set method with block division (CLSB), has been developed. Based on a two-phase level-set formulation, the conditioned initialization and region-lock optimization appear to be beneficial to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the flame contour identification. The original block-division strategy enables the approach to be unsupervised by calculating local self-adaptive threshold values autonomously before binarization. The CLSB approach has been applied to deal with a large set of experimental data involving swirl-stabilized premixed combustion in diluted regimes operating at atmospheric pressures. The OH-PLIF measurements have been carried out in this framework. The resulting images are, thus, featured by lower signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) than the ideal image; relatively complex flame structures lead to significant non-uniformity in the OH signal intensity; and, the magnitude of the maximum OH gradient observed along the flame front can also vary depending on flow or local stoichiometry. Compared with other conventional edge detection operators, the CLSB method demonstrates a good ability to deal with the OH-PLIF images at low SNR and with the presence of a multiple scales of both OH intensity and OH gradient. The robustness to noise sensitivity and intensity inhomogeneity has been evaluated throughout a range of experimental images of diluted flames, as well as against a circle test as Ground Truth (GT).

  14. Front Matter.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Special Topic Conference (STC) of the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI). The organisation of the STC is part of a long tradition of EFMI working groups to organise scientific events focused on important trends in medical informatics and eHealth. In 2016, the special topic is "Transforming Healthcare with the Internet of Things" in relation to the EFMI working group Personal Portable Devices (PPD). STC 2016 takes place in Paris, France, organised by the Laboratoire d'Informatique Médicale et d'Ingénierie des Connaissances en e-Santé (LIMICS) under the auspices of EFMI and the French Association for Medical Informatics (AIM). Only a few years ago, devices were limited to health cards and personal portable devices. Since then, devices have dramatically evolved to include wearables, sensors, and actuators for measuring health values. The application of such technologies in the field of health, social care and wellness has attracted the attention of both patients and members of the general public interested in supporting or improving their health and wellbeing. One of the characteristics of these 'devices' (sometimes too small to observe thanks to nanotechnology) is to be 'connected' and to communicate with other connected devices and systems. This has been the game changer, as it replaces the cumbersome and often error-prone intervention of the human being who was previously necessary to enter data. The Internet of Things (IoT) is thus turning out to have a major impact on the information paradigm in healthcare. The patient can now become their own Chief Operational Officer, as described by Eric Topol in his recent book The Patient will see you now Eric Topol, The Patient Will See You Now, Basic Books, New York, 2015. . By providing tools that are able to generate large quantities of data that must be processed in real time, the IoT can have a potentially

  15. A novel curvature-controllable steerable needle for percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Bui, Van Khuyen; Park, Sukho; Park, Jong-Oh; Ko, Seong Young

    2016-08-01

    Over the last few decades, flexible steerable robotic needles for percutaneous intervention have been the subject of significant interest. However, there still remain issues related to (a) steering the needle's direction with less damage to surrounding tissues and (b) increasing the needle's maximum curvature for better controllability. One widely used approach is to control the fixed-angled bevel-tip needle using a "duty-cycle" algorithm. While this algorithm has shown its applicability, it can potentially damage surrounding tissue, which has prevented the widespread adoption of this technology. This situation has motivated the development of a new steerable flexible needle that can change its curvature without axial rotation, while at the same time producing a larger curvature. In this article, we propose a novel curvature-controllable steerable needle. The proposed robotic needle consists of two parts: a cannula and a stylet with a bevel-tip. The curvature of the needle's path is controlled by a control offset, defined by the offset between the bevel-tip and the cannula. As a result, the necessity of rotating the whole needle's body is decreased. The duty-cycle algorithm is utilized to a limited degree to obtain a larger radius of curvature, which is similar to a straight path. The first prototype of 0.46 mm (outer diameter) was fabricated and tested with both in vitro gelatin phantom and ex vivo cow liver tissue. The maximum curvatures measured 0.008 mm(-1) in 6 wt% gelatin phantom, 0.0139 mm(-1) in 10 wt% gelatin phantom, and 0.0038 mm(-1) in cow liver. The experimental results show a linear relationship between the curvature and the control offset, which can be utilized for future implementation of this control algorithm. PMID:27206444

  16. Space Curvature and the "Heavy Banana 'Paradox.'"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Ronald P.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Two ways to visually enhance the concept of space curvature are described. Viewing space curvature as a meterstick contraction and the heavy banana "paradox" are discussed. The meterstick contraction is mathematically explained. (KR)

  17. Dynamics of curved fronts in systems with power-law memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Hamed, M.; Nepomnyashchy, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of a curved front in a plane between two stable phases with equal potentials is modeled via two-dimensional fractional in time partial differential equation. A closed equation governing a slow motion of a small-curvature front is derived and applied for two typical examples of the potential function. Approximate axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric solutions are obtained.

  18. Nonlinear Sorting, Curvature Generation, and Crowding of Endophilin N-BAR on Tubular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chen; Das, Sovan L.; Baumgart, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    The curvature of biological membranes is controlled by membrane-bound proteins. For example, during endocytosis, the sorting of membrane components, vesicle budding, and fission from the plasma membrane are mediated by adaptor and accessory proteins. Endophilin is a peripherally binding membrane protein that functions as an endocytic accessory protein. Endophilin's membrane tubulation capacity is well known. However, to understand the thermodynamic and mechanical aspects of endophilin function, experimental measurements need to be compared to quantitative theoretical models. We present measurements of curvature sorting and curvature generation of the endophilin A1 N-BAR domain on tubular membranes pulled from giant unilamellar vesicles. At low concentration, endophilin functions primarily as a membrane curvature sensor; at high concentrations, it also generates curvature. We determine the spontaneous curvature induced by endophilin and observe sigmoidal curvature/composition coupling isotherms that saturate at high membrane tensions and protein solution concentrations. The observation of saturation is supported by a strong dependence of lateral diffusion coefficients on protein density on the tether membrane. We develop a nonlinear curvature/composition coupling model that captures our experimental observations. Our model predicts a curvature-induced phase transition among two states with varying protein density and membrane curvature. This transition could act as a switch during endocytosis. PMID:22768939

  19. Measuring Delta Progradation Using Delta Front Flow Patterns: A New Method of Remote Imagery Analysis on the Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estep, J. D.; Shaw, J.; Edmonds, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the progradation of the Wax Lake Delta (WLD), a sub-delta of the Mississippi River Delta, can lend valuable insight into coastal land-building patterns. Previous studies of WLD progradation have relied on subaerially-exposed land for indicating delta extent, but an inherent problem with this method lies in the high variability of exposed land due to vegetative, hydrologic, and atmospheric fluctuations. By mapping water surface films observed in remote imagery which form streaklines along flow paths in the delta, we show that the shallow delta front flow patterns are relatively unaffected by short term water level changes and can be used to evaluate WLD progradation over time. Remotely sensed imagery from multiple sources (infrared aerial photography, SPOT, UAVSAR) spanning from 1988 to 2015 was used to map streaklines from which we calculate a flow direction divergence field across the delta. Measuring the translation of this field through time, such as areas containing extreme divergence values along the delta front, quantifies the progradation over the time elapsed. Preliminary measurements of WLD progradation were subdivided into the eastern, southern, and western thirds of the delta. The eastern third prograded at 110 ±20m/yr from 1988 - 1997, 100 ±40m/yr from 1997 - 2002, and then remained relatively constant to 2015. The southern third prograded at 130 ±20m/yr from 1988 - 1997, 200 ±40m/yr from 1997 - 2002, and remained relatively constant to 2015. The western third prograded at 130 ±30m/yr from 1988 - 1997, 220 ±60 m from 1997 - 2002, and then remained relatively constant from 2002 - 2015. Also of note is the retrogradation on the average of 700 ±400m observed from January to August, 1992 which we interpret as being caused by the impact of Hurricane Andrew. The streakline methodology of evaluating WLD progradation could provide new methods for analysis of land change in other deltas around the world.

