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1

Q-Ball of Inferior Fronto-Occipital Fasciculus and Beyond  

PubMed Central

The inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) is historically described as the longest associative bundle in the human brain and it connects various parts of the occipital cortex, temporo-basal area and the superior parietal lobule to the frontal lobe through the external/extreme capsule complex. The exact functional role and the detailed anatomical definition of the IFOF are still under debate within the scientific community. In this study we present a fiber tracking dissection of the right and left IFOF by using a q-ball residual-bootstrap reconstruction of High-Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) data sets in 20 healthy subjects. By defining a single seed region of interest on the coronal fractional anisotropy (FA) color map of each subject, we investigated all the pathways connecting the parietal, occipital and posterior temporal cortices to the frontal lobe through the external/extreme capsule. In line with recent post-mortem dissection studies we found more extended anterior-posterior association connections than the “classical” fronto-occipital representation of the IFOF. In particular the pathways we evidenced showed: a) diffuse projections in the frontal lobe, b) fronto-parietal lobes connections trough the external capsule in almost all the subjects and c) widespread connections in the posterior regions. Our study represents the first consistent in vivo demonstration across a large group of individuals of these novel anterior and posterior terminations of the IFOF detailed described only by post-mortem anatomical dissection. Furthermore our work establishes the feasibility of consistent in vivo mapping of this architecture with independent in vivo methodologies. In conclusion q-ball tractography dissection supports a more complex definition of IFOF, which includes several subcomponents likely underlying specific function. PMID:24945305

Amirbekian, Bagrat; Berger, Mitchel S.; Henry, Roland G.

2014-01-01

2

Structural connectivity in a single case of progressive prosopagnosia: the role of the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus.  

PubMed

Progressive prosopagnosia (PP) is a clinical syndrome characterized by a progressive and selective inability to recognize and identify faces of familiar people. Here we report a patient (G.S.) with PP, mainly related to a prominent deficit in recognition of familiar faces, without a semantic (cross-modal) impairment. An in-depth evaluation showed that his deficit extended to other classes of objects, both living and non-living. A follow-up neuropsychological assessment did not reveal substantial changes after about 1 year. Structural MRI showed predominant right temporal lobe atrophy. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed to elucidate structural connectivity of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), the two major tracts that project through the core fusiform region to the anterior temporal and frontal cortices, respectively. Right ILF was markedly reduced in G.S., while left ILF and IFOFs were apparently preserved. These data are in favour of a crucial role of the neural circuit subserved by right ILF in the pathogenesis of PP. PMID:23099263

Grossi, Dario; Soricelli, Andrea; Ponari, Marta; Salvatore, Elena; Quarantelli, Mario; Prinster, Anna; Trojano, Luigi

2014-07-01

3

Not on speaking terms: hallucinations and structural network disconnectivity in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in schizophrenia have previously been associated with functional deficiencies in language networks, specifically with functional disconnectivity in fronto-temporal connections in the left hemisphere and in interhemispheric connections between frontal regions. Here, we investigate whether AVH are accompanied by white matter abnormalities in tracts connecting the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes, also engaged during language tasks. We combined diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics and found white matter abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia as compared with healthy controls. The patients showed reduced fractional anisotropy bilaterally: in the anterior thalamic radiation (ATR), body of the corpus callosum (forceps minor), cingulum, temporal part of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and a small area in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF); and in the right hemisphere: in the visual cortex, forceps major, body of the corpus callosum (posterior parts) and inferior parietal cortex. Compared to patients without current hallucinations, patients with hallucinations revealed decreased fractional anisotropy in the left IFOF, uncinate fasciculus, arcuate fasciculus with SLF, corpus callosum (posterior parts-forceps major), cingulate, corticospinal tract and ATR. The severity of hallucinations correlated negatively with white matter integrity in tracts connecting the left frontal lobe with temporal regions (uncinate fasciculus, IFOF, cingulum, arcuate fasciculus anterior and long part and superior long fasciculus frontal part) and in interhemispheric connections (anterior corona radiata). These findings support the hypothesis that hallucinations in schizophrenia are accompanied by a complex pattern of white matter alterations that negatively affect the language, emotion and attention/perception networks. PMID:24185461

?ur?i?-Blake, Branislava; Nanetti, Luca; van der Meer, Lisette; Cerliani, Leonardo; Renken, Remco; Pijnenborg, Gerdina H M; Aleman, André

2015-01-01

4

Altered microstructure within social-cognitive brain networks during childhood in Williams syndrome.  

PubMed

Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental condition caused by a hemizygous deletion of ?26-28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. WS is associated with a distinctive pattern of social cognition. Accordingly, neuroimaging studies show that WS is associated with structural alterations of key brain regions involved in social cognition during adulthood. However, very little is currently known regarding the neuroanatomical structure of social cognitive brain networks during childhood in WS. This study used diffusion tensor imaging to investigate the structural integrity of a specific set of white matter pathways (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus [IFOF] and uncinate fasciculus [UF]) and associated brain regions [fusiform gyrus (FG), amygdala, hippocampus, medial orbitofrontal gyrus (MOG)] known to be involved in social cognition in children with WS and a typically developing (TD) control group. Children with WS exhibited higher fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial diffusivity values and lower radial diffusivity and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values within the IFOF and UF, higher FA values within the FG, amygdala, and hippocampus and lower ADC values within the FG and MOG compared to controls. These findings provide evidence that the WS genetic deletion affects the development of key white matter pathways and brain regions important for social cognition. PMID:23709644

Haas, Brian W; Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Sheau, Kristen E; Yamagata, Bun; Ullas, Shruti; Reiss, Allan L

2014-10-01

5

A low Complexity Wireless Gigabit Ethernet IFoF 60 GHz H/W Platform and Issues  

E-print Network

This paper proposes a complete IFoF system architecture derived from simplified IEEE802.15.3c PHY layer proposal to successfully ensure near 1 Gbps on the air interface. The system architecture utilizes low complexity baseband processing modules. The byte/frame synchronization technique is designed to provide a high value of preamble detection probability and a very small value of the false detection probability. Conventional Reed-Solomon RS (255, 239) coding is used for Channel Forward Error Correction (FEC). Good communication link quality and Bit Error Rate (BER) results at 875 Mbps are achieved with directional antennas.

Rakotondrainibe, Lahatra; Kokar, Y; Zaharia, G; Brunet, F; Tanguy, E; Zein, G El

2009-01-01

6

Pathways to Seeing Music: Enhanced Structural Connectivity in Colored-Music Synesthesia  

PubMed Central

Synesthesia, a condition in which a stimulus in one sensory modality consistently and automatically triggers concurrent percepts in another modality, provides a window into the neural correlates of cross-modal associations. While research on grapheme-color synesthesia has provided evidence for both hyperconnectivity/hyperbinding and disinhibited feedback as possible underlying mechanisms, less research has explored the neuroanatomical basis of other forms of synesthesia. In the current study we investigated the white matter correlates of colored-music synesthesia. As these synesthetes report seeing colors upon hearing musical sounds, we hypothesized they might show different patterns of connectivity between visual and auditory association areas. We used diffusion tensor imaging to trace the white matter tracts in temporal and occipital lobe regions in 10 synesthetes and 10 matched non-synesthete controls. Results showed that synesthetes possessed different hemispheric patterns of fractional anisotropy, an index of white matter integrity, in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), a major white matter pathway that connects visual and auditory association areas to frontal regions. Specifically, white matter integrity within the right IFOF was significantly greater in synesthetes than controls. Furthermore, white matter integrity in synesthetes was correlated with scores on audiovisual tests of the Synesthesia Battery, especially in white matter underlying the right fusiform gyrus. Our findings provide the first evidence of a white matter substrate of colored-music synesthesia, and suggest that enhanced white matter connectivity is involved in enhanced cross-modal associations. PMID:23454047

Zamm, Anna; Schlaug, Gottfried; Eagleman, David M.; Loui, Psyche

2013-01-01

7

Pathways to seeing music: enhanced structural connectivity in colored-music synesthesia.  

PubMed

Synesthesia, a condition in which a stimulus in one sensory modality consistently and automatically triggers concurrent percepts in another modality, provides a window into the neural correlates of cross-modal associations. While research on grapheme-color synesthesia has provided evidence for both hyperconnectivity-hyperbinding and disinhibited feedback as potential underlying mechanisms, less research has explored the neuroanatomical basis of other forms of synesthesia. In the current study we investigated the white matter correlates of colored-music synesthesia. As these synesthetes report seeing colors upon hearing musical sounds, we hypothesized that they might show unique patterns of connectivity between visual and auditory association areas. We used diffusion tensor imaging to trace the white matter tracts in temporal and occipital lobe regions in 10 synesthetes and 10 matched non-synesthete controls. Results showed that synesthetes possessed hemispheric patterns of fractional anisotropy, an index of white matter integrity, in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), a major white matter pathway that connects visual and auditory association areas to frontal regions. Specifically, white matter integrity within the right IFOF was significantly greater in synesthetes than controls. Furthermore, white matter integrity in synesthetes was correlated with scores on audiovisual tests of the Synesthesia Battery, especially in white matter underlying the right fusiform gyrus. Our findings provide the first evidence of a white matter substrate of colored-music synesthesia, and suggest that enhanced white matter connectivity is involved in enhanced cross-modal associations. PMID:23454047

Zamm, Anna; Schlaug, Gottfried; Eagleman, David M; Loui, Psyche

2013-07-01

8

The Role of the Arcuate Fasciculus in Conduction Aphasia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In aphasia literature, it has been considered that a speech repetition defect represents the main constituent of conduction aphasia. Conduction aphasia has frequently been interpreted as a language impairment due to lesions of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) that disconnect receptive language areas from expressive ones. Modern neuroradiological…

Bernal, Byron; Ardila, Alfredo

2009-01-01

9

Reflex vertical gaze and the medial longitudinal fasciculus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extraocular movements were investigated in a patient with bilateral vascular lesions of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. The patient showed voluntary and reflex horizontal gaze consistent with his lesion, but had absent reflex vertical gaze. Voluntary vertical gaze was present. Necropsy was performed, and the findings suggest that the medial longitudinal fasciculi in the pons conveys impulses for reflex vertical gaze,

L. R. Jenkyn; G. Margolis; A. G. Reeves

1978-01-01

10

Dissecting the uncinate fasciculus: disorders, controversies and a hypothesis  

PubMed Central

The uncinate fasciculus is a bidirectional, long-range white matter tract that connects lateral orbitofrontal cortex and Brodmann area 10 with the anterior temporal lobes. Although abnormalities in the uncinate fasciculus have been associated with several psychiatric disorders and previous studies suggest it plays a putative role in episodic memory, language and social emotional processing, its exact function is not well understood. In this review we summarize what is currently known about the anatomy of the uncinate, we review its role in psychiatric and neurological illnesses, and we evaluate evidence related to its putative functions. We propose that an overarching role of the uncinate fasciculus is to allow temporal lobe-based mnemonic associations (e.g. an individual’s name + face + voice) to modify behaviour through interactions with the lateral orbitofrontal cortex, which provides valence-based biasing of decisions. The bidirectionality of the uncinate fasciculus information flow allows orbital frontal cortex-based reward and punishment history to rapidly modulate temporal lobe-based mnemonic representations. According to this view, disruption of the uncinate may cause problems in the expression of memory to guide decisions and in the acquisition of certain types of learning and memory. Moreover, uncinate perturbation should cause problems that extend beyond memory to include social–emotional problems owing to people and objects being stripped of personal value and emotional history and lacking in higher-level motivational value. PMID:23649697

Von Der Heide, Rebecca J.; Skipper, Laura M.; Klobusicky, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

11

Diffusion Tensor Anisotropy in Adolescents and Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

We acquired diffusion tensor images on 33 normal adults aged 22–64 and 15 adolescents aged 14–21. We assessed relative anisotropy in stereotaxically located regions of interest in the internal capsule, corpus callosum, anterior thalamic radiations, frontal anterior fasciculus, fronto-occipital fasciculus, temporal lobe white matter, cingulum bundle, frontal inferior longitudinal fasciculus, frontal superior longitudinal fasciculus, and optic radiations. All of these

Jason S. Schneiderman; Monte S. Buchsbaum; M. Mehmet. Haznedar; Erin A. Hazlett; Adam M. Brickman; Lina Shihabuddin; Jesse G. Brand; Yuliya Torosjan; Randall E. Newmark; Cheuk Tang; Jonathan Aronowitz; Reshmi Paul-Odouard; William Byne; Patrick R. Hof

2007-01-01

12

The superior longitudinal fasciculus in typically developing children and adolescents: diffusion tensor imaging and neuropsychological correlates.  

PubMed

The relationship between superior longitudinal fasciculus microstructural integrity and neuropsychological functions were examined in 49 healthy children (range: 5-17 years) using diffusion tensor imaging. Seven major cognitive domains (intelligence, fine-motor, attention, language, visual-spatial, memory, executive function) were assessed. Data analyses used correlational methods. After adjusting for age and gender, fractional anisotropy and axial diffusivity values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus were positively correlated with executive functions of set shifting, whereas left superior longitudinal fasciculus fractional anisotropy values correlated with attention and language. Apparent diffusion coefficient values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus negatively correlated with inhibitory control. In the left arcuate fasciculus, fractional anisotropy correlated with IQ and attention, whereas radial diffusivity values negatively correlated with IQ, fine-motor skills, and expressive language. Findings from this study provide an examination of the relationship between superior longitudinal fasciculus integrity and children's neuropsychological abilities that can be useful in monitoring pediatric neurologic diseases. PMID:24556549

Urger, Sacide E; De Bellis, Michael D; Hooper, Stephen R; Woolley, Donald P; Chen, Steven D; Provenzale, James

2015-01-01

13

Decoding the superior parietal lobule connections of the superior longitudinal fasciculus/arcuate fasciculus in the human brain.  

PubMed

The temporo-parietal (TP) white matter connections between the inferior parietal lobule and superior temporal gyrus as part of the superior longitudinal fasciculus/arcuate fasciculus (SLF/AF) or middle longitudinal fasciculus (MdLF) have been studied in prior diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) studies. However, few studies have been focusing on the higher TP connections of the superior parietal lobule with the temporal lobe. These higher TP connections have been shown to have a role in core processes such as attention, memory, emotions, and language. Our most recent study, for the first time, hinted to the possibility of a long white matter connection interconnecting the superior parietal lobule (SPL) with the posterior temporal lobe in human brain which we call the SLF/AF TP-SPL and for a shorter abbreviation, the TP-SPL. We decided to further investigate this white matter connection using fiber assignment by continuous tracking deterministic tractography and high spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging on 3T. Five healthy right-handed men (age range 24-37 years) were studied. We delineated the SPL connections of the SLF/AF TP bilaterally in five normal adult human brains. Using a high resolution DTT technique, we demonstrate for the first time, the trajectory of a long fiber bundle connectivity between the SPL and posterior temporal lobe, called the SLF/AF TP-SPL (or the TP-SPL), bilaterally in five healthy adult human brains. We also demonstrate the trajectory of the vertically oriented posterior TP connections, interconnecting the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) with the posterior temporal lobe (TP-IPL) in relation to the TP-SPL, arcuate fasciculus and other major language pathways. In the current study, for the first time, we categorized the TP connections into the anterior and posterior connectivity groups and subcategorized each one into the SPL or IPL connections. PMID:25086308

Kamali, A; Sair, H I; Radmanesh, A; Hasan, K M

2014-09-26

14

Does the Left Inferior Longitudinal Fasciculus Play a Role in Language? A Brain Stimulation Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although advances in diffusion tensor imaging have enabled us to better study the anatomy of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), its function remains poorly understood. Recently, it was suggested that the subcortical network subserving the language semantics could be constituted, in parallel with the inferior occipitofrontal fasciculus, by…

Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Nouet, Aurelien; Gatignol, Peggy; Capelle, Laurent; Duffau, Hugues

2007-01-01

15

Right arcuate fasciculus abnormality in chronic fatigue syndrome.  

PubMed

Purpose To identify whether patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have differences in gross brain structure, microscopic structure, or brain perfusion that may explain their symptoms. Materials and Methods Fifteen patients with CFS were identified by means of retrospective review with an institutional review board-approved waiver of consent and waiver of authorization. Fourteen age- and sex-matched control subjects provided informed consent in accordance with the institutional review board and HIPAA. All subjects underwent 3.0-T volumetric T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, with two diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) acquisitions and arterial spin labeling (ASL). Open source software was used to segment supratentorial gray and white matter and cerebrospinal fluid to compare gray and white matter volumes and cortical thickness. DTI data were processed with automated fiber quantification, which was used to compare piecewise fractional anisotropy (FA) along 20 tracks. For the volumetric analysis, a regression was performed to account for differences in age, handedness, and total intracranial volume, and for the DTI, FA was compared piecewise along tracks by using an unpaired t test. The open source software segmentation was used to compare cerebral blood flow as measured with ASL. Results In the CFS population, FA was increased in the right arcuate fasciculus (P = .0015), and in right-handers, FA was also increased in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) (P = .0008). In patients with CFS, right anterior arcuate FA increased with disease severity (r = 0.649, P = .026). Bilateral white matter volumes were reduced in CFS (mean ± standard deviation, 467 581 mm(3) ± 47 610 for patients vs 504 864 mm(3) ± 68 126 for control subjects, P = .0026), and cortical thickness increased in both right arcuate end points, the middle temporal (T = 4.25) and precentral (T = 6.47) gyri, and one right ILF end point, the occipital lobe (T = 5.36). ASL showed no significant differences. Conclusion Bilateral white matter atrophy is present in CFS. No differences in perfusion were noted. Right hemispheric increased FA may reflect degeneration of crossing fibers or strengthening of short-range fibers. Right anterior arcuate FA may serve as a biomarker for CFS. (©) RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25353054

Zeineh, Michael M; Kang, James; Atlas, Scott W; Raman, Mira M; Reiss, Allan L; Norris, Jane L; Valencia, Ian; Montoya, Jose G

2015-02-01

16

Superior longitudinal fasciculus and language functioning in healthy aging.  

PubMed

Structural deterioration of brain tissue in older adults is thought to be responsible for the majority of age-related cognitive decline. Disruption of widespread cortical networks due to a loss of axonal integrity may also play an important role. Research examining correlations between structural change and functional decline has focused heavily on working memory, processing speed, and executive processes while other aspects of cognition, such as language functioning, have received less attention. The current study aimed to determine whether age-related changes in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), are responsible for the deterioration in language functioning associated with age. Subjects included 112 right-handed volunteers (ages 19-76). For each subject, the SLF of the left hemisphere was reconstructed from diffusion tensor images (DTI). Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values were extracted from parietal (SLFp) and temporal (SLFt) bundles. Language functioning was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), Boston Naming Test (BNT), Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT), and Semantic Fluency Test (SFT). Regression analyses revealed that males and females showed a different pattern of decline in FA across adulthood. For males, greater SLFt FA was significantly associated with increased COWAT performance, and there was a positive relationship between both age and SLFp FA with BNT scores. In females, greater SLFp FA was related to lower COWAT performance. Taken together, the results suggest that white matter integrity of the SLF follows a different pattern of decline in adulthood for males and females, and this decline differentially affects language functioning. PMID:24680744

Madhavan, Kiely M; McQueeny, Tim; Howe, Steven R; Shear, Paula; Szaflarski, Jerzy

2014-05-01

17

A tractography study in dyslexia: neuroanatomic correlates of orthographic, phonological and speech processing.  

PubMed

Diffusion tensor imaging tractography is a structural magnetic resonance imaging technique allowing reconstruction and assessment of the integrity of three dimensional white matter tracts, as indexed by their fractional anisotropy. It is assumed that the left arcuate fasciculus plays a crucial role for reading development, as it connects two regions of the reading network, the left temporoparietal region and the left inferior frontal gyrus, for which atypical functional activation and lower fractional anisotropy values have been reported in dyslexic readers. In addition, we explored the potential role of the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, which might connect a third region of the reading network, the left ventral occipitotemporal region with the left inferior frontal gyrus. In the present study, 20 adults with dyslexia and 20 typical reading adults were scanned using diffusion tensor imaging, and the bilateral arcuate fasciculus and the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus were delineated. Group comparisons show a significantly reduced fractional anisotropy in the left arcuate fasciculus of adults with dyslexia, in particular in the segment that directly connects posterior temporal and frontal areas. This fractional anisotropy reduction might reflect a lower degree of myelination in the dyslexic sample, as it co-occurred with a group difference in radial diffusivity. In contrast, no significant group differences in fractional anisotropy were found in the right arcuate fasciculus or in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Correlational analyses (controlled for reading status) demonstrated a specific relation between performance on phoneme awareness and speech perception and the integrity of left arcuate fasciculus as indexed by fractional anisotropy, and between orthographic processing and fractional anisotropy values in left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. The present study reveals structural anomalies in the left arcuate fasciculus in adults with dyslexia. This finding corroborates current hypotheses of dyslexia as a disorder of network connections. In addition, our study demonstrates a correlational double dissociation, which might reflect neuroanatomical correlates of the dual route reading model: the left arcuate fasciculus seems to sustain the dorsal phonological route underlying grapheme-phoneme decoding, while the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus seems to sustain the ventral orthographic route underlying reading by direct word access. PMID:22327793

Vandermosten, Maaike; Boets, Bart; Poelmans, Hanne; Sunaert, Stefan; Wouters, Jan; Ghesquière, Pol

2012-03-01

18

Am J Psychiatry 159:5, May 2002 813 Uncinate Fasciculus Findings in Schizophrenia  

E-print Network

Am J Psychiatry 159:5, May 2002 813 Article Uncinate Fasciculus Findings in Schizophrenia in schizophrenia. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) stud- ies, however, have not shown compelling integ- rity. The first three diffusion tensor imag- ing studies in schizophrenia showed lower

19

Anatomical Properties of the Arcuate Fasciculus Predict Phonological and Reading Skills in Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than a century, neurologists have hypothesized that the arcuate fasciculus carries signals that are essential for language function; however, the relevance of the pathway for particular behaviors is highly controversial. The primary objective of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging to examine the relationship between individual…

Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Sherbondy, Anthony J.; Deutsch, Gayle K.; Wandell, Brian A.; Ben-Shachar, Michal

2011-01-01

20

Uncinate fasciculus fiber tracking in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Initial findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS), ictal discharge spread to the frontal and insulo-perisylvian\\u000a cortex is commonly observed. The implication of white matter pathways in this propagation has not been investigated. We compared\\u000a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements along the uncinate fasciculus (UF), a major tract connecting the frontal and temporal\\u000a lobes, in patients and controls.

S. Rodrigo; C. Oppenheim; F. Chassoux; N. Golestani; Y. Cointepas; C. Poupon; F. Semah; J.-F. Mangin; D. Le Bihan; J.-F. Meder

2007-01-01

21

Evaluating the Arcuate Fasciculus With Combined Diffusion-Weighted MRI Tractography and Electrocorticography  

PubMed Central

The conventional model of language-related brain structure describing the arcuate fasciculus as a key white matter tract providing a direct connection between Wernicke’s region and Broca’s area has been called into question. Specifically, the inferior precentral gyrus, possessing both primary motor (Brodmann Area [BA] 4) and premotor cortex (BA 6), has been identified as a potential alternative termination. The authors initially localized cortical sites involved in language using measurement of event-related gamma-activity on electrocorticography (ECoG). The authors then determined whether language-related sites of the temporal lobe were connected, via white matter structures, to the inferior frontal gyrus more tightly than to the precentral gyrus. The authors found that language-related sites of the temporal lobe were far more likely to be directly connected to the inferior precentral gyrus through the arcuate fasciculus. Furthermore, tractography was a significant predictor of frontal language-related ECoG findings. Analysis of an interaction between anatomy and tractography in this model revealed tractrography to have the highest predictive value for language-related ECoG findings of the precentral gyrus. This study failed to support the conventional model of language-related brain structure. More feasible models should include the inferior precentral gyrus as a termination of the arcuate fasciculus. The exact functional significance of direct connectivity between temporal language-related sites and the precentral gyrus requires further study. PMID:23982893

Brown, Erik C.; Jeong, Jeong-Won; Muzik, Otto; Rothermel, Robert; Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Juhász, Csaba; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

2014-01-01

22

'For the benefit of the people': the Dutch translation of the Fasciculus medicinae, Antwerp 1512.  

PubMed

The article deals with the Dutch translation of the Fasciculus medicinae based on the Latin edition, Venice 1495, with the famous woodcuts created in 1494 for the Italian translation of the original Latin edition of 1491. The woodcuts are compared with the Venetian model. New features in the Antwerp edition include the Skeleton and the Zodiac Man, bot originally based on German models. The text also deals with other woodcuts in the Low Countries based on these Venetian illustrations. The Appendices provide a short title catalog of all the editions and translations based on the Venetian edition and a stemma. PMID:19642255

Coppens, Christian

2009-01-01

23

Damage to the anterior arcuate fasciculus predicts non-fluent speech production in aphasia  

PubMed Central

Non-fluent aphasia implies a relatively straightforward neurological condition characterized by limited speech output. However, it is an umbrella term for different underlying impairments affecting speech production. Several studies have sought the critical lesion location that gives rise to non-fluent aphasia. The results have been mixed but typically implicate anterior cortical regions such as Broca’s area, the left anterior insula, and deep white matter regions. To provide a clearer picture of cortical damage in non-fluent aphasia, the current study examined brain damage that negatively influences speech fluency in patients with aphasia. It controlled for some basic speech and language comprehension factors in order to better isolate the contribution of different mechanisms to fluency, or its lack. Cortical damage was related to overall speech fluency, as estimated by clinical judgements using the Western Aphasia Battery speech fluency scale, diadochokinetic rate, rudimentary auditory language comprehension, and executive functioning (scores on a matrix reasoning test) in 64 patients with chronic left hemisphere stroke. A region of interest analysis that included brain regions typically implicated in speech and language processing revealed that non-fluency in aphasia is primarily predicted by damage to the anterior segment of the left arcuate fasciculus. An improved prediction model also included the left uncinate fasciculus, a white matter tract connecting the middle and anterior temporal lobe with frontal lobe regions, including the pars triangularis. Models that controlled for diadochokinetic rate, picture-word recognition, or executive functioning also revealed a strong relationship between anterior segment involvement and speech fluency. Whole brain analyses corroborated the findings from the region of interest analyses. An additional exploratory analysis revealed that involvement of the uncinate fasciculus adjudicated between Broca’s and global aphasia, the two most common kinds of non-fluent aphasia. In summary, the current results suggest that the anterior segment of the left arcuate fasciculus, a white matter tract that lies deep to posterior portions of Broca’s area and the sensory-motor cortex, is a robust predictor of impaired speech fluency in aphasic patients, even when motor speech, lexical processing, and executive functioning are included as co-factors. Simply put, damage to those regions results in non-fluent aphasic speech; when they are undamaged, fluent aphasias result. PMID:24131592

Guo, Dazhou; Fillmore, Paul; Holland, Audrey; Rorden, Chris

2013-01-01

24

Virtual dissection and comparative connectivity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus in chimpanzees and humans.  

PubMed

Many of the behavioral capacities that distinguish humans from other primates rely on fronto-parietal circuits. The superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) is the primary white matter tract connecting lateral frontal with lateral parietal regions; it is distinct from the arcuate fasciculus, which interconnects the frontal and temporal lobes. Here we report a direct, quantitative comparison of SLF connectivity using virtual in vivo dissection of the SLF in chimpanzees and humans. SLF I, the superior-most branch of the SLF, showed similar patterns of connectivity between humans and chimpanzees, and was proportionally volumetrically larger in chimpanzees. SLF II, the middle branch, and SLF III, the inferior-most branch, showed species differences in frontal connectivity. In humans, SLF II showed greater connectivity with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas in chimps SLF II showed greater connectivity with the inferior frontal gyrus. SLF III was right-lateralized and proportionally volumetrically larger in humans, and human SLF III showed relatively reduced connectivity with dorsal premotor cortex and greater extension into the anterior inferior frontal gyrus, especially in the right hemisphere. These results have implications for the evolution of fronto-parietal functions including spatial attention to observed actions, social learning, and tool use, and are in line with previous research suggesting a unique role for the right anterior inferior frontal gyrus in the evolution of human fronto-parietal network architecture. PMID:25534109

Hecht, Erin E; Gutman, David A; Bradley, Bruce A; Preuss, Todd M; Stout, Dietrich

2015-03-01

25

Pediatric traumatic brain injury: language outcomes and their relationship to the arcuate fasciculus.  

PubMed

Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result in long-lasting language impairments alongside dysarthria, a motor-speech disorder. Whether this co-morbidity is due to the functional links between speech and language networks, or to widespread damage affecting both motor and language tracts, remains unknown. Here we investigated language function and diffusion metrics (using diffusion-weighted tractography) within the arcuate fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, and the corpus callosum in 32 young people after TBI (approximately half with dysarthria) and age-matched healthy controls (n=17). Only participants with dysarthria showed impairments in language, affecting sentence formulation and semantic association. In the whole TBI group, sentence formulation was best predicted by combined corpus callosum and left arcuate volumes, suggesting this "dual blow" seriously reduces the potential for functional reorganisation. Word comprehension was predicted by fractional anisotropy in the right arcuate. The co-morbidity between dysarthria and language deficits therefore seems to be the consequence of multiple tract damage. PMID:23756046

Liégeois, Frédérique J; Mahony, Kate; Connelly, Alan; Pigdon, Lauren; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Morgan, Angela T

2013-12-01

26

Disynaptic excitation from the medial longitudinal fasciculus to lumbosacral motoneurons: modulation by repetitive activation, descending pathways, and locomotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Short-latency excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by stimulation in the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) were recorded intracellularly from motoneurons in the cat lumbosacral spinal cord. Monosynaptic and disynaptic EPSPs occurred in most flexor and extensor motoneurons studied. These EPSPs resulted from the activation of fast (> 100 m\\/s) descending axons from the MLF to the spinal cord. Several features distinguished

M. K. Floeter; G. N. Sholomenko; J.-P. Gossard; R. E. Burke

1993-01-01

27

Is the term "fasciculus opticus cerebralis" more justifiable than the term "optic nerve"?  

PubMed

The terminology of the optic nerve had already been changed three times, since 1895 until 1955 when the term "nervus opticus" was introduced in the "Terminologia Anatomica". Following our study we claim that, from the aspect of phylogenetic evolution of binocular vision development as well as optical embryogenesis where opticus is evidently presented as a product of diencephalic structures, the addition of the term "nervus" to opticus is not adequate and justified. From the clinical aspect the term "nervus opticus" is also inadequate, both as a "nerve" that has no functional regenerative properties, unlike other cranial nerves, as well as from a pedagogical and didactical aspect of educating future physicians. We suggest that the term "Fasciculus Opticus Cerebralis" should be used as it much better explains the origin as well as its affiliation to the central nervous system. PMID:23837214

Vojnikovi?, Bojo; Bajek, Snjezana; Bajek, Goran; Strenja-Lini?, Ines; Grubesi?, Aron

2013-04-01

28

Evidence of Slow Maturation of the Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus in Early Childhood by Diffusion Tensor Imaging  

PubMed Central

While the majority of axonal organization is established by birth in mammalian brains, axonal wiring and pruning processes, as well as myelination, are known to extend to the postnatal periods, where environmental stimuli often play a major role. Normal axonal and myelin development of individual white matter tracts of human in this period is poorly understood and may have a major role in cognitive development of human. In this study, we applied diffusion tensor imaging and normalization-based population analyses to 44 preteen children and 30 adult images. We observed highly significant changes of fiber orientations at regions that correspond to the superior longitudinal fasciculus during the first five years. The result is attributed to slow axonal and/or myelin maturation of this tract, which is believed to be involved in language functions. PMID:17826183

Zhang, Jiangyang; Evans, Alan; Hermoye, Laurent; Lee, Seung-Koo; Wakana, Setsu; Zhang, Weihong; Donohue, Pamela; Miller, Michael I.; Huang, Hao; Wang, Xiaoqing; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Mori, Susumu

2009-01-01

29

Bilateral agenesis of arcuate fasciculus demonstrated by fiber tractography in congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome.  

PubMed

Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS) is a type of cortical developmental abnormality associated with distinctive clinical and imaging features. Clinical spectrum of this syndrome is quite heterogeneous, with different degrees of neurological impairment in affected individuals. High-definition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a great importance in revealing the presence of CBPS, but is limited in elucidating the heterogeneous clinical spectrum. The arcuate fasciculus (AF) is a prominent language tract in the perisylvian region interconnecting Broca and Wernicke areas, and has a high probability of being affected developmentally in CBPS. Herein, we report a case of CBPS with investigation of AF using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fiber tractography in relation to clinical findings. We postulated that proven absence of AF on DTI and fiber tractography would correlate with a severe phenotype of CBPS. PMID:24852949

Kilinc, Ozden; Ekinci, Gazanfer; Demirkol, Ezgi; Agan, Kadriye

2015-03-01

30

Evidence of slow maturation of the superior longitudinal fasciculus in early childhood by diffusion tensor imaging.  

PubMed

While the majority of axonal organization is established by birth in mammalian brains, axonal wiring and pruning processes, as well as myelination, are known to extend to the postnatal periods, where environmental stimuli often play a major role. Normal axonal and myelin development of individual white matter tracts of human in this period is poorly understood and may have a major role in cognitive development of human. In this study, we applied diffusion tensor imaging and normalization-based population analyses to 44 preteen children and 30 adult images. We observed highly significant changes of fiber orientations at regions that correspond to the superior longitudinal fasciculus during the first 5 years. The result is attributed to slow axonal and/or myelin maturation of this tract, which is believed to be involved in language functions. PMID:17826183

Zhang, Jiangyang; Evans, Alan; Hermoye, Laurent; Lee, Seung-Koo; Wakana, Setsu; Zhang, Weihong; Donohue, Pamela; Miller, Michael I; Huang, Hao; Wang, Xiaoqing; van Zijl, Peter C M; Mori, Susumu

2007-11-01

31

Uncinate fasciculus fiber tracking in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Initial findings.  

PubMed

In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS), ictal discharge spread to the frontal and insulo-perisylvian cortex is commonly observed. The implication of white matter pathways in this propagation has not been investigated. We compared diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements along the uncinate fasciculus (UF), a major tract connecting the frontal and temporal lobes, in patients and controls. Ten right-handed patients referred for intractable TLE due to a right HS were investigated on a 1.5-T MR scanner including a DTI sequence. All patients had interictal fluorodeoxyglucose PET showing an ipsilateral temporal hypometabolism associated with insular and frontal or perisylvian hypometabolism. The controls consisted of ten right-handed healthy subjects. UF fiber tracking was performed, and its fractional anisotropy (FA) values were compared between patients and controls, separately for the right and left UF. The left-minus-right FA UF asymmetry index was computed to test for intergroup differences. Asymmetries were found in the control group with right-greater-than-left FA. This asymmetrical pattern was lost in the patient group. Right FA values were lower in patients with right HS versus controls. Although preliminary, these findings may be related to the preferential pathway of seizure spread from the mesial temporal lobe to frontal and insulo-perisylvian areas. PMID:17219141

Rodrigo, S; Oppenheim, C; Chassoux, F; Golestani, N; Cointepas, Y; Poupon, C; Semah, F; Mangin, J-F; Le Bihan, D; Meder, J-F

2007-07-01

32

Detection of the arcuate fasciculus in congenital amusia depends on the tractography algorithm  

PubMed Central

The advent of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows researchers to virtually dissect white matter fiber pathways in the brain in vivo. This, for example, allows us to characterize and quantify how fiber tracts differ across populations in health and disease, and change as a function of training. Based on diffusion MRI, prior literature reports the absence of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in some control individuals and as well in those with congenital amusia. The complete absence of such a major anatomical tract is surprising given the subtle impairments that characterize amusia. Thus, we hypothesize that failure to detect the AF in this population may relate to the tracking algorithm used, and is not necessarily reflective of their phenotype. Diffusion data in control and amusic individuals were analyzed using three different tracking algorithms: deterministic and probabilistic, the latter either modeling two or one fiber populations. Across the three algorithms, we replicate prior findings of a left greater than right AF volume, but do not find group differences or an interaction. We detect the AF in all individuals using the probabilistic 2-fiber model, however, tracking failed in some control and amusic individuals when deterministic tractography was applied. These findings show that the ability to detect the AF in our sample is dependent on the type of tractography algorithm. This raises the question of whether failure to detect the AF in prior studies may be unrelated to the underlying anatomy or phenotype. PMID:25653637

Chen, Joyce L.; Kumar, Sukhbinder; Williamson, Victoria J.; Scholz, Jan; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Stewart, Lauren

2015-01-01

33

Recovery of injured arcuate fasciculus in the dominant hemisphere in a patient with an intracerebral hemorrhage.  

PubMed

This study reports on a patient with an intracerebral hemorrhage who showed recovery of an injured arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the dominant hemisphere, using follow-up diffusion tensor tractography. A 43-year-old right-handed man presented with severe aphasia and hemiparesis resulting from a spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parietotemporal lobes. The patient showed severe aphasia at 1 month after onset, with an aphasia quotient of 5% on the Korean-Western Aphasia Battery. He underwent comprehensive rehabilitative therapy until 22 months after onset and his aphasia showed improvement, with an aphasia quotient of 58% on the Korean-Western Aphasia Battery. On 1-month diffusion tensor tractography, only the thin ascending part of the left AF from the Wernicke area remained. In contrast, on 16-month diffusion tensor tractography, the injured left AF was thickened and elongated to around the left Broca area; however, discontinuation of the left AF was observed around the left Broca area, and this continuation was elongated to the left Broca area on 22-month diffusion tensor tractography. This study reports on a patient who showed recovery from injury of the left AF along with improvement of aphasia. Recovery of the injured AF in the dominant hemisphere appears to be one of the mechanisms for recovery from aphasia. PMID:25299531

Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Han Do

2014-12-01

34

Detection of the arcuate fasciculus in congenital amusia depends on the tractography algorithm.  

PubMed

The advent of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows researchers to virtually dissect white matter fiber pathways in the brain in vivo. This, for example, allows us to characterize and quantify how fiber tracts differ across populations in health and disease, and change as a function of training. Based on diffusion MRI, prior literature reports the absence of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in some control individuals and as well in those with congenital amusia. The complete absence of such a major anatomical tract is surprising given the subtle impairments that characterize amusia. Thus, we hypothesize that failure to detect the AF in this population may relate to the tracking algorithm used, and is not necessarily reflective of their phenotype. Diffusion data in control and amusic individuals were analyzed using three different tracking algorithms: deterministic and probabilistic, the latter either modeling two or one fiber populations. Across the three algorithms, we replicate prior findings of a left greater than right AF volume, but do not find group differences or an interaction. We detect the AF in all individuals using the probabilistic 2-fiber model, however, tracking failed in some control and amusic individuals when deterministic tractography was applied. These findings show that the ability to detect the AF in our sample is dependent on the type of tractography algorithm. This raises the question of whether failure to detect the AF in prior studies may be unrelated to the underlying anatomy or phenotype. PMID:25653637

Chen, Joyce L; Kumar, Sukhbinder; Williamson, Victoria J; Scholz, Jan; Griffiths, Timothy D; Stewart, Lauren

2015-01-01

35

Individual differences in crossmodal brain activity predict arcuate fasciculus connectivity in developing readers.  

PubMed

Crossmodal integration of auditory and visual information, such as phonemes and graphemes, is a critical skill for fluent reading. Previous work has demonstrated that white matter connectivity along the arcuate fasciculus (AF) is predicted by reading skill and that crossmodal processing particularly activates the posterior STS (pSTS). However, the relationship between this crossmodal activation and white matter integrity has not been previously reported. We investigated the interrelationship of crossmodal integration, both in terms of behavioral performance and pSTS activity, with AF tract coherence using a rhyme judgment task in a group of 47 children with a range of reading abilities. We demonstrate that both response accuracy and pSTS activity for crossmodal (auditory-visual) rhyme judgments was predictive of fractional anisotropy along the left AF. Unimodal (auditory-only or visual-only) pSTS activity was not significantly related to AF connectivity. Furthermore, activity in other reading-related ROIs did not show the same AV-only AF coherence relationship, and AV pSTS activity was not related to connectivity along other language-related tracts. This study is the first to directly show that crossmodal brain activity is specifically related to connectivity in the AF, supporting its role in phoneme-grapheme integration ability. More generally, this study helps to define an interdependent neural network for reading-related integration. PMID:24456399

Gullick, Margaret M; Booth, James R

2014-07-01

36

Sex Differences of Uncinate Fasciculus Structural Connectivity in Individuals with Conduct Disorder  

PubMed Central

Conduct disorder (CD) is one of the most common behavior disorders in adolescents, such as impulsivity, aggression, and running from school. Males are more likely to develop CD than females, and two previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have demonstrated abnormal microstructural integrity in the uncinate fasciculus (UF) in boys with CD compared to a healthy control group. However, little is known about changes in the UF in females with CD. In this study, the UF was illustrated by tractography; then, the fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity, mean diffusion, radial diffusivity (RD), and the length and number of the UF fiber bundles were compared between male and female patients with CD and between female patients with CD and female healthy controls, as well as between males with CD and healthy males. We found that males with CD showed significantly higher FA of the bilateral UF and significantly lower RD of the left UF when comparing with females with CD. Meanwhile, significantly higher FA and lower RD of the bilateral UF were also found in boys with CD relative to the male healthy controls. Our results replicated previous reports that the microstructural integrity of the UF was abnormal in boys with CD. Additionally, our results demonstrated significant gender effects on the UF of patients with CD, which may indicate why boys have higher rates of conduct problems than girls. PMID:24829912

Zhang, Jibiao; Gao, Junling; Shi, Huqing; Huang, Bingsheng; Wang, Xiang; Situ, Weijun; Cai, Weixiong; Yi, Jinyao; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Yao, Shuqiao

2014-01-01

37

Aberrations in the arcuate fasciculus are associated with auditory verbal hallucinations in psychotic and in non-psychotic individuals.  

PubMed

The pathophysiology of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) is still unclear. Cognitive as well as electrophysiological studies indicate that a defect in sensory feedback (corollary discharge) may contribute to the experience of AVH. This could result from disruption of the arcuate fasciculus, the major tract connecting frontal and temporo-parietal language areas. Previous diffusion tensor imaging studies indeed demonstrated abnormalities of this tract in schizophrenia patients with AVH. It is, however, difficult to disentangle specific associations with AVH in this patient group as many other factors, such as other positive and negative symptoms, medication or halted education could likewise have affected tract integrity. We therefore investigated AVH in relative isolation and studied a group of non-psychotic individuals with AVH as well as patients with AVH and non-hallucinating matched controls. We compared tract integrity of the arcuate fasiculus and of three other control tracts, between 35 non-psychotic individuals with AVH, 35 schizophrenia patients with AVH, and 36 controls using diffusion tensor imaging and magnetization transfer imaging. Both groups with AVH showed an increase in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in the arcuate fasciculus, but not in the other control tracts. In addition, a general decrease in fractional anisotropy (FA) for almost all bundles was observed in the patient group, but not in the non-psychotic individuals with AVH. As increased MTR in the arcuate fasciculus was present in both hallucinating groups, a specific association with AVH seems plausible. Decreases in FA, on the other hand, seem to be related to other disease processes of schizophrenia. PMID:22109992

de Weijer, Antoin D; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W; Diederen, Kelly M S; Mandl, René C W; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Sommer, Iris E

2013-03-01

38

Alterations of natural hand movements after interruption of fasciculus cuneatus in the macaque.  

PubMed

As part of a series of investigations on the control of fine finger movements in the macaque, spontaneous use of the hand in grooming, scratching, and manipulation was observed before and after interruption of fasciculus cuneatus (FC). Videotaped observations were made of four stumptail macaques (Macaca arctoides) living outdoors in social groups. The monkeys were followed for 1 to 3 years postoperatively. For the first 2 weeks following surgery, all monkeys neglected the affected hand and did not use it for support, locomotion, climbing, scratching, foraging, or grooming. Recovery of gross arm and hand movements occurred over a 1- to 3-month period. All the monkeys eventually used the hand for support, climbing, and object manipulation, but fine control of the fingers did not recover. Also, there was an apparent hypotonia of the fingers, imparting a "floppy" appearance to the hand. The animals coped with the loss of fine control by decreasing the frequency of some behaviors, eliminating others, and developing alternative strategies. Exploratory movements that were utilized for investigating the anogenital area or foraging for small food items were eliminated by FC interruption. There were obvious deficits in grip formation and grasp of small food objects (see Glendinning et al., this issue), but effects on similar movements during grooming only became obvious after repeated inspection of videotaped records. Self-scratching and sweeps of the hand in grooming were preserved but altered in form and frequency. The component movements in these behaviors were relatively uncoordinated, and the fingers were splayed (abducted). Often the hand was formed in a rigid posture throughout the sweeping motion, and the fingers did not stroke the skin individually. Frame-by-frame analysis of videotapes revealed that the morphology of the precision grip during grooming, in movements termed "plucks," was permanently altered. Preoperatively, the monkeys kept the index finger and thumb closely apposed and routinely made contact on the distal surfaces of the digits, as has been described for precision grip in humans. Postoperatively, this relationship was altered. The index finger frequently missed the thumb tip and made contact on the proximal part of the phalanx, or missed the thumb altogether. Thus, the dorsal column input is important for proprioceptive guidance of movements that achieve "tactile foveation," when objects or surfaces are actively contacted by the receptive areas of keenest sensitivity (on the fingertips). PMID:1595323

Leonard, C M; Glendinning, D S; Wilfong, T; Cooper, B Y; Vierck, C J

1992-01-01

39

Abnormal Language Pathway in Children with Angelman Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Angelman Syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by pervasive developmental disability with failure to develop speech. We examined the basis for severe language delay in Angelman Syndrome patients using diffusion tensor imaging. Magnetic Resonance Imaging/diffusion tensor imaging was performed in seven genetically confirmed Angelman Syndrome children (age:70±26 months, five males) and four age-matched controls to investigate the microstructural integrity of arcuate fasciculus and other major association tracts. Six of seven Angelman Syndrome children had unidentifiable left arcuate fasciculus while all controls had identifiable arcuate fasciculus. The right arcuate fasciculus was absent in six of seven Angelman Syndrome children and one of four controls. Diffusion tensor imaging color map suggested aberrant morphology of the arcuate fasciculus region. Other association tracts, including uncinate fasciculus, inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior-longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract, were identifiable but showed decreased fractional anisotropy in Angelman Syndrome children. Increased apparent diffusion coefficient was seen in all tracts except uncinate fasciculus when compared to controls. Angelman Syndrome patients have global impairment of white matter integrity in association tracts, particularly, the arcuate fasciculus which shows severe morphological changes. This could be due to a potential problem with axon guidance during brain development possibly due to loss of UBE3A gene expression. PMID:21481743

Wilson, Benjamin J.; Sundaram, Senthil K.; Huq, AHM; Jeong, Jeong-Won; Halverson, Stacey R.; Behen, Michael E.; Bui, Duy Q.; Chugani, Harry T.

2011-01-01

40

Relations between white matter maturation and reaction time in childhood.  

PubMed

White matter matures with age and is important for the efficient transmission of neuronal signals. Consequently, white matter growth may underlie the development of cognitive processes important for learning, including the speed of information processing. To dissect the relationship between white matter structure and information processing speed, we administered a reaction time task (finger abduction in response to visual cue) to 27 typically developing, right-handed children aged 4 to 13. Magnetoencephalography and Diffusion Tensor Imaging were used to delineate white matter connections implicated in visual-motor information processing. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) of the optic radiation in the left hemisphere, and FA and mean diffusivity (MD) of the optic radiation in the right hemisphere changed significantly with age. MD and RD decreased with age in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and bilaterally in the cortico-spinal tracts. No age-related changes were evident in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. FA of the cortico-spinal tract in the left hemisphere and MD of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus of the right hemisphere contributed uniquely beyond the effect of age in accounting for reaction time performance of the right hand. Our findings support the role of white matter maturation in the development of information processing speed. PMID:24168858

Scantlebury, Nadia; Cunningham, Todd; Dockstader, Colleen; Laughlin, Suzanne; Gaetz, William; Rockel, Conrad; Dickson, Jolynn; Mabbott, Donald

2014-01-01

41

White matter abnormalities in adolescents with generalized anxiety disorder: a diffusion tensor imaging study  

PubMed Central

Background Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested an abnormal neural circuitry of emotion regulation including the amygdala and prefrontal cortex in both adult and adolescent generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients. Aberrant integrity of white matter in this neural circuitry has been verified in adult GAD patients. White matter abnormalities in adolescent GAD patients have not been detected. Methods Twenty-five adolescents with GAD and 24 healthy controls underwent a diffusion tensor imaging scan. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was compared between groups with a voxel-wise Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) analysis method. Results Compared with healthy controls, adolescents with GAD showed significantly reduced FA in bilateral uncinate fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and corona radiata. Conclusions The findings in the present study suggest a neural basis of emotion dysregulation in adolescent GAD patients. PMID:24528558

2014-01-01

42

Altered integrity of the right arcuate fasciculus as a trait marker of schizophrenia: A sibling study using tractography-based analysis of the whole brain.  

PubMed

Trait markers of schizophrenia aid the dissection of the heterogeneous phenotypes into distinct subtypes and facilitate the genetic underpinning of the disease. The microstructural integrity of the white matter tracts could serve as a trait marker of schizophrenia, and tractography-based analysis (TBA) is the current method of choice. Manual tractography is time-consuming and limits the analysis to preselected fiber tracts. Here, we sought to identify a trait marker of schizophrenia from among 74 fiber tracts across the whole brain using a novel automatic TBA method. Thirty-one patients with schizophrenia, 31 unaffected siblings and 31 healthy controls were recruited to undergo diffusion spectrum magnetic resonance imaging at 3T. Generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA), an index reflecting tract integrity, was computed for each tract and compared among the three groups. Ten tracts were found to exhibit significant differences between the groups with a linear, stepwise order from controls to siblings to patients; they included the right arcuate fasciculus, bilateral fornices, bilateral auditory tracts, left optic radiation, the genu of the corpus callosum, and the corpus callosum to the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, bilateral temporal poles, and bilateral hippocampi. Posthoc between-group analyses revealed that the GFA of the right arcuate fasciculus was significantly decreased in both the patients and unaffected siblings compared to the controls. Furthermore, the GFA of the right arcuate fasciculus exhibited a trend toward positive symptom scores. In conclusion, the right arcuate fasciculus may be a candidate trait marker and deserves further study to verify any genetic association. Hum Brain Mapp 36:1065-1076, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25366810

Wu, Chen-Hao; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Chen, Yu-Jen; Hsu, Yun-Chin; Lo, Yu-Chun; Liu, Chih-Min; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Liu, Chen-Chung; Hsieh, Ming H; Chien, Yi Ling; Chen, Chung-Ming; Isaac Tseng, Wen-Yih

2015-03-01

43

Uncinate fasciculus microstructure and verbal episodic memory in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a diffusion tensor imaging and neuropsychological study.  

