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Sample records for frontal midline theta

  1. Validity and reliability of electroencephalographic frontal alpha asymmetry and frontal midline theta as biomarkers for depression.

    PubMed

    Gold, Christian; Fachner, Jörg; Erkkilä, Jaakko

    2013-04-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) frontal alpha asymmetry (FAA) and frontal midline (FM) theta have been suggested as biomarkers for depression and anxiety, but have mostly been assessed in small and non-clinical studies. In a clinical sample of 79 adults with depression (ICD-10: F32), resting EEG and scales of depression (MADRS) and anxiety (HADS-A) were measured at intake and after 3 months. FAA and FM theta values were referenced to a normative population database. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and correlations with psychiatric tests were examined. Reliability was sufficient. However, FAA and FM theta values were close to the general population, and correlations with psychiatric tests were mostly small and non-significant, with the exception of FAA on F7-F8 z-scores and HADS-A. We conclude that the validity of FAA and FM theta and therefore their potential as biomarkers for depression and anxiety remain unclear. PMID:23278257

  2. Frontal Midline Theta Reflects Anxiety and Cognitive Control: Meta-Analytic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, James F.; Shackman, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from imaging and anatomical studies suggests that the midcingulate cortex (MCC) is a dynamic hub lying at the interface of affect and cognition. In particular, this neural system appears to integrate information about conflict and punishment in order to optimize behavior in the face of action-outcome uncertainty. In a series of meta-analyses, we show how recent human electrophysiological research provides compelling evidence that frontal-midline theta signals reflecting MCC activity are moderated by anxiety and predict adaptive behavioral adjustments. These findings underscore the importance of frontal theta activity to a broad spectrum of control operations. We argue that frontal-midline theta provides a neurophysiologically plausible mechanism for optimally adjusting behavior to uncertainty, a hallmark of situations that elicit anxiety and demand cognitive control. These observations compel a new perspective on the mechanisms guiding motivated learning and behavior and provide a framework for understanding the role of the MCC in temperament and psychopathology. PMID:24787485

  3. Frontal midline theta reflects anxiety and cognitive control: meta-analytic evidence.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Shackman, Alexander J

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from imaging and anatomical studies suggests that the midcingulate cortex (MCC) is a dynamic hub lying at the interface of affect and cognition. In particular, this neural system appears to integrate information about conflict and punishment in order to optimize behavior in the face of action-outcome uncertainty. In a series of meta-analyses, we show how recent human electrophysiological research provides compelling evidence that frontal-midline theta signals reflecting MCC activity are moderated by anxiety and predict adaptive behavioral adjustments. These findings underscore the importance of frontal theta activity to a broad spectrum of control operations. We argue that frontal-midline theta provides a neurophysiologically plausible mechanism for optimally adjusting behavior to uncertainty, a hallmark of situations that elicit anxiety and demand cognitive control. These observations compel a new perspective on the mechanisms guiding motivated learning and behavior and provide a framework for understanding the role of the MCC in temperament and psychopathology. PMID:24787485

  4. Event-related desynchronization of frontal-midline theta rhythm during preconscious auditory oddball processing.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Masaru; Kirino, Eiji; Inoue, Reiichi; Arai, Heii

    2007-10-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the frontal-midline theta rhythm (Fm theta) generation mechanism employing event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) analysis in relation to task-irrelevant external stimuli. A dual paradigm was employed: a videogame and the simultaneous presentation of passive auditory oddball stimuli. We analyzed the data concerning ERD/ERS using both Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) and wavelet transform (WT). In the FFT data, during the periods with appearance of Fm theta, apparent ERD of the theta band was observed at Fz and Cz. ERD when Fm theta was present was much more prominent than when Fm theta was absent. In the WT data, as in the FFT data, ERD was seen again, but in this case the ERD was preceded by ERS during both the periods with and without Fm theta. Furthermore, the WT analysis indicated that ERD was followed by ERS during the periods without Fm theta. However, during Fm theta, no apparent ERS following ERD was seen. In our study, Fm theta was desynchronized by the auditory stimuli that were independent of the video game task used to evoke the Fm theta. The ERD of Fm theta might be reflecting the mechanism of "positive suppression" to process external auditory stimuli automatically and preventing attentional resources from being unnecessarily allocated to those stimuli. Another possibility is that Fm theta induced by our dual paradigm may reflect information processing modeled by multi-item working memory requirements for playing the videogame and the simultaneous auditory processing using a memory trace. ERS in the WT data without Fm theta might indicate further processing of the auditory information free from "positive suppression" control reflected by Fm theta. PMID:17993201

  5. Self-regulation of frontal-midline theta facilitates memory updating and mental set shifting

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez-Geppert, Stefanie; Huster, René J.; Figge, Christian; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2014-01-01

    Frontal-midline (fm) theta oscillations as measured via the electroencephalogram (EEG) have been suggested as neural “working language” of executive functioning. Their power has been shown to increase when cognitive processing or task performance is enhanced. Thus, the question arises whether learning to increase fm-theta amplitudes would functionally impact the behavioral performance in tasks probing executive functions (EFs). Here, the effects of neurofeedback (NF), a learning method to self-up-regulate fm-theta over fm electrodes, on the four most representative EFs, memory updating, set shifting, conflict monitoring, and motor inhibition are presented. Before beginning and after completing an individualized, eight-session gap-spaced NF intervention, the three-back, letter/number task-switching, Stroop, and stop-signal tasks were tested while measuring the EEG. Self-determined up-regulation of fm-theta and its putative role for executive functioning were compared to an active control group, the so-called pseudo-neurofeedback group. Task-related fm-theta activity after training differed significantly between groups. More importantly, though, after NF significantly enhanced behavioral performance was observed. The training group showed higher accuracy scores in the three-back task and reduced mixing and shifting costs in letter/number task-switching. However, this specific protocol type did not affect performance in tasks probing conflict monitoring and motor inhibition. Thus, our results suggest a modulation of proactive but not reactive mechanisms of cognitive control. Furthermore, task-related EEG changes show a distinct pattern for fm-theta after training between the NF and the pseudo-neurofeedback group, which indicates that NF training indeed tackles EFs-networks. In sum, the modulation of fm-theta via NF may serve as potent treatment approach for executive dysfunctions. PMID:25538585

  6. Frontal midline theta reflects individual task performance in a working memory task.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Urs; Brem, Silvia; Liechti, Martina; Maurizio, Stefano; Michels, Lars; Brandeis, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Frontal midline (fm-)theta activity has been related to working memory (WM) processes, as it typically increases with WM load. The robustness of this effect, however, varies across studies and subjects, putting limits to its interpretation. We hypothesized that variation in the fm-theta effect may reflect individual differences in task difficulty with increasing WM load as indicated by behavioural responses. We further tested whether effects in the alpha range are robust markers of WM load. We recorded 64-channel EEG from 24 healthy adults while they memorized either 2 or 4 unfamiliar symbols (low vs. high WM load) in a modified Sternberg task. The last 2 s of the retention phase were analyzed for WM load-related changes in the theta (5-7 Hz) and alpha range (lower: 8-10 Hz, upper: 10.5-12.5 Hz). Higher WM load led to less accurate and slower responses. The increase of fm-theta with WM load was most pronounced at fm electrodes, localized to anterior cingulate regions, and correlated with the participants' decrease in accuracy due to higher WM load. Alpha peak frequency increased in the high compared to the low WM load condition, corresponding to a decrease in lower alpha range across all channels. The results demonstrate that previously reported variation in fm-theta workload effects can partly be explained by variation in task difficulty indexed by individual task accuracy. Moreover, the results also demonstrate that alpha WM load effects are prominent when separating upper and lower alpha. PMID:24687327

  7. Frontal midline theta as a neurophysiological correlate for deficits of attentional orienting in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Hao; Lo, Yu-Hui; Pan, Chien-Yu; Chen, Fu-Chen; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Tsai, Chia-Liang

    2015-06-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have been demonstrated to show attentional orienting deficits. The neural mechanism, however, has thus far remained elusive. Here, we measure oscillations in the EEG associated with attentional orienting to address this issue. The EEG was recorded from DCD children and typical developing (TD) controls during an eye-gaze cueing paradigm. DCD group responded more slowly than TD group across all conditions. Additionally, TD group showed higher frontal midline theta activities in both valid and invalid conditions relative to a neutral condition, with such an effect absent in the DCD group. Theta oscillations might reflect attentional processing in relation to the cues being performed in TD group, with the lessened modulation of theta in DCD group possibly reflecting a deficit in attentional orienting. Possible explanations for the DCD-TD differences in theta oscillation and attentional orienting are discussed. PMID:25529042

  8. tACS Phase Locking of Frontal Midline Theta Oscillations Disrupts Working Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Chander, Bankim S.; Witkowski, Matthias; Braun, Christoph; Robinson, Stephen E.; Born, Jan; Cohen, Leonardo G.; Birbaumer, Niels; Soekadar, Surjo R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Frontal midline theta (FMT) oscillations (4–8 Hz) are strongly related to cognitive and executive control during mental tasks such as memory processing, arithmetic problem solving or sustained attention. While maintenance of temporal order information during a working memory (WM) task was recently linked to FMT phase, a positive correlation between FMT power, WM demand and WM performance was shown. However, the relationship between these measures is not well understood, and it is unknown whether purposeful FMT phase manipulation during a WM task impacts FMT power and WM performance. Here we present evidence that FMT phase manipulation mediated by transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) can block WM demand-related FMT power increase (FMTΔpower) and disrupt normal WM performance. Methods: Twenty healthy volunteers were assigned to one of two groups (group A, group B) and performed a 2-back task across a baseline block (block 1) and an intervention block (block 2) while 275-sensor magnetoencephalography (MEG) was recorded. After no stimulation was applied during block 1, participants in group A received tACS oscillating at their individual FMT frequency over the prefrontal cortex (PFC) while group B received sham stimulation during block 2. After assessing and mapping phase locking values (PLV) between the tACS signal and brain oscillatory activity across the whole brain, FMT power and WM performance were assessed and compared between blocks and groups. Results: During block 2 of group A but not B, FMT oscillations showed increased PLV across task-related cortical areas underneath the frontal tACS electrode. While WM task-related FMTΔpower and WM performance were comparable across groups in block 1, tACS resulted in lower FMTΔpower and WM performance compared to sham stimulation in block 2. Conclusion: tACS-related manipulation of FMT phase can disrupt WM performance and influence WM task-related FMTΔpower. This finding may have important

  9. [Effect of the TRH analog DN-1417 on the appearance of frontal midline theta activity (Fm0)].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, J; Mukasa, H; Hashimoto, M; Inanaga, K

    1987-06-01

    The distinct 0 rhythm which appears in the frontal midline area during the performance of mental tasks is called Fm0. The appearance of Fm0 shows individual differences and a close relationship to the personality traits of the subject. It is also reported that administration of diazepam or alcohol brings about an increase of Fm0 along with lowering of the anxiety level. In the present study, the TRH analog DN-1417 (80 mg) was administered to 8 healthy male students for 15 days. They were all extrovert in nature and had no great neurotic tendencies as measured by the Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI). EEG recording, determination of the blood concentration of DN-1417, and Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-I (STAI-I) were carried out before, during, and after drug administration. The appearance of Fm0 showed significant increase during and just after drug administration. As to anxiety, the STAI-I score showed no significant change. There was no correlation between blood concentration and Fm0. From these results, we considered that the change of appearance of Fm0 due to drug administration was not necessarily associated with change of the anxiety level, and that DN-1417, a DA releaser, increased the appearance of Fm0. PMID:2891228

  10. Frontal-posterior theta oscillations reflect memory retrieval during sentence comprehension.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Lars; Grigutsch, Maren; Schmuck, Noura; Gaston, Phoebe; Friederici, Angela D

    2015-10-01

    Successful working-memory retrieval requires that items be retained as distinct units. At the neural level, it has been shown that theta-band oscillatory power increases with the number of to-be-distinguished items during working-memory retrieval. Here we hypothesized that during sentence comprehension, verbal-working-memory retrieval demands lead to increased theta power over frontal cortex, supposedly supporting the distinction amongst stored items during verbal-working-memory retrieval. Also, synchronicity may increase between the frontal cortex and the posterior cortex, with the latter supposedly supporting item retention. We operationalized retrieval by using pronouns, which refer to and trigger the retrieval of antecedent nouns from a preceding sentence part. Retrieval demand was systematically varied by changing the pronoun antecedent: Either, it was non-embedded in the preceding main clause, and thus easy-to-retrieve across a single clause boundary, or embedded in the preceding subordinate clause, and thus hard-to-retrieve across a double clause boundary. We combined electroencephalography (EEG), scalp-level time-frequency analysis, source localization, and source-level coherence analysis, observing a frontal-midline and broad left-hemispheric theta-power increase for embedded-antecedent compared to non-embedded-antecedent retrieval. Sources were localized to left-frontal, left-parietal, and bilateral-inferior-temporal cortices. Coherence analyses suggested synchronicity between left-frontal and left-parietal and between left-frontal and right-inferior-temporal cortices. Activity of an array of left-frontal, left-parietal, and bilateral-inferior-temporal cortices may thus assist retrieval during sentence comprehension, potentially indexing the orchestration of item distinction, verbal working memory, and long-term memory. Our results extend prior findings by mapping prior knowledge on the functional role of theta oscillations onto processes genuine to human

  11. Frontal theta as a mechanism for cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, James F.; Frank, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in cognitive neuroscience have afforded a description of neural responses in terms of latent algorithmic operations. However, the adoption of this approach to human scalp EEG has been more limited, despite the ability of this methodology to quantify canonical neuronal processes. Here we provide evidence that theta band activities over the mid-frontal cortex appear to reflect a common computation used for realizing the need for cognitive control. Moreover, by virtue of inherent properties of field oscillations, these theta band processes may be used to communicate this need and subsequently implement such control across disparate brain regions. Frontal theta is thus a compelling candidate mechanism by which emergent processes such as ‘cognitive control’ may be biophysically realized. PMID:24835663

  12. Automatic Detection of Frontal Face Midline by Chain-coded Merlin-Farber Hough Trasform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Daichi; Ohyama, Wataru; Wakabayashi, Tetsushi; Kimura, Fumitaka

    We propose a novel approach for detection of the facial midline (facial symmetry axis) from a frontal face image. The facial midline has several applications, for instance reducing computational cost required for facial feature extraction (FFE) and postoperative assessment for cosmetic or dental surgery. The proposed method detects the facial midline of a frontal face from an edge image as the symmetry axis using the Merlin-Faber Hough transformation. And a new performance improvement scheme for midline detection by MFHT is present. The main concept of the proposed scheme is suppression of redundant vote on the Hough parameter space by introducing chain code representation for the binary edge image. Experimental results on the image dataset containing 2409 images from FERET database indicate that the proposed algorithm can improve the accuracy of midline detection from 89.9% to 95.1 % for face images with different scales and rotation.

  13. Frontal predominance of a relative increase in sleep delta and theta EEG activity after sleep loss in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Foy, R.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of sleep deprivation (40 h) on topographic and temporal aspects of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during sleep was investigated by all night spectral analysis in six young volunteers. The sleep-deprivation-induced increase of EEG power density in the delta and theta frequencies (1-7 Hz) during nonREM sleep, assessed along the antero-posterior axis (midline: Fz, Cz, Pz, Oz), was significantly larger in the more frontal derivations (Fz, Cz) than in the more parietal derivations (Pz, Oz). This frequency-specific frontal predominance was already present in the first 30 min of recovery sleep, and dissipated in the course of the 8-h sleep episode. The data demonstrate that the enhancement of slow wave EEG activity during sleep following extended wakefulness is most pronounced in frontal cortical areas.

  14. Frontal EEG theta changes assess the training improvements of novices in flight simulation tasks.

    PubMed

    Borghini, G; Arico, P; Astolfi, L; Toppi, J; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D; Cherubino, P; Vecchiato, G; Maglione, A G; Graziani, I; Babiloni, F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to analyze the variation of the EEG power spectra in theta band when a novice starts to learn a new task. In particular, the goal is to find out the differences from the beginning of the training to the session in which the performance level is good enough for considering him/her able to complete the task without any problems. While the novices were engaged in the flight simulation tasks we recorded the brain activity by using high resolution EEG techniques as well as neurophysiologic variables such as heart rate (HR) and eye blinks rate (EBR). Results show clear changes in the EEG power spectra in theta band over the frontal brain areas, either over the left, the midline and the right side, during the learning process of the task. These results are also supported by the autonomic signals of HR and EBR, by the performances' trends and by the questionnaires for the evaluation of the perceived workload level. PMID:24111260

  15. Frontal and rostral anterior cingulate (rACC) theta EEG in depression: implications for treatment outcome?

    PubMed

    Arns, Martijn; Etkin, Amit; Hegerl, Ulrich; Williams, Leanne M; DeBattista, Charles; Palmer, Donna M; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Harris, Anthony; deBeuss, Roger; Gordon, Evian

    2015-08-01

    In major depressive disorder (MDD), elevated theta current density in the rostral anterior cingulate (rACC), as estimated by source localization of scalp-recorded electroencenphalogram (EEG), has been associated with response to antidepressant treatments, whereas elevated frontal theta has been linked to non-response. This study used source localization to attempt to integrate these apparently opposite results and test, whether antidepressant response is associated with elevated rACC theta and non-response with elevated frontal theta and whether theta activity is a differential predictor of response to different types of commonly used antidepressants. In the international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression (iSPOT-D), a multi-center, international, randomized, prospective practical trial, 1008 MDD participants were randomized to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine-XR. The study also recruited 336 healthy controls. Treatment response and remission were established after eight weeks using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17). The resting-state EEG was assessed at baseline with eyes closed and source localization (eLORETA) was employed to extract theta from the rACC and frontal cortex. Patients with MDD had elevated theta in both frontal cortex and rACC, with small effect sizes. High frontal and rACC theta were associated with treatment non-response, but not with non-remission, and this effect was most pronounced in a subgroup with previous treatment failures. Low theta in frontal cortex and rACC are found in responders to antidepressant treatments with a small effect size. Future studies should investigate in more detail the role of previous treatment (failure) in the association between theta and treatment outcome. PMID:25936227

  16. Social exclusion modulates event-related frontal theta and tracks ostracism distress in children.

    PubMed

    van Noordt, Stefon J R; White, Lars O; Wu, Jia; Mayes, Linda C; Crowley, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Social exclusion is a potent elicitor of distress. Previous studies have shown that medial frontal theta oscillations are modulated by the experience of social exclusion. Using the Cyberball paradigm, we examined event-related dynamics of theta power in the EEG at medial frontal sites while children aged 8-12 years were exposed to conditions of fair play and social exclusion. Using an event-related design, we found that medial frontal theta oscillations (4-8Hz) increase during both early (i.e., 200-400ms) and late (i.e., 400-800ms) processing of rejection events during social exclusion relative to perceptually identical "not my turn" events during inclusion. Importantly, we show that only for the later time window (400-800ms) slow-wave theta power tracks self-reported ostracism distress. Specifically, greater theta power at medial frontal sites to "rejection" events predicted higher levels of ostracism distress. Alpha and beta oscillations for rejection events were unrelated to ostracism distress at either 200-400ms or 400-800ms time windows. Our findings extend previous studies by showing that medial frontal theta oscillations for rejection events are a neural signature of social exclusion, linked to experienced distress in middle childhood. PMID:26048623

  17. Theta lingua franca: a common mid-frontal substrate for action monitoring processes.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Zambrano-Vazquez, Laura; Allen, John J B

    2012-02-01

    We present evidence that a multitude of mid-frontal event-related potential (ERP) components partially reflect a common theta band oscillatory process. Specifically, mid-frontal ERP components in the N2 time range and error-related negativity time range are parsimoniously characterized as reflections of theta band activities. Forty participants completed three different tasks with varying stimulus-response demands. Permutation tests were used to identify the dominant time-frequency responses of stimulus- and response-locked conditions as well as the enhanced responses to novelty, conflict, punishment, and error. A dominant theta band feature was found in all conditions, and both ERP component amplitudes and theta power measures were similarly modulated by novelty, conflict, punishment, and error. The findings support the hypothesis that generic and reactive medial prefrontal cortex processes are parsimoniously reflected by theta band activities. PMID:22091878

  18. TERT promoter mutated WHO grades II and III gliomas are located preferentially in the frontal lobe and avoid the midline

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ze-Lin; Chan, Aden Ka-Yin; Chen, Ling-Chao; Tang, Chao; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Ding, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Yang; Sun, Chong-Ran; Ng, Ho-Keung; Yao, Yu; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    The promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERTp) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have been regarded as biomarkers with distinct clinical and phenotypic features. Investigated the possible correlations between tumor location and genetic alterations would enhance our understanding of gliomagenesis and heterogeneity of glioma. We examined mutations of TERTp and IDH by direct sequencing and fluorescence in-situ hybridization in a cohort of 225 grades II and III diffuse gliomas. Correlation analysis between molecular markers and tumor locations was performed by Chi-square tests/Fisher’s exact test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found gliomas in frontal lobe showed higher frequency of TERTp mutation (P=0.0337) and simultaneously mutations of IDH and TERTp (IDH mut-TERTpmut) (P=0.0281) than frequency of biomarkers mutation of tumors in no-Frontal lobes, while lower frequency of TERTp mutation (P<0.0001) and simultaneously wild type of IDH and TERTp (IDH wt-TERTpwt) (P<0.0001) in midline than no-midline lobes. Logistic regression analysis indicated that locations of tumors associated with TERTp mutation (OR=0.540, 95% CI 0.324-0.900, P=0.018) and status of combinations of IDH and TERTp (IDH mut-TERTp mut vs. IDH wt-TERTp wt OR=0.162, 95% CI 0.075-0.350, P<0.001). In conclusion, grades II and III gliomas harboring TERTp mutation were located preferentially in the frontal lobe and rarely in midline. Association of IDH-TERTp status and tumor location suggests their potential values in molecular classification of grades II and III gliomas. PMID:26617880

  19. A Comparison of Frontal Theta Activity During Shooting among Biathletes and Cross-Country Skiers before and after Vigorous Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Luchsinger, Harri; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Schubert, Michael; Ettema, Gertjan; Baumeister, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies using electroencephalography (EEG) to monitor brain activity have linked higher frontal theta activity to more focused attention and superior performance in goal-directed precision tasks. In biathlon, shooting performance requires focused attention after high-intensity cross-country skiing. Purpose To compare biathletes (serving as experts) and cross-country skiers (novices) and examine the effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity during shooting. Methods EEG frontal theta (4–7 Hz) activity was compared between nine biathletes and eight cross-country skiers at comparable skiing performance levels who fired 100 shots on a 5-m indoor shooting range in quiescent condition followed by 20 shots after each of five 6-min high-intensity roller skiing sessions in the skating technique on a treadmill. Results Biathletes hit 80±14% and 81±10% before and after the roller skiing sessions, respectively. For the cross-country skiers these values were significantly lower than for the biathletes and amounted to 39±13% and 44±11% (p<0.01). Biathletes had on average 6% higher frontal theta activity during shooting as compared to cross-country skiers (F1,15 = 4.82, p = 0.044), but no significant effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity in either of the two groups were found (F1,15 = 0.14, p = 0.72). Conclusions Biathletes had significantly higher frontal theta activity than cross-country skiers during shooting, indicating higher focused attention in biathletes. Vigorous exercise did not decrease shooting performance or frontal theta activity during shooting in biathletes and cross-country skiers. PMID:26981639

  20. Frontal and parietal theta burst TMS impairs working memory for visual-spatial conjunctions.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Helen M; Jackson, Margaret C; van Koningsbruggen, Martijn G; Shapiro, Kimron L; Linden, David E J

    2013-03-01

    In tasks that selectively probe visual or spatial working memory (WM) frontal and posterior cortical areas show a segregation, with dorsal areas preferentially involved in spatial (e.g. location) WM and ventral areas in visual (e.g. object identity) WM. In a previous fMRI study [1], we showed that right parietal cortex (PC) was more active during WM for orientation, whereas left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was more active during colour WM. During WM for colour-orientation conjunctions, activity in these areas was intermediate to the level of activity for the single task preferred and non-preferred information. To examine whether these specialised areas play a critical role in coordinating visual and spatial WM to perform a conjunction task, we used theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to induce a functional deficit. Compared to sham stimulation, TMS to right PC or left IFG selectively impaired WM for conjunctions but not single features. This is consistent with findings from visual search paradigms, in which frontal and parietal TMS selectively affects search for conjunctions compared to single features, and with combined TMS and functional imaging work suggesting that parietal and frontal regions are functionally coupled in tasks requiring integration of visual and spatial information. Our results thus elucidate mechanisms by which the brain coordinates spatially segregated processing streams and have implications beyond the field of working memory. PMID:22483548

  1. Morning nutrition and executive function processes in preadolescents: gender variations in phasic modulation of frontal eeg theta activity during a go/ no-go task

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frontal EEG theta activity has been related to executive functions (i.e., goal-directed behavior such as inhibition and flexibility of action). We studied the effects of morning nutritional status on frontal theta-executive function relationships using stimulus-locked responses [event-related increa...

  2. Auditory Conflict Resolution Correlates with Medial–Lateral Frontal Theta/Alpha Phase Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Samantha; Rossi, Stephanie; Hämäläinen, Matti; Ahveninen, Jyrki

    2014-01-01

    When multiple persons speak simultaneously, it may be difficult for the listener to direct attention to correct sound objects among conflicting ones. This could occur, for example, in an emergency situation in which one hears conflicting instructions and the loudest, instead of the wisest, voice prevails. Here, we used cortically-constrained oscillatory MEG/EEG estimates to examine how different brain regions, including caudal anterior cingulate (cACC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFC), work together to resolve these kinds of auditory conflicts. During an auditory flanker interference task, subjects were presented with sound patterns consisting of three different voices, from three different directions (45° left, straight ahead, 45° right), sounding out either the letters “A” or “O”. They were asked to discriminate which sound was presented centrally and ignore the flanking distracters that were phonetically either congruent (50%) or incongruent (50%) with the target. Our cortical MEG/EEG oscillatory estimates demonstrated a direct relationship between performance and brain activity, showing that efficient conflict resolution, as measured with reduced conflict-induced RT lags, is predicted by theta/alpha phase coupling between cACC and right lateral frontal cortex regions intersecting the right frontal eye fields (FEF) and DLPFC, as well as by increased pre-stimulus gamma (60–110 Hz) power in the left inferior fontal cortex. Notably, cACC connectivity patterns that correlated with behavioral conflict-resolution measures were found during both the pre-stimulus and the pre-response periods. Our data provide evidence that, instead of being only transiently activated upon conflict detection, cACC is involved in sustained engagement of attentional resources required for effective sound object selection performance. PMID:25343503

  3. Resting posterior versus frontal delta/theta EEG activity is associated with extraversion and the COMT VAL(158)MET polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Jan; Gatt, Justine Megan

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that resting posterior versus frontal EEG delta/theta activity (delta/theta Pz-Fz) is both sensitive to pharmacological manipulations of neural dopamine and associated with the agency facet of extraversion (i.e., a motivational disposition comprising enthusiasm, energy, assertiveness, achievement striving and social dominance). These observations suggest that posterior versus frontal resting EEG delta/theta activity may represent a useful marker for investigating the molecular genetic basis of extraversion. The present study aimed to test the novel hypothesis of an association between delta/theta Pz-Fz and a functional polymorphism of the enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT VAL(158)MET) involved in dopamine catabolism. This was conducted in a large EEG data set from the Brain Resource International Database (BRID; resting EEG from N=1093 healthy individuals, 382 of which also genotyped for COMT VAL(158)MET). In summary, we (1) showed for the first time that the VAL allele is associated with increased delta/theta Pz-Fz; (2) replicated the association between extraversion and delta/theta Pz-Fz in a large, heterogeneous sample including both genders; and (3) documented that the VAL allele of the COMT VAL(158)MET is associated with increased extraversion scores, as previously reported for an overlapping BRID sample. This coherent pattern of findings adds further support to the suggestion that the posterior-anterior distribution of resting EEG slow wave activity in the delta/theta range represents a useful tool for probing the dopaminergic basis of extraversion. PMID:20450956

  4. Neural mechanisms of infant learning: differences in frontal theta activity during object exploration modulate subsequent object recognition.

    PubMed

    Begus, Katarina; Southgate, Victoria; Gliga, Teodora

    2015-05-01

    Investigating learning mechanisms in infancy relies largely on behavioural measures like visual attention, which often fail to predict whether stimuli would be encoded successfully. This study explored EEG activity in the theta frequency band, previously shown to predict successful learning in adults, to directly study infants' cognitive engagement, beyond visual attention. We tested 11-month-old infants (N = 23) and demonstrated that differences in frontal theta-band oscillations, recorded during infants' object exploration, predicted differential subsequent recognition of these objects in a preferential-looking test. Given that theta activity is modulated by motivation to learn in adults, these findings set the ground for future investigation into the drivers of infant learning. PMID:26018832

  5. Neural mechanisms of infant learning: differences in frontal theta activity during object exploration modulate subsequent object recognition

    PubMed Central

    Begus, Katarina; Southgate, Victoria; Gliga, Teodora

    2015-01-01

    Investigating learning mechanisms in infancy relies largely on behavioural measures like visual attention, which often fail to predict whether stimuli would be encoded successfully. This study explored EEG activity in the theta frequency band, previously shown to predict successful learning in adults, to directly study infants' cognitive engagement, beyond visual attention. We tested 11-month-old infants (N = 23) and demonstrated that differences in frontal theta-band oscillations, recorded during infants' object exploration, predicted differential subsequent recognition of these objects in a preferential-looking test. Given that theta activity is modulated by motivation to learn in adults, these findings set the ground for future investigation into the drivers of infant learning. PMID:26018832

  6. EEG Theta Dynamics within Frontal and Parietal Cortices for Error Processing during Reaching Movements in a Prism Adaptation Study Altering Visuo-Motor Predictive Planning

    PubMed Central

    Bonfiglio, Luca; Minichilli, Fabrizio; Cantore, Nicoletta; Carboncini, Maria Chiara; Piccotti, Emily; Rossi, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of frontal midline theta (fmθ) is observed during error commission, but little is known about the role of theta oscillations in correcting motor behaviours. We investigate EEG activity of healthy partipants executing a reaching task under variable degrees of prism-induced visuo-motor distortion and visual occlusion of the initial arm trajectory. This task introduces directional errors of different magnitudes. The discrepancy between predicted and actual movement directions (i.e. the error), at the time when visual feedback (hand appearance) became available, elicits a signal that triggers on-line movement correction. Analysis were performed on 25 EEG channels. For each participant, the median value of the angular error of all reaching trials was used to partition the EEG epochs into high- and low-error conditions. We computed event-related spectral perturbations (ERSP) time-locked either to visual feedback or to the onset of movement correction. ERSP time-locked to the onset of visual feedback showed that fmθ increased in the high- but not in the low-error condition with an approximate time lag of 200 ms. Moreover, when single epochs were sorted by the degree of motor error, fmθ started to increase when a certain level of error was exceeded and, then, scaled with error magnitude. When ERSP were time-locked to the onset of movement correction, the fmθ increase anticipated this event with an approximate time lead of 50 ms. During successive trials, an error reduction was observed which was associated with indices of adaptations (i.e., aftereffects) suggesting the need to explore if theta oscillations may facilitate learning. To our knowledge this is the first study where the EEG signal recorded during reaching movements was time-locked to the onset of the error visual feedback. This allowed us to conclude that theta oscillations putatively generated by anterior cingulate cortex activation are implicated in error processing in semi-naturalistic motor

  7. Posterior versus frontal theta activity indexes approach motivation during affective autobiographical memories.

    PubMed

    Walden, K; Pornpattananangkul, N; Curlee, A; McAdams, D P; Nusslock, R

    2015-03-01

    Research has recently identified a promising neurophysiological marker of approach motivation involving posterior versus frontal (Pz - Fz) electroencephalographic (EEG) theta activity PFTA; Wacker, Chavanon, & Stemmler (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 91:171-187, 2006). Preliminary evidence indicated that PFTA is modulated by dopaminergic activity, thought to underlie appetitive tendencies, and that it indexes self-reported behavioral activation system (BAS) sensitivity. To date, research has largely relied on resting indices of PFTA and has yet to examine the relationship between PFTA and specific approach-related affective states generated by emotionally salient laboratory tasks. Accordingly, the present study evaluated PFTA both at rest and during an ecologically valid autobiographical memory task in which participants recalled personal life experiences involving a goal-striving, an anxious apprehension, a low-point (i.e., difficult), and a neutral memory while EEG data were recorded. In line with prediction, elevated PFTA was observed during both goal-striving and anxious apprehension autobiographical memories. PFTA was particularly elevated during anxious apprehension memories coded as being high on approach-related tendencies. Elevated PFTA during anxious apprehension is consistent with a growing literature indicating that anxious apprehension is associated with elevated approach- and reward-related brain function. Lastly, elevated resting PFTA was positively correlated with self-reported trait anger, a negatively valenced emotion characterized by approach-related tendencies. These results have implications for (a) enhancing our understanding of the neurophysiology of approach-related emotions, (b) establishing PFTA as an index of appetitive motivational states, and (c) clarifying our understanding of the neurophysiology and approach-related tendencies associated with both anxious apprehension and anger. PMID:25245178

  8. Emotional conflict processing induce boosted theta oscillation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianling; Liu, Chang; Chen, Xu

    2015-05-19

    Although previous studies have reported the neural correlates and dynamics of emotional conflict processing, the neural oscillatory features of such processing remain unclear. The present study uses time-frequency analysis to determine the event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP) characteristics underlying emotional conflict processing. Our behavioral results replicate previous findings of shorter response times and fewer response errors under the congruent condition relative to the incongruent condition, indicating a robust interference effect. Theta oscillatory activity was larger for the incongruent than for the congruent condition over frontal and frontal-central midline areas, reflecting a greater need for control under conditions of conflict. Moreover, the theta power difference was negatively associated with the RT difference, indicating that greater theta power leads to better behavioral performance. The present findings provide evidence that the theta oscillation is necessary for the control of emotional conflict. PMID:25863173

  9. Timing Tasks Synchronize Cerebellar and Frontal Ramping Activity and Theta Oscillations: Implications for Cerebellar Stimulation in Diseases of Impaired Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Krystal L.