  20. Simultaneous temperature and concentration measurement in front of solidifying monotectic systems using the two wavelength holographic technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecker, A.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Frazier, D. O.

    1987-01-01

    A holographic technique for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and concentration in solidifying transparent model alloy systems was developed. Its application to the study of the interactions between the temperature, concentration, and fluid flow fields in such systems at 1 g and micro-g conditions is discussed.

  1. Simultaneous temperature and concentration measurement in front of solidifying monotectic systems using the two wavelength holographic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecker, A.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Frazier, D. O.

    1987-02-01

    A holographic technique for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and concentration in solidifying transparent model alloy systems was developed. Its application to the study of the interactions between the temperature, concentration, and fluid flow fields in such systems at 1 g and micro-g conditions is discussed.

  2. A novel approach in assessment of root canal curvature

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Shiva; Poryousef, Vahideh

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this in vitro study was to introduce a new method to describe root canal curvatures and to assess the degree of curvature of human permanent mandibular teeth with curved root canals. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty five mesial root canals of mandibular first and second molar teeth were selected. Access cavities were prepared. After inserting a K-file size #10 into each canal, radiographs were taken. Canal curvature was determined by measuring the Schneider angle, canal access angle, as well as the canal radius, length, height and curvature starting distance on scanned radiographs using a computerized image processing system. Data was evaluated statistically using Pearson correlation. Results: The mean canal access angle (CAA) and Schneider angle (S) were 8.04◦ (3.46) and 19◦ (6.99), respectively. The Pearson correlation analysis found significant positive correlation between S and CAA (r=0.826, P<0.0001). Negative correlations were found between radius and length (r= –0.4, P<0.0001), radius and Schneider angle (r= –0.4, P<0.0001), radius and CAA (r= –0.24, P=0.004) and CAA and curvature starting distance (r= 0.4, P<0.0001). There was no correlation between height and distance (r=0.013, P=0.789), as well as CAA and height (r=0.654, P=0.001). Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, the results indicated that the shape of root canal curvature can be more accurately described using two angles, Schneider in combination with Canal access angle. The related parameters included radius, length, distance and height of curvature. [Iranian Endodontic Journal 2009;4(4):131-4] PMID:24019833

  3. SLED phenomenology: curvature vs. volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermann, Florian; Schneider, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We assess the question whether the SLED (Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions) model admits phenomenologically viable solutions with 4D maximal symmetry. We take into account a finite brane width and a scale invariance (SI) breaking dilaton-brane coupling, both of which should be included in a realistic setup. Provided that the brane tension and the microscopic size of the brane take generic values set by the fundamental bulk Planck scale, we find that either the 4D curvature or the size of the extra dimensions is unacceptably large. Since this result is independent of the dilaton-brane couplings, it provides the biggest challenge to the SLED program.

  4. Method Evaluation And Field Sample Measurements For The Rate Of Movement Of The Oxidation Front In Saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P. M.; Kaplan, D. I.; Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.; Spencer, W. A.; Hatfield, A.; Arai, Y.

    2012-08-23

    The objective of this work was to develop and evaluate a series of methods and validate their capability to measure differences in oxidized versus reduced saltstone. Validated methods were then applied to samples cured under field conditions to simulate Performance Assessment (PA) needs for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Four analytical approaches were evaluated using laboratory-cured saltstone samples. These methods were X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), chemical redox indicators, and thin-section leaching methods. XAS and thin-section leaching methods were validated as viable methods for studying oxidation movement in saltstone. Each method used samples that were spiked with chromium (Cr) as a tracer for oxidation of the saltstone. The two methods were subsequently applied to field-cured samples containing chromium to characterize the oxidation state of chromium as a function of distance from the exposed air/cementitious material surface.

  5. VOC Measurements in the Northern Colorado Front Range Metropolitan Area: Investigating the Impact of Oil and Natural Gas Emissions on O3 Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeleira, A.; Farmer, D.; Fischer, E. V.; Pollack, I. B.; Zaragoza, J.

    2015-12-01

    Authors: Ilana Pollock1,2, Jake Zaragoza2, Emily V. Fischer2, Delphine K. Farmer11. Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 2. Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO During summer months, the Northern Front Range Metropolitan Area (NFRMA) of Colorado consistently violates the 75 ppbv 8-hour EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ambient ozone (O3), despite continued reduction in anthropogenic emissions. The region has been deemed an O3 non-attainment zone since 2008. Ground-level O3 is produced from photochemical catalytic cycles involving OH radicals, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and NOx (NO + NO2). VOC emissions in the NFRMA are dominated by anthropogenic sources and influenced by biogenic and agricultural sources, while NOx emissions are mainly from automobile exhaust. A growing concern in the region is the role of oil and natural gas (ONG) on VOC concentrations and the potential for O3 production. Increases in local VOC emissions will likely cause subsequent increase in local O3 concentrations as PO3 increases in a region that is already affected by high O3episodes. As a part of the SONGNEX 2015 (Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus) campaign, we measured a broad suite of speciated VOCs during two 8-week deployments (March-May 2015, July-September 2015) at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, CO. VOC measurements were made with a custom-online multichannel gas chromatography system (50+ compounds hourly), along with measurements of O3, SO2, NOx, NOy, PAN, CO, CO2, and CH4. We use these data to investigate the role of different VOC sources, and ONG in particular, in contributing to VOC reactivity and thus instantaneous O3 production. Preliminary analysis of the Spring VOC data indicates that VOC reactivity is dominated by light alkanes typical of ONG emissions - specifically propane, consistent with previous winter-time studies. We will use the observed temperature