PubMed

The present study evaluates the integrity of uncinate fasciculus (UF) and the association between UF microstructure and verbal episodic memory (as one of the cognitive functions linked to UF) in non-demented patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We studied 21 patients with ALS and 11 healthy, demographically-comparable volunteers. Fractional anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficient, axial and radial diffusivity were the DTI metrics examined. Episodic memory was evaluated with Babcock Story Recall Test and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) for patients; measures of immediate and delayed recall and retention for both tests and sum of words recalled through five learning trials for RAVLT were considered. Patients with ALS showed significant bilateral reduction of axial diffusivity in the UF as compared to controls. Furthermore, there were several significant relations between various DTI metrics (mostly in left hemisphere) and memory measures (specifically for the RAVLT). UF microstructural changes may contribute to ALS-related memory impairment, with word-list learning performance relying more upon the integrity of frontal and temporal connections than memory components associated with story recall. PMID:24190400

Christidi, Foteini; Zalonis, Ioannis; Kyriazi, Stavroula; Rentzos, Michalis; Karavasilis, Efstratios; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Evdokimidis, Ioannis

2014-12-01

44

Quantitative Analysis of Gray and White Matter in Williams Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Williams Syndrome is a developmental disorder with a genetic basis, which results in an uneven cognitive profile with relatively strong language skills and severely impaired visuospatial abilities. To better understand the brain structure underlying this profile, we compared individuals with Williams Syndrome to controls using multimodal neuroimaging data and new analytic methods (diffeomorphic mapping and atlas-based analysis). People with Williams Syndrome had basal ganglia atrophy, while the fusiform, the medium temporal gyri, and the cerebellar cortex were relatively preserved. The right superior longitudinal fasciculus, the left fronto-occipital fasciculus, the caudate, and the cingulum demonstrated increased fractional anisotropy, while the corticospinal tract revealed decreased values. These findings may be linked to the uneven cognitive profile evident in Williams Syndrome. PMID:22410548

Faria, Andreia Vasconcellos; Landau, Barbara; O’Hearn, Kirsten M.; Li, Xin; Jiang, Hangyi; Oishi, Kenichi; Zhang, Jiangyang; Mori, Susumu

2012-01-01

45

Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging Reveals Persistent White Matter Alteration after Traumatic Brain Injury Experienced during Early Childhood  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can noninvasively quantify white matter (WM) integrity. Although its application in adult traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common, few studies in children have been reported. The purposes of this study were to examine the alteration of fractional anisotropy (FA) in children with TBI experienced during early childhood and to quantify the association between FA and injury severity. MATERIALS AND METHODS FA was assessed in 9 children with TBI (age = 7.89 ± 1.00 years; Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] = 10.11 ± 4.68) and a control group of 12 children with orthopedic injuries without central nervous system involvement (age = 7.51 ± 0.95 years). All of the subjects were at minimum 12 months after injury. We examined group differences in a series of predetermined WM regions of interest with t test analysis. We subsequently conducted a voxel-wise comparison with Spearman partial correlation analysis. Correlations between FA and injury severity were also calculated on a voxel-wise basis. RESULTS FA values were significantly reduced in the TBI group in genu of corpus callosum (CC), posterior limb of internal capsule (PLIC), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), superior fronto-occipital fasciculus (SFO), and centrum semiovale (CS). GCS scores were positively correlated with FA in several WM areas including CC, PLIC, SLF, CS, SFO, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO). CONCLUSION This DTI study provides evidence that WM integrity remains abnormal in children with moderate-to-severe TBI experienced during early childhood and that injury severity correlated strongly with FA. PMID:17905895

Yuan, W.; Holland, S.K.; Schmithorst, V.J.; Walz, N.C.; Cecil, K.M.; Jones, B.V.; Karunanayaka, P.; Michaud, L.; Wade, S.L.

2014-01-01

46

Downbeat nystagmus associated with damage to the medial longitudinal fasciculus of the pons: a vestibular balance control mechanism via the lower brainstem paramedian tract neurons.  

PubMed

The paramedian tract (PMT) neurons, a group of neurons associated with eye movement that project into the cerebellar flocculus, are present in or near the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) in the paramedian region of the lower brainstem. A 66-year-old man with multiple sclerosis in whom downbeat nystagmus appeared along with right MLF syndrome due to a unilateral pontomedullary lesion is described. In light of these findings, a possible schema for the vestibular balance control mechanism circuit of the PMT neurons via the flocculus is presented. Damage to the PMT neurons impaired the elective inhibitory control mechanism of the anterior semicircular canal neural pathway by the flocculus. This resulted in the appearance of anterior semicircular canal-dominant vestibular imbalance and the formation of downbeat nystagmus. From the pathogenesis of this vertical vestibular nystagmus, the action of the PMT neurons in the vestibular eye movement neuronal pathway to maintain vestibular balance was conjectured to be as follows. PMT neurons transmit vestibular information from the anterior semicircular canals to the cerebellum, forming a cerebellum/brainstem feedback loop. Vestibular information from that loop is integrated in the cerebellum, inhibiting only the anterior semicircular canal neuronal pathway via the flocculus and controlling vestibular balance. PMID:23510567

Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Fujizuka, Natsu; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Yamaguchi, Tetsuto; Tamaoka, Akira

2013-05-15

47

Differences in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus but no general disruption of white matter tracts in children with autism spectrum disorder  

PubMed Central

One of the most widely cited features of the neural phenotype of autism is reduced “integrity” of long-range white matter tracts, a claim based primarily on diffusion imaging studies. However, many prior studies have small sample sizes and/or fail to address differences in data quality between those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typical participants, and there is little consensus on which tracts are affected. To overcome these problems, we scanned a large sample of children with autism (n = 52) and typically developing children (n = 73). Data quality was variable, and worse in the ASD group, with some scans unusable because of head motion artifacts. When we follow standard data analysis practices (i.e., without matching head motion between groups), we replicate the finding of lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in multiple white matter tracts. However, when we carefully match data quality between groups, all these effects disappear except in one tract, the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF). Additional analyses showed the expected developmental increases in the FA of fiber tracts within ASD and typical groups individually, demonstrating that we had sufficient statistical power to detect known group differences. Our data challenge the widely claimed general disruption of white matter tracts in autism, instead implicating only one tract, the right ILF, in the ASD phenotype. PMID:24449864

Koldewyn, Kami; Yendiki, Anastasia; Weigelt, Sarah; Gweon, Hyowon; Julian, Joshua; Richardson, Hilary; Malloy, Caitlin; Saxe, Rebecca; Fischl, Bruce; Kanwisher, Nancy

2014-01-01

48

Case Series: Fractional Anisotropy Along the Trajectory of Selected White Matter Tracts in Adolescents Born Preterm With Ventricular Dilation  

PubMed Central

This case series assesses white matter microstructure in 3 adolescents born preterm with nonshunted ventricular dilation secondary to intraventricular hemorrhage. Subjects (ages 12–17 years, gestational age 26–29 weeks, birth weight 825–1624 g) were compared to 3 full-term controls (13–17 years, 39–40 weeks, 3147–3345 g) and 3 adolescents born preterm without ventricular dilatation (10–13 years, 26–29 weeks, 630–1673 g). Tractography using a 2 region of interest method reconstructed the following white matter tracts: superior longitudinal/arcuate fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, and corticospinal tract. Subjects showed increased fractional anisotropy and changes in the pattern of fractional anisotropy along the trajectory of tracts adjacent to the lateral ventricles. Tensor shape at areas of increased fractional anisotropy demonstrated increased linear anisotropy at the expense of planar and spherical anisotropy. These findings suggest increased axonal packing density and straightening of fibers secondary to ventricular enlargement. PMID:22859695

Myall, Nathaniel J.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Yeatman, Jason D.; Gaman-Bean, Shayna; Feldman, Heidi M.

2014-01-01

49

Origin and neurochemical properties of bulbospinal neurons projecting to the rat lumbar spinal cord via the medial longitudinal fasciculus and caudal ventrolateral medulla  

PubMed Central

Bulbospinal systems (BS) originate from various regions of the brainstem and influence spinal neurons by classical synaptic and modulatory mechanisms. Our aim was to determine the brainstem locations of cells of origin of BS pathways passing through the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) and the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM). We also examined the transmitter content of spinal terminations of the CVLM pathway. Six adult rats received Fluorogold (FG) injections to the right intermediate gray matter of the lumbar cord (L1–L2) and the b-subunit of cholera toxin (CTb) was injected either into the MLF or the right CVLM (3 animals each). Double-labeled cells were identified within brainstem structures with confocal microscopy and mapped onto brainstem diagrams. An additional 3 rats were injected with CTb in the CVLM to label axon terminals in the lumbar spinal cord. Double-labeled cells projecting via the MLF or CVLM were found principally in reticular regions of the medulla and pons but small numbers of cells were also located within the midbrain. CVLM projections to the lumbar cord were almost exclusively ipsilateral and concentrated within the intermediate gray matter. Most (62%) of terminals were immunoreactive for the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 while 23% contained the vesicular GABA transporter. The inhibitory subpopulation was glycinergic, GABAergic or contained both transmitters. The proportions of excitatory and inhibitory axons projecting via the CVLM to the lumbar cord are similar to those projecting via the MLF. Unlike the MLF pathway, CVLM projections are predominantly ipsilateral and concentrated within intermediate gray but do not extend into motor nuclei or laminia VIII. Terminations of the CVLM pathway are located in a region of the gray matter that is rich in premotor interneurons; thus its primary function may be to coordinate activity of premotor networks. PMID:24808828

Huma, Zilli; Du Beau, Amy; Brown, Christina; Maxwell, David J.

2014-01-01

50

New insights in the limbic modulation of visual inputs: The role of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the Li-Am bundle.  

PubMed

Recent anatomical and DTI data demonstrated new aspects in the subcortical occipito-temporal connections. Although a direct (inferior longitudinal fasciculus, ILF) pathway has been previously described, its fine description is still matter of debate. Moreover, a fast and direct subcortical connection between the limbic system and the occipital lobe has been previously recognized in many functional studies but it still remains poorly documented by anatomical images. We provided for the first time an extensive and detailed anatomical description of the ILF subcortical segmentation. We dissected four human hemispheres with modified Klingler's technique, from the basal to the lateral occipito-temporal surface in the two steps, tracking the ILF fibers until their cortical termination. Pictures of this direct temporo-occipital pathway are discussed in the light of recent literature regarding anatomy and functions of occipito-temporal areas. The dissection confirmed the classical originating branches of ILF and allowed a fine description of two main subcomponent of this bundle, both characterized by separate hierarchical distribution: a dorsal ILF and a ventral ILF. Moreover, a direct pathway between lingual cortex and amygdala, not previously demonstrated, is here described with anatomical images. Even if preliminary in results, this is the first fine description of ILF's subcomponents. The complex but clearly segregated organization of the fibers of this bundle (dILF and vILF) supports different level of functions mediated by visual recognition. Moreover, the newly described direct pathway from lingual to amygdala (Li-Am), seems involved in the limbic modulation of visual processing, so it may support physiological conditions the crucial role of this connection in human social cognition. In pathological conditions, on the other hand, this may be one of the hyperactivated pathways in temporo-occipital epileptic and nonepileptic syndromes. PMID:25323099

Latini, Francesco

2015-01-01

51

Neuroanatomical Abnormalities and Cognitive Impairments Are Shared by Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Their Unaffected First-Degree Relatives  

PubMed Central

Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the search for genes with a definitive role in its etiology has been elusive. Deconstructing the disorder in its endophenotypic traits, where the variance is thought to be associated with a fewer number of genes, should boost the statistical power of molecular genetic studies and clarify the pathophysiology of ADHD. In this study, we tested for neuroanatomical and cognitive endophenotypes in a group of adults with ADHD, their unaffected first-degree relatives, and typically developing control subjects. Methods Sixty participants, comprising 20 adults with ADHD, 20 unaffected first-degree relatives, and 20 typically developing control subjects matched for age and gender undertook structural magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry with DARTEL was performed to obtain regional gray and white matter volumes. General linear analyses of the volumes of brain regions, adjusting for age and total intracranial volume, were used to compare groups. Sustained attention and response inhibition were also investigated as cognitive endophenotypes. Results Neuroanatomical abnormalities in gray matter volume in the right inferior frontal gyrus and white matter volume in the caudal portion of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus were shared between ADHD probands and their unaffected first-degree relatives. In addition, impairments in sustained attention were also found to be shared between ADHD patients and their relatives. Conclusions Cognitive impairments in sustained attention and neuroanatomical abnormalities in the right inferior frontal gyrus and the posterior part of right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus are putative neurocognitive endophenotypes in adult ADHD. PMID:24199662

Pironti, Valentino Antonio; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Müller, Ulrich; Dodds, Chris Martin; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward Thomas; Sahakian, Barbara Jacquelyn

2014-01-01

52

Delineation of Early and Later Adult Onset Depression by Diffusion Tensor Imaging  

PubMed Central

Background Due to a lack of evidence, there is no consistent age of onset to define early onset (EO) versus later onset (LO) major depressive disorder (MDD). Fractional anisotropy (FA), derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), has been widely used to study neuropsychiatric disorders by providing information about the brain circuitry, abnormalities of which might facilitate the delineation of EO versus LO MDD. Method In this study, 61 pairs of untreated, non-elderly, first-episode MDD patients and healthy controls (HCs) aged 18–45 years old received DTI scans. The voxel-based analysis method (VBM), classification analysis, using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), and regression analyses were used to determine abnormal FA clusters and their correlations with age of onset and clinical symptoms. Results Classification analysis suggested in the best model that there were two subgroups of MDD patients, delineated by an age of onset of 30 years old, by which MDD patients could be divided into EO (18–29 years old) and LO (30–45 years old) groups. LO MDD was characterized by decreased FA, especially in the white matter (WM) of the fronto-occipital fasciculus and posterior limb of internal capsule, with a negative correlation with the severity of depressive symptoms; in marked contrast, EO MDD showed increased FA, especially in the WM of the corpus callosum, corticospinal midbrain and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, while FA of the WM near the midbrain had a positive correlation with the severity of depressive symptoms. Conclusion Specific abnormalities of the brain circuitry in EO vs. LO MDD were delineated by an age of onset of 30 years old, as demonstrated by distinct abnormal FA clusters with opposite correlations with clinical symptoms. This DTI study supported the evidence of an exact age for the delineation of MDD, which could have broad multidisciplinary importance. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00703742 PMID:25393297

Yu, Hongjun; Nie, Binbin; Li, Na; Luo, Chunrong; Li, Haijun; Liu, Fang; Bai, Yan; Shan, Baoci; Xu, Lin; Xu, Xiufeng

2014-01-01

53

White matter microstructure and the variable adult outcome of childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.  

PubMed

Changes in cerebral cortical anatomy have been tied to the clinical course of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We now ask if alterations in white matter tract microstructure are likewise linked with the adult outcome of childhood ADHD. Seventy-five young adults, 32 with ADHD persisting from childhood and 43 with symptom remission were contrasted against 74 never-affected comparison subjects. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we defined fractional anisotropy, a metric related to white matter microstructure, along with measures of diffusion perpendicular (radial) and parallel (axial) to the axon. Analyses were adjusted for head motion, age and sex, and controlled for multiple comparisons and medication history. Tract-based analyses showed that greater adult inattention, but not hyperactivity-impulsivity, was associated with significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the left uncinate (standardized ?=-0.37, t=3.28, p=0.002) and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (standardized ?=-0.37, t=3.29, p=0.002). The ADHD group with symptoms persisting into adulthood had significantly lower fractional anisotropy than the never-affected controls in these tracts, differences associated with medium to large effect sizes. By contrast, the ADHD group that remitted by adulthood did not differ significantly from controls. The anomalies were found in tracts that connect components of neural systems pertinent to ADHD, such as attention control (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus) and emotion regulation and the processing of reward (the uncinate fasciculus). Change in radial rather than axial diffusivity was the primary driver of this effect, suggesting pathophysiological processes including altered myelination as future targets for pharmacological and behavioral interventions. PMID:25241803

Shaw, Philip; Sudre, Gustavo; Wharton, Amy; Weingart, Daniel; Sharp, Wendy; Sarlls, Joelle

2015-02-01

54

The course and the anatomo-functional relationships of the optic radiation: a combined study with 'post mortem' dissections and 'in vivo' direct electrical mapping.  

PubMed

Even if different dissection, tractographic and connectivity studies provided pure anatomical evidences about the optic radiations (ORs), descriptions of both the anatomical structure and the anatomo-functional relationships of the ORs with the adjacent bundles were not reported. We propose a detailed anatomical and functional study with 'post mortem' dissections and 'in vivo' direct electrical stimulation (DES) of the OR, demonstrating also the relationships with the adjacent eloquent bundles in a neurosurgical 'connectomic' perspective. Six human hemispheres (three left, three right) were dissected after a modified Klingler's preparation. The anatomy of the white matter was analysed according to systematic and topographical surgical perspectives. The anatomical results were correlated to the functional responses collected during three resections of tumours guided by cortico-subcortical DES during awake procedures. We identified two groups of fibres forming the OR. The superior component runs along the lateral wall of the occipital horn, the trigone and the supero-medial wall of the temporal horn. The inferior component covers inferiorly the occipital horn and the trigone, the lateral wall of the temporal horn and arches antero-medially to form the Meyer's Loop. The inferior fronto-occipital fascicle (IFOF) covers completely the superior OR along its entire course, as confirmed by the subcortical DES. The inferior longitudinal fascicle runs in a postero-anterior and inferior direction, covering the superior OR posteriorly and the inferior OR anteriorly. The IFOF identification allows the preservation of the superior OR in the anterior temporal resection, avoiding post-operative complete hemianopia. The identification of the superior OR during the posterior temporal, inferior parietal and occipital resections leads to the preservation of the IFOF and of the eloquent functions it subserves. The accurate knowledge of the OR course and the relationships with the adjacent bundles is crucial to optimize quality of resection and functional outcome. PMID:25402811

Sarubbo, Silvio; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Milani, Paola; Paradiso, Beatrice; Barbareschi, Mattia; Rozzanigo, Umbero; Colarusso, Enzo; Tugnoli, Valeria; Farneti, Marco; Granieri, Enrico; Duffau, Hugues; Chioffi, Franco

2015-01-01

55

Clinical correlations of microstructural changes in progressive supranuclear palsy.  

PubMed

In patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), previous reports have shown a severe white matter (WM) damage involving supra and infratentorial regions including cerebellum. In the present study, we investigated potential correlations between WM integrity loss and clinical-cognitive features of patients with PSP. By using magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging with tract based spatial statistic analysis, we analyzed WM volume in 18 patients with PSP and 18 healthy controls (HCs). All patients and HCs underwent a detailed clinical and neuropsychological evaluation. Relative to HCs, patients with PSP showed WM changes encompassing supra and infratentorial areas such as corpus callosum, fornix, midbrain, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, superior cerebellar peduncle, superior longitudinal fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, cingulate gyrus, and cortico-spinal tract bilaterally. Among different correlations between motor-cognitive features and WM structural abnormalities, we detected a significant association between fronto-cerebellar WM loss and executive cognitive impairment in patients with PSP. Our findings, therefore, corroborate the hypothesis that cognitive impairment in PSP may result from both "intrinsic" and "extrinsic" frontal lobe dysfunction, likely related to cerebellar disconnection. PMID:24786632

Tessitore, Alessandro; Giordano, Alfonso; Caiazzo, Giuseppina; Corbo, Daniele; De Micco, Rosa; Russo, Antonio; Liguori, Sara; Cirillo, Mario; Esposito, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

2014-10-01

56

Cortico-cortical, cortico-striatal, and cortico-thalamic white matter fiber tracts generated in the macaque brain via dynamic programming.  

PubMed

Probabilistic methods have the potential to generate multiple and complex white matter fiber tracts in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Here, a method based on dynamic programming (DP) is introduced to reconstruct fibers pathways whose complex anatomical structures cannot be resolved beyond the resolution of standard DTI data. DP is based on optimizing a sequentially additive cost function derived from a Gaussian diffusion model whose covariance is defined by the diffusion tensor. DP is used to determine the optimal path between initial and terminal nodes by efficiently searching over all paths, connecting the nodes, and choosing the path in which the total probability is maximized. An ex vivo high-resolution scan of a macaque hemi-brain is used to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of DP. DP can generate fiber bundles between distant cortical areas (superior longitudinal fasciculi, arcuate fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, and fronto-occipital fasciculus), neighboring cortical areas (dorsal and ventral banks of the principal sulcus), as well as cortical projections to the hippocampal formation (cingulum bundle), neostriatum (motor cortical projections to the putamen), thalamus (subcortical bundle), and hippocampal formation projections to the mammillary bodies via the fornix. Validation is established either by comparison with in vivo intracellular transport of horseradish peroxidase in another macaque monkey or by comparison with atlases. DP is able to generate known pathways, including crossing and kissing tracts. Thus, DP has the potential to enhance neuroimaging studies of cortical connectivity. PMID:23879573

Ratnanather, J Tilak; Lal, Rakesh M; An, Michael; Poynton, Clare B; Li, Muwei; Jiang, Hangyi; Oishi, Kenichi; Selemon, Lynn D; Mori, Susumu; Miller, Michael I

2013-01-01

57

Genome-wide schizophrenia variant at MIR137 does not impact white matter microstructure in healthy participants.  

PubMed

A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1625579) within the micro-RNA 137 (MIR137) gene recently achieved strong genome-wide association with schizophrenia (SZ). However, the mechanisms by which SZ risk may be mediated by this variant are unknown. As miRNAs have the potential to influence oligodendrocyte development, we investigated whether this SNP was associated with variability in white matter (WM) microstructure. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted on 123 healthy participants genotyped for rs1625579. The analysis consisted of whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics and atlas-based tractography analysis of six major WM tracts known to be affected in SZ - the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the anterior thalamic radiation, the cingulum bundle and the corpus callosum. No significant differences in either whole-brain fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity between MIR137 genotype groups were observed (p>0.05). Similarly, atlas-based tractography of particular tracts implicated in SZ failed to reveal any significant differences between MIR137 genotype groups on measures of WM connectivity (p>0.05). In the absence of WM effects comparable to those reported for other SZ associated genes, these data suggest that MIR137 alone may not confer variability in these WM measures and therefore may not act in isolation for any effects that the variant may have on WM microstructure in SZ samples. PMID:24820543

Kelly, Sinead; Morris, Derek W; Mothersill, Omar; Rose, Emma Jane; Fahey, Ciara; O'Brien, Carol; O'Hanlon, Erik; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden P; Donohoe, Gary

2014-06-27

58

Neuronal substrates of Corsi Block span: Lesion symptom mapping analyses in relation to attentional competition and spatial bias.  

PubMed

Spatial working memory problems are frequently reported following brain damage within both left and right hemispheres but with the severity often being grater in individuals with right hemisphere lesions. Clinically, deficits in spatial working memory have also been noted in patients with visuospatial disorders such as unilateral neglect. Here, we examined neural substrates of short-term memory for spatial locations based on the Corsi Block tapping task and the relationship with the visuospatial deficits of neglect and extinction in a group of chronic neuropsychological patients. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to distinguish shared and dissociate functional components. The neural substrates of spatial short-term memory deficits and the components identified by PCA were examined using whole brain voxel-based morphometry and tract-wise lesion deficits analyses. We found that bilateral lesions within occipital cortex (middle occipital gyrus) and right posterior parietal cortex, along with disconnection of the right parieto-temporal segment of arcuate fasciculus, were associated with low spatial memory span. A single component revealed by PCA accounted for over half of the variance and was linked to damage to right posterior brain regions (temporo-parietal junction, the inferior parietal lobule and middle temporal gyrus extending into middle occipital gyrus). We also found link to disconnections within several association pathways including the superior longitudinal fasciculus, arcuate fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and inferior longitudinal fasciculus. These results indicate that different visuospatial deficits converge into a single component mapped within posterior parietal areas and fronto-parietal white matter pathways. Furthermore, the data presented here fit with the role of posterior parietal cortex/temporo-parietal junction in maintaining a map of salient locations in space, with Corsi Block performance being impaired when the spatial map is damaged. PMID:25281309

Chechlacz, Magdalena; Rotshtein, Pia; Humphreys, Glyn W

2014-10-01

59

Lifelong Bilingualism Contributes to Cognitive Reserve against White Matter Integrity Declines in Aging  

PubMed Central

Recent evidence suggests that lifelong bilingualism may contribute to cognitive reserve (CR) in normal aging. However, there is currently no neuroimaging evidence to suggest that lifelong bilinguals can retain normal cognitive functioning in the face of age-related neurodegeneration. Here we explored this issue by comparing white matter (WM) integrity and gray matter (GM) volumetric patterns of older adult lifelong bilinguals (N = 20) and monolinguals (N = 20). The groups were matched on a range of relevant cognitive test scores and on the established CR variables of education, socioeconomic status and intelligence. Participants underwent high-resolution structural imaging for assessment of GM volume and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessment of WM integrity. Results indicated significantly lower microstructural integrity in the bilingual group in several WM tracts. In particular, compared to their monolingual peers, the bilingual group showed lower fractional anisotropy and/or higher radial diffusivity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus bilaterally, the fornix, and multiple portions of the corpus callosum. There were no group differences in GM volume. Our results suggest that lifelong bilingualism contributes to CR against WM integrity declines in aging. PMID:24103400

Gold, Brian T.; Johnson, Nathan F.; Powell, David K.

2013-01-01

60

Brain morphometry of Dravet syndrome.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to identify differential global and local brain structural patterns in Dravet Syndrome (DS) patients as compared with a control subject group, using brain morphometry techniques which provide a quantitative whole-brain structural analysis that allows for specific patterns to be generalized across series of individuals. Nine patients with the diagnosis of DS that tested positive for mutation in the SCN1A gene and nine well-matched healthy controls were investigated using voxel brain morphometry (VBM), cortical thickness and cortical gyrification measurements. Global volume reductions of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) were related to DS. Local volume reductions corresponding to several white matter regions in brainstem, cerebellum, corpus callosum, corticospinal tracts and association fibers (left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and left uncinate fasciculus) were also found. Furthermore, DS showed a reduced cortical folding in the right precentral gyrus. The present findings describe DS-related brain structure abnormalities probably linked to the expression of the SCN1A mutation. PMID:25048308

Pérez, Alejandro; García-Pentón, Lorna; Canales-Rodríguez, Erick J; Lerma-Usabiaga, Garikoitz; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Román, Francisco J; Davidson, Doug; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Acha, Joana; Carreiras, Manuel

2014-10-01

61

Multivariate pattern analysis of DTI reveals differential white matter in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder  

PubMed Central

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have revealed group differences in white matter between patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and healthy controls. However, the results of these studies were based on average differences between the two groups, and therefore had limited clinical applicability. The objective of this study was to investigate whether fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter can be used to discriminate between patients with OCD and healthy controls at the level of the individual. DTI data were acquired from 28 OCD patients and 28 demographically matched healthy controls, scanned using a 3T MRI system. Differences in FA values of white matter between OCD and healthy controls were examined using a multivariate pattern classification technique known as support vector machine (SVM). SVM applied to FA images correctly identified OCD patients with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 82% resulting in a statistically significant accuracy of 84% (P ? 0.001). This discrimination was based on a distributed network including bilateral prefrontal and temporal regions, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, superior fronto-parietal fasciculus, splenium of corpus callosum and left middle cingulum bundle. The present study demonstrates subtle and spatially distributed white matter abnormalities in individuals with OCD, and provides preliminary support for the suggestion that that these could be used to aid the identification of individuals with OCD in clinical practice. Hum Brain Mapp 35:2643–2651, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24048702

Li, Fei; Huang, Xiaoqi; Tang, Wanjie; Yang, Yanchun; Li, Bin; Kemp, Graham J; Mechelli, Andrea; Gong, Qiyong

2014-01-01

62

Cognitive Processing Speed in Older Adults: Relationship with White Matter Integrity  

PubMed Central

Cognitive processing slows with age. We sought to determine the importance of white matter integrity, assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), at influencing cognitive processing speed among normal older adults, assessed using a novel battery of computerized, non-verbal, choice reaction time tasks. We studied 131 cognitively normal adults aged 55–87 using a cross-sectional design. Each participant underwent our test battery, as well as MRI with DTI. We carried out cross-subject comparisons using tract-based spatial statistics. As expected, reaction time slowed significantly with age. In diffuse areas of frontal and parietal white matter, especially the anterior corpus callosum, fractional anisotropy values correlated negatively with reaction time. The genu and body of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus were among the areas most involved. This relationship was not explained by gray or white matter atrophy or by white matter lesion volume. In a statistical mediation analysis, loss of white matter integrity mediated the relationship between age and cognitive processing speed. PMID:23185621

Kerchner, Geoffrey A.; Racine, Caroline A.; Hale, Sandra; Wilheim, Reva; Laluz, Victor; Miller, Bruce L.; Kramer, Joel H.

2012-01-01

63

Neuroimaging abnormalities, neurocognitive function, and fatigue in patients with hepatitis C  

PubMed Central

Objective: This study examined neurologic abnormalities (as measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging and diffusion tensor imaging), neurocognitive performance, and fatigue among a sample of adults with hepatitis C virus (HCV). We hypothesized that HCV+ individuals would demonstrate structural brain abnormalities and neurocognitive compromise consistent with frontostriatal dysfunction as well as increased fatigue compared to controls. Method: Participants were 76 individuals diagnosed with HCV and 20 controls who underwent a comprehensive neurocognitive evaluation and clinical assessments. A subset of the HCV+ participants (n = 29) and all controls underwent MRI. Results: Individuals diagnosed with chronic HCV infection demonstrated greater fractional anisotropy in the striatum as well as greater mean diffusivity in the fronto-occiptal fasciculus and external capsule compared to HCV? controls. HCV+ participants also demonstrated lower levels of N-acetylaspartate in bilateral parietal white matter and elevations in myo-inosital (mI) in bilateral frontal white matter compared to HCV? controls (all p values < 0.05). HCV+ participants also demonstrated significantly poorer neuropsychological performance, particularly in processing speed and verbal fluency. HCV+ patients reported higher levels of fatigue than controls, and fatigue was significantly correlated with diffusivity in the superior fronto-occipital fasciculus, elevations in mI in frontal white matter, and overall cognitive performance. Conclusions: Our results suggest that HCV-associated neurologic complications disrupt frontostriatal structures, which may result in increased fatigue and poorer cognitive performance, particularly in those cognitive domains regulated by frontostriatal regions. PMID:25610883

Castellon, Steven A.; Singer, Elyse J.; Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Sarma, Manoj K.; Smith, Jason; Thaler, Nicholas S.; Truong, Jonathan Hien; Schonfeld, Daniel; Thomas, M. Albert; Hinkin, Charles H.

2015-01-01

64

Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury  

PubMed Central

Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI) group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h) and at follow-up (~90 days). DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS). Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM). MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD) was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM) regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE) correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI. PMID:25610770

Narayana, Ponnada A.; Yu, Xintian; Hasan, Khader M.; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Levin, Harvey S.; Hunter, Jill V.; Miller, Emmy R.; Patel, Vipul Kumar S.; Robertson, Claudia S.; McCarthy, James J.

2014-01-01

65

Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI) group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h) and at follow-up (~90 days). DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS). Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM). MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD) was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM) regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE) correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI. PMID:25610770

Narayana, Ponnada A; Yu, Xintian; Hasan, Khader M; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Levin, Harvey S; Hunter, Jill V; Miller, Emmy R; Patel, Vipul Kumar S; Robertson, Claudia S; McCarthy, James J

2015-01-01

66

Association between white matter fiber structure and reward-related reactivity of the ventral striatum.  

PubMed

Individual responsiveness to rewards or rewarding stimuli may affect various domains of normal as well as pathological behavior. The ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (NAcc) constitutes a key brain structure in the regulation of reward-appetitive behavior. It remains unclear, however, to which extent individual reward-related BOLD response in the NAcc is dependent on individual characteristics of connecting white matter fiber tracts. Using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) this combined DTI - fMRI study investigated this question by correlating NAcc BOLD signal upon receipt of a monetary reward with different white matter characteristics (FA, axial diffusivity, radial diffusivity). The results show that increased integrity of white matter as assessed by FA in the cingulate and corpus callosum, the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the anterior thalamic radiation and the anterior limb of the internal capsule was positively correlated with reward-related activation in the NAcc. There were no negative correlations as well as no significant results regarding axial and radial diffusivity. These findings indicate that microstructural properties of fiber tracts connecting, amongst others, the cortex with the striatum may influence intensity of reward-related responsiveness of the ventral striatum by constraining or increasing efficiency in information transfer within relevant circuitries involved in processing of reward. PMID:23616433

Koch, Kathrin; Wagner, Gerd; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Schultz, C Christoph; Güllmar, Daniel; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Sauer, Heinrich; Zimmer, Claus; Schlösser, Ralf G M

2014-04-01

67

Effects of early-life adversity on white matter diffusivity changes in patients at risk for major depression  

PubMed Central

Background Relatives of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and people who experienced early-life adversity are at risk for MDD. The aim of our study was to investigate whether unaffected first-degree healthy relatives (UHRs) of patients with MDD show changes in white matter fibre connections compared with healthy controls and whether there are interactions between early-life adversity and these microstructural changes. Methods Unaffected, healthy first-degree relatives of patients with MDD and healthy controls without any family history for a psychiatric disease underwent high angular resolution diffusion imaging with 61 diffusion directions. Data were analyzed with tract-based spatial statistics, and findings were confirmed with tractography. Results Twenty-one UHRs and 24 controls participated in our study. The UHRs showed greater fractional anisotropy than controls in the body and splenium of the corpus callosum, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), left superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and right fornix. The UHRs who experienced more early-life adversity had greater fractional anisotropy than those with less early-life adversity in the splenium of the corpus callosum, fornix, IFO and SLF; in controls, early-life adversity was found to be associated with decreased fractional anisotropy in these fibre tracts. Limitations Studying participants’ strategies for coping with early-life adversity would have been helpful. Crossing fibres in tracts are a general limitation of the method used. Conclusion Altogether, our findings provide evidence for greater fractional anisotropy in UHRs and for interaction between early-life adversity and family risk on white matter tracts involved in cognitive–emotional processes. Whether stronger neural fibre connections are associated with more resilience against depression needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:22008179

Frodl, Thomas; Carballedo, Angela; Fagan, Andrew J.; Lisiecka, Danuta; Ferguson, Yolande; Meaney, James F.

2012-01-01

68

DTI-measured white matter abnormalities in adolescents with Conduct Disorder.  

PubMed

Emerging research suggests that antisocial behavior in youth is linked to abnormal brain white matter microstructure, but the extent of such anatomical connectivity abnormalities remain largely untested because previous Conduct Disorder (CD) studies typically have selectively focused on specific frontotemporal tracts. This study aimed to replicate and extend previous frontotemporal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) findings to determine whether noncomorbid CD adolescents have white matter microstructural abnormalities in major white matter tracts across the whole brain. Seventeen CD-diagnosed adolescents recruited from the community were compared to a group of 24 non-CD youth which did not differ in average age (12-18) or gender proportion. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) measurements were compared between groups using FSL nonparametric two-sample t test, clusterwise whole-brain corrected, p < .05. CD FA and AD deficits were widespread, but unrelated to gender, verbal ability, or CD age of onset. CD adolescents had significantly lower FA and AD values in frontal lobe and temporal lobe regions, including frontal lobe anterior/superior corona radiata, and inferior longitudinal and fronto-occipital fasciculi passing through the temporal lobe. The magnitude of several CD FA deficits was associated with number of CD symptoms. Because AD, but not RD, differed between study groups, abnormalities of axonal microstructure in CD rather than myelination are suggested. This study provides evidence that adolescent antisocial disorder is linked to abnormal white matter microstructure in more than just the uncinate fasciculus as identified in previous DTI studies, or frontotemporal brain structures as suggested by functional neuroimaging studies. Instead, neurobiological risk specific to antisociality in adolescence is linked to microstructural abnormality in numerous long-range white matter connections among many diverse different brain regions. PMID:24139595

Haney-Caron, Emily; Caprihan, Arvind; Stevens, Michael C

2014-01-01

69

Cerebral grey, white matter and csf in never-medicated, first-episode schizophrenia.  

PubMed

We report the first voxel-based morphometric (VBM) study to examine cerebral grey and white matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using computational morphometry in never-medicated, first-episode psychosis (FEP). Region-of-interest (ROI) analysis was also performed blind to group membership. 26 never-medicated individuals with FEP (23 with DSM-IV schizophrenia) and 38 healthy controls had MRI brain scans. Groups were balanced for age, sex, handedness, ethnicity, paternal socio-economic status, and height. Healthy controls were recruited from the local community by advertisement. Grey matter, white matter, and CSF: global brain volume ratios were significantly smaller in patients. Patients had significantly less grey matter volume in L and R caudate nuclei, cingulate gyri, parahippocampal gyri, superior temporal gyri, cerebellum and R thalamus, prefrontal cortex. They also had significantly less white matter volume in the R anterior limb of the internal capsule fronto-occipital fasciculus and L and R fornices, and significantly greater CSF volume especially in the R lateral ventricle. Excluding the 3 subjects with brief psychotic disorder did not alter our results. Our data suggest that fronto-temporal and subcortical-limbic circuits are morphologically abnormal in never-medicated, schizophrenia. ROI analysis comparing the schizophrenia group (n=23) with the healthy controls (n=38) confirmed caudate volumes were significantly smaller bilaterally by 11%, and lateral ventricular volume was significantly larger on the right by 26% in the patients. Caudate nuclei and lateral ventricular volume measurements were uncorrelated (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.30, p=0.10), ruling out the possibility of segmentation artefact. Ratio of lateral ventricle to caudate volume was bilaterally significantly increased (p<0.005, 2-tailed), which could represent an early biomarker in first-episode, never-medicated schizophrenia. PMID:17098398

Chua, Siew E; Cheung, Charlton; Cheung, Vinci; Tsang, Jack T K; Chen, Eric Y H; Wong, Jason C H; Cheung, Jason P Y; Yip, Lawrance; Tai, Kin-Shing; Suckling, John; McAlonan, Gráinne M

2007-01-01

70

Neuroanatomical pattern classification in a population-based sample of first-episode schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Recent neuroanatomical pattern classification studies have attempted to individually classify cases with psychotic disorders using morphometric MRI data in an automated fashion. However, this approach has not been tested in population-based samples, in which variable patterns of comorbidity and disease course are typically found. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (DA) of the above technique to discriminate between incident cases of first-episode schizophrenia identified in a circumscribed geographical region over a limited period of time, in comparison with next-door healthy controls. Sixty-two cases of first-episode schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder and 62 age, gender and educationally-matched controls underwent 1.5 T MRI scanning at baseline, and were naturalistically followed-up over 1 year. T1-weighted images were used to train a high-dimensional multivariate classifier, and to generate both spatial maps of the discriminative morphological patterns between groups and ROC curves. The spatial map discriminating first-episode schizophrenia patients from healthy controls revealed a complex pattern of regional volumetric abnormalities in the former group, affecting fronto-temporal-occipital gray and white matter regions bilaterally, including the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, as well as the third and lateral ventricles. However, an overall modest DA (73.4%) was observed for the individual discrimination between first-episode schizophrenia patients and controls, and the classifier failed to predict 1-year prognosis (remitting versus non-remitting course) of first-episode schizophrenia (DA=58.3%). In conclusion, using a "real world" sample recruited with epidemiological methods, the application of a neuroanatomical pattern classifier afforded only modest DA to classify first-episode schizophrenia subjects and next-door healthy controls, and poor discriminative power to predict the 1-year prognosis of first-episode schizophrenia. PMID:23261522

Zanetti, Marcus V; Schaufelberger, Maristela S; Doshi, Jimit; Ou, Yangming; Ferreira, Luiz K; Menezes, Paulo R; Scazufca, Marcia; Davatzikos, Christos; Busatto, Geraldo F

2013-06-01

71

Neuroanatomical Changes due to Hearing Loss and Chronic Tinnitus: A Combined VBM and DTI Study  

PubMed Central

Subjective tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of an external source. Tinnitus is often accompanied by hearing loss but not everyone with hearing loss experiences tinnitus. We examined neuroanatomical alterations associated with hearing loss and tinnitus in three groups of subjects: those with hearing loss with tinnitus, those with hearing loss without tinnitus and normal hearing controls without tinnitus. To examine changes in gray matter we used structural MRI scans and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and to identify changes in white matter tract orientation we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A major finding of our study was that there were both gray and white matter changes in the vicinity of the auditory cortex for subjects with hearing loss alone relative to those with tinnitus and those with normal hearing. We did not find significant changes in gray or white matter in subjects with tinnitus and hearing loss compared to normal hearing controls. VBM analysis revealed that individuals with hearing loss without tinnitus had gray matter decreases in anterior cingulate and superior and medial frontal gyri relative to those with hearing loss and tinnitus. Region-of-interest analysis revealed additional decreases in superior temporal gyrus for the hearing loss group compared to the tinnitus group. Investigating effects of hearing loss alone, we found gray matter decreases in superior and medial frontal gyri in participants with hearing loss compared to normal hearing controls. DTI analysis showed decreases in fractional anisotropy values in the right superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, corticospnial tract, inferior fronto-occipital tract, superior occipital fasciculus, and anterior thalamic radiation for the hearing loss group relative to normal hearing controls. In attempting to dissociate the effect of tinnitus from hearing loss, we observed that hearing loss rather than tinnitus had the greatest influence on gray and white matter alterations. PMID:21047501

Husain, Fatima T.; Medina, Roberto E.; Davis, Caroline W.; Szymko-Bennett, Yvonne; Simonyan, Kristina; Pajor, Nathan M.; Horwitz, Barry

2010-01-01

72

Artifact quantification and tractography from 3T MRI after placement of aneurysm clips in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients  

PubMed Central

Background The application of advanced 3T MRI imaging techniques to study recovery after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is complicated by the presence of image artifacts produced by implanted aneurysm clips. To characterize the effect of these artifacts on image quality, we sought to: 1) quantify extent of image artifact in SAH patients with implanted aneurysm clips across a range of MR sequences typically used in studies of volumetry, blood oxygen level dependent signal change (BOLD-fMRI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DW-MRI) and 2) to explore the ability to reconstruct white matter pathways in these patients. Methods T1- and T2-weighted structural, BOLD-fMRI, and DW-MRI scans were acquired at 3T in two patients with titanium alloy clips in ACOM and left ACA respectively. Intensity-based planimetric contouring was performed on aligned image volumes to define each artifact. Artifact volumes were quantified by artifact/clip length and artifact/brain volume ratios and analyzed by two-way (scan-by-rater) ANOVAs. Tractography pathways were reconstructed from DW-MRI at varying distances from the artifacts using deterministic methods. Results Artifact volume varied by MR sequence for length (p = 0.007) and volume (p < 0.001) ratios: it was smallest for structural images, larger for DW-MRI acquisitions, and largest on fMRI images. Inter-rater reliability was high (r = 0.9626, p < 0.0001), and reconstruction of white matter connectivity characteristics increased with distance from the artifact border. In both patients, reconstructed white matter pathways of the uncinate fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus were clearly visible within 2 mm of the artifact border. Conclusions Advanced 3T MR can successfully image brain tissue around implanted titanium aneurysm clips at different spatial ranges depending on sequence type. White matter pathways near clip artifacts can be reconstructed and visualized. These findings provide a reference for designing functional and structural neuroimaging studies of recovery in aSAH patients after clip placement. PMID:21970560

2011-01-01

73

Road work on memory lane--functional and structural alterations to the learning and memory circuit in adults born very preterm.  

PubMed

Very preterm (VPT) birth is considered a risk factor not only for neurological impairment, but also for reduced function in several cognitive domains in childhood and later in life. Individuals who were born VPT are more likely to demonstrate learning and memory difficulties compared to term-born controls. These problems contribute to more VPT-born children repeating grades and underachieving in school. This, in turn, affects their prospects in adult life. Here we aimed to 1) study how the VPT-born adult brain functionally recruited specific areas during learning, i.e. encoding and recall across four repeated blocks of verbal stimuli, and to investigate how these patterns of activation differed from term-born subjects; and 2) probe the microstructural differences of white-matter tracts connecting these areas to other parts of the learning and memory network. To investigate these functional-structural relationships we analyzed functional and diffusion-weighted MRI. Functional-MRI and a verbal paired associate learning (VPAL) task were used to extract Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) activity in 21 VPT-born adults (<33 weeks of gestation) (mean age: 19.68 years ± 0.85; IQ: 99.86 ± 11.20) and 10 term-born controls (mean age: 19.87 years ± 2.04; IQ: 108.9 ± 13.18). Areas in which differences in functional activation were observed between groups were used as seed regions for tractography. Fractional anisotropy (FA) of the tract-skeleton was then compared between groups on a voxel-wise basis. Results of functional MRI analysis showed a significantly different pattern of activation between groups during encoding in right anterior cingulate-caudate body, and during retrieval in left thalamus, hippocampus and parts of left posterior parahippocampal gyrus. The number of correctly recalled word pairs did not statistically differ between individuals who were born VPT and controls. The VPT-born group was found to have reduced FA in tracts passing through the thalamic/hippocampal region that was differently activated during the recall condition, with the hippocampal fornix, inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus particularly affected. Young adults who were born very preterm display a strikingly different pattern of activation during the process of learning in key structures of the learning and memory network, including anterior cingulate and caudate body during encoding and thalamus/parahippocampal gyrus during cued recall. Altered activation in thalamus/parahippocampal gyrus may be explained by reduced connections between these areas and the hippocampus, which may be a direct consequence of neonatal hypoxic/ischemic injury. These results could reflect the effect of adaptive plastic processes associated with high-order cognitive functions, at least when the cognitive load remains relatively low, as ex-preterm young adults displayed unimpaired performance in completing the verbal paired associate learning task. PMID:24368264

Salvan, Piergiorgio; Froudist Walsh, Seán; Allin, Matthew P G; Walshe, Muriel; Murray, Robin M; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; McGuire, Philip K; Williams, Steven C R; Nosarti, Chiara

2014-11-15

74

White Matter Microstructure in Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus Associated with Spatial Working Memory Performance in Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During childhood and adolescence, ongoing white matter maturation in the fronto-parietal cortices and connecting fiber tracts is measurable with diffusion-weighted imaging. Important questions remain, however, about the links between these changes and developing cognitive functions. Spatial working memory (SWM) performance improves significantly…

Vestergaard, Martin; Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Baare, William F. C.; Skimminge, Arnold; Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Ramsoy, Thomas Z.; Gerlach, Christian; Akeson, Per; Paulson, Olaf B.; Jernigan, Terry L.

2011-01-01

75

MR features of the developing perianterior horn structure including subcallosal fasciculus in infants and children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  To describe the changes in the magnetic resonance (MR) signal of the perianterior horn structure (PAS) with increasing age,\\u000a we studied 69 infants and children aged between 3 days and 9.4 years (average: 2.8 years) without any neurological deficits.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  T1- and T2-weighted images and FLAIR (fluid attenuation inversion recovery) images were obtained in the axial plane. Based\\u000a on a comparison

Hidetsuna Utsunomiya; Yasuhiro Nakamura

2007-01-01

76

Cingulate Fasciculus Integrity Disruption in Schizophrenia: A Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence suggests that a disruption in limbic system network integrity and, in particular, the cingulate gyrus (CG), may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia; however, the cingulum bundle (CB), the white matter tract furnishing both input and output to CG, and the most prominent white matter fiber tract in the limbic system, has not been evaluated in schizophrenia using the new technology of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods We used line scan DTI to evaluate diffusion in the CB in 16 male schizophrenia patients and 18 male control subjects, group-matched for age, parental socioeconomic status, and handedness. We acquired 4-mm-thick coronal slices through the entire brain. Maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) were generated to quantify diffusion within the left and right CB on eight slices that included the central portion of the CB. Results Results showed group differences, bilaterally, in area and mean FA for CB, where patients showed smaller area and less anisotropy than controls. For patients, decreased left CB correlated significantly with attention and working memory measures as assessed by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusions These data provide strong evidence for CB disruptions in schizophrenia, which may be related to disease-related attention and working memory abnormalities. PMID:14643084

Kubicki, Marek; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Nestor, Paul G.; Wible, Cynthia G.; Frumin, Melissa; Maier, Stephan E.; Kikinis, Ron; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; McCarley, Robert W.; Shenton, Martha E.

2009-01-01

77

Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus and Working Memory  

E-print Network

). Further, these cognitive deficits are not widely responsive to neuroleptics. While atypical antipsychotics are more effective in this domain than traditional antipsychotics, impairments may persist even after

Poldrack, Russ

78

Beyond the Arcuate Fasciculus: Consensus and Controversy in the Connectional Anatomy of Language  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The growing consensus that language is distributed into large-scale cortical and subcortical networks has brought with it an increasing focus on the connectional anatomy of language, or how particular fibre pathways connect regions within the language network. Understanding connectivity of the language network could provide critical insights into…

Dick, Anthony Steven; Tremblay, Pascale

2012-01-01

79

Long-Term Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies, Combined with Augmentative Communication, Are Related to Uncinate Fasciculus Integrity in Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent evidence points to white-matter abnormalities as a key factor in autism physiopathology. Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging, we studied white-matter structural properties in a convenience sample of twenty-two subjects with low-functioning autism exposed to long-term augmentative and alternative communication, combined with sessions of cognitive…

Pardini, Matteo; Elia, Maurizio; Garaci, Francesco G.; Guida, Silvia; Coniglione, Filadelfo; Krueger, Frank; Benassi, Francesca; Gialloreti, Leonardo Emberti

2012-01-01

80

Aberrant Diffusion and Geometric Properties in the Left Arcuate Fasciculus of Developmentally Delayed Children: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE One of the neurologic substrates of poor language in children with DD is the abnormal development of perisylvian language networks. We sought to determine whether this manifests as aberrant regional changes in diffusivity or geometry of the left AF. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed DTI studies in 16 young (age, 55.4 ± 18.95 months) patients with DD and 11 age- and sex-matched TD children (age, 60.09 ± 21.27 months). All children were right-handed. To detect the malformation of left AF structure in native or standard space, we proposed new methodology consisting of 2 complementary approaches, principal fiber orientation quantification in color-coded anisotropic maps and tract-based morphometry analysis. RESULTS Patients with DD did not show the typical pattern of age-related maturity of the AP and ML pathways passing through the left AF (R2 of the AP pathway: DD versus TD = 0.002 versus 0.4542; R2 of the ML pathway: DD versus TD = 0.002 versus 0.4154). In addition, the patients with DD showed significantly reduced FA in the temporal portion of the AF (mean FA of DD versus TD = 0.37 ± 0.11 versus 0.48 ± 0.06, P < .001), and the AF showed higher curvatures in the parietotemporal junction, resulting in sharper bends to the Wernicke area (mean curvature of DD versus TD = 0.12 ± 0.03 versus 0.06 ± 0.02, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS The proposed methods successfully revealed regional abnormalities in the axonal integrity of the left AF in the patients with DD. These abnormalities support the notion that the perisylvian language network is malformed in children with DD. PMID:21183617

Jeong, J.-W.; Sundaram, S.K.; Kumar, A.; Chugani, D.C.; Chugani, H.T.