    2016-01-01

    Timing is a fundamental and highly conserved mammalian capability, yet the underlying neural mechanisms are widely debated. Ramping activity of single neurons that gradually increase or decrease activity to encode the passage of time has been speculated to predict a behaviorally relevant temporal event. Cue-evoked low-frequency activity has also been implicated in temporal processing. Ramping activity and low-frequency oscillations occur throughout the brain and could indicate a network-based approach to timing. Temporal processing requires cognitive mechanisms of working memory, attention, and reasoning, which are dysfunctional in neuropsychiatric disease. Therefore, timing tasks could be used to probe cognition in animals with disease phenotypes. The medial frontal cortex and cerebellum are involved in cognition. Cerebellar stimulation has been shown to influence medial frontal activity and improve cognition in schizophrenia. However, the mechanism underlying the efficacy of cerebellar stimulation is unknown. Here, we discuss how timing tasks can be used to probe cerebellar interactions with the frontal cortex and the therapeutic potential of cerebellar stimulation. The goal of this theory and hypothesis manuscript is threefold. First, we will summarize evidence indicating that in addition to motor learning, timing tasks involve cognitive processes that are present within both the cerebellum and medial frontal cortex. Second, we propose methodologies to investigate the connections between these areas in patients with Parkinson’s disease, autism, and schizophrenia. Lastly, we hypothesize that cerebellar transcranial stimulation may rescue medial frontal ramping activity, theta oscillations, and timing abnormalities, thereby restoring executive function in diseases of impaired cognition. This hypothesis could inspire the use of timing tasks as biomarkers for neuronal and cognitive abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disease and promote the therapeutic potential of

  10. (No) time for control: Frontal theta dynamics reveal the cost of temporally guided conflict anticipation.

    PubMed

    van Driel, Joram; Swart, Jennifer C; Egner, Tobias; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Cohen, Michael X

    2015-12-01

    During situations of response conflict, cognitive control is characterized by prefrontal theta-band (3- to 8-Hz) activity. It has been shown that cognitive control can be triggered proactively by contextual cues that predict conflict. Here, we investigated whether a pretrial preparation interval could serve as such a cue. This would show that the temporal contingencies embedded in the task can be used to anticipate upcoming conflict. To this end, we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) from 30 human subjects while they performed a version of a Simon task in which the duration of a fixation cross between trials predicted whether the next trial would contain response conflict. Both their behavior and EEG activity showed a consistent but unexpected pattern of results: The conflict effect (increased reaction times and decreased accuracy on conflict as compared to nonconflict trials) was stronger when conflict was cued, and this was associated with stronger conflict-related midfrontal theta activity and functional connectivity. Interestingly, intervals that predicted conflict did show a pretarget increase in midfrontal theta power. These findings suggest that temporally guided expectations of conflict do heighten conflict anticipation, but also lead to less efficiently applied reactive control. We further explored this post-hoc interpretation by means of three behavioral follow-up experiments, in which we used nontemporal cues, semantically informative cues, and neutral cues. Together, this body of results suggests that the counterintuitive cost of conflict cueing may not be uniquely related to the temporal domain, but may instead be related to the implicitness and validity of the cue. PMID:26111755

  11. Human brain EEG indices of emotions: delineating responses to affective vocalizations by measuring frontal theta event-related synchronization.

    PubMed

    Bekkedal, Marni Y V; Rossi, John; Panksepp, Jaak

    2011-10-01

    At present there is no direct brain measure of basic emotional dynamics from the human brain. EEG provides non-invasive approaches for monitoring brain electrical activity to emotional stimuli. Event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) analysis, based on power shifts in specific frequency bands, has some potential as a method for differentiating responses to basic emotions as measured during brief presentations of affective stimuli. Although there appears to be fairly consistent theta ERS in frontal regions of the brain during the earliest phases of processing affective auditory stimuli, the patterns do not readily distinguish between specific emotions. To date it has not been possible to consistently differentiate brain responses to emotion-specific affective states or stimuli, and some evidence to suggests the theta ERS more likely measures general arousal processes rather than yielding veridical indices of specific emotional states. Perhaps cortical EEG patterns will never be able to be used to distinguish discrete emotional states from the surface of the brain. The implications and limitations of such approaches for understanding human emotions are discussed. PMID:21596060

  12. Reward feedback processing in children and adolescents: Medial frontal theta oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Michael J.; van Noordt, Stefon J.R.; Wu, Jia; Hommer, Rebecca E.; South, Mikle; Fearon, R. M. P.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2014-01-01

    We examined event-related electroencephalography (EEG) oscillations, including event-related spectral perturbations (ERSP) and intertrial coherence (ITC), to compare feedback processing during a chance-based reward vs. non-reward task in groups of 10-12-year-old (n = 42), 13-14-year-old (n = 34) and 15-17-year-olds (n = 32). Because few, if any studies have applied these analytic methods to examine feedback processing in children or adolescents, we used a fine-grained approach that explored one half hertz by 16 ms increments during feedback (no win vs. win events) in the theta (4-8 Hz) frequency band. Complex wavelet frequency decomposition revealed that no win feedback was associated with enhanced theta power and phase coherence. We observed condition and age-based differences for both ERSP and ITC, with stronger effects for ITC. The transition from childhood to early adolescence (13-14 yrs.) was a point of increased differentiation of ITC favoring no win vs. wins feedback and also compared to children or older adolescents, a point of heightened ITC for no win feedback (quadratic effect). PMID:24360036

  13. Morning nutrition and executive function processes in preadolescents: modulation of frontal event-related theta, beta and gamma EEG oscillations during a go/ no-go task

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Executive functions (i.e., goal-directed behavior such as inhibition and flexibility of action) have been linked to frontal brain regions and to covariations in oscillatory brain activity, e.g., theta and gamma activity. We studied the effects of morning nutritional status on executive function rel...

  14. Short theta burst stimulation to left frontal cortex prior to encoding enhances subsequent recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Demeter, Elise; Mirdamadi, Jasmine L; Meehan, Sean K; Taylor, Stephan F

    2016-08-01

    Deep semantic encoding of verbal stimuli can aid in later successful retrieval of those stimuli from long-term episodic memory. Evidence from numerous neuropsychological and neuroimaging experiments demonstrate regions in left prefrontal cortex, including left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), are important for processes related to encoding. Here, we investigated the relationship between left DLPFC activity during encoding and successful subsequent memory with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In a pair of experiments using a 2-session within-subjects design, we stimulated either left DLPFC or a control region (Vertex) with a single 2-s train of short theta burst stimulation (sTBS) during a semantic encoding task and then gave participants a recognition memory test. We found that subsequent memory was enhanced on the day left DLPFC was stimulated, relative to the day Vertex was stimulated, and that DLPFC stimulation also increased participants' confidence in their decisions during the recognition task. We also explored the time course of how long the effects of sTBS persisted. Our data suggest 2 s of sTBS to left DLPFC is capable of enhancing subsequent memory for items encoded up to 15 s following stimulation. Collectively, these data demonstrate sTBS is capable of enhancing long-term memory and provide evidence that TBS protocols are a potentially powerful tool for modulating cognitive function. PMID:27098772

  15. Successful memory encoding is associated with increased cross-frequency coupling between frontal theta and posterior gamma oscillations in human scalp-recorded EEG.

    PubMed

    Friese, Uwe; Köster, Moritz; Hassler, Uwe; Martens, Ulla; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson; Gruber, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Although previous studies have established that successful memory encoding is associated with increased synchronization of theta-band and gamma-band oscillations, it is unclear if there is a functional relationship between oscillations in these frequency bands. Using scalp-recorded EEG in healthy human participants, we demonstrate that cross-frequency coupling between frontal theta phase and posterior gamma power is enhanced during the encoding of visual stimuli which participants later on remember versus items which participants subsequently forget ("subsequent memory effect," SME). Conventional wavelet analyses and source localizations revealed SMEs in spectral power of theta-, alpha-, and gamma-band. Successful compared to unsuccessful encoding was reflected in increased theta-band activity in right frontal cortex as well as increased gamma-band activity in parietal-occipital regions. Moreover, decreased alpha-band activity in prefrontal and occipital cortex was also related to successful encoding. Overall, these findings support the idea that during the formation of new memories frontal cortex regions interact with cortical representations in posterior areas. PMID:23142278

  16. Human subthalamic nucleus-medial frontal cortex theta phase coherence is involved in conflict and error related cortical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Baltazar; Tan, Huiling; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Zaghloul, Kareem; Brown, Peter

    2016-08-15

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is thought to control the shift from automatic to controlled action selection when conflict is present or when mistakes have been recently committed. Growing evidence suggests that this process involves frequency specific communication in the theta (4-8Hz) band between the mPFC and the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which is the main target of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease. Key in this hypothesis is the finding that DBS can lead to impulsivity by disrupting the correlation between higher mPFC oscillations and slower reaction times during conflict. In order to test whether theta band coherence between the mPFC and the STN underlies adjustments to conflict and to errors, we simultaneously recorded mPFC and STN electrophysiological activity while DBS patients performed an arrowed flanker task. These recordings revealed higher theta phase coherence between the two sites during the high conflict trials relative to the low conflict trials. These differences were observed soon after conflicting arrows were displayed, but before a response was executed. Furthermore, trials that occurred after an error was committed showed higher phase coherence relative to trials that followed a correct trial, suggesting that mPFC-STN connectivity may also play a role in error related adjustments in behavior. Interestingly, the phase coherence we observed occurred before increases in theta power, implying that the theta phase and power may influence behavior at separate times during cortical monitoring. Finally, we showed that pre-stimulus differences in STN theta power were related to the reaction time on a given trial, which may help adjust behavior based on the probability of observing conflict during a task. PMID:27181763

  17. Effects of thienodiazepine derivatives, etizolam and clotiazepam on the appearance of Fm theta.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, J; Mukasa, H

    1992-12-01

    The effects of new thienodiazepine anxiolytics, etizolam and clotiazepam, on the appearance of frontal midline theta activity (Fm theta) were studied by the double-blind crossover method. The results were as follows; 1) Both clotiazepam and placebo tended to increase the Fm theta appearance in all subjects, but etizolam showed no such tendency. 2) Clotiazepam significantly increased the Fm theta appearance as compared with placebo in subjects with a high neurotic tendency (N-scale of MPI above 19). 3) Clotiazepam tended to increase the Fm theta appearance as compared with placebo and etizolam in subjects with a high anxiety level (MAS score above 14). 4) Apparently more subjects complained of drowsiness after the administration of etizolam than after clotiazepam or placebo. PMID:1363923

  18. Theta oscillations during the processing of monetary loss and gain: A perspective on gender and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Kamarajan, Chella; Rangaswamy, Madhavi; Chorlian, David B.; Manz, Niklas; Tang, Yongqiang; Pandey, Ashwini K.; Roopesh, Bangalore N.; Stimus, Arthur T.; Porjesz, Bernice

    2008-01-01

    Event-related oscillations (EROs) have proved to be very useful in the understanding of a variety of neurocognitive processes including reward/outcome processing. In the present study, theta power (4.0–7.0 Hz) following outcome stimuli in the time window of the N2-P3 complex (200–500 ms) was analyzed in healthy normals (20 males and 20 females) while performing a gambling task that involved monetary loss and gain. The main aim was to analyze outcome processing in terms of event-related theta power in the context of valence, amount, gender, and impulsivity. The S-transform was used for the signal processing of the ERO data in terms of time-frequency-power. Results from filtered waveforms showed a partially consistent phase-alignment of the increased theta activity corresponding to N2 and P3 components following the outcome stimuli. Gain conditions produced more theta power than loss conditions. While there was anterior involvement in both gain and loss, posterior activation was stronger during gain conditions than during loss conditions. Females exhibited posterior maxima during gain conditions while males had an anterior maxima during both loss and gain conditions. The current source density of theta activity in females involved larger areas of the scalp including a bilateral frontal activity while males predominantly had a frontal midline activity. Theta power was significantly higher in females than males across all conditions. Low theta (4.0–5.5 Hz) predominantly contributed to the posterior activity during gain conditions. High theta (5.5–7.0 Hz) was more associated with impulsivity measures than low theta activity. These findings may offer valuable clues to understand outcome processing, impulsivity, and gender differences. PMID:18616934

  19. Mathematically gifted adolescents mobilize enhanced workspace configuration of theta cortical network during deductive reasoning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Gan, J Q; Wang, H

    2015-03-19

    Previous studies have established the importance of the fronto-parietal brain network in the information processing of reasoning. At the level of cortical source analysis, this eletroencepalogram (EEG) study investigates the functional reorganization of the theta-band (4-8Hz) neurocognitive network of mathematically gifted adolescents during deductive reasoning. Depending on the dense increase of long-range phase synchronizations in the reasoning process, math-gifted adolescents show more significant adaptive reorganization and enhanced "workspace" configuration in the theta network as compared with average-ability control subjects. The salient areas are mainly located in the anterior cortical vertices of the fronto-parietal network. Further correlation analyses have shown that the enhanced workspace configuration with respect to the global topological metrics of the theta network in math-gifted subjects is correlated with the intensive frontal midline theta (fm theta) response that is related to strong neural effort for cognitive events. These results suggest that by investing more cognitive resources math-gifted adolescents temporally mobilize an enhanced task-related global neuronal workspace, which is manifested as a highly integrated fronto-parietal information processing network during the reasoning process. PMID:25595993

  20. Congenital midline cervical cleft.

    PubMed

    Agag, Richard; Sacks, Justin; Silver, Lester

    2007-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare disorder of the ventral neck that is clinically evident at birth and must be differentiated from the more common thyroglossal duct cyst. The case of CMCC presented here was associated with chromosomes 13/14 de novo Robertsonian translocations as well as midline deformities including a sacral tuft and a minor tongue-tie. The case is presented as well as discussion of histopathology, embryology, and surgical treatment. PMID:17214531

  1. Positive Emotional Experience: Induced by Vibroacoustic Stimulation Using a Body Monochord in Patients with Psychosomatic Disorders: Is Associated with an Increase in EEG-Theta and a Decrease in EEG-Alpha Power.

    PubMed

    Sandler, H; Tamm, S; Fendel, U; Rose, M; Klapp, B F; Bösel, R

    2016-07-01

    Relaxation and meditation techniques are generally characterized by focusing attention, which is associated with an increase of frontal EEG Theta. Some studies on music perception suggest an activation of Frontal Midline Theta during emotionally positive attribution, others display a lateralization of electrocortical processes in the attribution of music induced emotion of different valence. The present study examined the effects of vibroacoustic stimulation using a Body Monochord and the conventional relaxation music from an audio CD on the spontaneous EEG of patients suffering from psychosomatic disorders (N = 60). Each treatment took about 20 min and was presented to the patients in random order. Subjective experience was recorded via self-rating scale. EEG power spectra of the Theta, Alpha-1 and Alpha-2 bands were analysed and compard between the two treatment conditions. There was no lateralization of electrocortical activity in terms of the emotional experience of the musical pieces. A reduction in Alpha-2 power occurred during both treatments. An emotionally positive attribution of the experience of the vibroacoustically induced relaxation state is characterized by a more pronounced release of control. In the context of focused attention this is interpreted as flow experience. The spontaneous EEG showed an increase in Theta power, particularly in the frontal medial and central medial area, and a greater reduction in Alpha-2 power. The intensity of positive emotional feelings during the CD music showed no significant effect on the increase in Theta power. PMID:26936595

  2. Congenital midline nasofrontal masses.

    PubMed

    Saettele, Megan; Alexander, Alan; Markovich, Brian; Morelli, John; Lowe, Lisa H

    2012-09-01

    Congenital midline nasal masses are uncommon anomalies including nasal dermoids/epidermoids, nasal glial heterotopias and encephaloceles. These lesions can occur at the nasal bridge, extend intranasally and have intracranial extension with communication to the subarachnoid space. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of these lesions is critically important for presurgical planning and prevention of potentially fatal complications. Neuroimaging is essential in the evaluation of congenital midline nasal masses to identify the specific type of lesion, evaluate for the presence of intracranial extension and allow for appropriate presurgical planning. PMID:22648391

  3. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Glastonbury, Christine; Marcovici, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft is a rare anomaly that typically presents in the neonatal period as a thin suprasternal vertical band of erythematous skin with a nipple-like projection superiorly, which may exude fluid. We present the clinical and pathophysiologic features and the imaging findings of this uncommon, and rarely described entity in a newborn girl. PMID:25926928

  4. Midline thalamic neurons are differentially engaged during hippocampus network oscillations.

    PubMed

    Lara-Vásquez, Ariel; Espinosa, Nelson; Durán, Ernesto; Stockle, Marcelo; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The midline thalamus is reciprocally connected with the medial temporal lobe, where neural circuitry essential for spatial navigation and memory formation resides. Yet, little information is available on the dynamic relationship between activity patterns in the midline thalamus and medial temporal lobe. Here, we report on the functional heterogeneity of anatomically-identified thalamic neurons and the differential modulation of their activity with respect to dorsal hippocampal rhythms in the anesthetized mouse. Midline thalamic neurons expressing the calcium-binding protein calretinin, irrespective of their selective co-expression of calbindin, discharged at overall low levels, did not increase their activity during hippocampal theta oscillations, and their firing rates were inhibited during hippocampal sharp wave-ripples. Conversely, thalamic neurons lacking calretinin discharged at higher rates, increased their activity during hippocampal theta waves, but remained unaffected during sharp wave-ripples. Our results indicate that the midline thalamic system comprises at least two different classes of thalamic projection neuron, which can be partly defined by their differential engagement by hippocampal pathways during specific network oscillations that accompany distinct behavioral contexts. Thus, different midline thalamic neuronal populations might be selectively recruited to support distinct stages of memory processing, consistent with the thalamus being pivotal in the dialogue of cortical circuits. PMID:27411890

  5. Midline thalamic neurons are differentially engaged during hippocampus network oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Vásquez, Ariel; Espinosa, Nelson; Durán, Ernesto; Stockle, Marcelo; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The midline thalamus is reciprocally connected with the medial temporal lobe, where neural circuitry essential for spatial navigation and memory formation resides. Yet, little information is available on the dynamic relationship between activity patterns in the midline thalamus and medial temporal lobe. Here, we report on the functional heterogeneity of anatomically-identified thalamic neurons and the differential modulation of their activity with respect to dorsal hippocampal rhythms in the anesthetized mouse. Midline thalamic neurons expressing the calcium-binding protein calretinin, irrespective of their selective co-expression of calbindin, discharged at overall low levels, did not increase their activity during hippocampal theta oscillations, and their firing rates were inhibited during hippocampal sharp wave-ripples. Conversely, thalamic neurons lacking calretinin discharged at higher rates, increased their activity during hippocampal theta waves, but remained unaffected during sharp wave-ripples. Our results indicate that the midline thalamic system comprises at least two different classes of thalamic projection neuron, which can be partly defined by their differential engagement by hippocampal pathways during specific network oscillations that accompany distinct behavioral contexts. Thus, different midline thalamic neuronal populations might be selectively recruited to support distinct stages of memory processing, consistent with the thalamus being pivotal in the dialogue of cortical circuits. PMID:27411890

  6. Prefrontal and midline interactions mediating behavioural control

    PubMed Central

    Fassbender, Catherine; Hester, Robert; Murphy, Kevin; Foxe, John J.; Foxe, Deirdre M.; Garavan, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Top-down control processes are thought to interact with bottom-up stimulus-driven task demands to facilitate the smooth execution of behaviour. Frontal and midline areas are believed to subserve these control processes but their distinct roles and the interactions between them remain to be fully elucidated. In this fMRI study, we utilised a GO/NO-GO task with cued and uncued inhibitory events to investigate the effect of cue-induced levels of top-down control on NO-GO trial response conflict. We found that on a within-subjects, trial-for-trial basis, high levels of top-down control, as indexed by left dorsolateral prefrontal activation prior to the NO-GO, resulted in lower levels of activation on the NO-GO trial in the pre-supplementary motor area. These results suggest that prefrontal and midline regions work together to implement cognitive control and reveal that intra-subject variability is reflected in these lateral and midline interactions. PMID:19120444

  7. Pediatric frontal mucocele secondary to a bifid frontal sinus septum.

    PubMed

    Plikaitis, Christina M; Purzycki, Adam R; Couture, Daniel; David, Lisa R

    2010-09-01

    A mucocele is a mucus-containing sac lined with epithelium that arises within a sinus when its drainage is compromised. The frontal sinus is the most common location, with frontal mucocele development occurring when the nasofrontal duct becomes obstructed because of polyps, bone tumors, prior surgery, sinusitis, trauma, or anatomic variation. We report an unusual case of a sterile pediatric frontal mucocele presenting as a slowly enlarging forehead mass due to a bifid frontal sinus septum. A 9-year-old girl presented to the craniofacial clinic for evaluation of a right frontal mass that had been slowly growing over the past year. She was otherwise healthy and had no history of previous trauma or sinus infections. Computed tomography (CT) scan results revealed a localized frontal fluid collection with protrusion and thinning of the anterior frontal bone between 2 midline bony septii. Surgical cranialization of the frontal sinus was performed. The anatomy of her lesion seen both on CT scan and intraoperatively likely explains this unusual case presentation. Instead of the usual inciting event of an intact frontal sinus drainage system becoming blocked, this patient seemed to have a primary developmental lack of any drainage system that led to her mucocele. During formation of her frontal sinus, she developed a bifid septum within the midline that excluded a portion of her frontal sinus from the lateral nasofrontal ducts. With mucus-producing epithelium trapped within these bony confines, pressure began to mount with expansion and thinning of the bone both anteriorly and posteriorly. The lack of any infectious symptoms and sterile culture results may support that this space developed primarily and was never in continuity with the external drainage system. Only 4 other patients have been reported with asymptomatic forehead swelling as the only presenting symptom, with the age ranging from 33 to 79 years. This patient represents the first clinical report of a congenital

  8. Management of Midline Facial Clefts.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sobhan; Sabhlok, Samrat; Panda, Pankaj Kumar; Khatri, Isha

    2015-12-01

    Median or midline facial clefts are rare anomalies of developmental origin, etiology of whose occurrence is still unknown precisely. The most basic presentation of midline facial clefts is in the form of a Median cleft lip which is defined as any congenital vertical cleft through the centre of the upper lip. First described by Bechard in 1823, it is the most common amongst all atypical clefts reported. The incidence is about 1:10,00,000 births. This may occur as a sporadic event or as a part of an inherited sequence of anomalies. It arises embryologically from incomplete fusion of the medial nasal prominences. The authors present a series of eight cases with varying degrees of midline facial clefts. This review article aims to give a broad idea on the various classifications used for further understanding of midline facial clefts and a brief idea about the various surgical management techniques used in the repair of these facial clefts. PMID:26604459

  9. Theta and Alpha Band Modulations Reflect Error-Related Adjustments in the Auditory Condensation Task

    PubMed Central

    Novikov, Nikita A.; Bryzgalov, Dmitri V.; Chernyshev, Boris V.

    2015-01-01

    Error commission leads to adaptive adjustments in a number of brain networks that subserve goal-directed behavior, resulting in either enhanced stimulus processing or increased motor threshold depending on the nature of errors committed. Here, we studied these adjustments by analyzing post-error modulations of alpha and theta band activity in the auditory version of the two-choice condensation task, which is highly demanding for sustained attention while involves no inhibition of prepotent responses. Errors were followed by increased frontal midline theta (FMT) activity, as well as by enhanced alpha band suppression in the parietal and the left central regions; parietal alpha suppression correlated with the task performance, left central alpha suppression correlated with the post-error slowing, and FMT increase correlated with both behavioral measures. On post-error correct trials, left-central alpha band suppression started earlier before the response, and the response was followed by weaker FMT activity, as well as by enhanced alpha band suppression distributed over the entire scalp. These findings indicate that several separate neuronal networks are involved in post-error adjustments, including the midfrontal performance monitoring network, the parietal attentional network, and the sensorimotor network. Supposedly, activity within these networks is rapidly modulated after errors, resulting in optimization of their functional state on the subsequent trials, with corresponding changes in behavioral measures. PMID:26733266

  10. Middle interhemispheric variant of holoprosencephaly: A rare midline malformation

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, P. Prathiba; Gadodia, Ankur; Priyatharshini, P.

    2015-01-01

    Middle interhemispheric variant (MIH) of holoprosencephaly (HPE) or syntelencephaly is a rare variant of HPE characterized by abnormal midline union of the posterior frontal and parietal lobes with variable fusion of thalami. It varies from classic HPE in embryopathogenesis, severity of fusion of brain structures, associated craniofacial anomalies and clinical presentation. We report a case of MIH in a 5-year-old girl, who presented with severe developmental delay and discuss the features differentiating it from other more common forms of HPE. PMID:26557166

  11. Middle interhemispheric variant of holoprosencephaly: A rare midline malformation.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, P Prathiba; Gadodia, Ankur; Priyatharshini, P

    2015-01-01

    Middle interhemispheric variant (MIH) of holoprosencephaly (HPE) or syntelencephaly is a rare variant of HPE characterized by abnormal midline union of the posterior frontal and parietal lobes with variable fusion of thalami. It varies from classic HPE in embryopathogenesis, severity of fusion of brain structures, associated craniofacial anomalies and clinical presentation. We report a case of MIH in a 5-year-old girl, who presented with severe developmental delay and discuss the features differentiating it from other more common forms of HPE. PMID:26557166

  12. Age-related oscillatory theta modulation of multisensory integration in frontocentral regions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianyi; Bi, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Mengmeng; Wang, Wenhui; Yao, Zhiqi; Yang, Weiping; Wu, Jinglong

    2016-08-01

    This study used electroencephalogram measurements to investigate the effects of aging on oscillatory theta modulation during an audiovisual discrimination task. By a wavelet-based time-frequency analysis, age-related theta oscillation response differences were observed within a relatively restricted time range (0-500 ms) over frontal-central regions. Older adults showed stronger theta spectral power during visual and audiovisual stimuli in the left frontal regions; however, young adults showed stronger theta spectral power during auditory and audiovisual stimuli in the central regions. These findings suggest that multisensory oscillatory theta responses differ according to age, which further proves that the left frontal regions play an important role in audiovisual integration. PMID:27272690

  13. Frontal Oscillatory Dynamics Predict Feedback Learning and Action Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Vijver, Irene; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Cohen, Michael X.

    2011-01-01

    Frontal oscillatory dynamics in the theta (4-8 Hz) and beta (20-30 Hz) frequency bands have been implicated in cognitive control processes. Here we investigated the changes in coordinated activity within and between frontal brain areas during feedback-based response learning. In a time estimation task, participants learned to press a button after…

  14. Self-Related Processing and Deactivation of Cortical Midline Regions in Disorders of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Julia Sophia; Höller, Yvonne; Bergmann, Jürgen; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Kronbichler, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Self-related stimuli activate anterior parts of cortical midline regions, which normally show task-induced deactivation. Deactivation in medial posterior and frontal regions is associated with the ability to focus attention on the demands of the task, and therefore, with consciousness. Studies investigating patients with impaired consciousness, that is, patients in minimally conscious state and patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (formerly vegetative state), demonstrate that these patients show responses to self-related content in the anterior cingulate cortex. However, it remains unclear if these responses are an indication for conscious processing of stimuli or are due to automatic processing. To shed further light on this issue, we investigated responses of cortical midline regions to the own and another name in 27 patients with a disorder of consciousness and compared them to task-induced deactivation. While almost all of the control subjects responding to the own name demonstrated higher activation due to the self-related content in anterior midline regions and additional deactivation, none of the responding patients did so. Differences between groups showed a similar pattern of findings. Despite the relation between behavioral responsiveness in patients and activation in response to the own name, the findings of this study do not provide evidence for a direct association of activation in anterior midline regions and conscious processing. The deficits in processing of self-referential content in anterior midline regions may rather be due to general impairments in cognitive processing and not particularly linked to impaired consciousness. PMID:23986685

  15. Resting state theta band source distribution and functional connectivity in remitted schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Shreekantiah Umesh, D; Tikka, Sai Krishna; Goyal, Nishant; Nizamie, S Haque; Sinha, Vinod Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Increased resting theta activity is one consistent observation occurring during all the phases of schizophrenia. However, the resting theta oscillations during the remission phase are yet unclear. We studied resting theta current source density and functional connectivity in remitted schizophrenia and compared with healthy controls. Significantly increased current source density was found in the dominant anterior cingulate cortex. Increased connectivity between the inferior parietal lobe bilaterally and between the left inferior parietal lobe and right middle frontal gyrus was also found. It may be concluded that schizophrenia patients have aberrant regional theta band current source density and functional connectivity even during remission. PMID:27484634

  16. Limbic circuitry of the midline thalamus.

    PubMed

    Vertes, Robert P; Linley, Stephanie B; Hoover, Walter B

    2015-07-01

    The thalamus was subdivided into three major groups: sensorimotor nuclei (or principal/relay nuclei), limbic nuclei and nuclei bridging these two domains. Limbic nuclei of thalamus (or 'limbic thalamus') consist of the anterior nuclei, midline nuclei, medial division of the mediodorsal nucleus (MDm) and central medial nucleus (CM) of the intralaminar complex. The midline nuclei include the paraventricular (PV) and paratenial (PT) nuclei, dorsally, and the reuniens (RE) and rhomboid (RH) nuclei, ventrally. The 'limbic' thalamic nuclei predominantly connect with limbic-related structures and serve a direct role in limbic-associated functions. Regarding the midline nuclei, RE/RH mainly target limbic cortical structures, particularly the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Accordingly, RE/RH participate in functions involving interactions of the HF and mPFC. By contrast, PV/PT mainly project to limbic subcortical structures, particularly the amygdala and nucleus accumbens, and hence are critically involved in affective behaviors such as stress/anxiety, feeding behavior, and drug seeking activities. The anatomical/functional characteristics of MDm and CM are very similar to those of the midline nuclei and hence the collection of nuclei extending dorsoventrally along the midline/paramidline of the thalamus constitute the core of the 'limbic thalamus'. PMID:25616182

  17. LIMBIC CIRCUITRY OF THE MIDLINE THALAMUS

    PubMed Central

    Vertes, Robert P.; Linley, Stephanie B.; Hoover, Walter B.

    2016-01-01

    The thalamus was subdivided into three major groups: sensorimotor nuclei (or principal/relay nuclei), limbic nuclei and nuclei bridging these two domains. Limbic nuclei of thalamus (or ‘limbic thalamus’) consist of the anterior nuclei, midline nuclei, medial division of the mediodorsal nucleus (MDm) and central medial nucleus (CM) of the intralaminar complex. The midline nuclei include the paraventricular (PV) and paratenial (PT) nuclei, dorsally, and the reuniens (RE) and rhomboid (RH) nuclei, ventrally. The ‘limbic’ thalamic nuclei predominantly connect with limbic-related structures and serve a direct role in limbic–associated functions. Regarding the midline nuclei, RE/RH mainly target limbic cortical structures, particularly the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Accordingly, RE/RH participate in functions involving interactions of the HF and mPFC. By contrast, PV/PT mainly project to limbic subcortical structures, particularly the amygdala and nucleus accumbens, and hence are critically involved in affective behaviors such as stress/anxiety, feeding behavior, and drug seeking activities. The anatomical/functional characteristics of MDm and CM are very similar to those of the midline nuclei and hence the collection of nuclei extending dorsoventrally along the midline/paramidline of the thalamus constitute the core of the ‘limbic thalamus’. PMID:25616182

  18. Revisiting the Factors Underlying Maxillary Midline Diastema

    PubMed Central

    Jaija, Abdullah M. Zakria; El-Beialy, Amr Ragab; Mostafa, Yehya A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to analyze the etiological factors underlying the presence of maxillary midline diastema in a sample of orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods. One hundred patients who fulfill the inclusion criteria were selected from 1355 patients seeking orthodontic treatment. The pretreatment orthodontic records were analyzed. The width of the maxillary midline diastema was measured clinically with a digital caliper at two levels: the mesioincisal angles of the central incisors and five millimeters from the incisal edge. The two measurements were averaged, and patients with diastema of more than 0.5 millimeter in width were enrolled. Results. Diastema is a multifactorial clinical finding with more than one underlying etiological cause. The interrelationship between the familial pattern of midline diastema and the microdontia, macroglossia, labial frenum, and alveolar cleft conforms was clear. The effect of a mesiodens and the upper lateral incisor whether bilaterally missing, unerupted, or peg shaped was minimal. Conclusion. Etiological factors underlying maxillary midline diastema are interconnected. Using a checklist as a guide during handling maxillary midline diastema is important in the different stages of treatment. PMID:27239374

  19. Revisiting the Factors Underlying Maxillary Midline Diastema.

    PubMed

    Jaija, Abdullah M Zakria; El-Beialy, Amr Ragab; Mostafa, Yehya A

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to analyze the etiological factors underlying the presence of maxillary midline diastema in a sample of orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods. One hundred patients who fulfill the inclusion criteria were selected from 1355 patients seeking orthodontic treatment. The pretreatment orthodontic records were analyzed. The width of the maxillary midline diastema was measured clinically with a digital caliper at two levels: the mesioincisal angles of the central incisors and five millimeters from the incisal edge. The two measurements were averaged, and patients with diastema of more than 0.5 millimeter in width were enrolled. Results. Diastema is a multifactorial clinical finding with more than one underlying etiological cause. The interrelationship between the familial pattern of midline diastema and the microdontia, macroglossia, labial frenum, and alveolar cleft conforms was clear. The effect of a mesiodens and the upper lateral incisor whether bilaterally missing, unerupted, or peg shaped was minimal. Conclusion. Etiological factors underlying maxillary midline diastema are interconnected. Using a checklist as a guide during handling maxillary midline diastema is important in the different stages of treatment. PMID:27239374

  20. Midline lateralization thyroplasty for adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, N; Tsuji, D H; Yamamoto, Y; Iizuka, Y

    2000-02-01

    Midline lateralization thyroplasty was successfully performed on a patient with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. The thyroid cartilage was incised at the midline, and a 3 x 2-mm perforation was made at the anterior commissure to widen it. The perforation was closed with a free composite graft taken from the upper edge of the thyroid ala, and the incised thyroid cartilage edges were kept separated 4 mm apart with silicone wedges. A part of the sternohyoid muscle was rotated to seal any leak from the perforation. The postoperative course was uneventful. The voice has been restored to normal, and there is no sign of recurrence of the symptom so far, as of 1 year 5 months postoperative. Although a longer follow-up is needed, this case indicates that midline type II thyroplasty could be a useful treatment for adductor spasmodic dysphonia. PMID:10685572

  1. In vitro thermosensitivity of the midline thalamus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travis, Kathleen A.; Bockholt, H. Jeremy; Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M.