  6. Femoral condyle curvature is correlated with knee walking kinematics in ungulates.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    The knee has been the focus of many studies linking mammalian postcranial form with locomotor behaviors and animal ecology. A more difficult task has been linking joint morphology with joint kinematics during locomotor tasks. Joint curvature represents one opportunity to link postcranial morphology with walking kinematics because joint curvature develops in response to mechanical loading. As an initial examination of mammalian knee joint curvature, the curvature of the medial femoral condyle was measured on femora representing 11 ungulate species. The position of a region of low curvature was measured using a metric termed the "angle to low curvature". This low-curvature region is important because it provides the greatest contact area between femoral and tibial condyles. Kinematic knee angles during walking were derived from the literature and kinematic knee angles across the gait cycle were correlated with angle to low curvature values. The highest correlation between kinematic knee angle and the angle to low curvature metric occurred at 20% of the walking gait cycle. This early portion of the walking gait cycle is associated with a peak in the vertical ground reaction force for some mammals. The chondral modeling theory predicts that frequent and heavy loading of particular regions of a joint surface during ontogeny will result in these regions being flatter than the surrounding joint surface. The locations of flatter regions of the femoral condyles of ungulates, and their association with knee angles used during the early stance phase of walking provides support for the chondral modeling theory. PMID:26414648

  7. Effect of curvature on the backscattering from leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Senior, T. B. A.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model previously developed for the backscattering cross section of a planar leaf at X-band frequencies and above, the effect of leaf curvature is examined. For normal incidence on a rectangular section of a leaf curved in one and two dimensions, an integral expression for the backscattered field is evaluated numerically and by a stationary phase approximation, leading to a simple analytical expression for the cross section reduction produced by the curvature. Numerical results based on the two methods are virtually identical, and in excellent agreement with measured data for rectangular sections of coleus leaves applied to the surfaces of styrofoam cylinders and spheres of different radii.

  8. Effect of curvature on the backscattering from a leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Senior, T. B. A.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model previously developed for the backscattering cross section of a planar leaf at X-band frequencies and above, the effect of leaf curvature is examined. For normal incidence on a rectangular section of a leaf curved in one and two dimensions, an integral expression for the backscattered field is evaluated numerically and by a stationary phase approximation, leading to a simple analytical expression for the cross-section reduction produced by the curvature. Numerical results based on the two methods are virtually identical, and in excellent agreement with measured data for rectangular sections of coleus leaves applied to the surfaces of styrofoam cylinders and spheres of different radii.

  9. Focal Length Controllable Ultrasonic Array Transducer with Adjustable Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyel

    2012-07-01

    In the underwater imaging field, the control of the focal length of a transducer is very useful. As one of the control methods, we suggested an ultrasonic array transducer with adjustable curvature by using air pressure. The curvature of the transducer was investigated according to the air pressure level in the back space of the transducer. Concave-, planar-, and convex-type transducers were obtained with different air pressure levels. The acoustic fields of the transducer were measured for different shapes of the radiation surface.

  10. Exploiting cantilever curvature for noise reduction in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Labuda, Aleksander; Grütter, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Optical beam deflection is a widely used method for detecting the deflection of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. This paper presents a first order derivation for the angular detection noise density which determines the lower limit for deflection sensing. Surprisingly, the cantilever radius of curvature, commonly not considered, plays a crucial role and can be exploited to decrease angular detection noise. We demonstrate a reduction in angular detection shot noise of more than an order of magnitude on a home-built AFM with a commercial 450 μm long cantilever by exploiting the optical properties of the cantilever curvature caused by the reflective gold coating. Lastly, we demonstrate how cantilever curvature can be responsible for up to 45% of the variability in the measured sensitivity of cantilevers on commercially available AFMs. PMID:21280834

  11. Kinetics for phototropic curvature by etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orbovic, V.; Poff, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    An infrared-imaging system has been used to study the influence of gravity on the kinetics of first positive phototropism. The development of phototropic curvature of etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana was measured in the absence of visible radiation. Following a pulse of blue light, stationary seedlings curved to a maximum of approximately 16 degrees about 80 minutes after stimulation. The seedlings then curved upward again or straightened by about 6 degrees during the subsequent 100 minutes. Seedlings rotated on a clinostat reached a similar maximum curvature following photostimulation. These seedlings maintained that curvature for 30 to 40 minutes before subsequently straightening to the same extent as the stationary seedlings. It is concluded that straightening is not a consequence of gravitropism, although gravity has some effect on the phototropism kinetics.

  12. x-y curvature wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, Manuel P; Valle, Pedro J

    2015-04-15

    In this Letter, we propose a new curvature wavefront sensor based on the principles of optical differentiation. The theoretically modeled setup consists of a diffractive optical mask placed at the intermediate plane of a classical two-lens coherent optical processor. The resulting image is composed of a number of local derivatives of the entrance pupil function whose proper combination provides the wavefront curvature. In contrast to the common radial curvature sensors, this one is able to provide the x and y wavefront curvature maps simultaneously. The sensor offers other additional advantages like having high spatial resolution, adjustable dynamic range, and not being sensitive to misalignment. PMID:25872040

  13. Wall extensibility and gravitropic curvature of sunflower hypocotyls: correlation between timing of curvature and changes in extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagshaw, S. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Gravitropic curvature results from unequal growth rates on the upper and lower sides of horizontal stems. These unequal growth rates could be due to differences in wall extensibility between the two sides. To test this, the time course of curvature of horizontal sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) hypocotyls was determined and compared with the time courses of changes in Instron-measured wall extensibility (PEx) of the upper and lower epidermal layers. As gravicurvature developed, so did the difference in PEx between the upper and lower epidermis. The enhanced growth rate on the lower side during the period of maximum increase in curvature was matched by PEx values greater than those of the vertical control, while the inhibited growth rate on the upper side was accompanied by PEx values below that of the control. The close correlation between changes in growth rates and alterations in PEx demonstrates that changes in wall extensibility play a major role in controlling gravicurvature.

  14. The role of curvature in Diels-Alder functionalization of carbon-based materials.

    PubMed

    Willocq, B; Lemaur, V; El Garah, M; Ciesielski, A; Samorì, P; Raquez, J-M; Dubois, Ph; Cornil, J

    2016-06-18

    We have estimated theoretically the impact of curvature on the free energies of activation and reaction associated with Diels-Alder reactions on carbon-based materials. Significant reduction is observed for both energy values with increasing curvature for core-functionalization, while the opposite trend prevails for edge-functionalization, as further supported by SEM/fluorescence measurements. PMID:27226252

  15. Radius of curvature controlled mirror

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Rathke, John Wickham; Schultheiss, Thomas John; Shinn, Michelle D.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-17

    A controlled radius of curvature mirror assembly comprising: a distortable mirror having a reflective surface and a rear surface; and in descending order from the rear surface; a counter-distortion plate; a flow diverter having a flow diverter aperture at the center thereof; a flow return plate having a flow return aperture at the center thereof; a thermal isolation plate having a thermal isolation plate aperture at the center thereof and a flexible heater having a rear surface and a flexible heater aperture at the center thereof; a double walled tube defining a coolant feed chamber and a coolant return chamber; said coolant feed chamber extending to and through the flow diverter aperture and terminating at the counter-distortion plate and the coolant return chamber extending to and through the thermal isolation backplate and terminating at the flow diverter; and a coolant feed and a coolant return exit at the rear of said flexible heater.