2011-01-01

81

Multiple dermoid sinuses of type Vb and IIIb on the head of a Saint Bernard dog  

PubMed Central

Dermoid sinus, a congenital malformation of neural tube development, has been reported in humans and several animal species including dogs. It is typically found in the dorsal midline and commonly occurs in the Rhodesian Ridgeback breed. A case of multiple dermoid sinuses in the fronto-occipital region is described. An 11-month-old, intact female Saint Bernard dog was presented with a 2 day history of discharge from a large irregular subcutaneous mass in the fronto-occipital region. The dog was otherwise healthy. The dog had two circular skin lesions (approximately 4?×?4 and 4?×?2 cm diameter) surrounded by multiple irregular elevated masses. The masses had multiple small openings on the skin surface with tufts of hair protruding from the apertures. The masses were surgically removed, and the diagnosis of multiple dermoid sinuses was confirmed by histological examination. Histopathological examination showed multiple, variably sized, spherical to tubular cysts expanding the dermis and subcutis. Cysts were filled with hair shafts and lamellar keratin and were lined by a stratified squamous epithelium. Sebaceous and apocrine gland adnexal structures were also observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multiple dermoid sinuses of two different types in the head of a Saint Bernard dog. PMID:24006855

2013-01-01

82

Multiple dermoid sinuses of type Vb and IIIb on the head of a Saint Bernard dog.  

PubMed

Dermoid sinus, a congenital malformation of neural tube development, has been reported in humans and several animal species including dogs. It is typically found in the dorsal midline and commonly occurs in the Rhodesian Ridgeback breed. A case of multiple dermoid sinuses in the fronto-occipital region is described. An 11-month-old, intact female Saint Bernard dog was presented with a 2 day history of discharge from a large irregular subcutaneous mass in the fronto-occipital region. The dog was otherwise healthy. The dog had two circular skin lesions (approximately 4 × 4 and 4 × 2 cm diameter) surrounded by multiple irregular elevated masses. The masses had multiple small openings on the skin surface with tufts of hair protruding from the apertures. The masses were surgically removed, and the diagnosis of multiple dermoid sinuses was confirmed by histological examination. Histopathological examination showed multiple, variably sized, spherical to tubular cysts expanding the dermis and subcutis. Cysts were filled with hair shafts and lamellar keratin and were lined by a stratified squamous epithelium. Sebaceous and apocrine gland adnexal structures were also observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multiple dermoid sinuses of two different types in the head of a Saint Bernard dog. PMID:24006855

Perazzi, Anna; Berlanda, Michele; Bucci, Massimo; Ferro, Silvia; Rasotto, Roberta; Busetto, Roberto; Iacopetti, Ilaria

2013-01-01

83

Differences in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus but no general disruption of white matter tracts in children with autism spectrum disorder  

E-print Network

One of the most widely cited features of the neural phenotype of autism is reduced “integrity” of long-range white matter tracts, a claim based primarily on diffusion imaging studies. However, many prior studies have small ...

Koldewyn, Kami

84

Cephalometric Features of Moyamoya Disease: A case control study  

PubMed Central

Contribution of authors Adnan I Qureshi, Waqas I Gilani MD, Sarwat I. Gilani MD, Malik M. Adil MD . Equally assisted in the synthesis and discussion of ideas, and share equal responsibility for the information written in the manuscript above. Conflict Of Interest No conflict of interests. Running title Cephalometric Features of Moyamoya Disease Background Moyamoya disease is highly prevalent among patients with syndromes that have unique cephalometric characteristics such as Down syndrome. We performed a case control study to investigate the relationship between cephalometric parameters and Moyamoya disease. Methods Patients [aged 16-82 years] with angiographically confirmed Moyamoya disease who underwent cranial CT scan were analyzed. We identified three controls for each patient who were matched for age (±1 year), gender, and race (white or African American). The fronto-occipital diameter, bi-parietal diameter, and distance between bregma and occiput were measured from the head CT scans of cases and controls. The cephalic index was calculated by determining the ratio between bi-parietal diameter and fronto-occipital diameter and multiplying the value by 100. Results A total of 13 cases of Moyamoya disease and 39 controls were analyzed. The stage of Moyamoya disease in cases was as follows: stage 1 (n=0), stage 2 (n=1), stage 3 (n=4), stage 4 (n=2), stage 5 (n=5) and stage 6 (n=1). There was a significantly greater bi-parietal diameter in Moyamoya disease patients compared with controls (141.5±3.7 mm versus 136.9±5.4 mm, p=0.007). There was a significantly greater fronto-occipital diameter in Moyamoya disease patients compared with controls (186.5±6.5 mm versus 180.2±8.7mm, p=0.02). The distance between bregma and occiput was shorter among cases compared with controls (81.1±6.2 versus 87.5±7.0, p=0.01). Conclusions We observed an association between cephalometric parameters and Moyamoya disease. Further study of the unique cephalometric characteristics among Moyamoya disease patients may provide additional insight into disease occurrence in white and African American populations. PMID:25422708

Qureshi, Adnan I; Gilani, Waqas I; Gilani, Sarwat I.; Adil, Malik M.

2014-01-01

85

40 CFR 98.76 - Data reporting requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.76 Data reporting...of this section, as applicable for each ammonia manufacturing process unit. (a) If...of each type of feedstock consumed for ammonia manufacturing (scf of feedstock or...

2013-07-01

86

40 CFR 98.76 - Data reporting requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.76 Data reporting...of this section, as applicable for each ammonia manufacturing process unit. (a) If...of each type of feedstock consumed for ammonia manufacturing (scf of feedstock or...

2012-07-01

87

40 CFR 98.76 - Data reporting requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.76 Data reporting...of this section, as applicable for each ammonia manufacturing process unit. (a) If...of each type of feedstock consumed for ammonia manufacturing (scf of feedstock or...

2011-07-01

88

40 CFR 98.76 - Data reporting requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.76 Data reporting...of this section, as applicable for each ammonia manufacturing process unit. (a) If...of each type of feedstock consumed for ammonia manufacturing (scf of feedstock or...

2010-07-01

89

26 CFR 301.6110-3 - Deletion of certain information in written determinations open to public inspection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...the purchase and installation of blast furnaces, the “appropriate community...include all steel producers and blast furnace manufacturers, but if...of land on which to construct a building to house the blast furnaces, the “appropriate...

2011-04-01

90

26 CFR 301.6110-3 - Deletion of certain information in written determinations open to public inspection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...the purchase and installation of blast furnaces, the “appropriate community...include all steel producers and blast furnace manufacturers, but if...of land on which to construct a building to house the blast furnaces, the “appropriate...

2012-04-01

91

26 CFR 301.6110-3 - Deletion of certain information in written determinations open to public inspection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the purchase and installation of blast furnaces, the “appropriate community...include all steel producers and blast furnace manufacturers, but if...of land on which to construct a building to house the blast furnaces, the “appropriate...

2013-04-01

92

26 CFR 301.6110-3 - Deletion of certain information in written determinations open to public inspection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...the purchase and installation of blast furnaces, the “appropriate community...include all steel producers and blast furnace manufacturers, but if...of land on which to construct a building to house the blast furnaces, the “appropriate...

2014-04-01

93

26 CFR 301.6110-3 - Deletion of certain information in written determinations open to public inspection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the purchase and installation of blast furnaces, the “appropriate community...include all steel producers and blast furnace manufacturers, but if...of land on which to construct a building to house the blast furnaces, the “appropriate...

2010-04-01

94

48 CFR 570.402-2 - Publicizing/Advertising.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Publicizing/Advertising. 570.402-2 Section...Contracting for Continued Space Requirements 570.402-2 Publicizing/Advertising. Publish a notice if...of type and quantity of space. (c) Indicate...

2010-10-01

95

White matter diffusion alterations in normal women at risk of Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Increased white matter mean diffusivity and decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) has been observed in subjects diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We sought to determine whether similar alterations of white matter occur in normal individuals at risk of AD. Diffusion tensor images were acquired in 42 cognitively normal right-handed women with both a family history of dementia and at least one apolipoprotein E4 allele. These were compared with images from 23 normal women without either AD risk factor. Group analyses were performed using tract-based spatial statistics. Reduced FA was observed in the fronto-occipital and inferior temporal fasciculi (particularly posteriorly), the splenium of the corpus callosum, subcallosal white matter and the cingulum bundle. These findings demonstrate that specific white matter pathways are altered in normal women at increased risk of AD years before the expected onset of cognitive symptoms. PMID:18801597

Smith, Charles D; Chebrolu, Himachandra; Andersen, Anders H; Powell, David A; Lovell, Mark A; Xiong, Shuling; Gold, Brian T

2010-07-01

96

26 CFR 1.692-1 - Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the United States upon death.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. 1.692-1 Section 1.692-1...the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. (a)(1) This section applies if...of the United States, and (ii) His death occurs while he is serving in a...

2014-04-01

97

26 CFR 1.692-1 - Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the United States upon death.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. 1.692-1 Section 1.692-1...the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. (a)(1) This section applies if...of the United States, and (ii) His death occurs while he is serving in a...

2013-04-01

98

26 CFR 1.692-1 - Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the United States upon death.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. 1.692-1 Section 1.692-1...the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. (a)(1) This section applies if...of the United States, and (ii) His death occurs while he is serving in a...

2011-04-01

99

26 CFR 1.692-1 - Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the United States upon death.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. 1.692-1 Section 1.692-1...the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. (a)(1) This section applies if...of the United States, and (ii) His death occurs while he is serving in a...

2010-04-01

100

26 CFR 1.692-1 - Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the United States upon death.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. 1.692-1 Section 1.692-1...the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. (a)(1) This section applies if...of the United States, and (ii) His death occurs while he is serving in a...

2012-04-01

101

White Matter Changes in Healthy Adolescents at Familial Risk for Unipolar Depression: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study  

PubMed Central

Alterations in white matter integrity of several cortical and subcortical circuits have been reported in relation to unipolar major depressive disorder. It is not clear whether these white matter changes precede the onset of illness. In all, 13 adolescent volunteers with no personal or family history of a psychiatric disorder (controls) and 18 adolescent volunteers with no personal history of a psychiatric illness including depression, but who were at high risk for developing unipolar depression by virtue of parental depression (high-risk youth), underwent diffusion tensor imaging studies. An automated tract-based spatial statistics method, a whole-brain voxel-by-voxel analysis, was used to analyze the scans. Population average diffusion parameter values were also calculated for each tract. Adolescents at high risk for unipolar depression had lower fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the left cingulum, splenium of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculi, uncinate, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi than did controls. Altered white matter integrity in healthy adolescents at familial risk for unipolar depression suggests that it might serve as a vulnerability marker for the illness. PMID:21085111

Huang, Hao; Fan, Xin; Williamson, Douglas E; Rao, Uma

2011-01-01

102

Classification and pathogenic models of unintentional postural cranial deformities in infants: plagiocephalies and brachycephalies.  

PubMed

Unintentional postural deformities of the skull have increased in a pseudoepidemic manner in the last 15 years. Although dorsal decubitus and prenatal risk factors can play a role in the genesis of such deformities, we think that a crucial determinant is a postnatal defect of cervical mobility responsible for the infant's posture (ie, positional preference) when supine. Indeed, muscular factors, which limit the range of head and neck movements, have been underestimated in the genesis of skull deformities. Here, we have retrospectively analyzed data from 181 infants with unintentional skull deformities and propose a classification of these deformities into 3 types based on their pathogenic model and clinical appearance: fronto-occipital plagiocephalies due to severe muscle hypertonia in which the myogenic component is the first implicated, occipital plagiocephalies with muscle imbalance due to neurogenic muscle hypertonia, and posterior brachycephalies with neurogenic muscle hypertonia of the suboccipital muscles due to trauma to the occipitovertebral junction. Future studies on the size and density of specific muscles or group of muscles should help us to better understand their involvement in the pathogenesis of postural deformities. Our findings also highlight the importance of carefully assessing cervical mobility during the first week of life to detect possible limitations and to prescribe (if needed) an adapted rehabilitation. Rehabilitation should be associated with postural measures put in place when infants sleep supine to prevent the appearance of skull deformations. PMID:21187780

Captier, Guillaume; Dessauge, David; Picot, Marie-Christine; Bigorre, Michele; Gossard, Camille; El Ammar, Jaffar; Leboucq, Nicolas

2011-01-01

103

A new interpretation of P300 responses upon analysis of coherences  

PubMed Central

Previous studies on cognitive dynamics showed that oscillatory responses of P300 are composed of mainly delta and theta responses. In the present study, for the first time, the long-distance intra-hemispheric event related coherence (auditory oddball paradigm) and evoked coherence (simple sound) were compared in order to evaluate the effects of cognitive tasks on the long-distance coherences. Seventeen healthy subjects (8 female, 9 male) were included in the study. The coherence was analyzed for delta (1–3.5 Hz), theta (4–7.5 Hz) and alpha (8–13 Hz) frequency ranges for (F3-P3, F4-P4, F3-T7, F4-T8, F3-O1, F4-O2) electrode pairs. The coherence to target responses were higher than the non-target and simple auditory response coherence. This difference is significant for the delta coherence for both hemispheres and for theta coherences over the left hemisphere. The highest coherences were recorded at fronto-temporal locations for all frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha). Furthermore, fronto-parietal coherences were higher than the fronto-occipital coherences for all frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha).These results show that the fronto-temporal and fronto-parietal connections are most relevant for the identification of the target signal. This analysis open the way for a new interpretation of dynamic localization results during cognitive tasks. PMID:21629584

Güntekin, Bahar

2010-01-01

104

Pathophysiological Concepts in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Diffusion Tensor Imaging Related to Acute Perfusion CT Imaging  

PubMed Central

Background A subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) experiences residual symptoms interfering with their return to work. The pathophysiological substrate of the suboptimal outcome in these patients is a source of debate. Objective To provide greater insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms of mild TBI. Methods Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed during follow-up of 18 patients with mild TBI and compared with healthy control subjects. DTI data of the patient group were also compared with perfusion CT imaging in the acute phase of injury. Results In patients with mild TBI, a trend was observed for a decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in widespread bilateral frontal white matter areas with increased mean diffusivity (MD) in the parieto-temporal regions, compared to healthy control subjects. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) correlated significantly with FA in several white matter tracts including the corpus callosum, the internal capsule, the inferior fronto-occipital fascicle, the corticospinal tract, the superior and the inferior longitudinal fascicle. Conclusion In mild TBI with normal conventional imaging significant associations between cerebral perfusion in the acute phase of injury and DTI analyses in the chronic phase of injury were discerned. The pathophysiological concept of these findings is being outlined. PMID:23704986

Rödiger, Lars A.; van der Naalt, Joukje

2013-01-01

105

Effect of observation of simple hand movement on brain activations in patients with unilateral cerebral palsy: an fMRI study.  

PubMed

The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to examine and compare brain activation in patients with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) during observation of simple hand movement performed by the paretic and nonparetic hand. Nineteen patients with clinical unilateral CP (14 male, mean age 14 years, 7-21 years) participated in the study. Hand motor impairment was assessed using the sequential finger opposition task. Using fMRI block design, brain activation was examined following observation at rest of a simple opening-closing hand movement, performed by either the left or right hand of an actor. Eighteen fMRI dataset were analyzed. Observing hand movement produced large bilateral activations in temporo-parieto-fronto-occipital network, comprising most of the nodes of the well described action-observation network. For either side, observing hand movements recruits the primary motor cortex (M1), contralateral to the viewed hand, as would be expected in healthy persons. Viewing movement performed by an actor's hand representing the paretic side of patients activated more strongly ipsilesional M1 than viewing movement performed by an actor's hand representing the nonparetic side of patients. Observation of hand movement in patients with CP engaged the motor execution network regardless of the degree of motor impairment. PMID:23584173

Dinomais, Mickael; Lignon, Gregoire; Chinier, Eva; Richard, Isabelle; Ter Minassian, Aram; Tich, Sylvie N'Guyen The

2013-06-01

106

DTI Tractography of the Human Brain's Language Pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) tractography has been used to detect leftward asymmetries in the arcuate fasciculus, a pathway that links temporal and inferior frontal language cortices. In this study, we more specifically define this asymmetry with respect to both anatomy and function. Twenty right-handed male subjects were scanned with DTI, and the arcuate fasciculus was reconstructed using deterministic tractography. The

Matthew F. Glasser; James K. Rilling

2008-01-01

107

Morphometry, Asymmetry and Variations of the Sylvian Fissure and Sulci Bordering and Within the Pars Triangularis and Pars Operculum: An Autopsy Study  

PubMed Central

Objective: Speech and Language, one of the most lateralized of all cerebral functions is located within the pars opercularis (PO) and pars triangularis (PT). There is also inter-hemispheric variability of the sulcal contours bordering these areas. The study was undertaken to note the morphometry, asymmetry and variations of the Sylvian fissure (SF), and the sulci bordering and within the PO and PT. Materials and Methods: An adult autopsy cadaveric study was carried. The measurements made amongst others, included fronto-occipital cerebral length, cerebral width, Sylvian fissure length, and anterior Sylvian point (ASP) to inferior Rolandic point distance. The PT and PO were also studied. Results: Sixty-two adult cadaveric hemispheres were studied. The SF length on the right (mean=84.3mm, median=88mm) was significantly shorter than that on the left (mean=89.4mm, median=92.0mm) (p=0.037). The anterior ascending and anterior horizontal rami of the SF arose from the ASP and either divides at this point (43 hemispheres, 69.4%) or have a common short stem before separating distally giving a Y-shape configuration. The triangularis sulcus was noted in 49 hemispheres (79%) while the diagonal sulcus was noted in 26 hemispheres (41.9%). Conclusion: The left SF was significantly longer than the right and both were positively correlated. The presence of the triangularis sulcus was not dependent on the side (p=0.348) or gender (0.622) unlike the diagonal sulcus was side dependent (p= 0.000). PMID:25584204

Soyemi, Sunday; Atobatele, Kazeem

2014-01-01

108

Axonal deficits in young adults with High Functioning Autism and their impact on processing speed.  

PubMed

Microstructural white matter deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have been suggested by both histological findings and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) studies, which show reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased mean diffusivity (MD). However, imaging reports are generally not consistent across studies and the underlying physiological causes of the reported differences in FA and MD remain poorly understood. In this study, we sought to further characterize white matter deficits in ASD by employing an advanced diffusion imaging method, the Diffusional Kurtosis Imaging (DKI), and a two-compartment diffusion model of white matter. This model differentially describes intra- and extra-axonal white matter compartments using Axonal Water Fraction (faxon ) a measure reflecting axonal caliber and density, and compartment-specific diffusivity measures. Diagnostic utility of these measures and associations with processing speed performance were also examined. Comparative studies were conducted in 16 young male adults with High Functioning Autism (HFA) and 17 typically developing control participants (TDC). Significantly decreased faxon was observed in HFA compared to the control group in most of the major white matter tracts, including the corpus callosum, cortico-spinal tracts, and superior longitudinal, inferior longitudinal and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi. Intra-axonal diffusivity (Daxon ) was also found to be reduced in some of these regions. Decreased axial extra-axonal diffusivity (ADextra ) was noted in the genu of the corpus callosum. Reduced processing speed significantly correlated with decreased faxon and Daxon in several tracts. faxon of the left cortico-spinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculi showed good accuracy in discriminating the HFA and TDC groups. In conclusion, these findings suggest altered axonal microstructure in young adults with HFA which is associated with reduced processing speed. Compartment-specific diffusion metrics appear to improve specificity and sensitivity to white matter deficits in this population. PMID:24624327

Lazar, Mariana; Miles, Laura M; Babb, James S; Donaldson, Jeffrey B

2014-01-01

109

Axonal deficits in young adults with High Functioning Autism and their impact on processing speed  

PubMed Central

Microstructural white matter deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have been suggested by both histological findings and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) studies, which show reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased mean diffusivity (MD). However, imaging reports are generally not consistent across studies and the underlying physiological causes of the reported differences in FA and MD remain poorly understood. In this study, we sought to further characterize white matter deficits in ASD by employing an advanced diffusion imaging method, the Diffusional Kurtosis Imaging (DKI), and a two-compartment diffusion model of white matter. This model differentially describes intra- and extra-axonal white matter compartments using Axonal Water Fraction (faxon) a measure reflecting axonal caliber and density, and compartment-specific diffusivity measures. Diagnostic utility of these measures and associations with processing speed performance were also examined. Comparative studies were conducted in 16 young male adults with High Functioning Autism (HFA) and 17 typically developing control participants (TDC). Significantly decreased faxon was observed in HFA compared to the control group in most of the major white matter tracts, including the corpus callosum, cortico-spinal tracts, and superior longitudinal, inferior longitudinal and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi. Intra-axonal diffusivity (Daxon) was also found to be reduced in some of these regions. Decreased axial extra-axonal diffusivity (ADextra) was noted in the genu of the corpus callosum. Reduced processing speed significantly correlated with decreased faxon and Daxon in several tracts. faxon of the left cortico-spinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculi showed good accuracy in discriminating the HFA and TDC groups. In conclusion, these findings suggest altered axonal microstructure in young adults with HFA which is associated with reduced processing speed. Compartment-specific diffusion metrics appear to improve specificity and sensitivity to white matter deficits in this population. PMID:24624327

Lazar, Mariana; Miles, Laura M.; Babb, James S.; Donaldson, Jeffrey B.

2014-01-01

110

Differential vulnerability of gray matter and white matter to intrauterine growth restriction in preterm infants at 12 months corrected age.  

PubMed

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with a high risk of abnormal neurodevelopment. Underlying neuroanatomical substrates are partially documented. We hypothesized that at 12 months preterm infants would evidence specific white-matter microstructure alterations and gray-matter differences induced by severe IUGR. Twenty preterm infants with IUGR (26-34 weeks of gestation) were compared with 20 term-born infants and 20 appropriate for gestational age preterm infants of similar gestational age. Preterm groups showed no evidence of brain abnormalities. At 12 months, infants were scanned sleeping naturally. Gray-matter volumes were studied with voxel-based morphometry. White-matter microstructure was examined using tract-based spatial statistics. The relationship between diffusivity indices in white matter, gray matter volumes, and perinatal data was also investigated. Gray-matter decrements attributable to IUGR comprised amygdala, basal ganglia, thalamus and insula bilaterally, left occipital and parietal lobes, and right perirolandic area. Gray-matter volumes positively correlated with birth weight exclusively. Preterm infants had reduced FA in the corpus callosum, and increased FA in the anterior corona radiata. Additionally, IUGR infants had increased FA in the forceps minor, internal and external capsules, uncinate and fronto-occipital white matter tracts. Increased axial diffusivity was observed in several white matter tracts. Fractional anisotropy positively correlated with birth weight and gestational age at birth. These data suggest that IUGR differentially affects gray and white matter development preferentially affecting gray matter. At 12 months IUGR is associated with a specific set of structural gray-matter decrements. White matter follows an unusual developmental pattern, and is apparently affected by IUGR and prematurity combined. PMID:24361462

Padilla, Nelly; Junqué, Carme; Figueras, Francesc; Sanz-Cortes, Magdalena; Bargalló, Núria; Arranz, Angela; Donaire, Antonio; Figueras, Josep; Gratacos, Eduard

2014-01-30

111

Linked alterations in gray and white matter morphology in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: A multimodal brain imaging study.  

PubMed

Growing evidence suggests that a broad range of behavioral anomalies in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be linked with morphological and functional alterations in the brain. However, the neuroanatomical underpinnings of ASD have been investigated using either structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and the relationships between abnormalities revealed by these two modalities remain unclear. This study applied a multimodal data-fusion method, known as linked independent component analysis (ICA), to a set of structural MRI and DTI data acquired from 46 adult males with ASD and 46 matched controls in order to elucidate associations between different aspects of atypical neuroanatomy of ASD. Linked ICA identified two composite components that showed significant between-group differences, one of which was significantly correlated with age. In the other component, participants with ASD showed decreased gray matter (GM) volumes in multiple regions, including the bilateral fusiform gyri, bilateral orbitofrontal cortices, and bilateral pre- and post-central gyri. These GM changes were linked with a pattern of decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in several white matter tracts, such as the bilateral inferior longitudinal fasciculi, bilateral inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi, and bilateral corticospinal tracts. Furthermore, unimodal analysis for DTI data revealed significant reductions of FA along with increased mean diffusivity in those tracts for ASD, providing further evidence of disrupted anatomical connectivity. Taken together, our findings suggest that, in ASD, alterations in different aspects of brain morphology may co-occur in specific brain networks, providing a comprehensive view for understanding the neuroanatomy of this disorder. PMID:25610777

Itahashi, Takashi; Yamada, Takashi; Nakamura, Motoaki; Watanabe, Hiromi; Yamagata, Bun; Jimbo, Daiki; Shioda, Seiji; Kuroda, Miho; Toriizuka, Kazuo; Kato, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro

2015-01-01

112

Linked alterations in gray and white matter morphology in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: A multimodal brain imaging study  

PubMed Central

Growing evidence suggests that a broad range of behavioral anomalies in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be linked with morphological and functional alterations in the brain. However, the neuroanatomical underpinnings of ASD have been investigated using either structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and the relationships between abnormalities revealed by these two modalities remain unclear. This study applied a multimodal data-fusion method, known as linked independent component analysis (ICA), to a set of structural MRI and DTI data acquired from 46 adult males with ASD and 46 matched controls in order to elucidate associations between different aspects of atypical neuroanatomy of ASD. Linked ICA identified two composite components that showed significant between-group differences, one of which was significantly correlated with age. In the other component, participants with ASD showed decreased gray matter (GM) volumes in multiple regions, including the bilateral fusiform gyri, bilateral orbitofrontal cortices, and bilateral pre- and post-central gyri. These GM changes were linked with a pattern of decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in several white matter tracts, such as the bilateral inferior longitudinal fasciculi, bilateral inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi, and bilateral corticospinal tracts. Furthermore, unimodal analysis for DTI data revealed significant reductions of FA along with increased mean diffusivity in those tracts for ASD, providing further evidence of disrupted anatomical connectivity. Taken together, our findings suggest that, in ASD, alterations in different aspects of brain morphology may co-occur in specific brain networks, providing a comprehensive view for understanding the neuroanatomy of this disorder. PMID:25610777

Itahashi, Takashi; Yamada, Takashi; Nakamura, Motoaki; Watanabe, Hiromi; Yamagata, Bun; Jimbo, Daiki; Shioda, Seiji; Kuroda, Miho; Toriizuka, Kazuo; Kato, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro

2014-01-01

113

Is Aberrant Functional Connectivity A Psychosis Endophenotype? A Resting State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study  

PubMed Central

Background Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share overlapping symptoms and risk genes. Shared aberrant functional connectivity is hypothesized in both disorders and in relatives. Methods We investigated resting state functional MRI (fMRI) in 70 schizophrenia and 64 psychotic bipolar probands, their respective first-degree relatives (N = 70 and 52) and 118 healthy subjects. We used independent component analysis (ICA) to identify components representing various resting state networks and assessed spatial aspects of functional connectivity within all networks. We first investigated group differences using five-level, one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), followed by post-hoc t-tests within regions displaying ANCOVA group differences and correlation of such functional connectivity measures with symptom ratings to examine clinical relationships. Results Seven different networks revealed abnormalities (five-level one-way ANCOVA, family-wise error correction p < 0.05): (A) fronto-occipital, (B) midbrain/cerebellum, (C) frontal/thalamic/basal ganglia, (D) meso/paralimbic, (E) posterior default mode network, (F) fronto-temporal/paralimbic and (G) sensorimotor networks. Abnormalities in networks B and F were unique to schizophrenia probands only. Furthermore, abnormalities in networks D and E were common to both patient groups. Finally, networks A, C and G showed abnormalities shared by probands and their relative groups. Negative correlation with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) negative and positive scores were found in regions within network C and F respectively, and positive correlation with PANSS negative scores was found in regions in network D among schizophrenia probands only. Conclusion Schizophrenia, psychotic bipolar probands and their relatives share both unique and overlapping within-network brain connectivity abnormalities, revealing potential psychosis endophenotypes. PMID:23746539

Khadka, Sabin; Meda, Shashwath A.; Stevens, Michael C.; Glahn, David C.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Sweeney, John A.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; O’Neil, Kasey; Schretlen, David; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

2013-01-01

114

A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study on the White Matter Skeleton in Individuals with Sports-Related Concussion  

PubMed Central

Abstract Recognizing and managing the effects of cerebral concussion is very challenging, given the discrete symptomatology. Most individuals with sports-related concussion will not score below 15 on the Glasgow Coma Scale, but will present with rapid onset of short-lived neurological impairment, demonstrating no structural changes on traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans. The return-to-play decision is one of the most difficult responsibilities facing the physician, and so far this decision has been primarily based on neurological examination, symptom checklists, and neuropsychological (NP) testing. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may be a more objective tool to assess the severity and recovery of function after concussion. We assessed white matter (WM) fiber tract integrity in varsity level college athletes with sports-related concussion without loss of consciousness, who experienced protracted symptoms for at least 1 month after injury. Evaluation of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of the WM skeleton using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) revealed a large cluster of significantly increased MD for concussed subjects in several WM fiber tracts in the left hemisphere, including parts of the inferior/superior longitudinal and fronto-occipital fasciculi, the retrolenticular part of the internal capsule, and posterior thalamic and acoustic radiations. Qualitative comparison of average FA and MD suggests that with increasing level of injury severity (ranging from sports-related concussion to severe traumatic brain injury), MD might be more sensitive at detecting mild injury, whereas FA captures more severe injuries. In conclusion, the TBSS analysis used to evaluate diffuse axonal injury of the WM skeleton seems sensitive enough to detect structural changes in sports-related concussion. PMID:21083414

Cubon, Valerie A.; Putukian, Margot; Boyer, Cynthia

2011-01-01

115

White Matter Fractional Anisotropy Correlates With Speed of Processing and Motor Speed in Young Childhood Cancer Survivors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether childhood medulloblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors have decreased white matter fractional anisotropy (WMFA) and whether WMFA is related to the speed of processing and motor speed. Methods and Materials: For this study, 17 patients (6 medulloblastoma, 5 ALL treated with high-dose methotrexate (MTX) (4 x 5 g/m{sup 2}) and 6 with low-dose MTX (3 x 2 g/m{sup 2})) and 17 age-matched controls participated. On a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed, and WMFA values were calculated, including specific regions of interest (ROIs), and correlated with the speed of processing and motor speed. Results: Mean WMFA in the patient group, mean age 14 years (range 8.9 - 16.9), was decreased compared with the control group (p = 0.01), as well as WMFA in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciliculus (IFO) (p = 0.03) and in the genu of the corpus callosum (gCC) (p = 0.01). Based on neurocognitive results, significant positive correlations were present between processing speed and WMFA in the splenium (sCC) (r = 0.53, p = 0.03) and the body of the corpus callosum (bCC) (r = 0.52, p = 0.03), whereas the right IFO WMFA was related to motor speed (r = 0.49, p < 0.05). Conclusions: White matter tracts, using a 3.0-T MRI scanner, show impairment in childhood cancer survivors, medulloblastoma survivors, and also those treated with high doses of MTX. In particular, white matter tracts in the sCC, bCC and right IFO are positively correlated with speed of processing and motor speed.

Aukema, Eline J. [Pediatric Psychosocial Department, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: e.j.aukema@amc.uva.nl; Caan, Matthan W.A. [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Oudhuis, Nienke [Pediatric Psychosocial Department, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Majoie, Charles [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vos, Frans M. [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Reneman, Liesbeth [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Last, Bob F. [Pediatric Psychosocial Department, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Developmental Psychology, Free University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Grootenhuis, Martha A. [Pediatric Psychosocial Department, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2009-07-01

116

A multiparametric evaluation of regional brain damage in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to define the topographical distribution of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) damage in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), using a multiparametric MR-based approach. Using a 3 Tesla scanner, dual-echo, 3D fast-field echo (FFE), and diffusion tensor (DT) MRI scans were acquired from 18 PPMS patients and 17 matched healthy volunteers. An optimized voxel-based (VB) analysis was used to investigate the patterns of regional GM density changes and to quantify GM and WM diffusivity alterations of the entire brain. In PPMS patients, GM atrophy was found in the thalami and the right insula, while mean diffusivity (MD) changes involved several cortical-subcortical structures in all cerebral lobes and the cerebellum. An overlap between decreased WM fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased WM MD was found in the corpus callosum, the cingulate gyrus, the left short temporal fibers, the right short frontal fibers, the optic radiations, and the middle cerebellar peduncles. Selective MD increase, not associated with FA decrease, was found in the internal capsules, the corticospinal tracts, the superior longitudinal fasciculi, the fronto-occipital fasciculi, and the right cerebral peduncle. A discrepancy was found between regional WM diffusivity changes and focal lesions because several areas had DT MRI abnormalities but did not harbor T2-visible lesions. Our study allowed to detect tissue damage in brain areas associated with motor and cognitive functions, which are known to be impaired in PPMS patients. Combining regional measures derived from different MR modalities may be a valuable tool to improve our understanding of PPMS pathophysiology. PMID:19172642

Ceccarelli, Antonia; Rocca, Maria A; Valsasina, Paola; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Pagani, Elisabetta; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

2009-09-01

117

Aphasia severity in chronic stroke patients: a combined disconnection in the dorsal and ventral language pathways.  

PubMed

Background. The contribution of lesion size and location in poststroke aphasia is debated, especially the extent to which aphasia severity is affected by damage to specific white matter areas. Objective. To identify specific white matter areas critical for poststroke aphasia global severity and to determine whether injury to these areas had more impact on aphasia severity than the infarct volume. Methods. Twenty-three chronic poststroke aphasic patients were assessed with the Aphasia Rapid Test (ART) and the Boston Diagnosis Aphasia Examination (BDAE) global severity scales and underwent diffusion tensor and structural imaging. Voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging regression analysis was used to determine in which areas fractional anisotropy (FA) abnormalities were correlated with ART and BDAE severity scales. The relationships between aphasia severity, FA values, and infarct volumes were investigated using global and partial correlations. Results. We found a critical area associated with aphasia severity overlapping with the arcuate and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi, resulting in a combined disconnection of the dorsal and ventral pathways. ART scores were inversely correlated with FA values in this region, with greater severity present with lower FA values (correlation coefficient = -0.833, P < .0001). The proportion of variance explained by the FA value was higher than the proportion of variance explained by the infarct volume (R (2) = 68% vs 27%, P = .01). The impact of infarct volume on aphasia severity disappeared when damage to this critical white matter area was taken into account (P = .38). Conclusion. The assessment of the integrity of this region may potentially have a clinical impact in neurorehabilitation and acute decision making. PMID:25096274

Rosso, Charlotte; Vargas, Patricia; Valabregue, Romain; Arbizu, Céline; Henry-Amar, François; Leger, Anne; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Samson, Yves

2015-03-01

118

Gravity Influences Top-Down Signals in Visual Processing  

PubMed Central

Visual perception is not only based on incoming visual signals but also on information about a multimodal reference frame that incorporates vestibulo-proprioceptive input and motor signals. In addition, top-down modulation of visual processing has previously been demonstrated during cognitive operations including selective attention and working memory tasks. In the absence of a stable gravitational reference, the updating of salient stimuli becomes crucial for successful visuo-spatial behavior by humans in weightlessness. Here we found that visually-evoked potentials triggered by the image of a tunnel just prior to an impending 3D movement in a virtual navigation task were altered in weightlessness aboard the International Space Station, while those evoked by a classical 2D-checkerboard were not. Specifically, the analysis of event-related spectral perturbations and inter-trial phase coherency of these EEG signals recorded in the frontal and occipital areas showed that phase-locking of theta-alpha oscillations was suppressed in weightlessness, but only for the 3D tunnel image. Moreover, analysis of the phase of the coherency demonstrated the existence on Earth of a directional flux in the EEG signals from the frontal to the occipital areas mediating a top-down modulation during the presentation of the image of the 3D tunnel. In weightlessness, this fronto-occipital, top-down control was transformed into a diverging flux from the central areas toward the frontal and occipital areas. These results demonstrate that gravity-related sensory inputs modulate primary visual areas depending on the affordances of the visual scene. PMID:24400069

Cheron, Guy; Leroy, Axelle; Palmero-Soler, Ernesto; De Saedeleer, Caty; Bengoetxea, Ana; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Vidal, Manuel; Dan, Bernard; Berthoz, Alain; McIntyre, Joseph

2014-01-01

119

Gravity influences top-down signals in visual processing.  

PubMed

Visual perception is not only based on incoming visual signals but also on information about a multimodal reference frame that incorporates vestibulo-proprioceptive input and motor signals. In addition, top-down modulation of visual processing has previously been demonstrated during cognitive operations including selective attention and working memory tasks. In the absence of a stable gravitational reference, the updating of salient stimuli becomes crucial for successful visuo-spatial behavior by humans in weightlessness. Here we found that visually-evoked potentials triggered by the image of a tunnel just prior to an impending 3D movement in a virtual navigation task were altered in weightlessness aboard the International Space Station, while those evoked by a classical 2D-checkerboard were not. Specifically, the analysis of event-related spectral perturbations and inter-trial phase coherency of these EEG signals recorded in the frontal and occipital areas showed that phase-locking of theta-alpha oscillations was suppressed in weightlessness, but only for the 3D tunnel image. Moreover, analysis of the phase of the coherency demonstrated the existence on Earth of a directional flux in the EEG signals from the frontal to the occipital areas mediating a top-down modulation during the presentation of the image of the 3D tunnel. In weightlessness, this fronto-occipital, top-down control was transformed into a diverging flux from the central areas toward the frontal and occipital areas. These results demonstrate that gravity-related sensory inputs modulate primary visual areas depending on the affordances of the visual scene. PMID:24400069

Cheron, Guy; Leroy, Axelle; Palmero-Soler, Ernesto; De Saedeleer, Caty; Bengoetxea, Ana; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Vidal, Manuel; Dan, Bernard; Berthoz, Alain; McIntyre, Joseph

2014-01-01

120

Effects of NG-nitro-L-arginine and L-arginine on regional cerebral blood flow in the cat.  

PubMed Central

1. We studied the effects of NG-nitro-L-arginine (NOLA), a potent inhibitor of the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway, and L-arginine, the precursor of nitric oxide, on regional cerebral blood flow, electrocortical activity and ex vivo cerebrovascular reactivity in the cat. Flow was measured via radiolabelled microspheres, and vascular responses were studied by measuring isometric tension of isolated middle cerebral arterial rings. 2. NOLA (30 mg kg-1 bolus followed by 1 mg kg-1 min-1 infusion) caused an approximately 40 mmHg elevation in the mean arterial blood pressure, a regionally heterogenous increase of the regional cerebrovascular resistance and a decrease in the regional cerebral blood flow 15 and 40 min after the start of its administration. In contrast L-arginine (30 mg kg-1 bolus followed by 10 mg kg-1 min-1 infusion) did not alter blood pressure, cerebrovascular resistance nor regional cerebral blood flow 15 min after the start of its administration. The NOLA-induced changes in tissue flow were the most pronounced in the cerebellum, pituitary and medulla oblongata, whereas there was no decrease in the flow of the cortex and white matter. 3. NOLA caused characteristic changes in total fronto-occipital EEG power and in power spectra which were unlikely to have been due to cerebral ischaemia. In addition, the ex vivo reactivity of the middle cerebral arteries showed signs of impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthesis: there were enhanced noradrenaline-induced contractions and N-ethoxycarbonyl-3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1)-induced relaxations and markedly attenuated acetylcholine- and ATP-induced relaxations after NOLA treatment. 4. The present data indicate that resting cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular resistance are regulated by nitric oxide derived from L-arginine in a regionally heterogenous way and that exogenous L-arginine availability is not a limiting factor in this nitric oxide generation. Possibly, both the vascular endothelium and the neurons contribute to this basal nitric oxide release. PMID:1522509

Kovách, A G; Szabó, C; Benyó, Z; Csáki, C; Greenberg, J H; Reivich, M

1992-01-01

121

Fronto-temporal Anatomical Connectivity and Working-Relational Memory Performance Predict Everyday Functioning in Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Hippocampal (relational memory) and prefrontal cortex (PFC; working memory) impairments have been found in patients with schizophrenia (SP), possibly due to a dysfunctional connection between structures. Neuroanatomical studies that describe reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in the uncinate fasciculus support this idea. The dysconnection hypothesis in SP was investigated by examining fronto-temporal anatomical connectivity (uncinate fasciculus FA) and PFC-hippocampal memory and their relationship with each other and everyday functioning. PFC-hippocampal memory was examined with two working-relational memory tasks: transverse patterning and virtual Morris water task. SP exhibited a performance deficit on both tasks and had lower FA in bilateral uncinate fasciculus than healthy volunteers. Lower fronto-temporal anatomical connectivity was related to lower working-relational memory performance, and both predicted worse everyday functioning. PMID:22882287

Hanlon, Faith M.; Houck, Jon M.; Klimaj, Stefan D.; Caprihan, Arvind; Mayer, Andrew R.; Weisend, Michael P.; Bustillo, Juan R.; Hamilton, Derek A.; Tesche, Claudia D.

2014-01-01

122

Microstructural Abnormalities in Language and Limbic Pathways in Orphanage-reared Children: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study  

PubMed Central

This study utilized diffusion tensor imaging fiber tractography to examine the miscrostructural integrity of limbic and paralimbic white matter tracts in thirty-six children (Mean age=124 months) with histories of early deprivation, raised from birth in orphanages and subsequently adopted into the United States, compared to 16 age-matched typically developing children. We found increased mean diffusivity bilaterally in the arcuate fasciculus, and increased mean diffusivity and reduced fractional anisotropy bilaterally in the uncinate fasciculus and cingulum in children with early deprivation. Microstructural integrity of the left arcuate fasciculus and right cingulum was related to language and behavioral functioning, respectively. White matter abnormalities were also associated with length of deprivation and time in the adoptive home. Our findings suggest that white matter pathways, connecting limbic and paralimbic brain regions is abnormal in children with histories of early deprivation; with some pathways appearing more susceptible to early deprivation than others. PMID:23358628

Kumar, Ajay; Behen, Michael E.; Singsoonsud, Piti; Veenstra, Amy L.; Wolfe-Christensen, Cortney; Helder, Emily; Chugani, Harry T.

2013-01-01

123

Patterns of Cortical Reorganization in the Adult Marmoset After a Cervical Spinal Cord Injury  

PubMed Central

In the present study, we used microelectrode recordings of multiunit responses to evaluate patterns of the reactivation of somatosensory cortex after sensory loss produced by spinal cord lesions in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). These New World monkeys have become a popular model in studies of cortical organization and function. Primary somatosensory cortex and adjoining somatosensory areas can become extensively deactivated by lesions of somatosensory afferents as they ascend in the dorsal columns of the cervical spinal cord. Six to 7 weeks after complete lesions of the cuneate fasciculus subserving the forelimb at cervical levels 5–6, the hand region in contralateral areas 3b and 1 was reactivated by inputs from the forelimb, but excluded representations of some or all digits. In a similar manner, recording sites from the forelimb region of areas 2–5 responded to parts of the forelimb but not to digits after an extensive lesion of the contralateral cuneate fasciculus at C5–C6. Lesions that damaged only the gracile fasciculus or a small percentage of the cuneate fasciculus did not produce changes in the gross hand representation in contralateral areas 3b, 3a, 1, and 2. Finally, a complete but lower lesion of the cuneate fasciculus at C8 produced some abnormalities in the reactivation, but the digits were represented. The results indicate that areas 3a, 3b, 1, and 2–5 of the somatosensory cortex are extensively reactivated after large, apparently complete lesions of the contralateral cuneate fasciculus, but afferents from the digits may not contribute to their reactivation. PMID:23681952

Bowes, Charnese; Burish, Mark; Cerkevich, Christina; Kaas, Jon

2014-01-01

124

Longitudinal changes of structural connectivity in traumatic axonal injury  

E-print Network

during the first 6 months after traumatic brain injury and to evaluate the utility of diffusion tensor changes occurring between the acute and chronic stages of traumatic brain injury and for predicting of interest; TAI traumatic axonal injury; TBI traumatic brain injury; UF uncinate fasciculus. Traumatic axonal

Abdi, Hervé

125

White matter tract signatures of the progressive aphasias  

PubMed Central

The primary progressive aphasias (PPA) are a heterogeneous group of language-led neurodegenerative diseases resulting from large-scale brain network degeneration. White matter (WM) pathways bind networks together, and might therefore hold information about PPA pathogenesis. Here we used diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics to compare WM tract changes between PPA syndromes and with respect to Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls in 33 patients with PPA (13 nonfluent/agrammatic PPA); 10 logopenic variant PPA; and 10 semantic variant PPA. Nonfluent/agrammatic PPA was associated with predominantly left-sided and anterior tract alterations including uncinate fasciculus (UF) and subcortical projections; semantic variant PPA with bilateral alterations in inferior longitudinal fasciculus and UF; and logopenic variant PPA with bilateral but predominantly left-sided alterations in inferior longitudinal fasciculus, UF, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and subcortical projections. Tract alterations were more extensive than gray matter alterations, and the extent of alteration across tracts and PPA syndromes varied between diffusivity metrics. These WM signatures of PPA syndromes illustrate the selective vulnerability of brain language networks in these diseases and might have some pathologic specificity. PMID:23312804

Mahoney, Colin J.; Malone, Ian B.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Buckley, Aisling H.; Downey, Laura E.; Golden, Hannah L.; Ryan, Natalie S.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rossor, Martin N.; Fox, Nick C.; Warren, Jason D.

2013-01-01

126

Investigating the contribution of ventral-lexical and dorsal-sublexical pathways during reading in bilinguals  

PubMed Central

Several studies suggest the existence of ventral-lexical and dorsal-sublexical systems for reading. The relative contribution of these pathways can be manipulated by stimulus type and task demands. However, little is known about how bilinguals use these systems to read in their second language. In this study diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to investigate the relationship between white matter (WM) integrity and reaction time in a group of 12 Chinese–English bilingual and 11 age-matched English monolingual adults. Considering a dual-route model of reading, the following four tracts were isolated in both the left and right hemispheres using a tractography measurement approach. Ventral tracts included the uncinate fasciculus (UF) and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF). The dorsal tracts of interest were the arcuate fasciculus (AF) and the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). A significant correlation between the reaction time in a reading task and the mean diffusivity (MD) value was observed in the right UF in both bilingual and monolingual groups. Moreover, in the bilingual group we observed significantly more positive relationships between reaction time and MD in the right AF, and bilaterally in the SLF. We concluded that the relative contribution of the dorsal system for reading is greater in bilinguals than monolinguals. Further, these findings implicate a role of the right hemisphere in reading. PMID:25071533

Bakhtiari, Reyhaneh; Boliek, Carol; Cummine, Jacqueline

2014-01-01

127

Loss of connectivity in Alzheimer's disease: an evaluation of white matter tract integrity with colour coded MR diffusion tensor imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

A NOVEL MRI METHODdiffusion tensor imaging—was used to compare the integrity of several white matter fibre tracts in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease. Relative to normal controls, patients with probable Alzheimer's disease showed a highly significant reduction in the integrity of the association white matter fibre tracts, such as the splenium of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cingulum.

Stephen E Rose; Fang Chen; Jonathan B Chalk; Fernando O Zelaya; Wendy E Strugnell; Mark Benson; James Semple; David M Doddrell

2000-01-01

128

Paraphasias in Multilingual Conduction Aphasia: A Single Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conduction aphasia is a type of fluent aphasia, which is caused due to the damage to the supramarginal gyrus and arcuate fasciculus resulting in repetition disturbance. It has been speculated that linguistic system in bilingual aphasics can breakdown in different ways across languages. There is a lack of detailed linguistic studies in specific…

Hegde, Medha; Bhat, Sapna

2007-01-01

129

A Tractography Study in Dyslexia: Neuroanatomic Correlates of Orthographic, Phonological and Speech Processing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diffusion tensor imaging tractography is a structural magnetic resonance imaging technique allowing reconstruction and assessment of the integrity of three dimensional white matter tracts, as indexed by their fractional anisotropy. It is assumed that the left arcuate fasciculus plays a crucial role for reading development, as it connects two…

Vandermosten, Maaike; Boets, Bart; Poelmans, Hanne; Sunaert, Stefan; Wouters, Jan; Ghesquiere, Pol

2012-01-01

130

Tracking the Roots of Reading Ability: White Matter Volume and Integrity Correlate with Phonological Awareness in Prereading and Early-Reading Kindergarten Children  

PubMed Central

Developmental dyslexia, an unexplained difficulty in learning to read, has been associated with alterations in white matter organization as measured by diffusion-weighted imaging. It is unknown, however, whether these differences in structural connectivity are related to the cause of dyslexia or if they are consequences of reading difficulty (e.g., less reading experience or compensatory brain organization). Here, in 40 kindergartners who had received little or no reading instruction, we examined the relation between behavioral predictors of dyslexia and white matter organization in left arcuate fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and the parietal portion of the superior longitudinal fasciculus using probabilistic tractography. Higher composite phonological awareness scores were significantly and positively correlated with the volume of the arcuate fasciculus, but not with other tracts. Two other behavioral predictors of dyslexia, rapid naming and letter knowledge, did not correlate with volumes or diffusion values in these tracts. The volume and fractional anisotropy of the left arcuate showed a particularly strong positive correlation with a phoneme blending test. Whole-brain regressions of behavioral scores with diffusion measures confirmed the unique relation between phonological awareness and the left arcuate. These findings indicate that the left arcuate fasciculus, which connects anterior and posterior language regions of the human brain and which has been previously associated with reading ability in older individuals, is already smaller and has less integrity in kindergartners who are at risk for dyslexia because of poor phonological awareness. These findings suggest a structural basis of behavioral risk for dyslexia that predates reading instruction. PMID:23946384

Osher, David E.; Beach, Sara D.; Cyr, Abigail B.; Ozernov-Palchik, Ola; Yendiki, Anastasia; Fischl, Bruce; Gaab, Nadine; Gabrieli, John D.E.

2013-01-01

131

Tracking the roots of reading ability: white matter volume and integrity correlate with phonological awareness in prereading and early-reading kindergarten children.  