    1995-01-01

    This study compared the thermosensitivity and spontaneous activity of thatamic midline neurons with those of neurons in areas widely regarded to be involved in thermoregulation (preoptic/anterior hypothalamus and posterior hypothalamus). In vitro single unit recordings were made from neurons within the thalamic midline nuclei, the preoptic/anterior hypothalamus and posterior hypothalamus prior to and during a temperature change 3-7 C above and below 37 C. There were no significant differences in the degree of thermosensitivity or the proportion of thermosensitive neurons in the three areas. In each area examined, the thermosensitive neurons had a spontaneous activity which was significantly greater than that of the temperature-insensitive neurons. The results suggest that structures of the midline thalamus may play a role similar to that of the preoptic/anterior hypothalamus and posterior hypothalamus in the processing of temperature related information.

  2. Understanding the theta aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fear, Robert; Milan, Steve; Carter, Jennifer; Maggiolo, Romain; Fazakerley, Andrew; Dandouras, Iannis; Mende, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The theta aurora, first observed by Dynamics Explorer in the 1980s, is a configuration of the Earth's aurora in which auroral emissions extend into and across the polar cap in the form of a transpolar arc. It is well established that the theta aurora occurs predominantly when the interplanetary magnetic field has a northward component, but over the last thirty years various mechanisms have been put forward to explain this intriguing phenomenon. In the last couple of years, a range of evidence has accumulated which strongly suggests that the transpolar arc is formed as proposed by Milan et al. (2005): magnetotail reconnection occurs during intervals of northward IMF, which results in a local "wedge" of closed magnetospheric flux that remains trapped in the magnetotail. Precipitation on these closed field lines results in the transpolar arc analogously to the formation of the aurora in the main oval. Evidence for magnetotail reconnection as the cause of the theta aurora includes the timescales necessary to influence the location at which the transpolar arc forms, and the presence of characteristic ionospheric flows which are excited by magnetotail reconnection and which are statistically associated with transpolar arcs (Fear & Milan, 2012a,b). Most recently, direct observation has been made of a localised wedge of closed magnetic flux, "trapped" in the lobe, which was observed to move back and forth in a manner which (to our knowledge) can only be explained by the magnetotail reconnection mechanism (Fear et al., 2014). In this talk, we summarise the evidence for the formation of the theta aurora by magnetotail reconnection, and discuss the remaining challenges in obtaining a comprehensive understanding of this spectacular phenomenon.

  3. Evidence for the "midline" hypothesis in associated defects of laterality formation and multiple midline anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Barness, E; Debich-Spicer, D; Cohen, M M; Opitz, J M

    2001-07-15

    A male infant was liveborn at 38 weeks of gestation to a G4P1AB2, 22-year-old, mother. Polyhydramnios and multiple congenital anomalies were noted by ultrasonography; the infant died 5 min after birth. At autopsy, the infant had multiple defects of blastogenesis including midline anomalies with asplenia and abnormalities of laterality formation. The laterality defects were unusual in that they combined asplenia with hypoplastic, symmetrically unilobate lungs and bilateral hyparterial bronchi more consistent with polysplenia, abdominal situs inversus with midline stomach, symmetric liver, and left gallbladder. No intracardiac abnormalities were present, but there was azygous continuation of the inferior vena cava. Additional multiple midline defects included bronchoesophageal fistula, duodenal atresia, absence of posterior leaf of diaphragm; horseshoe adrenal gland; microcephaly; Dandy-Walker anomaly with agenesis of cerebellar vermis and occipital encephalocele; holoprosencephaly with orbital encephalocele, midline defect of the orbital plate of the skull, bilateral anophthalmia, double proboscis with bilateral choanal atresia, midline upper lip and palatal cleft; single-lobed thyroid; hypoplastic external genitalia with midline cleft of scrotum, long tapering fingers, and defects of the cranium at the sites of orbital and occipital encephaloceles. Defects of laterality frequently are associated with other complex midline anomalies, which both result from a disturbance of pattern formation during blastogenesis, i.e., the induction of the progenitor fields. The latter are the result of the establishment of upstream expression domains of growth and transcription factors and other morphogens. Many of these and other genetic systems, expressed asymmetrically around the midline, are responsible for laterality formation and are the result of upstream and subsequent downstream gene expression cascades through the expression of genes such as HOX genes; bFGF; transforming

  4. Pre-stimulus thalamic theta power predicts human memory formation.

    PubMed

    Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M; Zaehle, Tino; Voges, Jürgen; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Buentjen, Lars; Kopitzki, Klaus; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Knight, Robert T; Rugg, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Pre-stimulus theta (4-8Hz) power in the hippocampus and neocortex predicts whether a memory for a subsequent event will be formed. Anatomical studies reveal thalamus-hippocampal connectivity, and lesion, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological studies show that memory processing involves the dorsomedial (DMTN) and anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN). The small size and deep location of these nuclei have limited real-time study of their activity, however, and it is unknown whether pre-stimulus theta power predictive of successful memory formation is also found in these subcortical structures. We recorded human electrophysiological data from the DMTN and ATN of 7 patients receiving deep brain stimulation for refractory epilepsy. We found that greater pre-stimulus theta power in the right DMTN was associated with successful memory encoding, predicting both behavioral outcome and post-stimulus correlates of successful memory formation. In particular, significant correlations were observed between right DMTN theta power and both frontal theta and right ATN gamma (32-50Hz) phase alignment, and frontal-ATN theta-gamma cross-frequency coupling. We draw the following primary conclusions. Our results provide direct electrophysiological evidence in humans of a role for the DMTN as well as the ATN in memory formation. Furthermore, prediction of subsequent memory performance by pre-stimulus thalamic oscillations provides evidence that post-stimulus differences in thalamic activity that index successful and unsuccessful encoding reflect brain processes specifically underpinning memory formation. Finally, the findings broaden the understanding of brain states that facilitate memory encoding to include subcortical as well as cortical structures. PMID:27208861

  5. Ramanujan's mock theta functions.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael; Ono, Ken; Rolen, Larry

    2013-04-01

    In his famous deathbed letter, Ramanujan introduced the notion of a mock theta function, and he offered some alleged examples. Recent work by Zwegers [Zwegers S (2001) Contemp Math 291:268-277 and Zwegers S (2002) PhD thesis (Univ of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)] has elucidated the theory encompassing these examples. They are holomorphic parts of special harmonic weak Maass forms. Despite this understanding, little attention has been given to Ramanujan's original definition. Here, we prove that Ramanujan's examples do indeed satisfy his original definition. PMID:23536292

  6. The theta aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Craven, J. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Shawhan, S. D.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Chappell, C. R.; Waite, J. H.; Maynard, N. C.; Sugiura, M.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive review is presented of the characteristics of theta aurora as revealed from four imaging efforts with the DE 1 and 2 satellites. The theta aurora consists of an auroral oval with a sun-aligned arc extending from the dayside to the nightside sectors of the oval. The DE 1 spacecraft provided high altitude simultaneous measurements of the electric and magnetic fields and plasma and the DE 2 collected equivalent low altitude data on the four events. The plasma was found to convect sunward when the transpolar arc appeared, while the convection was antisunward in other regions over the polar cap. The arc plasmas featured field-aligned electron acceleration into the polar atmosphere and field-aligned current sheets, both of which were sparse over the rest of the polar cap. The ions originated in the ionosphere and the solar wind; ions over the rest of the polar cap mainly arrived from the magnetosphere. Further discussions are provided of the dominant electrons and ions and the associated flow directions into and out of the various regions of the pole, similarities between the transpolar arc and the auroral oval, and interactions between the ionosphere and the auroral phenomena.

  7. Midline Prostatic Cyst Marsupialization Using Holmium Laser.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Mehmet; Goger, Yunus Emre; Piskin, Mesut; Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Many of the prostatic cysts are asymptomatic and only 5% are symptomatic (Hamper et al., 1990; Higashi et al., 1990). These symptoms include pelvic pain, hematospermia, infertility, voiding dysfunction, prostatitis-like syndrome, and painful ejaculation. Treatment of prostatic cysts includes TRUSG guided drainage, endoscopic transurethral resection, and in some cases even open surgery. In the literature, endoscopic interventions use marsupialization of the midline prostatic cyst with transurethral resection (TUR) or transurethral incision with endoscopic urethrotomy (Dik et al., 1996; Terris, 1995). Holmium: YAG laser was employed for the marsupialization of the cyst wall in midline prostatic cyst treatment for the first time in the present study. Symptoms, treatment, and follow-up are presented in this paper. PMID:26101688

  8. Midline Prostatic Cyst Marsupialization Using Holmium Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Mehmet; Goger, Yunus Emre; Piskin, Mesut; Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Many of the prostatic cysts are asymptomatic and only 5% are symptomatic (Hamper et al., 1990; Higashi et al., 1990). These symptoms include pelvic pain, hematospermia, infertility, voiding dysfunction, prostatitis-like syndrome, and painful ejaculation. Treatment of prostatic cysts includes TRUSG guided drainage, endoscopic transurethral resection, and in some cases even open surgery. In the literature, endoscopic interventions use marsupialization of the midline prostatic cyst with transurethral resection (TUR) or transurethral incision with endoscopic urethrotomy (Dik et al., 1996; Terris, 1995). Holmium: YAG laser was employed for the marsupialization of the cyst wall in midline prostatic cyst treatment for the first time in the present study. Symptoms, treatment, and follow-up are presented in this paper. PMID:26101688

  9. TMS-induced theta phase synchrony reveals a bottom-up network in working memory.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Eri; Kitajo, Keiichi; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2016-05-27

    Global theta phase synchronization between the frontal and sensory areas has been suggested to connect the relevant areas for executive processes of working memory (WM). However, little is known regarding network directionality (i.e. top-down or bottom-up) of this interaction. To address the issue, the present study conducted transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-electroencephalography (EEG) experiment during WM tasks. Results showed that TMS-induced increases in theta phase synchronization were observed only when TMS was delivered to the sensory areas but not the frontal area. These findings suggest that network directionality represented in WM is bottom-up rather than top-down. PMID:27063284

  10. Theta vocabulary II. Multidimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchev, S.; Zabrodin, A.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that the Jacobi and Riemann identities of degree four for the multidimensional theta functions as well as the Weierstrass identities emerge as algebraic consequences of the fundamental multidimensional binary identities connecting the theta functions with Riemann matrices τ and 2 τ.

  11. Modulation of induced frontocentral theta (Fm-θ) event-related (de-)synchronisation dynamics following mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Poppy L A; Speckens, Anne E M

    2014-10-01

    Depressive severity has been associated with attenuated neocortical frontal midline theta (Fm-θ) power/evoked activity. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) has shown to be a successful novel intervention for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), albeit precise working mechanisms remain elusive. We examined the hypothesis that MBCT would have modulating effects upon evoked Fm-θ power, in addition to investigating possible mediation of induced event-related de/synchronisation (ERD/ERS) dynamics. Fifty one patients with a primary diagnosis of MDD (26 exposed to MBCT vs. 25 wait-list/WL controls) undertook a Go/NoGo task consisting of positive, negative and neutral words, further stratified into abstract versus trait adjective matrices. Depressive symptom severity and rumination were also examined. A pattern of enhanced induced Fm-θ synchronisation during the latter 400-800 ms temporal-window pre-to-post MBCT was observed; the contrary in the WL. Modulated ERD/ERS dynamics correlated to amelioration in depressive and rumination symptoms in the MBCT group. We propose the primary action pathway alluded to a neural disengagement mechanism enacting upon tonic neuronal assemblies implicated in emotional and self-related processing. Due to the complexity and presently undiscovered complete unified scientific understanding of neuro-oscillatory-dynamics, and associated clinical interplays; we hypothesise that the electro-cortical and connected clinical working pathways of MBCT in depression are multi-levelled constituting nonlinear and interdependent mechanisms, represented by mediated EEG synchronisation dynamics. PMID:25206931

  12. Theta responses are abnormal in mild cognitive impairment: evidence from analysis of theta event-related synchronization during a temporal expectancy task.

    PubMed

    Caravaglios, Giuseppe; Muscoso, Emma Gabriella; Di Maria, Giulia; Costanzo, Erminio

    2013-07-01

    We examined the hypothesis that the attention/executive deficits in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease is associated to an abnormal cortical activation, revealed by the method of event-related synchronization/desynchronization (ERS/ERD) in the theta band during a paradigm of temporal orienting of attention. MCI patients (n = 25) and healthy elderly (HE) matched controls (n = 15) performed a task in which periodically omitted tones had to be predicted and their virtual onset time had to be marked by pressing a button. Single-trial theta responses were measured, respectively, before and after the motor response. Then, theta responses were compared to theta power during eyes closed resting state (ERD/ERS method).The temporal course of the task was characterized by two different behavioural conditions: (1) a pre-event epoch, in which the subject awaited the virtual onset of the omitted tone, (2) a post-event (after button pressing) epoch, in which the subject was in a post-motor response condition. The most important findings are summarized as follows: (1) in both groups, the pre-event epoch was characterized by theta ERS on temporal electrodes, but HE had a greater theta ERS compared to that of MCI group; (2) in both groups, during the post-motor condition, there was a theta ERS on prefrontal regions, and, also in this case, HE showed a greater theta enhancement compared to that of MCI patients; (3) HE showed evidence of lateralization: during the waiting epoch, theta ERS was dominant on the right posterior temporal lead (T6), whilst, during the post-motor epoch, theta ERS was greater on the left, as well as the midline prefrontal leads. Compared to the traditional neuropsychological measures for the episodic memory, these theta ERS indicators were less accurate in differentiating MCI patients from healthy elderly. The clinical relevance of these findings is that the weaker theta reactivity in MCI would indicate an early impairment in the

  13. Decrease of theta response in euthymic bipolar patients during an oddball paradigm.

    PubMed

    Atagün, M İ; Güntekin, B; Ozerdem, A; Tülay, E; Başar, E

    2013-06-01

    Theta oscillations are related to cognitive functions and reflect functional integration of frontal and medial temporal structures into coherent neurocognitive networks. This study assessed event-related theta oscillations in medication-free, euthymic patients with bipolar disorder upon auditory oddball paradigm. Twenty-two DSM-IV euthymic bipolar I (n = 19) and II (n = 3) patients and twenty-two healthy subjects were included. Patients were euthymic for at least 6 months, and psychotropic-free for at least 2 weeks. EEG was recorded at 30 electrode sites. Auditory oddball paradigm and sensory stimuli were used. Event-related Oscillations were analyzed using adaptive filtering in two different theta frequency bands (4-6 Hz, 6-8 Hz). In healthy subjects, slow theta (4-6 Hz) responses were significantly higher than those of euthymic patients upon target, non-target and sensory stimuli (p < 0.05). Fast theta (6-8 Hz) responses of healthy subjects were significantly higher than those of euthymic patients upon target-only stimuli (p < 0.05). Reduced theta oscillations during auditory processing provide strong quantitative evidence of activation deficits in related networks in bipolar disorder. Fast theta responses are related to cognitive functions, whereas slow theta responses are related to sensory processes more than cognitive processes. PMID:24427202

  14. Resonances, and mechanisms of Theta-production

    SciTech Connect

    Ya.I. Azimov; I.I. Strakovsky

    2004-09-01

    After explaining necessity of exotic hadrons, we discuss mechanisms which could determine production of the exotic Theta-baryon. A possible important role of resonances (producing the Theta in real or virtual decays) is emphasized for various processes. Several experimental directions for studies of such resonances, and the Theta itself, are suggested. We briefly discuss also recent negative results on the Theta-baryon.

  15. Treatment of giant congenital cysts of the midline in adults: Report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, Liverana; Mattogno, Pier Paolo; Bianchi, Federico; Pallini, Roberto; Fernandez, Eduardo; Doglietto, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: Giant cysts of the midline, not associated to a tumor, are exceptional finding in the brain of adults. Here we present two cases of symptomatic giant cerebral cysts of the midline occurred in an elderly and in a young adult patients both treated with mini-invasive unilateral neuroendoscopic procedure. In the recent literature (since 1999) similar cases have not been reported. Beside the clinical report, review of literature and major anatomical features of the region are described. Case Description: These two adults (82 and 41 years old respectively) had a slow progressive development of headache, gait disturbances, memory impairment and urinary incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging showed giant cyst of the midline and hydrocephalus. Surgery with the endoscopic procedure, through a right frontal burr hole, was followed by clinical and radiological improvement. Conclusion: Giant cerebral cysts of the midline in adults can be successfully treated through a neuroendoscopic monolateral approach that comprehends multiple openings, diffuse coagulation of the capsule, and careful releasing of capsule-ependyma adherences. Knowledge of major anatomical and developmental details of the septal region is necessary to avoid complication in a mini-invasive surgical procedure. PMID:26421217

  16. Pathology of 'non-healing (midline) granuloma'.

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, L; Gregory, M M

    1977-01-01

    In a histological study of biopsy and postmortem material from 30 cases of nasal disease in which a clinical diagnosis of 'midline granuloma' or Wegener's granuloma had been given, we selected 10 cases on the basis of the presence of widespread coagulative necrosis and atypical cells. Evidence is provided that such changes represent a malignant neoplasm of histiocytic lymphoma type. Local invasion and spread to cervical and more distant lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and kidney were seen in some of the cases. Erythrophagocytic activity was marked in the spleen in three cases and histiocytic infiltration of the bone marrow in two cases, indicating a more generalised activity of histiocytic cells. Terms such as 'malignant granuloma' should be abandoned. In obstructive and ulcerating conditions of the nose efforts should be concentrated on making an accurate histological diagnosis. Images PMID:323295

  17. Midline diastema and its aetiology--a review.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Reji; Kamath, Geetha

    2014-06-01

    Maxillary midline diastema is a common aesthetic complaint of patients. Treating the midline diastema is a matter of concern for practitioners, as many different aetiologies are reported to be associated with it. The appearance of midline diastema as part of the normal dental development makes it difficult for practitioners to decide whether to intervene or not at an early stage. The aim of this article is to review the possible aetiology and management options which will help the clinician to diagnose, intercept and to take effective action to correct the midline diastema. The available data shows that an early intervention is desirable in cases with large diastemas. Treatment modality, timing and retention protocol depends on the aetiology of the diastema. Therefore, priority needs to be given to diagnosing the aetiology before making any treatment decisions. Clinical Relevance: This article aims to determine and evaluate the aetiology and possible treatment options of midline diastema. PMID:25073229

  18. Association between theta power in 6-month old infants at rest and maternal PTSD severity: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan, Pilar M; Poremba, Carly; Flynn, Lucinda R; Savich, Renate; Annett, Robert D; Stephen, Julia

    2016-09-01

    Compared to infants born to mothers without PTSD, infants born to mothers with active PTSD develop poorer behavioral reactivity and emotional regulation. However, the association between perinatal maternal PTSD and infant neural activation remains largely unknown. This pilot study (N=14) examined the association between perinatal PTSD severity and infant frontal neural activity, as measured by MEG theta power during rest. Results indicated that resting left anterior temporal/frontal theta power was correlated with perinatal PTSD severity (p=0.004). These findings suggest delayed cortical maturation in infants whose mothers had higher perinatal PTSD severity and generate questions regarding perinatal PTSD severity and infant neurophysiological consequences. PMID:27473944

  19. The effects of theta transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on fluid intelligence.

    PubMed

    Pahor, Anja; Jaušovec, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to explore the influence of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on resting brain activity and on measures of fluid intelligence. Theta tACS was applied to the left parietal and left frontal brain areas of healthy participants after which resting electroencephalogram (EEG) data was recorded. Following sham/active stimulation, the participants solved two tests of fluid intelligence while their EEG was recorded. The results showed that active theta tACS affected spectral power in theta and alpha frequency bands. In addition, active theta tACS improved performance on tests of fluid intelligence. This influence was more pronounced in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left parietal area than in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left frontal area. Left parietal tACS increased performance on the difficult test items of both tests (RAPM and PF&C) whereas left frontal tACS increased performance only on the easy test items of one test (RAPM). The observed behavioral tACS influences were also accompanied by changes in neuroelectric activity. The behavioral and neuroelectric data tentatively support the P-FIT neurobiological model of intelligence. PMID:24998643

  20. Coherent theta-band EEG activity predicts item-context binding during encoding.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Christopher; Mangels, Jennifer A

    2005-02-01

    Episodic memories consist of semantic information coupled with a rich array of contextual detail. Here, we investigate the neural processes by which information about the sensory context of a learning event is "bound" to the semantic representation of the to-be-encoded item. We present evidence that item-context binding during encoding is mediated by frontoposterior electroencephalographic (EEG) phase locking within and between hemispheres in the theta (4-8 Hz) band. During a task in which subjects encoded words in different font colors, later memory for the word was associated with sustained frontal theta activity and frontoposterior theta-band coherence, primarily within the left hemisphere. When the word-color association was later successfully retrieved, however, neurons synchronized their theta-band responses bilaterally in a more sustained fashion, particularly during the latter part of the stimulus epoch (>800 ms). Our results confirm the importance of functional coupling between frontal and posterior regions for successful encoding. One interpretation of these data is hemispheric contributions to item and context encoding may be asymmetric, with left hemisphere coherence facilitating semantic processing of an item and right hemisphere coherence facilitating processing of sensory context. Theta-band coherence may be an important mechanism by which brain networks exchange information during learning. PMID:15652304

  1. Modulation of theta phase synchronization in the human electroencephalogram during a recognition memory task.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Phil; Kang, Jae-Hwan; Choe, Seong-Hyun; Jeong, Ji Woon; Kim, Hyun Taek; Yun, Kyongsik; Jeong, Jaeseung; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2012-08-01

    To the extent that recognition memory relies on interactions among widely distributed neural assemblies across the brain, phase synchronization between brain rhythms may play an important role in meditating those interactions. As the theta rhythm is known to modulate in power during the recognition memory process, we aimed to determine how the phase synchronization of the theta rhythms across the brain changes with recognition memory. Fourteen human participants performed a visual object recognition task in a virtual reality environment. Electroencephalograms were recorded from the scalp of the participants while they either recognized objects that had been presented previously or identified new objects. From the electroencephalogram recordings, we analyzed the phase-locking value of the theta rhythms, which indicates the degree of phase synchronization. We found that the overall phase-locking value recorded during the recognition of previously viewed objects was greater than that recorded during the identification of new objects. Specifically, the theta rhythms became strongly synchronized between the frontal and the left parietal areas during the recognition of previously viewed objects. These results suggest that the recognition memory process may involve an interaction between the frontal and the left parietal cortical regions mediated by theta phase synchronization. PMID:22610314

  2. Simultaneous correction of functional posterior cross bite and midline shift

    PubMed Central

    Arvinth, R.; Rana, Shailendra Singh; Duggal, Ritu; Kharbanda, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent cause of functional posterior crossbite is the reduction in width of the maxillary dental arch. This posterior crossbite is associated with anterior crowding which is presented as an infrapositioned canine or a palatally positioned lateral incisor on one side; this leads to an upper midline shift toward the crowded side. The present case report shows the management of posterior crossbite with functional shift and upper midline shift simultaneously without adverse side effects. In this case, rapid maxillary expansion along with fixed appliance is used to correct posterior crossbite with the upper dental midline shift using reciprocal action of elastic transseptal fibers.

  3. Comparative drug screening in NUT midline carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beesley, A H; Stirnweiss, A; Ferrari, E; Endersby, R; Howlett, M; Failes, T W; Arndt, G M; Charles, A K; Cole, C H; Kees, U R

    2014-01-01

    Background: The NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a rare but fatal cancer for which systematic testing of therapy options has never been performed. Methods: On the basis of disease biology, we compared the efficacy of the CDK9 inhibitor flavopiridol (FP) with a panel of anticancer agents in NMC cell lines and mouse xenografts. Results: In vitro anthracyclines, topoisomerase inhibitors, and microtubule poisons were among the most cytotoxic drug classes for NMC cells, while efficacy of the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 varied considerably between lines carrying different BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4)–NUT (nuclear protein in testis) translocations. Efficacy of FP was comparable to vincristine and doxorubicin, drugs that have been previously used in NMC patients. All three compounds showed significantly better activity than etoposide and vorinostat, agents that have also been used in NMC patients. Statins and antimetabolites demonstrated intermediate single-agent efficacy. In vivo, vincristine significantly inhibited tumour growth in two different NMC xenografts. Flavopiridol in vivo was significantly effective in one of the two NMC xenograft lines, demonstrating the biological heterogeneity of this disease. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that FP may be of benefit to a subset of patients with NMC, and warrant a continued emphasis on microtubule inhibitors, anthracyclines, and topoisomerase inhibitors as effective drug classes in this disease. PMID:24518598

  4. Midline Anterior Craniofacial Approach for Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Bryan John; Traynelis, Vincent C.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Funk, Gerry F.; Menezes, Arnold H.; Hoffman, Henry T.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty consecutive cases of midline anterior craniofacial procedures for the treatment of malignant neoplasms arising from the paranasal sinuses were reviewed. Posterior and lateral base craniofacial procedures were specifically excluded. This review compares the results, in terms of survival and major complication rate, between en bloc and piecemeal resections. The average follow-up was 4 years and 3 months. Sixteen patients were treated with an en bloc resection. The major complication rate was 31%. One-year survival rate was 94% for the en bloc resection group, 67% for patients with positive margins, and 100% for patients with clear margins. Three-year survival for en bloc resection dropped to 56, 33, and 67%, respectively. Fourteen patients were treated with piecemeal resections. The major complication rate was 21%. One-year survival rate was 83% for the piecemeal resection group, 60% for patients with positive margins, and 100% for patients with clear margins. Three-year survival dropped to 70, 60, and 80%, respectively. Although it is considered desirable to obtain an en bloc resection in some craniofacial procedures, we conclude that a piecemeal resection is a viable alternative in situations where an en bloc procedure is difficult to obtain safely. ImagesFigure 1p43-bFigure 2p44-b PMID:17171080

  5. Regional and inter-regional theta oscillation during episodic novelty processing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwan-Taek; Lee, Chany; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Jung, Ki-Young

    2014-10-01

    Recent event-related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggest that novelty processing may be involved in processes that recognize the meaning of a novel sound, during which widespread cortical regions including the right prefrontal cortex are engaged. However, it remains unclear how those cortical regions are functionally integrated during novelty processing. Because theta oscillation has been assumed to have a crucial role in memory operations, we examined local and inter-regional neural synchrony of theta band activity during novelty processing. Fifteen right-handed healthy university students participated in this study. Subjects performed an auditory novelty oddball task that consisted of the random sequence of three types of stimuli such as a target (1000Hz pure tone), novel (familiar environmental sounds such as dog bark, buzz, car crashing sound and so on), and standard sounds (950Hz pure tone). Event-related spectra perturbation (ERSP) and the phase-locking value (PLV) were measured from human scalp EEG during task. Non-parametric statistical tests were applied to test for significant differences between stimulus novelty and stimulus targets in ERSP and PLV. The novelty P3 showed significant higher amplitude and shorter latency compared with target P3 in frontocentral regions. Overall, theta activity was significantly higher in the novel stimuli compared with the target stimuli. Specifically, the difference in theta power between novel and target stimuli was most significant in the right frontal region. This right frontal theta activity was accompanied by phase synchronization with the left temporal region. Our results imply that theta phase synchronization between right frontal and left temporal regions underlie the retrieval of memory traces for unexpected but familiar sounds from long term memory in addition to working memory retrieval or novelty encoding. PMID:25014407

  6. Midline Body Actions and Leftward Spatial "Aiming" in Patients with Spatial Neglect.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Amit; Pigott, Kara; Barrett, A M

    2015-01-01

    Spatial motor-intentional "Aiming" bias is a dysfunction in initiation/execution of motor-intentional behavior, resulting in hypokinetic and hypometric leftward movements. Aiming bias may contribute to posture, balance, and movement problems and uniquely account for disability in post-stroke spatial neglect. Body movement may modify and even worsen Aiming errors, but therapy techniques, such as visual scanning training, do not take this into account. Here, we evaluated (1) whether instructing neglect patients to move midline body parts improves their ability to explore left space and (2) whether this has a different impact on different patients. A 68-year-old woman with spatial neglect after a right basal ganglia infarct had difficulty orienting to and identifying left-sided objects. She was prompted with four instructions: "look to the left," "point with your nose to the left," "point with your [right] hand to the left," and "stick out your tongue and point it to the left." She oriented leftward dramatically better when pointing with the tongue/nose, than she did when pointing with the hand. We then tested nine more consecutive patients with spatial neglect using the same instructions. Only four of them made any orienting errors. Only one patient made >50% errors when pointing with the hand, and she did not benefit from pointing with the tongue/nose. We observed that pointing with the tongue could facilitate left-sided orientation in a stroke survivor with spatial neglect. If midline structures are represented more bilaterally, they may be less affected by Aiming bias. Alternatively, moving the body midline may be more permissive for leftward orienting than moving right body parts. We were not able to replicate this effect in another patient; we suspect that the magnitude of this effect may depend upon the degree to which patients have directional akinesia, spatial Where deficits, or cerebellar/frontal cortical lesions. Future research could examine these

  7. Conservation of arthropod midline netrin accumulation revealed with a cross-reactive antibody provides evidence for midline cell homology

    PubMed Central

    Simanton, Wendy; Clark, Stephanie; Clemons, Anthony; Jacowski, Caitlin; Farrell-VanZomeren, Adrienne; Beach, Paul; Browne, William E.; Duman-Scheel, Molly

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Although many similarities in arthropod CNS development exist, differences in axonogenesis and the formation of midline cells, which regulate axon growth, have been observed. For example, axon growth patterns in the ventral nerve cord of Artemia franciscana differ from that of Drosophila melanogaster. Despite such differences, conserved molecular marker expression at the midline of several arthropod species indicates that midline cells may be homologous in distantly related arthropods. However, data from additional species are needed to test this hypothesis. In this investigation, nerve cord formation and the putative homology of midline cells were examined in distantly related arthropods, including: long- and short-germ insects (D. melanogaster, Aedes aeygypti, and Tribolium castaneum), branchiopod crustaceans (A. franciscana and Triops longicauditus), and malacostracan crustaceans (Porcellio laevis and Parhyale hawaiensis). These comparative analyses were aided by a cross-reactive antibody generated against the Netrin (Net) protein, a midline cell marker and regulator of axonogenesis. The mechanism of nerve cord formation observed in Artemia is found in Triops, another branchiopod, but is not found in the other arthropods examined. Despite divergent mechanisms of midline cell formation and nerve cord development, Net accumulation is detected in a well-conserved subset of midline cells in branchiopod crustaceans, malacostracan crustaceans, and insects. Notably, the Net accumulation pattern is also conserved at the midline of the amphipod P. hawaiensis, which undergoes split germ-band development. Conserved Net accumulation patterns indicate that arthropod midline cells are homologous, and that Nets function to regulate commissure formation during CNS development of Tetraconata. PMID:19469853

  8. Oscillatory dynamics coordinating human frontal networks in support of goal maintenance.

    PubMed

    Voytek, Bradley; Kayser, Andrew S; Badre, David; Fegen, David; Chang, Edward F; Crone, Nathan E; Parvizi, Josef; Knight, Robert T; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Humans have a capacity for hierarchical cognitive control-the ability to simultaneously control immediate actions while holding more abstract goals in mind. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging evidence suggests that hierarchical cognitive control emerges from a frontal architecture whereby prefrontal cortex coordinates neural activity in the motor cortices when abstract rules are needed to govern motor outcomes. We utilized the improved temporal resolution of human intracranial electrocorticography to investigate the mechanisms by which frontal cortical oscillatory networks communicate in support of hierarchical cognitive control. Responding according to progressively more abstract rules resulted in greater frontal network theta phase encoding (4-8 Hz) and increased prefrontal local neuronal population activity (high gamma amplitude, 80-150 Hz), which predicts trial-by-trial response times. Theta phase encoding coupled with high gamma amplitude during inter-regional information encoding, suggesting that inter-regional phase encoding is a mechanism for the dynamic instantiation of complex cognitive functions by frontal cortical subnetworks. PMID:26214371

  9. On Ramanujan's definition of mock theta function.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Robert C

    2013-05-01

    In his famous "deathbed" letter, Ramanujan "defined" the notion of a mock theta function and offered some examples of functions he believed satisfied his definition. Very recently, Griffin et al. established for the first time that Ramanujan's mock theta functions actually satisfy his own definition. On the other hand, Zwegers' 2002 doctoral thesis [Zwegers S (2002) Mock theta functions. PhD thesis (Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)] showed that all of Ramanujan's examples are holomorphic parts of harmonic Maass forms. This has led to an alternate definition of a mock theta function. This paper shows that Ramanujan's definition of mock theta function is not equivalent to the modern definition. PMID:23625007

  10. Genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG theta power in humans.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Böcker, K B E; Baas, J M P

    2014-11-01

    It has long been postulated that exogenous cannabinoids have a profound effect on human cognitive functioning. These cannabinoid effects are thought to depend, at least in parts, on alterations of phase-locking of local field potential neuronal firing. The latter can be measured as activity in the theta frequency band (4-7Hz) by electroencephalogram. Theta oscillations are supposed to serve as a mechanism in neural representations of behaviorally relevant information. However, it remains unknown whether variability in endogenous cannabinoid activity is involved in theta rhythms and therefore, may serve as an individual differences index of human cognitive functioning. To clarify this issue, we recorded resting state EEG activity in 164 healthy human subjects and extracted EEG power across frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β). To assess variability in the endocannabinoid system, two genetic polymorphisms (rs1049353, rs2180619) within the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) were determined in all participants. As expected, we observed significant effects of rs1049353 on EEG power in the theta band at frontal, central and parietal electrode regions. Crucially, these effects were specific for the theta band, with no effects on activity in the other frequency bands. Rs2180619 showed no significant associations with theta power after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, we provide novel evidence in humans showing that genetic variability in the cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG power in the theta frequency band. This extends prior findings of exogenous cannabinoid effects on theta power to the endogenous cannabinoid system. PMID:25116250

  11. EEG theta and Mu oscillations during perception of human and robot actions.

    PubMed

    Urgen, Burcu A; Plank, Markus; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Poizner, Howard; Saygin, Ayse P

    2013-01-01

    The perception of others' actions supports important skills such as communication, intention understanding, and empathy. Are mechanisms of action processing in the human brain specifically tuned to process biological agents? Humanoid robots can perform recognizable actions, but can look and move differently from humans, and as such, can be used in experiments to address such questions. Here, we recorded EEG as participants viewed actions performed by three agents. In the Human condition, the agent had biological appearance and motion. The other two conditions featured a state-of-the-art robot in two different appearances: Android, which had biological appearance but mechanical motion, and Robot, which had mechanical appearance and motion. We explored whether sensorimotor mu (8-13 Hz) and frontal theta (4-8 Hz) activity exhibited selectivity for biological entities, in particular for whether the visual appearance and/or the motion of the observed agent was biological. Sensorimotor mu suppression has been linked to the motor simulation aspect of action processing (and the human mirror neuron system, MNS), and frontal theta to semantic and memory-related aspects. For all three agents, action observation induced significant attenuation in the power of mu oscillations, with no difference between agents. Thus, mu suppression, considered an index of MNS activity, does not appear to be selective for biological agents. Observation of the Robot resulted in greater frontal theta activity compared to the Android and the Human, whereas the latter two did not differ from each other. Frontal theta thus appears to be sensitive to visual appearance, suggesting agents that are not sufficiently biological in appearance may result in greater memory processing demands for the observer. Studies combining robotics and neuroscience such as this one can allow us to explore neural basis of action processing on the one hand, and inform the design of social robots on the other. PMID:24348375

  12. EEG theta and Mu oscillations during perception of human and robot actions

    PubMed Central

    Urgen, Burcu A.; Plank, Markus; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Poizner, Howard; Saygin, Ayse P.