  16. Flame front geometry in premixed turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G.; Ashurst, W.T.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental and numerical determinations of flame front curvature and orientation in premixed turbulent flames are presented. The experimental data is obtained from planar, cross sectional images of stagnation point flames at high Damkoehler number. A direct numerical simulation of a constant energy flow is combined with a zero-thickness, constant density flame model to provide the numerical results. The computational domain is a 32{sup 3} cube with periodic boundary conditions. The two-dimensional curvature distributions of the experiments and numerical simulations compare well at similar q{prime}/S{sub L} values with means close to zero and marked negative skewness. At higher turbulence levels the simulations show that the distributions become symmetric about zero. These features are also found in the three dimensional distributions of curvature. The simulations support assumptions which make it possible to determine the mean direction cosines from the experimental data. This leads to a reduction of 12% in the estimated flame surface area density in the middle of the flame brush. 18 refs.

  17. Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts

    PubMed Central

    Ukhorskiy, AY; Sitnov, MI; Merkin, VG; Artemyev, AV

    2013-01-01

    [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz. We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processes operate in a realistic magnetotail geometry. For this purpose we construct an analytical model of the front which is superimposed onto the ambient field of the magnetotail. According to our numerical simulations, both trapping and quasi-trapping can produce rapid acceleration of protons by more than an order of magnitude. In the case of trapping, the acceleration levels depend on the amount of time particles stay in phase with the front which is controlled by the magnetic field curvature ahead of the front and the front width. Quasi-trapping does not cause particle scattering out of the equatorial plane. Energization levels in this case are limited by the number of encounters particles have with the front before they get magnetized behind it. PMID:26167430

  18. Fronts, fish, and predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Hunt, George L.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Zamon, Jeannette E.; Schick, Robert S.; Prieto, Rui; Brodziak, Jon; Teo, Steven L. H.; Thorne, Lesley; Bailey, Helen; Itoh, Sachihiko; Munk, Peter; Musyl, Michael K.; Willis, Jay K.; Zhang, Wuchang

    2014-09-01

    Ocean fronts play a key role in marine ecosystems. Fronts shape oceanic landscapes and affect every trophic level across a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, from meters to thousands of kilometers, and from days to millions of years. At some fronts, there is an elevated rate of primary production, whereas at others, plankton is aggregated by advection and by the behavior of organisms moving against gradients in temperature, salinity, light irradiance, hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical and biological factors. Lower trophic level organisms - phytoplankton and zooplankton - that are aggregated in sufficient densities, attract organisms from higher trophic levels, from planktivorous schooling fish to squid, large piscivorous fish, seabirds and marine mammals. Many species have critical portions of their life stages or behaviors closely associated with fronts, including spawning, feeding, ontogenetic development, migrations, and other activities cued to frontal dynamics. At different life stages, an individual species or population might be linked to different fronts. The nature and strength of associations between fronts and biota depend on numerous factors such as the physical nature and spatio-temporal scales of the front and the species and their life stages in question. In other words, fronts support many different niches and micro/macro-habitats over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales.

  19. Capillary Force on a Micrometric Sphere Trapped at a Fluid Interface Exhibiting Arbitrary Curvature Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Christophe; Fedorenko, Denys; Gross, Michel; In, Martin; Abkarian, Manouk; Gharbi, Mohamed Amine; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste; Galatola, Paolo; Nobili, Maurizio

    2013-08-01

    We report theoretical predictions and measurements of the capillary force acting on a spherical colloid smaller than the capillary length that is placed on a curved fluid interface of arbitrary shape. By coupling direct imaging and interferometry, we are able to measure the in situ colloid contact angle and to correlate its position with respect to the interface curvature. Extremely tiny capillary forces down to femtonewtons can be measured with this method. Measurements agree well with a theory relating the capillary force to the gradient of Gaussian curvature and to the mean curvature of the interface prior to colloidal deposition. Numerical calculations corroborate these results.

  20. A METHODOLOGY FOR ANALYZING CURVATURE IN THE DEVELOPING BRAIN FROM PRETERM TO ADULT

    PubMed Central

    PIENAAR, R.; FISCHL, B.; CAVINESS, V.; MAKRIS, N.; GRANT, P. E.

    2009-01-01

    The character and timing of gyral development is one manifestation of the complex orchestration of human brain development. The ability to quantify these changes would not only allow for deeper understanding of cortical development, but also conceivably allow for improved detection of pathologies. This paper describes a FreeSurfer based image-processing analysis “pipeline” or methodology that inputs an MRI volume, corrects possible contrast defects, creates surface reconstructions, and outputs various curvature-based function analyses. A technique of performing neonate reconstructions using FreeSurfer, which has not been possible previously due to inverted image contrast in pre-myelinated brains, is described. Once surfaces are reconstructed, the analysis component of the pipeline incorporates several surface-based curvature functions found in literature (principle curvatures, Gaussian, mean curvature, “curvedness”, and Willmore Bending Energy). We consider the problem of analyzing curvatures from different sized brains by introducing a Gaussian-curvature based variable-radius filter. Segmented volume data is also analyzed for folding measures: a gyral folding index (gyrification-white index GWI), and a gray-white matter junction folding index (WMF). A very simple curvature-based classifier is proposed that has the potential to discriminate between certain classes of subjects. We also present preliminary results of this curvature analysis pipeline on nine neonate subjects (30.4 weeks through 40.3 weeks Corrected Gestational Age), 3 children (2, 3, and 7 years) and 3 adults (33, 37, and 39 years). Initial results demonstrate that curvature measures and functions across our subjects peaked at term, with a gradual decline through early childhood and further decline continuing through to adults. We can also discriminate older neonates, children, and adults based on curvature analysis. Using a variable radius Gaussian-curvature filter, we also observed that the

  1. Variation and Heritability in Hair Diameter and Curvature in an Australian Twin Sample.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yvonne Y W; Brims, Mark; McNevin, Dennis; Spector, Timothy D; Martin, Nicholas G; Medland, Sarah E

    2016-08-01

    Hair diameter and curvature are two characteristics of human scalp hair used in forensic contexts. While previous data show that subjective categorization of hair curvature is highly heritable, the heritability of objectively measured curvature and diameter, and variability of hair characteristics within each individual have not yet been studied. The present study measured hair diameter and curvature using an optical fiber diameter analyzer in a sample of 2,332 twins and siblings. Heritability was estimated using maximum likelihood structural equation modeling. Results show sex differences in the magnitude of genetic influence for mean diameter and curvature, with the vast majority of the variance accounted for by genetic effects in males (diameter = 86%, curvature = 53%) and females (diameter = 77%, curvature = 61%). The consistency of diameter (variance within an individual) was also highly heritable, but did not show sex limitation, with 68% of the variance accounted for by genetic factors. Moderate phenotypic correlations were seen between diameter and consistency (r = 0.3) but there was little correlation between diameter and curvature (r = -0.13). A bivariate Cholesky analysis was used to estimate the genetic and environmental correlations between hair diameter and consistency, yielding genetic correlations of r gF = 0.27 for females and r gM = 0.25 for males. PMID:27291867