PubMed

Developmental dyslexia, an unexplained difficulty in learning to read, has been associated with alterations in white matter organization as measured by diffusion-weighted imaging. It is unknown, however, whether these differences in structural connectivity are related to the cause of dyslexia or if they are consequences of reading difficulty (e.g., less reading experience or compensatory brain organization). Here, in 40 kindergartners who had received little or no reading instruction, we examined the relation between behavioral predictors of dyslexia and white matter organization in left arcuate fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and the parietal portion of the superior longitudinal fasciculus using probabilistic tractography. Higher composite phonological awareness scores were significantly and positively correlated with the volume of the arcuate fasciculus, but not with other tracts. Two other behavioral predictors of dyslexia, rapid naming and letter knowledge, did not correlate with volumes or diffusion values in these tracts. The volume and fractional anisotropy of the left arcuate showed a particularly strong positive correlation with a phoneme blending test. Whole-brain regressions of behavioral scores with diffusion measures confirmed the unique relation between phonological awareness and the left arcuate. These findings indicate that the left arcuate fasciculus, which connects anterior and posterior language regions of the human brain and which has been previously associated with reading ability in older individuals, is already smaller and has less integrity in kindergartners who are at risk for dyslexia because of poor phonological awareness. These findings suggest a structural basis of behavioral risk for dyslexia that predates reading instruction. PMID:23946384

Saygin, Zeynep M; Norton, Elizabeth S; Osher, David E; Beach, Sara D; Cyr, Abigail B; Ozernov-Palchik, Ola; Yendiki, Anastasia; Fischl, Bruce; Gaab, Nadine; Gabrieli, John D E

2013-08-14

132

Diffusion tensor tractography findings in schizophrenia across the adult lifespan  

PubMed Central

In healthy adult individuals, late life is a dynamic time of change with respect to the microstructural integrity of white matter tracts. Yet, elderly individuals are generally excluded from diffusion tensor imaging studies in schizophrenia. Therefore, we examined microstructural integrity of frontotemporal and interhemispheric white matter tracts in schizophrenia across the adult lifespan. Diffusion tensor imaging data from 25 younger schizophrenic patients (?55 years), 25 younger controls, 25 older schizophrenic patients (?56 years) and 25 older controls were analysed. Patients with schizophrenia in each group were individually matched to controls. Whole-brain tractography and clustering segmentation were employed to isolate white matter tracts. Groups were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance with 12 within-group measures of fractional anisotropy: (left and right) uncinate fasciculus, arcuate fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior occipito-frontal fasciculus, cingulum bundle, and genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. For each white matter tract, fractional anisotropy was then regressed against age in patients and controls, and correlation coefficients compared. The main effect of group (F3,92 = 12.2, P < 0.001), and group by tract interactions (F26,832 = 1.68, P = 0.018) were evident for fractional anisotropy values. Younger patients had significantly lower fractional anisotropy than younger controls (Bonferonni-corrected alpha = 0.0042) in the left uncinate fasciculus (t48 = 3.7, P = 0.001) and right cingulum bundle (t48 = 3.6, P = 0.001), with considerable effect size, but the older groups did not differ. Schizophrenic patients did not demonstrate accelerated age-related decline compared with healthy controls in any white matter tract. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the microstructural integrity of frontotemporal white matter tracts across the adult lifespan in schizophrenia. The left uncinate fasciculus and right cingulum bundle are disrupted in younger chronic patients with schizophrenia compared with matched controls, suggesting that these white matter tracts are related to frontotemporal disconnectivity. The absence of accelerated age-related decline, or differences between older community-dwelling patients and controls, suggests that these patients may possess resilience to white matter disruption. PMID:20237131

Lobaugh, Nancy J.; Bouix, Sylvain; Rajji, Tarek K.; Miranda, Dielle; Kennedy, James L.; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Shenton, Martha E.

2010-01-01

133

Neural pathways for language in autism: the potential for music-based treatments  

PubMed Central

Language deficits represent the core diagnostic characteristics of autism, and some of these individuals never develop functional speech. The language deficits in autism may be due to structural and functional abnormalities in certain language regions (e.g., frontal and temporal), or due to altered connectivity between these brain regions. In particular, a number of anatomical pathways that connect auditory and motor brain regions (e.g., the arcuate fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus and the extreme capsule) may be altered in individuals with autism. These pathways may also provide targets for experimental treatments to facilitate communication skills in autism. We propose that music-based interventions (e.g., auditory–motor mapping training) would take advantage of the musical strengths of these children, and are likely to engage, and possibly strengthen, the connections between frontal and temporal regions bilaterally. Such treatments have important clinical potential in facilitating expressive language in nonverbal children with autism. PMID:21197137

Wan, Catherine Y; Schlaug, Gottfried

2010-01-01

134

Microstructural White Matter Changes, Not Hippocampal Atrophy, Detect Early Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment  

PubMed Central

Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is generally considered to be characterized by pathology in gray matter of the brain, but convergent evidence suggests that white matter degradation also plays a vital role in its pathogenesis. The evolution of white matter deterioration and its relationship with gray matter atrophy remains elusive in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), a prodromal stage of AD. Methods We studied 155 cognitively normal (CN) and 27 ‘late’ aMCI individuals with stable diagnosis over 2 years, and 39 ‘early’ aMCI individuals who had converted from CN to aMCI at 2-year follow up. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography was used to reconstruct six white matter tracts three limbic tracts critical for episodic memory function - the fornix, the parahippocampal cingulum, and the uncinate fasciculus; two cortico-cortical association fiber tracts - superior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior longitudinal fasciculus; and one projection fiber tract - corticospinal tract. Microstructural integrity as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial diffusivity (AxD) was assessed for these tracts. Results Compared with CN, late aMCI had lower white matter integrity in the fornix, the parahippocampal cingulum, and the uncinate fasciculus, while early aMCI showed white matter damage in the fornix. In addition, fornical measures were correlated with hippocampal atrophy in late aMCI, whereas abnormality of the fornix in early aMCI occurred in the absence of hippocampal atrophy and did not correlate with hippocampal volumes. Conclusions Limbic white matter tracts are preferentially affected in the early stages of cognitive dysfunction. Microstructural degradation of the fornix preceding hippocampal atrophy may serve as a novel imaging marker for aMCI at an early stage. PMID:23516569

Zhuang, Lin; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Trollor, Julian N.; Reppermund, Simone; Kochan, Nicole A.; Brodaty, Henry; Wen, Wei

2013-01-01

135

A novel frontal pathway underlies verbal fluency in primary progressive aphasia  

PubMed Central

The frontal aslant tract is a direct pathway connecting Broca’s region with the anterior cingulate and pre-supplementary motor area. This tract is left lateralized in right-handed subjects, suggesting a possible role in language. However, there are no previous studies that have reported an involvement of this tract in language disorders. In this study we used diffusion tractography to define the anatomy of the frontal aslant tract in relation to verbal fluency and grammar impairment in primary progressive aphasia. Thirty-five patients with primary progressive aphasia and 29 control subjects were recruited. Tractography was used to obtain indirect indices of microstructural organization of the frontal aslant tract. In addition, tractography analysis of the uncinate fasciculus, a tract associated with semantic processing deficits, was performed. Damage to the frontal aslant tract correlated with performance in verbal fluency as assessed by the Cinderella story test. Conversely, damage to the uncinate fasciculus correlated with deficits in semantic processing as assessed by the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test. Neither tract correlated with grammatical or repetition deficits. Significant group differences were found in the frontal aslant tract of patients with the non-fluent/agrammatic variant and in the uncinate fasciculus of patients with the semantic variant. These findings indicate that degeneration of the frontal aslant tract underlies verbal fluency deficits in primary progressive aphasia and further confirm the role of the uncinate fasciculus in semantic processing. The lack of correlation between damage to the frontal aslant tract and grammar deficits suggests that verbal fluency and grammar processing rely on distinct anatomical networks. PMID:23820597

Mesulam, Marsel M.; Jakobsen, Estrid; Malik, Farah; Martersteck, Adam; Wieneke, Christina; Thompson, Cynthia K.; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Dell’Acqua, Flavio; Weintraub, Sandra; Rogalski, Emily

2013-01-01

136

The Projection of Cervical Primary Fibers to the DCN of the Squirrel, Sciurus niger: Fiber Sorting in the Dorsal Columns  

Microsoft Academic Search

The course and terminal distribution of cervical primary afferents in the dorsal column nuclei were studied in the fox squirrel, Sciurus niger. Unilateral rhizotomies were performed at cervical levels C3, C4, C5, C6 and C8. For all spinal levels studied except C8, degeneration in the medullary cuneate fasciculus was present within two distinct groups. They included a large oblique lateral

B. C. Albright; J. I. Johnson; E. M. Ostapoff

1983-01-01

137

Altered structural connectivity and trait anhedonia in patients with schizophrenia.  

PubMed

This study tested association between anhedonia scores and white matter integrity in order to investigate the neural basis of trait anhedonia in schizophrenia. A total of 31 patients with schizophrenia and 33 healthy controls underwent diffusion weighted imaging and scoring of trait anhedonia using the Physical Anhedonia Scale. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we found that fractional anisotropy values of some white matter regions were differently correlated with Physical Anhedonia Scale scores between the two groups. The white matter regions that were more significantly correlated with trait anhedonia in patients than in controls included the left side of the cingulum, splenium of the corpus callosum, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, superior longitudinal fasciculus I and II, anterior thalamic radiation, and optic radiation. Of these regions, fractional anisotropy values in the cingulum and superior longitudinal fasciculus II were positively correlated with trait anhedonia in patients with schizophrenia. These findings suggest that alterations in structural connectivity within large-scale brain networks, including the default mode and central executive networks, may contribute to the development of trait anhedonia in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25017826

Lee, Jung Suk; Han, Kiwan; Lee, Seung-Koo; Seok, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Jin

2014-09-01

138

Constrained spherical deconvolution analysis of the limbic network in human, with emphasis on a direct cerebello-limbic pathway  

PubMed Central

The limbic system is part of an intricate network which is involved in several functions like memory and emotion. Traditionally the role of the cerebellum was considered mainly associated to motion control; however several evidences are raising about a role of the cerebellum in learning skills, emotions control, mnemonic and behavioral processes involving also connections with limbic system. In 15 normal subjects we studied limbic connections by probabilistic Constrained Spherical Deconvolution (CSD) tractography. The main result of our work was to prove for the first time in human brain the existence of a direct cerebello-limbic pathway which was previously hypothesized but never demonstrated. We also extended our analysis to the other limbic connections including cingulate fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, uncinated fasciculus, anterior thalamic connections and fornix. Although these pathways have been already described in the tractographic literature we provided reconstruction, quantitative analysis and Fractional Anisotropy (FA) right-left symmetry comparison using probabilistic CSD tractography that is known to provide a potential improvement compared to previously used Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) techniques. The demonstration of the existence of cerebello-limbic pathway could constitute an important step in the knowledge of the anatomic substrate of non-motor cerebellar functions. Finally the CSD statistical data about limbic connections in healthy subjects could be potentially useful in the diagnosis of pathological disorders damaging this system. PMID:25538606

Arrigo, Alessandro; Mormina, Enricomaria; Anastasi, Giuseppe Pio; Gaeta, Michele; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Quartarone, Angelo; De Salvo, Simona; Bruschetta, Daniele; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Trimarchi, Fabio; Milardi, Demetrio

2014-01-01

139

Decreased Axial Diffusivity within Language Connections: A Possible Biomarker of Schizophrenia Risk  

PubMed Central

Siblings of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia are at elevated risk for developing this disorder. The nature of such risk associated with brain abnormalities, and whether such abnormalities are similar to those observed in schizophrenia, remain unclear. Deficits in language processing are frequently reported in increased risk populations. Interestingly, white matter pathology involving fronto-temporal language pathways, including Arcuate Fasciculus (AF), Uncinate Fasciculus (UF), and Inferior Occipitofrontal Fasciculus (IOFF), are frequently reported in schizophrenia. In this study, high spatial and directional resolution diffusion MRI data was obtained on a 3T magnet from 33 subjects with increased familial risk for developing schizophrenia, and 28 control subjects. Diffusion Tractography was performed to measure white matter integrity within AF, UF, and IOFF. To understand these abnormalities, Fractional anisotropy (FA, a measure of tract integrity) and Trace (a measure of overall diffusion), were combined with more specific measures of axial diffusivity (AX, a putative measure of axonal integrity) and radial diffusivity (RD, a putative measure of myelin integrity). Results revealed a significant decrease in Trace within IOFF, and a significant decrease in AX in all tracts. FA and RD anomalies, frequently reported in schizophrenia, were not observed. Moreover, AX group effect was modulated by age, with increased risk subjects demonstrating a deviation from normal maturation trajectory. Findings suggest that familial risk for schizophrenia may be associated with abnormalities in axonal rather than myelin integrity, and possibly associated with disruptions in normal brain maturation. AX should be considered a possible biomarker of risk for developing schizophrenia. PMID:23800617

Kubicki, M; Shenton, ME; Maciejewski, PK; Pelavin, PE; Hawley, KJ; Ballinger, T; Swisher, T; Jabbar, GA; Thermenos, HW; Keshavan, MS; Seidman, LJ; DeLisi, LE

2013-01-01

140

Decreased axial diffusivity within language connections: a possible biomarker of schizophrenia risk.  

PubMed

Siblings of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia are at elevated risk for developing this disorder. The nature of such risk associated with brain abnormalities, and whether such abnormalities are similar to those observed in schizophrenia, remain unclear. Deficits in language processing are frequently reported in increased risk populations. Interestingly, white matter pathology involving fronto-temporal language pathways, including arcuate fasciculus (AF), uncinate fasciculus (UF), and inferior occipitofrontal fasciculus (IOFF), are frequently reported in schizophrenia. In this study, high spatial and directional resolution diffusion MRI data was obtained on a 3T magnet from 33 subjects with increased familial risk for developing schizophrenia, and 28 control subjects. Diffusion tractography was performed to measure white matter integrity within AF, UF, and IOFF. To understand these abnormalities, Fractional Anisotropy (FA, a measure of tract integrity) and Trace (a measure of overall diffusion), were combined with more specific measures of axial diffusivity (AX, a putative measure of axonal integrity) and radial diffusivity (RD, a putative measure of myelin integrity). Results revealed a significant decrease in Trace within IOFF, and a significant decrease in AX in all tracts. FA and RD anomalies, frequently reported in schizophrenia, were not observed. Moreover, AX group effect was modulated by age, with increased risk subjects demonstrating a deviation from normal maturation trajectory. Findings suggest that familial risk for schizophrenia may be associated with abnormalities in axonal rather than myelin integrity, and possibly associated with disruptions in normal brain maturation. AX should be considered a possible biomarker of risk for developing schizophrenia. PMID:23800617

Kubicki, M; Shenton, M E; Maciejewski, P K; Pelavin, P E; Hawley, K J; Ballinger, T; Swisher, T; Jabbar, G A; Thermenos, H W; Keshavan, M S; Seidman, L J; Delisi, L E

2013-08-01

141

Regional White Matter Damage Predicts Speech Fluency in Chronic Post-Stroke Aphasia  

PubMed Central

Recently, two different white matter regions that support speech fluency have been identified: the aslant tract and the anterior segment of the arcuate fasciculus (ASAF). The role of the ASAF was demonstrated in patients with post-stroke aphasia, while the role of the aslant tract shown in primary progressive aphasia. Regional white matter integrity appears to be crucial for speech production; however, the degree that each region exerts an independent influence on speech fluency is unclear. Furthermore, it is not yet defined if damage to both white matter regions influences speech in the context of the same neural mechanism (stroke-induced aphasia). This study assessed the relationship between speech fluency and quantitative integrity of the aslant region and the ASAF. It also explored the relationship between speech fluency and other white matter regions underlying classic cortical language areas such as the uncinate fasciculus and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF). Damage to these regions, except the ILF, was associated with speech fluency, suggesting synergistic association of these regions with speech fluency in post-stroke aphasia. These observations support the theory that speech fluency requires the complex, orchestrated activity between a network of pre-motor, secondary, and tertiary associative cortices, supported in turn by regional white matter integrity. PMID:25368572

Basilakos, Alexandra; Fillmore, Paul T.; Rorden, Chris; Guo, Dazhou; Bonilha, Leonardo; Fridriksson, Julius

2014-01-01

142

White matter correlates of cognitive domains in normal aging with diffusion tensor imaging  

PubMed Central

The ability to perform complex as well as simple cognitive tasks engages a network of brain regions that is mediated by the white matter fiber bundles connecting them. Different cognitive tasks employ distinctive white matter fiber bundles. The temporal lobe and its projections subserve a variety of key functions known to deteriorate during aging. In a cohort of 52 healthy subjects (ages 25–82 years), we performed voxel-wise regression analysis correlating performance in higher-order cognitive domains (executive function, information processing speed, and memory) with white matter integrity, as measured by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) fiber tracking in the temporal lobe projections [uncinate fasciculus (UF), fornix, cingulum, inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF)]. The fiber tracts were spatially registered and statistical parametric maps were produced to spatially localize the significant correlations. Results showed that performance in the executive function domain is correlated with DTI parameters in the left SLF and right UF; performance in the information processing speed domain is correlated with fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left cingulum, left fornix, right and left ILF and SLF; and the memory domain shows significant correlations with DTI parameters in the right fornix, right cingulum, left ILF, left SLF and right UF. These findings suggest that DTI tractography enables anatomical definition of region of interest (ROI) for correlation of behavioral parameters with diffusion indices, and functionality can be correlated with white matter integrity. PMID:23493587

Sasson, Efrat; Doniger, Glen M.; Pasternak, Ofer; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Assaf, Yaniv

2013-01-01

143

Outcomes of Diffusion Tensor Tractography-Integrated Stereotactic Radiosurgery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the effect of use of tractography of the critical brain white matter fibers created from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging on reduction of morbidity associated with radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Tractography of the pyramidal tract has been integrated since February 2004 if lesions are adjacent to it, the optic radiation since May 2006, and the arcuate fasciculus since October 2007. By visually confirming the precise location of these fibers, the dose to these fiber tracts was optimized. One hundred forty-four consecutive patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations who underwent radiosurgery with this technique between February 2004 and December 2009 were analyzed. Results: Tractography was prospectively integrated in 71 of 155 treatments for 144 patients. The pyramidal tract was visualized in 45, the optic radiation in 22, and the arcuate fasciculus in 13 (two tracts in 9). During the follow-up period of 3 to 72 months (median, 23 months) after the procedure, 1 patient showed permanent worsening of pre-existing dysesthesia, and another patient exhibited mild transient hemiparesis 12 months later but fully recovered after oral administration of corticosteroid agents. Two patients had transient speech disturbance before starting integration of the arcuate fasciculus tractography, but no patient thereafter. Conclusion: Integrating tractography helped prevent morbidity of radiosurgery in patients with brain arteriovenous malformations.

Koga, Tomoyuki, E-mail: kouga-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Maruyama, Keisuke; Kamada, Kyousuke; Ota, Takahiro; Shin, Masahiro [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, Daisuke [Department of Radiology, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kunii, Naoto [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ino, Kenji; Terahara, Atsuro; Aoki, Shigeki; Masutani, Yoshitaka [Department of Radiology, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Nobuhito [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-02-01

144

Reliability of two clinically relevant fiber pathways reconstructed with constrained spherical deconvolution.  

PubMed

The single diffusion tensor model is inadequate for the reconstruction of fiber pathways in brain regions with multiple fiber orientations. To overcome this limitation, constrained spherical deconvolution has been proposed. A high reliability of constrained spherical deconvolution is, however, a pre-requisite for its use in clinical applications. Reliability of reconstructed fiber pathways can be assessed in terms of architectural (addressing their spatial configuration) and microstructural (addressing diffusion-derived measures along the fibers) reproducibility. We assess the reliability for two clinically relevant fiber pathways: the corticospinal tract and arcuate fasciculus. The fiber pathways were reconstructed using constrained spherical deconvolution in 11 healthy subjects who were scanned on three occasions. Coefficients of variations of diffusion-derived measures were used to assess the microstructural reproducibility. Image correlation and fiber overlap were used to assess the architectural reproducibility. The mean correlation between sessions was 72% for both the corticospinal tract and arcuate fasciculus. The mean overlap between sessions was 63% for the corticospinal tract and 58% for the arcuate fasciculus. Coefficients of variations of diffusion-derived measures showed very low variation (all measures <3.1%). These results are comparable with reliability results based on the diffusion tensor model, which is commonly used in clinical settings. The reliability results found here are, therefore, promising to further investigate the use of constrained spherical deconvolution in clinical practice. PMID:23359402

Kristo, Gert; Leemans, Alexander; Raemaekers, Mathijs; Rutten, Geert-Jan; de Gelder, Beatrice; Ramsey, Nick F

2013-12-01

145

White matter disruption at the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease: Relationships with hippocampal atrophy and episodic memory performance  

PubMed Central

White matter tract alterations have been consistently described in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In particular, limbic fronto-temporal connections, which are critical to episodic memory function, may degenerate early in the course of the disease. However the relation between white matter tract degeneration, hippocampal atrophy and episodic memory impairment at the earliest stages of AD is still unclear. In this magnetic resonance imaging study, white matter integrity and hippocampal volumes were evaluated in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment due to AD (Albert et al., 2011) (n = 22) and healthy controls (n = 15). Performance in various episodic memory tasks was also evaluated in each participant. Relative to controls, patients showed a significant reduction of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) and increase of radial diffusivity (RD) in the bilateral uncinate fasciculus, parahippocampal cingulum and fornix. Within the patient group, significant intra-hemispheric correlations were notably found between hippocampal grey matter volume and FA in the uncinate fasciculus, suggesting a relationship between atrophy and disconnection of the hippocampus. Moreover, episodic recognition scores were related with uncinate fasciculus FA across patients. These results indicate that fronto-hippocampal connectivity is reduced from the earliest pre-demential stages of AD. Disruption of fronto-hippocampal connections may occur progressively, in parallel with hippocampal atrophy, and may specifically contribute to early initial impairment in episodic memory.

Rémy, Florence; Vayssière, Nathalie; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Barbeau, Emmanuel; Pariente, Jérémie

2015-01-01

146

Changes to memory structures in children treated for posterior fossa tumors.  

PubMed

Children treated for medulloblastoma (MB) exhibit long-term impairments in declarative memory, but the pathophysiology underlying this is unclear. Previous studies report declines in global white matter volume, but have failed to link this to declines in memory performance. We examined the effects of treatment on measures of global brain structure (i.e., total white and gray matter volume) and specific memory structures (i.e., hippocampus and uncinate fasciculus). We used volumetric MRI and diffusion tensor imaging in pediatric survivors of MB and one survivor of astrocytoma treated with cranial-spinal radiation (n = 20), and healthy controls (n = 13). Compared to controls, the survivor group exhibited reduced white matter volume, damage to the uncinate fasciculus, and a smaller right hippocampus. Critically, reduced hippocampal volume was not related to differences in brain volume, suggesting that the hippocampus may be especially vulnerable to treatment effects. A subset of the survivors (n = 10) also underwent memory testing using the Children's Memory Scale (CMS). Performance on the general index of the CMS was significantly correlated with measures of hippocampal volume and uncinate fasciculus. The examination of treatment effects on specific brain regions provides a better understanding of long-term cognitive outcome in children with brain tumors, particularly medulloblastoma. PMID:24460980

Riggs, Lily; Bouffet, Eric; Laughlin, Suzanne; Laperriere, Normand; Liu, Fang; Skocic, Jovanka; Scantlebury, Nadia; Wang, Frank; Schoenhoff, Nicholas J; Strother, Douglas; Hukin, Juliette; Fryer, Christopher; McConnell, Dina; Mabbott, Donald J

2014-02-01

147

Clinical findings and white matter abnormalities seen on diffusion tensor imaging in adolescents with very low birth weight.  

PubMed

Very low birth weight (VLBW) children are at high risk of perinatal white matter injury, which, when subtle, may not be seen using conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The relationship between clinical findings and fractional anisotropy (FA) measurements in white matter of adolescents born prematurely with VLBW was studied in 34 subjects (age = 15 years, birth weight fasciculus. Within this group of children, visual motor and visual perceptual deficits were associated with low FA values in the external capsule, posterior part of the internal capsule and in the inferior fasciculus. Children with low IQ had low FA values in the external capsule and inferior and middle superior fasciculus. Fine motor impairment was related to low FA values in the internal and external capsule and superior fasciculus. Eight VLBW children with inattention symptoms or a diagnosis of ADHD had significantly lower FA values in several areas. Mild social deficits correlated with reduced FA values in the external capsule and superior fasciculus. We conclude that DTI was able to detect differences in FA between VLBW adolescents and controls in several white matter areas at risk of periventricular leucomalacia in VLBW newborns. Our results show that low FA values in these areas were associated with perceptual, cognitive, motor and mental health impairments. These conclusions indicate that perinatal injury of white matter tracts persist with clinical significance in adolescence. PMID:17347255

Skranes, J; Vangberg, T R; Kulseng, S; Indredavik, M S; Evensen, K A I; Martinussen, M; Dale, A M; Haraldseth, O; Brubakk, A-M

2007-03-01

148

White matter microstructure in late middle-age: Effects of apolipoprotein E4 and parental family history of Alzheimer's disease  

PubMed Central

Introduction Little is still known about the effects of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) on white matter microstructure in cognitively healthy adults. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the effect of two well-known risk factors for AD, parental family history and APOE4 genotype. Methods This study included 343 participants from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention, who underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A region of interest analysis was performed on fractional anisotropy maps, in addition to mean, radial, and axial diffusivity maps, aligned to a common template space using a diffeomorphic, tensor-based registration method. The analysis focused on brain regions known to be affected in AD including the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, fornix, cingulum, and uncinate fasciculus. Analyses assessed the impact of APOE4, parental family history of AD, age, and sex on white matter microstructure in late middle-aged participants (aged 47–76 years). Results Both APOE4 and parental family history were associated with microstructural white matter differences. Participants with parental family history of AD had higher FA in the genu of the corpus callosum and the superior longitudinal fasciculus. We observed an interaction between family history and APOE4, where participants who were family history positive but APOE4 negative had lower axial diffusivity in the uncinate fasciculus, and participants who were both family history positive and APOE4 positive had higher axial diffusivity in this region. We also observed an interaction between APOE4 and age, whereby older participants (=65 years of age) who were APOE4 carriers, had higher MD in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and in the portion of the cingulum bundle running adjacent to the cingulate cortex, compared to non-carriers. Older participants who were APOE4 carriers also showed higher radial diffusivity in the genu compared to non-carriers. Across all participants, age had an effect on FA, MD, and axial and radial diffusivities. Sex differences were observed in FA and radial diffusivity. Conclusion APOE4 genotype, parental family history of AD, age, and sex are all associated with microstructural white matter differences in late middle-aged adults. In participants at risk for AD, alterations in diffusion characteristics—both expected and unexpected—may represent cellular changes occurring at the earliest disease stages, but further work is needed. Higher mean, radial, and axial diffusivities were observed in participants who are more likely to be experiencing later stage preclinical pathology, including participants who were both older and carried APOE4, or who were positive for both APOE4 and parental family history of AD. PMID:24936424

Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Daniel J.; Lu, Sharon Yuan-Fu; Doran, Samuel T.; Birdsill, Alex C.; Melah, Kelsey E.; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Alexander, Andrew L.; Dowling, N. Maritza; Johnson, Sterling C.; Sager, Mark A.; Bendlin, Barbara B.

2014-01-01

149

Electrophysiological and diffusion tensor imaging evidence of delayed corollary discharges in patients with schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Patients with schizophrenia (SZ) characteristically exhibit supranormal levels of cortical activity to self-induced sensory stimuli, ostensibly because of abnormalities in the neural signals (corollary discharges, CDs) normatively involved in suppressing the sensory consequences of self-generated actions. The nature of these abnormalities is unknown. This study investigated whether SZ patients experience CDs that are abnormally delayed in their arrival at the sensory cortex. Twenty-one patients with SZ and 25 matched control participants underwent electroencephalography (EEG). Participants’ level of cortical suppression was calculated as the amplitude of the N1 component evoked by a button press-elicited auditory stimulus, subtracted from the N1 amplitude evoked by the same stimulus presented passively. In the three experimental conditions, the auditory stimulus was delivered 0, 50 or 100 ms subsequent to the button-press. Fifteen SZ patients and 17 healthy controls (HCs) also underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and the fractional anisotropy (FA) of participants’ arcuate fasciculus was used to predict their level of cortical suppression in the three conditions. While the SZ patients exhibited subnormal N1 suppression to undelayed, self-generated auditory stimuli, these deficits were eliminated by imposing a 50-ms, but not a 100-ms, delay between the button-press and the evoked stimulus. Furthermore, the extent to which the 50-ms delay normalized a patient’s level of N1 suppression was linearly related to the FA of their arcuate fasciculus. These data suggest that SZ patients experience temporally delayed CDs to self-generated auditory stimuli, putatively because of structural damage to the white-matter (WM) fasciculus connecting the sites of discharge initiation and destination. PMID:20663254

Whitford, T. J.; Mathalon, D. H.; Shenton, M. E.; Roach, B. J.; Bammer, R.; Adcock, R. A.; Bouix, S.; Kubicki, M.; De Siebenthal, J.; Rausch, A. C.; Schneiderman, J. S.; Ford, J. M.

2013-01-01

150

White matter correlates of sensory processing in autism spectrum disorders  

PubMed Central

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been characterized by atypical socio-communicative behavior, sensorimotor impairment and abnormal neurodevelopmental trajectories. DTI has been used to determine the presence and nature of abnormality in white matter integrity that may contribute to the behavioral phenomena that characterize ASD. Although atypical patterns of sensory responding in ASD are well documented in the behavioral literature, much less is known about the neural networks associated with aberrant sensory processing. To address the roles of basic sensory, sensory association and early attentional processes in sensory responsiveness in ASD, our investigation focused on five white matter fiber tracts known to be involved in these various stages of sensory processing: superior corona radiata, centrum semiovale, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, posterior limb of the internal capsule, and splenium. We acquired high angular resolution diffusion images from 32 children with ASD and 26 typically developing children between the ages of 5 and 8. We also administered sensory assessments to examine brain-behavior relationships between white matter integrity and sensory variables. Our findings suggest a modulatory role of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and splenium in atypical sensorimotor and early attention processes in ASD. Increased tactile defensiveness was found to be related to reduced fractional anisotropy in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, which may reflect an aberrant connection between limbic structures in the temporal lobe and the inferior parietal cortex. Our findings also corroborate the modulatory role of the splenium in attentional orienting, but suggest the possibility of a more diffuse or separable network for social orienting in ASD. Future investigation should consider the use of whole brain analyses for a more robust assessment of white matter microstructure. PMID:25379451

Pryweller, Jennifer R.; Schauder, Kimberly B.; Anderson, Adam W.; Heacock, Jessica L.; Foss-Feig, Jennifer H.; Newsom, Cassandra R.; Loring, Whitney A.; Cascio, Carissa J.

2014-01-01

151

Solution to the algebraic analogue of a differential equation  

E-print Network

HPROB&'EM+ e 12+BX ~ 12+ 12H ~ ~ I TERATI ONSZP ) 4 FORMAT(2 X ~ 1 1 HB & I & ~ I =I t 12 i 3X~ 3( E16 ~ 8 ~ 3X )/)6 X ~ 3(E16+Bo3X)l XI 6 X+3( E 1 6 ~ Bo 3X &/'16X e 3 (E16 ~ 8 & 3X )li' ) 5 2 I 7 8 FORMAT(7Xi9H ERROR~)E)6+8/A') SI&0 ' 0 SUM2&0... ~ Q DQ I I=l ~ 12 SUM~0 ~ Q DQ 2 J~l &12 SUM~SUM+8(a)&)P(V&l& X~R(I) F~FXY&XaBePol ~ L& SVM2~SVM2+F+2 Sl ~&SUM F)A)&2 +Sl DF~SQRT&SI ESVM2 ) IF(OF~0 F 0001) 7)7&8 CONT INVE WRITE(6&3& L&K WR I TE( 6 e 4) (8 & I ) A I ~I e 12 & WRITE(6&5)DF...

Moore, Leslie Ray

2012-06-07

152

Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

1986-03-01

153

Correlation of White Matter Diffusivity and Anisotropy with Age during Childhood and Adolescence: A Cross-sectional Diffusion-Tensor MR Imaging Study  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE To evaluate differences in white matter diffusion properties as a function of age in healthy children and adolescents. MATERIALS AND METHODS Echo-planar diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 33 healthy subjects aged 5–18 years who were recruited from a functional imaging study of normal language development. Results of neurologic, psychologic, and structural MR imaging examinations were within the normal range for all subjects. The trace of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy in white matter were correlated as a function of age by using Spearman rank correlation. RESULTS Statistically significant negative correlation of the trace of the apparent diffusion coefficient with age was found throughout the white matter. Significant positive correlation of fractional anisotropy with age was found in the internal capsule, corticospinal tract, left arcuate fasciculus, and right inferior longitudinal fasciculus. CONCLUSION Diffusion-tensor MR imaging results indicate that white matter maturation assessed at different ages involves increases in both white matter density and organization during childhood and adolescence. The trace of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy may reflect different physiologic processes in healthy children and adolescents. PMID:11756728

Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Wilke, Marko; Dardzinski, Bernard J.; Holland, Scott K.

2008-01-01

154

DTI Tractography and White Matter Fiber Tract Characteristics in Euthymic Bipolar I Patients and Healthy Control Subjects  

PubMed Central

With the introduction of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), structural differences in white matter (WM) architecture between psychiatric populations and healthy controls can be systematically observed and measured. In particular, DTI-tractography can be used to assess WM characteristics over the entire extent of WM tracts and aggregated fiber bundles. Using 64-direction DTI scanning in 27 participants with bipolar disorder (BD) and 26 age-and-gender-matched healthy control subjects, we compared relative length, density, and fractional anisotrophy (FA) of WM tracts involved in emotion regulation or theorized to be important neural components in BD neuropathology. We interactively isolated 22 known white matter tracts using region-of-interest placement (TrackVis software program) and then computed relative tract length, density, and integrity. BD subjects demonstrated significantly shorter WM tracts in the genu, body and splenium of the corpus callosum compared to healthy controls. Additionally, bipolar subjects exhibited reduced fiber density in the genu and body of the corpus callosum, and in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus bilaterally. In the left uncinate fasciculus, however, BD subjects exhibited significantly greater fiber density than healthy controls. There were no significant differences between groups in WM tract FA for those tracts that began and ended in the brain. The significance of differences in tract length and fiber density in BD is discussed. PMID:23070746

Irimia, Andrei; Leow, Alex D.; Bartzokis, George; Moody, Teena D.; Jennings, Robin G.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Van Horn, John Darrell; Altshuler, Lori L.

2012-01-01

155

Left fronto-temporal dysconnectivity within the language network in schizophrenia: an fMRI and DTI study.  

PubMed

Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by language disorders. Studies reveal that both a functional dysconnectivity and a disturbance in the integrity of white matter fibers are implicated in the language process in patients with schizophrenia. Here, we investigate the relationship between functional connectivity within a language-comprehension network and anatomical connectivity using fiber tracking in schizophrenia. We hypothesized that patients would present an impaired functional connectivity in the language network due to anatomical dysconnectivity. Participants comprised 20 patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls who were studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. The temporal correlation coefficient and diffusion values between the left frontal and temporal clusters, belonging to the language network, were individually extracted, in order to study the relationships of anatomo-functional connectivity. In patients, functional connectivity was positively correlated with fractional anisotropy, but was negatively correlated with radial diffusivity and/or mean diffusivity, in the left arcuate fasciculus and part of the inferior occipitofrontal fasciculus, determined as the fronto-temporal tracts. Our findings indicate a close relationship between functional and anatomical dysconnectivity in patients with schizophrenia. The disturbance in the integrity of the left fronto-temporal tracts might be one origin of the functional dysconnectivity in the language-comprehension network in schizophrenia. PMID:25028156

Leroux, Elise; Delcroix, Nicolas; Dollfus, Sonia

2014-09-30

156

Altered white matter connectivity in never-medicated patients with schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Numerous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have implicated white matter brain tissue abnormalities in schizophrenia. However, the vast majority of these studies included patient populations that use antipsychotic medication. Previous research showed that medication intake can affect brain morphology and the question therefore arises to what extent the reported white matter aberrations can be attributed to the disease rather than to the use of medication. In this study we included 16 medication-naïve patients with schizophrenia and compared them to 23 healthy controls to exclude antipsychotic medication use as a confounding factor. For each subject DTI scans and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) scans were acquired. A new tract-based analysis was used that combines fractional anisoptropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) to examine group differences in 12 major white matter fiber bundles. Significant group differences in combined FA, MD, MTR values were found for the right uncinate fasciculus and the left arcuate fasciculus. Additional analysis revealed that the largest part of both tracts showed an increase in MTR in combination with an increase in MD for patients with schizophrenia. We interpret these group-related differences as disease-related axonal or glial aberrations that cannot be attributed to antipsychotic medication use. PMID:22461372

Mandl, René C W; Rais, Monica; van Baal, Gertrudis Caroline M; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

2013-09-01

157

Involvement of the right hemisphere in reading comprehension: a DTI study.  

PubMed

The Simple View of reading emphasizes the critical role of two factors in normal reading skills: word recognition and reading comprehension. The current study aims to identify the anatomical support for aspects of reading performance that fall within these two components. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values were obtained from diffusion tensor images in twenty-one typical adolescents and young adults using the tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) method. We focused on the arcuate fasciculus (AF) and inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) as fiber tracts that connect regions already implicated in the distributed cortical network for reading. Our results demonstrate dissociation between word-level and narrative-level reading skills: the FA values for both left and right ILF were correlated with measures of word reading, while only the left ILF correlated with reading comprehension scores. FA in the AF, however, correlated only with reading comprehension scores, bilaterally. Correlations with the right AF were particularly robust, emphasizing the contribution of the right hemisphere, especially the frontal lobe, to reading comprehension performance on the particular passage comprehension test used in this study. The anatomical dissociation between these reading skills is supported by the Simple View theory and may shed light on why these two skills dissociate in those with reading disorders. PMID:24909792

Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi; Wang, Yingying; Plante, Elena; Holland, Scott K

2014-09-25

158

Structural correlates of cognitive domains in normal aging with diffusion tensor imaging.  

PubMed

The involvement of brain structures in specific cognitive functions is not straightforward. In order to characterize the brain micro-structural correlates of cognitive domains, 52 healthy subjects, age 25-82 years, completed a computerized neuropsychological battery and were scanned using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging. Factor analysis of 44 different cognitive scores was performed, isolating three cognitive domains-executive function, information processing speed and memory. Partial correlation was conducted between DTI parameters and each of the three cognitive domains controlling for age and motor function. Regions showing significant correlations with cognitive domains are domain-specific and are consistent with previous knowledge. While executive function was correlated with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters in frontal white matter and in the superior longitudinal fasciculus, information processing speed was correlated with DTI parameters in the cingulum, corona radiata, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, parietal white matter and in the thalamus. Memory performance was correlated with DTI measures in temporal and frontal gray matter and white matter regions, including the cingulate cortex and the parahippocampus. Thus, inter-subject variability in cognitive performance and tissue morphology, as expressed by diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, can be used to relate tissue microstructure with cognitive performance and to provide information to corroborate other functional localization techniques. PMID:21909706

Sasson, Efrat; Doniger, Glen M; Pasternak, Ofer; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Assaf, Yaniv

2012-04-01

159

White matter integrity is associated with alcohol cue reactivity in heavy drinkers  

PubMed Central

Neuroimaging studies have shown that white matter damage accompanies excessive alcohol use, but the functional correlates of alcohol-related white matter disruption remain unknown. This study applied tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from 332 heavy drinkers (mean age = 31.2 ± 9.4; 31% female) to obtain averaged fractional anisotropy (FA) values of 18 white matter tracts. Statistical analyses examined correlations of FA values with blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) response to an alcohol taste cue, measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). FA values of nine white matter tracts (anterior corona radiata, body of corpus callosum, cingulate gyrus, external capsule, fornix, inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, posterior corona radiata, retrolenticular limb of internal capsule, and superior longitudinal fasciculus) were significantly, negatively correlated with BOLD activation in medial frontal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, cingulum, thalamus, caudate, putamen, insula, and cerebellum. The inverse relation between white matter integrity and functional activation during the alcohol taste cue provides support for the hypothesis that lower white matter integrity in frontoparietal and corticolimbic networks is a factor in loss of control over alcohol consumption. PMID:24683509

Monnig, Mollie A; Thayer, Rachel E; Caprihan, Arvind; Claus, Eric D; Yeo, Ronald A; Calhoun, Vince D; Hutchison, Kent E

2014-01-01

160

Gestures, vocalizations, and memory in language origins.  

PubMed

THIS ARTICLE DISCUSSES THE POSSIBLE HOMOLOGIES BETWEEN THE HUMAN LANGUAGE NETWORKS AND COMPARABLE AUDITORY PROJECTION SYSTEMS IN THE MACAQUE BRAIN, IN AN ATTEMPT TO RECONCILE TWO EXISTING VIEWS ON LANGUAGE EVOLUTION: one that emphasizes hand control and gestures, and the other that emphasizes auditory-vocal mechanisms. The capacity for language is based on relatively well defined neural substrates whose rudiments have been traced in the non-human primate brain. At its core, this circuit constitutes an auditory-vocal sensorimotor circuit with two main components, a "ventral pathway" connecting anterior auditory regions with anterior ventrolateral prefrontal areas, and a "dorsal pathway" connecting auditory areas with parietal areas and with posterior ventrolateral prefrontal areas via the arcuate fasciculus and the superior longitudinal fasciculus. In humans, the dorsal circuit is especially important for phonological processing and phonological working memory, capacities that are critical for language acquisition and for complex syntax processing. In the macaque, the homolog of the dorsal circuit overlaps with an inferior parietal-premotor network for hand and gesture selection that is under voluntary control, while vocalizations are largely fixed and involuntary. The recruitment of the dorsal component for vocalization behavior in the human lineage, together with a direct cortical control of the subcortical vocalizing system, are proposed to represent a fundamental innovation in human evolution, generating an inflection point that permitted the explosion of vocal language and human communication. In this context, vocal communication and gesturing have a common history in primate communication. PMID:22347184

Aboitiz, Francisco

2012-01-01

161

The projection of cervical primary fibers to the DCN of the squirrel, Sciurus niger: fiber sorting in the dorsal columns.  

PubMed

The course and terminal distribution of cervical primary afferents in the dorsal column nuclei were studied in the fox squirrel, Sciurus niger. Unilateral rhizotomies were performed at cervical levels C3, C4, C5, C6 and C8. For all spinal levels studied except C8, degeneration in the medullary cuneate fasciculus was present within two distinct groups. They included a large oblique lateral lamina and a small superficial group of degeneration. The superficial group was horizontal, located medial to the large lamina and appeared to be formed by the medial shifting of fibers away from the initial larger group. Fibers in the large primary lamina appeared to terminate primarily in the ventrolateral areas of the cuneate nucleus. Fibers from the superficial group, however, appeared to project mostly to dorsal cuneate nuclear areas. Hence, the dual transverse terminal patterns for cervical fibers in the cuneate nucleus appeared to be related directly to a fiber sorting process that involved the formation of two often separate ascending fiber groups in the cuneate fasciculus. The results of this study are compared with the mechanosensory mapping of the dorsal column nuclei in the squirrel. PMID:6303492

Albright, B C; Johnson, J I; Ostapoff, E M

1983-01-01

162

Msx1 disruption leads to diencephalon defects and hydrocephalus.  

PubMed

We have analyzed the expression of the Msx1 gene in the developing mouse brain and examined the brain phenotype in homozygotes. Msx1 is expressed in every cerebral vesicle throughout development, particularly in neuroepithelia, such as those of the fimbria and the medulla. Timing analysis suggests that Msx1(nLacZ) cells delaminate and migrate radially from these epithelia, mainly at embryonic days 14-16, while immunohistochemistry studies reveal that some of the beta-galactosidase migrating cells are oligodendrocytes or astrocytes. Our results suggest that the Msx1 neuroepithelia of fimbria and medulla may be a source of glial precursors. The Msx1 mutants display severe hydrocephalus at birth, while the subcommissural organ, the habenula, and the posterior commissure fail to develop correctly. No label was detected in the mutant subcommissural organ using a specific antibody against Reissner's fiber. Besides, the fasciculus retroflexus deviates close to the subcommissural organ, while the paraventricular thalamic nucleus shows histological disorganization. Our results implicate the Msx1 gene in the differentiation of the subcommissural organ cells and posterior commissure and that Msx1 protein may play a role in the pathfinding and bundling of the fasciculus retroflexus and in the structural arrangement of the paraventricular thalamic nucleus. PMID:15188430

Ramos, Casto; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro; Bach, Antoine; Robert, Benoît; Soriano, Eduardo

2004-07-01

163

Analyses of Disruption of Cerebral White Matter Integrity in Schizophrenia with MR Diffusion Tensor Fiber Tracking Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have analyzed cerebral white matter using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) to measure the diffusion anisotropy of water molecules. The goal of this study is the quantitative evaluation of schizophrenia. Diffusion tensor images are acquired for patients with schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects, group-matched for age, sex, and handedness. Fiber tracking is performed on the superior longitudinal fasciculus for the comparison between the patient and comparison groups. We have analysed and compared the cross-sectional area on the starting coronal plane and the mean and standard deviation of the fractional anisotropy and the apparent diffusion coefficient along fibers in the right and left hemispheres. In the right hemisphere, the cross-sectional areas in patient group are significantly smaller than those in the comparison group. Furthermore, in the comparison group, the cross-sectional areas in the right hemisphere are significantly larger than those in the left hemisphere, whereas there is no significant difference in the patient group. These results suggest that we may evaluate the disruption in white matter integrity in schizophrenic patients quantitatively by comparing the cross-sectional area of the superior longitudinal fasciculus in the right and left hemispheres.

Yamamoto, Utako; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Kito, Shinsuke; Koga, Yoshihiko

164

Stereotactic disconnection of hypothalamic hamartoma to control seizure and behavior disturbance: case report and literature review.  

PubMed

An 18-year-old boy with refractory epilepsy and aggressiveness associated to a hypothalamic hamartoma was submitted to a stereotactically guided lesion by thermocoagulation. The target was based on magnetic resonance (MR) images merged with computed tomography scan images taken on the day of surgery while patient was on a stereotactic frame. In order to reveal structures not discernible in MR images, the Schaltenbrand digital brain atlas was merged onto the patient's images. Target and trajectory of the depth electrode were chosen based on three-dimensional imaging reconstructions. A surgical plan was devised to disconnect the hypothalamic hamartoma from the hypothalamus, medial forebrain bundle, fasciculus princeps, and dorsal longitudinal fasciculus. Our target was placed at the inferior portion of the posterolateral component of the hamartoma, bordering the normal hypothalamus. The patient evolved with marked lessening of aggressiveness. Seizure frequency was reduced from several seizures per day to less than one tonic-clonic seizure during sleep per month and only two episodes suggestive of partial complex seizures during daytime. These results have remained consistent over a 24-month postoperative follow-up. Functional neuroanatomy of hypothalamic connections involved in seizure propagation and aggressive behavior was reviewed. PMID:18443834

de Almeida, Antonio Nogueira; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Ballester, Gerson; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marino, Raul

2008-07-01

165

Complete bilateral horizontal gaze paralysis disclosing multiple sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Two women presented with bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia evolving in a few days to complete bilateral horizontal gaze paralysis. Convergence and vertical eye movements were normal. Cerebral MRI showed a few small white matter lesions in the lateral ventricle regions, and, at the brainstem level, a single, small, bilateral lesion affecting the posterior part of the medial pontine tegmentum and responsible for the clinical syndrome. The condition gradually improved in both patients, following a similar progression as at the onset: improvement first involved the adduction movements in both eyes, whereas bilateral abduction paresis still persisted for a few weeks, before complete recovery of eye movements. Bilateral damage to the medial longitudinal fasciculus and subsequent lateral extent of damage to the region of the two abducens emerging fibres may explain the clinical findings. In both cases, the cause was probably multiple sclerosis.?? PMID:11160480

Milea, D; Napolitano, M; Dechy, H; Le Hoang, P; Delattre, J; Pierrot-Deseillig..., C

2001-01-01

166

Projections from the rostral mesencephalic reticular formation to the spinal cord - An HRP and autoradiographical tracing study in the cat  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Horseradish peroxidase was injected, or implanted unilaterally, into various levels of the spinal cord of anesthetized cats, to trace the distribution of projections to the spinal cord, of neurons in Field H of Forel, including the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (riMLF), and the interstitial nucleus of Cajal with adjacent reticular formation (INC-RF). Results indicate that, unlike the neurons projecting to the extraocular muscle motoneurons, the major portion of the spinally projecting neurons are not located in the riMLF or INC proper, but in adjacent areas, i.e., the ventral and lateral parts of the caudal third of the Field H of Forel and in the INC-RF. Neurons in caudal Field H of Forel, project, via the ventral part of the ventral funicululs, to the lateral part of the upper cervical ventral horn.

Holstege, G.; Cowie, R. J.

1989-01-01

167

ADAPTIVE CUTS FOR EXTRACTING SPECIFIC WHITE MATTER TRACTS  

PubMed Central

Extracting specific white matter tracts (e.g., uncinate fasciculus) from whole brain tractography has numerous applications in studying individual differences in white matter. Typically specific tracts are extracted manually, following replicable protocols which can be prohibitively expensive for large scale studies. A tract clustering framework is a suitable computational framework but from a neuroanatomical point of view, one of the key challenges is that it is very hard to design a universal similarity function for different types of white matter tracts (e.g., projection, association, commissural tracts). In this paper, we propose an adaptive cuts framework in which, using normalized cuts motivated objective function, we adaptively learn tract-tract similarity for each specific tract class using atlas based training data. Using the learnt similarity function we train an ensemble of binary support vector machines to extract specific tracts from unlabeled whole-brain tractography sets. PMID:24163723

Adluru, Nagesh; Singh, Vikas; Alexander, Andrew L.

2013-01-01

168

Patterns of dissociate torsional-vertical nystagmus in internuclear ophthalmoplegia.  

PubMed

To explore the patterns and mechanisms of jerky seesaw nystagmus in internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO), we analyzed the nystagmus patterns in 33 patients with dissociated torsional-vertical nystagmus and INO. In 11 (33%) patients, the nystagmus was ipsiversive torsional in both eyes with vertical components in the opposite directions. In contrast, 18 (55%) patients showed ipsiversive torsional nystagmus with a larger upbeat component in the contralesional eye. Four (12%) patients exhibited ipsiversive torsional nystagmus with a greater downbeat component in the ipsilesional eye. At least one component of contraversive ocular tilt reaction was associated in most patients (30/33, 91%). The patterns of jerky seesaw nystagmus in INO suggest a disruption of neural pathways from the contralateral vertical semicircular canals with or without concomitant damage to the fibers from the contralateral utricle in or near the medial longitudinal fasciculus. PMID:21951004

Jeong, Seong-Hae; Kim, Eung Kyu; Lee, Jun; Choi, Kwang-Dong; Kim, Ji Soo

2011-09-01

169

An Anatomical Variation of the Lesser Occipital Nerve in the "Carefree part" of the Posterior Triangle.  