    2013-01-01

    The perception of others’ actions supports important skills such as communication, intention understanding, and empathy. Are mechanisms of action processing in the human brain specifically tuned to process biological agents? Humanoid robots can perform recognizable actions, but can look and move differently from humans, and as such, can be used in experiments to address such questions. Here, we recorded EEG as participants viewed actions performed by three agents. In the Human condition, the agent had biological appearance and motion. The other two conditions featured a state-of-the-art robot in two different appearances: Android, which had biological appearance but mechanical motion, and Robot, which had mechanical appearance and motion. We explored whether sensorimotor mu (8–13 Hz) and frontal theta (4–8 Hz) activity exhibited selectivity for biological entities, in particular for whether the visual appearance and/or the motion of the observed agent was biological. Sensorimotor mu suppression has been linked to the motor simulation aspect of action processing (and the human mirror neuron system, MNS), and frontal theta to semantic and memory-related aspects. For all three agents, action observation induced significant attenuation in the power of mu oscillations, with no difference between agents. Thus, mu suppression, considered an index of MNS activity, does not appear to be selective for biological agents. Observation of the Robot resulted in greater frontal theta activity compared to the Android and the Human, whereas the latter two did not differ from each other. Frontal theta thus appears to be sensitive to visual appearance, suggesting agents that are not sufficiently biological in appearance may result in greater memory processing demands for the observer. Studies combining robotics and neuroscience such as this one can allow us to explore neural basis of action processing on the one hand, and inform the design of social robots on the other. PMID

  13. Uncovertebral Anatomic Midline Targeting for Cervical Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bednar, Drew A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Prospective observational cohort. Objective To document the accuracy of uncovertebral anatomic targeting in positioning cervical disc arthroplasty. Summary of Background Data Disc arthroplasty implants depend on midline placement for optimum mechanical function. Fluoroscopy is used to delineate the midline. Anatomic targeting from the uncovertebral joints in the neck may be adequate. We have investigated the efficacy of uncovertebral anatomic targeting for cervical disc arthroplasty. Methods Anatomic uncovertebral midline targeting for disc arthroplasty insertion was performed in 18 male (mean age 51 years, range 27 to 67) and 22 female (mean age 50, range 35 to 70) patients receiving a total of 59 implants over a 5-year period. Device insertion was under only lateral imaging control. Postinsertion operative fluoroscopy with optimized centering was used to record implant position in the anteroposterior plane, and centerline analysis was performed using cursor measurement technology from the GE PACS™ imaging system (GE Medical Systems, Mt. Prospect, IL). Results Analysis found a mean deviation from the ideal midline placement of only 0.7 mm (range, 0 to 2.9 mm). Only three devices were more than 2 mm off the anatomic midline. Conclusion This anatomic technique is effective, safely minimizing imaging resource needs and X-ray exposure to the patient and operating team. PMID:24353946

  14. Tensile Properties of the Murine Ventral Vertical Midline Incision

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Mark A.; Chakkalakal, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Background In clinical surgery, the vertical midline abdominal incision is popular but associated with healing failures. A murine model of the ventral vertical midline incision was developed in order to study the healing of this incision type. Methodology/Principal Findings The strength of the wild type murine ventral abdominal wall in the midline was contained within the dermis; the linea alba made a negligible contribution. Unwounded abdominal wall had a downward trend (nonsignificant) in maximal tension between 12 and 29 weeks of age. The incision attained 50% of its final strength by postoperative day 40. The maximal tension of the ventral vertical midline incision was nearly that of unwounded abdominal wall by postwounding day 60; there was no difference in unwounded vs. wounded maximal tension at postwounding day 120. Conclusions/Significance After 120 days of healing, the ventral vertical midline incision in the wild type mouse was not significantly different from age-matched nonwounded controls. About half of the final incisional strength was attained after 6 weeks of healing. The significance of this work was to establish the kinetics of wild type incisional healing in a model for which numerous genotypes and genetic tools would be available for subsequent study. PMID:21915298

  15. A midline for oxaliplatin infusion: the myth of safety devices

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Ben; Hickish, Tamas; Uña Cidon, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum compound mainly used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. According to its manufacturer it is not considered vesicant agent though it has been shown to cause severe tissue damage if extravasation occurs in large doses. Several cases of extravasation have been reported; most of them from incorrectly placed peripheral cannula or incorrect use of central venous access devices. To reduce these risks, peripherally inserted central catheters and midline catheters have been increasingly used and are especially helpful if poor peripheral venous access. Midlines are mainly used for patients not receiving vesicant drugs, and are generally inserted without radiological guidance. They are believed to be safe, but we present the first ever-documented oxaliplatin extravasation injury from a midline catheter. PMID:24903726

  16. Traveling Theta Waves in the Human Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honghui; Jacobs, Joshua

    2015-09-01

    The hippocampal theta oscillation is strongly correlated with behaviors such as memory and spatial navigation, but we do not understand its specific functional role. One hint of theta's function came from the discovery in rodents that theta oscillations are traveling waves that allow parts of the hippocampus to simultaneously exhibit separate oscillatory phases. Because hippocampal theta oscillations in humans have different properties compared with rodents, we examined these signals directly using multielectrode recordings from neurosurgical patients. Our findings confirm that human hippocampal theta oscillations are traveling waves, but also show that these oscillations appear at a broader range of frequencies compared with rodents. Human traveling waves showed a distinctive pattern of spatial propagation such that there is a consistent phase spread across the hippocampus regardless of the oscillations' frequency. This suggests that traveling theta oscillations are important functionally in humans because they coordinate phase coding throughout the hippocampus in a consistent manner. Significance statement: We show for the first time in humans that hippocampal theta oscillations are traveling waves, moving along the length of the hippocampus in a posterior-anterior direction. The existence of these traveling theta waves is important for understanding hippocampal neural coding because they cause neurons at separate positions in the hippocampus to experience different theta phases simultaneously. The theta phase that a neuron measures is a key factor in how that cell represents behavioral information. Therefore, the existence of traveling theta waves indicates that, to fully understand how a hippocampal neuron represents information, it is vital to also account for that cell's location in addition to conventional measures of neural activity. PMID:26354915

  17. Numerical experiments on the theta pinch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volosevich, P. P.; Zukakishyili, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical calculation of theta pinch problems are presented. Physical processes in theta pinch systems are considered in a one dimensional, two temperature magnetohydrodynamic, approximation with allowance for end losses by longitudinal heat conductivity. The numerical calculations are compared with results of earlier experiments.

  18. Midline Body Actions and Leftward Spatial “Aiming” in Patients with Spatial Neglect

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Amit; Pigott, Kara; Barrett, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial motor–intentional “Aiming” bias is a dysfunction in initiation/execution of motor–intentional behavior, resulting in hypokinetic and hypometric leftward movements. Aiming bias may contribute to posture, balance, and movement problems and uniquely account for disability in post-stroke spatial neglect. Body movement may modify and even worsen Aiming errors, but therapy techniques, such as visual scanning training, do not take this into account. Here, we evaluated (1) whether instructing neglect patients to move midline body parts improves their ability to explore left space and (2) whether this has a different impact on different patients. A 68-year-old woman with spatial neglect after a right basal ganglia infarct had difficulty orienting to and identifying left-sided objects. She was prompted with four instructions: “look to the left,” “point with your nose to the left,” “point with your [right] hand to the left,” and “stick out your tongue and point it to the left.” She oriented leftward dramatically better when pointing with the tongue/nose, than she did when pointing with the hand. We then tested nine more consecutive patients with spatial neglect using the same instructions. Only four of them made any orienting errors. Only one patient made >50% errors when pointing with the hand, and she did not benefit from pointing with the tongue/nose. We observed that pointing with the tongue could facilitate left-sided orientation in a stroke survivor with spatial neglect. If midline structures are represented more bilaterally, they may be less affected by Aiming bias. Alternatively, moving the body midline may be more permissive for leftward orienting than moving right body parts. We were not able to replicate this effect in another patient; we suspect that the magnitude of this effect may depend upon the degree to which patients have directional akinesia, spatial Where deficits, or cerebellar/frontal cortical lesions. Future research

  19. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia.

    PubMed

    Holmes, S

    2016-07-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia, described just over 20 years ago, has become one of the most frequently seen causes of scarring alopecia at many specialist hair clinics. Considered a clinical variant of lichen planopilaris (LPP), it has distinctive features and associations which distinguish it from LPP. Although largely affecting postmenopausal women, a small but increasing number of men and premenopausal women are affected. The spectrum of the disease has expanded from involvement of the frontal hairline and eyebrows, to potentially affecting the entire hairline, facial and body hair. Genetic and environmental factors have been implicated but the aetiology remains uncertain. A range of treatments have been used in management of the condition, but clinical trials are required to establish effectiveness. PMID:27388531

  20. Frontal Polymerization in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Frontal polymerization systems, with their inherent large thermal and compositional gradients, are greatly affected by buoyancy-driven convection. Sounding rocket experiments allowed the preparation of benchmark materials and demonstrated that methods to suppress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in ground-based research did not significantly affect the molecular weight of the polymer. Experiments under weightlessness show clearly that bubbles produced during the reaction interact very differently than under 1 g.

  1. [Frontal mucocele: open surgery].

    PubMed

    Pia, F; Aluffi, P; Borello, G

    1999-06-01

    This work presents 13 cases of frontal mucoceles, 9 with endo-orbital extension. All were treated with 'open surgery': 11 using a fronto-orbital approach, 2 with a bicoronal Cairns-Unterberger approach. Four patients had recurrent mucoceles 1-20 years after the previous surgery. In one case there was an association with frontal osteoma. In 10 cases, conservative treatment was applied through repermeabilization of the infundibular region through an external, endonasal pathway and positioning of a nasal sinus drainage tube (kept in place for 4 weeks). In the remaining 3 cases, the sinus cavity was obliterated with autologous abdominal fat. This choice was made because of the presence of osteomyelitic foci, in one case mucopioceles, or by the widespread dural exposure encountered during the course of surgery. Two cases of post-operative sinus reinfection were encountered: one underwent surgical revision, the other was an orbital site recurrence arising 7 years after previous surgical obliteration of the frontal sinus. The esthetic result was unsatisfactory in 2 patients treated with a trans-facial approach. Ten patients were disease free after an average 56 months of follow-up. Although functional endoscopic surgery undoubtedly makes it possible to achieve excellent results in the treatment of most sinus mucoceles, open surgery remains a valid procedure in frontal mucoceles with orbital and/or endocranial extension and in cases where the district anatomy is unfavorable for a purely endonasal approach. The indications and limitations of open surgery are critically discussed in the light of personal experience and current literature. PMID:10546373

  2. Lower theta inter-trial phase coherence during performance monitoring is related to higher reaction time variability: a lifespan study.

    PubMed

    Papenberg, Goran; Hämmerer, Dorothea; Müller, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman; Li, Shu-Chen

    2013-12-01

    Trial-to-trial reaction time (RT) variability is consistently higher in children and older adults than in younger adults. Converging evidence also indicates that higher RT variability is (a) associated with lower behavioral performance on complex cognitive tasks, (b) distinguishes patients with neurological deficits from healthy individuals, and also (c) predicts longitudinal cognitive decline in older adults. However, so far the processes underlying increased RT variability are poorly understood. Previous evidence suggests that control signals in the medial frontal cortex (MFC) are reflected in theta band activity and may implicate the coordination of distinct brain areas during performance monitoring. We hypothesized that greater trial-to-trial variability in theta power during performance monitoring may be associated with greater behavioral variability in response latencies. We analyzed event-related theta oscillations assessed during a cued-Go/NoGo task in a lifespan sample covering the age range from middle childhood to old age. Our results show that theta inter-trial coherence during NoGo trials increases from childhood to early adulthood, and decreases from early adulthood to old age. Moreover, in all age groups, individuals with higher variability in medial frontal stimulus-locked theta oscillations showed higher trial-to-trial RT variability behaviorally. Importantly, this effect was strongest at high performance monitoring demands and independent of motor response execution as well as theta power. Taken together, our findings reveal that lower theta inter-trial coherence is related to greater behavioral variability within and across age groups. These results hint at the possibility that more variable MFC control may be associated with greater performance fluctuations. PMID:23876249

  3. Concurrent working memory task decreases the Stroop interference effect as indexed by the decreased theta oscillations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Tang, D; Hu, L; Zhang, L; Hitchman, G; Wang, L; Chen, A

    2014-03-14

    Working memory (WM) tasks may increase or decrease the interference effect of concurrently performed cognitive control tasks. However, the neural oscillatory correlates of this modulation effect of WM on the Stroop task are still largely unknown. In the present study, behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded from 32 healthy participants during their performance of the single Stroop task and the same task with a concurrent WM task. We observed that the Stroop interference effect represented in both response times (RTs) and theta-band event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP) magnitude reduced under the dual-task condition compared with the single-task condition. The reduction of interference in theta-band ERSP was further positively correlated with interference reduction in RTs, and was mainly explained by the source in the left middle frontal gyrus. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the effect of concurrent WM tasks on the reduction of the Stroop interference effect can be indexed by EEG oscillations in theta-band rhythm in the centro-frontal regions and this modulation was mediated by the reduced cognitive control under the concurrent WM task. PMID:24406438

  4. Midline (Central) Fluid Percussion Model of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Rachel K; Griffiths, Daniel R; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Research models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) hold significant validity towards the human condition, with each model replicating a subset of clinical features and symptoms. After 30 years of characterization and implementation, fluid percussion injury (FPI) is firmly recognized as a clinically relevant model of TBI, encompassing concussion through severe injury. The midline variation of FPI may best represent mild and diffuse clinical brain injury, because of the acute behavioral deficits, the late onset of subtle behavioral morbidities, and the absence of gross histopathology. This chapter outlines the procedures for midline (diffuse) FPI in adult male rats and mice. With these procedures, it becomes possible to generate brain-injured laboratory animals for studies of injury-induced pathophysiology and behavioral deficits, for which rational therapeutic interventions can be implemented. PMID:27604721

  5. The midline metathoracic ear of the praying mantis, Mantis religiosa.

    PubMed

    Yager, D D; Hoy, R R

    1987-12-01

    The praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, is unique in possessing a single, tympanal auditory organ located in the ventral midline of its body between the metathoracic coxae. The ear is in a deep groove and consists of two tympana facing each other and backed by large air sacs. Neural transduction takes place in a structure at the anterior end of the groove. This tympanal organ contains 32 chordotonal sensilla organized into three groups, two of which are 180 degrees out of line with the one attaching directly to the tympanum. Innervation is provided by Nerve root 7 from the metathoracic ganglion. Cobalt backfills show that the auditory neuropile is a series of finger-like projections terminating ipsilaterally near the midline, primarily near DC III and SMC. The auditory neuropile thus differs from the pattern common to all other insects previously studied. PMID:3690633

  6. Individual differences in EEG theta and alpha dynamics during working memory correlate with fMRI responses across subjects

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Jed A.; Negishi, Michiro; Mayes, Linda C.; Constable, R. Todd

    2007-01-01

    Objective Theta and alpha range EEG oscillations are commonly induced in cognitive tasks, but their possible relationship to the BOLD signal of fMRI is not well understood, and individual variability is high. We explored individual differences in EEG reactivity to determine whether it is positively or negatively correlated with BOLD across subjects. Methods A Sternberg working memory task with 2, 4, or 6 digits was administered to 18 subjects in separate fMRI and EEG sessions. Memory load dependent theta and alpha reactivity was quantified and used as a regressor to reveal brain areas exhibiting EEG-fMRI correlation across subjects. Results Theta increases localized to medial prefrontal cortex, and correlated negatively with BOLD in that region and in other “default mode” areas. Alpha modulation localized to parietal-occipital midline cortex and also correlated negatively with BOLD. Conclusions Individual tendencies to exhibit memory-load dependent oscillations are associated with negative BOLD responses certain brain regions. Significance Positive BOLD responses and increased EEG oscillations do not necessarily arise in the same regions. Negative BOLD responses may also relate to cognitive activity, as traditionally indexed by increased EEG power in the theta band. PMID:17900976

  7. Closure of large midline diastema by a "HIV-Spring".

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Pandurangan

    2015-01-01

    Midline diastema is a common orthodontic problem in mixed dentition caused by various factors like genetic, supernumery teeth, abnormal frenum attachment, habits and microdontia etc. Large diastemas need closure for the eruption of adjacent teeth. I present here a newly designed customized self active HIV-Spring (Hari Inverted 'V' Spring) for closing a large diastema with minimum orthodontic materials and less activation visits. The spring can be modfied for the three dimensional movement of central incisors. PMID:25881378

  8. Robotic Anterior and Midline Skull Base Surgery: Preclinical Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, Bert W. Weinstein, Gregory S.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a minimally invasive surgical technique to access the midline and anterior skull base using the optical and technical advantages of robotic surgical instrumentation. Methods and Materials: Ten experimental procedures focusing on approaches to the nasopharynx, clivus, sphenoid, pituitary sella, and suprasellar regions were performed on one cadaver and one live mongrel dog. Both the cadaver and canine procedures were performed in an approved training facility using the da Vinci Surgical Robot. For the canine experiments, a transoral robotic surgery (TORS) approach was used, and for the cadaver a newly developed combined cervical-transoral robotic surgery (C-TORS) approach was investigated and compared with standard TORS. The ability to access and dissect tissues within the various areas of the midline and anterior skull base were evaluated, and techniques to enhance visualization and instrumentation were developed. Results: Standard TORS approaches did not provide adequate access to the midline and anterior skull base; however, the newly developed C-TORS approach was successful in providing the surgical access to these regions of the skull base. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is an exciting minimally invasive approach to the skull base that warrants continued preclinical investigation and development.

  9. Note on trigonometric expansions of theta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouikha, A. Raouf

    2003-04-01

    We are interested in properties of coefficients of certain expansions of the classical theta functions. We show that they are solutions of a differential system derived from the heat equation. We plan to explicitly give expressions of these coefficients.

  10. Human hippocampal theta activity during virtual navigation.

    PubMed

    Ekstrom, Arne D; Caplan, Jeremy B; Ho, Emily; Shattuck, Kirk; Fried, Itzhak; Kahana, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    This study examines whether 4-8-Hz theta oscillations can be seen in the human hippocampus, and whether these oscillations increase during virtual movement and searching, as they do in rodents. Recordings from both hippocampal and neocortical depth electrodes were analyzed while six epileptic patients played a virtual taxi-driver game. During the game, the patients alternated between searching for passengers, whose locations were random, and delivering them to stores, whose locations remained constant. In both hippocampus and neocortex, theta increased during virtual movement in all phases of the game. Hippocampal and neocortical theta activity were also significantly correlated with each other, but this correlation did not differ between neocortex and hippocampus and within disparate neocortical electrodes. Our findings demonstrate the existence of movement-related theta oscillations in human hippocampus, and suggest that both cortical and hippocampal oscillations play a role in attention and sensorimotor integration. PMID:16114040

  11. Sensory and spinal inhibitory dorsal midline crossing is independent of Robo3.

    PubMed

    Comer, John D; Pan, Fong Cheng; Willet, Spencer G; Haldipur, Parthiv; Millen, Kathleen J; Wright, Christopher V E; Kaltschmidt, Julia A

    2015-01-01

    Commissural neurons project across the midline at all levels of the central nervous system (CNS), providing bilateral communication critical for the coordination of motor activity and sensory perception. Midline crossing at the spinal ventral midline has been extensively studied and has revealed that multiple developmental lineages contribute to this commissural neuron population. Ventral midline crossing occurs in a manner dependent on Robo3 regulation of Robo/Slit signaling and the ventral commissure is absent in the spinal cord and hindbrain of Robo3 mutants. Midline crossing in the spinal cord is not limited to the ventral midline, however. While prior anatomical studies provide evidence that commissural axons also cross the midline dorsally, little is known of the genetic and molecular properties of dorsally-crossing neurons or of the mechanisms that regulate dorsal midline crossing. In this study, we describe a commissural neuron population that crosses the spinal dorsal midline during the last quarter of embryogenesis in discrete fiber bundles present throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord. Using immunohistochemistry, neurotracing, and mouse genetics, we show that this commissural neuron population includes spinal inhibitory neurons and sensory nociceptors. While the floor plate and roof plate are dispensable for dorsal midline crossing, we show that this population depends on Robo/Slit signaling yet crosses the dorsal midline in a Robo3-independent manner. The dorsally-crossing commissural neuron population we describe suggests a substrate circuitry for pain processing in the dorsal spinal cord. PMID:26257608

  12. Sensory and spinal inhibitory dorsal midline crossing is independent of Robo3

    PubMed Central

    Comer, John D.; Pan, Fong Cheng; Willet, Spencer G.; Haldipur, Parthiv; Millen, Kathleen J.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Kaltschmidt, Julia A.

    2015-01-01

    Commissural neurons project across the midline at all levels of the central nervous system (CNS), providing bilateral communication critical for the coordination of motor activity and sensory perception. Midline crossing at the spinal ventral midline has been extensively studied and has revealed that multiple developmental lineages contribute to this commissural neuron population. Ventral midline crossing occurs in a manner dependent on Robo3 regulation of Robo/Slit signaling and the ventral commissure is absent in the spinal cord and hindbrain of Robo3 mutants. Midline crossing in the spinal cord is not limited to the ventral midline, however. While prior anatomical studies provide evidence that commissural axons also cross the midline dorsally, little is known of the genetic and molecular properties of dorsally-crossing neurons or of the mechanisms that regulate dorsal midline crossing. In this study, we describe a commissural neuron population that crosses the spinal dorsal midline during the last quarter of embryogenesis in discrete fiber bundles present throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord. Using immunohistochemistry, neurotracing, and mouse genetics, we show that this commissural neuron population includes spinal inhibitory neurons and sensory nociceptors. While the floor plate and roof plate are dispensable for dorsal midline crossing, we show that this population depends on Robo/Slit signaling yet crosses the dorsal midline in a Robo3-independent manner. The dorsally-crossing commissural neuron population we describe suggests a substrate circuitry for pain processing in the dorsal spinal cord. PMID:26257608

  13. Family-based genome-wide association study of frontal θ oscillations identifies potassium channel gene KCNJ6.

    PubMed

    Kang, S J; Rangaswamy, M; Manz, N; Wang, J-C; Wetherill, L; Hinrichs, T; Almasy, L; Brooks, A; Chorlian, D B; Dick, D; Hesselbrock, V; Kramer, J; Kuperman, S; Nurnberger, J; Rice, J; Schuckit, M; Tischfield, J; Bierut, L J; Edenberg, H J; Goate, A; Foroud, T; Porjesz, B

    2012-08-01

    Event-related oscillations (EROs) represent highly heritable neuroelectric correlates of cognitive processes that manifest deficits in alcoholics and in offspring at high risk to develop alcoholism. Theta ERO to targets in the visual oddball task has been shown to be an endophenotype for alcoholism. A family-based genome-wide association study was performed for the frontal theta ERO phenotype using 634 583 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 1560 family members from 117 families densely affected by alcohol use disorders, recruited in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism. Genome-wide significant association was found with several SNPs on chromosome 21 in KCNJ6 (a potassium inward rectifier channel; KIR3.2/GIRK2), with the most significant SNP at P = 4.7 × 10(-10)). The same SNPs were also associated with EROs from central and parietal electrodes, but with less significance, suggesting that the association is frontally focused. One imputed synonymous SNP in exon four, highly correlated with our top three SNPs, was significantly associated with the frontal theta ERO phenotype. These results suggest KCNJ6 or its product GIRK2 account for some of the variations in frontal theta band oscillations. GIRK2 receptor activation contributes to slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials that modulate neuronal excitability, and therefore influence neuronal networks. PMID:22554406

  14. An Alpha and Theta Intensive and Short Neurofeedback Protocol for Healthy Aging Working-Memory Training

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Joana; Portugal, Ana Maria; Fernandes, Luís; Afonso, Nuno; Pereira, Mariana; Sousa, Nuno; Dias, Nuno S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study tested the effects of an intensive and short alpha and theta neurofeedback (NF) protocol in working memory (WM) performance in a healthy elder population and explored the effects of a multimodal approach, by supplementing NF with cognitive tasks. Participants were allocated to four groups: NF (N = 9); neurofeedback supplemented with cognitive training (NFCT) (N = 8); cognitive training (CT) (N = 7) and sham neurofeedback (Sham-NF) (N = 6). The intervention consisted in 30-min sessions for 8 days. The NF group presented post intervention increases of alpha and theta relative power as well as performance in the matrix rotation task. In addition, a successful up training of frontal theta showed positive correlation with an improvement of post-training alpha and a better performance in the matrix rotation task. The results presented herein suggest that an intensive and short NF protocol enables elders to learn alpha and theta self-modulation and already presents moderate improvements in cognition and basal EEG. Also, CT group showed moderate performance gains on the cognitive tasks used during the training sessions but no clear improvements on neurophysiology and behavioral measurements were observed. This study represents a first attempt to study the effects of an intensive and short NF protocol in WM performance of elders. The evidence presented here suggests that an intensive and short NF intervention could be a valid alternative for introduction of older populations to NF methodologies. PMID:27458369

  15. An Alpha and Theta Intensive and Short Neurofeedback Protocol for Healthy Aging Working-Memory Training.

    PubMed

    Reis, Joana; Portugal, Ana Maria; Fernandes, Luís; Afonso, Nuno; Pereira, Mariana; Sousa, Nuno; Dias, Nuno S

    2016-01-01

    The present study tested the effects of an intensive and short alpha and theta neurofeedback (NF) protocol in working memory (WM) performance in a healthy elder population and explored the effects of a multimodal approach, by supplementing NF with cognitive tasks. Participants were allocated to four groups: NF (N = 9); neurofeedback supplemented with cognitive training (NFCT) (N = 8); cognitive training (CT) (N = 7) and sham neurofeedback (Sham-NF) (N = 6). The intervention consisted in 30-min sessions for 8 days. The NF group presented post intervention increases of alpha and theta relative power as well as performance in the matrix rotation task. In addition, a successful up training of frontal theta showed positive correlation with an improvement of post-training alpha and a better performance in the matrix rotation task. The results presented herein suggest that an intensive and short NF protocol enables elders to learn alpha and theta self-modulation and already presents moderate improvements in cognition and basal EEG. Also, CT group showed moderate performance gains on the cognitive tasks used during the training sessions but no clear improvements on neurophysiology and behavioral measurements were observed. This study represents a first attempt to study the effects of an intensive and short NF protocol in WM performance of elders. The evidence presented here suggests that an intensive and short NF intervention could be a valid alternative for introduction of older populations to NF methodologies. PMID:27458369

  16. Instrumentation in Frontal Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Adappa, Nithin D

    2016-08-01

    Frontal recess dissection proposes many challenges to the surgeon. These challenges stem from its highly variable nature, small caliber, difficult visualization, and proximity to vital structures such as the skull base and orbit. As such, delicate mucosal-sparing dissection of the frontal recess with proper instrumentation is paramount to minimize scar formation and ensure patency. Here, the article explores key instrumentation in frontal recess surgery with an emphasis on hand instruments and adjunctive technologies. PMID:27329980

  17. Corticostriatal Field Potentials Are Modulated at Delta and Theta Frequencies during Interval-Timing Task in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Eric B.; Ruggiero, Rafael N.; Kelley, Ryan M.; Parker, Krystal L.; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.

    2016-01-01

    Organizing movements in time is a critical and highly conserved feature of mammalian behavior. Temporal control of action requires corticostriatal networks. We investigate these networks in rodents using a two-interval timing task while recording LFPs in medial frontal cortex (MFC) or dorsomedial striatum. Consistent with prior work, we found cue-triggered delta (1–4 Hz) and theta activity (4–8 Hz) primarily in rodent MFC. We observed delta activity across temporal intervals in MFC and dorsomedial striatum. Rewarded responses were associated with increased delta activity in MFC. Activity in theta bands in MFC and delta bands in the striatum was linked with the timing of responses. These data suggest both delta and theta activity in frontostriatal networks are modulated during interval timing and that activity in these bands may be involved in the temporal control of action. PMID:27092091

  18. Interhemispheric Asymmetries and Theta Activity in the Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex as EEG Signature of HIV-Related Depression: Gender Matters.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Heidemarie; Lutz, Franz P C; McIntosh, Roger C; Dévieux, Jessy G; Ironson, Gail

    2016-04-01

    Resting EEGs of 40 people living with HIV (PLWH) on long-term antiretroviral treatment were examined for z-scored deviations from a healthy control (normative database) to examine the main and interaction effects of depression and gender. Regions of interest were frontal (alpha) and central (all bands) for interhemispheric asymmetries in quantitative EEGs and theta in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) in low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Z-scored normed deviations of depressed PLWH, compared with nondepressed, showed right-dominant interhemispheric asymmetries in all regions. However, after adjusting for multiple testing, significance remained only central for theta, alpha, and beta. Reversed (left-dominant) frontal alpha asymmetry is a potential EEG marker of depression in the HIV negative population that was not reversed in depressive PLWH; however, corresponding with extant literature, gender had an effect on the size of frontal alpha asymmetry. The LORETA analysis revealed a trending interactional effect of depression and gender on theta activity in the rACC in Brodmann area 32. We found that compared to men, women had greater right-dominant frontal alpha-asymmetry and elevated theta activity in voxels of the rACC, which may indicate less likelihood of depression and a higher likelihood of response to antidepressants. In conclusion, subtle EEG deviations, such as right-dominant central theta, alpha, and beta asymmetries and theta activity in the rACC may mark HIV-related depressive symptoms and may predict the likelihood of response to antidepressants but gender effects need to be taken into account. Although this study introduced the use of LORETA to examine the neurophysiological correlates of negative affect in PLWH, further research is needed to assess the utility of this tool in diagnostics and treatment monitoring of depression in PLWH. PMID:25568149

  19. Intrinsic properties and neuropharmacology of midline paraventricular thalamic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li; Hermes, Michael L. H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei are components of an interconnected brainstem, limbic and prefrontal cortex neural network that is engaged during arousal, vigilance, motivated and addictive behaviors, and stress. To better understand the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions, here we review some of the recently characterized electrophysiological and neuropharmacological properties of neurons in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT), derived from whole cell patch clamp recordings in acute rat brain slice preparations. PVT neurons display firing patterns and ionic conductances (IT and IH) that exhibit significant diurnal change. Their resting membrane potential (RMP) is maintained by various ionic conductances that include inward rectifier (Kir), hyperpolarization-activated nonselective cation (HCN) and TWIK-related acid sensitive (TASK) K+ channels. Firing patterns are regulated by high voltage-activated (HVA) and low voltage-activated (LVA) Ca2+ conductances. Moreover, transient receptor potential (TRP)-like nonselective cation channels together with Ca2+- and Na+-activated K+ conductances (KCa; KNa) contribute to unique slow afterhyperpolarizing potentials (sAHPs) that are generally not detectable in lateral thalamic or reticular thalamic nucleus neurons. The excitability of PVT neurons is also modulated by activation of neurotransmitter receptors associated with afferent pathways to PVT and other thalamic midline nuclei. We report on receptor-mediated actions of GABA, glutamate, monoamines and several neuropeptides: arginine vasopressin, gastrin-releasing peptide, thyrotropin releasing hormone and the orexins (hypocretins). This review represents an initial survey of intrinsic and transmitter-sensitive ionic conductances that are deemed to be unique to this population of midline thalamic neurons, information that is fundamental to an appreciation of the role these thalamic neurons may play in normal central nervous system

  20. Analysis of matrix cracking and local delamination in (O/theta/-theta)sub s graphite epoxy laminates under tension load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    Several 3D finite element analyses of (O/theta/-theta)sub s graphite epoxy laminates, where theta = 15, 20, 25, 30, and 45 deg, subjected to axial tension load were performed. The interlaminar stresses in the theta/-theta interface were calculated with and without a matrix crack in the central -theta plies. The interlaminar normal stress changes from a small compressive stress when no matrix crack is present to a high tensile stress at the intersection of the matrix crack and free edge. The analysis of local delamination from the -theta matrix crack indicates a high strain energy release rate and a localized mode I component near the free edge, within one ply distance from the matrix crack. In order to examine the stress state causing the matrix cracking the maximum principal normal stress in a plane perpendicular to the fiber direction in the -theta ply was calculated in an uncracked laminate. The corresponding shear stress parallel to the fiber was also calculated. The principal normal stress at the laminate edge increases through the ply thickness and reached a very high tensile value at the theta/-theta interface indicating that the crack in the -theta ply may initiate at the theta/-theta interface. Crack profiles on the laminate edge in the -theta ply were constructed from the principal stress directions. The cracks were found to be more curved for layups with smaller theta angles, which is consistent with experimental observations in the literature.