  2. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  3. Integrating 3D seismic curvature and curvature gradient attributes for fracture characterization: Methodologies and interpretational implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Dengliang

    2013-03-01

    In 3D seismic interpretation, curvature is a popular attribute that depicts the geometry of seismic reflectors and has been widely used to detect faults in the subsurface; however, it provides only part of the solutions to subsurface structure analysis. This study extends the curvature algorithm to a new curvature gradient algorithm, and integrates both algorithms for fracture detection using a 3D seismic test data set over Teapot Dome (Wyoming). In fractured reservoirs at Teapot Dome known to be formed by tectonic folding and faulting, curvature helps define the crestal portion of the reservoirs that is associated with strong seismic amplitude and high oil productivity. In contrast, curvature gradient helps better define the regional northwest-trending and the cross-regional northeast-trending lineaments that are associated with weak seismic amplitude and low oil productivity. In concert with previous reports from image logs, cores, and outcrops, the current study based on an integrated seismic curvature and curvature gradient analysis suggests that curvature might help define areas of enhanced potential to form tensile fractures, whereas curvature gradient might help define zones of enhanced potential to develop shear fractures. In certain fractured reservoirs such as at Teapot Dome where faulting and fault-related folding contribute dominantly to the formation and evolution of fractures, curvature and curvature gradient attributes can be potentially applied to differentiate fracture mode, to predict fracture intensity and orientation, to detect fracture volume and connectivity, and to model fracture networks.

  4. Effect of shockwave curvature on run distance observed with a modified wedge test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Dorgan, Robert J.; Sutherland, Gerrit; Benedetta, Ashley; Milby, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    The effect of wave curvature on shock initiation in PBXN-110 was investigated using a modified wedge test configuration. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with line-wave generators so that the shock from the donor would be the same shape, magnitude and duration across the entire input surface of the wedge. The shock parameters were varied for a given donor with PMMA spacers placed between the donor and the wedge sample. A high-speed electronic framing camera was used to observe where initiation occurred along the face of the wedge. Initiation always occurred at the center of the shock front instead of along the sides like that reported by others using a much smaller test format. Results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distance predicted in CTH for a 50.8 mm wide donor slab (low curvature) compared favorably with experimental results. However, results from thinner donor slabs (higher curvature) indicate a more sensitive behavior than the simulations predicted.

  5. Effect of Shockwave Curvature on Run Distance Observed with a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Dorgan, Robert; Sutherland, Gerrit; Benedetta, Ashley; Milby, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    The effect of wave curvature on shock initiation in PBXN-110 was investigated using a modified wedge test configuration. Various thicknesses of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with line-wave generators so that the introduced shock would be the same shape, magnitude and duration across the entire input surface of the wedge. The shock parameters were varied for a given donor thickness via different widths of PMMA spacers placed between the donor and the wedge. A framing camera was used to observe where initiation occurred along the face of the wedge. Initiation always occurred at the center of the shock front instead of the sides like that reported by others using a much smaller test format. Results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distance predicted in CTH for a 50.8 mm thick donor slab (low curvature) compared favorably with experimental results. However, results from thinner donor slabs (higher curvature) indicate a more sensitive behavior than the simulations predicted.

  6. Programming curvature using origami tessellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudte, Levi H.; Vouga, Etienne; Tachi, Tomohiro; Mahadevan, L.

    2016-05-01

    Origami describes rules for creating folded structures from patterns on a flat sheet, but does not prescribe how patterns can be designed to fit target shapes. Here, starting from the simplest periodic origami pattern that yields one-degree-of-freedom collapsible structures--we show that scale-independent elementary geometric constructions and constrained optimization algorithms can be used to determine spatially modulated patterns that yield approximations to given surfaces of constant or varying curvature. Paper models confirm the feasibility of our calculations. We also assess the difficulty of realizing these geometric structures by quantifying the energetic barrier that separates the metastable flat and folded states. Moreover, we characterize the trade-off between the accuracy to which the pattern conforms to the target surface, and the effort associated with creating finer folds. Our approach enables the tailoring of origami patterns to drape complex surfaces independent of absolute scale, as well as the quantification of the energetic and material cost of doing so.

  7. Relation between shape of liquid-gas interface and evolution of buoyantly unstable three-dimensional chemical fronts.

    PubMed

    Sebestíková, L

    2013-09-01

    Buoyantly unstable 3D chemical fronts were seen traveling through an iodate-arsenous acid reaction solution. The experiments were performed in channel reactors with rectangular cross sections, where the top of the reaction solution was in contact with air. A concave or convex meniscus was pinned to reactor lateral walls. Influence of the meniscus shape on front development was investigated. For the concave meniscus, an asymptotic shape of fronts holding negative curvature was observed. On the other hand, fronts propagating in the solution with the convex meniscus kept only positive curvature. Those fronts were also a bit faster than fronts propagating in the solution with the concave meniscus. A relation between the meniscus shape, flow distribution, velocity, and shape is discussed. PMID:24125360

  8. Secondary reconnection, energisation and turbulence in dipolarisation fronts: results of a 3D kinetic simulation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Markidis, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Dipolarization fronts (DF) are formed by reconnection outflows interacting with the pre-existing environment. These regions are host of important energy exchanges [1], particle acceleration [2] and a complex structure and evolution [3]. Our recent work has investigated these regions via fully kinetic 3D simulations [4]. As reported recently on Nature Physics [3], based on 3D fully kinetic simulations started with a well defined x-line, we observe that in the DF reconnection transitions towards a more chaotic regime. In the fronts an instability devel- ops caused by the local gradients of the density and by the unfavourable acceleration and field line curvature. The consequence is the break up of the fronts in a fashion similar to the classical fluid Rayleigh-Taylor instability with the formation of "fingers" of plasma and embedded magnetic fields. These fingers interact and produce secondary reconnection sites. We present several different diagnostics that prove the existence of these secondary reconnection sites. Each site is surrounded by its own electron diffusion region. At the fronts the ions are generally not magnetized and considerable ion slippage is present. The discovery we present is that electrons are also slipping, forming localized diffusion regions near secondary reconnection sites [1]. The consequence of this discovery is twofold. First, the instability in the fronts has strong energetic implications. We observe that the energy transfer locally is very strong, an order of magnitude stronger than in the "X" line. However, this energy transfer is of both signs as it is natural for a wavy rippling with regions of magnetic to kinetic and regions of kinetic to magnetic energy conversion. Second, and most important for this session, is that MMS should not limit the search for electron diffusion regions to the location marked with X in all reconnection cartoons. Our simulations predict more numerous and perhaps more easily measurable electron diffusion

  9. Variability in Ocean Color Associated with Phytoplankton and Terrigenous Matter: Time Series Measurements and Algorithm Development at the FRONT Site on the New England Continental Shelf. Chapter 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, John R.; Sosik, Heidi M.