PubMed

The occurrence of the lesser occipital nerve (LON) at an anomalous location in the "carefree part" within the posterior triangle has been seldom reported in the literature. We are reporting a rare case of location of the LON in the "carefree part" of the posterior triangle, in a 55-year-old formalin embalmed male cadaver. LON, after emerging from the posterior margin of the sternomastoid muscle (SM), ran obliquely towards the trapezius muscle. Here, it hooked around the unusual separated muscle fasciculus of the trapezius, 7.5 cm below the superior nuchal line. Further, LON gave contributions to spinal accessory nerve (SAN); one deep into the SM and another one in the posterior triangle. The knowledge on the unusual location and course of the LON and its contribution to the SAN is significantly important while an anaesthetic blockade is being performed for the management of a cervicogenic headache and a super selective radical neck dissection. PMID:24959430

Ravindra S, Swamy; Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Nayak, Satheesha B; Rao Kg, Mohandas; Patil, Jyothsna

2014-04-01

170

Social cognition and the anterior temporal lobes: a review and theoretical framework  

PubMed Central

Memory for people and their relationships, along with memory for social language and social behaviors, constitutes a specific type of semantic memory termed social knowledge. This review focuses on how and where social knowledge is represented in the brain. We propose that portions of the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) play a critical role in representing and retrieving social knowledge. This includes memory about people, their names and biographies and more abstract forms of social memory such as memory for traits and social concepts. This hypothesis is based on the convergence of several lines of research including anatomical findings, lesion evidence from both humans and non-human primates and neuroimaging evidence. Moreover, the ATL is closely interconnected with cortical nuclei of the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex via the uncinate fasciculus. We propose that this pattern of connectivity underlies the function of the ATL in encoding and storing emotionally tagged knowledge that is used to guide orbitofrontal-based decision processes. PMID:23051902

McCoy, David; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Ross, Lars A.

2013-01-01

171

White Matter Abnormalities Correlating with Memory and Depression in Heroin Users under Methadone Maintenance Treatment  

PubMed Central

Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has elevated rates of co-morbid memory deficit and depression that are associated with higher relapse rates for substance abuse. White matter (WM) disruption in MMT patients have been reported but their impact on these co-morbidities is unknown. This study aimed to investigate changes in WM integrity of MMT subjects using diffusion tensor image (DTI), and their relationship with history of heroin and methadone use in treated opiate-dependent individuals. The association between WM integrity changes from direct group comparisons and the severity of memory deficit and depression was also investigated. Differences in WM integrity between 35 MMT patients and 23 healthy controls were evaluated using DTI with tract-based spatial statistical analysis. Differences in DTI indices correlated with diminished memory function, Beck Depression Inventory, duration of heroin use and MMT, and dose of heroin and methadone administration. Changes in WM integrity were found in several WM regions, including the temporal and frontal lobes, pons, cerebellum, and cingulum bundles. The duration of MMT was associated with declining DTI indices in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and para-hippocampus. MMT patients had more memory and emotional deficits than healthy subjects. Worse scores in both depression and memory functions were associated with altered WM integrity in the superior longitudinal fasciculus, para-hippocampus, and middle cerebellar peduncle in MMT. Patients on MMT also had significant WM differences in the reward circuit and in depression- and memory-associated regions. Correlations among decreased DTI indices, disease severity, and accumulation effects of methadone suggest that WM alterations may be involved in the psychopathology and pathophysiology of co-morbidities in MMT. PMID:22496768

Lin, Wei-Che; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Chien-Chih; Huang, Chu-Chung; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Wang, Ya-Ling; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Lin, Ching-Po

2012-01-01

172

White matter tractography in early psychosis: clinical and neurocognitive associations  

PubMed Central

Background While many diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) investigations have noted disruptions to white matter integrity in individuals with chronic psychotic disorders, fewer studies have been conducted in young people at the early stages of disease onset. Using whole tract reconstruction techniques, the aim of this study was to identify the white matter pathology associated with the common clinical symptoms and executive function impairments observed in young people with psychosis. Methods We obtained MRI scans from young people with psychosis and healthy controls. Eighteen major white matter tracts were reconstructed to determine group differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) and then were subsequently correlated with symptomatology and neurocognitive performance. Results Our study included 42 young people with psychosis (mean age 23 yr) and 45 healthy controls (mean age 25 yr). Compared with the control group, the psychosis group had reduced FA and AD in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and forceps major indicative of axonal disorganization, reduction and/or loss. These changes were associated with worse overall psychiatric symptom severity, increases in positive and negative symptoms, and worse current levels of depression. The psychosis group also showed FA reductions in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus that were associated with impaired neurocognitive performance in attention and semantic fluency. Limitations Our analysis grouped 4 subcategories of psychosis together, and a larger follow-up study comparing affective and nonaffective psychoses is warranted. Conclusion Our findings suggest that impaired axonal coherence in the left ILF and forceps major underpin psychiatric symptoms in young people in the early stages of psychosis. PMID:25111788

Hatton, Sean N.; Lagopoulos, Jim; Hermens, Daniel F.; Hickie, Ian B.; Scott, Elizabeth; Bennett, Maxwell R.

2014-01-01

173

Sentence processing and verbal working memory in a white-matter-disconnection patient.  

PubMed

The Arcuate Fasciculus/Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus (AF/SLF) is the white-matter bundle that connects posterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortex. Its causal functional role in sentence processing and verbal working memory is currently under debate. While impairments of sentence processing and verbal working memory often co-occur in patients suffering from AF/SLF damage, it is unclear whether these impairments result from shared white-matter damage to the verbal-working-memory network. The present study sought to specify the behavioral consequences of focal AF/SLF damage for sentence processing and verbal working memory, which were assessed in a single patient suffering from a cleft-like lesion spanning the deep left superior temporal gyrus, sparing most surrounding gray matter. While tractography suggests that the ventral fronto-temporal white-matter bundle is intact in this patient, the AF/SLF was not visible to tractography. In line with the hypothesis that the AF/SLF is causally involved in sentence processing, the patient?s performance was selectively impaired on sentences that jointly involve both complex word orders and long word-storage intervals. However, the patient was unimpaired on sentences that only involved long word-storage intervals without involving complex word orders. On the contrary, the patient performed generally worse than a control group across standard verbal-working-memory tests. We conclude that the AF/SLF not only plays a causal role in sentence processing, linking regions of the left dorsal inferior frontal gyrus to the temporo-parietal region, but moreover plays a crucial role in verbal working memory, linking regions of the left ventral inferior frontal gyrus to the left temporo-parietal region. Together, the specific sentence-processing impairment and the more general verbal-working-memory impairment may imply that the AF/SLF subserves both sentence processing and verbal working memory, possibly pointing to the AF and SLF respectively supporting each. PMID:24953959

Meyer, Lars; Cunitz, Katrin; Obleser, Jonas; Friederici, Angela D

2014-08-01

174

Decreased white matter integrity in late-myelinating fiber pathways in Alzheimer's disease supports retrogenesis.  

PubMed

The retrogenesis model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) posits that white matter (WM) degeneration follows a pattern that is the reverse of myelogenesis. Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to test this model, we predicted greater loss of microstructural integrity in late-myelinating WM fiber pathways in AD patients than in healthy older adults, whereas differences in early-myelinating WM fiber pathways were not expected. We compared 16 AD patients and 14 demographically-matched healthy older adults with a whole-brain approach via tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS), and a region of interest (ROI) approach targeting early-myelinating (posterior limb of internal capsule, cerebral peduncles) and late-myelinating (inferior longitudinal fasciculus [ILF], superior longitudinal fasciculus [SLF]) fiber pathways. Permutation-based voxelwise analysis supported the retrogenesis model. There was significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in AD patients compared to healthy older adults in late-myelinating but not early-myelinating pathways. These group differences appeared to be driven by loss of myelin integrity based on our finding of greater radial diffusion in AD than in healthy elderly. ROI analyses were generally in agreement with whole-brain findings, with significantly lower FA and increased radial diffusion in the ILF in the AD group. Consistent with the retrogenesis model, AD patients showed demonstrable changes in late-myelinating WM fiber pathways. Given greater change in the ILF than the SLF, wallerian degeneration secondary to cortical atrophy may also be a contributing mechanism. Knowledge of the pattern of WM microstructural changes in AD and its underlying mechanisms may contribute to earlier detection and intervention in at-risk groups. PMID:19100839

Stricker, N H; Schweinsburg, B C; Delano-Wood, L; Wierenga, C E; Bangen, K J; Haaland, K Y; Frank, L R; Salmon, D P; Bondi, M W

2009-03-01

175

The architecture of the chess player's brain.  

PubMed

The game of chess can be seen as a typical example for an expertise task requiring domain-specific training and experience. Despite intensive behavioural studies the neural underpinnings of chess performance and expertise are not entirely understood. A few functional neuroimaging studies have shown that expert chess players recruit different psychological functions and activate different brain areas while they are engaged in chess-related activities. Based on this functional literature, we predicted to find morphological differences in a network comprised by parietal and frontal areas and especially the occipito-temporal junction (OTJ), fusiform gyrus, and caudate nucleus. Twenty expert chess players and 20 control subjects were investigated using voxel-based and surface-based morphometry as well as diffusion tensor imaging. Grey matter volume and cortical thickness were reduced in chess players compared with those of control men in the OTJ and precunei. The volumes of both caudate nuclei were not different between groups, but correlated inversely with the years of chess playing experience. Mean diffusivity was increased in chess players compared with that of controls in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus and the Elo score (a chess tournament ranking) was inversely related to mean diffusivity within the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. To the best of our knowledge we showed for the first time that there are specific differences in grey and white matter morphology between chess players and control subjects in brain regions associated with cognitive functions important for playing chess. Whether these anatomical alterations are the cause or consequence of the intensive and long-term chess training and practice remains to be shown in future studies. PMID:25065494

Hänggi, Jürgen; Brütsch, Karin; Siegel, Adrian M; Jäncke, Lutz

2014-09-01

176

Sensory-to-motor integration during auditory repetition: a combined fMRI and lesion study.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper was to investigate the neurological underpinnings of auditory-to-motor translation during auditory repetition of unfamiliar pseudowords. We tested two different hypotheses. First we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 25 healthy subjects to determine whether a functionally defined area in the left temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), referred to as Sylvian-parietal-temporal region (Spt), reflected the demands on auditory-to-motor integration during the repetition of pseudowords relative to a semantically mediated nonverbal sound-naming task. The experiment also allowed us to test alternative accounts of Spt function, namely that Spt is involved in subvocal articulation or auditory processing that can be driven either bottom-up or top-down. The results did not provide convincing evidence that activation increased in either Spt or any other cortical area when non-semantic auditory inputs were being translated into motor outputs. Instead, the results were most consistent with Spt responding to bottom up or top down auditory processing, independent of the demands on auditory-to-motor integration. Second, we investigated the lesion sites in eight patients who had selective difficulties repeating heard words but with preserved word comprehension, picture naming and verbal fluency (i.e., conduction aphasia). All eight patients had white-matter tract damage in the vicinity of the arcuate fasciculus and only one of the eight patients had additional damage to the Spt region, defined functionally in our fMRI data. Our results are therefore most consistent with the neurological tradition that emphasizes the importance of the arcuate fasciculus in the non-semantic integration of auditory and motor speech processing. PMID:24550807

Parker Jones, '?iwi; Prejawa, Susan; Hope, Thomas M H; Oberhuber, Marion; Seghier, Mohamed L; Leff, Alex P; Green, David W; Price, Cathy J

2014-01-01

177

White matter pathway supporting phonological encoding in speech production: a multi-modal imaging study of brain damage patients.  

PubMed

In speech production, an important step before motor programming is the retrieval and encoding of the phonological elements of target words. It has been proposed that phonological encoding is supported by multiple regions in the left frontal, temporal and parietal regions and their underlying white matter, especially the left arcuate fasciculus (AF) or superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). It is unclear, however, whether the effects of AF/SLF are indeed related to phonological encoding for output and whether there are other white matter tracts that also contribute to this process. We comprehensively investigated the anatomical connectivity supporting phonological encoding in production by studying the relationship between the integrity of all major white matter tracts across the entire brain and phonological encoding deficits in a group of 69 patients with brain damage. The integrity of each white matter tract was measured both by the percentage of damaged voxels (structural imaging) and the mean fractional anisotropy value (diffusion tensor imaging). The phonological encoding deficits were assessed by various measures in two oral production tasks that involve phonological encoding: the percentage of nonword (phonological) errors in oral picture naming and the accuracy of word reading aloud with word comprehension ability regressed out. We found that the integrity of the left SLF in both the structural and diffusion tensor imaging measures consistently predicted the severity of phonological encoding impairment in the two phonological production tasks. Such effects of the left SLF on phonological production remained significant when a range of potential confounding factors were considered through partial correlation, including total lesion volume, demographic factors, lesions on phonological-relevant grey matter regions, or effects originating from the phonological perception or semantic processes. Our results therefore conclusively demonstrate the central role of the left SLF in phonological encoding in speech production. PMID:25359657

Han, Zaizhu; Ma, Yujun; Gong, Gaolang; Huang, Ruiwang; Song, Luping; Bi, Yanchao

2014-10-31

178

Brain changes within the visuo-spatial attentional network in posterior cortical atrophy.  

PubMed

Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is characterized by basic visual and high order visual-spatial dysfunctions. In this study, we investigated long-distance deafferentation processes within the frontal-parietal-occipital network in ten PCA patients using a MRI-PET combined approach. Objective voxel-based [18F]FDG-PET imaging measured metabolic changes in single patients. Comprehensive investigation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics and grey-matter density with voxel-based morphometry were obtained in a subgroup of 6 patients. Fractional anisotropy in the superior longitudinal fasciculus correlated with the PET metabolic changes within the inferior parietal and frontal eye field regions. [18F]FDG-PET analysis showed in each PCA case the typical bilateral hypometabolic pattern, involving posterior temporal, parietal, and occipital cortex, with additional hypometabolic foci in the frontal eye fields. Voxel-based morphometry showed right-sided atrophy in the parieto-occipital cortex, as well as a limited temporal involvement. DTI revealed extensive degeneration of the major anterior-posterior connecting fiber bundles and of commissural frontal lobe tracts. Microstructural measures in the superior longitudinal fasciculus were correlated with the PET metabolic changes within the inferior parietal and frontal eye field regions. Our results confirmed the predominant occipital-temporal and occipital-parietal degeneration in PCA patients. [18F]FDG-PET and DTI-MRI combined approaches revealed neurodegeneration effects well beyond the classical posterior cortical involvement, most likely as a consequence of deafferentation processes within the occipital-parietal-frontal network that could be at the basis of visuo-perceptual, visuo-spatial integration and attention deficits in PCA. PMID:25114070

Cerami, Chiara; Crespi, Chiara; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Dodich, Alessandra; Marcone, Alessandra; Magnani, Giuseppe; Coppi, Elisabetta; Falini, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F; Perani, Daniela

2015-01-01

179

The relation between structural and functional connectivity depends on age and on task goals  

PubMed Central

The last decade has seen an increase in neuroimaging studies examining structural (i.e., structural integrity of white matter tracts) and functional connectivity (e.g., correlations in neural activity throughout the brain). Although structural and functional connectivity changes have often been measured independently, examining the relation between these two measures is critical to understanding the specific function of neural networks and the ways they may differ across tasks and individuals. The current study addressed this question by examining the effect of age (treated as a continuous variable) and emotional valence on the relation between functional and structural connectivity. As prior studies have suggested that prefrontal regions may guide and regulate emotional memory search via functional connections with the amygdala, the current analysis focused on functional connectivity between the left amygdala and the left prefrontal cortex, and structural integrity of the uncinate fasciculus, a white matter tract connecting prefrontal and temporal regions. Participants took part in a scanned retrieval task in which they recalled positive, negative, and neutral images associated with neutral titles. Aging was associated with a significant increase in the relation between measures of structural integrity (specifically, fractional anisotropy, or FA) along the uncinate fasciculus and functional connectivity between the left ventral prefrontal cortex and amygdala during positive event retrieval, but not negative or neutral retrieval. Notably, during negative event retrieval, age was linked to stronger structure-function relations between the amygdala and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, such that increased structural integrity predicted stronger negative functional connectivity in older adults only. These findings suggest that young and older adults may utilize a structural pathway to engage different retrieval and regulatory strategies, even when structural integrity along that pathway does not differ. PMID:24904351

Ford, Jaclyn H.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

2014-01-01

180

Frontotemporal neural systems supporting semantic processing in Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

We hypothesized that semantic memory for object concepts involves both representations of visual feature knowledge in modality-specific association cortex and heteromodal regions that are important for integrating and organizing this semantic knowledge so that it can be used in a flexible, contextually appropriate manner. We examined this hypothesis in an fMRI study of mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Participants were presented with pairs of printed words and asked whether the words matched on a given visual-perceptual feature (e.g., guitar, violin: SHAPE). The stimuli probed natural kinds and manufactured objects, and the judgments involved shape or color. We found activation of bilateral ventral temporal cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during semantic judgments, with AD patients showing less activation of these regions than healthy seniors. Moreover, AD patients showed less ventral temporal activation than did healthy seniors for manufactured objects, but not for natural kinds. We also used diffusion-weighted MRI of white matter to examine fractional anisotropy (FA). Patients with AD showed significantly reduced FA in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus, which carry projections linking temporal and frontal regions of this semantic network. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that semantic memory is supported in part by a large-scale neural network involving modality-specific association cortex, heteromodal association cortex, and projections between these regions. The semantic deficit in AD thus arises from gray matter disease that affects the representation of feature knowledge and processing its content, as well as white matter disease that interrupts the integrated functioning of this large-scale network. PMID:24425352

Peelle, Jonathan E; Powers, John; Cook, Philip A; Smith, Edward E; Grossman, Murray

2014-03-01

181

Reduced fractional anisotropy in the visual limbic pathway of young adults witnessing domestic violence in childhood.  

PubMed

Witnessing domestic violence (WDV) is a traumatic childhood experience associated with increased risk for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder and reduced IQ scores. Specific affects of WDV on brain development have not been assessed. We sought to ascertain whether WDV was associated with abnormalities in white matter (WM) tract integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty subjects who witnessed domestic violence (16F/4M, mean age 22.4 ± 2.48 years) but were not physically or sexually abused were compared to 27 healthy controls (19F/8M, 21.9 ± 1.97 years) without exposure to trauma or Axis I and II disorders. DTI images were acquired with a 3T Siemens Trio scanner. Group differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), covaried by age, gender, parental education, perceived financial sufficiency, IQ and degree of exposure to parental verbal aggression were assessed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS), which projects FA values onto an alignment-invariant fiber tract representation. FA values in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus of left lateral occipital lobe were significantly lower (P<0.05 corrected for multiple comparison) in the WDV group. FA values correlated inversely with ratings of depression, anxiety, somatization, 'limbic irritability' and neuropsychological measures of processing speed. Measures of radial but not axial diffusivity were affected suggesting alterations in myelination. Degree of FA reduction was associated with duration of witnessing interparental verbal aggression and with exposure between ages 7 and 13 years. The inferior longitudinal fasciculus connects occipital and temporal cortex and is the main component of the visual-limbic pathway that subserves emotional, learning and memory functions that are modality specific to vision. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to childhood maltreatment is associated with alterations in fiber pathways that convey the adverse experience to frontal, temporal or limbic regions. PMID:21985907

Choi, Jeewook; Jeong, Bumseok; Polcari, Ann; Rohan, Michael L; Teicher, Martin H

2012-01-16

182

White matter fiber compromise contributes differentially to attention and emotion processing impairment in alcoholism, HIV-infection, and their comorbidity  

PubMed Central

Alcoholism (ALC) and HIV-1 infection (HIV) each affects emotional and attentional processes and integrity of brain white matter fibers likely contributing to functional compromise. The highly prevalent ALC+HIV comorbidity may exacerbate compromise. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and an emotional Stroop Match-to-Sample task in 19 ALC, 16 HIV, 15 ALC+HIV, and 15 control participants to investigate whether disruption of fiber system integrity accounts for compromised attentional and emotional processing. The task required matching a cue color to that of an emotional word with faces appearing between the color cue and the Stroop word in half of the trials. Nonmatched cue-word color pairs assessed selective attention, and face-word pairs assessed emotion. Relative to controls, DTI-based fiber tracking revealed lower inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ilf) integrity in HIV and ALC+HIV and lower uncinate fasciculus (uf) integrity in all three patient groups. Controls exhibited Stroop effects to positive face-word emotion, and greater interference was related to greater callosal, cingulum and ilf integrity. By contrast, HIV showed greater interference from negative Stroop words during color-nonmatch trials, correlating with greater uf compromise. For face trials, ALC and ALC+HIV showed greater Stroop-word interference, correlating with lower cingulate and callosal integrity. Thus, in HIV, conflict resolution was diminished when challenging conditions usurped resources needed to manage interference from negative emotion and to disengage attention from wrongly cued colors (nonmatch). In ALC and ALC+HIV, poorer callosal integrity was related to enhanced emotional interference suggesting curtailed interhemispheric exchange needed between preferentially right-hemispheric emotion and left-hemispheric Stroop-word functions. PMID:22960416

Schulte, T.; Müller-Oehring, E.M.; Sullivan, E.V.; Pfefferbaum, A.

2012-01-01

183

Sensory-to-motor integration during auditory repetition: a combined fMRI and lesion study  

PubMed Central

The aim of this paper was to investigate the neurological underpinnings of auditory-to-motor translation during auditory repetition of unfamiliar pseudowords. We tested two different hypotheses. First we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 25 healthy subjects to determine whether a functionally defined area in the left temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), referred to as Sylvian-parietal-temporal region (Spt), reflected the demands on auditory-to-motor integration during the repetition of pseudowords relative to a semantically mediated nonverbal sound-naming task. The experiment also allowed us to test alternative accounts of Spt function, namely that Spt is involved in subvocal articulation or auditory processing that can be driven either bottom-up or top-down. The results did not provide convincing evidence that activation increased in either Spt or any other cortical area when non-semantic auditory inputs were being translated into motor outputs. Instead, the results were most consistent with Spt responding to bottom up or top down auditory processing, independent of the demands on auditory-to-motor integration. Second, we investigated the lesion sites in eight patients who had selective difficulties repeating heard words but with preserved word comprehension, picture naming and verbal fluency (i.e., conduction aphasia). All eight patients had white-matter tract damage in the vicinity of the arcuate fasciculus and only one of the eight patients had additional damage to the Spt region, defined functionally in our fMRI data. Our results are therefore most consistent with the neurological tradition that emphasizes the importance of the arcuate fasciculus in the non-semantic integration of auditory and motor speech processing. PMID:24550807

Parker Jones, ‘?iwi; Prejawa, Susan; Hope, Thomas M. H.; Oberhuber, Marion; Seghier, Mohamed L.; Leff, Alex P.; Green, David W.; Price, Cathy J.

2014-01-01

184

Relating brain anatomy and cognitive ability using a multivariate multimodal framework  

PubMed Central

Linking structural neuroimaging data from multiple modalities to cognitive performance is an important challenge for cognitive neuroscience. In this study we examined the relationship between verbal fluency performance and neuroanatomy in 54 patients with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) and 15 age-matched controls, all of whom had T1- and diffusion-weighted imaging. Our goal was to incorporate measures of both gray matter (voxel-based cortical thickness) and white matter (fractional anisotropy) into a single statistical model that relates to behavioral performance. We first used eigenanatomy to define data-driven regions of interest (DD-ROIs) for both gray matter and white matter. Eigenanatomy is a multivariate dimensionality reduction approach that identifies spatially smooth, unsigned principal components that explain the maximal amount of variance across subjects. We then used a statistical model selection procedure to see which of these DD-ROIs best modeled performance on verbal fluency tasks hypothesized to rely on distinct components of a large-scale neural network that support language: category fluency requires a semantic-guided search and is hypothesized to rely primarily on temporal cortices that support lexical-semantic representations; letter-guided fluency requires a strategic mental search and is hypothesized to require executive resources to support a more demanding search process, which depends on prefrontal cortex in addition to temporal network components that support lexical representations. We observed that both types of verbal fluency performance are best described by a network that includes a combination of gray matter and white matter. For category fluency, the identified regions included bilateral temporal cortex and a white matter region including left inferior longitudinal fasciculus and frontal–occipital fasciculus. For letter fluency, a left temporal lobe region was also selected, and also regions of frontal cortex. These results are consistent with our hypothesized neuroanatomical models of language processing and its breakdown in FTD. We conclude that clustering the data with eigenanatomy before performing linear regression is a promising tool for multimodal data analysis. PMID:24830834

Cook, Philip A.; McMillan, Corey T.; Avants, Brian B.; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Gee, James C.; Grossman, Murray

2014-01-01

185

Gray-white matter and cerebrospinal fluid volume differences in children with Specific Language Impairment and/or Reading Disability.  

PubMed

We studied gray-white matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alterations that may be critical for language, through an optimized voxel-based morphometry evaluation in children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI), compared to Typical Language Development (TLD). Ten children with SLI (8;5-10;9) and 14 children with TLD (8;2-11;8) participated. They received a comprehensive language and reading test battery. We also analyzed a subgroup of six children with SLI+RD (Reading Disability). Brain images from 3-Tesla MRIs were analyzed with intelligence, age, gender, and total intracranial volume as covariates. Children with SLI or SLI+RD exhibited a significant lower overall gray matter volume than children with TLD. Particularly, children with SLI showed a significantly lower volume of gray matter compared to children with TLD in the right postcentral parietal gyrus (BA4), and left and right medial occipital gyri (BA19). The group with SLI also exhibited a significantly greater volume of gray matter in the right superior occipital gyrus (BA19), which may reflect a brain reorganization to compensate for their lower volumes at medial occipital gyri. Children with SLI+RD, compared to children with TLD, showed a significantly lower volume of: (a) gray matter in the right postcentral parietal gyrus; and (b) white matter in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (RILF), which interconnects the temporal and occipital lobes. Children with TLD exhibited a significantly lower CSF volume than children with SLI and children with SLI+RD respectively, who had somewhat smaller volumes of gray matter allowing for more CSF volume. The significant lower gray matter volume at the right postcentral parietal gyrus and greater cerebrospinal fluid volume may prove to be unique markers for SLI. We discuss the association of poor knowledge/visual representations and language input to brain development. Our comorbid study showed that a significant lower volume of white matter in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus may be unique to children with SLI and Reading Disability. It was significantly associated to reading comprehension of sentences and receptive language composite z-score, especially receptive vocabulary and oral comprehension of stories. PMID:24418156

Girbau-Massana, Dolors; Garcia-Marti, Gracian; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Schwartz, Richard G

2014-04-01

186

Descending projections of Forel's field H neurones to the brain stem and the upper cervical spinal cord in the cat.  

PubMed

1. Descending projections from Forel's field H (FFH) to the brain stem and upper cervical spinal cord were studied in cats. 2. Following implantation of HRP pellets into the spinal gray matter (C1-C3) or in the ponto-medullary reticular formation, the nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis (NRPC) or in the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRG), numerous neurones were retrogradely labelled in FFH on the ipsilateral side. In the former cases, the sizes of labelled neurones were medium-large (20-40 microns in diameter) while both small and medium-large neurones were labelled in the latter cases. 3. The lowest levels of spinal projection of single FFH neurones (n = 70) were assessed by antidromic spikes elicited by stimulating electrodes placed in C1, C3 and C7. The majority (59%) projected to C1 (but not to C3), about 27% to C3 (but not to C7), and only 14% to C7. 4. Axonal trajectories of single FFH neurones in C1-C3 segments were investigated by antidromic threshold mapping methods. The stem axons of spinal-projecting FFH neurones descended in the ventral or in the ventrolateral funiculi and the collaterals were projected to neck motor nuclei (lamina IX, Rexed 1954) and laminae V-VIII. The conduction velocities were estimated as 8-37 m/s from the antidromic latencies. 5. Axonal trajectories of 7 FFH neurones were investigated in the ponto-medullary reticular formation. All were antidromically activated from C1. In six neurones, the stem axons were located in the ventral part of the central tegmental tract and collaterals were projected to the NRPC and/or the NRG. Some of them projected to the inferior olive and the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi as well. The stem axon, in the remaining cell, was in the most dorso-medial part of the medial longitudinal fasciculus and collaterals were projected mainly to the dorsal part of the NRPC and the NRG, and also to the medial vestibular nucleus. 6. Anterograde transport of WGA-HRP injected into FFH revealed that in the upper cervical spinal cord, stem axons were found in the ventral funiculus and ventral part of the lateral funiculus. Collateral projections and presumed bouton-like deposits were observed in the laminae VI-IX, especially in their medial part. In the brain stem, dense bundles of the descending fibres were found in the central and the medial tegmental tracts and in the medial longitudinal fasciculus. FFH neurones projected densely to the caudal half of the NRPC and to the rostral half of the NRG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1375165

Isa, T; Sasaki, S

1992-01-01

187

Alzheimer's disease susceptibility genes APOE and TOMM40, and brain white matter integrity in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936?  

PubMed Central

Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ? genotype has previously been significantly associated with cognitive, brain imaging, and Alzheimer's disease-related phenotypes (e.g., age of onset). In the TOMM40 gene, the rs10524523 (“523”) variable length poly-T repeat polymorphism has more recently been associated with similar ph/enotypes, although the allelic directions of these associations have varied between initial reports. Using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging tractography, the present study aimed to investigate whether there are independent effects of apolipoprotein E (APOE) and TOMM40 genotypes on human brain white matter integrity in a community-dwelling sample of older adults, the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (mean age = 72.70 years, standard deviation = 0.74, N approximately = 640–650; for most analyses). Some nominally significant effects were observed (i.e., covariate-adjusted differences between genotype groups at p < 0.05). For APOE, deleterious effects of ?4 “risk” allele presence (vs. absence) were found in the right ventral cingulum and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. To test for biologically independent effects of the TOMM40 523 repeat, participants were stratified into APOE genotype subgroups, so that any significant effects could not be attributed to APOE variation. In participants with the APOE ?3/?4 genotype, effects of TOMM40 523 status were found in the left uncinate fasciculus, left rostral cingulum, left ventral cingulum, and a general factor of white matter integrity. In all 4 of these tractography measures, carriers of the TOMM40 523 “short” allele showed lower white matter integrity when compared with carriers of the “long” and “very-long” alleles. Most of these effects survived correction for childhood intelligence test scores and vascular disease history, though only the effect of TOMM40 523 on the left ventral cingulum integrity survived correction for false discovery rate. The effects of APOE in this older population are more specific and restricted compared with those reported in previous studies, and the effects of TOMM40 on white matter integrity appear to be novel, although replication is required in large independent samples. PMID:24508314

Lyall, Donald M.; Harris, Sarah E.; Bastin, Mark E.; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Murray, Catherine; Lutz, Michael W.; Saunders, Ann M.; Roses, Allen D.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Royle, Natalie A.; Starr, John M.; Porteous, David. J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

2014-01-01

188

Relating brain anatomy and cognitive ability using a multivariate multimodal framework.  

PubMed

Linking structural neuroimaging data from multiple modalities to cognitive performance is an important challenge for cognitive neuroscience. In this study we examined the relationship between verbal fluency performance and neuroanatomy in 54 patients with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) and 15 age-matched controls, all of whom had T1- and diffusion-weighted imaging. Our goal was to incorporate measures of both gray matter (voxel-based cortical thickness) and white matter (fractional anisotropy) into a single statistical model that relates to behavioral performance. We first used eigenanatomy to define data-driven regions of interest (DD-ROIs) for both gray matter and white matter. Eigenanatomy is a multivariate dimensionality reduction approach that identifies spatially smooth, unsigned principal components that explain the maximal amount of variance across subjects. We then used a statistical model selection procedure to see which of these DD-ROIs best modeled performance on verbal fluency tasks hypothesized to rely on distinct components of a large-scale neural network that support language: category fluency requires a semantic-guided search and is hypothesized to rely primarily on temporal cortices that support lexical-semantic representations; letter-guided fluency requires a strategic mental search and is hypothesized to require executive resources to support a more demanding search process, which depends on prefrontal cortex in addition to temporal network components that support lexical representations. We observed that both types of verbal fluency performance are best described by a network that includes a combination of gray matter and white matter. For category fluency, the identified regions included bilateral temporal cortex and a white matter region including left inferior longitudinal fasciculus and frontal-occipital fasciculus. For letter fluency, a left temporal lobe region was also selected, and also regions of frontal cortex. These results are consistent with our hypothesized neuroanatomical models of language processing and its breakdown in FTD. We conclude that clustering the data with eigenanatomy before performing linear regression is a promising tool for multimodal data analysis. PMID:24830834

Cook, Philip A; McMillan, Corey T; Avants, Brian B; Peelle, Jonathan E; Gee, James C; Grossman, Murray

2014-10-01

189

White matter microstructure is associated with cognitive control in children  

PubMed Central

Cognitive control, which involves the ability to pay attention and suppress interference, is important for learning and achievement during childhood. The white matter tracts related to control during childhood are not well known. We examined the relationship between white matter microstructure and cognitive control in 61 children aged 7 to 9 years using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). This technique enables an in vivo characterization of microstructural properties of white matter based on properties of diffusion. Such properties include fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity, measures thought to reflect specific biological properties of white matter integrity. Our results suggest that children with higher estimates of white matter integrity in the corona radiata, superior longitudinal fasciculus, posterior thalamic radiation, and cerebral peduncle, were more accurate during incongruent (>><>>, <<><<) and neutral (-->--, --<--) trials of a task of cognitive control. Importantly, less interference during the task (i.e., incongruent and neutral difference scores) was associated with greater white matter microstructure in the posterior thalamic radiation and cerebral peduncle. Fiber tracts in a frontal-parietal-striatal-motor circuit seem to play a role in cognitive control in children. PMID:23714226

Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Erickson, Kirk I.; Voss, Michelle W.; Powers, John P.; Knecht, Anya M.; Hillman, Charles H.; Kramer, Arthur F.

2013-01-01

190

White matter abnormalities in adolescents with major depressive disorder.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify areas of abnormal white matter microstructure in adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Fractional anisotropy (FA) values representing preferential diffusivity along major tracts were examined using tract-based spatial statistics across the whole brain in adolescents ages 13-19 with MDD (n?=?31) compared with demographically-matched healthy controls (n?=?31). We not only examined frontal lobe tracts that have been most frequently identified as abnormal in previous DTI studies of older depressed patients, but also tested for FA group differences across the whole brain to determine if adolescent depression was related to any other regional white matter abnormality. MDD-diagnosed adolescents had significantly lower FA in many regions concentrated predominantly in the frontal lobe. There also was strong evidence for lower FA in bilateral anterior/posterior limbs of the internal capsules, as well as tracts through the midbrain, left external capsule, right thalamic radiation and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Consistent with previous findings in depressed young and elderly adults, the current study found evidence for abnormal microstructure in white matter connections of the frontal lobe in MDD adolescents. There also was strong evidence for FA abnormalities in corpus callosum genu, internal and external capsule tracts, thalamus and midbrain, notable for both the relative magnitude of these effects and absence from most previous white matter studies of depression. These abnormalities might represent important markers of early life-onset depression. PMID:24242685

Bessette, Katie L; Nave, Andrea M; Caprihan, Arvind; Stevens, Michael C

2014-12-01

191

Cryptic organisation within an apparently irregular rostrocaudal distribution of interneurons in the embryonic zebrafish spinal cord  

SciTech Connect

The molecules and mechanisms involved in patterning the dorsoventral axis of the developing vertebrate spinal cord have been investigated extensively and many are well known. Conversely, knowledge of mechanisms patterning cellular distributions along the rostrocaudal axis is relatively more restricted. Much is known about the rostrocaudal distribution of motoneurons and spinal cord cells derived from neural crest but there is little known about the rostrocaudal patterning of most of the other spinal cord neurons. Here we report data from our analyses of the distribution of dorsal longitudinal ascending (DoLA) interneurons in the developing zebrafish spinal cord. We show that, although apparently distributed irregularly, these cells have cryptic organisation. We present a novel cell-labelling technique that reveals that DoLA interneurons migrate rostrally along the dorsal longitudinal fasciculus of the spinal cord during development. This cell-labelling strategy may be useful for in vivo analysis of factors controlling neuron migration in the central nervous system. Additionally, we show that DoLA interneurons persist in the developing spinal cord for longer than previously reported. These findings illustrate the need to investigate factors and mechanisms that determine 'irregular' patterns of cell distribution, particularly in the central nervous system but also in other tissues of developing embryos.

Wells, Simon, E-mail: simon.wells@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia) [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); The Special Research Centre for the Molecular Genetics of Development, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Conran, John G., E-mail: john.conran@adelaide.edu.au [Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Tamme, Richard, E-mail: rtamme@ttu.ee [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)] [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Gaudin, Arnaud, E-mail: a.gaudin@uq.edu.au [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)] [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Webb, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.webb@worc.ox.ac.uk [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)] [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Lardelli, Michael, E-mail: michael.lardelli@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia) [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); The Special Research Centre for the Molecular Genetics of Development, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

2010-11-15

192

Development of Tectal Connectivity across Metamorphosis in the Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)  

PubMed Central

In the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), the process of metamorphosis culminates in the appearance of new visual and visuomotor behaviors reflective of the emergence of binocular vision and visually-guided prey capture behaviors as the animal transitions to life on land. Using several different neuroanatomical tracers, we examined the substrates that may underlie these behavioral changes by tracing the afferent and efferent connectivity of the midbrain optic tectum across metamorphic development. Intratectal, tectotoral, tectotegmental, tectobulbar, and tecto-thalamic tracts exhibit similar trajectories of neurobiotin fiber label across the developmental span from early larval tadpoles to adults. Developmental variability was apparent primarily in intensity and distribution of cell and puncta label in target nuclei. Combined injections of cholera toxin subunit ? and Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin consistently label cell bodies, puncta, or fiber segments bilaterally in midbrain targets including the pretectal gray, laminar nucleus of the torus semicircularis, and the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Developmentally stable label was observed bilaterally in medullary targets including the medial vestibular nucleus, lateral vestibular nucleus, and reticular gray, and in forebrain targets including the posterior and ventromedial nuclei of the thalamus. The nucleus isthmi, cerebellum, lateral line nuclei, medial septum, ventral striatum, and medial pallium show more developmentally variable patterns of connectivity. Our results suggest that even during larval development, the optic tectum contains substrates for integration of visual with auditory, vestibular, and somatosensory cues, as well as for guidance of motivated behaviors. PMID:21266803

Horowitz, Seth S.; Simmons, Andrea Megela

2011-01-01

193

Dissociable morphometric profiles of the affective and cognitive dimensions of alexithymia.  

PubMed

Alexithymia ("no words for feelings") is a psychological construct that can be divided in a cognitive and affective dimension. The cognitive dimension reflects the ability to identify, verbalize and analyze feelings, whereas the affective dimension reflects the degree to which individuals get aroused by emotional stimuli and their ability to fantasize. These two alexithymia dimensions may differentially put individuals at risk to develop psychopathology. However, their neural correlates have rarely been investigated. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether the cognitive and affective alexithymia dimension are associated with unique anatomical profiles. Structural MRI scans of 57 participants (29 males; mean age: 34) were processed using a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) - Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) approach. Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine the common and specific associations between gray and white matter volume and alexithymia subdimensions. The results revealed that the cognitive dimension was related to lower dorsal anterior cingulate volume. In contrast, the affective alexithymia was associated with lower gray matter volume in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and lower white matter volume in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) near the angular gyrus. No relationship between corpus callosum volume and alexithymia was observed. These results are consistent with the idea that there are two separable neural systems underlying alexithymia. This finding might encourage future research into the link between specific alexithymia subtypes and the development of psychopathology. PMID:24699037

van der Velde, Jorien; van Tol, Marie-José; Goerlich-Dobre, Katharina Sophia; Gromann, Paula M; Swart, Marte; de Haan, Lieuwe; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Krabbendam, Lydia; Aleman, André

2014-05-01

194

Blocking central pathways in the primate motor system using high frequency sinusoidal current.  

PubMed

Electrical stimulation with high frequency (2-10 kHz) sinusoidal currents has previously been shown to produce a transient and complete nerve block in the peripheral nervous system. Modelling and in vitro studies suggest that this is due to a prolonged local depolarization across a broad section of membrane underlying the blocking electrode. Previous work has used cuff electrodes wrapped around the peripheral nerve to deliver the blocking stimulus. We extended this technique to central motor pathways, using a single metal microelectrode to deliver focal sinusoidal currents to the corticospinal tract at the cervical spinal cord in anaesthetized adult baboons. The extent of conduction block was assessed by stimulating a second electrode caudal to the blocking site, and recording the antidromic field potential over contralateral primary motor cortex. The maximal block achieved was 99.6%, similar to previous work in peripheral fibers, and the optimal frequency for blocking was 2 kHz. Block had a rapid onset, being complete as soon as the transient activation associated with the start of the sinusoidal current was over. High frequency block was also successfully applied to the pyramidal tract at the medulla, ascending sensory pathways in the dorsal columns and the descending systems of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. High frequency sinusoidal stimulation produces transient, reversible lesions in specific target locations and could therefore be a useful alternative to permanent tissue transection in some experimental paradigms. It could also help to control or prevent some of the hyperactivity associated with chronic neurological disorders. PMID:25475345

Fisher, Karen M; Jillani, Ngalla E; Oluoch, George O; Baker, Stuart N

2014-12-01

195

DEVELOPMENTAL SEX DIFFERENCES IN THE RELATION OF NEUROANATOMICAL CONNECTIVITY TO INTELLIGENCE  

PubMed Central

Recent neuroimaging research has shown sex-related differences in the relationship between brain structure and cognitive function. Anatomical studies have shown a greater reliance for cognitive function on white matter structure in adult females, and a greater reliance on gray matter structure in adult males. Functional neuroimaging studies have also shown a greater correlation between brain connectivity and cognitive function in females. However, this relationship is not present in young childhood (5 years old) but appears during the developmental period. Here sex differences in structure-function relationships and their developmental trajectory are investigated using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on a large cohort of over 100 normal children ages 5–18. Significant sex-X-IQ interactions on fractional anisotropy (FA), a marker for white matter organization, were seen in the left frontal lobe, in fronto-parietal areas bilaterally, and in the arcuate fasciculus bilaterally, with girls showing positive correlations of FA with IQ, and boys showing a negative correlation. Significant sex-X-IQ-X-age interactions on FA were also seen in the left frontal lobe and in fronto-parietal areas bilaterally, showing a developmental effect. These results strongly corroborate previous findings regarding sex differences in structure-function relationships regarding intelligence. Results also indicate that a naïve interpretation of “more is better” with respect to FA may not be accurate, especially in adult males. PMID:21297966

2011-01-01

196

A Brain Centred View of Psychiatric Comorbidity in Tinnitus: From Otology to Hodology  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Comorbid psychiatric disorders are frequent among patients affected by tinnitus. There are mutual clinical influences between tinnitus and psychiatric disorders, as well as neurobiological relations based on partially overlapping hodological and neuroplastic phenomena. The aim of the present paper is to review the evidence of alterations in brain networks underlying tinnitus physiopathology and to discuss them in light of the current knowledge of the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders. Methods. Relevant literature was identified through a search on Medline and PubMed; search terms included tinnitus, brain, plasticity, cortex, network, and pathways. Results. Tinnitus phenomenon results from systemic-neurootological triggers followed by neuronal remapping within several auditory and nonauditory pathways. Plastic reorganization and white matter alterations within limbic system, arcuate fasciculus, insula, salience network, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, auditory pathways, ffrontocortical, and thalamocortical networks are discussed. Discussion. Several overlapping brain network alterations do exist between tinnitus and psychiatric disorders. Tinnitus, initially related to a clinicoanatomical approach based on a cortical localizationism, could be better explained by an holistic or associationist approach considering psychic functions and tinnitus as emergent properties of partially overlapping large-scale neural networks. PMID:25018882

Minichino, Amedeo; Panico, Roberta; Testugini, Valeria; Altissimi, Giancarlo; Cianfrone, Giancarlo

2014-01-01

197

Association between Severe Upper Limb Spasticity and Brain Lesion Location in Stroke Patients  

PubMed Central

Association between the site of brain injury and poststroke spasticity is poorly understood. The present study investigated whether lesion analysis could document brain regions associated with the development of severe upper limb poststroke spasticity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 39 chronic stroke patients. Spasticity was assessed at the affected upper limb with the modified Ashworth scale (shoulder, elbow, wrist, and fingers). Brain lesions were traced from magnetic resonance imaging performed within the first 7 days after stroke and region of interest images were generated. The association between severe upper limb spasticity (modified Ashworth scale ?2) and lesion location was determined with the voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping method implemented in MRIcro software. Colored maps representing the z statistics were generated and overlaid onto the automated anatomical labeling and the Johns Hopkins University white matter templates provided with MRIcron. Thalamic nuclei were identified with the Talairach Daemon software. Injuries to the insula, the thalamus, the basal ganglia, and white matter tracts (internal capsule, corona radiata, external capsule, and superior longitudinal fasciculus) were significantly associated with severe upper limb poststroke spasticity. Further advances in our understanding of the neural correlates of spasticity may lead to early targeted rehabilitation when key regions are damaged. PMID:24963473

Picelli, Alessandro; Tamburin, Stefano; Gajofatto, Francesca; Zanette, Giampietro; Praitano, Marialuigia; Saltuari, Leopold; Corradini, Claudio; Smania, Nicola

2014-01-01

198

A new mouse mutant with progressive motor neuronopathy.  

PubMed

A new autosomal-recessive mouse mutant with progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) is described. Homozygotes develop paralysis of the hindlimbs during the third week of life. Soon thereafter the forelimbs also become weak, and all mice die six to seven weeks after birth. Heterozygotes are normal. Skeletal muscles show neurogenic atrophy without histological signs of reinnervation. Axonal degeneration apparently starts at the endplates and is prominent in the sciatic nerve and its branches and the phrenic nerve. Axonal sprouts are abundant. There is no evidence of demyelination, and unaffected nerve fibers are normally myelinated. Sensory axons are spared. Almost all distal motor axons have disappeared in four to five weeks after birth. Ventral nerve roots show a reduced diameter of the largest fibers but no fiber deficits. The ventral horn cells show slight chromatolysis. The corticospinal tract is normal, but in terminally ill animals the fasciculus gracilis, the rubrospinal tract and possibly also reticulospinal fibers degenerate. The brain is histologically normal. The disease manifests itself in a dying-back fashion in the distal portion of the motor neurons and may represent an animal model of hereditary motor neuron diseases in man. PMID:2022963

Schmalbruch, H; Jensen, H J; Bjaerg, M; Kamieniecka, Z; Kurland, L

1991-05-01

199

Degradation of cognitive timing mechanisms in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.  

PubMed

The current study examined motor timing in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which manifests as progressive deterioration in social, behavioural and cognitive functions. Twenty-patients fulfilling consensus clinical criteria for behavioural variant FTD (bvFTD), 11 patients fulfilling consensus clinical criteria for semantic-variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), four patients fulfilling criteria for nonfluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia (naPPA), eight patients fulfilling criteria for Alzheimer?s disease (AD), and 31 controls were assessed on both an externally- and self-paced finger-tapping task requiring maintenance of a regular, 1500ms beat over 50 taps. Grey and white matter correlates of deficits in motor timing were examined using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). bvFTD patients exhibited significant deficits in aspects of both externally- and self-paced tapping. Increased mean inter-response interval (faster than target tap time) in the self-paced task was associated with reduced grey matter volume in the cerebellum bilaterally, right middle temporal gyrus, and with increased axial diffusivity in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus, regions and tracts which have been suggested to be involved in a subcortical-cortical network of structures underlying timing abilities. This suggests that such structures can be affected in bvFTD, and that impaired motor timing may underlie some characteristics of the bvFTD phenotype. PMID:25447066

Henley, Susie M D; Downey, Laura E; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Kinnunen, Kirsi M; Golden, Hannah L; Buckley, Aisling; Mahoney, Colin J; Crutch, Sebastian J

2014-12-01

200

Whole brain functional connectivity using phase locking measures of resting state magnetoencephalography  

PubMed Central

The analysis of spontaneous functional connectivity (sFC) reveals the statistical connections between regions of the brain consistent with underlying functional communication networks within the brain. In this work, we describe the implementation of a complete all-to-all network analysis of resting state neuronal activity from magnetoencephalography (MEG). Using graph theory to define networks at the dipole level, we established functionally defined regions by k-means clustering cortical surface locations using Eigenvector centrality (EVC) scores from the all-to-all adjacency model. Permutation testing was used to estimate regions with statistically significant connections compared to empty room data, which adjusts for spatial dependencies introduced by the MEG inverse problem. In order to test this model, we performed a series of numerical simulations investigating the effects of the MEG reconstruction on connectivity estimates. We subsequently applied the approach to subject data to investigate the effectiveness of our method in obtaining whole brain networks. Our findings indicated that our model provides statistically robust estimates of functional region networks. Application of our phase locking network methodology to real data produced networks with similar connectivity to previously published findings, specifically, we found connections between contralateral areas of the arcuate fasciculus that have been previously investigated. The use of data-driven methods for neuroscientific investigations provides a new tool for researchers in identifying and characterizing whole brain functional connectivity networks. PMID:25018690

Schmidt, Benjamin T.; Ghuman, Avniel S.; Huppert, Theodore J.

2014-01-01

201

[Enzyme histochemical study of the brain of Chthonerpeton indistinctum (Gymnophiona, Amphibia)].  

PubMed

In the brain of the Caecilian species Chthonerpeton indistinctum the following enzymes have been demonstrated by means of histochemical techniques: acid phosphatase, alpha-naphthylacetate esterase, acetylcholin esterase. Acid phosphatase occurs in the cytoplasm of the neurons in 4 different types of localization. Its activity in the ventral parts of the brain is markedly higher than in the dorsal ones. Of particularly high activity are: the motor neurons in the tegmentum, the nucleus mesencephali trigemini, individual large neurons in the marginal zone of the grey matter of the telencephalon, which seems to be a special character of the Caecilians among the Amphibia. The ependyma exhibits local differences in respect of acid phosphatase activity. alpha-Naphthylacetate esterase marks in particular the secretory neurons of the hypothalamus, the large perikarya of the nucleus mesencephali trigemini and the motor neurons of the tegmentum. In the telencephalon the alpha-naphthylacetate esterase activity corresponds to that of acid phosphatase. Acetylcholin esterase marks--with certain restrictions--cholinergic neurons. These predominate in Chthonerpeton in the caudal parts of the brain. In the telencephalon amygdala, septal area striatum and the mitral cells are of comparatively high activity. The neurosecretory neurons of the hypothalamus are particularly rich in this enzyme. As an anurans the cholinergic fasciculus retroflexus as asymmetric. The tectum opticum is of secondary simplicity and does not exhibit a clearly recognizable stratification. PMID:524986

Welsch, U; Tan, S H

1979-01-01

202

Differences in integrity of white matter and changes with training in spelling impaired children: a diffusion tensor imaging study.  

PubMed

While the functional correlates of spelling impairment have been rarely investigated, to our knowledge no study exists regarding the structural characteristics of spelling impairment and potential changes with interventions. Using diffusion tensor imaging at 3.0 T, we here therefore sought to investigate (a) differences between children with poor spelling abilities (training group and waiting group) and controls, and (b) the effects of a morpheme-based spelling intervention in children with poor spelling abilities on DTI parameters. A baseline comparison of white matter indices revealed significant differences between controls and spelling-impaired children, mainly located in the right hemisphere (superior corona radiata (SCR), posterior limb of internal capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus). After 5 weeks of training, spelling ability improved in the training group, along with increases in fractional anisotropy and decreases of radial diffusivity in the right hemisphere compared to controls. In addition, significantly higher decreases of mean diffusivity in the right SCR for the spelling-impaired training group compared to the waiting group were observed. Our results suggest that spelling impairment is associated with differences in white-matter integrity in the right hemisphere. We also provide first indications that white matter changes occur during successful training, but this needs to be more specifically addressed in future research. PMID:22198594

Gebauer, D; Fink, A; Filippini, N; Johansen-Berg, H; Reishofer, G; Koschutnig, K; Kargl, R; Purgstaller, C; Fazekas, F; Enzinger, C

2012-07-01

203

Tractography reveals diffuse white matter abnormalities in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.  