  1. Analysis of matrix cracking and local delamination in (0/theta/-theta)sub s graphite epoxy laminates under tension load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Obrien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    Several 3D finite element analyses of (0/theta/-theta)sub s graphite epoxy laminates, where theta=15, 20, 25, 30, and 45 deg, subjected to axial tension load were performed. The interlaminar stresses in the theta/-theta interface were calculated with and without a matrix crack in the central -theta plies. The interlaminar normal stress changes from a small compressive stress when no matrix crack is present to a high tensile stress at the intersection of the matrix crack and free edge. The analysis of local delamination from the -theta matrix crack indicates a high strain energy release rate and a localized mode I component near the free edge, within one ply distance from the matrix crack. In order to examine the stress state causing the matrix cracking the maximum principal normal stress in a plane perpendicular to the fiber direction in the -theta ply was calculated in an uncracked laminate. The corresponding shear stress parallel to the fiber was also calculated. The principal normal stress at the laminate edge increases through the ply thickness and reached a very high tensile value at the theta/-theta interface indicating that the crack in the -theta ply may initiate at the theta/-theta interface. Crack profiles on the laminate edge in the -theta ply were constructed from the principal stress directions. The cracks were found to be more curved for layups with smaller theta angles, which is consistent with experimental observations in the literature.

  2. Measuring Theta_13 at Daya Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Kwong

    2014-03-14

    We measured the neutrino mixing angle, theta13, presumably related to the preponderance of matter over antimatter in our universe with high precision. We determined theta13 by measuring the disappearance of neutrinos from a group of six nuclear reactors. The target, located inside a mountain at about 2 km from the reactors, is 80 tons of liquid scintillator doped with trace amount of Gadolinium to increase its neutron detection efficiency. The neutrino flux is measured by the inverse beta-decay reaction where the final-state particles are detected by the liquid scintillator. The measured value of theta13, based on data collected over 3 years, is large, around 8 degrees, rendering the measurement of the parameter related to matter-antimatter asymmetry in future long baseline neutrino experiments easier.

  3. Directed Communication between Nucleus Accumbens and Neocortex in Humans Is Differentially Supported by Synchronization in the Theta and Alpha Band

    PubMed Central

    Horschig, Jörn M.; Smolders, Ruud; Bonnefond, Mathilde; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P. Richard; Cools, Roshan; Denys, Damiaan; Jensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report evidence for oscillatory bi-directional interactions between the nucleus accumbens and the neocortex in humans. Six patients performed a demanding covert visual attention task while we simultaneously recorded brain activity from deep-brain electrodes implanted in the nucleus accumbens and the surface electroencephalogram (EEG). Both theta and alpha oscillations were strongly coherent with the frontal and parietal EEG during the task. Theta-band coherence increased during processing of the visual stimuli. Granger causality analysis revealed that the nucleus accumbens was communicating with the neocortex primarily in the theta-band, while the cortex was communicating the nucleus accumbens in the alpha-band. These data are consistent with a model, in which theta- and alpha-band oscillations serve dissociable roles: Prior to stimulus processing, the cortex might suppress ongoing processing in the nucleus accumbens by modulating alpha-band activity. Subsequently, upon stimulus presentation, theta oscillations might facilitate the active exchange of stimulus information from the nucleus accumbens to the cortex. PMID:26394404

  4. Midline Cervical Cleft: Review of an Uncommon Entity

    PubMed Central

    Puscas, Liana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Midline cervical cleft is a rare congenital malformation which nonetheless has a classic presentation. This study presents one of the largest single series of new patients with MCC and provides an exhaustive review and catalogue of publications from the international literature. Materials and Methods. Retrospective chart review performed in two academic medical centers and literature review performed with primary verification of all quoted references. Results. Ten patients with MCC were identified (8 boys and 2 girls). All patients presented with the classic findings of this congenital anomaly, and the length of the skin defect correlated with an increase in the patient's age. Surgical excision was complete in all cases. Thorough international literature review yielded only 195 verifiable previously reported cases. Conclusions. This is one of the largest series of new patients with midline cervical cleft presented in the world literature. Although rare (with less than 200 cases published to date) this entity does have a reliable presentation that should lead to rapid and accurate diagnosis. Complete surgical excision at an early age is appropriate since the anomaly increases in length commensurate with the patient's age. PMID:25983756

  5. Deficient Event-Related Theta Oscillations in Individuals at Risk for Alcoholism: A Study of Reward Processing and Impulsivity Features

    PubMed Central

    Kamarajan, Chella; Pandey, Ashwini K.; Chorlian, David B.; Manz, Niklas; Stimus, Arthur T.; Anokhin, Andrey P.; Bauer, Lance O.; Kuperman, Samuel; Kramer, John; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Hesselbrock, Victor M.; Porjesz, Bernice

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals at high risk to develop alcoholism often manifest neurocognitive deficits as well as increased impulsivity. Event-related oscillations (EROs) have been used to effectively measure brain (dys)function during cognitive tasks in individuals with alcoholism and related disorders and in those at risk to develop these disorders. The current study examines ERO theta power during reward processing as well as impulsivity in adolescent and young adult subjects at high risk for alcoholism. Methods EROs were recorded during a monetary gambling task (MGT) in 12–25 years old participants (N = 1821; males = 48%) from high risk alcoholic families (HR, N = 1534) and comparison low risk community families (LR, N = 287) from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). Impulsivity scores and prevalence of externalizing diagnoses were also compared between LR and HR groups. Results HR offspring showed lower theta power and decreased current source density (CSD) activity than LR offspring during loss and gain conditions. Younger males had higher theta power than younger females in both groups, while the older HR females showed more theta power than older HR males. Younger subjects showed higher theta power than older subjects in each comparison. Differences in topography (i.e., frontalization) between groups were also observed. Further, HR subjects across gender had higher impulsivity scores and increased prevalence of externalizing disorders compared to LR subjects. Conclusions As theta power during reward processing is found to be lower not only in alcoholics, but also in HR subjects, it is proposed that reduced reward-related theta power, in addition to impulsivity and externalizing features, may be related in a predisposition to develop alcoholism and related disorders. PMID:26580209

  6. Analysis of matrix cracking and local delamination in (0/theta/-theta)s graphite epoxy laminates under tensile load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional element analyses of (0/theta/-theta)s graphite epoxy laminates, where theta = 15, 20, 25, 30, and 45 deg, subjected to axial tensile load, were performed. The interlaminar stresses in the theta/-theta interface were calculated with and without a matrix crack in the central -theta plies. The interlaminar normal stress changes from a small compressive stress when no matrix crack is present to a high tensile stress at the intersection of the matrix crack and the free edge. The analysis of local delamination from the -theta matrix crack indicates a high strain energy release rate and a localized Mode I component near the free edge, within one-ply distance from the matrix crack. To examine the stress state causing the matrix cracking, the maximum principal normal stress in a plane perpendicular to the fiber direction in the -theta ply was calculated in an uncracked laminate. The corresponding shear stress parallel to the fiber was also calculated. The principal normal stress at the laminate edge increased through the ply thickness and reached a very high tensile value at the theta/-theta interface indicating that the crack in the -theta ply may initiate at the theta/-theta interface.

  7. Hippocampal theta, gamma, and theta-gamma coupling: effects of aging, environmental change, and cholinergic activation

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Tara K.; Howe, Matthew D.; Schmidt, Brandy; Hinman, James R.; Escabí, Monty A.

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal theta and gamma oscillations coordinate the timing of multiple inputs to hippocampal neurons and have been linked to information processing and the dynamics of encoding and retrieval. One major influence on hippocampal rhythmicity is from cholinergic afferents. In both humans and rodents, aging is linked to impairments in hippocampus-dependent function along with degradation of cholinergic function. Cholinomimetics can reverse some age-related memory impairments and modulate oscillations in the hippocampus. Therefore, one would expect corresponding changes in these oscillations and possible rescue with the cholinomimetic physostigmine. Hippocampal activity was recorded while animals explored a familiar or a novel maze configuration. Reexposure to a familiar situation resulted in minimal aging effects or changes in theta or gamma oscillations. In contrast, exploration of a novel maze configuration increased theta power; this was greater in adult than old animals, although the deficit was reversed with physostigmine. In contrast to the theta results, the effects of novelty, age, and/or physostigmine on gamma were relatively weak. Unrelated to the behavioral situation were an age-related decrease in the degree of theta-gamma coupling and the fact that physostigmine lowered the frequency of theta in both adult and old animals. The results indicate that age-related changes in gamma and theta modulation of gamma, while reflecting aging changes in hippocampal circuitry, seem less related to aging changes in information processing. In contrast, the data support a role for theta and the cholinergic system in encoding and that hippocampal aging is related to impaired encoding of new information. PMID:23303862

  8. Rapid memory stabilization by transient theta coherence in the human medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Thézé, Raphaël; Guggisberg, Adrian G; Nahum, Louis; Schnider, Armin

    2016-04-01

    Presenting stimuli again after presentation of intervening stimuli improves their retention, an effect known as the spacing effect. However, using event-related potentials (ERPs), we had observed that immediate, in comparison to spaced, repetition of pictures induced a positive frontal potential at 200-300 ms. This potential appeared to emanate from the left medial temporal lobe (MTL), a structure critical for memory consolidation. In this study, we tested the behavioral relevance of this signal and explored functional connectivity changes during picture repetition. We obtained high-density electroencephalographic recordings from 14 healthy subjects performing a continuous recognition task where pictures were either repeated immediately or after 9 intervening items. Conventional ERP analysis replicated the positive frontal potential emanating from the left MTL at 250-350 ms in response to immediately repeated stimuli. Connectivity analysis showed that this ERP was associated with increased coherence in the MTL region-left more that right-in the theta-band (3.5-7 Hz) 200-400 ms following immediate, but not spaced, repetition. This increase was stronger in subjects who better recognized immediately repeated stimuli after 30 min. These findings indicate that transient theta-band synchronization between the MTL and the rest of the brain at 200-400 ms reflects a memory stabilizing signal. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26386180

  9. Upper and Lower Extremity Midline Crossing Effects upon Adults with Mild to Moderate Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Rebecca J.; Surburg, Paul R.; Lewis, Colleen A.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined whether midline crossing inhibition (MCI) was present in 13 adults with mild to moderate mental retardation when crossing the midline of the body with both the upper and lower extremities. Results indicated that participants exhibited MCI with both the upper and lower extremities. (Author/CR)

  10. Human Hippocampal Theta Oscillations during Movement without Visual Cues.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Salman E; Jacobs, Joshua

    2016-03-16

    The hippocampus exhibits theta oscillations when animals navigate. Vass et al. (2016) discovered that theta oscillations are also present when humans are moved through a virtual environment without sensory feedback, indicating that theta oscillations have a general role in spatial cognition beyond sensorimotor processing. PMID:26985718

  11. Frontal and Parietal Cortices Show Different Spatiotemporal Dynamics across Problem-solving Stages.

    PubMed

    Tschentscher, Nadja; Hauk, Olaf

    2016-08-01

    Arithmetic problem-solving can be conceptualized as a multistage process ranging from task encoding over rule and strategy selection to step-wise task execution. Previous fMRI research suggested a frontal-parietal network involved in the execution of complex numerical and nonnumerical tasks, but evidence is lacking on the particular contributions of frontal and parietal cortices across time. In an arithmetic task paradigm, we evaluated individual participants' "retrieval" and "multistep procedural" strategies on a trial-by-trial basis and contrasted those in time-resolved analyses using combined EEG and MEG. Retrieval strategies relied on direct retrieval of arithmetic facts (e.g., 2 + 3 = 5). Procedural strategies required multiple solution steps (e.g., 12 + 23 = 12 + 20 + 3 or 23 + 10 + 2). Evoked source analyses revealed independent activation dynamics within the first second of problem-solving in brain areas previously described as one network, such as the frontal-parietal cognitive control network: The right frontal cortex showed earliest effects of strategy selection for multistep procedural strategies around 300 msec, before parietal cortex activated around 700 msec. In time-frequency source power analyses, memory retrieval and multistep procedural strategies were differentially reflected in theta, alpha, and beta frequencies: Stronger beta and alpha desynchronizations emerged for procedural strategies in right frontal, parietal, and temporal regions as function of executive demands. Arithmetic fact retrieval was reflected in right prefrontal increases in theta power. Our results demonstrate differential brain dynamics within frontal-parietal networks across the time course of a problem-solving process, and analyses of different frequency bands allowed us to disentangle cortical regions supporting the underlying memory and executive functions. PMID:27027542

  12. Lateral Ventricle Volume Asymmetry Predicts Midline Shift in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Arnold; Schmalfuss, Ilona; Heaton, Shelley C; Gabrielli, Andrea; Hannay, H Julia; Papa, Linda; Brophy, Gretchen M; Wang, Kevin K W; Büki, András; Schwarcz, Attila; Hayes, Ronald L; Robertson, Claudia S; Robicsek, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    Midline shift following severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) detected on computed tomography (CT) scans is an established predictor of poor outcome. We hypothesized that lateral ventricular volume (LVV) asymmetry is an earlier sign of developing asymmetric intracranial pathology than midline shift. This retrospective analysis was performed on data from 84 adults with blunt sTBI requiring a ventriculostomy who presented to a Level I trauma center. Seventy-six patients underwent serial CTs within 3 h and an average of three scans within the first 10 d of sTBI. Left and right LVVs were quantified by computer-assisted manual volumetric measurements. LVV ratios (LVR) were determined on the admission CT to evaluate ventricular asymmetry. The relationship between the admission LVR value and subsequent midline shift development was tested using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and odds ratio (OR) and relative risk tests. Sixty patients had no >5 mm midline shift on the initial admission scan. Of these, 15 patients developed it subsequently (16 patients already had >5 mm midline shift on admission scans). For >5 mm midline shift development, admission LVR of >1.67 was shown to have a sensitivity of 73.3% and a specificity of 73.3% (area under the curve=0.782; p<0.0001). LVR of >1.67 as exposure yielded an OR of 7.56 (p<0.01), and a risk ratio of 4.42 (p<0.01) for midline shift development as unfavorable outcome. We propose that LVR captures LVV asymmetry and is not only related to, but also predicts the development of midline shift already at admission CT examination. Lateral ventricles may have a higher "compliance" than midline structures to developing asymmetric brain pathology. LVR analysis is simple, rapidly accomplished and may allow earlier interventions to attenuate midline shift and potentially improve ultimate outcomes. PMID:25752227

  13. Electromagnetic theta gun and tubular projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, T.J.; Cnare, E.C.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Beard, S.G.; Cowan, M.

    1980-12-01

    Unlike the better known rail gun, the theta gun applies the propelling force along the length of its projectile. This is shown to allow much greater acceleration of high fineness ratio projectiles for a given barrel pressure, allowing much shorter barrels for military applications. A computer code which simulates performance of the theta gun is described and experimental results from a few simple, low energy experiments show close agreement with code predictions. Trajectories and aerodynamic heating for three candidate military projectiles are calculated for vertical and horizontal atmospheric launches where initial velocity is as high as 3 km/s. The calculations indicate that in some cases a thin layer of heatshield (ablator) will be required to control projectile heating.

  14. Management of Frontal Sinus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Anne Morgan; Desai, Dipan; Thorp, Brian D; Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M

    2016-08-01

    The most common primary tumors of the frontal sinus are osteomas and inverted papillomas, although a variety of other tumors involving this space have been reported. With the advent of new surgical techniques and instrumentation, an endoscopic approach to this region has become feasible. The preoperative assessment and decision making must take into account the complexity of frontal sinus anatomy, tumor type, tumor location, and associated attachments. These procedures allow adequate visualization, tumor removal, and postoperative monitoring, and preserve fairly normal sinus function. Open techniques may also be required and should be in the surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:27450620

  15. Progressive Fracture of [0/90/ + or - Theta]s Composite Structure Under Uniform Pressure Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascalis K.; Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Christos K.; Mouratidis, Ericos

    2007-01-01

    S-Glass/epoxy [0/90/plus or minus theta]s for theta =45 deg., 60 deg., and 75 deg. laminated fiber-reinforced composite stiffened plate was simulated to investigated for damage and fracture progression under uniform pressure. An integrated computer code was augmented for the simulation of the damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture and to structural collapse. Results show in detail the damage progression sequence and structural fracture resistance during different degradation stages. Damage through the thickness of the laminate initiated first at [0/90/plus or minus 45]s at 15.168 MPa (2200 psi), followed by [0/90/plus or minus 60]s at 16.96 MPa (2460 psi) and finally by [0/90/plus or minus 75]s at 19.3 MPa (2800 psi). After damage initiation happened the cracks propagate rapidly to structural fracture.

  16. When the Midline Diastema Is Not Characteristic of the "Ugly Duckling" Stage.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Morino, Alessandro Yuske Kusano; Machuca, Oscar Fernando; Schneider, Neblyssa Ágatha

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents the interceptive orthodontic treatment of a 9-year, 5-month-old boy with class I malocclusion, a 9.0-mm maxillary midline diastema, and deviation from the midline. The treatment goals were to decrease the magnitude of the diastema and to simulate the characteristics of the "ugly duckling" stage. Braces were placed on the first molars and the maxillary central incisors. The biomechanics of the anchors on the first molars elicited substantial mesial movement of the left central incisor to match the midline. A flat wire segment was bonded onto the palatal surface of the central incisors for retention. PMID:26345220

  17. When the Midline Diastema Is Not Characteristic of the “Ugly Duckling” Stage

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Morino, Alessandro Yuske Kusano; Machuca, Oscar Fernando; Schneider, Neblyssa Ágatha

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents the interceptive orthodontic treatment of a 9-year, 5-month-old boy with class I malocclusion, a 9.0-mm maxillary midline diastema, and deviation from the midline. The treatment goals were to decrease the magnitude of the diastema and to simulate the characteristics of the “ugly duckling” stage. Braces were placed on the first molars and the maxillary central incisors. The biomechanics of the anchors on the first molars elicited substantial mesial movement of the left central incisor to match the midline. A flat wire segment was bonded onto the palatal surface of the central incisors for retention. PMID:26345220

  18. [Diagnostic dyspraxia and frontal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Donnet, A; Schmitt, A; Poncet, M

    1998-05-01

    A 27-year-old ambidexter woman experienced a clinical and psychometric frontal syndrome associated with a partial callosal syndrome following transcallosal surgery for an intraventricular neurocytoma. She also complained of difficulties with her left hand which realized a particular form of diagnostic dyspraxia: there were specific features of an isolated dysfunction of the control of the realization of a program. PMID:9773062

  19. Conceptual Models of Frontal Cyclones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagleman, Joe R.

    1981-01-01

    This discussion of weather models uses maps to illustrate the differences among three types of frontal cyclones (long wave, short wave, and troughs). Awareness of these cyclones can provide clues to atmospheric conditions which can lead toward accurate weather forecasting. (AM)

  20. Collaborative Writing: Online versus Frontal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passig, David; Schwartz, Gali

    2007-01-01

    Students in higher education, most frequently, use the frontal approach while being asked to collaborate on a writing assignment. However, the difficulty in collaborative writing using conventional technologies such as pen and paper, board or computer is the limited ability to view the work of your peers during the process (Baeker, Glass,…

  1. Clinical evaluation of a securement device used on midline catheters.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Roy; O'Loughlin, Chris; Vavrik, Boris

    2016-07-28

    Since the introduction of sutureless securement products for vascular access devices (VADs), there has been a great deal of discussion of their advantages and disadvantages in comparison with sutures. This includes questions related to VAD securement, patients' comfort, infection control, user-friendliness and potential complications of using the device. The literature review of the available evidence indicates the superiority of the novel sutureless devices in the aforementioned aspects. The authors collected data to further contribute in the analysis of the attributes of these products, namely Statlock™ and Grip-Lok™ (current devices). The authors then trialled, collected and analysed data from relevant healthcare practitioners on their perception of a novel sutureless 3M™ Tegaderm™ PICC/CVC Securement Device + Tegaderm™ I.V. Advanced Securement Dressing (trialled device) for midline VADs. Evaluation forms have been provided and filled in by the practitioners. The results showed that the trialled product is perceived as user-and patient-friendly, resulting in increased security of VAD and easier handling compared to the current devices. Overall, 70% of the evaluators stated that the trialled product has better or much better overall performance. The remaining 30% characterised the overall performance comparable with the current devices. PMID:27467651

  2. Appearance can be deceptive: Dentigerous cyst crossing the midline.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rahul; Paul, Geeta; Prasad, Ruchika K; Singh, Shilpa; Agarwal, Nitin; Sinha, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Dentigerous cyst is a developmental odontogenic cyst, which develops by accumulation of fluid between reduced enamel epithelium and the tooth crown of an unerupted tooth. Dentigerous cysts are usually solitary, slow growing, asymptomatic lesions that are incidentally found during routine radiographs They most frequently involve the mandibular third molar followed in order of frequency by the maxillary canine, mandibular second pre-molar and maxillary third molar. Occasionally, these cysts become painful when infected causing swelling and erythema. The cyst is usually small, however, when large, results in the expansion and thinning of the cortex leading to pathological fracture. Radiographic features are specific to the lesion characterized by a well-defined radiolucency circumscribed by a sclerotic border, associated with the crown of an impacted or unerupted tooth. Dentigerous cysts are treated most commonly by enucleation, Marsupialization and decompression of cyst by fenestration. The criteria for selecting the treatment modality is based on the age, size, location, stage of root development, position of the involved tooth and relation of the lesion to the adjacent tooth and vital structure. The prognosis is an excellent when the cyst is enucleated and recurrence is rare. In this article, we present a case of a Dentigerous cyst in an 80-year-old man in the anterior aspect of the mandible enveloping an impacted canine and crossing the midline but with no clinical expansion or discomfort. PMID:24163563

  3. Differentiation of NUT Midline Carcinoma by Epigenomic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Brian E.; Hofer, Matthias D.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Bauer, Daniel E.; Cameron, Michael J.; West, Nathan H.; Agoston, Elin S.; Reynoird, Nicolas; Khochbin, Saadi; Ince, Tan A.; Christie, Amanda; Janeway, Katherine A.; Vargas, Sara O.; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R.; Aster, Jon C.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Kung, Andrew L.; Bradner, James E.; French, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a lethal pediatric tumor defined by the presence of BRD-NUT fusion proteins that arrest differentiation. Here we explore the mechanisms underlying the ability of BRD4-NUT to prevent squamous differentiation. In both gain-of and loss-of-expression assays we find that expression of BRD4-NUT is associated with globally decreased histone acetylation and transcriptional repression. Bulk chromatin acetylation can be restored by treatment of NMC cells with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), engaging a program of squamous differentiation and arrested growth in vitro that closely mimics the effects of siRNA mediated attenuation of BRD4-NUT expression. The potential therapeutic utility of HDACi differentiation therapy was established in three different NMC xenograft models, where it produced significant growth inhibition and a survival benefit. Based on these results and translational studies performed with patient-derived primary tumor cells, a child with NMC was treated with the FDA-approved HDAC inhibitor, vorinostat. An objective response was obtained after five weeks of therapy, as determined by positron emission tomography. These findings provide preclinical support for trials of HDACi in patients with NMC. PMID:21447744

  4. Frontal Monitoring and Parietal Evidence: Mechanisms of Error Correction.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Cebrian, Ana; Knight, Robert T; Kayser, Andrew S

    2016-08-01

    When we respond to a stimulus, our decisions are based not only on external stimuli but also on our ongoing performance. If the response deviates from our goals, monitoring and decision-making brain areas interact so that future behavior may change. By taking advantage of natural variation in error salience, as measured by the RT taken to correct an error (RTEC), here we argue that an evidence accumulation framework provides a potential underlying mechanism for this variable process of error identification and correction, as evidenced by covariation of frontal monitoring and parietal decision-making processes. We study two early EEG signals linked to monitoring within medial PFC-the error-related negativity (ERN) and frontocentral theta activity-and a third EEG signal, the error positivity (Pe), that is thought to share the same parietal substrates as a signal (the P3b) proposed to reflect evidence accumulation. As predicted, our data show that on slow RTEC trials, frontal monitoring resources are less strongly employed, and the latency of the Pe is longer. Critically, the speed of the RTEC also covaries with the magnitude of subsequent neural (intertrial alpha power) and behavioral (post-error slowing) adjustments following the correction. These results are synthesized to describe a timing diagram for adaptive decision-making after errors and support a potential evidence accumulation mechanism in which error signaling is followed by rapid behavioral adjustments. PMID:27027420

  5. Network mechanisms of responsiveness to continuous theta-burst stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Sviatlana; Ptak, Radek; Nyffeler, Thomas; Schnider, Armin; Guggisberg, Adrian G

    2013-10-01

    Continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) can modify behavior, but effects are inconsistent and their mechanisms insufficiently understood. As coherence in resting-state networks influences human behavior, we hypothesized that cTBS may act via modulation of neural oscillation coherence. This study used electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate whether behavioral effects of cTBS on visuospatial attention are associated with coherence changes in the attention network. In healthy human subjects, cTBS of the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and the right frontal eye field was compared with sham stimulation. Effects on visuospatial attention were quantified with a visual exploration task, and network effects were assessed from surface EEG with inverse solutions and source coherence analyses. Before stimulation, left visual exploration was linearly correlated with alpha-band coherence between the right temporo-parietal cortex and the rest of the brain. Posterior parietal cortex stimulation induced neglect-like visual exploration behavior in the majority, but not all, subjects. It reduced alpha-band coherence between the stimulation site and the rest of the brain but also enhanced it between the contralateral left parietal cortex and the rest of the brain. The contralateral increase correlated with the induced reduction in left visual attention. The behavioral response of individual participants to cTBS could be predicted by coherence in the right temporo-parietal junction before stimulation. Behavioral effects of cTBS therefore depend on network states before stimulation and are linearly associated with changes in network interactions. In particular, cTBS modulates an interhemispheric competition in alpha-band coherence. EEG network imaging might help to optimize therapeutic cTBS in the future. PMID:23941616

  6. Tobacco Smoking and the Resting Maternal Brain: A Preliminary Study of Frontal EEG

    PubMed Central

    Wilbanks, Haley E.; Von Mohr, Mariana; Potenza, Marc N.; Mayes, Linda C.; Rutherford, Helena J.V.

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoking has been attributed to a wide range of detrimental health consequences for both women and their children. In addition to its known physical health effects, smoking may also impact maternal neural responses and subsequent caregiving behavior. To begin investigating this issue, we employed electroencephalography (EEG) to examine resting neural oscillations of tobacco-smoking mothers (n = 35) and non-smoking mothers (n = 35). We examined seven EEG frequency bands recorded from frontal electrode sites (delta, theta, alpha, alpha1, alpha2, beta, and gamma). While no between-group differences were present in high-frequency bands (alpha2, beta, gamma), smokers showed greater spectral power in low-frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, alpha1) compared to non-smokers. This increased power in low-frequency bands of tobacco-smoking mothers is consistent with a less aroused state and may be one mechanism through which smoking might affect the maternal brain and caregiving behavior. PMID:27354838

  7. Nuclear Protein of the Testis Midline Carcinoma Masquerading as a Primary Mediastinal Seminoma

    PubMed Central

    Sayapina, Maria S.; Savelov, Nikita A.; Karseladze, Apollon I.; Bulanov, Anatoly A.; Tryakin, Alexey A.; Nosov, Dmitry A.; Garin, Avgust M.; Tjulandin, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear protein of the testis (NUT) midline carcinomas are rare aggressive carcinomas characterized by chromosomal rearrangements that involve the gene encoding the NUT. This article reviews the clinicopathologic features and the differential diagnosis of these malignancies. PMID:27441078

  8. Perinatal midline astrocyte development is impaired in fibroblast growth factor 8 hypomorphic mice.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Courtney E; Corella, Kristina M; Samberg, Brittany D; Jones, Paula T; Linscott, Megan L; Chung, Wilson C J

    2016-09-01

    Our previous studies showed that Fgf8 mutations can cause Kallmann syndrome (KS), a form of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, in which patients do not undergo puberty and are infertile. Interestingly, some KS patients also have agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) suggesting that KS pathology is not limited to reproductive function. Here, we asked whether FGF8 dysfunction is the underlying cause of ACC in some KS patients. Indeed, early studies in transgenic mice with Fgf8 mutations reported the presence of failed or incomplete corpus callosum formation. Additional studies in transgenic mice showed that FGF8 function most likely prevents the prenatal elimination of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive (IR) glial cells in the indusium griseum (IG) and midline zipper (MZ), two anterior-dorsal midline regions required for corpus callosum formation (i.e., between embryonic days (E) 15.5-18.5). Here, we tested the hypothesis that FGF8 function is critical for the survival of the GFAP-IR midline glial cells. First, we measured the incidence of apoptosis in the anterior-dorsal midline region in Fgf8 hypomorphic mice during embryonic corpus callosum formation. Second, we quantified the GFAP expression in the anterior-dorsal midbrain region during pre- and postnatal development, in order to study: 1) how Fgf8 hypomorphy disrupts prenatal GFAP-IR midline glial cell development, and 2) whether Fgf8 hypomorphy continues to disrupt postnatal GFAP-IR midline glial cell development. Our results indicate that perinatal FGF8 signaling is important for the timing of the onset of anterior-dorsal Gfap expression in midline glial cells suggesting that FGF8 function regulates midline GFAP-IR glial cell development, which when disrupted by Fgf8 deficiency prevents the formation of the corpus callosum. These studies provide an experimentally-based mechanistic explanation as to why corpus callosum formation may fail in KS patients with deficits in FGF signaling

  9. Primary Pulmonary NUT Midline Carcinoma: Clinical, Radiographic, and Pathologic Characterizations.

    PubMed

    Sholl, Lynette M; Nishino, Mizuki; Pokharel, Saraswati; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; French, Christopher A; Janne, Pasi A; Lathan, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a poorly differentiated tumor typically driven by a t(15;19) rearrangement leading to a NUT fusion event. This rare and uniformly fatal tumor arises in multiple organ sites; however the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic characteristics of primary pulmonary NMC are poorly defined. We identified eight cases of primary pulmonary NMC in our consult practice over 4 years and, using a NUT immunohistochemistry screen, retrospectively identified one additional case from 166 (0.6%) consecutive in-house biopsies of lung carcinomas lacking glandular differentiation. Eight cases had available clinical and radiographic data and shared a remarkable degree of similarity. The median age at presentation was 30 (range 21-68). Six patients had little or no smoking history. All complained of 1 to 3 months of cough at presentation. Computed tomography scans showed a large, centrally located primary mass with confluent involvement of mediastinal lymph nodes, pleural disease, and sparing of the contralateral lung. Lytic bone metastases were common but brain metastases were absent in all cases. Pathologically, all cases showed primitive-appearing round to epitheloid cells growing in nests and sheets. All tumors expressed keratin, p63 or p40, and NUT protein. Eight cases had a fluorescence in situ hybridization-proven BRD4-NUT or BRD3-NUT rearrangement; one case was presumed to have a NUT-variant fusion event. Median overall survival was 2.2 months. Despite the rarity of primary pulmonary NMC, it is important to recognize this entity to counsel patients regarding outcome and to identify candidates for targeted BRD inhibitors currently in clinical trials. PMID:26001144

  10. Historical evolution of the frontal lobe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krudop, Welmoed A; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L

    2015-01-01

    The function of the frontal lobes and the related frontal lobe syndrome have not been described in detail until relatively late in history. Slowly, the combination of knowledge from animal models, the detailed examination of symptoms after traumatic frontal lobe injuries, and the rise and fall of psychosurgery has led to increasing insight into frontal lobe function. The frontosubcortical circuits have been described and increasingly related to clinical syndromes, confirmed by the latest developments in functional connectivity networks. PMID:25997476

  11. Occurrence of midline diastema and frenum attachments amongst school children in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kaimenyi, J T

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of midline diastema, tongue tie and frenum attachments amongst school children in Nairobi. A total of 1802 children aged between 4 and 16 years were selected randomly using multistage sampling technique. To avoid oversampling in either sex, a proportionate sampling procedure was used. Thereafter, a thorough intra-oral examination was carried out using a mouth mirror under artificial or natural light with the children lying on a supine position. Presence or absence of midline interdental spaces unusually bigger than other interdental spaces were noted and recorded on a prepared dateacollection form. Accurate location of the origin of the frenum was done using Placek et al Morphological-functional classification of the labial frenum attachments. Data was analyzed manually by tally method. Results showed that 35% had upper and lower midline diastema. 55% were females and 45% were males. Their mean age was 7.6 years. 0.2% had a high lingual frenum. The commonest location of frenum attachment amongst children with lower midline diastema was the mucogingival junction (86%) whereas amongst those with upper midline diastema it was attached gingiva (50%). None of the children had frenum attachment on the interdental papilla. It was concluded that the maxilla had a higher prevalence of midline diastema than the mandible and that papillary penetrating frenum attachments amongst these patients were higher in the maxilla than the mandible. PMID:10530193