    2003-01-01

    Fronts in the coastal ocean describe areas of strong horizontal gradients in both physical and biological properties associated with tidal mixing and freshwater estuarine output (e.g. Simpson, 1981 and O Donnell, 1993). Related gradients in optically important constituents mean that fronts can be observed from space as changes in ocean color as well as sea surface temperature (e.g., Dupouy et al., 1986). This research program is designed to determine which processes and optically important constituents must be considered to explain ocean color variations associated with coastal fronts on the New England continental shelf, in particular the National Ocean Partnership Program (NOPP) Front Resolving Observational Network with Telemetry (FRONT) site. This site is located at the mouth of Long Island sound and was selected after the analysis of 12 years of AVHRR data showed the region to be an area of strong frontal activity (Ullman and Cornillon, 1999). FRONT consists of a network of modem nodes that link bottom mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) and profiling arrays. At the center of the network is the Autonomous Vertically Profiling Plankton Observatory (AVPPO) (Thwaites et al. 1998). The AVPPO consists of buoyant sampling vehicle and a trawl-resistant bottom-mounted enclosure, which holds a winch, the vehicle (when not sampling), batteries, and controller. Three sampling systems are present on the vehicle, a video plankton recorder, a CTD with accessory sensors, and a suite of bio-optical sensors including Satlantic OCI-200 and OCR-200 spectral radiometers and a WetLabs ac-9 dual path absorption and attenuation meter. At preprogrammed times the vehicle is released, floats to the surface, and is then winched back into the enclosure with power and data connection maintained through the winch cable. Communication to shore is possible through a bottom cable and nearby surface telemetry buoy, equipped with a mobile modem, giving the capability for near

  10. Curvature and torsion in growing actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2008-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Rickettsia rickettsii move within a host cell by polymerizing a comet-tail of actin fibers that ultimately pushes the cell forward. This dense network of cross-linked actin polymers typically exhibits a striking curvature that causes bacteria to move in gently looping paths. Theoretically, tail curvature has been linked to details of motility by considering force and torque balances from a finite number of polymerizing filaments. Here we track beads coated with a prokaryotic activator of actin polymerization in three dimensions to directly quantify the curvature and torsion of bead motility paths. We find that bead paths are more likely to have low rather than high curvature at any given time. Furthermore, path curvature changes very slowly in time, with an autocorrelation decay time of 200 s. Paths with a small radius of curvature, therefore, remain so for an extended period resulting in loops when confined to two dimensions. When allowed to explore a three-dimensional (3D) space, path loops are less evident. Finally, we quantify the torsion in the bead paths and show that beads do not exhibit a significant left- or right-handed bias to their motion in 3D. These results suggest that paths of actin-propelled objects may be attributed to slow changes in curvature, possibly associated with filament debranching, rather than a fixed torque.

  11. Soliton curvatures of surfaces and spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Konopelchenko, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    An intrinsic geometry of surfaces and three-dimensional Riemann spaces is discussed. In the geodesic coordinates the Gauss equation for two-dimensional Riemann spaces (surfaces) is reduced to the one-dimensional Schr{umlt o}dinger equation, where the Gaussian curvature plays a role of potential. The use of this fact provides an infinite set of explicit expressions for curvature and metric of surface. A special case is governed by the KdV equation for the Gaussian curvature. Integrable dynamics of curvature via the KdV equation, higher KdV equations, and 2+1-dimensional integrable equations with breaking solitons is considered. For a special class of three-dimensional Riemann spaces the relation between metric and scalar curvature is given by the two-dimensional stationary Schr{umlt o}dinger or perturbed string equations. This provides us an infinite family of Riemann spaces with explicit scalar curvature and metric. Particular class of spaces and their integrable evolutions are described by the Nizhnik{endash}Veselov{endash}Novikov equation and its higher analogs. Surfaces and three-dimensional Riemann spaces with large curvature and slow dependence on the variable are considered. They are associated with the Burgers and Kadomtsev{endash}Petviashvili equations, respectively. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Magnetic curvature effects on plasma interchange turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Liao, X.; Sun, C. K.; Ou, W.; Liu, D.; Gui, G.; Wang, X. G.

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic curvature effects on plasma interchange turbulence and transport in the Z-pinch and dipole-like systems are explored with two-fluid global simulations. By comparing the transport levels in the systems with a different magnetic curvature, we show that the interchange-mode driven transport strongly depends on the magnetic geometry. For the system with large magnetic curvature, the pressure and density profiles are strongly peaked in a marginally stable state and the nonlinear evolution of interchange modes produces the global convective cells in the azimuthal direction, which lead to the low level of turbulent convective transport.

  13. Sequence-dependent DNA curvature and flexibility from scanning force microscopy images.

    PubMed Central

    Scipioni, Anita; Anselmi, Claudio; Zuccheri, Giampaolo; Samori, Bruno; De Santis, Pasquale

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports a study of the sequence-dependent DNA curvature and flexibility based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) images. We used a palindromic dimer of a 1878-bp pBR322 fragment and collected a large pool of SFM images. The curvature of each imaged chain was measured in modulus and direction. It was found that the ensemble curvature modulus does not allow the separation of static and dynamic contributions to the curvature, whereas the curvature, when its direction in the two dimensions is taken into account, permits the direct separation of the intrinsic curvature contributions static and dynamic contributions. The palindromic symmetry also acted as an internal gauge of the validity of the SFM images statistical analysis. DNA static curvature resulted in good agreement with the predicted sequence-dependent intrinsic curvature. Furthermore, DNA sequence-dependent flexibility was found to correlate with the occurrence of A.T-rich dinucleotide steps along the chain and, in general, with the normalized basepair stacking energy distribution. PMID:12414677

  14. The role of the epidermis and cortex in gravitropic curvature of maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Cleland, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    In order to determine the role of the epidermis and cortex in gravitropic curvature of seedling roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Merit), the cortex on the two opposite flanks was removed from the meristem through the growing zone; gravitropic curvature was measured with the roots oriented horizontally with the cut flanks either on the upper and lower side, or on the lateral sides as a wound control. Curvature was slower in both these treatments (53 degrees in 5 h) than in intact roots (82 degrees), but there was no difference between the two orientations in extent and rate of curvature, nor in the latent time, showing that epidermis and cortex were not the site of action of the growth-regulating signal. The amount of cortex removed made no difference in the extent of curvature. Curvature was eliminated when the endodermis was damaged, raising the possibility that the endodermis or the stele-cortex interface controls gravitropic curvature in roots. The elongation rate of roots from which just the epidermis had been peeled was reduced by 0.01 mM auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) from 0.42 to 0.27 mm h-1, contradicting the hypothesis that only the epidermis responds to changes in auxin activity during gravistimulation. These observations indicate that gravitropic curvature in maize roots is not driven by differential cortical cell enlargement, and that movement of growth regulator(s) from the tip to the elongating zone is unlikely to occur in the cortex.