PubMed

Cerebral involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 (DM1) is well-established but not well characterized. This study applied new Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) tractography to characterize white matter disturbance in adults with DM1. Forty-five participants with DM1 and 44 control participants had MRIs on a Siemens 3T TIM Trio scanner. Data were processed with TRActs Constrained by UnderLying Anatomy (TRACULA) and 7 tracts were evaluated. Bilateral disturbances in white matter integrity were seen in all tracts in participants with DM1 compared to controls. There were no right-left hemisphere differences. The resulting DTI metrics were correlated with cognitive functioning, particularly working memory and processing speed. Motor speed was not significantly correlated with white matter microstructural integrity and, thus, was not the core explanation for the working memory and processing speed findings. White matter integrity was correlated with important clinical variables including the muscular impairment rating scale (MIRS). CTG repeat length was moderately associated with white matter status in corticospinal tract and cingulum. Sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale) was moderately associated with white matter status in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and cingulum. Overall, the results add to an emerging literature showing widespread white matter disturbances in both early-onset and adult-onset DM1. Results suggest that further investigation of white matter pathology is warranted in DM1 and that non-invasive measures such as DTI have a potentially important clinical value in characterizing the status of individuals with DM1. PMID:24768314

Wozniak, Jeffrey R; Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Hemmy, Laura S; Day, John W

2014-06-15

204

Inter-individual differences in audio-motor learning of piano melodies and white matter fiber tract architecture.  

PubMed

Humans vary substantially in their ability to learn new motor skills. Here, we examined inter-individual differences in learning to play the piano, with the goal of identifying relations to structural properties of white matter fiber tracts relevant to audio-motor learning. Non-musicians (n = 18) learned to perform three short melodies on a piano keyboard in a pure audio-motor training condition (vision of their own fingers was occluded). Initial learning times ranged from 17 to 120 min (mean ± SD: 62 ± 29 min). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was used to derive the fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of white matter microstructural arrangement. A correlation analysis revealed that higher FA values were associated with faster learning of piano melodies. These effects were observed in the bilateral corticospinal tracts, bundles of axons relevant for the execution of voluntary movements, and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus, a tract important for audio-motor transformations. These results suggest that the speed with which novel complex audio-motor skills can be acquired may be determined by variability in structural properties of white matter fiber tracts connecting brain areas functionally relevant for audio-motor learning. PMID:23904213

Engel, Annerose; Hijmans, Brenda S; Cerliani, Leonardo; Bangert, Marc; Nanetti, Luca; Keller, Peter E; Keysers, Christian

2014-05-01

205

Limbic Tract Integrity Contributes to Pattern Separation Performance Across the Lifespan.  

PubMed

Accurate memory for discrete events is thought to rely on pattern separation to orthogonalize the representations of similar events. Previously, we reported that a behavioral index of pattern separation was correlated with activity in the hippocampus (dentate gyrus, CA3) and with integrity of the perforant path, which provides input to the hippocampus. If the hippocampus operates as part of a broader neural network, however, pattern separation would likely also relate to integrity of limbic tracts (fornix, cingulum bundle, and uncinate fasciculus) that connect the hippocampus to distributed brain regions. In this study, healthy adults (20-89 years) underwent diffusion tensor imaging and completed the Behavioral Pattern Separation Task-Object Version (BPS-O) and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). After controlling for global effects of brain aging, exploratory skeleton-wise and targeted tractography analyses revealed that fornix integrity (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and radial diffusivity; but not mode) was significantly related to pattern separation (measured using BPS-O and RAVLT tasks), but not to recognition memory. These data suggest that hippocampal disconnection, via individual- and age-related differences in limbic tract integrity, contributes to pattern separation performance. Extending our earlier work, these results also support the notion that pattern separation relies on broad neural networks interconnecting the hippocampus. PMID:24825784

Bennett, Ilana J; Huffman, Derek J; Stark, Craig E L

2014-05-13

206

Research with rTMS in the treatment of aphasia  

PubMed Central

This review of our research with rTMS to treat aphasia contains four parts: Part 1 reviews functional brain imaging studies related to recovery of language in aphasia with emphasis on nonfluent aphasia. Part 2 presents the rationale for using rTMS to treat nonfluent aphasia patients (based on results from functional imaging studies). Part 2 also reviews our current rTMS treatment protocol used with nonfluent aphasia patients, and our functional imaging results from overt naming fMRI scans, obtained pre- and post- a series of rTMS treatments. Part 3 presents results from a pilot study where rTMS treatments were followed immediately by constraint-induced language therapy (CILT). Part 4 reviews our diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study that examined white matter connections between the horizontal, midportion of the arcuate fasciculus (hAF) to different parts within Broca’s area (pars triangularis, PTr; pars opercularis, POp), and the ventral premotor cortex (vPMC) in the RH and in the LH. Part 4 also addresses some of the possible mechanisms involved with improved naming and speech, following rTMS with nonfluent aphasia patients. PMID:20714075

Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I; Treglia, Ethan; Ho, Michael; Kaplan, Elina; Bashir, Shahid; Hamilton, Roy; Coslett, H. Branch; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

2013-01-01

207

Frontostriatal fiber bundle compromise in HIV infection without dementia  

PubMed Central

Background Quantitative fiber tracking derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to determine whether white matter association, projection, or commissural tracts are affected in nondemented individuals with HIV infection and to identify the regional distribution of sparing and impairment of fiber systems. Methods DTI measured fractional anisotropy and diffusivity, quantified separately for longitudinal (?L) diffusivity (index of axonal injury) and transverse (?T) diffusivity (index of myelin injury), in 11 association and projection white matter tracts and six commissural tracts in 29 men and 13 women with HIV infection and 88 healthy, age-matched controls (42 men and 46 women). Results The total group of HIV-infected individuals had higher diffusivity (principally longitudinal) than controls in the posterior sectors of the corpus callosum, internal and external capsules, and superior cingulate bundles. High longitudinal diffusivity, indicative of axonal compromise, was especially prominent in posterior callosal sectors, fornix, and superior cingulate bundle in HIV with AIDS. Unmedicated patients had notably high transverse diffusivity, indicative of myelin compromise, in the occipital forceps, inferior cingulate bundle, and superior longitudinal fasciculus. Pontocerebellar projection fibers were resistant to HIV effects as were commissural fibers coursing through premotor and sensorimotor callosal sectors. Conclusion This quantitative survey of brain fiber tract integrity indicates that even nondemented HIV patients can have neuroradiological evidence for damage to association and commissural tracts. These abnormalities were vulnerable to exacerbation with AIDS and possibly mitigated by HAART. PMID:19730350

Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Rosenbloom, Margaret J.; Rohlfing, Torsten; Kemper, Carol A.; Deresinski, Stanley; Sullivan, Edith V.

2010-01-01

208

White matter abnormalities in schizophrenia and schizotypal personality disorder.  

PubMed

Prior diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies examining schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) and schizophrenia, separately have shown that compared with healthy controls (HCs), patients show frontotemporal white matter (WM) abnormalities. This is the first DTI study to directly compare WM tract coherence with tractography and fractional anisotropy (FA) across the schizophrenia spectrum in a large sample of demographically matched HCs (n = 55), medication-naive SPD patients (n = 49), and unmedicated/never-medicated schizophrenia patients (n = 22) to determine whether (a) frontal-striatal-temporal WM tract abnormalities in schizophrenia are similar to, or distinct from those observed in SPD; and (b) WM tract abnormalities are associated with clinical symptom severity indicating a common underlying pathology across the spectrum. Compared with both the HC and SPD groups, schizophrenia patients showed WM abnormalities, as indexed by lower FA in the temporal lobe (inferior longitudinal fasciculus) and cingulum regions. SPD patients showed lower FA in the corpus callosum genu compared with the HC group, but this regional abnormality was more widespread in schizophrenia patients. Across the schizophrenia spectrum, greater WM disruptions were associated with greater symptom severity. Overall, frontal-striatal-temporal WM dysconnectivity is attenuated in SPD compared with schizophrenia patients and may mitigate the emergence of psychosis. PMID:24962608

Lener, Marc S; Wong, Edmund; Tang, Cheuk Y; Byne, William; Goldstein, Kim E; Blair, Nicholas J; Haznedar, M Mehmet; New, Antonia S; Chemerinski, Eran; Chu, King-Wai; Rimsky, Liza S; Siever, Larry J; Koenigsberg, Harold W; Hazlett, Erin A

2015-01-01

209

Vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites and fibers in the brain of the pigeon Columba livia: An autoradiographic and immunohistochemical study  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) binding sites in the pigeon brain was examined by in vitro autoradiography on slide-mounted sections. A fully characterized monoiodinated form of VIP, which maintains the biological activity of the native peptide, was used throughout this study. The highest densities of binding sites were observed in the hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, auditory field L of neostriatum, area corticoidea dorsolateralis and temporo-parieto-occipitalis, area parahippocampalis, tectum opticum, nucleus dorsomedialis anterior thalami, and in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus. Lower densities of specific binding occurred in the neostriatum, hyperstriatum ventrale and nucleus septi lateralis, dorsolateral area of the thalamus, and lateral and posteromedial hypothalamus. Very low to background levels of VIP binding were detected in the ectostriatum, paleostriatum primitivum, paleostriatum augmentatum, lobus parolfactorius, nucleus accumbens, most of the brainstem, and the cerebellum. The distribution of VIP-containing fibers and terminals was examined by indirect immunofluorescence using a polyclonal antibody against porcine VIP. Fibers and terminals were observed in the area corticoidea dorsolateralis, area parahippocampalis, hippocampus, hyperstriatum accessorium, hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, tuberculum olfactorium, nuclei dorsolateralis and dorsomedialis of the thalamus, and throughout the hypothalamus and the median eminence. Long projecting fibers were visualized in the tractus septohippocampalis. In the brainstem VIP immunoreactive fibers and terminals were observed mainly in the substantia grisea centralis, fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, lemniscus lateralis, and in the area surrounding the nuclei of the 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves.

Hof, P.R.; Dietl, M.M.; Charnay, Y.; Martin, J.L.; Bouras, C.; Palacios, J.M.; Magistretti, P.J. (Fishberg Research Center for Neurobiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (USA))

1991-03-15

210

Music making as a tool for promoting brain plasticity across the life span.  

PubMed

Playing a musical instrument is an intense, multisensory, and motor experience that usually commences at an early age and requires the acquisition and maintenance of a range of skills over the course of a musician's lifetime. Thus, musicians offer an excellent human model for studying the brain effects of acquiring specialized sensorimotor skills. For example, musicians learn and repeatedly practice the association of motor actions with specific sound and visual patterns (musical notation) while receiving continuous multisensory feedback. This association learning can strengthen connections between auditory and motor regions (e.g., arcuate fasciculus) while activating multimodal integration regions (e.g., around the intraparietal sulcus). We argue that training of this neural network may produce cross-modal effects on other behavioral or cognitive operations that draw on this network. Plasticity in this network may explain some of the sensorimotor and cognitive enhancements that have been associated with music training. These enhancements suggest the potential for music making as an interactive treatment or intervention for neurological and developmental disorders, as well as those associated with normal aging. PMID:20889966

Wan, Catherine Y; Schlaug, Gottfried

2010-10-01

211

Is meditation associated with altered brain structure? A systematic review and meta-analysis of morphometric neuroimaging in meditation practitioners.  

PubMed

Numerous studies have begun to address how the brain's gray and white matter may be shaped by meditation. This research is yet to be integrated, however, and two fundamental questions remain: Is meditation associated with altered brain structure? If so, what is the magnitude of these differences? To address these questions, we reviewed and meta-analyzed 123 brain morphology differences from 21 neuroimaging studies examining ?300 meditation practitioners. Anatomical likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis found eight brain regions consistently altered in meditators, including areas key to meta-awareness (frontopolar cortex/BA 10), exteroceptive and interoceptive body awareness (sensory cortices and insula), memory consolidation and reconsolidation (hippocampus), self and emotion regulation (anterior and mid cingulate; orbitofrontal cortex), and intra- and interhemispheric communication (superior longitudinal fasciculus; corpus callosum). Effect size meta-analysis (calculating 132 effect sizes from 16 studies) suggests a global 'medium' effect size (Cohen's d¯=0.46; r¯=.19). Publication bias and methodological limitations are strong concerns, however. Further research using rigorous methods is required to definitively link meditation practice to altered brain morphology. PMID:24705269

Fox, Kieran C R; Nijeboer, Savannah; Dixon, Matthew L; Floman, James L; Ellamil, Melissa; Rumak, Samuel P; Sedlmeier, Peter; Christoff, Kalina

2014-06-01

212

A combinatorial optogenetic approach to medial habenula function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The habenula is a brain region found in all vertebrate species. It consists of medial and lateral subnuclei which make complex descending connections to the brainstem. Although the medial habenula (MHb) and its projection, the fasciculus retroflexus (FR), have been recognized for decades, their function remains obscure. The small size of the MHb in rodents, and the cellular and molecular complexity of this region, have made it difficult to study the function of this region with high specificity. Here we describe a Cre-mediated genetic system for expressing the microbial opsin channelrhodopsin (ChR2) specifically in the dorsal (dMHb) and ventral (vMHb) medial habenula. Genetically targeted expression of ChR2 allows MHb neurons to be selectively activated with light in acute brain slices with electrophysiological readouts, and in vivo by means of custom-built fiber optic cannulas. These tools will allow highly specific studies of MHb circuitry and the role of the MHb in behaviors related to addiction and mood regulation.

Turner, Eric E.; Hsu, Yun-Wei; Wang, Si; Morton, Glenn; Zeng, Hongkui

2013-03-01

213

The role of the habenula in drug addiction  

PubMed Central

Interest in the habenula has greatly increased in recent years. The habenula is a small brain structure located posterior to the thalamus and adjacent to the third ventricle. Despite its small size, the habenula can be divided into medial habenula (MHb) and lateral habenula (LHb) nuclei that are anatomically and transcriptionally distinct. The habenula receives inputs from the limbic system and basal ganglia primarily via the stria medullaris. The fasciculus retroflexus is the primary habenular output from the habenula to the midbrain and governs release of glutamate onto gabaergic cells in the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) and onto the interpeduncular nucleus. The resulting GABA released from RMTg neurons inactivates dopaminergic cells in the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra compacta. Through this process, the habenula controls dopamine levels in the striatum. Thus, the habenula plays a critical role in reward and reward-associated learning. The LHb also modulates serotonin levels and norepinephrine release, while the MHb modulates acetylcholine. The habenula is a critical crossroad that influences the brain’s response to pain, stress, anxiety, sleep, and reward. Dysfunction of the habenula has been linked to depression, schizophrenia, and the effects of drugs of abuse. This review focuses on the possible relationships between the habenula and drug abuse. PMID:24734015

Velasquez, Kenia M.; Molfese, David L.; Salas, Ramiro

2014-01-01

214

Social subordination stress and serotonin transporter polymorphisms: associations with brain white matter tract integrity and behavior in juvenile female macaques.  

PubMed

We examined the relationship between social rank and brain white matter (WM) microstructure, and socioemotional behavior, and its modulation by serotonin (5HT) transporter (5HTT) polymorphisms in prepubertal female macaques. Using diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics, social status differences were found in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) WM and cortico-thalamic tracts, with subordinates showing higher WM structural integrity (measured as fractional anisotropy, FA) than dominant animals. 5HTT genotype-related differences were detected in the posterior limb of the internal capsule, where s-variants had higher FA than l/l animals. Status by 5HTT interaction effects were found in (1) external capsule (middle longitudinal fasciculus), (2) parietal WM, and (3) short-range PFC tracts, with opposite effects in dominant and subordinate animals. In most regions showing FA differences, opposite differences were detected in radial diffusivity, but none in axial diffusivity, suggesting that differences in tract integrity likely involve differences in myelin. These findings highlight that differences in social rank are associated with differences in WM structural integrity in juveniles, particularly in tracts connecting prefrontal, sensory processing, motor and association regions, sometimes modulated by 5HTT genotype. Differences in these tracts were associated with increased emotional reactivity in subordinates, particularly with higher submissive and fear behaviors. PMID:23908263

Howell, Brittany R; Godfrey, Jodi; Gutman, David A; Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Zhang, Xiaodong; Nair, Govind; Hu, Xiaoping; Wilson, Mark E; Sanchez, Mar M

2014-12-01

215

Genetic and neuroanatomic associations in sporadic frontotemporal lobar degeneration.  

PubMed

Genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are sensitive for tau or TDP-43 pathology in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Neuroimaging analyses have revealed distinct distributions of disease in FTLD patients with genetic mutations. However, genetic influences on neuroanatomic structure in sporadic FTLD have not been assessed. In this report, we use novel multivariate tools, Eigenanatomy, and sparse canonical correlation analysis to identify associations between SNPs and neuroanatomic structure in sporadic FTLD. Magnetic resonance imaging analyses revealed that rs8070723 (MAPT) was associated with gray matter variance in the temporal cortex. Diffusion tensor imaging analyses revealed that rs1768208 (MOBP), rs646776 (near SORT1), and rs5848 (PGRN) were associated with white matter variance in the midbrain and superior longitudinal fasciculus. In an independent autopsy series, we observed that rs8070723 and rs1768208 conferred significant risk of tau pathology relative to TDP-43, and rs646776 conferred increased risk of TDP-43 pathology relative to tau. Identified brain regions and SNPs may help provide an in vivo screen for underlying pathology in FTLD and contribute to our understanding of sporadic FTLD. PMID:24373676

McMillan, Corey T; Toledo, Jon B; Avants, Brian B; Cook, Philip A; Wood, Elisabeth M; Suh, Eunran; Irwin, David J; Powers, John; Olm, Christopher; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Grossman, Murray

2014-06-01

216

The Simplified Reference Tissue Model with 18F-fallypride PET: Choice of Reference Region  

PubMed Central

The development of high-affinity radiotracers for positron emission tomography has allowed for quantification of dopamine receptors in extrastriatal as well as striatal regions of brain. As these new radiotracers have distinctly different kinetic properties than their predecessors, it is important to examine the suitability of kinetic models to represent their uptake, distribution and in vivo washout. Using the simplified reference tissue model, we investigated the influence of reference region choice on striatal binding potential (BPND) of 18F-fallypride, a high-affinity dopamine D2/D3 receptor ligand. We compared visual cortex and a white matter region (superior longitudinal fasciculus) to the cerebellum, a commonly used reference tissue, in a PET-fallypride study of healthy and methamphetamine-dependent subjects. Compared to cerebellum, use of visual cortex produced significantly greater sample variance in BPND. Use of the white matter region was associated with BPND values and sample variance similar to those obtained with cerebellum, and a larger effect size for the group differences in striatal BPND between healthy and methamphetamine-dependent subjects. Our results do not support the use of visual cortex as a reference region in 18F-fallypride studies, and suggest that white matter may be a reasonable alternative to cerebellum as it displays similar statistical and kinetic properties. PMID:24447617

Ishibashi, Kenji; Robertson, Chelsea L.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; Morgan, Andrew T.; London, Edythe D.

2014-01-01

217

Symptomatic unruptured capillary telangiectasia of the brain stem: report of three cases and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Three young patients with transient or intermittent focal neurological signs suggesting brain stem involvement are described, in whom high field MRI showed focal areas of hyperintensity in T2 weighted spin echo images, hypointensity in T2* weighted gradient echo images, and enhancement in postcontrast T1 weighted images consistent with unruptured capillary telangiectasia of the brain stem. The first patient was a 28 year old woman who complained of recurrent left ear tinnitus, exacerbated during the menstrual period; MRI demonstrated that the vascular anomaly involved the left acoustic pathway. The second patient was a 30 year old woman who had three episodes of paroxysmal left lip movement 4 weeks after child delivery; MRI showed capillary telangiectasia in the right corticonuclear pathway. The third patient, a 36 year old man, had a transient right Bell's palsy; MRI disclosed two circumscribed areas consistent with capillary telangiectasia in the left corticospinal tract and medial longitudinal fasciculus.? Steroid receptors in the telangiectatic vessels walls might account for the recurrent and transient course seen in our two female patients.? Awareness of the MRI features of capillary telangiectasia may help in defining the real incidence, clinical correlation, and the risk of haemorrhagic complications of these vascular malformations.?? PMID:11511717

Scaglione, C; Salvi, F; Riguzzi, P; Vergelli, M; Tassinari, C; Mascalchi, M

2001-01-01

218

Symptomatic unruptured capillary telangiectasia of the brain stem: report of three cases and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Three young patients with transient or intermittent focal neurological signs suggesting brain stem involvement are described, in whom high field MRI showed focal areas of hyperintensity in T2 weighted spin echo images, hypointensity in T2* weighted gradient echo images, and enhancement in postcontrast T1 weighted images consistent with unruptured capillary telangiectasia of the brain stem. The first patient was a 28 year old woman who complained of recurrent left ear tinnitus, exacerbated during the menstrual period; MRI demonstrated that the vascular anomaly involved the left acoustic pathway. The second patient was a 30 year old woman who had three episodes of paroxysmal left lip movement 4 weeks after child delivery; MRI showed capillary telangiectasia in the right corticonuclear pathway. The third patient, a 36 year old man, had a transient right Bell's palsy; MRI disclosed two circumscribed areas consistent with capillary telangiectasia in the left corticospinal tract and medial longitudinal fasciculus. Steroid receptors in the telangiectatic vessels walls might account for the recurrent and transient course seen in our two female patients. Awareness of the MRI features of capillary telangiectasia may help in defining the real incidence, clinical correlation, and the risk of haemorrhagic complications of these vascular malformations. PMID:11511717

Scaglione, C; Salvi, F; Riguzzi, P; Vergelli, M; Tassinari, C A; Mascalchi, M

2001-09-01

219

WEBINO and the return of the King's Speech.  

PubMed

We present a 69 year-old man with hypertension who developed the sudden onset of horizontal binocular diplopia and stuttering of speech. On examination, bilateral exotropia (i.e. 'wall-eyed') was observed in the primary position. Attempted horizontal saccades revealed bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia; all consistent with the wall-eyed bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (WEBINO) syndrome. Convergence, vertical saccades and vestibular ocular reflexes were likewise impaired. Pupillary and levator palpebrae superioris functions were intact. Mild left-sided dysmetria, intention tremor and dysdiadochokinesia were elicited. Conspicuously, further characterization of the patient's history revealed that he had stuttered as a child, but it had resolved in adolescence. Brain MRI revealed an acute infarction of the mesencephalic and upper pontine tegmentum involving the periaqueductal gray region and the medial longitudinal fasciculus bilaterally with greater involvement of the left. Like the WEBINO syndrome, re-emergent developmental stuttering is a rare neurologic phenomenon. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a mesencephalic and upper pontine infarction causing both syndromes. We discuss the pathobiological underpinnings of the WEBINO syndrome and neurogenic stuttering and in relationship to this unusual case. PMID:22178081

Beh, Shin C; Frohman, Elliot M

2012-04-15

220

A Brain Network Processing the Age of Faces  

PubMed Central

Age is one of the most salient aspects in faces and of fundamental cognitive and social relevance. Although face processing has been studied extensively, brain regions responsive to age have yet to be localized. Using evocative face morphs and fMRI, we segregate two areas extending beyond the previously established face-sensitive core network, centered on the inferior temporal sulci and angular gyri bilaterally, both of which process changes of facial age. By means of probabilistic tractography, we compare their patterns of functional activation and structural connectivity. The ventral portion of Wernicke's understudied perpendicular association fasciculus is shown to interconnect the two areas, and activation within these clusters is related to the probability of fiber connectivity between them. In addition, post-hoc age-rating competence is found to be associated with high response magnitudes in the left angular gyrus. Our results provide the first evidence that facial age has a distinct representation pattern in the posterior human brain. We propose that particular face-sensitive nodes interact with additional object-unselective quantification modules to obtain individual estimates of facial age. This brain network processing the age of faces differs from the cortical areas that have previously been linked to less developmental but instantly changeable face aspects. Our probabilistic method of associating activations with connectivity patterns reveals an exemplary link that can be used to further study, assess and quantify structure-function relationships. PMID:23185334

Homola, György A.; Jbabdi, Saad; Beckmann, Christian F.; Bartsch, Andreas J.

2012-01-01

221

F-Spondin/spon1b Expression Patterns in Developing and Adult Zebrafish  

PubMed Central

F-spondin, an extracellular matrix protein, is an important player in embryonic morphogenesis and CNS development, but its presence and role later in life remains largely unknown. We generated a transgenic zebrafish in which GFP is expressed under the control of the F-spondin (spon1b) promoter, and used it in combination with complementary techniques to undertake a detailed characterization of the expression patterns of F-spondin in developing and adult brain and periphery. We found that F-spondin is often associated with structures forming long neuronal tracts, including retinal ganglion cells, the olfactory bulb, the habenula, and the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nMLF). F-spondin expression coincides with zones of adult neurogenesis and is abundant in CSF-contacting secretory neurons, especially those in the hypothalamus. Use of this new transgenic model also revealed F-spondin expression patterns in the peripheral CNS, notably in enteric neurons, and in peripheral tissues involved in active patterning or proliferation in adults, including the endoskeleton of zebrafish fins and the continuously regenerating pharyngeal teeth. Moreover, patterning of the regenerating caudal fin following fin amputation in adult zebrafish was associated with F-spondin expression in the blastema, a proliferative region critical for tissue reconstitution. Together, these findings suggest major roles for F-spondin in the CNS and periphery of the developing and adult vertebrate. PMID:22768035

Akle, Veronica; Guelin, Emmanuel; Yu, Lili; Brassard-Giordano, Helena; Slack, Barbara E.; Zhdanova, Irina V.

2012-01-01

222

Fiber architecture of the extensors of the hindlimb in semiterrestrial and arboreal guenons.  

PubMed

Fiber architecture of the extensor musculature of the knee and ankle is examined in two African gueon species--the semiterrestrial Cercopithecus aethiops, and the arboreal C. ascanius. Using histologic and microscopic techniques to measure lengths of sarcomeres, the original lengths of muscle fasciculi and angles of pinnation in quadriceps femoris and triceps surae are reconstructed from direct measurements on cadavers. Calculations of reduced physiological cross-sectional area, mass/predicted effective tetanic tension, maximum excursion, and tendon length/fasciculus+tendon lengths are correlated to preferred locomotor modalities in the wild. For both species, greater morphological differences occur among the bellies of quadriceps femoris--rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, v. lateralis, and v. medialis--than among the bellies of triceps surae--gastrocnemius lateralis, g. medialis, plantaris, and soleus. With regard to quadriceps femoris, few differences occur between species. Interspecific differences in the triceps surae indicate (1) redirection of muscle force to accommodate arboreality in which the substrate is less than body width; (2) muscles more suited for velocity in the semiterrestrial vervets; and (3) muscles used more isotonically in vervets and more isometrically in red-tailed monkeys. The inherent flexibility of muscles may be preadaptive to a primary species shift in locomotor modality until the bony morphology is able to adapt through natural selection. PMID:8850183

Anapol, F; Barry, K

1996-03-01

223

Longitudinal Assessment of Neuroanatomical and Cognitive Differences in Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes: Association with Hyperglycemia.  

PubMed

Significant regional differences in gray and white matter volume, and subtle cognitive differences between young diabetic and non-diabetic children have been observed. Here, we assessed whether these differences change over time and the relation with dysglycemia.Children ages 4 to <10 years with (N=144) and without (N=72) type 1 diabetes (T1D) had high resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging and comprehensive neurocognitive tests at baseline and 18-months, and continuous glucose monitoring and HbA1C performed quarterly for 18-months.There were no differences in cognitive and executive functions scores between groups at 18-months. However, children with diabetes had slower total gray and white matter growth than controls. Gray matter regions (left precuneus, right temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes, right medial-frontal cortex) showed lesser growth in diabetes, as did white matter areas (splenium of the corpus callosum, bilateral superior-parietal lobe, bilateral anterior forceps, and inferior-frontal fasciculus). These changes were associated with higher cumulative hyperglycemia and glucose variability but not with hypoglycemia.Young children with T1D have significant differences in total and regional gray and white matter growth in brain regions involved in complex sensorimotor processing and cognition compared to age-matched controls over 18-months, suggesting that chronic hyperglycemia may be detrimental to the developing brain. PMID:25488901

Mauras, Nelly; Mazaika, Paul; Buckingham, Bruce; Weinzimer, Stuart; White, Neil H; Tsalikian, Eva; Hershey, Tamara; Cato, Allison; Cheng, Peiyao; Kollman, Craig; Beck, Roy W; Ruedy, Katrina; Aye, Tandy; Fox, Larry; Arbelaez, Ana Maria; Wilson, Darrell; Tansey, Michael; Tamborlane, William; Peng, Daniel; Marzelli, Matthew; Winer, Karen K; Reiss, Allan L

2014-12-01

224

BRAIN ACTIVITY DURING BLADDER FILLING IS RELATED TO WHITE MATTER STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN OLDER WOMEN WITH URINARY INCONTINENCE  

PubMed Central

Evidence from longitudinal studies in community-dwelling elderly links complaints of urgency and urinary incontinence with structural white matter changes known as white matter hyperintensities (WMH). How WMH might lead to incontinence remains unknown, since information about how they relate to neural circuits involved in continence control is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of WMH in altered brain activity in older women with urgency incontinence. In a cross-sectional study, we measured WMH, globally and in specific white matter tracts, and correlated them with regional brain activity measured by fMRI (combined with simultaneous urodynamic monitoring) during bladder filling and reported 'urgency'. We postulated that increase in global WMH burden would be associated with changes (either attenuation or reinforcement) in responses to bladder filling in brain regions involved in bladder control. Secondly, we proposed that such apparent effects of global WMH burden might be specifically related to the burden in a few critical white matter pathways. The results showed that regional activations (e.g. medial/superior frontal gyrus adjacent to dorsal ACG) and deactivations (e.g. perigenual ACG adjacent to ventromedial prefrontal cortex) became more prominent with increased global WMH burden, suggesting that activity aimed at suppressing urgency was augmented. Secondary analyses confirmed that the apparent effect of global WMH burden might reflect the presence of WMH in specific pathways (anterior thalamic radiation and superior longitudinal fasciculus), thus affecting connections between key regions and suggesting possible mechanisms involved in continence control. PMID:20302947

Tadic, Stasa D.; Griffiths, Derek; Murrin, Andrew; Schaefer, Werner; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Resnick, Neil M.

2010-01-01

225

Channeling of developing rat corticospinal tract axons by myelin-associated neurite growth inhibitors  

SciTech Connect

CNS myelin contains 2 membrane proteins that are potent inhibitors of neurite growth (NI-35 and NI-250). Because myelin formation starts at different times in different regions and tracts of the CNS, this inhibitory property of myelin could serve boundary and guidance functions for late-growing fiber tracts. In the rat, the corticospinal tract (CST) grows into and down the spinal cord during the first 10 postnatal days, in close proximity to the sensory tracts fasciculus cuneatus and gracilis. Immunofluorescence for myelin constituents showed that, in the rostral half of the spinal cord, the myelinating tissue of these ascending tracts surrounds the growing, myelin-free CST in a channellike fashion. Elimination of oligodendrocytes by x-irradiation of the newborn rats, or application of antibody IN-1, which neutralizes the inhibitory substrate property of CNS myelin, resulted in significant anatomical aberration of CST fibers. In particular, the tract was larger in cross-section, and aberrant CST fibers and fascicles intermixed with the neighboring sensory ascending tracts. These results assign an important channeling and guard-rail function to the oligodendrocyte-associated neurite growth inhibitors for the developing CST in the rat spinal cord.

Schwab, M.E.; Schnell, L. (Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland))

1991-03-01

226

Spatial distribution of fiber degeneration in acute hypoglycemic neuropathy in rat.  

PubMed

Hypoglycemia may cause axonal nerve fiber degeneration, but to do so it must be severe (less than 1.5 mmol/L) and of long duration (greater than or equal to 12 hours). Since in our previous study, systemic PO2, PCO2, pH, blood pressure, temperature, and hematocrit were maintained within physiologic limits, fiber degeneration cannot be attributed to systemic hypoxia. In this study the spatial distribution of axonal degeneration was assessed in transverse epoxy sections and teased fibers from different proximal-to-distal levels of nerves of the lower limb of the rats. Reactions in lumbar spinal motor neurons, spinal ganglia, and fasciculus gracilis were also studied. Axonal degeneration was the characteristic fiber alteration and it predominated in central fascicular distributions of distal sciatic, proximal tibial, and proximal peroneal nerves. This proximal-to-distal and central fascicular spatial distribution is not typical of distal polyneuropathy or of neuronal degeneration, but it is characteristic of a focal or multifocal nerve trunk neuropathy. Although local hypoxic-ischemic injury, possibly mediated by enhanced sympathetic tone, has not been excluded, we postulate a generalized deficiency of energy substrate manifesting itself by fiber degeneration at watershed zones of poorest perfusion. PMID:1660919

Yasaki, S; Dyck, P J

1991-11-01

227

Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD) populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia). Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors. PMID:25422929

Lense, Miriam D.; Dankner, Nathan; Pryweller, Jennifer R.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

2014-01-01

228

Whole brain functional connectivity using phase locking measures of resting state magnetoencephalography.  

PubMed

The analysis of spontaneous functional connectivity (sFC) reveals the statistical connections between regions of the brain consistent with underlying functional communication networks within the brain. In this work, we describe the implementation of a complete all-to-all network analysis of resting state neuronal activity from magnetoencephalography (MEG). Using graph theory to define networks at the dipole level, we established functionally defined regions by k-means clustering cortical surface locations using Eigenvector centrality (EVC) scores from the all-to-all adjacency model. Permutation testing was used to estimate regions with statistically significant connections compared to empty room data, which adjusts for spatial dependencies introduced by the MEG inverse problem. In order to test this model, we performed a series of numerical simulations investigating the effects of the MEG reconstruction on connectivity estimates. We subsequently applied the approach to subject data to investigate the effectiveness of our method in obtaining whole brain networks. Our findings indicated that our model provides statistically robust estimates of functional region networks. Application of our phase locking network methodology to real data produced networks with similar connectivity to previously published findings, specifically, we found connections between contralateral areas of the arcuate fasciculus that have been previously investigated. The use of data-driven methods for neuroscientific investigations provides a new tool for researchers in identifying and characterizing whole brain functional connectivity networks. PMID:25018690

Schmidt, Benjamin T; Ghuman, Avniel S; Huppert, Theodore J

2014-01-01

229

A dedicated visual pathway for prey detection in larval zebrafish  

PubMed Central

Zebrafish larvae show characteristic prey capture behavior in response to small moving objects. The neural mechanism used to recognize objects as prey remains largely unknown. We devised a machine learning behavior classification system to quantify hunting kinematics in semi-restrained animals exposed to a range of virtual stimuli. Two-photon calcium imaging revealed a small visual area, AF7, that was activated specifically by the optimal prey stimulus. This pretectal region is innervated by two types of retinal ganglion cells, which also send collaterals to the optic tectum. Laser ablation of AF7 markedly reduced prey capture behavior. We identified neurons with arbors in AF7 and found that they projected to multiple sensory and premotor areas: the optic tectum, the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nMLF) and the hindbrain. These findings indicate that computations in the retina give rise to a visual stream which transforms sensory information into a directed prey capture response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04878.001 PMID:25490154

Semmelhack, Julia L; Donovan, Joseph C; Thiele, Tod R; Kuehn, Enrico; Laurell, Eva; Baier, Herwig

2014-01-01

230

A novel approach with "skeletonised MTR" measures tract-specific microstructural changes in early primary-progressive MS.  

PubMed

We combined tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and magnetization transfer (MT) imaging to assess white matter (WM) tract-specific short-term changes in early primary-progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) and their relationships with clinical progression. Twenty-one PPMS patients within 5 years from onset underwent MT and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at baseline and after 12 months. Patients' disability was assessed. DTI data were processed to compute fractional anisotropy (FA) and to generate a common WM "skeleton," which represents the tracts that are "common" to all subjects using TBSS. The MT ratio (MTR) was computed from MT data and co-registered with the DTI. The skeletonization procedure derived for FA was applied to each subject's MTR image to obtain a "skeletonised" MTR map for every subject. Permutation tests were used to assess (i) changes in FA, principal diffusivities, and MTR over the follow-up, and (ii) associations between changes in imaging parameters and changes in disability. Patients showed significant decreases in MTR over one year in the corpus callosum (CC), bilateral corticospinal tract (CST), thalamic radiations, and superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. These changes were located both within lesions and the normal-appearing WM. No significant longitudinal change in skeletonised FA was found, but radial diffusivity (RD) significantly increased in several regions, including the CST bilaterally and the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus. MTR decreases, RD increases, and axial diffusivity decreases in the CC and CST correlated with a deterioration in the upper limb function. We detected tract-specific multimodal imaging changes that reflect the accrual of microstructural damage and possibly contribute to clinical impairment in PPMS. We propose a novel methodology that can be extended to other diseases to map cross-subject and tract-specific changes in MTR. PMID:23616276

Bodini, Benedetta; Cercignani, Mara; Toosy, Ahmed; De Stefano, Nicola; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

2014-02-01

231

Multimodal assessments of the hippocampal formation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Evidences from neurobehavioral measures and functional and structural MRI  

PubMed Central

A potential clinical and etiological overlap between schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) has long been a subject of discussion. Imaging studies imply functional and structural alterations of the hippocampus in both diseases. Thus, imaging this core memory region could provide insight into the pathophysiology of these disorders and the associated cognitive deficits. To examine possible shared alterations in the hippocampus, we conducted a multi-modal assessment, including functional and structural imaging as well as neurobehavioral measures of memory performance in BD and SZ patients compared with healthy controls. We assessed episodic memory performance, using tests of verbal and visual learning (HVLT, BVMT) in three groups of participants: BD patients (n = 21), SZ patients (n = 21) and matched (age, gender, education) healthy control subjects (n = 21). In addition, we examined hippocampal resting state functional connectivity, hippocampal volume using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and fibre integrity of hippocampal connections using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We found memory deficits, changes in functional connectivity within the hippocampal network as well as volumetric reductions and altered white matter fibre integrity across patient groups in comparison with controls. However, SZ patients when directly compared with BD patients were more severely affected in several of the assessed parameters (verbal learning, left hippocampal volumes, mean diffusivity of bilateral cingulum and right uncinated fasciculus). The results of our study suggest a graded expression of verbal learning deficits accompanied by structural alterations within the hippocampus in BD patients and SZ patients, with SZ patients being more strongly affected. Our findings imply that these two disorders may share some common pathophysiological mechanisms. The results could thus help to further advance and integrate current pathophysiological models of SZ and BD. PMID:25379425

Knöchel, Christian; Stäblein, Michael; Storchak, Helena; Reinke, Britta; Jurcoane, Alina; Prvulovic, David; Linden, David E.J.; van de Ven, Vincent; Ghinea, Denisa; Wenzler, Sofia; Alves, Gilberto; Matura, Silke; Kröger, Anne; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola

2014-01-01

232

Microstructure of frontoparietal connections predicts individual resistance to sleep deprivation.  

PubMed

Sleep deprivation (SD) can degrade cognitive functioning, but growing evidence suggests that there are large individual differences in the vulnerability to this effect. Some evidence suggests that baseline differences in the responsiveness of a fronto-parietal attention system that is activated during working memory (WM) tasks may be associated with the ability to sustain vigilance during sleep deprivation. However, the neurocircuitry underlying this network remains virtually unexplored. In this study, we employed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the association between the microstructure of the axonal pathway connecting the frontal and parietal regions-i.e., the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF)-and individual resistance to SD. Thirty healthy participants (15 males) aged 20-43years underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at rested wakefulness prior to a 28-hour period of SD. Task-related fronto-parietal fMRI activation clusters during a Sternberg WM Task were localized and used as seed regions for probabilistic fiber tractography. DTI metrics, including fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial and radial diffusivity were measured in the SLF. The psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) was used to evaluate resistance to SD. We found that activation in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) positively correlated with resistance. Higher fractional anisotropy of the left SLF comprising the primary axons connecting IPL and DLPFC was also associated with better resistance. These findings suggest that individual differences in resistance to SD are associated with the functional responsiveness of a fronto-parietal attention system and the microstructural properties of the axonal interconnections. PMID:25463450

Cui, Jiaolong; Tkachenko, Olga; Gogel, Hannah; Kipman, Maia; Preer, Lily A; Weber, Mareen; Divatia, Shreya C; Demers, Lauren A; Olson, Elizabeth A; Buchholz, Jennifer L; Bark, John S; Rosso, Isabelle M; Rauch, Scott L; Killgore, William D S

2015-02-01

233

INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN SERUM CHOLESTEROL IS ASSOCIATED WITH REGIONAL WHITE MATTER TISSUE INTEGRITY IN OLDER ADULTS  

PubMed Central

Prior research has demonstrated links among vascular health and the occurrence of stroke, mild cognitive decline, and dementia in older adults. However, little is known about whether normal variation in vascular indicators may be related to changes in neural tissue integrity. Even less is known about how the brain is affected by cholesterol levels in the normal to moderate risk range, leading up to overt disease pathology. This study examined associations between serum lipid levels and DTI indicators of white matter (WM) structural integrity in a sample of 125 generally healthy older adults aged 43–87 years. Whole-brain voxelwise analysis, controlling for age and gender, revealed low density lipoprotein levels (LDL) as the most robust correlate of regional WM structural integrity of the measured lipids. Higher LDL was associated with decreased WM integrity in right frontal and temporal regions, the superior longitudinal fasciculus and internal/external capsules. Increasing LDL was associated with increased radial and axial diffusivity; however, more widespread statistical effects were found for radial diffusivity. These findings suggest that normal inter-individual variation in lipid levels is associated with compromised regional WM integrity, even in individuals below clinical thresholds for hyperlipidemia. Given the prevalence of cholesterol-associated sequelae in older adults, and mounting evidence suggesting a vascular role in the etiology of dementia, the current data suggest that understanding the relationship between cholesterol and brain tissue microstructure may have important clinical implications for early detection of vascular-related cognitive disorders and optimal regulation of serum lipids to maintain neural health in older adults. PMID:22438182

Williams, Victoria J.; Leritz, Elizabeth C.; Shepel, Juli; McGlinchey, Regina E.; Milberg, William P.; Rudolph, James L.; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Salat, David H.

2013-01-01

234

Evidence That the Blood Biomarker SNTF Predicts Brain Imaging Changes and Persistent Cognitive Dysfunction in Mild TBI Patients  

PubMed Central

Although mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), or concussion, is not typically associated with abnormalities on computed tomography (CT), it nevertheless causes persistent cognitive dysfunction for many patients. Consequently, new prognostic methods for mTBI are needed to identify at risk cases, especially at an early and potentially treatable stage. Here, we quantified plasma levels of the neurodegeneration biomarker calpain-cleaved ?II-spectrin N-terminal fragment (SNTF) from 38 participants with CT-negative mTBI, orthopedic injury (OI), and normal uninjured controls (UCs) (age range 12–30?years), and compared them with findings from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and long-term cognitive assessment. SNTF levels were at least twice the lower limit of detection in 7 of 17 mTBI cases and in 3 of 13 OI cases, but in none of the UCs. An elevation in plasma SNTF corresponded with significant differences in fractional anisotropy and the apparent diffusion coefficient in the corpus callosum and uncinate fasciculus measured by DTI. Furthermore, increased plasma SNTF on the day of injury correlated significantly with cognitive impairment that persisted for at least 3?months, both across all study participants and also among the mTBI cases by themselves. The elevation in plasma SNTF in the subset of OI cases, accompanied by corresponding white matter and cognitive abnormalities, raises the possibility of identifying undiagnosed cases of mTBI. These data suggest that the blood level of SNTF on the day of a CT-negative mTBI may identify a subset of patients at risk of white matter damage and persistent disability. SNTF could have prognostic and diagnostic utilities in the assessment and treatment of mTBI. PMID:24302918

Siman, Robert; Giovannone, Nicholas; Hanten, Gerri; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; McCauley, Stephen R.; Hunter, Jill V.; Li, Xiaoqi; Levin, Harvey S.; Smith, Douglas H.

2013-01-01

235

Relation between variants in the neurotrophin receptor gene, NTRK3, and white matter integrity in healthy young adults  

PubMed Central

The NTRK3 gene (also known as TRKC) encodes a high affinity receptor for the neurotrophin 3?-nucleotidase (NT3), which is implicated in oligodendrocyte and myelin development. We previously found that white matter integrity in young adults related to genetic variants in genes encoding neurotrophins and their receptors. This underscores the importance of neurotrophins for white matter development. NTRK3 variants are putative risk factors for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder hoarding, suggesting that some NTRK3 variants may affect the brain. To test this, we scanned 392 healthy adult twins and their siblings (mean age, 23.6 ± 2.2 years; range: 20-29 years) with 105-gradient 4-Tesla diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We identified 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NTRK3 gene that have been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. We used a multi-SNP model, adjusting for family relatedness, age, and sex, to relate these variants to voxelwise fractional anisotropy (FA) – a DTI measure of white matter integrity. FA was optimally predicted (based on the highest false discovery rate critical p), by five SNPs (rs1017412, rs2114252, rs16941261, rs3784406, and rs7176429; overall FDR critical p = 0.028). Gene effects were widespread and included the corpus callosum genu and inferior longitudinal fasciculus - regions implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders and previously associated with other neurotrophin-related genetic variants in an overlapping sample of subjects. NTRK3 genetic variants, and neurotrophins more generally, may influence white matter integrity in brain regions implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:23727532

Braskie, Meredith N; Kohannim, Omid; Jahanshad, Neda; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Barysheva, Marina; Toga, Arthur W; Ringman, John M; Montgomery, Grant W; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

2014-01-01

236

Validating Serum S100B and Neuron-Specific Enolase as Biomarkers for the Human Brain – A Combined Serum, Gene Expression and MRI Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Former studies have investigated the potential of serum biomarkers for diseases affecting the human brain. In particular the glial protein S100B, a neuro- and gliotrophin inducing plasticity, seems to be involved in the pathogenesis and treatment of psychiatric diseases such as major depression and schizophrenia. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a specific serum marker for neuronal damage. However, the specificity of these biomarkers for cell type and brain region has not been investigated in vivo until now. Methods We acquired two magnetic resonance imaging parameters sensitive to changes in gray and white matter (T1-weighted/diffusion tensor imaging) and obtained serum S100B and NSE levels of 41 healthy subjects. Additionally, we analyzed whole brain gene expressions of S100B in another male cohort of three subjects using the Allen Brain Atlas. Furthermore, a female post mortal brain was investigated using double immunofluorescence labelling with oligodendrocyte markers. Results We show that S100B is specifically related to white matter structures, namely the corpus callosum, anterior forceps and superior longitudinal fasciculus in female subjects. This effect was observed in fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity – the latest an indicator of myelin changes. Histological data confirmed a co-localization of S100B with oligodendrocyte markers in the human corpus callosum. S100B was most abundantly expressed in the corpus callosum according to the whole genome Allen Human Brain Atlas. In addition, NSE was related to gray matter structures, namely the amygdala. This effect was detected across sexes. Conclusion Our data demonstrates a very high S100B expression in white matter tracts, in particular in human corpus callosum. Our study is the first in vivo study validating the specificity of the glial marker S100B for the human brain, and supporting the assumption that radial diffusivity represents a myelin marker. Our results open a new perspective for future studies investigating major neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:22916238

Streitbürger, Daniel-Paolo; Arelin, Katrin; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Thiery, Joachim; Steiner, Johann; Villringer, Arno

2012-01-01

237

Effects of chronic mild traumatic brain injury on white matter integrity in Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans.  

PubMed

Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common source of morbidity from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. With no overt lesions on structural MRI, diagnosis of chronic mild TBI in military veterans relies on obtaining an accurate history and assessment of behavioral symptoms that are also associated with frequent comorbid disorders, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Military veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan with mild TBI (n = 30) with comorbid PTSD and depression and non-TBI participants from primary (n = 42) and confirmatory (n = 28) control groups were assessed with high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). White matter-specific registration followed by whole-brain voxelwise analysis of crossing fibers provided separate partial volume fractions reflecting the integrity of primary fibers and secondary (crossing) fibers. Loss of white matter integrity in primary fibers (P < 0.05; corrected) was associated with chronic mild TBI in a widely distributed pattern of major fiber bundles and smaller peripheral tracts including the corpus callosum (genu, body, and splenium), forceps minor, forceps major, superior and posterior corona radiata, internal capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and others. Distributed loss of white matter integrity correlated with duration of loss of consciousness and most notably with "feeling dazed or confused," but not diagnosis of PTSD or depressive symptoms. This widespread spatial extent of white matter damage has typically been reported in moderate to severe TBI. The diffuse loss of white matter integrity appears consistent with systemic mechanisms of damage shared by blast- and impact-related mild TBI that involves a cascade of inflammatory and neurochemical events. PMID:22706988

Morey, Rajendra A; Haswell, Courtney C; Selgrade, Elizabeth S; Massoglia, Dino; Liu, Chunlei; Weiner, Jonathan; Marx, Christine E; Cernak, Ibolja; McCarthy, Gregory

2013-11-01

238

Neuronal fiber bundle lengths in healthy adult carriers of the ApoE4 allele: a quantitative tractography DTI study.  