  12. Psychophysical properties of line bisection and body midline perception in unilateral neglect.

    PubMed

    Pizzamiglio, L; Committeri, G; Galati, G; Patria, F

    2000-09-01

    Past research associated unilateral neglect with a systematic ipsilesional shift of the perceived position of the body midline; however, this was not confirmed by recent experiments. We used the constant stimuli method to control for potential artifacts intrinsic to the techniques used in previous studies. Body midline perception was measured in the visual and proprioceptive modalities in ten patients with left unilateral neglect, ten control patients and ten normal subjects and compared with a visual line bisection task, also using the constant stimuli method. Neglect patients showed a significant rightward bias in the line bisection task, but no consistent directional bias either in the proprioceptive or in the visual body midline task. These results clearly counter the association between neglect and an ipsilesional shift of the body midline. However, in the body midline tasks neglect patients made more errors in judgement on both sides of their subjective midline, both with respect to the control groups and with respect to the line bisection task. This may imply that a specific impairment of body-centered representations is indeed present and manifests as a non directional increase in response variability, rather than as a systematic shift. It is suggested that body- and object-related tasks (such as line bisection) may be processed by independent cognitive computations. This interpretation is discussed with reference to a recent neuroimaging study investigating the same kinds of tasks. PMID:11059450

  13. Extracardiac anomalies in the heterotaxy syndromes with focus on anomalies of midline-associated structures.

    PubMed

    Ticho, B S; Goldstein, A M; Van Praagh, R

    2000-03-15

    The extracardiac defects in patients with heterotaxy have not been examined as extensively as cardiac defects. We found a high incidence of midline-associated defects in 160 autopsied cases of heterotaxy (asplenia, polysplenia, or single right-sided spleen). Fifty-two percent of patients with left-sided polysplenia had a midline-associated defect, as did 45% of those with asplenia. Most common were musculoskeletal or genitourinary anomalies, as well as cleft palate. Fused adrenal glands and anal stenosis or atresia occurred exclusively among patients with asplenia. A midline anomaly was twice as likely to be detected on complete autopsy than from clinical findings alone. Linkage studies should take into account that affected subjects may have isolated subclinical midline defects. The high incidence of midline-associated defects supports the theory that the midline plays a critical role in establishing left-right asymmetry in the body. Comparison of these defects with mouse models of laterality defects suggests that mutations that disrupt the transforming growth factor beta pathway may result in heterotaxy. PMID:12000048

  14. Mushroom body defect is required in parallel to Netrin for midline axon guidance in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cate, Marie-Sophie; Gajendra, Sangeetha; Alsbury, Samantha; Raabe, Thomas; Tear, Guy; Mitchell, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The outgrowth of many neurons within the central nervous system is initially directed towards or away from the cells lying at the midline. Recent genetic evidence suggests that a simple model of differential sensitivity to the conserved Netrin attractants and Slit repellents is insufficient to explain the guidance of all axons at the midline. In the Drosophila embryonic ventral nerve cord, many axons still cross the midline in the absence of the Netrin genes (NetA and NetB) or their receptor frazzled. Here we show that mutation of mushroom body defect (mud) dramatically enhances the phenotype of Netrin or frazzled mutants, resulting in many more axons failing to cross the midline, although mutations in mud alone have little effect. This suggests that mud, which encodes a microtubule-binding coiled-coil protein homologous to NuMA and LIN-5, is an essential component of a Netrin-independent pathway that acts in parallel to promote midline crossing. We demonstrate that this novel role of Mud in axon guidance is independent of its previously described role in neural precursor development. These studies identify a parallel pathway controlling midline guidance in Drosophila and highlight a novel role for Mud potentially acting downstream of Frizzled to aid axon guidance. PMID:26893348

  15. Mushroom body defect is required in parallel to Netrin for midline axon guidance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cate, Marie-Sophie; Gajendra, Sangeetha; Alsbury, Samantha; Raabe, Thomas; Tear, Guy; Mitchell, Kevin J

    2016-03-15

    The outgrowth of many neurons within the central nervous system is initially directed towards or away from the cells lying at the midline. Recent genetic evidence suggests that a simple model of differential sensitivity to the conserved Netrin attractants and Slit repellents is insufficient to explain the guidance of all axons at the midline. In the Drosophila embryonic ventral nerve cord, many axons still cross the midline in the absence of the Netrin genes (NetA and NetB) or their receptor frazzled. Here we show that mutation of mushroom body defect (mud) dramatically enhances the phenotype of Netrin or frazzled mutants, resulting in many more axons failing to cross the midline, although mutations in mud alone have little effect. This suggests that mud, which encodes a microtubule-binding coiled-coil protein homologous to NuMA and LIN-5, is an essential component of a Netrin-independent pathway that acts in parallel to promote midline crossing. We demonstrate that this novel role of Mud in axon guidance is independent of its previously described role in neural precursor development. These studies identify a parallel pathway controlling midline guidance in Drosophila and highlight a novel role for Mud potentially acting downstream of Frizzled to aid axon guidance. PMID:26893348

  16. Theta oscillations accompanying concurrent auditory stream segregation.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Brigitta; Kocsis, Zsuzsanna; Urbán, Gábor; Winkler, István

    2016-08-01

    The ability to isolate a single sound source among concurrent sources is crucial for veridical auditory perception. The present study investigated the event-related oscillations evoked by complex tones, which could be perceived as a single sound and tonal complexes with cues promoting the perception of two concurrent sounds by inharmonicity, onset asynchrony, and/or perceived source location difference of the components tones. In separate task conditions, participants performed a visual change detection task (visual control), watched a silent movie (passive listening) or reported for each tone whether they perceived one or two concurrent sounds (active listening). In two time windows, the amplitude of theta oscillation was modulated by the presence vs. absence of the cues: 60-350ms/6-8Hz (early) and 350-450ms/4-8Hz (late). The early response appeared both in the passive and the active listening conditions; it did not closely match the task performance; and it had a fronto-central scalp distribution. The late response was only elicited in the active listening condition; it closely matched the task performance; and it had a centro-parietal scalp distribution. The neural processes reflected by these responses are probably involved in the processing of concurrent sound segregation cues, in sound categorization, and response preparation and monitoring. The current results are compatible with the notion that theta oscillations mediate some of the processes involved in concurrent sound segregation. PMID:27170058

  17. Frontal photopolymerization for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Cabral, João T; Hudson, Steven D; Harrison, Christopher; Douglas, Jack F

    2004-11-01

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) offers numerous advantages for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. Quantitative utilization of this method, however, requires a control of the vertical dimensions of the patterned resist material. To address this fundamental problem, we study the ultraviolet (UV) photopolymerization of a series of multifunctional thiolene resists through a combination of experiments and analytical modeling of the polymerization fronts. We describe this nonlinear spatio-temporal growth process in terms of a "minimal" model involving an order parameter phi(x, t) characterizing the extent of monomer-to-polymer conversion, the optical attenuation T(x, t), and the solid front position h(t). The latter exhibits an induction time (or equivalent critical UV dose) characterizing the onset of frontal propagation. We also observe a novel transition between two logarithmic rates of growth, determined by the Beer-Lambert attenuation constants mu(0) and mu(infinity) of the monomer and fully polymerized material, respectively. The measured frontal kinetics and optical transmission of the thiolene resist materials are consistent with our photopolymerization model, exhibiting both "photodarkening" and "photoinvariant" polymerization. This is apparently the first observation of photodarkening reported in FPP. On the basis of these results, multilevel fluidic devices with controlled height are readily fabricated with modulated illumination. A representative two-level microfluidic device, incorporating a chaotic mixer, a T junction, and a series of controlled flow constrictions, illustrates the practical versatility of this fabrication method. PMID:15518489

  18. A theory of alpha/theta neurofeedback, creative performance enhancement, long distance functional connectivity and psychological integration.

    PubMed

    Gruzelier, John

    2009-02-01

    Professionally significant enhancement of music and dance performance and mood has followed training with an EEG-neurofeedback protocol which increases the ratio of theta to alpha waves using auditory feedback with eyes closed. While originally the protocol was designed to induce hypnogogia, a state historically associated with creativity, the outcome was psychological integration, while subsequent applications focusing on raising the theta-alpha ratio, reduced depression and anxiety in alcoholism and resolved post traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD). In optimal performance studies we confirmed associations with creativity in musical performance, but effects also included technique and communication. We extended efficacy to dance and social anxiety. Diversity of outcome has a counterpart in wide ranging associations between theta oscillations and behaviour in cognitive and affective neuroscience: in animals with sensory-motor activity in exploration, effort, working memory, learning, retention and REM sleep; in man with meditative concentration, reduced anxiety and sympathetic autonomic activation, as well as task demands in virtual spatial navigation, focussed and sustained attention, working and recognition memory, and having implications for synaptic plasticity and long term potentiation. Neuroanatomical circuitry involves the ascending mescencephalic-cortical arousal system, and limbic circuits subserving cognitive as well as affective/motivational functions. Working memory and meditative bliss, representing cognitive and affective domains, respectively, involve coupling between frontal and posterior cortices, exemplify a role for theta and alpha waves in mediating the interaction between distal and widely distributed connections. It is posited that this mediation in part underpins the integrational attributes of alpha-theta training in optimal performance and psychotherapy, creative associations in hypnogogia, and enhancement of technical, communication and

  19. Fracture of the frontal sinus in children.

    PubMed

    Weber, S C; Cohn, A M

    1977-04-01

    Two juvenile patients, ages 5 and 8, had traumatic fractures of the frontal sinus that included involvement of the nasal-frontal ducts and posterior tables. Principles of management are discussed and the techniques for the operative procedures described. While rare in occurrence in children, it is felt that traumatic involvement of the nasal-frontal ducts or posterior tables of the frontal sinus requires an osteoplastic flap--fat obliteration of the frontal sinus cavity in order to preclude subsequent mucocele development or mucosal ingrowth into the anterior fossa. PMID:849204

  20. [Frontal osteoplasty technique. Report of a case of giant frontal osteoma].

    PubMed

    García Rodríguez, M R; Cabanas López, A; Fernández Domínguez, A; García Calleja, J M; García Rodríguez, J F

    1991-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with old frontal headache, who was admitted with frontal acute sinusitis symptoms at the emergency service. The radiology study shows a compatible image with frontal osteoma, which was extirpated as being asymptomatic, by frontal osteoplastic technique. The case is described and it is made a frontal osteoma review and the surgical technique used to do it. PMID:2036264

  1. EEG theta/beta ratio as a potential biomarker for attentional control and resilience against deleterious effects of stress on attention.

    PubMed

    Putman, Peter; Verkuil, Bart; Arias-Garcia, Elsa; Pantazi, Ioanna; van Schie, Charlotte

    2014-06-01

    Anxious stress compromises cognitive executive performance. This occurs, for instance, in cognitive performance anxiety (CPA), in which anxiety about one's cognitive performance causes that performance to actually deteriorate (e.g., test anxiety). This is thought to result from a prefrontal cortically (PFC) mediated failure of top-down attentional control over stress-induced automatic processing of threat-related information. In addition, stress-induced increased catecholamine influx into the PFC may directly compromise attentional function. Previous research has suggested that the ratio between resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) low- and high-frequency power (the theta/beta ratio) is related to trait attentional control, which might moderate these effects of stress on attentional function. The goals of the present study were to test the novel prediction that theta/beta ratio moderates the deleterious effects of CPA-like anxious stress on state attentional control and to replicate a previous finding that the theta/beta ratio is related to self-reported trait attentional control. After recording of baseline frontal EEG signals, 77 participants performed a stress induction or a control procedure. Trait attentional control was assessed with the Attentional Control Scale, whereas stress-induced changes in attentional control and anxiety were measured with self-report visual analogue scales. The hypothesized moderating influence of theta/beta ratio on the effects of stress on state attentional control was confirmed. Theta/beta ratio explained 28% of the variance in stress-induced deterioration of self-reported attentional control. The negative relationship between theta/beta ratio and trait attentional control was replicated (r = -.33). The theta/beta ratio reflects, likely prefrontally mediated, attentional control, and should be a useful biomarker for the study of CPA and other anxiety-cognition interactions. PMID:24379166

  2. The neuronal mechanisms underlying improvement of impulsivity in ADHD by theta/beta neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Bluschke, Annet; Broschwitz, Felicia; Kohl, Simon; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback is increasingly recognized as an intervention to treat core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the large number of studies having been carried out to evaluate its effectiveness, it is widely elusive what neuronal mechanisms related to the core symptoms of ADHD are modulated by neurofeedback. 19 children with ADHD undergoing 8 weeks of theta/beta neurofeedback and 17 waiting list controls performed a Go/Nogo task in a pre-post design. We used neurophysiological measures combining high-density EEG recording with source localization analyses using sLORETA. Compared to the waiting list ADHD control group, impulsive behaviour measured was reduced after neurofeedback treatment. The effects of neurofeedback were very specific for situations requiring inhibitory control over responses. The neurophysiological data shows that processes of perceptual gating, attentional selection and resource allocation processes were not affected by neurofeedback. Rather, neurofeedback effects seem to be based on the modulation of response inhibition processes in medial frontal cortices. The study shows that specific neuronal mechanisms underlying impulsivity are modulated by theta/beta neurofeedback in ADHD. The applied neurofeedback protocol could be particularly suitable to address inhibitory control. The study validates assumed functional neuroanatomical target regions of an established neurofeedback protocol on a neurophysiological level. PMID:27514985

  3. The neuronal mechanisms underlying improvement of impulsivity in ADHD by theta/beta neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Bluschke, Annet; Broschwitz, Felicia; Kohl, Simon; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback is increasingly recognized as an intervention to treat core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the large number of studies having been carried out to evaluate its effectiveness, it is widely elusive what neuronal mechanisms related to the core symptoms of ADHD are modulated by neurofeedback. 19 children with ADHD undergoing 8 weeks of theta/beta neurofeedback and 17 waiting list controls performed a Go/Nogo task in a pre-post design. We used neurophysiological measures combining high-density EEG recording with source localization analyses using sLORETA. Compared to the waiting list ADHD control group, impulsive behaviour measured was reduced after neurofeedback treatment. The effects of neurofeedback were very specific for situations requiring inhibitory control over responses. The neurophysiological data shows that processes of perceptual gating, attentional selection and resource allocation processes were not affected by neurofeedback. Rather, neurofeedback effects seem to be based on the modulation of response inhibition processes in medial frontal cortices. The study shows that specific neuronal mechanisms underlying impulsivity are modulated by theta/beta neurofeedback in ADHD. The applied neurofeedback protocol could be particularly suitable to address inhibitory control. The study validates assumed functional neuroanatomical target regions of an established neurofeedback protocol on a neurophysiological level. PMID:27514985

  4. Hippocampo-cerebellar theta band phase synchrony in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wikgren, J; Nokia, M S; Penttonen, M

    2010-02-17

    Hippocampal functioning, in the form of theta band oscillation, has been shown to modulate and predict cerebellar learning of which rabbit eyeblink conditioning is perhaps the most well-known example. The contribution of hippocampal neural activity to cerebellar learning is only possible if there is a functional connection between the two structures. Here, in the context of trace eyeblink conditioning, we show (1) that, in addition to the hippocampus, prominent theta oscillation also occurs in the cerebellum, and (2) that cerebellar theta oscillation is synchronized with that in the hippocampus. Further, the degree of phase synchrony (PS) increased both as a response to the conditioning stimuli and as a function of the relative power of hippocampal theta oscillation. However, the degree of PS did not change as a function of either training or learning nor did it predict learning rate as the hippocampal theta ratio did. Nevertheless, theta band synchronization might reflect the formation of transient neural assemblies between the hippocampus and the cerebellum. These findings help us understand how hippocampal function can affect eyeblink conditioning, during which the critical plasticity occurs in the cerebellum. Future studies should examine cerebellar unit activity in relation to hippocampal theta oscillations in order to discover the detailed mechanisms of theta-paced neural activity. PMID:19945512

  5. Theta Phase Synchrony and Conscious Target Perception

    PubMed Central

    Slagter, Heleen A.; Lutz, Antoine; Greischar, Lawrence L.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Davidson, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The information processing capacity of the human mind is limited, as is evidenced by the attentional blink—a deficit in identifying the second of two targets (T1 and T2) presented in close succession. This deficit is thought to result from an overinvestment of limited resources in T1 processing. We previously reported that intensive mental training in a style of meditation aimed at reducing elaborate object processing, reduced brain resource allocation to T1, and improved T2 accuracy [Slagter, H. A., Lutz, A., Greisschar, L. L., Frances, A. D., Nieuwenhuis, S., Davis, J., et al. Mental training affects distribution of limited brain resources. PloS Biology, 5, e138, 2007]. Here we report EEG spectral analyses to examine the possibility that this reduction in elaborate T1 processing rendered the system more available to process new target information, as indexed by T2-locked phase variability. Intensive mental training was associated with decreased cross-trial variability in the phase of oscillatory theta activity after successfully detected T2s, in particular, for those individuals who showed the greatest reduction in brain resource allocation to T1. These data implicate theta phase locking in conscious target perception, and suggest that after mental training the cognitive system is more rapidly available to process new target information. Mental training was not associated with changes in the amplitude of T2-induced responses or oscillatory activity before task onset. In combination, these findings illustrate the usefulness of systematic mental training in the study of the human mind by revealing the neural mechanisms that enable the brain to successfully represent target information. PMID:18823234

  6. Biomechanics of frontal skull fracture.

    PubMed

    Delye, Hans; Verschueren, Peter; Depreitere, Bart; Verpoest, Ignaas; Berckmans, Daniel; Vander Sloten, Jos; Van Der Perre, Georges; Goffin, Jan

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether an energy failure level applies to the skull fracture mechanics in unembalmed post-mortem human heads under dynamic frontal loading conditions. A double-pendulum model was used to conduct frontal impact tests on specimens from 18 unembalmed post-mortem human subjects. The specimens were isolated at the occipital condyle level, and pre-test computed tomography images were obtained. The specimens were rigidly attached to an aluminum pendulum in an upside down position and obtained a single degree of freedom, allowing motion in the plane of impact. A steel pendulum delivered the impact and was fitted with a flat-surfaced, cylindrical aluminum impactor, which distributed the load to a force sensor. The relative displacement between the two pendulums was used as a measure for the deformation of the specimen in the plane of impact. Three impact velocity conditions were created: low (3.60+/-0.23 m/sec), intermediate (5.21+/-0.04 m/sec), and high (6.95+/-0.04 m/sec) velocity. Computed tomography and dissection techniques were used to detect pathology. If no fracture was detected, repeated tests on the same specimen were performed with higher impact energy until fracture occurred. Peak force, displacement and energy variables were used to describe the biomechanics. Our data suggests the existence of an energy failure level in the range of 22-24 J for dynamic frontal loading of an intact unembalmed head, allowed to move with one degree of freedom. Further experiments, however, are necessary to confirm that this is a definitive energy criterion for skull fracture following impact. PMID:17970621

  7. Neural circuits underlying the generation of theta oscillations.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Michele; Beyeler, Anna; Leinekugel, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Theta oscillations represent the neural network configuration underlying active awake behavior and paradoxical sleep. This major EEG pattern has been extensively studied, from physiological to anatomical levels, for more than half a century. Nevertheless the cellular and network mechanisms accountable for the theta generation are still not fully understood. This review synthesizes the current knowledge on the circuitry involved in the generation of theta oscillations, from the hippocampus to extra hippocampal structures such as septal complex, entorhinal cortex and pedunculopontine tegmentum, a main trigger of theta state through direct and indirect projections to the septal complex. We conclude with a short overview of the perspectives offered by technical advances for deciphering more precisely the different neural components underlying the emergence of theta oscillations. PMID:21964249

  8. Clinical Utilization of M Spring for the Space Closure of Midline Diastema – Clinical Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Hanumanth; Kommi, Pradeep Babu; Arani, Nandakumar; Keerthi, V. Naga

    2016-01-01

    People approach orthodontist mainly for aesthetic purpose, midline diastema is one of the condition which causes aesthetic compromise. The midline diastema can be caused by various reasons such as high frenal attachment, midline pathology, etc. In the field of orthodontics, relapse rate is high while treating midline diastema. This relapse can be reduced only when there is bodily movement of the incisors in mesial direction. In this article, two cases of midline diastema are selected. Both the cases were treated using “M” spring which has three coils; two at periphery and one at the center and each coil was of 3mm diameter. “M” spring was fabricated using round 0.018” AJ Wilcock wire for one case and 0.017 X 0.025 TMA for another case. For both cases the duration of treatment was for six weeks. IOPA was taken after six weeks, the case in which rectangular wire was used; there was bodily movement of the central incisor in mesial direction. Whereas in round wire technique, predominantly tipping type of tooth movement was seen. The rectangular wire has two point contacts, because of which bodily movement was obtained. This technique of using rectangular wire to fabricate “M” spring has less inventory and chair side time. PMID:27135014

  9. Clinical Utilization of M Spring for the Space Closure of Midline Diastema - Clinical Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Kanyas, S Dhivya; Sankar, Hanumanth; Kommi, Pradeep Babu; Arani, Nandakumar; Keerthi, V Naga

    2016-03-01

    People approach orthodontist mainly for aesthetic purpose, midline diastema is one of the condition which causes aesthetic compromise. The midline diastema can be caused by various reasons such as high frenal attachment, midline pathology, etc. In the field of orthodontics, relapse rate is high while treating midline diastema. This relapse can be reduced only when there is bodily movement of the incisors in mesial direction. In this article, two cases of midline diastema are selected. Both the cases were treated using "M" spring which has three coils; two at periphery and one at the center and each coil was of 3mm diameter. "M" spring was fabricated using round 0.018" AJ Wilcock wire for one case and 0.017 X 0.025 TMA for another case. For both cases the duration of treatment was for six weeks. IOPA was taken after six weeks, the case in which rectangular wire was used; there was bodily movement of the central incisor in mesial direction. Whereas in round wire technique, predominantly tipping type of tooth movement was seen. The rectangular wire has two point contacts, because of which bodily movement was obtained. This technique of using rectangular wire to fabricate "M" spring has less inventory and chair side time. PMID:27135014

  10. Regeneration and maintenance of the planarian midline is regulated by a slit orthologue.

    PubMed

    Cebrià, Francesc; Guo, Tingxia; Jopek, Jessica; Newmark, Phillip A

    2007-07-15

    Several families of evolutionarily conserved axon guidance cues orchestrate the precise wiring of the nervous system during embryonic development. The remarkable plasticity of freshwater planarians provides the opportunity to study these molecules in the context of neural regeneration and maintenance. Here we characterize a homologue of the Slit family of guidance cues from the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Smed-slit is expressed along the planarian midline, in both dorsal and ventral domains. RNA interference (RNAi) targeting Smed-slit results in the collapse of many newly regenerated tissues at the midline; these include the cephalic ganglia, ventral nerve cords, photoreceptors, and the posterior digestive system. Surprisingly, Smed-slit RNAi knockdown animals also develop morphologically distinguishable, ectopic neural structures near the midline in uninjured regions of intact and regenerating planarians. These results suggest that Smed-slit acts not only as a repulsive cue required for proper midline formation during regeneration but that it may also act to regulate the behavior of neural precursors at the midline in intact planarians. PMID:17553481

  11. Slow-Theta-to-Gamma Phase-Amplitude Coupling in Human Hippocampus Supports the Formation of New Episodic Memories.

    PubMed

    Lega, Bradley; Burke, John; Jacobs, Joshua; Kahana, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) has been proposed as a neural mechanism for coordinating information processing across brain regions. Here we sought to characterize PAC in the human hippocampus, and in temporal and frontal cortices, during the formation of new episodic memories. Intracranial recordings taken as 56 neurosurgical patients studied and recalled lists of words revealed significant hippocampal PAC, with slow-theta activity (2.5-5 Hz) modulating gamma band activity (34-130 Hz). Furthermore, a significant number of hippocampal electrodes exhibited greater PAC during successful than unsuccessful encoding, with the gamma activity at these sites coupled to the trough of the slow-theta oscillation. These same conditions facilitate LTP in animal models, providing a possible mechanism of action for this effect in human memory. Uniquely in the hippocampus, phase preference during item encoding exhibited a biphasic pattern. Overall, our findings help translate between the patterns identified during basic memory tasks in animals and those present during complex human memory encoding. We discuss the unique properties of human hippocampal PAC and how our findings relate to influential theories of information processing based on theta-gamma interactions. PMID:25316340

  12. FGF-dependent midline-derived progenitor cells in hypothalamic infundibular development.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Caroline Alayne; Ohyama, Kyoji; Manning, Liz; Aghamohammadzadeh, Soheil; Sang, Helen; Placzek, Marysia

    2011-06-01

    The infundibulum links the nervous and endocrine systems, serving as a crucial integrating centre for body homeostasis. Here we describe that the chick infundibulum derives from two subsets of anterior ventral midline cells. One set remains at the ventral midline and forms the posterior-ventral infundibulum. A second set migrates laterally, forming a collar around the midline. We show that collar cells are composed of Fgf3(+) SOX3(+) proliferating progenitors, the induction of which is SHH dependent, but the maintenance of which requires FGF signalling. Collar cells proliferate late into embryogenesis, can generate neurospheres that passage extensively, and differentiate to distinct fates, including hypothalamic neuronal fates and Fgf10(+) anterior-dorsal infundibular cells. Together, our study shows that a subset of anterior floor plate-like cells gives rise to Fgf3(+) SOX3(+) progenitor cells, demonstrates a dual origin of infundibular cells and reveals a crucial role for FGF signalling in governing extended infundibular growth. PMID:21610037

  13. Comparative study between lag screw and miniplate fixation for straight midline mandibular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Dediol, E; Čvrljević, I; Dobranić, M; Uglešić, V

    2014-04-01

    The mandibular swing approach is a surgical approach for the resection of malignant lesions localized in the posterior oral cavity and oropharynx. We analyzed 15 years of experience with fixation of the straight midline mandibulotomy and compared two fixation methods: lag screws and miniplates. A total of 117 patients underwent a straight midline mandibulotomy during the study period; 85 had fixation with two lag screws and 32 with two miniplates. The overall complication rate was low and there was no significant difference in complication rate regarding the fixation method (9% for miniplates vs. 7% for lag screws). The most serious complication over the whole study period was non union, which occurred in only two patients, followed by orocutaneous fistula and infection. Radiotherapy did not cause serious complications and is not regarded as hazardous in midline mandibulotomy patients. We conclude that lag screw fixation is at least as safe as miniplate fixation, but because of better fragment compression, offers faster bone healing. PMID:24100153

  14. Pleomorphic Adenoma of Base of Tongue: Is Midline Mandibulotomy Necessary for Approaching Benign Base Tongue Lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sandeep; Kalsotra, Gopika; Mohammed, Abdul Wadood; Bahl, Amanjit; Gupta, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To report a rare presentation of pleomorphic adenoma, at base tongue, excised surgically by a transoral midline glossotomy technique without mandibulotomy. Case Report. Pleomorphic adenoma is a benign tumor of the salivary gland found rarely in the base of tongue. Surgery is the definitive treatment for this tumor, and different approaches have been mentioned in the literature. In our case we surgically excised the tumor by a transoral midline glossotomy technique without mandibulotomy where we combined the cosmetic advantage of transoral technique and the exposure advantage of a glossotomy technique. Discussion. We discuss the different approaches to oropharynx, their advantages and disadvantages. Primary transoral approach provides better cosmesis but less exposure whereas median labiomandibuloglossotomy approach provides more exposure but is cosmetically unacceptable. Conclusion. A transoral midline glossotomy approach without mandibulotomy provides wide exposure with acceptable cosmesis. PMID:22953125

  15. FGF-dependent midline-derived progenitor cells in hypothalamic infundibular development

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Caroline Alayne; Ohyama, Kyoji; Manning, Liz; Aghamohammadzadeh, Soheil; Sang, Helen; Placzek, Marysia

    2011-01-01

    The infundibulum links the nervous and endocrine systems, serving as a crucial integrating centre for body homeostasis. Here we describe that the chick infundibulum derives from two subsets of anterior ventral midline cells. One set remains at the ventral midline and forms the posterior-ventral infundibulum. A second set migrates laterally, forming a collar around the midline. We show that collar cells are composed of Fgf3+ SOX3+ proliferating progenitors, the induction of which is SHH dependent, but the maintenance of which requires FGF signalling. Collar cells proliferate late into embryogenesis, can generate neurospheres that passage extensively, and differentiate to distinct fates, including hypothalamic neuronal fates and Fgf10+ anterior-dorsal infundibular cells. Together, our study shows that a subset of anterior floor plate-like cells gives rise to Fgf3+ SOX3+ progenitor cells, demonstrates a dual origin of infundibular cells and reveals a crucial role for FGF signalling in governing extended infundibular growth. PMID:21610037

  16. Anatomic Considerations in Frontal Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Folbe, Adam J; Svider, Peter F; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2016-08-01

    Comprehension of the complex anatomic variants comprising the frontal sinus outflow tract is essential for successful surgical intervention. Deviation from sound technique increases the potential for a variety of deleterious sequelae, including recurrent disease as well as catastrophic intracranial and orbital injury. Furthermore, incomplete removal of elements occluding the frontal recess can result in severe stenosis that can increase the difficulty of further interventions. This review covers anatomic considerations that should be kept in mind when performing frontal sinus surgery. PMID:27329978

  17. Theta synchronizes the activity of medial prefrontal neurons during learning.

    PubMed

    Paz, Rony; Bauer, Elizabeth P; Paré, Denis

    2008-07-01

    Memory consolidation is thought to involve the gradual transfer of transient hippocampal-dependent traces to distributed neocortical sites via the rhinal cortices. Recently, medial prefrontal (mPFC) neurons were shown to facilitate this process when their activity becomes synchronized. However, the mechanisms underlying this enhanced synchrony remain unclear. Because the hippocampus projects to the mPFC, we tested whether theta oscillations contribute to synchronize mPFC neurons during learning. Thus, we obtained field (LFP) and unit recordings from multiple mPFC sites during the acquisition of a trace-conditioning task, where a visual conditioned stimulus (CS) predicted reward delivery. In quiet waking, the activity of mPFC neurons was modulated by theta oscillations. During conditioning, CS presentation caused an increase in mPFC theta power that augmented as the CS gained predictive value for reward delivery. This increased theta power coincided with a transient theta phase locking at distributed mPFC sites, an effect that was also manifest in the timing of mPFC unit activity. Overall, these results show that theta oscillations contribute to synchronize neuronal activity at distributed mPFC sites, suggesting that the hippocampus, by generating a stronger theta source during learning, can synchronize mPFC activity, in turn facilitating rhinal transfer of its activity to the neocortex. PMID:18612069

  18. Overview of Frontal Sinus Pathology and Management.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Alejandro; Baredes, Soly; Setzen, Michael; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2016-08-01

    The frontal sinus is the most complex of all paranasal sinuses. Given its proximity to the cranial vault and orbit, frontal sinus pathology can progress to involve these structures and lead to significant morbidity, or even mortality. Surgical management of the frontal sinus is technically challenging. Various open and endoscopic surgical techniques are available to the otolaryngologist. This article presents an overview of the major disease entities that affect the frontal sinus, with a special emphasis on treatment principles and surgical management. PMID:27329984

  19. A Comparison of Midline and Tracheal Gene Regulation during Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Long, Sarah K. R.; Fulkerson, Eric; Breese, Rebecca; Hernandez, Giovanna; Davis, Cara; Melton, Mark A.; Chandran, Rachana R.; Butler, Napoleon; Jiang, Lan; Estes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Within the Drosophila embryo, two related bHLH-PAS proteins, Single-minded and Trachealess, control development of the central nervous system midline and the trachea, respectively. These two proteins are bHLH-PAS transcription factors and independently form heterodimers with another bHLH-PAS protein, Tango. During early embryogenesis, expression of Single-minded is restricted to the midline and Trachealess to the trachea and salivary glands, whereas Tango is ubiquitously expressed. Both Single-minded/Tango and Trachealess/Tango heterodimers bind to the same DNA sequence, called the CNS midline element (CME) within cis-regulatory sequences of downstream target genes. While Single-minded/Tango and Trachealess/Tango activate some of the same genes in their respective tissues during embryogenesis, they also activate a number of different genes restricted to only certain tissues. The goal of this research is to understand how these two related heterodimers bind different enhancers to activate different genes, thereby regulating the development of functionally diverse tissues. Existing data indicates that Single-minded and Trachealess may bind to different co-factors restricted to various tissues, causing them to interact with the CME only within certain sequence contexts. This would lead to the activation of different target genes in different cell types. To understand how the context surrounding the CME is recognized by different bHLH-PAS heterodimers and their co-factors, we identified and analyzed novel enhancers that drive midline and/or tracheal expression and compared them to previously characterized enhancers. In addition, we tested expression of synthetic reporter genes containing the CME flanked by different sequences. Taken together, these experiments identify elements overrepresented within midline and tracheal enhancers and suggest that sequences immediately surrounding a CME help dictate whether a gene is expressed in the midline or trachea. PMID:24465586

  20. Analysis of the energetic parameters of a theta pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalcanti, G. H.; Farias, E. E.

    2009-12-15

    This work is devoted to study experimentally the performance of a theta pinch when the number of capacitors and turns of magnetic coil and the diameter of the glass tube are changed. To model the theta pinch a simple RLC circuit is used and the measurement of energy transmission from the bank of capacitors to the plasma is made using few experimental resources. In this work it was analyzed more than 2500 curves with a nonlinear procedure. Our results show that it is possible to design an optimized theta pinch making the appropriated choice of energetic parameters and therefore to reduce the stress of the system.

  1. Numerical studies of frontal dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Efforts concentrated on the development of a two dimensional primitive equation (PE) model of frontogenesis that simultaneously incorporates the frontagenetical mechanisms of confluence and horizontal shear. Applying this model to study the effects of upper level frontogenesis, it appeared to be dominated by tilting effects associated with cross front variation of vertical motion, in which subsidence is maximized within and to the warm side of the frontal zone. Results suggest that aspects characteristic of three-dimensional baroclinic waves may be abstracted to a significant extent in a two dimensional framework. They also show that upper-level frontogenesis and tropopause folding can occur in the absence of three-dimensional curvature effects, commonly believed to be necessary for realistic upper-level frontogenesis. An implication of the dominant tilting effects is that they may have to be adequately resolved by numerical weather prediction models, thus requiring better horizontal and vertical resolution.