  15. Gravitropic basis of leaf blade nastic curvatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    The curvatures produced in leaf blades by auxin treatment have been described as nastic curvatures because the initial differential growth is always enhanced on the lower side, regardless of the side of application. It is now known, however, that blades can show differential growth of either the upper or the lower side depending on the conditions of treatment. The dorsiventrality of the blade therefore influences but does not limit the direction of curvature. The dorsiventral directionality of response to growth regulators and the response to changes in the orientation to gravity are seen as indicating that blade curvatures are analogous to negative or positive gravitropism. It is noted that neither blade hyponasty or epinasty can be accounted for by ethylene alone. Petiole responses, however, are not directional, and the leaf angle changes induced by rotation or auxin treatment can be accounted for by ethylene production.

  16. Visually discerning the curvature of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Lynch, David K

    2008-12-01

    Reports and photographs claiming that visual observers can detect the curvature of the Earth from high mountains or high-flying commercial aircraft are investigated. Visual daytime observations show that the minimum altitude at which curvature of the horizon can be detected is at or slightly below 35,000 ft, providing that the field of view is wide (60 degrees ) and nearly cloud free. The high-elevation horizon is almost as sharp as the sea-level horizon, but its contrast is less than 10% that of the sea-level horizon. Photographs purporting to show the curvature of the Earth are always suspect because virtually all camera lenses project an image that suffers from barrel distortion. To accurately assess curvature from a photograph, the horizon must be placed precisely in the center of the image, i.e., on the optical axis. PMID:19037349

  17. Anisotropic Membrane Curvature Sensing by Amphipathic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Elías-Wolff, Federico; Lindén, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins and peptides have an intrinsic capacity to sense and induce membrane curvature, and play crucial roles for organizing and remodeling cell membranes. However, the molecular driving forces behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we describe an approach to study curvature sensing by simulating the interactions of single molecules with a buckled lipid bilayer. We analyze three amphipathic antimicrobial peptides, a class of membrane-associated molecules that specifically target and destabilize bacterial membranes, and find qualitatively different sensing characteristics that would be difficult to resolve with other methods. Our findings provide evidence for direction-dependent curvature sensing mechanisms in amphipathic peptides and challenge existing theories of hydrophobic insertion. The buckling approach is generally applicable to a wide range of curvature-sensing molecules, and our results provide strong motivation to develop new experimental methods to track position and orientation of membrane proteins. PMID:26745422

  18. Radius of Curvature of the Cornea--An Experiment for the Life-Science Physics Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLatchy, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a quantitative laboratory experiment in geometrical optics. It involves the student in the measurement of the radius of curvature of the cornea and is based on an old method devised by Kohlrausch in 1839. (Author/GA)

  19. Curvature tensors unified field equations on SEXn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kyung Tae; Lee, Il Young

    1988-09-01

    We study the curvature tensors and field equations in the n-dimensional SE manifold SEXn. We obtain several basic properties of the vectors S λ and U λ and then of the SE curvature tensor and its contractions, such as a generalized Ricci identity, a generalized Bianchi identity, and two variations of the Bianchi identity satisfied by the SE Einstein tensor. Finally, a system of field equations is discussed in SEXn and one of its particular solutions is constructed and displayed.

  20. Induced gravity from curvature density preserving diffeomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    We construct not only an induced gravity model with restricted diffeomorphisms, that is, transverse diffeomorphisms that preserve the curvature density, but also with full diffeomorphisms. By solving the equations of motion, it turns out that these models produce Einstein's equations with a certain Newton constant in addition to the constraint for the curvature density. In the limit of the infinite Newton constant, the models give rise to induced gravity. Moreover, we discuss cosmological solutions on the basis of the gravitational models at hand.

  1. Cosmological attractor models and higher curvature supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecotti, Sergio; Kallosh, Renata

    2014-05-01

    We study cosmological α-attractors in superconformal/supergravity models, where α is related to the geometry of the moduli space. For α = 1 attractors [1] we present a generalization of the previously known manifestly superconformal higher curvature supergravity model [2]. The relevant standard 2-derivative supergravity with a minimum of two chiral multiplets is shown to be dual to a 4-derivative higher curvature supergravity, where in general one of the chiral superfields is traded for a curvature superfield. There is a degenerate case when both matter superfields become non-dynamical and there is only a chiral curvature superfield, pure higher derivative supergravity. Generic α-models [3] interpolate between the attractor point at α = 0 and generic chaotic inflation models at large α, in the limit when the inflaton moduli space becomes flat. They have higher derivative duals with the same number of matter fields as the original theory or less, but at least one matter multiplet remains. In the context of these models, the detection of primordial gravity waves will provide information on the curvature of the inflaton submanifold of the Kähler manifold, and we will learn if the inflaton is a fundamental matter multiplet, or can be replaced by a higher derivative curvature excitation.

  2. The role of curvature in entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Gregory

    2015-10-01

    Which tangles more readily: curly hair or straight hair? A perhaps natural thought, supported by some theoretical evidence, is to associate curvature and entanglement, and assume that they would grow together-that an increase in one fosters an increase in the other. However we have biological examples such as DNA in the chromosome, and mechanical examples such as coiled telephone cords, in which much more curvature is employed than is required for the packing, and in which tangling is presumably detrimental. We offer a resolution to this conundrum. We show, that at least for simple but generally applicable models, the relationship between curvature and entanglement is subtle: if we keep filament density constant and increase curvature, the entanglement initially increases, passes through a maximum, then decreases, so there is a regime where increasing curvature increases entanglement, and there is also a regime where increasing curvature decreases entanglement. This has implications for filament packing in many circumstances, and in particular for the compaction structure of DNA in the cell-it provides a straightforward argument for the view that one purpose of DNA coiling and supercoiling is to inhibit entanglement. It also tells us to expect that wavy hair-neither the straightest nor the curliest-tangles most readily.

  3. Spherical gravitational curvature boundary-value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    Values of scalar, vector and second-order tensor parameters of the Earth's gravitational field have been collected by various sensors in geodesy and geophysics. Such observables have been widely exploited in different parametrization methods for the gravitational field modelling. Moreover, theoretical aspects of these quantities have extensively been studied and well understood. On the other hand, new sensors for observing gravitational curvatures, i.e., components of the third-order gravitational tensor, are currently under development. As the gravitational curvatures represent new types of observables, their exploitation for modelling of the Earth's gravitational field is a subject of this study. Firstly, the gravitational curvature tensor is decomposed into six parts which are expanded in terms of third-order tensor spherical harmonics. Secondly, gravitational curvature boundary-value problems defined for four combinations of the gravitational curvatures are formulated and solved in spectral and spatial domains. Thirdly, properties of the corresponding sub-integral kernels are investigated. The presented mathematical formulations reveal some important properties of the gravitational curvatures and extend the so-called Meissl scheme, i.e., an important theoretical framework that relates various parameters of the Earth's gravitational field.