PubMed

The epsilon 4 (e4) isoform of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is a known genetic risk factor for suboptimal brain health. Morphometry studies of brains with Alzheimer's disease have reported significant alterations in temporal lobe brain structure of e4 carriers, yet it remains unclear if the presence of an e4 allele is associated with alterations in the microstructure of white matter fiber bundles in healthy populations. The present study used quantitative tractography based on diffusion tensor imaging (qtDTI) to examine the influence of the e4 allele on temporal lobe fiber bundle lengths (FBLs) in 64 healthy older adults with at least one e4 allele (carriers, N = 23) versus no e4 allele (non-carriers, N = 41). Subtests from the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) were also analyzed to examine memory performance between groups. Analyses revealed shorter FBLs in the left uncinate fasciculus (UF) (p =?.038) of e4 carriers compared to non-carriers. By contrast, neither FBLs specific to the temporal lobe nor memory performances differed significantly between groups. Increased age correlated significantly with shorter FBL in the temporal lobe and UF, and with decreased performance on tests of memory. This is the first study to utilize qtDTI to examine relationships between FBL and ApoE genotype. Results suggest that FBL in the UF is influenced by the presence of an ApoE e4 allele (ApoE4) in healthy older adults. Temporal lobe FBLs, however, are more vulnerable to aging than the presence of an e4 allele. PMID:23475756

Salminen, Lauren E; Schofield, Peter R; Lane, Elizabeth M; Heaps, Jodi M; Pierce, Kerrie D; Cabeen, Ryan; Laidlaw, David H; Akbudak, Erbil; Conturo, Thomas E; Correia, Stephen; Paul, Robert H

2013-09-01

239

Imaging-Based Biomarkers of Cognitive Performance in Older Adults Constructed via High-Dimensional Pattern Regression Applied to MRI and PET  

PubMed Central

In this study, we used high-dimensional pattern regression methods based on structural (gray and white matter; GM and WM) and functional (positron emission tomography of regional cerebral blood flow; PET) brain data to identify cross-sectional imaging biomarkers of cognitive performance in cognitively normal older adults from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). We focused on specific components of executive and memory domains known to decline with aging, including manipulation, semantic retrieval, long-term memory (LTM), and short-term memory (STM). For each imaging modality, brain regions associated with each cognitive domain were generated by adaptive regional clustering. A relevance vector machine was adopted to model the nonlinear continuous relationship between brain regions and cognitive performance, with cross-validation to select the most informative brain regions (using recursive feature elimination) as imaging biomarkers and optimize model parameters. Predicted cognitive scores using our regression algorithm based on the resulting brain regions correlated well with actual performance. Also, regression models obtained using combined GM, WM, and PET imaging modalities outperformed models based on single modalities. Imaging biomarkers related to memory performance included the orbito-frontal and medial temporal cortical regions with LTM showing stronger correlation with the temporal lobe than STM. Brain regions predicting executive performance included orbito-frontal, and occipito-temporal areas. The PET modality had higher contribution to most cognitive domains except manipulation, which had higher WM contribution from the superior longitudinal fasciculus and the genu of the corpus callosum. These findings based on machine-learning methods demonstrate the importance of combining structural and functional imaging data in understanding complex cognitive mechanisms and also their potential usage as biomarkers that predict cognitive status. PMID:24392010

Resnick, Susan M.; Davatzikos, Christos

2013-01-01

240

Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Coordinated Use of Multiple, Mutually Informative Probes to Understand Brain Structure and Function  

PubMed Central

Differing imaging modalities provide unique channels of information to probe differing aspects of the brain’s structural or functional organization. In combination, differing modalities provide complementary and mutually informative data about tissue organization that is more than their sum. We acquired and spatially coregistered data in four MRI modalities – anatomical MRI, functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) – from 20 healthy adults to understand how inter-individual variability in measures from one modality account for variability in measures from other modalities at each voxel of the brain. We detected significant correlations of local volumes with the magnitude of functional activation, suggesting that underlying variation in local volumes contributes to individual variability in functional activation. We also detected significant inverse correlations of NAA (a putative measure of neuronal density and viability) with volumes of white matter in the frontal cortex, with DTI-based measures of tissue organization within the superior longitudinal fasciculus, and with the magnitude of functional activation and default-mode activity during simple visual and motor tasks, indicating that substantial variance in local volumes, white matter organization, and functional activation derives from an underlying variability in the number or density of neurons in those regions. Many of these imaging measures correlated with measures of intellectual ability within differing brain tissues and differing neural systems, demonstrating that the neural determinants of intellectual capacity involve numerous and disparate features of brain tissue organization, a conclusion that could be made with confidence only when imaging the same individuals with multiple MRI modalities. PMID:22076792

Hao, Xuejun; Xu, Dongrong; Bansal, Ravi; Dong, Zhengchao; Liu, Jun; Wang, Zhishun; Kangarlu, Alayar; Liu, Feng; Duan, Yunsuo; Shova, Satie; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

2014-01-01

241

White matter integrity and its association with affective and interpersonal symptoms in borderline personality disorder  

PubMed Central

Background Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe psychiatric disorder involving a range of symptoms including marked affective instability and disturbances in interpersonal interactions. Neuroimaging studies are beginning to provide evidence of altered processing in fronto-limbic network deficits in the disorder, however, few studies directly examine structural connections within this circuitry together with their relation to proposed causative processes and clinical features. Methods In the current study, we investigated whether individuals with BPD (n = 20) have deficits in white matter integrity compared to a matched group of healthy controls (n = 18) using diffusion tensor MRI (DTI). We hypothesized that the BPD group would have decreased fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure of white matter integrity, compared to the controls in white matter tracts connecting frontal and limbic regions, primarily the cingulum, fornix and uncinate fasciculus. We also investigated the extent to which any such deficits related to childhood adversity, as measured by the childhood trauma questionnaire, and symptom severity as measured by the Zanarini rating scale for BPD. Results We report decreased white matter integrity in BPD versus controls in the cingulum and fornix. There were no significant relationships between FA and measures of childhood trauma. There were, however, significant associations between FA in the cingulum and clinical symptoms of anger, and in the fornix with affective instability, and measures of avoidance of abandonment from the Zanarini rating scale. Conclusions We report deficits within fronto-limbic connections in individuals with BPD. Abnormalities within the fornix and cingulum were related to severity of symptoms and highlight the importance of these tracts in the pathogenesis of the disorder.

Whalley, Heather C.; Nickson, Thomas; Pope, Merrick; Nicol, Katie; Romaniuk, Liana; Bastin, Mark E.; Semple, Scott I.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Hall, Jeremy

2015-01-01

242

The role of lymphotoxin in pathogenesis of polymyositis.  

PubMed

Polymyositis (PM) is a cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Perforin (PF), Fas ligand (FasL) and TNF-alpha are considered to be important factors in cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated cell injury, and several studies have established a role of lymphotoxin (LT) in T helper type 1 (Th1)-induced cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. In the present study, to determine how LT, PF and FasL are involved in the pathogenesis of PM, we used immunohistochemical staining (IHC), reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and in situ hybridization (ISH) on muscle specimens from patients with PM, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), myotonic dystrophy (MyD) and controls (NC). There were many mononuclear cells (MNCs) immunoreactive for LT and some for PF and FasL within the fasciculus in PM muscles. On the other hand, only few or no LT-, PF- and FasL-positive cells were detected in MyD, ALS and NC muscles. The results of mRNA expression of these three molecules with RT-PCR were consistent with those using IHC methods. The number of MNCs positive for LT with ISH was far higher in PM compared to MyD, ALS and NC (P < 0.05 or 0.01). The MNCs located in the connective tissue or in the vicinity of necrotizing or non-necrotizing muscles were mainly LT mRNA and CD4 positive, while MNCs invading the non-necrotic fibers were mainly LT mRNA and CD8 positive. Our results indicated that the expression of LT was up-regulated in PM, and LT plays an important role in muscle injury and orchestrating the inflammatory reaction in PM. PMID:11045674

Liang, Y; Inukai, A; Kuru, S; Kato, T; Doyu, M; Sobue, G

2000-11-01

243

An Arbitrary Waveform Wearable Neuro-stimulator System for Neurophysiology Research on Freely Behaving Animals.  

PubMed

Portable wireless neuro-stimulators have been developed to facilitate long-term cognitive and behavioral studies on the central nervous system in freely moving animals. These stimulators can provide precisely controllable input(s) to the nervous system, without distracting the animal attention with cables connected to its body. In this study, a low power backpack neuro-stimulator was developed for animal brain researches that can provides arbitrary stimulus waveforms for the stimulation, while it is small and light weight to be used for small animals including rats. The system consists of a controller that uses an RF link to program and activate a small and light microprocessor-based stimulator. A Howland current source was implemented to produce precise current controlled arbitrary waveform stimulations. The system was optimized for ultra-low power consumption and small size. The stimulator was first tested for its electrical specifications. Then its performance was evaluated in a rat experiment when electrical stimulation of medial longitudinal fasciculus induced circling behavior. The stimulator is capable of delivering programmed stimulations up to ± 2 mA with adjusting steps of 1 ?A, accuracy of 0.7% and compliance of 6 V. The stimulator is 15 mm × 20 mm × 40 mm in size, weights 13.5 g without battery and consumes a total power of only 5.l mW. In the experiment, the rat could easily carry the stimulator and demonstrated the circling behavior for 0.1 ms current pulses of above 400 ?A. The developed system has a competitive size and weight, whereas providing a wide range of operation and the flexibility of generating arbitrary stimulation patterns ideal for long-term experiments in the field of cognitive and neuroscience research. PMID:24761373

Samani, Mohsen Mosayebi; Mahnam, Amin; Hosseini, Nasrin

2014-04-01

244

Profiles of White Matter Tract Pathology in Frontotemporal Dementia  

PubMed Central

Despite considerable interest in improving clinical and neurobiological characterisation of frontotemporal dementia and in defining the role of brain network disintegration in its pathogenesis, information about white matter pathway alterations in frontotemporal dementia remains limited. Here we investigated white matter tract damage using an unbiased, template-based diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) protocol in a cohort of 27 patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) representing both major genetic and sporadic forms, in relation both to healthy individuals and to patients with Alzheimer's disease. Widespread white matter tract pathology was identified in the bvFTD group compared with both healthy controls and Alzheimer's disease group, with prominent involvement of uncinate fasciculus, cingulum bundle and corpus callosum. Relatively discrete and distinctive white matter profiles were associated with genetic subgroups of bvFTD associated with MAPT and C9ORF72 mutations. Comparing diffusivity metrics, optimal overall separation of the bvFTD group from the healthy control group was signalled using radial diffusivity, whereas optimal overall separation of the bvFTD group from the Alzheimer's disease group was signalled using fractional anisotropy. Comparing white matter changes with regional grey matter atrophy (delineated using voxel based morphometry) in the bvFTD cohort revealed co-localisation between modalities particularly in the anterior temporal lobe, however white matter changes extended widely beyond the zones of grey matter atrophy. Our findings demonstrate a distributed signature of white matter alterations that is likely to be core to the pathophysiology of bvFTD and further suggest that this signature is modulated by underlying molecular pathologies. PMID:24510641

Mahoney, Colin J; Ridgway, Gerard R; Malone, Ian B; Downey, Laura E; Beck, Jonathan; Kinnunen, Kirsi M; Schmitz, Nicole; Golden, Hannah L; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Schott, Jonathan M; Rossor, Martin N; Ourselin, Sebastien; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick C; Warren, Jason D

2014-01-01

245

Electroconvulsive therapy mediates neuroplasticity of white matter microstructure in major depression  

PubMed Central

Whether plasticity of white matter (WM) microstructure relates to therapeutic response in major depressive disorder (MDD) remains uncertain. We examined diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) correlates of WM structural connectivity in patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a rapidly acting treatment for severe MDD. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) applied to DTI data (61 directions, 2.5?mm3 voxel size) targeted voxel-level changes in fractional anisotropy (FA), and radial (RD), axial (AD) and mean diffusivity (MD) in major WM pathways in MDD patients (n=20, mean age: 41.15 years, 10.32 s.d.) scanned before ECT, after their second ECT and at transition to maintenance therapy. Comparisons made at baseline with demographically similar controls (n=28, mean age: 39.42 years, 12.20 s.d.) established effects of diagnosis. Controls were imaged twice to estimate scanning-related variance. Patients showed significant increases of FA in dorsal fronto-limbic circuits encompassing the anterior cingulum, forceps minor and left superior longitudinal fasciculus between baseline and transition to maintenance therapy (P<0.05, corrected). Decreases in RD and MD were observed in overlapping regions and the anterior thalamic radiation (P<0.05, corrected). Changes in DTI metrics associated with therapeutic response in tracts showing significant ECT effects differed between patients and controls. All measures remained stable across time in controls. Altered WM microstructure in pathways connecting frontal and limbic areas occur in MDD, are modulated by ECT and relate to therapeutic response. Increased FA together with decreased MD and RD, which trend towards normative values with treatment, suggest increased fiber integrity in dorsal fronto-limbic pathways involved in mood regulation. PMID:24713861

Lyden, H; Espinoza, R T; Pirnia, T; Clark, K; Joshi, S H; Leaver, A M; Woods, R P; Narr, K L

2014-01-01

246

The Evolution of Syntax: An Exaptationist Perspective  

PubMed Central

The evolution of language required elaboration of a number of independent mechanisms in the hominin lineage, including systems involved in signaling, semantics, and syntax. Two perspectives on the evolution of syntax can be contrasted. The “continuist” perspective seeks the evolutionary roots of complex human syntax in simpler combinatory systems used in animal communication systems, such as iteration and sequencing. The “exaptationist” perspective posits evolutionary change of function, so that systems today used for linguistic communication might previously have served quite different functions in earlier hominids. I argue that abundant biological evidence supports an exaptationist perspective, in general, and that it must be taken seriously when considering language evolution. When applied to syntax, this suggests that core computational components used today in language could have originally served non-linguistic functions such as motor control, non-verbal thought, or spatial reasoning. I outline three specific exaptationist hypotheses for spoken language. These three hypotheses each posit a change of functionality in a precursor circuit, and its transformation into a neural circuit or region specifically involved in language today. Hypothesis 1 suggests that the precursor mechanism for intentional vocal control, specifically direct cortical control over the larynx, was manual motor control subserved by the cortico-spinal tract. The second is that the arcuate fasciculus, which today connects syntactic and lexical regions, had its origin in intracortical connections subserving vocal imitation. The third is that the specialized components of Broca’s area, specifically BA 45, had their origins in non-linguistic motor control, and specifically hierarchical planning of action. I conclude by illustrating the importance of both homology (studied via primates) and convergence (typically analyzed in birds) for testing such evolutionary hypotheses. PMID:22207847

Fitch, W. Tecumseh

2011-01-01

247

Associations Between White Matter Microstructure and Infants’ Working Memory  

PubMed Central

Working memory emerges in infancy and plays a privileged role in subsequent adaptive cognitive development. The neural networks important for the development of working memory during infancy remain unknown. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and deterministic fiber tracking to characterize the microstructure of white matter fiber bundles hypothesized to support working memory in 12-month-old infants (n=73). Here we show robust associations between infants’ visuospatial working memory performance and microstructural characteristics of widespread white matter. Significant associations were found for white matter tracts that connect brain regions known to support working memory in older children and adults (genu, anterior and superior thalamic radiations, anterior cingulum, arcuate fasciculus, and the temporal-parietal segment). Better working memory scores were associated with higher FA and lower RD values in these selected white matter tracts. These tract-specific brain-behavior relationships accounted for a significant amount of individual variation above and beyond infants’ gestational age and developmental level, as measured with the Mullen Scales of Early Learning. Working memory was not associated with global measures of brain volume, as expected, and few associations were found between working memory and control white matter tracts. To our knowledge, this study is among the first demonstrations of brain-behavior associations in infants using quantitative tractography. The ability to characterize subtle individual differences in infant brain development associated with complex cognitive functions holds promise for improving our understanding of normative development, biomarkers of risk, experience-dependent learning and neuro-cognitive periods of developmental plasticity. PMID:22989623

Short, Sarah J.; Elison, Jed T.; Goldman, Barbara Davis; Styner, Martin; Gu, Hongbin; Connelly, Mark; Maltbie, Eric; Woolson, Sandra; Lin, Weili; Gerig, Guido; Reznick, J. Steven; Gilmore, John H.

2013-01-01

248

White matter microstructural abnormalities in girls with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Fragile X or Turner syndrome as evidenced by diffusion tensor imaging  

PubMed Central

Children with chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS), Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), or Turner Syndrome (TS) are considered to belong to distinct genetic groups, as each disorder is caused by separate genetic alterations. Even so, they have similar cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions, particularly in visuospatial and numerical abilities. To assess evidence for common underlying neural microstructural alterations, we set out to determine whether these groups have partially overlapping white matter abnormalities, relative to typically developing controls. We scanned 101 female children between 7 and 14 years old: 25 with 22q11.2DS, 18 with FXS, 17 with TS, and 41 aged-matched controls using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Anisotropy and diffusivity measures were calculated and all brain scans were nonlinearly aligned to population and site-specific templates. We performed voxel-based statistical comparisons of the DTI-derived metrics between each disease group and the controls, while adjusting for age. Girls with 22q11.2DS showed lower fractional anisotropy (FA) than controls in the association fibers of the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, the splenium of the corpus callosum, and the corticospinal tract. FA was abnormally lower in girls with FXS in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule, posterior thalami, and precentral gyrus. Girls with TS had lower FA in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right internal capsule and left cerebellar peduncle. Partially overlapping neurodevelopmental anomalies were detected in all three neurogenetic disorders. Altered white matter integrity in the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi and thalamic to frontal tracts may contribute to the behavioral characteristics of all of these disorders. PMID:23602925

Villalon, Julio; Jahanshad, Neda; Beaton, Elliott; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Simon, Tony J.

2014-01-01

249

Aerobic Exercise Moderates the Effect of Heavy Alcohol Consumption on White Matter Damage  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic alcohol abuse is related to numerous deleterious neurobiological consequences, including loss of gray matter, damage to white matter, and impairment of cognitive and motor functions. Aerobic exercise has been demonstrated to slow cognitive decline and decrease the negative neural changes resulting from normal aging and from several diseases. It is possible that exercise may also prevent or repair alcohol-related neurological damage. The present study tested the hypothesis that aerobic exercise protects white matter in anterior and dorsal areas of the brain from damage related to heavy alcohol use. Methods 60 individuals underwent a diffusion tensor imaging session and completed measures of alcohol consumption, loss of control over drinking and aerobic exercise participation. Analyses examined the relationship of exercise, alcohol and their interaction to fractional anisotropy (FA) in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), external capsule (EC), superior and anterior corona radiata and fornix. The relationship of aerobic exercise and alcohol consumption to self-reported loss of control over drinking were also examined. Results A significant interaction was observed between alcohol consumption and aerobic exercise participation on FA in the SLF and EC. In the models examining loss of control over drinking, a significant interaction between aerobic exercise and alcohol consumption was observed, such that alcohol consumption was associated with loss of control more strongly for low exercisers than high exercisers. Conclusions These results indicate that the association between heavy alcohol consumption and white matter damage in the EC and SLF, and the association between alcohol consumption and loss of control over drinking, are greater among individuals who do not exercise regularly. These results are consistent with the notion that exercise may protect white matter integrity from alcohol-related damage. PMID:23551199

Karoly, Hollis C.; Stevens, Courtney J.; Thayer, Rachel E.; Magnan, Renee, E.; Bryan, Angela D.; Hutchison, Kent E.

2013-01-01

250

Profiles of white matter tract pathology in frontotemporal dementia.  

PubMed

Despite considerable interest in improving clinical and neurobiological characterisation of frontotemporal dementia and in defining the role of brain network disintegration in its pathogenesis, information about white matter pathway alterations in frontotemporal dementia remains limited. Here we investigated white matter tract damage using an unbiased, template-based diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) protocol in a cohort of 27 patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) representing both major genetic and sporadic forms, in relation both to healthy individuals and to patients with Alzheimer's disease. Widespread white matter tract pathology was identified in the bvFTD group compared with both healthy controls and Alzheimer's disease group, with prominent involvement of uncinate fasciculus, cingulum bundle and corpus callosum. Relatively discrete and distinctive white matter profiles were associated with genetic subgroups of bvFTD associated with MAPT and C9ORF72 mutations. Comparing diffusivity metrics, optimal overall separation of the bvFTD group from the healthy control group was signalled using radial diffusivity, whereas optimal overall separation of the bvFTD group from the Alzheimer's disease group was signalled using fractional anisotropy. Comparing white matter changes with regional grey matter atrophy (delineated using voxel based morphometry) in the bvFTD cohort revealed co-localisation between modalities particularly in the anterior temporal lobe, however white matter changes extended widely beyond the zones of grey matter atrophy. Our findings demonstrate a distributed signature of white matter alterations that is likely to be core to the pathophysiology of bvFTD and further suggest that this signature is modulated by underlying molecular pathologies. PMID:24510641

Mahoney, Colin J; Ridgway, Gerard R; Malone, Ian B; Downey, Laura E; Beck, Jonathan; Kinnunen, Kirsi M; Schmitz, Nicole; Golden, Hannah L; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Schott, Jonathan M; Rossor, Martin N; Ourselin, Sebastien; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick C; Warren, Jason D

2014-08-01

251

Assessment of whole brain white matter integrity in youths and young adults with a family history of substance-use disorders.  

PubMed

Individuals with a family history of substance use disorders (FH+) are at a greater risk of developing substance use disorders than their peers with no such family histories (FH-) and this vulnerability is proportional to the number of affected relatives (FH density). The risk for developing substance use disorders peaks during adolescence to early adulthood in the general population, and that is thought to be related to delayed maturation of frontocortical and frontostriatal functional circuits. We hypothesized that FH+ youth and young adults have impaired myelination of frontocortical and frontostriatal white matter tracts. We examined fractional anisotropy (FA) data in 80 FH+ and 34 FH- youths (12.9?±?1.0 years) and in 25 FH+ and 30 FH- young adults (24.3?±?3.4 years). FH+ youths had lower FA values in both frontocortical and frontostriatal tracts as well as parietocortical tracts including the anterior, superior and posterior corona radiata and the superior frontal-occipital fasciculus. Moreover, FA values in these tracts were negatively correlated with FH density. FH+ adults had lower FA values in two frontocortical tracts: the genu of the corpus callosum and anterior corona radiata and also significant negative correlations between FA and FH density in these same tracts. In both groups, lower FA values corresponded to higher radial diffusivity suggesting reduced axonal myelination. We interpreted our findings as evidence for impaired myelination of frontal white matter that was proportional to FH density. Our data suggest that deficits may partially resolve with age, paralleling an age-related decline in risk for developing substance use disorders. PMID:24867528

Acheson, Ashley; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Rowland, Laura M; Winkler, Anderson M; Gaston, Frank; Mathias, Charles W; Fox, Peter T; Lovallo, William R; Wright, Susan N; Hong, L Elliot; Dougherty, Donald M; Kochunov, Peter

2014-11-01

252

Neuroradiological and Neurophysiological Characteristics of Patients With Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate neuroradiological and neurophysiological characteristics of patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy (CP), by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), voxel-based morphometry (VBM), diffusion tensor tractography (DTT), and motor evoked potential (MEP). Methods Twenty-three patients with dyskinetic CP (13 males, 10 females; mean age 34 years, range 16-50 years) were participated in this study. Functional evaluation was assessed by the Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) and Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS). Brain imaging was performed on 3.0 Tesla MRI, and volume change of the grey matter was assessed using VBM. The corticospinal tract (CST) and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) were analyzed by DTT. MEPs were recorded in the first dorsal interossei, the biceps brachii and the deltoid muscles. Results Mean BADS was 16.4±5.0 in ambulatory group (GMFCS levels I, II, and III; n=11) and 21.3±3.9 in non-ambulatory group (GMFCS levels IV and V; n=12). Twelve patients showed normal MRI findings, and eleven patients showed abnormal MRI findings (grade I, n=5; grade II, n=2; grade III, n=4). About half of patients with dyskinetic CP showed putamen and thalamus lesions on MRI. Mean BADS was 20.3±5.7 in normal MRI group and 17.5±4.0 in abnormal MRI group. VBM showed reduced volume of the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus. In DTT, no abnormality was observed in CST, but not in SLF. In MEPs, most patients showed normal central motor conduction time. Conclusion These results support that extrapyramidal tract, related with basal ganglia circuitry, may be responsible for the pathophysiology of dyskinetic CP rather than CST abnormality. PMID:24855613

Park, Byung-Hyun; Seo, Jeong-Hwan; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Chung, Gyung-Ho

2014-01-01

253

Differential distribution and energy status-dependent regulation of the four CART neuropeptide genes in the zebrafish brain.  

PubMed

The cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) neuropeptide has been implicated in the neural regulation of energy homeostasis across vertebrate phyla. By using gene-specific in situ hybridization, we have mapped the distribution of the four CART mRNAs in the central nervous system of the adult zebrafish. The widespread neuronal expression pattern for CART 2 and 4 suggests a prominent role for the peptide in processing sensory information from diverse modalities including olfactory and visual inputs. In contrast, CART 1 and 3 have a much more restricted distribution, predominantly located in the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (NMLF) and entopeduncular nucleus (EN), respectively. Enrichment of CART 2 and 4 in the preoptic and tuberal areas emphasizes the importance of CART in neuroendocrine functions. Starvation resulted in a significant decrease in CART-positive cells in the nucleus recessus lateralis (NRL) and nucleus lateralis tuberis (NLT) hypothalamic regions, suggesting a function in energy homeostasis for these neurons. Similarly, the EN emerges as a novel energy status-responsive region. Not only is there abundant and overlapping expression of CART 2, 3, and 4 in the EN, but also starvation induced a decrease in CART-expressing neurons in this region. The cellular resolution mapping of CART mRNA and the response of CART-expressing nuclei to starvation underscores the importance of CART neuropeptide in energy processing. Additionally, the regional and gene-specific responses to energy levels suggest a complex, interactive network whereby the four CART gene products may have nonredundant functions in energy homeostasis. PMID:24374761

Akash, G; Kaniganti, Tarun; Tiwari, Neeraj Kumar; Subhedar, Nishikant K; Ghose, Aurnab

2014-07-01

254

Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple System Atrophy and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study  

PubMed Central

Although often clinically indistinguishable in the early stages, Parkinson’s disease (PD), Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) have distinct neuropathological changes. The aim of the current study was to identify white matter tract neurodegeneration characteristic of each of the three syndromes. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was used to perform a whole-brain automated analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data to compare differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) between the three clinical groups and healthy control subjects. Further analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between these putative indices of white matter microstructure and clinical measures of disease severity and symptoms. In PSP, relative to controls, changes in DTI indices consistent with white matter tract degeneration were identified in the corpus callosum, corona radiata, corticospinal tract, superior longitudinal fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, superior cerebellar peduncle, medial lemniscus, retrolenticular and anterior limb of the internal capsule, cerebral peduncle and external capsule bilaterally, as well as the left posterior limb of the internal capsule and the right posterior thalamic radiation. MSA patients also displayed differences in the body of the corpus callosum corticospinal tract, cerebellar peduncle, medial lemniscus, anterior and superior corona radiata, posterior limb of the internal capsule external capsule and cerebral peduncle bilaterally, as well as the left anterior limb of the internal capsule and the left anterior thalamic radiation. No significant white matter abnormalities were observed in the PD group. Across groups, MD correlated positively with disease severity in all major white matter tracts. These results show widespread changes in white matter tracts in both PSP and MSA patients, even at a mid-point in the disease process, which are not found in patients with PD. PMID:25405990

Worker, Amanda; Blain, Camilla; Jarosz, Jozef; Chaudhuri, K. Ray; Barker, Gareth J.; Williams, Steve C. R.; Brown, Richard G.; Leigh, P. Nigel; Dell’Acqua, Flavio; Simmons, Andrew

2014-01-01

255

Acquisition of Paleolithic toolmaking abilities involves structural remodeling to inferior frontoparietal regions.  

PubMed

Human ancestors first modified stones into tools 2.6 million years ago, initiating a cascading increase in technological complexity that continues today. A parallel trend of brain expansion during the Paleolithic has motivated over 100 years of theorizing linking stone toolmaking and human brain evolution, but empirical support remains limited. Our study provides the first direct experimental evidence identifying likely neuroanatomical targets of natural selection acting on toolmaking ability. Subjects received MRI and DTI scans before, during, and after a 2-year Paleolithic toolmaking training program. White matter fractional anisotropy (FA) showed changes in branches of the superior longitudinal fasciculus leading into left supramarginal gyrus, bilateral ventral precentral gyri, and right inferior frontal gyrus pars triangularis. FA increased from Scan 1-2, a period of intense training, and decreased from Scan 2-3, a period of reduced training. Voxel-based morphometry found a similar trend toward gray matter expansion in the left supramarginal gyrus from Scan 1-2 and a reversal of this effect from Scan 2-3. FA changes correlated with training hours and with motor performance, and probabilistic tractography confirmed that white matter changes projected to gray matter changes and to regions that activate during Paleolithic toolmaking. These results show that acquisition of Paleolithic toolmaking skills elicits structural remodeling of recently evolved brain regions supporting human tool use, providing a mechanistic link between stone toolmaking and human brain evolution. These regions participate not only in toolmaking, but also in other complex functions including action planning and language, in keeping with the hypothesized co-evolution of these functions. PMID:24859884

Hecht, E E; Gutman, D A; Khreisheh, N; Taylor, S V; Kilner, J; Faisal, A A; Bradley, B A; Chaminade, T; Stout, D

2014-05-25

256

Improving diffusion-weighted imaging of post-mortem human brains: SSFP at 7 T.  

PubMed

Post-mortem diffusion imaging of whole, human brains has potential to provide data for validation or high-resolution anatomical investigations. Previous work has demonstrated improvements in data acquired with diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession (DW-SSFP) compared with conventional diffusion-weighted spin echo at 3T. This is due to the ability of DW-SSFP to overcome signal-to-noise and diffusion contrast losses brought about by tissue fixation related decreases in T2 and ADC. In this work, data of four post-mortem human brains were acquired at 3T and 7 T, using DW-SSFP with similar effective b-values (b(eff)~5150 s/mm(2)) for inter-field strength comparisons; in addition, DW-SSFP data were acquired at 7 T with higher b(eff) (~8550 s/mm(2)) for intra-field strength comparisons. Results demonstrate that both datasets acquired at 7 T had higher SNR and diffusion contrast than data acquired at 3T, and data acquired at higher b(eff) had improved diffusion contrast than at lower b(eff) at 7 T. These results translate to improved estimates of secondary fiber orientations leading to higher fidelity tractography results compared with data acquired at 3T. Specifically, tractography streamlines of cortical projections originating from the corpus callosum, corticospinal tract, and superior longitudinal fasciculus were more successful at crossing the centrum semiovale and projected closer to the cortex. Results suggest that DW-SSFP at 7 T is a preferential method for acquiring diffusion-weighted data of post-mortem human brain, specifically where the primary region of interest involves crossing white matter tracts. PMID:25128709

Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Clare, Stuart; Lam, Wilfred; Ansorge, Olaf; Douaud, Gwenaelle; Miller, Karla

2014-11-15

257

Quantitative imaging of neuroinflammation in human white matter: a positron emission tomography study with translocator protein 18 kDa radioligand, [18F]-FEPPA.  

PubMed

The ability to quantify translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) in white matter (WM) is important to understand the role of neuroinflammation in neurological disorders with WM involvement. This article aims to extend the utility of TSPO imaging in WM using a second-generation radioligand, [18F]-FEPPA, and high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) positron emission tomography (PET) camera system. Four WM regions of interests (WM-ROI), relevant to the study of aging and neuroinflammatory diseases, were examined. The corpus callosum, cingulum bundle, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and posterior limb of internal capsule were delineated automatically onto subject's T1 -weighted magnetic resonance image using a diffusion tensor imaging-based WM template. The TSPO polymorphism (rs6971) stratified individuals to three genetic groups: high-affinity binders (HAB), mixed-affinity binders (MAB), and low-affinity binders. [18F]-FEPPA PET scans were acquired on 32 healthy subjects and analyzed using a full kinetic compartment analysis. The two-tissue compartment model showed moderate identifiability (coefficient of variation 15-19%) for [18F]-FEPPA total volume distribution (VT ) in WM-ROIs. Noise affects VT variability, although its effect on bias was small (6%). In a worst-case scenario, ?6% of simulated data did not fit reliably. A simulation of increased TSPO density exposed minimal effect on variability and identifiability of [18F]-FEPPA VT in WM-ROIs. We found no association between age and [18F]-FEPPA VT in WM-ROIs. The VT values were 15% higher in HAB than in MAB, although the difference was not statistically significant. This study provides evidence for the utility and limitations of [18F]-FEPPA PET to measure TSPO expression in WM. PMID:25043159

Suridjan, Ivonne; Rusjan, Pablo M; Kenk, Miran; Verhoeff, Nicolaas Paul L G; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Rotenberg, David; Wilson, Alan A; Meyer, Jeffrey H; Houle, Sylvain; Mizrahi, Romina

2014-11-01

258

CNTNAP2 polymorphisms and structural brain connectivity: a diffusion-tensor imaging study  

PubMed Central

CNTNAP2 is a gene on chromosome 7 that has shown associations with autism and schizophrenia, and there is evidence that it plays an important role for neuronal synchronization and brain connectivity. In this study, we assessed the relationship between Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), a putative marker of anatomical brain connectivity, and multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spread out over this large gene. 81 healthy controls and 44 patients with schizophrenia (all Caucasian) underwent DTI and genotyping of 31 SNPs within CNTNAP2. We employed Tract-based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) for inter-subject brain registration and computed average diffusivity values for six major white matter tracts. Analyses of Covariance (ANCOVAs) were computed to test for possible associations with genotypes. The strongest association, which survived rigorous Bonferroni correction, was between rs2710126 genotype and Fractional Anisotropy (FA) in the uncinate fasciculus (p=.00003). This anatomical location is particularly interesting given the enriched fronto-temporal expression of CNTNAP2 in the developing brain. For this SNP, no phenotype association has been reported before. There were several further genotype-DTI associations that were nominally significant but did not survive Bonferroni correction, including an association between axial diffusivity in the dorsal cingulum bundle and a region in intron 13 (represented by rs2710102, rs759178, rs2538991), which has previously been reported to be associated with anterior-posterior functional connectivity. We present new evidence about the effects of CNTNAP2 on brain connectivity, whose disruption has been hypothesized to be central to schizophrenia pathophysiology. PMID:23871450

von Hohenberg, Christian Clemm; Wigand, Marlene C.; Kubicki, Marek; Leicht, Gregor; Giegling, Ina; Karch, Susanne; Hartmann, Annette M.; Konte, Bettina; Friedl, Marion; Ballinger, Thomas; Eckbo, Ryan; Bouix, Sylvain; Jäger, Lorenz; Shenton, Martha E.; Rujescu, Dan; Mulert, Christoph

2013-01-01

259

Associations between fractional anisotropy and problematic alcohol use in juvenile justice-involved adolescents  

PubMed Central

Background Studies have shown associations between heavy alcohol use and white matter alterations in adolescence. Youth involved with the juvenile justice system engage in high levels of risk behavior generally and alcohol use in particular as compared to their non-justice-involved peers. Objectives This study explored white matter integrity among justice-involved adolescents. Analyses examined fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) between adolescents with low and high levels of problematic alcohol use as assessed by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Methods Participants (N = 125; 80% male; 14–18 years) completed measures assessing psychological status and substance use followed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). DTI data for low (n = 51) and high AUDIT (n = 74) adolescents were subjected to cluster-based group comparisons on skeletonized FA and MD data. Results Whole-brain analyses revealed significantly lower FA in clusters in the right and left posterior corona radiata (PCR) and right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) in the high AUDIT group, as well as one cluster in the right anterior corona radiata that showed higher FA in the high AUDIT group. No differences in MD were identified. Exploratory analyses correlated cluster FA with measures of additional risk factors. FA in the right SLF and left PCR was negatively associated with impulsivity. Conclusion Justice-involved adolescents with alcohol use problems generally showed poorer FA than their low problematic alcohol use peers. Future research should aim to better understand the nature of the relationship between white matter development and alcohol use specifically as well as risk behavior more generally. PMID:24200206

Thayer, Rachel E.; Callahan, Tiffany J.; Weiland, Barbara J.; Hutchison, Kent E.; Bryan, Angela D.

2014-01-01

260

White matter microstructural changes as vulnerability factors and acquired signs of post-earthquake distress.  

PubMed

Many survivors of severe disasters need psychological support, even those not suffering post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The critical issue in understanding the psychological response after experiencing severe disasters is to distinguish neurological microstructural underpinnings as vulnerability factors from signs of emotional distress acquired soon after the stressful life event. We collected diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) data from a group of healthy adolescents before the Great East Japan Earthquake and re-examined the DTIs and anxiety levels of 30 non-PTSD subjects from this group 3-4 months after the earthquake using voxel-based analyses in a longitudinal DTI study before and after the earthquake. We found that the state anxiety level after the earthquake was negatively associated with fractional anisotropy (FA) in the right anterior cingulum (Cg) before the earthquake (r?=?-0.61, voxel level p<0.0025, cluster level p<0.05 corrected), and positively associated with increased FA changes from before to after the earthquake in the left anterior Cg (r?=?0.70, voxel level p<0.0025, cluster level p<0.05 corrected) and uncinate fasciculus (Uf) (r?=?0.65, voxel level p<0.0025, cluster level p<0.05 corrected). The results demonstrated that lower FA in the right anterior Cg was a vulnerability factor and increased FA in the left anterior Cg and Uf was an acquired sign of state anxiety after the earthquake. We postulate that subjects with dysfunctions in processing fear and anxiety before the disaster were likely to have higher anxiety levels requiring frequent emotional regulation after the disaster. These findings provide new evidence of psychophysiological responses at the neural network level soon after a stressful life event and might contribute to the development of effective methods to prevent PTSD. PMID:24400079

Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sugiura, Motoaki; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hanawa, Sugiko; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Sakuma, Atsushi; Kawashima, Ryuta

2014-01-01

261

Effects of chronic mild traumatic brain injury on white matter integrity in Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans  

PubMed Central

Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common source of morbidity from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. With no overt lesions on structural MRI, diagnosis of chronic mild TBI in military veterans relies on obtaining an accurate history and assessment of behavioral symptoms that are also associated with frequent comorbid disorders, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Military veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan with mild TBI (n=30) with comorbid PTSD and depression and non-TBI participants from primary (n=42) and confirmatory (n=28) control groups were assessed with high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). White matter-specific registration followed by whole-brain voxelwise analysis of crossing fibers provided separate partial volume fractions reflecting the integrity of primary fibers and secondary (crossing) fibers. Loss of white matter integrity in primary fibers (p < .05; corrected) was associated with chronic mild TBI in a widely distributed pattern of major fiber bundles and smaller peripheral tracts including the corpus callosum (genu, body, splenium), forceps minor, forceps major, superior and posterior corona radiata, internal capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and others. Distributed loss of white matter integrity correlated with duration of loss of consciousness and most notably with “feeling dazed or confused,” but not diagnosis of PTSD or depressive symptoms. This widespread spatial extent of white matter damage has typically been reported in moderate to severe TBI. The diffuse loss of white matter integrity appears consistent with systemic mechanisms of damage shared by blast- and impact-related mild TBI that involves a cascade of inflammatory and neurochemical events. PMID:22706988

Morey, Rajendra A.; Haswell, Courtney C.; Selgrade, Elizabeth S.; Massoglia, Dino; Liu, Chunlei; Weiner, Jonathan; Marx, Christine E.; Cernak, Ibolja; McCarthy, Gregory

2013-01-01

262

White matter is altered with parental family history of Alzheimer’s disease  

PubMed Central

Background Brain alterations in structure and function have been identified in people with risk factors for sporadic type Alzheimer’s disease (AD), suggesting that alterations can be detected decades before AD diagnosis. While the effect of Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ?4 on the brain is well studied, less is known about the effect of family history of AD. We examined the main effects of family history and ApoE ?4 on brain integrity, in addition to assessing possible additive effects of these two risk factors. Methods Diffusion tensor imaging was performed in 136 middle-aged asymptomatic participants stratified on family history and ApoE ?4. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy (FA) were entered in factorial analyses to test the effect of AD risk on microstructural brain integrity. We performed a post hoc analysis of the three principle diffusivities (?1, ?2, ?3) to provide potential additional insight on underlying tissue differences. Results Parental family history of AD was associated with lower FA in regions of the brain known to be affected by AD, including cingulum, corpus callosum, tapetum, uncinate fasciculus, hippocampus, and adjacent white matter. Contrary to previous reports there was no main effect of ApoE ?4; however, there was an additive effect of family history and ApoE ?4 where family history positive participants who were also ApoE ?4 carriers had the lowest FA compared to the other groups. Conclusions The data indicate that unknown risk factors contained in family history are associated with changes in microstructural brain integrity in areas of the brain known be affected by AD. Importantly, the results provide further evidence that AD pathology may be detected prior to cognitive changes, perhaps decades before disease onset. PMID:20713315

Bendlin, B. B.; Ries, M. L.; Canu, E.; Sodhi, A.; Lazar, M.; Alexander, A. L.; Carlsson, C. M.; Sager, M. A.; Asthana, S.; Johnson, S. C.

2009-01-01

263

Hidden word learning capacity through orthography in aphasia.  

PubMed

The ability to learn to use new words is thought to depend on the integrity of the left dorsal temporo-frontal speech processing pathway. We tested this assumption in a chronic aphasic individual (AA) with an extensive left temporal lesion using a new-word learning paradigm. She exhibited severe phonological problems and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) suggested a complete disconnection of this left-sided white-matter pathway comprising the arcuate fasciculus (AF). Diffusion imaging tractography confirmed the disconnection of the direct segment and the posterior indirect segment of her left AF, essential components of the left dorsal speech processing pathway. Despite her left-hemispheric damage and moderate aphasia, AA learned to name and maintain the novel words in her active vocabulary on par with healthy controls up to 6 months after learning. This exceeds previous demonstrations of word learning ability in aphasia. Interestingly, AA's preserved word learning ability was modality-specific as it was observed exclusively for written words. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed that in contrast to normals, AA showed a significantly right-lateralized activation pattern in the temporal and parietal regions when engaged in reading. Moreover, learning of visually presented novel word-picture pairs also activated the right temporal lobe in AA. Both AA and the controls showed increased activation during learning of novel versus familiar word-picture pairs in the hippocampus, an area critical for associative learning. AA's structural and functional imaging results suggest that in a literate person, a right-hemispheric network can provide an effective alternative route for learning of novel active vocabulary. Importantly, AA's previously undetected word learning ability translated directly into therapy, as she could use written input also to successfully re-learn and maintain familiar words that she had lost due to her left hemisphere lesion. PMID:24262200

Tuomiranta, Leena M; Càmara, Estela; Froudist Walsh, Seán; Ripollés, Pablo; Saunavaara, Jani P; Parkkola, Riitta; Martin, Nadine; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Laine, Matti

2014-01-01

264

Bridging the Gap between Perceptual and Cognitive Perspectives on Absolute Pitch.  

PubMed

Absolute pitch (AP) refers to the rare ability to identify the chroma of a tone or to produce a specific pitch without reference to keyality (e.g., G or C). Previously, AP has been proposed to rely on the distinctive functional-anatomical architecture of the left auditory-related cortex (ARC), this specific trait possibly enabling an optimized early "categorical perception". In contrast, currently prevailing models of AP postulate that cognitive rather than perceptual processes, namely "pitch labeling" mechanisms, more likely constitute the bearing skeleton of AP. This associative memory component has previously been proposed to be dependent, among other mechanisms, on the recruitment of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as well as on the integrity of the left arcuate fasciculus, a fiber bundle linking the posterior supratemporal plane with the DLPFC. Here, we attempted to integrate these two apparently conflicting perspectives on AP, namely early "categorical perception" and "pitch labeling". We used electroencephalography and evaluated resting-state intracranial functional connectivity between the left ARC and DLPFC in a sample of musicians with and without AP. Results demonstrate significantly increased left-hemispheric theta phase synchronization in AP compared with non-AP musicians. Within the AP group, this specific electrophysiological marker was predictive of absolute-hearing behavior and explained ?30% of variance. Thus, we propose that in AP subjects the tonal inputs and the corresponding mnemonic representations are tightly coupled in such a manner that the distinctive electrophysiological signature of AP can saliently be detected in only 3 min of resting-state measurements. PMID:25568128

Elmer, Stefan; Rogenmoser, Lars; Kühnis, Jürg; Jäncke, Lutz

2015-01-01

265

Episodic memory function is associated with multiple measures of white matter integrity in cognitive aging  

PubMed Central

Previous neuroimaging research indicates that white matter injury and integrity, measured respectively by white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and fractional anisotropy (FA) obtained from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), differ with aging and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and are associated with episodic memory deficits in cognitively normal older adults. However, knowledge about tract-specific relationships between WMH, FA, and episodic memory in aging remains limited. We hypothesized that white matter connections between frontal cortex and subcortical structures as well as connections between frontal and temporo-parietal cortex would be most affected. In the current study, we examined relationships between WMH, FA and episodic memory in 15 young adults, 13 elders with minimal WMH and 15 elders with extensive WMH, using an episodic recognition memory test for object-color associations. Voxel-based statistics were used to identify voxel clusters where white matter measures were specifically associated with variations in episodic memory performance, and white matter tracts intersecting these clusters were analyzed to examine white matter-memory relationships. White matter injury and integrity measures were significantly associated with episodic memory in extensive regions of white matter, located predominantly in frontal, parietal, and subcortical regions. Template based tractography indicated that white matter injury, as measured by WMH, in the uncinate and inferior longitudinal fasciculi were significantly negatively associated with episodic memory performance. Other tracts such as thalamo-frontal projections, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and dorsal cingulum bundle demonstrated strong negative associations as well. The results suggest that white matter injury to multiple pathways, including connections of frontal and temporal cortex and frontal-subcortical white matter tracts, plays a critical role in memory differences seen in older individuals. PMID:22438841

Lockhart, Samuel N.; Mayda, Adriane B. V.; Roach, Alexandra E.; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Maillard, Pauline; Schwarz, Christopher G.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Ranganath, Charan; DeCarli, Charles

2011-01-01

266

Quantitative diffusion tensor imaging and intellectual outcomes in spina bifida  

PubMed Central

Object Patients with spina bifida (SB) have variable intellectual outcomes. The authors used diffusion tensor (DT) imaging to quantify whole-brain volumes of gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and perform regional quantitative microstructural assessments of gray matter nuclei and white matter tracts in relation to intellectual outcomes in patients with SB. Methods Twenty-nine children with myelomeningoceles and 20 age- and sex-matched children with normal neural tube development underwent MR imaging with DT image acquisition and assessments of intelligence. The DT imaging-derived metrics were the fractional anisotropy (FA), axial (parallel), and transverse (perpendicular) diffusivities. These metrics were also used to segment the brain into white matter, gray matter, and CSF. A region-of-interest analysis was conducted of the white and gray matter structures implicated in hydrocephalus. Results The amount of whole-brain gray matter was decreased in patients with SB, with a corresponding increase in CSF (p < 0.0001). Regional transverse diffusivity in the caudate nucleus was decreased (p < 0.0001), and the corresponding FA was increased (p < 0.0001), suggesting reduced dendritic branching and connectivity. Fractional anisotropy in the posterior limb of the internal capsule increased in the myelomeningocele group (p = 0.02), suggesting elimination of some divergent fascicles; in contrast, the FA in several white matter structures (such as the corpus callosum genu [p < 0.001] and arcuate fasciculus) was reduced, suggesting disruption of myelination. Diffusion tensor imaging-metrics involving gray matter volume and the caudate nucleus, but not other structures, predicted variations in IQ (r = 0.37-0.50; p < 0.05). Conclusions Diffusion tensor imaging-derived metrics provide noninvasive neuronal surrogate markers of the pathogenesis of SB and predict variations in general intellectual outcomes in children with this condition. PMID:18590401

Hasan, Khader M.; Sankar, Ambika; Halphen, Christopher; Kramer, Larry A.; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Dennis, Maureen; Fletcher, Jack M.

2011-01-01

267

Evidence for fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity white matter abnormalities in the internal capsule and cingulum in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder  

PubMed Central

Background There is evidence to suggest that obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is associated with structural abnormalities in cortico–striato–thalamic circuits, yet the extent of white matter abnormalities is not well established. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine white matter integrity in specific regions of interest (ROIs) in patients with OCD. Methods Patients with OCD and sex-, age- and IQ-matched healthy controls underwent DTI. The primary objective was to explore whether patients with OCD had white matter abnormalities in the anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC), the uncinate fasciculus, the genu of the corpus callosum and the cingulum. The secondary objective was to evaluate the relation between fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity in these ROIs and other clinical variables (including age at onset of OCD, OCD severity and levels of depressive and anxiety symptomatology) in patients with OCD. Results There were 15 patients and 17 controls enrolled in our study. Compared with healthy controls, patients with OCD showed increased fractional anisotropy in bilateral regions of the ALIC adjacent to the body of the caudate, as well as decreased fractional anisotropy in the right anterior limb near the head of the caudate. Patients also had decreased mean diffusivity in the body of the right cingulum and the left anterior cingulum compared with controls. Correlational analyses revealed significant associations of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity in select circuits with OCD, depression and anxiety severity scores. Limitations Inclusion of patients with OCD receiving pharmacotherapy may have been a limitation. In addition, the patients were heterogeneous in terms of their obsessive–compulsive symptom profiles; we did not distinguish between different obsessive–compulsive symptom dimensions. Conclusion The study results provide further evidence for OCD-related white matter abnormalities in the ALIC and cingulum, consistent with a corticostriatal model of OCD. PMID:22297066

Lochner, Christine; Fouché, Jean-Paul; du Plessis, Stefan; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Seedat, Soraya; (Psych), MMed; Fineberg, Naomi; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Stein, Dan J.

2012-01-01

268

Maternal Pravastatin Prevents Altered Fetal Brain Development in a Preeclamptic CD-1 Mouse Model  

PubMed Central

Objective Using an animal model, we have previously shown that preeclampsia results in long-term adverse neuromotor outcomes in the offspring, and this phenotype was prevented by antenatal treatment with pravastatin. This study aims to localize the altered neuromotor programming in this animal model and to evaluate the role of pravastatin in its prevention. Materials and Methods For the preeclampsia model, pregnant CD-1 mice were randomly allocated to injection of adenovirus carrying sFlt-1 or its control virus carrying mFc into the tail vein. Thereafter they received pravastatin (sFlt-1-pra “experimental group”) or water (sFlt-1 “positive control”) until weaning. The mFc group (“negative control”) received water. Offspring at 6 months of age were sacrificed, and whole brains underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRIs were performed using an 11.7 Tesla vertical bore MRI scanner. T2 weighted images were acquired to evaluate the volumes of 28 regions of interest, including areas involved in adaptation and motor, spatial and sensory function. Cytochemistry and cell quantification was performed using neuron-specific Nissl stain. One-way ANOVA with multiple comparison testing was used for statistical analysis. Results Compared with control offspring, male sFlt-1 offspring have decreased volumes in the fimbria, periaquaductal gray, stria medullaris, and ventricles and increased volumes in the lateral globus pallidus and neocortex; however, female sFlt-1 offspring showed increased volumes in the ventricles, stria medullaris, and fasciculus retroflexus and decreased volumes in the inferior colliculus, thalamus, and lateral globus pallidus. Neuronal quantification via Nissl staining exhibited decreased cell counts in sFlt-1 offspring neocortex, more pronounced in males. Prenatal pravastatin treatment prevented these changes. Conclusion Preeclampsia alters brain development in sex-specific patterns, and prenatal pravastatin therapy prevents altered neuroanatomic programming in this animal model. PMID:24963809

Carver, Alissa R.; Andrikopoulou, Maria; Lei, Jun; Tamayo, Esther; Gamble, Phyllis; Hou, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jiangyang; Mori, Susumu; Saade, George R.; Costantine, Maged M.; Burd, Irina

2014-01-01

269

Improving diffusion-weighted imaging of post-mortem human brains: SSFP at 7 T  

PubMed Central

Post-mortem diffusion imaging of whole, human brains has potential to provide data for validation or high-resolution anatomical investigations. Previous work has demonstrated improvements in data acquired with diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession (DW-SSFP) compared with conventional diffusion-weighted spin echo at 3 T. This is due to the ability of DW-SSFP to overcome signal-to-noise and diffusion contrast losses brought about by tissue fixation related decreases in T2 and ADC. In this work, data of four post-mortem human brains were acquired at 3 T and 7 T, using DW-SSFP with similar effective b-values (beff ~ 5150 s/mm2) for inter-field strength comparisons; in addition, DW-SSFP data were acquired at 7 T with higher beff (~ 8550 s/mm2) for intra-field strength comparisons. Results demonstrate that both datasets acquired at 7 T had higher SNR and diffusion contrast than data acquired at 3 T, and data acquired at higher beff had improved diffusion contrast than at lower beff at 7 T. These results translate to improved estimates of secondary fiber orientations leading to higher fidelity tractography results compared with data acquired at 3 T. Specifically, tractography streamlines of cortical projections originating from the corpus callosum, corticospinal tract, and superior longitudinal fasciculus were more successful at crossing the centrum semiovale and projected closer to the cortex. Results suggest that DW-SSFP at 7 T is a preferential method for acquiring diffusion-weighted data of post-mortem human brain, specifically where the primary region of interest involves crossing white matter tracts. PMID:25128709

Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Clare, Stuart; Lam, Wilfred; Ansorge, Olaf; Douaud, Gwenaelle; Miller, Karla

2014-01-01

270

Relation between variants in the neurotrophin receptor gene, NTRK3, and white matter integrity in healthy young adults.  