  2. Intrinsic Cornu Ammonis Area 1 Theta-Nested Gamma Oscillations Induced by Optogenetic Theta Frequency Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James L.; Mendonça, Philipe R. F.; Robinson, Hugh P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma oscillations (30–120 Hz) are thought to be important for various cognitive functions, including perception and working memory, and disruption of these oscillations has been implicated in brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. The cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) of the hippocampus receives gamma frequency inputs from upstream regions (cornu ammonis area 3 and medial entorhinal cortex) and generates itself a faster gamma oscillation. The exact nature and origin of the intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillation is still under debate. Here, we expressed channelrhodopsin-2 under the CaMKIIα promoter in mice and prepared hippocampal slices to produce a model of intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillations. Sinusoidal optical stimulation of CA1 at theta frequency was found to induce robust theta-nested gamma oscillations with a temporal and spatial profile similar to CA1 gamma in vivo. The results suggest the presence of a single gamma rhythm generator with a frequency range of 65–75 Hz at 32°C. Pharmacological analysis found that the oscillations depended on both AMPA and GABAA receptors. Cell-attached and whole-cell recordings revealed that excitatory neuron firing slightly preceded interneuron firing within each gamma cycle, suggesting that this intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillation is generated with a pyramidal–interneuron circuit mechanism. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study demonstrates that the cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) is capable of generating intrinsic gamma oscillations in response to theta input. This gamma generator is independent of activity in the upstream regions, highlighting that CA1 can produce its own gamma oscillation in addition to inheriting activity from the upstream regions. This supports the theory that gamma oscillations predominantly function to achieve local synchrony, and that a local gamma generated in each area conducts the signal to the downstream region. PMID:27076416

  3. Reversed theta sequences of hippocampal cell assemblies during backward travel.

    PubMed

    Cei, Anne; Girardeau, Gabrielle; Drieu, Céline; Kanbi, Karim El; Zugaro, Michaël

    2014-05-01

    Hippocampal cell assemblies coding for past, present and future events form theta-timescale (~100 ms) sequences that represent spatio-temporal episodes. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We recorded hippocampal and entorhinal cortical activity as rats experienced backward travel on a model train. Although the firing fields of place cells remained stable, the order in which they were activated in the theta sequence was reversed during backward travel. Thus, hippocampal cell assemblies coordinated their relative timing to correctly predict the sequential traversal of place fields in reverse order. At the single-cell level, theta phase represented distance traveled through the field, even though the head of the rat was oriented opposite to travel direction and entorhinal head-direction cells maintained their preferred firing direction. Our results challenge most theoretical models of theta sequence generation in the hippocampus. PMID:24667574

  4. Simultaneous observations of a theta aurora and associated magnetotail plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.Y.; Craven, J.D.; Frank, L.A.

    1989-08-01

    Observations of a transpolar arc and simultaneous measurements of associated plasmas in the magnetotail lobe on March 25, 1982, are presented. The auroral imager on board Dynamics Explorer 1 observes a theta aurora in the northern polar cap for more than 2 hours, between 0502 and 0720 UT. ISEE 1 is located in the southern lobe of the geomagnetic tail at a distance of 22.2 RE during this time. The plasma and particle detectors measure intermittent bursts of particle fluxes between 0530 and 0705 UT. The observations suggest that these particle fluxes represent the high-altitude signature of a theta aurora in the southern polar cap. The relatively dense and energetic plasmas are organized into several filamentary structures. Magnetic mapping between the two polar regions indicates that the theta aurora in the southern hemisphere is a mirror reflection about the noon-midnight meridional plane of the theta aurora in the northern hemisphere.

  5. Hippocampal-Prefrontal Theta Oscillations Support Memory Integration.

    PubMed

    Backus, Alexander R; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Szebényi, Szabolcs; Hanslmayr, Simon; Doeller, Christian F

    2016-02-22

    Integration of separate memories forms the basis of inferential reasoning--an essential cognitive process that enables complex behavior. Considerable evidence suggests that both hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) play a crucial role in memory integration. Although previous studies indicate that theta oscillations facilitate memory processes, the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying memory integration remain elusive. To bridge this gap, we recorded magnetoencephalography data while participants performed an inference task and employed novel source reconstruction techniques to estimate oscillatory signals from the hippocampus. We found that hippocampal theta power during encoding predicts subsequent memory integration. Moreover, we observed increased theta coherence between hippocampus and mPFC. Our results suggest that integrated memory representations arise through hippocampal theta oscillations, possibly reflecting dynamic switching between encoding and retrieval states, and facilitating communication with mPFC. These findings have important implications for our understanding of memory-based decision making and knowledge acquisition. PMID:26832442

  6. The cos-theta coil re-re-visited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Precision measurement of symmetry violating effects such the electric dipole moment (EDM) of fundamental particles requires extremely uniform fields. The cos-theta coil is the standard workhorse for generating uniform transverse magnetic fields in these experiments. Limitations in field uniformity include fringe effects (finite length), discretization (finite number of wires), and construction tolerance (finite resources). The field can be isolated from its environment by superposition of two coaxial cos-theta coils of different radii and opposite magnetic moment (double-cos-theta coil), or by shielding the coil inside a permeable or superconducting cylinder. I will discuss methods for optimizing the field uniformity of a compact cos-theta coil, and compare the ultimate limit on errors due to each source described above. Within the context of the scalar potential, I will show a straightforward generalization to non-circular coils with z- or ϕ-symmetry. Supported in part by DOE contract DE-SC0008107.

  7. Simultaneous observations of a theta aurora and associated magnetotail plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of a transpolar arc and simultaneous measurements of associated plasmas in the magnetotail lobe on March 25, 1982, are presented. The auroral imager on board Dynamics Explorer 1 observes a theta aurora in the northern polar cap for more than two hours, between 0502 and 0720 UT. ISEE 1 is located in the southern lobe of the geomagnetic tail at a distance of 22.2 R(E) during this time. The plasma and particle detectors measure intermittent bursts of particle fluxes between 0530 and 0705 UT. The observations suggest that these particle fluxes represent the high-altitude signature of a theta aurora in the southern polar cap. The relatively dense and energetic plasmas are organized into several filamentary structures. Magnetic mapping between the two polar regions indicates that the theta aurora in the Southern Hemisphere is a mirror reflection about the noon-midnight meridional plane of the theta aurora in the Northern Hemisphere.

  8. Neutrino mass hierarchy determination for theta{sub 13} = 0

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Raj; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Sankar, S. Uma

    2010-03-30

    We examine the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy in the limit theta{sub 13} = 0 using atmospheric neutrinos as the source. In this limit, theta{sub 13} driven matter effects are absent so independent measurements of DELTA{sub 31} and DELTA{sub 32} can, in principle, lead to hierarchy determination. Since their difference is DELTA{sub 21}, one needs an experimental arrangement where DELTA{sub 21}L/E > or approx. 1 can be achieved. This can be satisfied by atmospheric neutrinos which have a large range of L and E. Still, we find that hierarchy determination in the theta{sub 13} = 0 limit with atmospheric neutrinos is not a realistic possibility, even in conjunction with a beam experiment like T2K or NOnuA. We discuss why, and also reiterate the general conditions for hierarchy determination if theta{sub 13} = 0.

  9. Probing {theta}{sub 23} in neutrino telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Choubey, Sandhya; Niro, Viviana; Rodejohann, Werner

    2008-06-01

    Among all neutrino mixing parameters, the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 23} introduces the strongest variation on the flux ratios of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos. We investigate the potential of these flux ratio measurements at neutrino telescopes to constrain {theta}{sub 23}. We consider astrophysical neutrinos originating from pion, muon-damped, and neutron sources and make a comparative study of their sensitivity reach to {theta}{sub 23}. It is found that neutron sources are most favorable for testing deviations from maximal {theta}{sub 23}. Using a {chi}{sup 2} analysis, we show, in particular, the power of combining (i) different flux ratios from the same type of source, and also (ii) combining flux ratios from different astrophysical sources. We include in our analysis 'impure' sources, i.e., deviations from the usually assumed initial (1 ratio 2 ratio 0), (0 ratio 1 ratio 0), or (1 ratio 0 ratio 0) flux compositions.

  10. Transient global amnesia and left frontal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Jacome, D. E.; Yanez, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    A patient developed spontaneous, acute, dominant frontal lobe haemorrhage neighbouring on a zone of pre-existing post-traumatic encephalomalacia manifesting clinically as transient global amnesia. Amnesia can be secondary to disease of the frontal lobe, affecting pathways interconnecting the basal forebrain and hippocampus of the temporal lobe. Images Figure 1 PMID:3174526

  11. The surgery of frontal sinus infection.

    PubMed

    Du Preez, S F; Collard, W M; Sellars, S L

    1975-11-01

    A clinical and surgical review of 37 patients treated for acute and chronic frontal sinusitis at Groote Schuur Hospital during the 6-year period 1967-1972, is presented. The mode of clinical presentation of this disease and its complications are discussed, and the surgical management of frontal sinus disease as practised at this hospital is described. PMID:1198214

  12. Human frontal lobes are not relatively large.

    PubMed

    Barton, Robert A; Venditti, Chris

    2013-05-28

    One of the most pervasive assumptions about human brain evolution is that it involved relative enlargement of the frontal lobes. We show that this assumption is without foundation. Analysis of five independent data sets using correctly scaled measures and phylogenetic methods reveals that the size of human frontal lobes, and of specific frontal regions, is as expected relative to the size of other brain structures. Recent claims for relative enlargement of human frontal white matter volume, and for relative enlargement shared by all great apes, seem to be mistaken. Furthermore, using a recently developed method for detecting shifts in evolutionary rates, we find that the rate of change in relative frontal cortex volume along the phylogenetic branch leading to humans was unremarkable and that other branches showed significantly faster rates of change. Although absolute and proportional frontal region size increased rapidly in humans, this change was tightly correlated with corresponding size increases in other areas and whole brain size, and with decreases in frontal neuron densities. The search for the neural basis of human cognitive uniqueness should therefore focus less on the frontal lobes in isolation and more on distributed neural networks. PMID:23671074

  13. Human frontal lobes are not relatively large

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Robert A.; Venditti, Chris

    2013-01-01

    One of the most pervasive assumptions about human brain evolution is that it involved relative enlargement of the frontal lobes. We show that this assumption is without foundation. Analysis of five independent data sets using correctly scaled measures and phylogenetic methods reveals that the size of human frontal lobes, and of specific frontal regions, is as expected relative to the size of other brain structures. Recent claims for relative enlargement of human frontal white matter volume, and for relative enlargement shared by all great apes, seem to be mistaken. Furthermore, using a recently developed method for detecting shifts in evolutionary rates, we find that the rate of change in relative frontal cortex volume along the phylogenetic branch leading to humans was unremarkable and that other branches showed significantly faster rates of change. Although absolute and proportional frontal region size increased rapidly in humans, this change was tightly correlated with corresponding size increases in other areas and whole brain size, and with decreases in frontal neuron densities. The search for the neural basis of human cognitive uniqueness should therefore focus less on the frontal lobes in isolation and more on distributed neural networks. PMID:23671074

  14. Midline Crossing: Developmental Trend from 3 to 10 Years of Age in a Preferential Card-Reaching Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlier, M.; Doyen, A.-L.; Lamard, C.

    2006-01-01

    We assessed 110 left-handed and 322 right-handed children aged from 3 to 10 years, using Bishop's card-reaching task. Manual body midline crossings were observed. A regular developmental trend was observed from 3 to 10 years: older children crossed the body midline more frequently when reaching for cards than did younger children. The factor age…

  15. Neonatal Stroke Causes Poor Midline Motor Behaviors and Poor Fine and Gross Motor Skills during Early Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chao-Ying; Lo, Warren D.; Heathcock, Jill C.

    2013-01-01

    Upper extremity movements, midline behaviors, fine, and gross motor skills are frequently impaired in hemiparesis and cerebral palsy. We investigated midline toy exploration and fine and gross motor skills in infants at risk for hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Eight infants with neonatal stroke (NS) and thirteen infants with typical development (TD)…

  16. Maxillary Midline diastema closure after replacement of primary teeth with implant prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Al-Saqabi, Farah Y; Fenlon, Michael R; Bavisha, Kalpesh A

    2015-05-01

    This case shows an excellent esthetic treatment outcome using implant-retained crowns replacing maxillary laterals and canines in hypodontia patient with unusual incidence of spontaneous diastema closure after the placement of implants. To our knowledge, this is the first case report showing maxillary midline diastema closure after implant placement. PMID:25984308

  17. Transient Relay Function of Midline Thalamic Nuclei during Long-Term Memory Consolidation in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thielen, Jan-Willem; Takashima, Atsuko; Rutters, Femke; Tendolkar, Indira; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that thalamic midline nuclei play a transient role in memory consolidation, we reanalyzed a prospective functional MRI study, contrasting recent and progressively more remote memory retrieval. We revealed a transient thalamic connectivity increase with the hippocampus, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and a…

  18. Cooperation or competition of the two hemispheres in processing characters presented at vertical midline.

    PubMed

    Verleger, Rolf; Dittmer, Marie; Smigasiewicz, Kamila

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how the hemispheres interact in processing of stimuli presented at vertical midline. Processing might be mutually independent or cooperative. Here we measured target identification and visually evoked EEG potentials while stimulus streams containing two targets, T1 and T2, were either presented at vertical midline above and below fixation, or laterally, left and right. With left and right streams, potentials evoked by filler stimuli and by T2 were earlier at the right than the left visual cortex, and T2 was better identified left than right, confirming earlier results and suggesting better capabilities of the right hemisphere in this task. With streams above and below fixation, EEG potentials evoked by filler stimuli and by T2 were likewise earlier at the right than the left hemisphere, and T2 was generally identified as well as, but not better than left T2, in one target constellation even worse (T2 in lower stream preceded by T1 in upper stream). These results suggest right-hemisphere preference for this task even with stimuli at vertical midline, and no added value through hemispheric cooperation. Lacking asymmetry for T1 amidst asymmetries for filler stimuli and for T2 might indicate alternating access of the hemispheres to midline stimuli as one means of hemispheric division of labor. PMID:23451226

  19. Chemogenetic silencing of the midline and intralaminar thalamus blocks amygdala-kindled seizures.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Evan; Forcelli, Patrick A

    2016-09-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common form of medically-intractable epilepsy. While seizures in TLE originate in structures such as hippocampus, amygdala, and temporal cortex, they propagate through a crucial relay: the midline/intralaminar thalamus. Prior studies have shown that pharmacological inhibition of midline thalamus attenuates limbic seizures. Here, we examined a recently developed technology, Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs), as a means of chemogenetic silencing to attenuate limbic seizures. Adult, male rats were electrically kindled from the amygdala, and injected with virus coding for inhibitory (hM4Di) DREADDs into the midline/intralaminar thalamus. When treated with the otherwise inert ligand Clozapine-N-Oxide (CNO) at doses of 2.5, 5, and 10mg/kg, electrographic and behavioral seizure manifestations were suppressed in comparison to vehicle. At higher doses, we found complete blockade of seizure activity in a subset of subjects. CNO displayed a sharp time-response profile, with significant seizure attenuation seen 20-30min post injection, in comparison to 10 and 40min post injection. Seizures in animals injected with a control vector (i.e., no DREADD) were unaffected by CNO administration. These data underscore the crucial role of the midline/intralaminar thalamus in the propagation of seizures, specifically in the amygdala kindling model, and provide validation of chemogenetic silencing of limbic seizures. PMID:27404844

  20. Midline lumbar ganglion/synovial cyst mimicking an epidural tumor: case report and review of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Azzam, C J

    1988-08-01

    A case of a midline lumbar extradural ganglion/synovial cyst causing lumbar canal stenosis and mimicking an epidural tumor is presented. The lesion was demonstrated by a magnetic resonance imaging study, and relief of symptoms was achieved with decompressive laminectomy and total removal of the mass. The pathogenesis of lumbar ganglion/synovial cyst is reviewed. PMID:2972941

  1. Self-Referential Processing, Rumination, and Cortical Midline Structures in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Nejad, Ayna Baladi; Fossati, Philippe; Lemogne, Cédric

    2013-01-01

    Major depression is associated with a bias toward negative emotional processing and increased self-focus, i.e., the process by which one engages in self-referential processing. The increased self-focus in depression is suggested to be of a persistent, repetitive and self-critical nature, and is conceptualized as ruminative brooding. The role of the medial prefrontal cortex in self-referential processing has been previously emphasized in acute major depression. There is increasing evidence that self-referential processing as well as the cortical midline structures play a major role in the development, course, and treatment response of major depressive disorder. However, the links between self-referential processing, rumination, and the cortical midline structures in depression are still poorly understood. Here, we reviewed brain imaging studies in depressed patients and healthy subjects that have examined these links. Self-referential processing in major depression seems associated with abnormally increased activity of the anterior cortical midline structures. Abnormal interactions between the lateralized task-positive network, and the midline cortical structures of the default mode network, as well as the emotional response network, may underlie the pervasiveness of ruminative brooding. Furthermore, targeting this maladaptive form of rumination and its underlying neural correlates may be key for effective treatment. PMID:24124416

  2. gdnf activates midline repulsion by Semaphorin3B via NCAM during commissural axon guidance.

    PubMed

    Charoy, Camille; Nawabi, Homaira; Reynaud, Florie; Derrington, Edmund; Bozon, Muriel; Wright, Kevin; Falk, Julien; Helmbacher, Françoise; Kindbeiter, Karine; Castellani, Valérie

    2012-09-20

    The Neurotrophic factor gdnf plays diverse developmental roles, supporting survival and also acting as a chemoattractant for axon and cell migration. We report that in the developing spinal cord, a focal source of gdnf is present in the floor plate (FP) where commissural axons cross the midline. Gdnf has no direct guidance properties but switches on the responsiveness of crossing commissural growth cones to the midline repellent Semaphorin3B by suppressing calpain-mediated processing of the Sema3B signaling coreceptor Plexin-A1. Analysis of single and double mutant mouse models indicates that although gdnf is the principal trigger of Sema3B midline repulsion, it acts with another FP cue, NrCAM. Finally, genetic and in vitro experiments provide evidence that this gdnf effect is RET independent and mediated by NCAM/GFRα1 signaling. This study identifies a regulator of midline crossing and reveals interplays between Semaphorin and gdnf signaling during axon guidance. PMID:22998873

  3. Clinical and Imaging Features of a Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft in a Neonate: A Rare Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Pritish; Ibrahim, Zachary; Amodio, John

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare congenital anomaly. CMCC and its complications and treatment have been well described in ENT, dermatology, and pediatric surgery literature. However, to our knowledge, the imaging work-up has not been reported in the literature thus far. We present a case of CMCC in a neonate with description of clinical presentation and imaging features. PMID:26078904

  4. Medial prefrontal theta phase coupling during spatial memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Raphael; Bush, Daniel; Bonnefond, Mathilde; Bandettini, Peter A; Barnes, Gareth R; Doeller, Christian F; Burgess, Neil

    2014-06-01

    Memory retrieval is believed to involve a disparate network of areas, including medial prefrontal and medial temporal cortices, but the mechanisms underlying their coordination remain elusive. One suggestion is that oscillatory coherence mediates inter-regional communication, implicating theta phase and theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling in mnemonic function across species. To examine this hypothesis, we used non-invasive whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) as participants retrieved the location of objects encountered within a virtual environment. We demonstrate that, when participants are cued with the image of an object whose location they must subsequently navigate to, there is a significant increase in 4-8 Hz theta power in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and the phase of this oscillation is coupled both with ongoing theta phase in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and perceptually induced 65-85 Hz gamma amplitude in medial parietal cortex. These results suggest that theta phase coupling between mPFC and MTL and theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling between mPFC and neocortical regions may play a role in human spatial memory retrieval. PMID:24497013

  5. Analytical Insights on Theta-Gamma Coupled Neural Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of a quadratic integrate-and-fire neuron, spiking in the gamma (30–100 Hz) range, coupled to a delta/theta frequency (1–8 Hz) neural oscillator. Using analytical and semianalytical methods, we were able to derive characteristic spiking times for the system in two distinct regimes (depending on parameter values): one regime where the gamma neuron is intrinsically oscillating in the absence of theta input, and a second one in which gamma spiking is directly gated by theta input, i.e., windows of gamma activity alternate with silence periods depending on the underlying theta phase. In the former case, we transform the equations such that the system becomes analogous to the Mathieu differential equation. By solving this equation, we can compute numerically the time to the first gamma spike, and then use singular perturbation theory to find successive spike times. On the other hand, in the excitable condition, we make direct use of singular perturbation theory to obtain an approximation of the time to first gamma spike, and then extend the result to calculate ensuing gamma spikes in a recursive fashion. We thereby give explicit formulas for the onset and offset of gamma spike burst during a theta cycle, and provide an estimation of the total number of spikes per theta cycle both for excitable and oscillator regimes. PMID:23945442

  6. Frontal sinus cholesterol granuloma: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Nicholas L.; Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Chaudhry, Ajaz L.

    2014-01-01

    A case report of a massive cholesterol granuloma (CG) of the frontal sinus in a 15-year-old male subject treated endoscopically is reported. CGs are slowly expanding, cystic lesions that are rarely observed in the frontal sinus. Frontal sinus CGs characteristically present with proptosis, diplopia, and a unilateral painless expanding mass above the orbit. Patients frequently report a history of chronic nasal obstruction or head trauma. Although the pathogenesis is unclear, it is likely multifactorial in etiology. Surgical resection via endoscopic sinus surgery has been gaining popularity because of the minimally invasive approach and lower rates of recurrence. PMID:24612824

  7. Spectral modulation of frontal EEG during motor skill acquisition: a mobile EEG study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Savio W H; Chan, Rosa H M; Mak, Joseph N

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the modulation of frontal EEG dynamics with respect to progress in motor skill acquisition using a wireless EEG system with a single dry sensor. Participants were required to complete repeated trials of a computerized visual-motor task similar to mirror drawing while the EEG was collected. In each trial, task performance of the participants was summarized with a familiarity index which took into account the performance accuracy, completion rate and time. Our findings demonstrated that certain EEG power spectra decreased with an increase in motor task familiarity. In particular, frontal EEG activities in delta and theta bands of the whole trial and in gamma band in the middle of the trial are having a significant negative relationship with the overall familiarity level of the task. The findings suggest that frontal EEG spectra are significantly modulated during motor skill acquisition. Results of this study shed light on the possibility of simultaneous monitoring of brain activity during an unconstrained natural task with a single dry sensor mobile EEG in an everyday environment. PMID:24095979

  8. Cranialization of the Frontal Sinus for Secondary Mucocele Prevention following Open Surgery for Benign Frontal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Gilad; Amit, Moran; Ben-Ari, Oded; Gil, Ziv; Abergel, Abraham; Margalit, Nevo; Cavel, Oren; Wasserzug, Oshri; Fliss, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare frontal sinus cranialization to obliteration for future prevention of secondary mucocele formation following open surgery for benign lesions of the frontal sinus. Study Design Retrospective case series. Setting Tertiary academic medical center. Patients Sixty-nine patients operated for benign frontal sinus pathology between 1994 and 2011. Interventions Open excision of benign frontal sinus pathology followed by either frontal obliteration (n = 41, 59%) or frontal cranialization (n = 28, 41%). Main Outcome Measures The prevalence of post-surgical complications and secondary mucocele formation were compiled. Results Pathologies included osteoma (n = 34, 49%), mucocele (n = 27, 39%), fibrous dysplasia (n = 6, 9%), and encephalocele (n = 2, 3%). Complications included skin infections (n = 6), postoperative cutaneous fistula (n = 1), telecanthus (n = 4), diplopia (n = 3), nasal deformity (n = 2) and epiphora (n = 1). None of the patients suffered from postoperative CSF leak, meningitis or pneumocephalus. Six patients, all of whom had previously undergone frontal sinus obliteration, required revision surgery due to secondary mucocele formation. Statistical analysis using non-inferiority test reveal that cranialization of the frontal sinus is non-inferior to obliteration for preventing secondary mucocele formation (P<0.0001). Conclusion Cranialization of the frontal sinus appears to be a good option for prevention of secondary mucocele development after open excision of benign frontal sinus lesions. PMID:24376760

  9. Msxb is a core component of the genetic circuitry specifying the dorsal and ventral neurogenic midlines in the ascidian embryo.

    PubMed

    Roure, Agnès; Darras, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The tail ascidian larval peripheral nervous system is made up of epidermal sensory neurons distributed more or less regularly in ventral and dorsal midlines. Their formation occurs in two-steps: the ventral and dorsal midlines are induced as neurogenic territories by Fgf9/16/20 and Admp respectively. The Delta2/Notch interaction then controls the number of neurons that form. The genetic machinery acting between the inductive processes taking place before gastrulation and neuron specification at tailbud stages are largely unknown. The analysis of seven transcription factors expressed in the forming midlines revealed an unexpected complexity and dynamic of gene expression. Their systematic overexpression confirmed that these genes do not interact following a linear cascade of activation. However, the integration of our data revealed the distinct key roles of the two upstream factors Msxb and Nkx-C that are the earliest expressed genes and the only ones able to induce neurogenic midline and ESN formation. Our data suggest that Msxb would be the primary midline gene integrating inputs from the ventral and dorsal inducers and launching a pan-midline transcriptional program. Nkx-C would be involved in tail tip specification, in maintenance of the pan-midline network and in a posterior to anterior wave controlling differentiation. PMID:26592100

  10. Quantum modular forms, mock modular forms, and partial theta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimport, Susanna

    Defined by Zagier in 2010, quantum modular forms have been the subject of an explosion of recent research. Many of these results are aimed at discovering examples of these functions, which are defined on the rational numbers and have "nice" modularity properties. Though the subject is in its early stages, numerous results (including Zagier's original examples) show these objects naturally arising from many areas of mathematics as limits of other modular-like functions. One such family of examples is due to Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades, who connected these new objects to partial theta functions (introduced by Rogers in 1917) and mock modular forms (about which there is a rich theory, whose origins date back to Ramanujan in 1920). In this thesis, we build off of the work of Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades by providing an infinite family of quantum modular forms of arbitrary positive half-integral weight. Further, this family of quantum modular forms "glues" mock modular forms to partial theta functions and is constructed from a so-called "universal" mock theta function by extending a method of Eichler and Zagier (originally defined for holomorphic Jacobi forms) into a non-holomorphic setting. In addition to the infinite family, we explore the weight 1/2 and 3/2 functions in more depth. For both of these weights, we are able to explicitly write down the quantum modular form, as well as the corresponding "errors to modularity," which can be shown to be Mordell integrals of specific theta functions and, as a consequence, are real-analytic functions. Finally, we turn our attention to the partial theta functions associated with these low weight examples. Berndt and Kim provide asymptotic expansions for a certain class of partial theta functions as q approaches 1 radially within the unit disk. Here, we extend this work to not only obtain asymptotic expansions for this class of functions as q approaches any root of unity, but also for a certain class of derivatives of these functions

  11. A comparison of the Wiltse versus midline approaches in degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Street, John T; Andrew Glennie, R; Dea, Nicolas; DiPaola, Christian; Wang, Zhi; Boyd, Michael; Paquette, Scott J; Kwon, Brian K; Dvorak, Marcel F; Fisher, Charles G

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference in surgical site infection (SSI) when comparing the Wiltse and midline approaches for posterior instrumented interbody fusions of the lumbar spine and, secondarily, to evaluate if the reoperation rates and specific causes for reoperation were similar for both approaches. METHODS A total of 358 patients who underwent 1- or 2-level posterior instrumented interbody fusions for degenerative lumbar spinal pathology through either a midline or Wiltse approach were prospectively followed between March 2005 and January 2011 at a single tertiary care facility. A retrospective analysis was performed primarily to evaluate the incidence of SSI and the incidence and causes for reoperation. Secondary outcome measures included intraoperative complications, blood loss, and length of stay. A matched analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test and a logistic regression model. The matched analysis controlled for age, sex, comorbidities, number of index levels addressed surgically, number of levels fused, and the use of bone grafting. RESULTS All patients returned for follow-up at 1 year, and adverse events were followed for 2 years. The rate of SSI was greater in the midline group (8 of 103 patients; 7.8%) versus the Wiltse group (1 of 103 patients; 1.0%) (p = 0.018). Fewer additional surgical procedures were performed in the Wiltse group (p = 0.025; OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.23-0.95). Proximal adjacent segment failure requiring reoperation occurred more frequently in the midline group (15 of 103 patients; 14.6%) versus the Wiltse group (6 of 103 patients; 5.8%) (p = 0.048). Blood loss was significantly lower in the Wiltse group (436 ml) versus the midline group (703 ml); however, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups in intraoperative complications or length of stay. CONCLUSIONS The patients who underwent the Wiltse approach had a decreased risk of wound breakdown and

  12. Harnessing the power of theta: natural manipulations of cognitive performance during hippocampal theta-contingent eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Loren C; Cicchese, Joseph J; Berry, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Neurobiological oscillations are regarded as essential to normal information processing, including coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within structures as well as in long feedback loops of distributed neural systems. The hippocampal theta rhythm is a 3-12 Hz oscillatory potential observed during cognitive processes ranging from spatial navigation to associative learning. The lower range, 3-7 Hz, can occur during immobility and depends upon the integrity of cholinergic forebrain systems. Several studies have shown that the amount of pre-training theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning. Our lab has used a brain-computer interface (BCI) that delivers eyeblink conditioning trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. A behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to four-fold increase in learning speed. This behavioral effect is accompanied by enhanced amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potential (LFP)s, multi-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns that depend on theta state. Additionally, training in the presence of hippocampal theta has led to increases in the salience of tone-induced unit firing patterns in the medial prefrontal cortex, followed by persistent multi-unit activity during the trace interval. In cerebellum, rhythmicity and precise synchrony of stimulus time-locked LFPs with those of hippocampus occur preferentially under the theta condition. Here we review these findings, integrate them into current models of hippocampal-dependent learning and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories of medial temporal lobe processes underlying intact and pathological learning. PMID:25918501

  13. Harnessing the power of theta: natural manipulations of cognitive performance during hippocampal theta-contingent eyeblink conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Loren C.; Cicchese, Joseph J.; Berry, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Neurobiological oscillations are regarded as essential to normal information processing, including coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within structures as well as in long feedback loops of distributed neural systems. The hippocampal theta rhythm is a 3–12 Hz oscillatory potential observed during cognitive processes ranging from spatial navigation to associative learning. The lower range, 3–7 Hz, can occur during immobility and depends upon the integrity of cholinergic forebrain systems. Several studies have shown that the amount of pre-training theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning. Our lab has used a brain-computer interface (BCI) that delivers eyeblink conditioning trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. A behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to four-fold increase in learning speed. This behavioral effect is accompanied by enhanced amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potential (LFP)s, multi-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns that depend on theta state. Additionally, training in the presence of hippocampal theta has led to increases in the salience of tone-induced unit firing patterns in the medial prefrontal cortex, followed by persistent multi-unit activity during the trace interval. In cerebellum, rhythmicity and precise synchrony of stimulus time-locked LFPs with those of hippocampus occur preferentially under the theta condition. Here we review these findings, integrate them into current models of hippocampal-dependent learning and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories of medial temporal lobe processes underlying intact and pathological learning. PMID:25918501

  14. Theta EEG neurofeedback benefits early consolidation of motor sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Rozengurt, Roman; Barnea, Anat; Uchida, Sunao; Levy, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Procedural learning is subject to consolidation processes believed to depend on the modulation of functional connections involved in representing the acquired skill. While sleep provides the most commonly studied framework for such consolidation processes, posttraining modulation of oscillatory brain activity may also impact on plasticity processes. Under the hypothesis that consolidation of motor learning is associated with theta band activity, we used EEG neurofeedback (NFB) to enable participants to selectively increase either theta or beta power in their EEG spectra following the acquisition phase of motor sequence learning. We tested performance on a motor task before and after training, right after the NFB session to assess immediate NFB effects, 1 day after NFB to assess interaction between NFB effects and overnight sleep-dependent stabilization, and 1 week after the initial session, to assess the effects of NFB on long-term stabilization of motor training. We also explored the extent of the influence of single-electrode NFB on EEG recorded across the scalp. Results revealed a significantly greater improvement in performance immediately after NFB in the theta group than in the beta group. This effect continued for testing up to 1 week following training. Across participants, post-NFB improvement correlated positively with theta/beta ratio change achieved during NFB. Additionally, NFB was found to cause widespread band-power modulation beyond the electrode used for feedback. Thus, upregulating postlearning theta power may yield contributions to the immediate performance and subsequent consolidation of an acquired motor skill. PMID:27080752

  15. Theta oscillations and human navigation: a magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Dráulio B; Baffa, Oswaldo; Wakai, Ronald T

    2002-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to study alpha and theta activity while subjects navigated through a computer-generated virtual reality town. The subjects were first allowed to explore the environment freely. They then had to navigate from a starting point to a destination, knowing that an obstruction would appear at one of several possible locations along the main route and force them to take a detour. Spatiotemporal analysis of the theta and alpha bands were performed (1) prior to the start of navigation, (2) from the start of navigation until the obstruction was encountered, (3) during the time subjects were contemplating a detour and were not navigating, and (4) from the resumption of navigation until the destination was reached. In all subjects, theta power was strongest during the two periods of navigation. The peak frequency of the oscillations was approximately 3.7 Hz. Control studies consisted of a motor task similar to that required for navigation, passive viewing of a tour through the same virtual reality town, and a mental concentration task. No consistent increases in theta power were seen in the MEG during any of the control tasks. The results suggest an association between theta rhythm and the performance of navigational tasks in humans. PMID:11798388

  16. Human Frontal Lobes and AI Planning Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Richard; Lum, Henry Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Human frontal lobes are essential for maintaining a self-regulating balance between predictive and reactive behavior. This paper describes a system that integrates prediction and reaction based on neuropsychological theories of frontal lobe function. In addition to enhancing our understanding of deliberate action in humans' the model is being used to develop and evaluate the same properties in machines. First, the paper presents some background neuropsychology in order to set a general context. The role of frontal lobes is then presented by summarizing three theories which formed the basis for this work. The components of an artificial frontal lobe are then discussed from both neuropsychological and AI perspectives. The paper concludes by discussing issues and methods for evaluating systems that integrate planning and reaction.