  4. Spherical gravitational curvature boundary-value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    Values of scalar, vector and second-order tensor parameters of the Earth's gravitational field have been collected by various sensors in geodesy and geophysics. Such observables have been widely exploited in different parametrization methods for the gravitational field modelling. Moreover, theoretical aspects of these quantities have extensively been studied and well understood. On the other hand, new sensors for observing gravitational curvatures, i.e., components of the third-order gravitational tensor, are currently under development. As the gravitational curvatures represent new types of observables, their exploitation for modelling of the Earth's gravitational field is a subject of this study. Firstly, the gravitational curvature tensor is decomposed into six parts which are expanded in terms of third-order tensor spherical harmonics. Secondly, gravitational curvature boundary-value problems defined for four combinations of the gravitational curvatures are formulated and solved in spectral and spatial domains. Thirdly, properties of the corresponding sub-integral kernels are investigated. The presented mathematical formulations reveal some important properties of the gravitational curvatures and extend the so-called Meissl scheme, i.e., an important theoretical framework that relates various parameters of the Earth's gravitational field.

  5. Flame front configuration of turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Junichi; Maruta, Kaoru; Hirano, Toshisuke

    1998-02-01

    The present study is performed to explore dependence of the wrinkle scale of propane-air turbulent premixed flames on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow, burner size, and mixture ratio. The wrinkle scales are examined and expressed in the frequency distribution of the radii of flame front curvatures. The average wrinkle scale depends not only on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow but also on burner diameter and mixture ratio. The average wrinkle scale of a lean propane-air flame is larger than those of the near stoichiometric and rich flames. The smallest wrinkle scale of turbulent premixed flame is in the range of 0.75--1.0 mm, which is much larger than the Kolmogorov scale of turbulence in the nonreacting flow.

  6. A high-sensitive fiber curvature sensor using twin core fiber-based filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, G. L.; Lou, S. Q.; Lu, W. L.; Wang, X.

    2014-04-01

    A high-sensitive fiber curvature sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in a large measurement range by using a twin core fiber (TCF)-based filter as sensor head. Applying the coupled-mode theory and equivalent refractive index model, we theoretically anticipate the "blue shift" of the transmission dips of the TCF-based filter when sensor head is bent. Experimentally, we fabricate an 86.9 mm TCF-based filter with a free spectral range of 49 nm and characterize its curvature performance by measuring the wavelength shift. A nonlinear "blue shift" of the wavelength is observed when we increase the curvature. The relationship between wavelength shift and curvature is a second-order polynomial function. In the range from 0 to 9.30 m-1, the maximum sensitivity is up to -14.7 nm/m-1. The measurement range can be further increased by selecting a shorter TCF.

  7. A kind of wavefront curvature sensor with diffraction grating and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hongbin; Li, Gang; Huang, Fuyu; Liu, Jie; Wang, Yuanbo

    2009-11-01

    The basic principle of wavefront curvature sensor (WFS) is described, and the strongpoints and shortcomings of traditional schemes are analyzed. As a novel WFS, the wavefront curvature sensor comprising a diffraction grating (DGWFS), which consist a defocus grating and lens, and can measure the light intensity distribution at the two defocused spots simultaneity, has the advantage of realization easily, adjustment expediently, low cost, and so on. The DGWFS has a wide application in astronomy, measurement, laser, optical component testing etc. Its principle is analyzed. Two kinds of phase retrieval arithmetics of wavefront curvature sensor are analyzed by comparison. Besides, the latest applications of wavefront curvature sensor are generally presented. Finally a novel method for measurement on solid-state laser thermal lens utilizing DGWFS is presented.

  8. Nonlinear diffusion filtering influenced by mean curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Michal; Mikula, Karol; Čunderlík, Róbert

    2016-04-01

    The presentation introduces a new nonlinear diffusion filtering method on closed surfaces such as a sphere, ellipsoid or the Earth's surface. Our new model extends the regularized surface Perona-Malik model by including a local extrema detector based on a mean curvature of processed data. The model is thus represented by a nonlinear diffusion equation which filters noise while preserves main edges, local extrema and details important for a correct interpretation of data. We define a surface finite-volume method to approximate numerically the nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation on a closed surface. The closed surface is approximated by a polyhedral surface created by planar triangles representing subdivision of an initial icosahedron grid and we use a piece-wise linear approximation of a solution in space and the backward Euler time discretization. Numerical experiments present nonlinear diffusion filtering of artificial data and real measurements, namely the GOCE satellite observations. They aim to point out a main advantage of the new nonlinear model which, on the contrary of Perona-Malik model, preserves local extremal values of filtered data.

  9. Curvature-tuned preparation of nanoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Genç, Rükan; Ortiz, Mayreli; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2009-11-01

    Numerous methods have been reported for the preparation of liposomes, many of which, in addition to requiring time-consuming preparative steps and the use of organic solvents, result in heterogeneous liposome populations of incontrollable size. Taking into consideration the phenomenon of spontaneous vesiculation and the theory of curvature, here we present an extremely rapid and simple, solvent-free method for the preparation of monodisperse solutions of highly stable small unilamellar vesicles using both charged and zwitterionic lipids mixed with lyso-palmitoylphosphatidylcholine, exploiting a combination of a rapid pH change followed by a defined period of equilibration. Various experimental parameters and their interactions were evaluated in terms of their effect on resulting liposome size and shape, as well as on liposome stability and size distribution, with transmission electron microscope imaging being used to visualize the formed liposomes, and photon correlation spectroscopy to obtain statistical data on mean diameter and monodispersity of the liposome population. zeta potential measurements also provided information about the interpretation of vesiculation kinetics and liposome stability. The time interval of pH jump, operation temperature, equilibration time, and lipid type were shown to be the determining factors controlling the size, shape, and monodispersity of the liposomes. Buffer type was also found to be important for the long-term storage of the liposomes. Ongoing work is looking at the application of the developed method for encapsulation of bioactive molecules, such as drugs, genetic materials, and enzymes. PMID:19856992

  10. Effects of ethylene on the kinetics of curvature and auxin redistribution in gravistimulated roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Evans, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    We tested the involvement of ethylene in maize (Zea mays L.) root gravitropism by measuring the kinetics of curvature and lateral auxin movement in roots treated with ethylene, inhibitors of ethylene synthesis, or inhibitors of ethylene action. In the presence of ethylene the latent period of gravitropic curvature appeared to be increased somewhat. However, ethylene-treated roots continued to curve after control roots had reached their final angle of curvature. Consequently, maximum curvature in the presence of ethylene was much greater in ethylene-treated roots than in controls. Inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or action had effects on the kinetics of curvature opposite to that of ethylene, i.e. the latent period appeared to be shortened somewhat while total curvature was reduced relative to that of controls. Label from applied 3H-indole-3-acetic acid was preferentially transported toward the lower side of stimulated roots. In parallel with effects on curvature, ethylene treatment delayed the development of gravity-induced asymmetric auxin movement across the root but extended its duration once initiated. The auxin transport inhibitor, 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid reduced both gravitropic curvature and the effect of ethylene on curvature. Since neither ethylene nor inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or action prevented curvature, we conclude that ethylene does not mediate the primary differential growth response causing curvature. Because ethylene affects curvature and auxin transport in parallel, we suggest that ethylene modifies curvature by affecting gravity-induced lateral transport of auxin, perhaps by interfering with adaptation of the auxin transport system to the gravistimulus.