  17. Frontal sinus recognition for human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falguera, Juan Rogelio; Falguera, Fernanda Pereira Sartori; Marana, Aparecido Nilceu

    2008-03-01

    Many methods based on biometrics such as fingerprint, face, iris, and retina have been proposed for person identification. However, for deceased individuals, such biometric measurements are not available. In such cases, parts of the human skeleton can be used for identification, such as dental records, thorax, vertebrae, shoulder, and frontal sinus. It has been established in prior investigations that the radiographic pattern of frontal sinus is highly variable and unique for every individual. This has stimulated the proposition of measurements of the frontal sinus pattern, obtained from x-ray films, for skeletal identification. This paper presents a frontal sinus recognition method for human identification based on Image Foresting Transform and shape context. Experimental results (ERR = 5,82%) have shown the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Rationale for Management of Frontal Sinus Fractures

    PubMed Central

    BANICA, Bogdan; ENE, Patricia; DABU, Aurelia; ENE, Razvan; CIRSTOIU, Catalin

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The optimal treatment of frontal sinus fractures remains controversial. Multiple treatment options and algorithms have been proposed by multiple specialties throughout the years; however, the optimal method of frontal sinus repair has yet to be discovered. Overwhelming complications such as meningitis, encephalitis or brain abscess are quite uncommon nowadays. Nevertheless, late development of invasive mucoceles is not a rarity and therefore long-term follow-up is mandatory. PMID:24790677

  19. Beyond the sniffer: frontal sinuses in Carnivora.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Abigail A; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2014-11-01

    Paranasal sinuses are some of the most poorly understood features of mammalian cranial anatomy. They are highly variable in presence and form among species, but their function is not well understood. The best-supported explanations for the function of sinuses is that they opportunistically fill mechanically unnecessary space, but that in some cases, sinuses in combination with the configuration of the frontal bone may improve skull performance by increasing skull strength and dissipating stresses more evenly. We used CT technology to investigate patterns in frontal sinus size and shape disparity among three families of carnivores: Canidae, Felidae, and Hyaenidae. We provide some of the first quantitative data on sinus morphology for these three families, and employ a novel method to quantify the relationship between three-dimensional sinus shape and skull shape. As expected, frontal sinus size and shape were more strongly correlated with frontal bone size and shape than with the morphology of the skull as a whole. However, sinus morphology was also related to allometric differences among families that are linked to biomechanical function. Our results support the hypothesis that frontal sinuses most often opportunistically fill space that is mechanically unnecessary, and they can facilitate cranial shape changes that reduce stress during feeding. Moreover, we suggest that the ability to form frontal sinuses allows species to modify skull function without compromising the performance of more functionally constrained regions such as the nasal chamber (heat/water conservation, olfaction), and braincase (housing the brain and sensory structures). PMID:25312364

  20. Theta oscillations regulate the speed of locomotion via a hippocampus to lateral septum pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Franziska; Gorbati, Maria; Cadavieco, Marta Carus; Denisova, Natalia; Gao, Xiaojie; Holman, Constance; Korotkova, Tatiana; Ponomarenko, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta oscillations support encoding of an animal's position during spatial navigation, yet longstanding questions about their impact on locomotion remain unanswered. Combining optogenetic control of hippocampal theta oscillations with electrophysiological recordings in mice, we show that hippocampal theta oscillations regulate locomotion. In particular, we demonstrate that their regularity underlies more stable and slower running speeds during exploration. More regular theta oscillations are accompanied by more regular theta-rhythmic spiking output of pyramidal cells. Theta oscillations are coordinated between the hippocampus and its main subcortical output, the lateral septum (LS). Chemo- or optogenetic inhibition of this pathway reveals its necessity for the hippocampal regulation of running speed. Moreover, theta-rhythmic stimulation of LS projections to the lateral hypothalamus replicates the reduction of running speed induced by more regular hippocampal theta oscillations. These results suggest that changes in hippocampal theta synchronization are translated into rapid adjustment of running speed via the LS. PMID:26455912

  1. Theta oscillations regulate the speed of locomotion via a hippocampus to lateral septum pathway.

    PubMed

    Bender, Franziska; Gorbati, Maria; Cadavieco, Marta Carus; Denisova, Natalia; Gao, Xiaojie; Holman, Constance; Korotkova, Tatiana; Ponomarenko, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta oscillations support encoding of an animal's position during spatial navigation, yet longstanding questions about their impact on locomotion remain unanswered. Combining optogenetic control of hippocampal theta oscillations with electrophysiological recordings in mice, we show that hippocampal theta oscillations regulate locomotion. In particular, we demonstrate that their regularity underlies more stable and slower running speeds during exploration. More regular theta oscillations are accompanied by more regular theta-rhythmic spiking output of pyramidal cells. Theta oscillations are coordinated between the hippocampus and its main subcortical output, the lateral septum (LS). Chemo- or optogenetic inhibition of this pathway reveals its necessity for the hippocampal regulation of running speed. Moreover, theta-rhythmic stimulation of LS projections to the lateral hypothalamus replicates the reduction of running speed induced by more regular hippocampal theta oscillations. These results suggest that changes in hippocampal theta synchronization are translated into rapid adjustment of running speed via the LS. PMID:26455912

  2. Segmented flow sampling with push-pull theta pipettes.

    PubMed

    Saha-Shah, Anumita; Green, Curtis M; Abraham, David H; Baker, Lane A

    2016-03-21

    We report development of a mobile and easy-to-fabricate theta pipette microfluidic device for segmented flow sampling. The theta pipettes were also used as electrospray emitters for analysis of sub-nanoliter segments, which resulted in delivery of analyte to the vacuum inlet of the mass spectrometer without multiple transfer steps. Theta pipette probes enable sample collection with high spatial resolution due to micron or smaller sized probe inlets and can be used to manipulate aqueous segments in the range of 200 pL to tens of nanoliters. Optimized conditions can enable sampling with high spatial and temporal resolution, suitable for chemical monitoring in biological samples and studies of sample heterogeneity. Intercellular heterogeneity among Allium cepa cells was studied by collecting cytoplasm from multiple cells using a single probe. Extracted cytoplasm was analyzed in a fast and high throughput manner by direct electrospray mass spectrometry of segmented sample from the probe tip. PMID:26907673

  3. Geometrical model for non-zero {theta}{sub 13}

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Junmou; Wang Bin; Li Xueqian

    2011-10-01

    Based on Friedberg and Lee's geometric picture by which the tribimaximal Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakawaga-Sakata leptonic mixing matrix is constructed, namely, corresponding mixing angles correspond to the geometric angles among the sides of a cube. We suggest that the three realistic mixing angles, which slightly deviate from the values determined for the cube, are due to a viable deformation from the perfectly cubic shape. Taking the best-fitted results of {theta}{sub 12} and {theta}{sub 23} as inputs, we determine the central value of sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} should be 0.0238, with a relatively large error tolerance; this value lies in the range of measurement precision of the Daya Bay experiment and is consistent with recent results from the T2K Collaboration.

  4. Midline extraperitoneal approach for bilateral widespread retroperitoneal abscess originating from anorectal infection

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Koji; Oshima, Yuka; Saito, Kentaro; Uesaka, Takahiro; Terasaki, Yasunobu; Kasai, Hironori; Minagawa, Nozomi; Oshima, Takahiro; Okawa, Yumi; Misawa, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Anorectal abscess is one of the most common anorectal conditions encountered in practice. However, such abscesses may rarely extend upward and cause life-threatening medical conditions. Presentation of case A 53-year-old woman presented with symptoms of anorectal abscess and evidence of severe inflammatory response and acute kidney injury. Computed tomography revealed a widespread abscess extending to the bilateral retroperitoneal spaces. Surgical drainage was performed via a totally extraperitoneal approach through a lower midline abdominal incision, and the patient had a rapid and uncomplicated recovery. Discussion Although retroperitoneal abscesses originating from the anorectal region are rare, they are life-threating events that require immediate treatment. Percutaneous abscess drainage has been recently evolved; however, surgical drainage is required sometimes that may be challenging, particularly in the case of widespread abscesses, as in our case. Conclusion The midline extraperitoneal approach reported here might be an effective surgical option for patients with bilateral widespread retroperitoneal abscesses. PMID:26701843

  5. Perfusion MRI Indexes Variability in the Functional Brain Effects of Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Caterina; Lee, Taraz G.; Nomura, Emi M.; D’Esposito, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an important tool for testing causal relationships in cognitive neuroscience research. However, the efficacy of TMS can be variable across individuals and difficult to measure. This variability is especially a challenge when TMS is applied to regions without well-characterized behavioral effects, such as in studies using TMS on multi-modal areas in intrinsic networks. Here, we examined whether perfusion fMRI recordings of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), a quantitative measure sensitive to slow functional changes, reliably index variability in the effects of stimulation. Twenty-seven participants each completed four combined TMS-fMRI sessions during which both resting state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) and perfusion Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) scans were recorded. In each session after the first baseline day, continuous theta-burst TMS (TBS) was applied to one of three locations: left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L dlPFC), left anterior insula/frontal operculum (L aI/fO), or left primary somatosensory cortex (L S1). The two frontal targets are components of intrinsic networks and L S1 was used as an experimental control. CBF changes were measured both before and after TMS on each day from a series of interleaved resting state and perfusion scans. Although TBS led to weak selective increases under the coil in CBF measurements across the group, individual subjects showed wide variability in their responses. TBS-induced changes in rCBF were related to TBS-induced changes in functional connectivity of the relevant intrinsic networks measured during separate resting-state BOLD scans. This relationship was selective: CBF and functional connectivity of these networks were not related before TBS or after TBS to the experimental control region (S1). Furthermore, subject groups with different directions of CBF change after TBS showed distinct modulations in the functional interactions of targeted networks. These results suggest

  6. Differential geometry of the Fermat quartic and theta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadnot, Jason

    2012-02-01

    The universal curve over a finite cover of the moduli space of elliptic curves with level four structure is embedded in C as the Fermat quartic and is parametrized via the four Jacobi theta functions. Constructions from completely integrable systems have shown the importance of looking at the curvature of certain spaces and here we compute sectional curvatures. For our computations, we choose the ambient Fubini-Study metric of C. We also derive several theta identities which arise from the quartic's holomorphic two-form.

  7. Midline-derived Shh regulates mesonephric tubule formation through the paraxial mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Murashima, Aki; Akita, Hiroki; Okazawa, Mika; Kishigami, Satoshi; Nakagata, Naomi; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Yamada, Gen

    2014-01-01

    During organogenesis, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) possesses dual functions: Shh emanating from midline structures regulates the positioning of bilateral structures at early stages, whereas organ-specific Shh locally regulates organ morphogenesis at later stages. The mesonephros is a transient embryonic kidney in amniote, whereas it becomes definitive adult kidney in some anamniotes. Thus, elucidating the regulation of mesonephros formation has important implications for our understanding of kidney development and evolution. In Shh knockout (KO) mutant mice, the mesonephros was displaced towards the midline and ectopic mesonephric tubules (MTs) were present in the caudal mesonephros. Mesonephros-specific ablation of Shh in Hoxb7-Cre;Shhflox/− and Sall1CreERT2/+;Shhflox/− mice embryos indicated that Shh expressed in the mesonephros was not required for either the development of the mesonephros or the differentiation of the male reproductive tract. Moreover, stage-specific ablation of Shh in ShhCreERT2/flox mice showed that notochord- and/or floor plate-derived Shh were essential for the regulation of the number and position of MTs. Lineage analysis of hedgehog (Hh)-responsive cells, and analysis of gene expression in Shh KO embryos suggested that Shh regulated nephrogenic gene expression indirectly, possibly through effects on the paraxial mesoderm. These data demonstrate the essential role of midline-derived Shh in local tissue morphogenesis and differentiation. PMID:24370450

  8. Changes in quality of life during orthodontic correction of midline diastema

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, S.; Sathish, R.; Priya, K.; Dhayanithi, D.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of our study is to evaluate the changes in quality of life among patients treated for maxillary midline diastema by fixed orthodontic appliances. Materials and Methods: This prospective longitudinal study consists of 40 patients of age group 20-30 years who underwent orthodontic correction of midline diastema. The patient's quality of life is evaluated using 22-item orthognathic quality of life questionnaire. They were evaluated prior to appliance therapy, 1 month after appliance fixation, 4th and 8th month during treatment and 1 month after treatment. Results: Our results showed moderate improvement in quality of life as early as at the start of orthodontic therapy. The response was equal among both sexes. The quality of life experience improved only mildly during the orthodontic treatment. However, the condition specific quality of life at the end of appliance therapy improved by nearly 50% when compared with prior to treatment. Conclusion: Our study has concluded that the correction of midline diastema has improved the quality of life among young people by nearly 50%. The acceptance to orthodontic therapy and patient perception toward fixed appliance has demonstrated remarkable improvement in quality of life during the treatment. Our study calls for additional patient counseling and motivation during the course of fixed appliance therapy. PMID:25210363

  9. Treatment of Calcified Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy by the Posterior Midline Approach.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xu-Dong; Jiang, Hongfei; Wu, Yong-Ping; Tao, Hui-Min; Yang, Di-Sheng; Hu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the clinical outcomes of the posterior midline approach in the treatment of 34 patients with significantly calcified insertional Achilles tendinopathy. The posterior midline approach was applied for the surgical treatment of 34 patients with chronic significantly calcified insertional Achilles tendinopathy after failed conservative treatment. Gastrocnemius recession was performed simultaneously for patients with gastrocnemius contracture. The Fowler-Philip angle and parallel pitch lines were measured before surgery, and the visual analog scale, Tegner score, and Victorian Institute of Sport tendon study group score were recorded before and after surgery. The mean follow-up period was 45.2 ± 17.7 (range 24 to 84) months. After surgery, the visual analog scale score had decreased notably, and the Tegner score and Victorian Institute of Sport tendon study group score had increased significantly. The posterior midline approach can achieve satisfactory outcomes in the treatment of significantly calcified insertional Achilles tendinopathy, and gastrocnemius recession (Strayer procedure) should be performed for patients with gastrocnemius contracture to improve the surgical outcome. PMID:26874831

  10. A midline switch of receptor processing regulates commissural axon guidance in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Nawabi, Homaira; Briançon-Marjollet, Anne; Clark, Christopher; Sanyas, Isabelle; Takamatsu, Hyota; Okuno, Tatsusada; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Bozon, Muriel; Takeshima, Kaori; Yoshida, Yutaka; Moret, Frédéric; Abouzid, Karima; Castellani, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Commissural axon guidance requires complex modulations of growth cone sensitivity to midline-derived cues, but underlying mechanisms in vertebrates remain largely unknown. By using combinations of ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we uncovered a molecular pathway controlling the gain of response to a midline repellent, Semaphorin3B (Sema3B). First, we provide evidence that Semaphorin3B/Plexin-A1 signaling participates in the guidance of commissural projections at the vertebrate ventral midline. Second, we show that, at the precrossing stage, commissural neurons synthesize the Neuropilin-2 and Plexin-A1 Semaphorin3B receptor subunits, but Plexin-A1 expression is prevented by a calpain1-mediated processing, resulting in silencing commissural responsiveness. Third, we report that, during floor plate (FP) in-growth, calpain1 activity is suppressed by local signals, allowing Plexin-A1 accumulation in the growth cone and sensitization to Sema3B. Finally, we show that the FP cue NrCAM mediates the switch of Plexin-A1 processing underlying growth cone sensitization to Sema3B. This reveals pathway-dependent modulation of guidance receptor processing as a novel mechanism for regulating guidance decisions at intermediate targets. PMID:20159958

  11. A midline switch of receptor processing regulates commissural axon guidance in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Nawabi, Homaira; Briançon-Marjollet, Anne; Clark, Christopher; Sanyas, Isabelle; Takamatsu, Hyota; Okuno, Tatsusada; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Bozon, Muriel; Takeshima, Kaori; Yoshida, Yutaka; Moret, Frédéric; Abouzid, Karima; Castellani, Valérie

    2010-02-15

    Commissural axon guidance requires complex modulations of growth cone sensitivity to midline-derived cues, but underlying mechanisms in vertebrates remain largely unknown. By using combinations of ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we uncovered a molecular pathway controlling the gain of response to a midline repellent, Semaphorin3B (Sema3B). First, we provide evidence that Semaphorin3B/Plexin-A1 signaling participates in the guidance of commissural projections at the vertebrate ventral midline. Second, we show that, at the precrossing stage, commissural neurons synthesize the Neuropilin-2 and Plexin-A1 Semaphorin3B receptor subunits, but Plexin-A1 expression is prevented by a calpain1-mediated processing, resulting in silencing commissural responsiveness. Third, we report that, during floor plate (FP) in-growth, calpain1 activity is suppressed by local signals, allowing Plexin-A1 accumulation in the growth cone and sensitization to Sema3B. Finally, we show that the FP cue NrCAM mediates the switch of Plexin-A1 processing underlying growth cone sensitization to Sema3B. This reveals pathway-dependent modulation of guidance receptor processing as a novel mechanism for regulating guidance decisions at intermediate targets. PMID:20159958

  12. Axonal commissures in the central nervous system: how to cross the midline?

    PubMed

    Nawabi, Homaira; Castellani, Valérie

    2011-08-01

    Organisms with bilateral symmetry elaborate patterns of neuronal projections connecting both sides of the central nervous system at all levels of the neuraxis. During development, these so-called commissural projections navigate across the midline to innervate their contralateral targets. Commissural axon pathfinding has been extensively studied over the past years and turns out to be a highly complex process, implicating modulation of axon responsiveness to the various guidance cues that instruct axon trajectories towards, within and away from the midline. Understanding the molecular mechanisms allowing these switches of response to take place at the appropriate time and place is a major challenge for current research. Recent work characterized several instructive processes controlling the spatial and temporal fine-tuning of the guidance molecular machinery. These findings illustrate the molecular strategies by which commissural axons modulate their sensitivity to guidance cues during midline crossing and show that regulation at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels are crucial for commissural axon guidance. PMID:21538161

  13. Automated MRI parcellation of the frontal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Ranta, Marin E.; Chen, Min; Crocetti, Deana; Prince, Jerry L.; Subramaniam, Krish; Fischl, Bruce; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2014-01-01

    Examination of associations between specific disorders and physical properties of functionally relevant frontal lobe sub-regions is a fundamental goal in neuropsychiatry. Here we present and evaluate automated methods of frontal lobe parcellation with the programs FreeSurfer(FS) and TOADS-CRUISE(T-C), based on the manual method described in Ranta et al. (2009) in which sulcal-gyral landmarks were used to manually delimit functionally relevant regions within the frontal lobe: i.e., primary motor cortex, anterior cingulate, deep white matter, premotor cortex regions (supplementary motor complex, frontal eye field and lateral premotor cortex) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions (medial PFC, dorsolateral PFC, inferior PFC, lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and medial OFC). Dice's coefficient, a measure of overlap, and percent volume difference were used to measure the reliability between manual and automated delineations for each frontal lobe region. For FS, mean Dice's coefficient for all regions was 0.75 and percent volume difference was 21.2%. For T-C the mean Dice's coefficient was 0.77 and the mean percent volume difference for all regions was 20.2%. These results, along with a high degree of agreement between the two automated methods (mean Dice's coefficient = 0.81, percent volume difference = 12.4%) and a proof-of-principle group difference analysis that highlights the consistency and sensitivity of the automated methods, indicate that the automated methods are valid techniques for parcellation of the frontal lobe into functionally relevant sub-regions. Thus, the methodology has the potential to increase efficiency, statistical power and reproducibility for population analyses of neuropsychiatric disorders with hypothesized frontal lobe contributions. PMID:23897577

  14. [Normal aging of frontal lobe functions].

    PubMed

    Calso, Cristina; Besnard, Jérémy; Allain, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Normal aging in individuals is often associated with morphological, metabolic and cognitive changes, which particularly concern the cerebral frontal regions. Starting from the "frontal lobe hypothesis of cognitive aging" (West, 1996), the present review is based on the neuroanatomical model developed by Stuss (2008), introducing four categories of frontal lobe functions: executive control, behavioural and emotional self-regulation and decision-making, energization and meta-cognitive functions. The selected studies only address the changes of one at least of these functions. The results suggest a deterioration of several cognitive frontal abilities in normal aging: flexibility, inhibition, planning, verbal fluency, implicit decision-making, second-order and affective theory of mind. Normal aging seems also to be characterised by a general reduction in processing speed observed during neuropsychological assessment (Salthouse, 1996). Nevertheless many cognitive functions remain preserved such as automatic or non-conscious inhibition, specific capacities of flexibility and first-order theory of mind. Therefore normal aging doesn't seem to be associated with a global cognitive decline but rather with a selective change in some frontal systems, conclusion which should be taken into account for designing caring programs in normal aging. PMID:27005339

  15. Interhemispheric Plasticity following Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Chronic Poststroke Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Griffis, Joseph C.; Nenert, Rodolphe; Allendorfer, Jane B.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of noninvasive neurostimulation on brain structure and function in chronic poststroke aphasia are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) applied to residual language-responsive cortex in chronic patients using functional and anatomical MRI data acquired before and after iTBS. Lateralization index (LI) analyses, along with comparisons of inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) activation and connectivity during covert verb generation, were used to assess changes in cortical language function. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to assess effects on regional grey matter (GM). LI analyses revealed a leftward shift in IFG activity after treatment. While left IFG activation increased, right IFG activation decreased. Changes in right to left IFG connectivity during covert verb generation also decreased after iTBS. Behavioral correlations revealed a negative relationship between changes in right IFG activation and improvements in fluency. While anatomical analyses did not reveal statistically significant changes in grey matter volume, the fMRI results provide evidence for changes in right and left IFG function after iTBS. The negative relationship between post-iTBS changes in right IFG activity during covert verb generation and improvements in fluency suggests that iTBS applied to residual left-hemispheric language areas may reduce contralateral responses related to language production and facilitate recruitment of residual language areas after stroke. PMID:26881111

  16. Holomorphic projections and Ramanujan’s mock theta functions

    PubMed Central

    Imamoğlu, Özlem; Raum, Martin; Richter, Olav K.

    2014-01-01

    We use spectral methods of automorphic forms to establish a holomorphic projection operator for tensor products of vector-valued harmonic weak Maass forms and vector-valued modular forms. We apply this operator to discover simple recursions for Fourier series coefficients of Ramanujan’s mock theta functions. PMID:24591582

  17. A Low energy neutrino factory for large theta(13)

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; Mena, Olga; Pascoli, Silvia; /Durham U., IPPP

    2007-01-01

    If the value of {theta}{sub 13} is within the reach of the upcoming generation of long-baseline experiments, T2K and NOvA, they show that a low-energy neutrino factory, with peak energy in the few GeV range, would provide a sensitive tool to explore CP-violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy. They consider baselines with typical length 1000-1500 km. The unique performance of the low energy neutrino factory is due to the rich neutrino oscillation pattern at energies between 1 and 4 GeV at baselines {Omicron}(1000) km. They perform both a semi-analytical study of the sensitivities and a numerical analysis to explore how well this setup can measure {theta}{sub 13}, CP-violation, and determine the type of mass hierarchy and the {theta}{sub 23} quadrant. A low energy neutrino factory provides a powerful tool to resolve ambiguities and make precise parameter determinations, for both large and fairly small values of the mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}.

  18. Presence of state transitions in the cryptophyte alga Guillardia theta

    PubMed Central

    Cheregi, Otilia; Kotabová, Eva; Prášil, Ondřej; Schröder, Wolfgang P.; Kaňa, Radek; Funk, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Plants and algae have developed various regulatory mechanisms for optimal delivery of excitation energy to the photosystems even during fluctuating light conditions; these include state transitions as well as non-photochemical quenching. The former process maintains the balance by redistributing antennae excitation between the photosystems, meanwhile the latter by dissipating excessive excitation inside the antennae. In the present study, these mechanisms have been analysed in the cryptophyte alga Guillardia theta. Photoprotective non-photochemical quenching was observed in cultures only after they had entered the stationary growth phase. These cells displayed a diminished overall photosynthetic efficiency, measured as CO2 assimilation rate and electron transport rate. However, in the logarithmic growth phase G. theta cells redistributed excitation energy via a mechanism similar to state transitions. These state transitions were triggered by blue light absorbed by the membrane integrated chlorophyll a/c antennae, and green light absorbed by the lumenal biliproteins was ineffective. It is proposed that state transitions in G. theta are induced by small re-arrangements of the intrinsic antennae proteins, resulting in their coupling/uncoupling to the photosystems in state 1 or state 2, respectively. G. theta therefore represents a chromalveolate algae able to perform state transitions. PMID:26254328

  19. Presence of state transitions in the cryptophyte alga Guillardia theta.

    PubMed

    Cheregi, Otilia; Kotabová, Eva; Prášil, Ondřej; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Kaňa, Radek; Funk, Christiane

    2015-10-01

    Plants and algae have developed various regulatory mechanisms for optimal delivery of excitation energy to the photosystems even during fluctuating light conditions; these include state transitions as well as non-photochemical quenching. The former process maintains the balance by redistributing antennae excitation between the photosystems, meanwhile the latter by dissipating excessive excitation inside the antennae. In the present study, these mechanisms have been analysed in the cryptophyte alga Guillardia theta. Photoprotective non-photochemical quenching was observed in cultures only after they had entered the stationary growth phase. These cells displayed a diminished overall photosynthetic efficiency, measured as CO2 assimilation rate and electron transport rate. However, in the logarithmic growth phase G. theta cells redistributed excitation energy via a mechanism similar to state transitions. These state transitions were triggered by blue light absorbed by the membrane integrated chlorophyll a/c antennae, and green light absorbed by the lumenal biliproteins was ineffective. It is proposed that state transitions in G. theta are induced by small re-arrangements of the intrinsic antennae proteins, resulting in their coupling/uncoupling to the photosystems in state 1 or state 2, respectively. G. theta therefore represents a chromalveolate algae able to perform state transitions. PMID:26254328

  20. Interindividual Differences in Alpha and Theta Power Reflect Memory Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klimesch, W.; Vogt, F.; Doppelmayr, M.

    1999-01-01

    Tested whether tonic EEG power is related to memory performance by analyzing ongoing EEG for 60 subjects in 5 experimental conditions. Subjects with good memory performance had significantly larger upper alpha power, but less theta and lower alpha power. Also discusses findings for subjects good at calculation. (SLD)

  1. Irregular Speech Rate Dissociates Auditory Cortical Entrainment, Evoked Responses, and Frontal Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Stephanie J.; Ince, Robin A.A.; Gross, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The entrainment of slow rhythmic auditory cortical activity to the temporal regularities in speech is considered to be a central mechanism underlying auditory perception. Previous work has shown that entrainment is reduced when the quality of the acoustic input is degraded, but has also linked rhythmic activity at similar time scales to the encoding of temporal expectations. To understand these bottom-up and top-down contributions to rhythmic entrainment, we manipulated the temporal predictive structure of speech by parametrically altering the distribution of pauses between syllables or words, thereby rendering the local speech rate irregular while preserving intelligibility and the envelope fluctuations of the acoustic signal. Recording EEG activity in human participants, we found that this manipulation did not alter neural processes reflecting the encoding of individual sound transients, such as evoked potentials. However, the manipulation significantly reduced the fidelity of auditory delta (but not theta) band entrainment to the speech envelope. It also reduced left frontal alpha power and this alpha reduction was predictive of the reduced delta entrainment across participants. Our results show that rhythmic auditory entrainment in delta and theta bands reflect functionally distinct processes. Furthermore, they reveal that delta entrainment is under top-down control and likely reflects prefrontal processes that are sensitive to acoustical regularities rather than the bottom-up encoding of acoustic features. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The entrainment of rhythmic auditory cortical activity to the speech envelope is considered to be critical for hearing. Previous work has proposed divergent views in which entrainment reflects either early evoked responses related to sound encoding or high-level processes related to expectation or cognitive selection. Using a manipulation of speech rate, we dissociated auditory entrainment at different time scales. Specifically, our

  2. Violations of parity and charge conjugation in the {theta} vacuum with imaginary chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kouno, Hiroaki; Sakai, Yuji; Sasaki, Takahiro; Kashiwa, Kouji; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2011-04-01

    Charge conjugation (C) and parity (P) are exact symmetries at {theta}={pi} and {Theta}{identical_to}{mu}/(iT)={pi}, where {theta} is the parameter of the so-called {theta} vacuum, {mu} is the imaginary quark-number chemical potential and T is the temperature. Spontaneous breakings of these discrete symmetries are investigated by the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. At zero T, P symmetry is spontaneously broken while C symmetry is conserved. As T increases, P symmetry is restored just after C symmetry is spontaneously broken, so that either P or C symmetry or both the symmetries are spontaneously broken for any T. The chiral-symmetry restoration and the deconfinement transition at {theta}={Theta}=0 are remnants of the P restoration and the C breaking at {theta}={Theta}={pi}, respectively.

  3. Frontal-subcortical circuitry and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bonelli, Raphael M.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The neuropsychiatric manifestations of neurodegenerative diseases are closely linked to neurocircuitry defects. Frontal-subcortical circuits, in particular, are effector mechanisms that allow the organism to act on its environment In this paper, we present the three main frontal-subcortical circuits: the dorsolateral prefrontal circuit allows the organization of information to facilitate a response; the anterior cingulate circuit is required for motivated behavior; and the orbitofrontal circuit allows the integration of limbic and emotional information into behavioral responses. Impaired executive functions, apathy, and impulsivity are hallmarks of frontal-subcortical circuit dysfunction. A variety of other neuropsychiatrie disorders, such as Tourette's syndrome, Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and mood disorders may result from disturbances that have a direct or indirect impact on the integrity or functioning of these loops. PMID:17726913

  4. Sexual differentiation of mammalian frontal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, A.; Zucchi, I.

    1987-03-23

    The pattern of distribution of the progesterone binding sites was examined in selected nuclei of the brain of male and female rat. In female rats the frontal cortex resulted to be the region with the highest concentration of /sup 3/H R5020 biding sites. However, in male rats the same region showed very little progestin binding activity. When female rats were androgenized via neonatal exposure to testosterone, the progestin binding activity of the frontal cortex became similar to that observed in male rats. The present investigation indicates that sexual differentiation of the rat brain may include also brain regions not clearly involved in sex related functions like the frontal cortex. 30 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  5. Cephalic aura after frontal lobe resection.

    PubMed

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Jehi, Lara; Alkawadri, Rafeed; Wang, Zhong I; Enatsu, Rei; Mosher, John C; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Burgess, Richard C

    2014-08-01

    A cephalic aura is a common sensory aura typically seen in frontal lobe epilepsy. The generation mechanism of cephalic aura is not fully understood. It is hypothesized that to generate a cephalic aura extensive cortical areas need to be excited. We report a patient who started to have cephalic aura after right frontal lobe resection. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed interictal spike and ictal change during cephalic aura, both of which were distributed in the right frontal region, and the latter involved much more widespread areas than the former on MEG sensors. The peculiar seizure onset pattern may indicate that surgical modification of the epileptic network was related to the appearance of cephalic aura. We hypothesize that generation of cephalic aura may be associated with more extensive cortical involvement of epileptic activity than that of interictal activity, in at least a subset of cases. PMID:24613491

  6. Frontal-thalamic circuits associated with language

    PubMed Central

    Barbas, Helen; García-Cabezas, Miguel Ángel; Zikopoulos, Basilis

    2012-01-01

    Thalamic nuclei associated with language including the ventral lateral, ventral anterior, intralaminar and mediodorsal form a hub that uniquely receives the output of the basal ganglia and cerebellum, and is connected with frontal (premotor and prefrontal) cortices through two parallel circuits: a thalamic pathway targets the middle frontal cortical layers focally, and the other innervates widely cortical layer 1, poised to recruit other cortices and thalamic nuclei for complex cognitive operations. Return frontal pathways to the thalamus originate from cortical layers 6 and 5. Information through this integrated thalamo-cortical system is gated by the inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus and modulated by dopamine, representing a specialization in primates. The intricate dialogue of distinct thalamic nuclei with the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and specific dorsolateral prefrontal and premotor cortices associated with language, suggests synergistic roles in the complex but seemingly effortless sequential transformation of cognitive operations for speech production in humans. PMID:23211411

  7. [Simple partial frontal nonconvulsive status epilepticus].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Mottin, Y

    1997-07-01

    Non convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) of frontal origin is a rare cause of mental confusion. The present case of possible frontal-onset NCSE proved to have a neuropsychological examination that was suggestive either of a disruption of attentional function or a left prefrontal dysfunction, exhibiting disturbances of immediate memory and logical programmation, perseverations and affective disinhibition. Vigilance was not impaired. This case was therefore, on a nosographic point of view, more consistent with a simple partial status epilepticus with cognitive and affective symptomatology rather than with a complex partial status epilepticus of extra-temporal origin. PMID:9684010

  8. The frontal method in hydrodynamics simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    The frontal solution method has proven to be an effective means of solving the matrix equations resulting from the application of the finite element method to a variety of problems. In this study, several versions of the frontal method were compared in efficiency for several hydrodynamics problems. Three basic modifications were shown to be of value: 1. Elimination of equations with boundary conditions beforehand, 2. Modification of the pivoting procedures to allow dynamic management of the equation size, and 3. Storage of the eliminated equations in a vector. These modifications are sufficiently general to be applied to other classes of problems. ?? 1980.

  9. Frontal Polymerization in Microgravity Summary of Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    The project began with frontal polymerization (FP). We studied many aspects of FP on the ground and performed two successful weeks of flying on the KC-135. The project evolved into the current flight investigation, Transient Interfacial Phenomena in Miscible Polymer Systems (TIPMPS), as we recognized that an essential question could best be studied using a non-frontal approach. We present detailed results from our ground-based work on FP, KC-135 results and the background, justification and numerical work for the TIPMPS project.

  10. Modulation of Hippocampal Theta Oscillations and Spatial Memory by Relaxin-3 Neurons of the Nucleus Incertus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Sherie; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E.; Hossain, M. Akhter; Lin, Feng; Kuei, Chester; Liu, Changlu; Wade, John D.; Sutton, Steven W.; Nunez, Angel; Gundlach, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal theta rhythm is thought to underlie learning and memory, and it is well established that "pacemaker" neurons in medial septum (MS) modulate theta activity. Recent studies in the rat demonstrated that brainstem-generated theta rhythm occurs through a multisynaptic pathway via the nucleus incertus (NI), which is the primary source of the…