PubMed

The NTRK3 gene (also known as TRKC) encodes a high affinity receptor for the neurotrophin 3'-nucleotidase (NT3), which is implicated in oligodendrocyte and myelin development. We previously found that white matter integrity in young adults is related to common variants in genes encoding neurotrophins and their receptors. This underscores the importance of neurotrophins for white matter development. NTRK3 variants are putative risk factors for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder hoarding, suggesting that some NTRK3 variants may affect the brain. To test this, we scanned 392 healthy adult twins and their siblings (mean age, 23.6 ± 2.2 years; range: 20-29 years) with 105-gradient 4-Tesla diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We identified 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NTRK3 gene that have been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. We used a multi-SNP model, adjusting for family relatedness, age, and sex, to relate these variants to voxelwise fractional anisotropy (FA) - a DTI measure of white matter integrity. FA was optimally predicted (based on the highest false discovery rate critical p), by five SNPs (rs1017412, rs2114252, rs16941261, rs3784406, and rs7176429; overall FDR critical p=0.028). Gene effects were widespread and included the corpus callosum genu and inferior longitudinal fasciculus - regions implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders and previously associated with other neurotrophin-related genetic variants in an overlapping sample of subjects. NTRK3 genetic variants, and neurotrophins more generally, may influence white matter integrity in brain regions implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:23727532

Braskie, Meredith N; Kohannim, Omid; Jahanshad, Neda; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Barysheva, Marina; Toga, Arthur W; Ringman, John M; Montgomery, Grant W; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

2013-11-15

271

An Arbitrary Waveform Wearable Neuro-stimulator System for Neurophysiology Research on Freely Behaving Animals  

PubMed Central

Portable wireless neuro-stimulators have been developed to facilitate long-term cognitive and behavioral studies on the central nervous system in freely moving animals. These stimulators can provide precisely controllable input(s) to the nervous system, without distracting the animal attention with cables connected to its body. In this study, a low power backpack neuro-stimulator was developed for animal brain researches that can provides arbitrary stimulus waveforms for the stimulation, while it is small and light weight to be used for small animals including rats. The system consists of a controller that uses an RF link to program and activate a small and light microprocessor-based stimulator. A Howland current source was implemented to produce precise current controlled arbitrary waveform stimulations. The system was optimized for ultra-low power consumption and small size. The stimulator was first tested for its electrical specifications. Then its performance was evaluated in a rat experiment when electrical stimulation of medial longitudinal fasciculus induced circling behavior. The stimulator is capable of delivering programmed stimulations up to ± 2 mA with adjusting steps of 1 ?A, accuracy of 0.7% and compliance of 6 V. The stimulator is 15 mm × 20 mm × 40 mm in size, weights 13.5 g without battery and consumes a total power of only 5.l mW. In the experiment, the rat could easily carry the stimulator and demonstrated the circling behavior for 0.1 ms current pulses of above 400 ?A. The developed system has a competitive size and weight, whereas providing a wide range of operation and the flexibility of generating arbitrary stimulation patterns ideal for long-term experiments in the field of cognitive and neuroscience research. PMID:24761373

Samani, Mohsen Mosayebi; Mahnam, Amin; Hosseini, Nasrin

2014-01-01

272

Delay discounting behavior and white matter microstructure abnormalities in youth with a family history of alcoholism  

PubMed Central

Background Youth with family history of alcohol abuse have a greater risk of developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD). Brain and behavior differences may underlie this increased vulnerability. The current study examined delay discounting behavior and white matter microstructure in youth at high-risk for alcohol abuse, as determined by a family history of alcoholism (FH+), and youth without such family history (FH?). Methods Thirty-three healthy youth (FH+ = 15, FH? = 18), ages 11 to 15 years, completed a delay discounting task and underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Tract Based Spatial Statistics (Smith et al., 2006), as well as follow-up region-of-interest analyses, were performed in order to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) between FH+ and FH? youth. Results FH+ youth showed a trend toward increased discounting behavior and had significantly slower reaction times on the delay discounting paradigm compared to FH? youth. Group differences in FA were seen in several white matter tracts. Furthermore, lower FA in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the right optic radiation statistically mediated the relationship between FH status and slower reaction times on the delay discounting task. Conclusion Youth with a family history of substance abuse have disrupted white matter microstructure, which likely contributes to less efficient cortical processing, and may act as an intrinsic risk-factor contributing to an increased susceptibility of developing AUD. In addition, FHP youth showed a trend toward greater impulsive decision making, possibly representing an inherent personal characteristic that may facilitate substance use onset and abuse in high-risk youth. PMID:20586754

Herting, Megan M.; Schwartz, Daniel; Mitchell, Suzanne H.; Nagel, Bonnie J.

2011-01-01

273

Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Frontotemporal Dementia  

PubMed Central

Objective Novel biomarkers for monitoring progression in neurodegenerative conditions are needed. Measurement of microstructural changes in white matter (WM) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may be a useful outcome measure. Here we report trajectories of WM change using serial DTI in a cohort with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Methods Twenty-three patients with bvFTD (12 having genetic mutations), and 18 age-matched control participants were assessed using DTI and neuropsychological batteries at baseline and ?1.3 years later. Baseline and follow-up DTI scans were registered using a groupwise approach. Annualized rates of change for DTI metrics, neuropsychological measures, and whole brain volume were calculated. DTI metric performances were compared, and sample sizes for potential clinical trials were calculated. Results In the bvFTD group as a whole, rates of change in fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) within the right paracallosal cingulum were greatest (FA: ?6.8%/yr, p?fasciculus (FA: ?7.9%/yr, p?

Mahoney, Colin J; Simpson, Ivor J A; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Fletcher, Phillip D; Downey, Laura E; Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Schmitz, Nicole; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Schott, Jonathan M; Zhang, Hui; Ourselin, Sebastian; Warren, Jason D; Fox, Nick C

2015-01-01

274

Electroconvulsive therapy mediates neuroplasticity of white matter microstructure in major depression.  

PubMed

Whether plasticity of white matter (WM) microstructure relates to therapeutic response in major depressive disorder (MDD) remains uncertain. We examined diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) correlates of WM structural connectivity in patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a rapidly acting treatment for severe MDD. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) applied to DTI data (61 directions, 2.5 mm(3) voxel size) targeted voxel-level changes in fractional anisotropy (FA), and radial (RD), axial (AD) and mean diffusivity (MD) in major WM pathways in MDD patients (n=20, mean age: 41.15 years, 10.32 s.d.) scanned before ECT, after their second ECT and at transition to maintenance therapy. Comparisons made at baseline with demographically similar controls (n=28, mean age: 39.42 years, 12.20 s.d.) established effects of diagnosis. Controls were imaged twice to estimate scanning-related variance. Patients showed significant increases of FA in dorsal fronto-limbic circuits encompassing the anterior cingulum, forceps minor and left superior longitudinal fasciculus between baseline and transition to maintenance therapy (P<0.05, corrected). Decreases in RD and MD were observed in overlapping regions and the anterior thalamic radiation (P<0.05, corrected). Changes in DTI metrics associated with therapeutic response in tracts showing significant ECT effects differed between patients and controls. All measures remained stable across time in controls. Altered WM microstructure in pathways connecting frontal and limbic areas occur in MDD, are modulated by ECT and relate to therapeutic response. Increased FA together with decreased MD and RD, which trend towards normative values with treatment, suggest increased fiber integrity in dorsal fronto-limbic pathways involved in mood regulation. PMID:24713861

Lyden, H; Espinoza, R T; Pirnia, T; Clark, K; Joshi, S H; Leaver, A M; Woods, R P; Narr, K L

2014-01-01

275

Longitudinal changes in patients with traumatic brain injury assessed with diffusion tensor and volumetric imaging  

PubMed Central

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with brain volume loss, but there is little information on the regional gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) changes that contribute to overall loss. Since axonal injury is a common occurrence in TBI, imaging methods that are sensitive to WM damage such as diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) may be useful for characterizing microstructural brain injury contributing to regional WM loss in TBI. High-resolution T1-weighted imaging and DTI were used to evaluate regional changes in TBI patients compared to matched controls. Patients received neuropsychological testing and were imaged approximately 2 months and 12.7 months post injury. Paradoxically, neuropsychological function improved from Visit 1 to Visit 2, while voxel-based analyses of fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) from the DTI images, and voxel-based analyses of the GM and WM probability maps from the T1-weighted images, mainly revealed significantly greater deleterious GM and WM change over time in patients compared to controls. Cross-sectional comparisons of the DTI measures indicated that patients have decreased FA and increased MD compared to controls over large regions of the brain. TBI affected virtually all of the major fiber bundles in the brain including the corpus callosum, cingulum, the superior and inferior longitudinal fascicules, the uncinate fasciculus, and brain stem fiber tracts. The results indicate that both GM and WM degeneration are significant contributors to brain volume loss in the months following brain injury, and also suggest that DTI measures may be more useful than high-resolution anatomical images in assessment of group differences. PMID:18556217

Bendlin, Barbara; Ries, Michele L.; Lazar, Mariana; Alexander, Andrew L.; Dempsey, Robert J.; Rowley, Howard A.; Sherman, Jack E.; Johnson, Sterling C.

2008-01-01

276

Association fiber pathways to the frontal cortex from the superior temporal region in the rhesus monkey  

SciTech Connect

The projections to the frontal cortex that originate from the various areas of the superior temporal region of the rhesus monkey were investigated with the autoradiographic technique. The results demonstrated that the rostral part of the superior temporal gyrus (areas Pro, Ts1, and Ts2) projects to the proisocortical areas of the orbital and medial frontal cortex, as well as to the nearby orbital areas 13, 12, and 11, and to medial areas 9, 10, and 14. These fibers travel to the frontal lobe as part of the uncinate fascicle. The middle part of the superior temporal gyrus (areas Ts3 and paAlt) projects predominantly to the lateral frontal cortex (areas 12, upper 46, and 9) and to the dorsal aspect of the medial frontal lobe (areas 9 and 10). Only a small number of these fibers terminated within the orbitofrontal cortex. The temporofrontal fibers originating from the middle part of the superior temporal gyrus occupy the lower portion of the extreme capsule and lie just dorsal to the fibers of the uncinate fascicle. The posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus projects to the lateral frontal cortex (area 46, dorsal area 8, and the rostralmost part of dorsal area 6). Some of the fibers from the posterior superior temporal gyrus run initially through the extreme capsule and then cross the claustrum as they ascend to enter the external capsule before continuing their course to the frontal lobe. A larger group of fibers curves round the caudalmost Sylvian fissure and travels to the frontal cortex occupying a position just above and medial to the upper branch of the circular sulcus. This latter pathway constitutes a part of the classically described arcuate fasciculus.

Petrides, M.; Pandya, D.N.

1988-07-01

277

Primary Position Upbeat Nystagmus during an Acute Attack of Multiple Sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose Ocular manifestation is one of the frequent signs of an acute attack in multiple sclerosis (MS), although primary position upbeat nystagmus (PPUN) is rare. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence of PPUN in MS and to determine the lesions that are responsible for this sign. Methods The medical records of 120 MS patients with acute brain lesions were reviewed over a consecutive period of 9 years; of these, 6 patients were found to have PPUN. Other ocular motor abnormalities were analyzed in combination with upbeat nystagmus, video-oculographic findings, and lesions detected on brain MRI. Results Lesions in the pontine tegmentum involving the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) and ventral tegmental tract (VTT) were the most common, being observed in three of the six patients with PPUN. One patient exhibited caudal medullary lesions bilaterally affecting the paramedian portion of the posterior tegmentum, and two patients exhibited multiple lesions involving the pons with the cerebral peduncle or medulla. In five patients, other ocular motor dysfunctions, such as gaze-evoked nystagmus (n=3) and internuclear ophthalmoplegia (n=1), were found in combination with upbeat nystagmus. Conclusions PPUN is an infrequent, ocular manifestation noted during an acute attack of MS, and was observed in 5% of the present cases. Brainstem lesions in these cases primarily involved the pontine tegmentum and the caudal medulla. These findings support the theory that upbeat nystagmus is attributable to damage to the upward vestibulo-ocular reflex pathway related to the vestibular nucleus, VTT, and interconnecting pathways. PMID:24465261

Kim, Jee-Ae; Jeong, In-Hye; Lim, Young-Min

2014-01-01

278

Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging and neuropsychological correlates in traumatic brain injury patients  

PubMed Central

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often involves focal cortical injury and white matter (WM) damage that can be measured shortly after injury. Additionally, slowly evolving WM change can be observed but there is a paucity of research on the duration and spatial pattern of long-term changes several years post-injury. The current study utilized diffusion tensor imaging to identify regional WM changes in 12 TBI patients and nine healthy controls at three time points over a four year period. Neuropsychological testing was also administered to each participant at each time point. Results indicate that TBI patients exhibit longitudinal changes to WM indexed by reductions in fractional anisotropy (FA) in the corpus callosum, as well as FA increases in bilateral regions of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and portions of the optic radiation (OR). FA changes appear to be driven by changes in radial (not axial) diffusivity, suggesting that observed longitudinal FA changes may be related to changes in myelin rather than to axons. Neuropsychological correlations indicate that regional FA values in the corpus callosum and sagittal stratum (SS) correlate with performance on finger tapping and visuomotor speed tasks (respectively) in TBI patients, and that longitudinal increases in FA in the SS, SLF, and OR correlate with improved performance on the visuomotor speed (SS) task as well as a derived measure of cognitive control (SLF, OR). The results of this study showing progressive WM deterioration for several years post-injury contribute to a growing literature supporting the hypothesis that TBI should be viewed not as an isolated incident but as a prolonged disease state. The observations of long-term neurological and functional improvement provide evidence that some ameliorative change may be occurring concurrently with progressive degeneration. PMID:22723773

Farbota, Kimberly D.; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Alexander, Andrew L.; Rowley, Howard A.; Dempsey, Robert J.; Johnson, Sterling C.

2012-01-01

279

Hereditary spastic paraplegia: clinico-pathologic features and emerging molecular mechanisms  

PubMed Central

Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a syndrome designation describing inherited disorders in which lower extremity weakness and spasticity are the predominant symptoms. There are more than 50 genetic types of HSP. HSP affects individuals diverse ethnic groups with prevalence estimates ranging from 1.2 to 9.6 per 100,000 [39, 70, 77, 154, 185]. Symptoms may begin at any age. Gait impairment that begins after childhood usually worsens very slowly over many years. Gait impairment that begins in infancy and early childhood may not worsen significantly. Post mortem studies consistently identify degeneration of corticospinal tract axons (maximal in the thoracic spinal cord) and degeneration of fasciculus gracilis fibers (maximal in the cervico-medullary region). HSP syndromes thus appear to involve motor-sensory axon degeneration affecting predominantly (but not exclusively) the distal ends of long central nervous system (CNS) axons. In general, proteins encoded by HSP genes have diverse functions including axon transport (e.g. SPG30/KIF1A, SPG10/KIF5A and possibly SPG4/Spastin); endoplasmic reticulum morphology (e.g. SPG3A/Atlastin, SPG4/Spastin, SPG12/reticulon 2, and SPG31/REEP1, all of which interact); mitochondrial function (e.g. SPG13/chaperonin 60/heat shock protein 60, SPG7/paraplegin; and mitochondrial ATP6; 4) myelin formation (e.g. SPG2/Proteolipid protein and SPG42/Connexin 47); 5) protein folding and ER-stress response (SPG6/NIPA1, SPG8/K1AA0196 (Strumpellin), SGP17/BSCL2 (Seipin) [113-115], “mutilating sensory neuropathy with spastic paraplegia” due to CcT5 mutation and presumably SPG18/ERLIN2); 6) corticospinal tract and other neurodevelopment (e.g. SPG1/L1 cell adhesion molecule and SPG22/thyroid transporter MCT8); 7) fatty acid and phospholipid metabolism (e.g. SPG28/DDHD1, SPG35/FA2H, SPG39/NTE, SPG54/DDHD2, and SPG56/CYP2U1); and 8) endosome membrane trafficking and vesicle formation (e.g. SPG47/AP4B1, SPG48/KIAA0415, SPG50/AP4M1, SPG51/AP4E, SPG52/AP4S1, and VSPG53/VPS37A). The availability of animal models (including bovine, murine, zebrafish, Drosophila, and C. elegans) for many types of HSP permits exploration of disease mechanisms and potential treatments. This review highlights emerging concepts of this large group of clinically similar disorders. For recent review of HSP including historical descriptions, differential diagnosis, and additional references see [78]. PMID:23897027

Fink, John K.

2014-01-01

280

Repeatability and variation of region-of-interest methods using quantitative diffusion tensor MR imaging of the brain  

PubMed Central

Background Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is increasingly used in various diseases as a clinical tool for assessing the integrity of the brain’s white matter. Reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and an increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) are nonspecific findings in most pathological processes affecting the brain’s parenchyma. At present, there is no gold standard for validating diffusion measures, which are dependent on the scanning protocols, methods of the softwares and observers. Therefore, the normal variation and repeatability effects on commonly-derived measures should be carefully examined. Methods Thirty healthy volunteers (mean age 37.8 years, SD 11.4) underwent DTI of the brain with 3T MRI. Region-of-interest (ROI) -based measurements were calculated at eleven anatomical locations in the pyramidal tracts, corpus callosum and frontobasal area. Two ROI-based methods, the circular method (CM) and the freehand method (FM), were compared. Both methods were also compared by performing measurements on a DTI phantom. The intra- and inter-observer variability (coefficient of variation, or CV%) and repeatability (intra-class correlation coefficient, or ICC) were assessed for FA and ADC values obtained using both ROI methods. Results The mean FA values for all of the regions were 0.663 with the CM and 0.621 with the FM. For both methods, the FA was highest in the splenium of the corpus callosum. The mean ADC value was 0.727 ×10-3 mm2/s with the CM and 0.747 ×10-3 mm2/s with the FM, and both methods found the ADC to be lowest in the corona radiata. The CV percentages of the derived measures were < 13% with the CM and < 10% with the FM. In most of the regions, the ICCs were excellent or moderate for both methods. With the CM, the highest ICC for FA was in the posterior limb of the internal capsule (0.90), and with the FM, it was in the corona radiata (0.86). For ADC, the highest ICC was found in the genu of the corpus callosum (0.93) with the CM and in the uncinate fasciculus (0.92) with FM. Conclusions With both ROI-based methods variability was low and repeatability was moderate. The circular method gave higher repeatability, but variation was slightly lower using the freehand method. The circular method can be recommended for the posterior limb of the internal capsule and splenium of the corpus callosum, and the freehand method for the corona radiata. PMID:23057584

2012-01-01

281

Hereditary spastic paraplegia: clinico-pathologic features and emerging molecular mechanisms.  

PubMed

Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a syndrome designation describing inherited disorders in which lower extremity weakness and spasticity are the predominant symptoms. There are more than 50 genetic types of HSP. HSP affects individuals of diverse ethnic groups with prevalence estimates ranging from 1.2 to 9.6 per 100,000. Symptoms may begin at any age. Gait impairment that begins after childhood usually worsens very slowly over many years. Gait impairment that begins in infancy and early childhood may not worsen significantly. Postmortem studies consistently identify degeneration of corticospinal tract axons (maximal in the thoracic spinal cord) and degeneration of fasciculus gracilis fibers (maximal in the cervico-medullary region). HSP syndromes thus appear to involve motor-sensory axon degeneration affecting predominantly (but not exclusively) the distal ends of long central nervous system (CNS) axons. In general, proteins encoded by HSP genes have diverse functions including (1) axon transport (e.g. SPG30/KIF1A, SPG10/KIF5A and possibly SPG4/Spastin); (2) endoplasmic reticulum morphology (e.g. SPG3A/Atlastin, SPG4/Spastin, SPG12/reticulon 2, and SPG31/REEP1, all of which interact); (3) mitochondrial function (e.g. SPG13/chaperonin 60/heat-shock protein 60, SPG7/paraplegin; and mitochondrial ATP6); (4) myelin formation (e.g. SPG2/Proteolipid protein and SPG42/Connexin 47); (5) protein folding and ER-stress response (SPG6/NIPA1, SPG8/K1AA0196 (Strumpellin), SGP17/BSCL2 (Seipin), "mutilating sensory neuropathy with spastic paraplegia" owing to CcT5 mutation and presumably SPG18/ERLIN2); (6) corticospinal tract and other neurodevelopment (e.g. SPG1/L1 cell adhesion molecule and SPG22/thyroid transporter MCT8); (7) fatty acid and phospholipid metabolism (e.g. SPG28/DDHD1, SPG35/FA2H, SPG39/NTE, SPG54/DDHD2, and SPG56/CYP2U1); and (8) endosome membrane trafficking and vesicle formation (e.g. SPG47/AP4B1, SPG48/KIAA0415, SPG50/AP4M1, SPG51/AP4E, SPG52/AP4S1, and VSPG53/VPS37A). The availability of animal models (including bovine, murine, zebrafish, Drosophila, and C. elegans) for many types of HSP permits exploration of disease mechanisms and potential treatments. This review highlights emerging concepts of this large group of clinically similar disorders. PMID:23897027

Fink, John K

2013-09-01

282

Effect of gravity on vertical eye position.  

PubMed

There is growing evidence that gravity markedly influences vertical eye position and movements. A new model for the organization of brainstem upgaze pathways is presented in this review. The crossing ventral tegmental tract (CVTT) could be the efferent tract of an "antigravitational" pathway terminating at the elevator muscle motoneurons in the third nerve nuclei and comprising, upstream, the superior vestibular nucleus and y-group, the flocculus, and the otoliths. This pathway functions in parallel to the medial longitudinal fasciculus pathways, which control vertical eye movements made to compensate for all vertical head movements and may also comprise the "gravitational" vestibular pathways, involved in the central reflection of the gravity effect. The CVTT could provide the upgaze system with the supplement of tonic activity required to counteract the gravity effect expressed in the gravitational pathway, being permanently modulated according to the static positions of the head (i.e., the instantaneous gravity vector) between a maximal activity in the upright position and a minimal activity in horizontal positions. Different types of arguments support this new model. The permanent influence of gravity on vertical eye position is strongly suggested by the vertical slow phases and nystagmus observed after rapid changes in hypo- or hypergravity. The chin-beating nystagmus, existing in normal subjects with their head in the upside-down position, suggests that gravity is not compensated for in the downgaze system. Upbeat nystagmus due to brainstem lesions, most likely affecting the CVTT circuitry, is improved when the head is in the horizontal position, suggesting that this circuitry is involved in the counteraction of gravity between the upright and horizontal positions of the head. In downbeat nystagmus due to floccular damage, in which a permanent hyperexcitation of the CVTT could exist, a marked influence of static positions of the head is also observed. Finally, the strongest argument supporting a marked role of gravity in vertical eye position is that the eye movement alterations observed in the main, typical physiological and pathological conditions are precisely those that would be expected from a direct effect of gravity on the eyeballs, with, moreover, no single alternative interpretation existing so far that could account for all these different types of findings. PMID:19645894

Pierrot-Deseilligny, C

2009-05-01

283

Dissociated repetition deficits in aphasia can reflect flexible interactions between left dorsal and ventral streams and gender-dimorphic architecture of the right dorsal stream  

PubMed Central

Assessment of brain-damaged subjects presenting with dissociated repetition deficits after selective injury to either the left dorsal or ventral auditory pathways can provide further insight on their respective roles in verbal repetition. We evaluated repetition performance and its neural correlates using multimodal imaging (anatomical MRI, DTI, fMRI, and18FDG-PET) in a female patient with transcortical motor aphasia (TCMA) and in a male patient with conduction aphasia (CA) who had small contiguous but non-overlapping left perisylvian infarctions. Repetition in the TCMA patient was fully preserved except for a mild impairment in nonwords and digits, whereas the CA patient had impaired repetition of nonwords, digits and word triplet lists. Sentence repetition was impaired, but he repeated novel sentences significantly better than clichés. The TCMA patient had tissue damage and reduced metabolism in the left sensorimotor cortex and insula. DTI showed damage to the left temporo-frontal and parieto-frontal segments of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) and part of the left ventral stream together with well-developed right dorsal and ventral streams, as has been reported in more than one-third of females. The CA patient had tissue damage and reduced metabolic activity in the left temporoparietal cortex with additional metabolic decrements in the left frontal lobe. DTI showed damage to the left temporo-parietal and temporo-frontal segments of the AF, but the ventral stream was spared. The direct segment of the AF in the right hemisphere was also absent with only vestigial remains of the other dorsal subcomponents present, as is often found in males. fMRI during word and nonword repetition revealed bilateral perisylvian activation in the TCMA patient suggesting recruitment of spared segments of the left dorsal stream and right dorsal stream with propagation of signals to temporal lobe structures suggesting a compensatory reallocation of resources via the ventral streams. The CA patient showed a greater activation of these cortical areas than the TCMA patient, but these changes did not result in normal performance. Repetition of word triplet lists activated bilateral perisylvian cortices in both patients, but activation in the CA patient with very poor performance was restricted to small frontal and posterior temporal foci bilaterally. These findings suggest that dissociated repetition deficits in our cases are probably reliant on flexible interactions between left dorsal stream (spared segments, short tracts remains) and left ventral stream and on gender-dimorphic architecture of the right dorsal stream. PMID:24391569

Berthier, Marcelo L.; Froudist Walsh, Seán; Dávila, Guadalupe; Nabrozidis, Alejandro; Juárez y Ruiz de Mier, Rocío; Gutiérrez, Antonio; De-Torres, Irene; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; Alfaro, Francisco; García-Casares, Natalia

2013-01-01

284

Characterizing a neurodegenerative syndrome: primary progressive apraxia of speech  

PubMed Central

Apraxia of speech is a disorder of speech motor planning and/or programming that is distinguishable from aphasia and dysarthria. It most commonly results from vascular insults but can occur in degenerative diseases where it has typically been subsumed under aphasia, or it occurs in the context of more widespread neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to determine whether apraxia of speech can present as an isolated sign of neurodegenerative disease. Between July 2010 and July 2011, 37 subjects with a neurodegenerative speech and language disorder were prospectively recruited and underwent detailed speech and language, neurological, neuropsychological and neuroimaging testing. The neuroimaging battery included 3.0 tesla volumetric head magnetic resonance imaging, [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose and [11C] Pittsburg compound B positron emission tomography scanning. Twelve subjects were identified as having apraxia of speech without any signs of aphasia based on a comprehensive battery of language tests; hence, none met criteria for primary progressive aphasia. These subjects with primary progressive apraxia of speech included eight females and four males, with a mean age of onset of 73 years (range: 49–82). There were no specific additional shared patterns of neurological or neuropsychological impairment in the subjects with primary progressive apraxia of speech, but there was individual variability. Some subjects, for example, had mild features of behavioural change, executive dysfunction, limb apraxia or Parkinsonism. Voxel-based morphometry of grey matter revealed focal atrophy of superior lateral premotor cortex and supplementary motor area. Voxel-based morphometry of white matter showed volume loss in these same regions but with extension of loss involving the inferior premotor cortex and body of the corpus callosum. These same areas of white matter loss were observed with diffusion tensor imaging analysis, which also demonstrated reduced fractional anisotropy and increased mean diffusivity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus, particularly the premotor components. Statistical parametric mapping of the [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans revealed focal hypometabolism of superior lateral premotor cortex and supplementary motor area, although there was some variability across subjects noted with CortexID analysis. [11C]-Pittsburg compound B positron emission tomography binding was increased in only one of the 12 subjects, although it was unclear whether the increase was actually related to the primary progressive apraxia of speech. A syndrome characterized by progressive pure apraxia of speech clearly exists, with a neuroanatomic correlate of superior lateral premotor and supplementary motor atrophy, making this syndrome distinct from primary progressive aphasia. PMID:22382356

Duffy, Joseph R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Machulda, Mary M.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Master, Ankit V.; Lowe, Val J.; Jack, Clifford R.; Whitwell, Jennifer L.

2012-01-01

285

Brain microstructural changes and cognitive correlates in patients with pure obsessive compulsive disorder  

PubMed Central

Object The aim of this study was to investigate macrostructural and microstructural brain changes in patients with pure obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and to examine the relationship between brain structure and neuropsychological deficits. Method 20 patients with OCD underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. A combined voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis was used to capture gray matter (GM) and white matter changes in OCD patients as compared to pair-matched healthy volunteers. Multiple regression designs explored the relationship between cognition and neuroimaging parameters. Results OCD patients had increased mean diffusivity (MD) in GM nodes of the orbitofronto-striatal loop (left dorsal anterior cingulate [Z = 3.67, P < 0.001] left insula [Z = 3.35 P < 0.001] left thalamus [Z = 3.59, P < 0.001] left parahippocampal gyrus [Z = 3.77 P < 0.001]) and in lateral frontal and posterior associative cortices (right frontal operculum [Z = 3.42 P < 0.001], right temporal lobe [Z = 3.79 P < 0.001] left parietal lobe [Z = 3.91 P < 0.001]). Decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) was detected in intrahemispheric (left superior longitudinal fasciculus [Z = 4.07 P < 0.001]) and interhemispheric (body of corpus callosum [CC, Z = 4.42 P < 0.001]) bundles. Concurrently, the semantic fluency score, a measure of executive control processes, significantly predicted OCD diagnosis (Odds Ratio = 1.37; 95% Confidence Intervals = 1.09–1.73; P = 0.0058), while variation in performance was correlated with increased MD in left temporal (Z = 4.25 P < 0.001) and bilateral parietal regions (left Z = 3.94, right Z = 4.19 P < 0.001), and decreased FA in the right posterior corona radiata (Z = 4.07 P < 0.001) and the left corticospinal tract (Z = 3.95 P < 0.001). Conclusions The reported deficit in executive processes and the underlying microstructural alterations may qualify as behavioral and biological markers of OCD. PMID:24683518

Spalletta, Gianfranco; Piras, Fabrizio; Fagioli, Sabrina; Caltagirone, Carlo; Piras, Federica

2014-01-01

286

Development of Cerebral Fiber Pathways in Cats revealed by Diffusion Spectrum Imaging  

PubMed Central

Examination of the three-dimensional axonal pathways in the developing brain is key to understanding the formation of cerebral connectivity. By tracing fiber pathways throughout the entire brain, diffusion tractography provides information that cannot be achieved by conventional anatomical MR imaging or histology. However, standard diffusion tractography (based on diffusion tensor imaging, or DTI) tends to terminate in brain areas with low water diffusivity, indexed by low diffusion fractional anisotropy (FA), which can be caused by crossing fibers as well as fibers with less myelin. For this reason, DTI tractography is not effective for delineating the structural changes that occur in the developing brain, where the process of myelination is incomplete, and where crossing fibers exist in greater numbers than in the adult brain. Unlike DTI, diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) can define multiple directions of water diffusivity; as such, diffusion tractography based on DSI provides marked flexibility for delineation of fiber tracts in areas where the fiber architecture is complex and multidirectional, even in areas of low FA. In this study, we showed that FA values were lower in the white matter of newborn (postnatal day 0; P0) cat brains than in the white matter of infant (P35) and juvenile (P100) cat brains. These results correlated well with histological myelin stains of the white matter: the newborn kitten brain has much less myelin than that found in cat brains at later stages of development. Using DSI tractography, we successfully identified structural changes in thalamo-cortical and cortico-cortical association tracts in cat brains from one stage of development to another. In newborns, the main body of the thalamo-cortical tract was smooth, and fibers branching from it were almost straight, while the main body became more complex and branching fibers became curved reflecting gyrification in the older cats. Cortico-cortical tracts in the temporal lobe were smooth in newborns, and they formed a sharper angle in the later stages of development. The cingulum bundle and superior longitudinal fasciculus became more visible with time. Within the first month after birth, structural changes occurred in these tracts that coincided with the formation of the gyri. These results show that DSI tractography has the potential for mapping morphological changes in low FA areas associated with growth and development. The technique may also be applicable to the study of other forms of brain plasticity, including future studies in vivo. PMID:19747553

Takahashi, Emi; Dai, Guangping; Wang, Ruopeng; Ohki, Kenichi; Rosen, Glenn D.; Galaburda, Albert M.; Grant, P. Ellen; Wedeen, Van J.

2009-01-01

287

Speech entrainment enables patients with Broca's aphasia to produce fluent speech.  

PubMed

A distinguishing feature of Broca's aphasia is non-fluent halting speech typically involving one to three words per utterance. Yet, despite such profound impairments, some patients can mimic audio-visual speech stimuli enabling them to produce fluent speech in real time. We call this effect 'speech entrainment' and reveal its neural mechanism as well as explore its usefulness as a treatment for speech production in Broca's aphasia. In Experiment 1, 13 patients with Broca's aphasia were tested in three conditions: (i) speech entrainment with audio-visual feedback where they attempted to mimic a speaker whose mouth was seen on an iPod screen; (ii) speech entrainment with audio-only feedback where patients mimicked heard speech; and (iii) spontaneous speech where patients spoke freely about assigned topics. The patients produced a greater variety of words using audio-visual feedback compared with audio-only feedback and spontaneous speech. No difference was found between audio-only feedback and spontaneous speech. In Experiment 2, 10 of the 13 patients included in Experiment 1 and 20 control subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine the neural mechanism that supports speech entrainment. Group results with patients and controls revealed greater bilateral cortical activation for speech produced during speech entrainment compared with spontaneous speech at the junction of the anterior insula and Brodmann area 47, in Brodmann area 37, and unilaterally in the left middle temporal gyrus and the dorsal portion of Broca's area. Probabilistic white matter tracts constructed for these regions in the normal subjects revealed a structural network connected via the corpus callosum and ventral fibres through the extreme capsule. Unilateral areas were connected via the arcuate fasciculus. In Experiment 3, all patients included in Experiment 1 participated in a 6-week treatment phase using speech entrainment to improve speech production. Behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected before and after the treatment phase. Patients were able to produce a greater variety of words with and without speech entrainment at 1 and 6 weeks after training. Treatment-related decrease in cortical activation associated with speech entrainment was found in areas of the left posterior-inferior parietal lobe. We conclude that speech entrainment allows patients with Broca's aphasia to double their speech output compared with spontaneous speech. Neuroimaging results suggest that speech entrainment allows patients to produce fluent speech by providing an external gating mechanism that yokes a ventral language network that encodes conceptual aspects of speech. Preliminary results suggest that training with speech entrainment improves speech production in Broca's aphasia providing a potential therapeutic method for a disorder that has been shown to be particularly resistant to treatment. PMID:23250889

Fridriksson, Julius; Hubbard, H Isabel; Hudspeth, Sarah Grace; Holland, Audrey L; Bonilha, Leonardo; Fromm, Davida; Rorden, Chris

2012-12-01

288

Connections of the corpus cerebelli in the green sunfish and the common goldfish: a comparison of perciform and cypriniform teleosts.  

PubMed

Examination of the connections of the corpus cerebelli in one perciform (Lepomis cyanellus) and one cypriniform teleost (Carassius auratus) reveal that ipsilateral afferent connections in both species arise from an anterior group of nuclei in the diencephalon and mesencephalon, and a posterior group of nuclei in the rhombencephalon. Some nuclei of the anterior group and all those of the posterior group have in addition a weaker, and the medial octavolateralis nucleus a stronger, contralateral component. The inferior olivary nucleus in both species projects solely contralaterally. Nucleus paracommissuralis, the ventral accessory optic nucleus and nucleus isthmi are minute in Carassius compared to Lepomis. The latter species has in addition a bilateral corpopetal projection (ipsilaterally stronger) from the lateral cuneate nucleus. Efferent fibers in both species reach the contralateral nucleus ruber, oculomotor nucleus, nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus, torus semicircularis, ventromedial and ventrolateral thalamic nuclei, optic tectum and superior and inferior reticular formation. An additional weaker ipsilateral terminal field could be observed in all nuclei except in the ventrolateral and ventromedial thalamic nuclei, the dorsal periventricular pretectal nucleus and the optic tectum. Lepomis in addition has a bilateral terminal field in the ventral accessory optic nucleus (contralaterally stronger). In both species, stronger ipsilateral and weaker contralateral terminal fields were present in the torus longitudinalis and the valvula cerebelli. The two patterns of corpopetal connections in Lepomis and Carassius were used as models for perciforms and cypriniforms in the analysis of the existing information in the literature on teleosts. While most discrepancies in the literature on percomorphs and ostariophysines could be interpreted consistently, the available information on mormyrids revealed a very different pattern of corpopetal organization: presence of additional connections (from a division of the nucleus preglomerulosus) and absence of otherwise well-established corpopetal connections in teleosts. In a second step, a phyletic analysis of teleostean corpopetal organization revealed that while teleosts share with all other vertebrates a group of corpopetal connections from the rhombencephalon, they evolved many new, more anteriorly located afferent inputs to the corpus cerebelli. Furthermore, electroreceptive mormyrids in addition evolved newly at least one corpopetal connection and lost many others. PMID:3233488

Wullimann, M F; Northcutt, R G

1988-01-01

289

Executive deficits, not processing speed relates to abnormalities in distinct prefrontal tracts in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.  

PubMed

Cognitive impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is characterized by deficits on tests of executive function; however, the contribution of abnormal processing speed is unknown. Methods are confounded by tasks that depend on motor speed in patients with physical disability. Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed multi-system cerebral involvement, with evidence of reduced white matter volume and integrity in predominant frontotemporal regions. The current study has two aims. First, to investigate whether cognitive impairments in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are due to executive dysfunction or slowed processing speed using methodology that accommodates motor disability. This is achieved using a dual-task paradigm and tasks that manipulate stimulus presentation times and do not rely on response motor speed. Second, to identify relationships between specific cognitive impairments and the integrity of distinct white matter tracts. Thirty patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 30 age- and education-matched control subjects were administered an experimental dual-task procedure that combined a visual inspection time task and digit recall. In addition, measures of executive function (including letter fluency) and processing speed (visual inspection time and rapid serial letter identification) were administered. Integrity of white matter tracts was determined using region of interest analyses of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging data. Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis did not show impairments on tests of processing speed, but executive deficits were revealed once visual inspection time was combined with digit recall (dual-task) and in letter fluency. In addition to the corticospinal tracts, significant differences in fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity were found between groups in a number of prefrontal and temporal white matter tracts including the anterior cingulate, anterior thalamic radiation, uncinate fasciculus and hippocampal portion of the cingulum bundles. Significant differences also emerged in the anterior corona radiata as well as in white matter underlying the superior, medial and inferior frontal gyri and the temporal gyri. Dual-task performance significantly correlated with fractional anisotropy measures in the middle frontal gyrus white matter and anterior corona radiata. Letter fluency indices significantly correlated with fractional anisotropy measures of the inferior frontal gyrus white matter and corpus callosum in addition to the corticospinal tracts and mean diffusivity measures in the white matter of the superior frontal gyrus. The current study demonstrates that cognitive impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is not due to generic slowing of processing speed. Moreover, different executive deficits are related to distinct prefrontal tract involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with dual-task impairment associating with dorsolateral prefrontal dysfunction and letter fluency showing greater dependence on inferolateral prefrontal dysfunction. PMID:24056536

Pettit, Lewis D; Bastin, Mark E; Smith, Colin; Bak, Thomas H; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Abrahams, Sharon

2013-11-01

290

The Prognosis of Allocentric and Egocentric Neglect: Evidence from Clinical Scans  

PubMed Central

We contrasted the neuroanatomical substrates of sub-acute and chronic visuospatial deficits associated with different aspects of unilateral neglect using computed tomography scans acquired as part of routine clinical diagnosis. Voxel-wise statistical analyses were conducted on a group of 160 stroke patients scanned at a sub-acute stage. Lesion-deficit relationships were assessed across the whole brain, separately for grey and white matter. We assessed lesions that were associated with behavioural performance (i) at a sub-acute stage (within 3 months of the stroke) and (ii) at a chronic stage (after 9 months post stroke). Allocentric and egocentric neglect symptoms at the sub-acute stage were associated with lesions to dissociated regions within the frontal lobe, amongst other regions. However the frontal lesions were not associated with neglect at the chronic stage. On the other hand, lesions in the angular gyrus were associated with persistent allocentric neglect. In contrast, lesions within the superior temporal gyrus extending into the supramarginal gyrus, as well as lesions within the basal ganglia and insula, were associated with persistent egocentric neglect. Damage within the temporo-parietal junction was associated with both types of neglect at the sub-acute stage and 9 months later. Furthermore, white matter disconnections resulting from damage along the superior longitudinal fasciculus were associated with both types of neglect and critically related to both sub-acute and chronic deficits. Finally, there was a significant difference in the lesion volume between patients who recovered from neglect and patients with chronic deficits. The findings presented provide evidence that (i) the lesion location and lesion size can be used to successfully predict the outcome of neglect based on clinical CT scans, (ii) lesion location alone can serve as a critical predictor for persistent neglect symptoms, (iii) wide spread lesions are associated with neglect symptoms at the sub-acute stage but only some of these are critical for predicting whether neglect will become a chronic disorder and (iv) the severity of behavioural symptoms can be a useful predictor of recovery in the absence of neuroimaging findings on clinical scans. We discuss the implications for understanding the symptoms of the neglect syndrome, the recovery of function and the use of clinical scans to predict outcome. PMID:23133604

Chechlacz, Magdalena; Rotshtein, Pia; Roberts, Katherine L.; Bickerton, Wai-Ling; Lau, Johnny K. L.; Humphreys, Glyn W.

2012-01-01

291

Torsional Eye Movements Evoked by Unilateral Labyrinthine Galvanic Polarizations in the Squirrel Monkey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electrical stimulation of vestibular-nerve afferents innervating the semicircular canals has been used to identify the extraocular muscles receiving activation or inhibition by individual ampullary nerves. This technique was originally developed by Szentagothai (1950) and led to the description of three neuron reflex arcs that connect each semicircular canal through an interneuron traversing in the region of the medial longitudinal fasciculus to one ipsilateral and one contralateral eye muscle. Selective ampullary nerve stimulation was subsequently used by Cohen and colleagues (Cohen and Suzuki, 1963; Cohen et al., 1964; Suzuki et al., 1964; Cohen et al., 1966) to study movements of the eyes and activation of individual extraocular muscles in response to stimulation of combinations of ampullary nerves. This work led to a description of the now familiar relationships between activation of a semicircular canal ampullary nerves and the anticipated movement in each eye. Disconjugacy of eye movements induced by individual vertical canal stimulation and dependence of the pulling direction of vertical recti and oblique muscles on eye position were also defined in these experiments. Subsequent studies have defined the mechanisms by which externally applied galvanic currents result in a change in vestibular-nerve afferent discharge. The currents appear to act at the spike trigger site. Perilymphatic cathodal currents depolarize the trigger site and lead to excitation whereas anodal currents hyperpolarize and result in inhibition. Afferents innervating all five vestibular endorgans appear to be affected equally by the currents (Goldberg et al., 1984). Irregularly discharging afferents are about 5-10 times more sensitive than regularly discharging ones because of the steeper slope of the former's faster postspike recovery of excitability in encoder sensitivity (Smith and Goldberg, 1986). Response adaptation similar to that noted during acceleration steps is apparent for longer periods of current administration. This adaptation is manifested as a perstimulus return toward resting discharge and poststimulus after-response in the opposite direction (Goldberg et al., 1984; Minor and Goldberg, l991). Cathodal currents (with respect to the perilymphatic space of the vestibule) are excitatory whereas anodal currents are inhibitory. Horizontal eye movements evoked by unilateral galvanic polarizations administered through chronically implanted labyrinthine stimulating electrodes have been studied in alert squirrel monkeys (Minor and Goldberg, 1991). We sought to extend this analysis by recording three-dimensional eye movements during galvanic stimulation. As predicted based upon roughly equal stimulation of ampullary nerves innervating the vertical canals, a substantial torsional component to the nystagmus is noted. The trajectory of torsional slow phases and nystagmus profile after the polarization provide insight into the central mechanisms that influence these responses.

Minor, Lloyd B.; Tomko, David L.; Paige, Gary D.

1995-01-01

292

Brain microstructural development at near-term age in very-low-birth-weight preterm infants: an atlas-based diffusion imaging study.  

PubMed

At near-term age the brain undergoes rapid growth and development. Abnormalities identified during this period have been recognized as potential predictors of neurodevelopment in children born preterm. This study used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine white matter (WM) microstructure in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infants to better understand regional WM developmental trajectories at near-term age. DTI scans were analyzed in a cross-sectional sample of 45 VLBW preterm infants (BW?1500g, GA?32weeks) within a cohort of 102 neonates admitted to the NICU and recruited to participate prior to standard-of-care MRI, from 2010 to 2011, 66/102 also had DTI. For inclusion in this analysis, 45 infants had DTI, no evidence of brain abnormality on MRI, and were scanned at PMA ?40weeks (34.7-38.6). White matter microstructure was analyzed in 19 subcortical regions defined by DiffeoMap neonatal brain atlas, using threshold values of trace <0.006mm(2)s(-1) and FA >0.15. Regional fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) were calculated and temporal-spatial trajectories of development were examined in relation to PMA and brain region location. Posterior regions within the corona radiata (CR), corpus callosum (CC), and internal capsule (IC) demonstrated significantly higher mean FA values compared to anterior regions. Posterior regions of the CR and IC demonstrated significantly lower RD values compared to anterior regions. Centrally located projection fibers demonstrated higher mean FA and lower RD values than peripheral regions including the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC), cerebral peduncle, retrolenticular part of the IC, posterior thalamic radiation, and sagittal stratum. Centrally located association fibers of the external capsule had higher FA and lower RD than the more peripherally-located superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). A significant relationship between PMA-at-scan and FA, MD, and RD was demonstrated by a majority of regions, the strongest correlations were observed in the anterior limb of the internal capsule, a region undergoing early stages of myelination at near-term age, in which FA increased (r=.433, p=.003) and MD (r=-.545, p=.000) and RD (r=-.540, p=.000) decreased with PMA-at-scan. No correlation with PMA-at-scan was observed in the CC or SLF, regions that myelinate later in infancy. Regional patterns of higher FA and lower RD were observed at this near-term age, suggestive of more advanced microstructural development in posterior compared to anterior regions within the CR, CC, and IC and in central compared to peripheral WM structures. Evidence of region-specific rates of microstructural development was observed. Temporal-spatial patterns of WM microstructure development at near-term age have important implications for interpretation of near-term DTI and for identification of aberrations in typical developmental trajectories that may signal future impairment. PMID:24091089

Rose, Jessica; Vassar, Rachel; Cahill-Rowley, Katelyn; Guzman, Ximena Stecher; Stevenson, David K; Barnea-Goraly, Naama

2014-02-01

293

Speech entrainment enables patients with Broca’s aphasia to produce fluent speech  

PubMed Central

A distinguishing feature of Broca’s aphasia is non-fluent halting speech typically involving one to three words per utterance. Yet, despite such profound impairments, some patients can mimic audio-visual speech stimuli enabling them to produce fluent speech in real time. We call this effect ‘speech entrainment’ and reveal its neural mechanism as well as explore its usefulness as a treatment for speech production in Broca’s aphasia. In Experiment 1, 13 patients with Broca’s aphasia were tested in three conditions: (i) speech entrainment with audio-visual feedback where they attempted to mimic a speaker whose mouth was seen on an iPod screen; (ii) speech entrainment with audio-only feedback where patients mimicked heard speech; and (iii) spontaneous speech where patients spoke freely about assigned topics. The patients produced a greater variety of words using audio-visual feedback compared with audio-only feedback and spontaneous speech. No difference was found between audio-only feedback and spontaneous speech. In Experiment 2, 10 of the 13 patients included in Experiment 1 and 20 control subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine the neural mechanism that supports speech entrainment. Group results with patients and controls revealed greater bilateral cortical activation for speech produced during speech entrainment compared with spontaneous speech at the junction of the anterior insula and Brodmann area 47, in Brodmann area 37, and unilaterally in the left middle temporal gyrus and the dorsal portion of Broca’s area. Probabilistic white matter tracts constructed for these regions in the normal subjects revealed a structural network connected via the corpus callosum and ventral fibres through the extreme capsule. Unilateral areas were connected via the arcuate fasciculus. In Experiment 3, all patients included in Experiment 1 participated in a 6-week treatment phase using speech entrainment to improve speech production. Behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected before and after the treatment phase. Patients were able to produce a greater variety of words with and without speech entrainment at 1 and 6 weeks after training. Treatment-related decrease in cortical activation associated with speech entrainment was found in areas of the left posterior-inferior parietal lobe. We conclude that speech entrainment allows patients with Broca’s aphasia to double their speech output compared with spontaneous speech. Neuroimaging results suggest that speech entrainment allows patients to produce fluent speech by providing an external gating mechanism that yokes a ventral language network that encodes conceptual aspects of speech. Preliminary results suggest that training with speech entrainment improves speech production in Broca’s aphasia providing a potential therapeutic method for a disorder that has been shown to be particularly resistant to treatment. PMID:23250889

Hubbard, H. Isabel; Hudspeth, Sarah Grace; Holland, Audrey L.; Bonilha, Leonardo; Fromm, Davida; Rorden, Chris

2012-01-01

294

Hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic sauvagine-like immunoreactivity in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) central nervous system.  

PubMed

In the present study, immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay were used to investigate the presence of sauvagine in both hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic areas of the central nervous system (CNS) of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) using a specific antiserum raised against synthetic non-conjugated sauvagine (SVG), a frog (Phyllomedusa sauvagei) skin peptide of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family. Sauvagine-immunoreactive (SVG-ir) bipolar neurons were found in the nucleus of the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis located in the rostral mesencephalic tegmentum. In the tectal mesencephalon, beaded SVG-ir fibres were present in the optic tectum, and in the torus semicircularis. Abundant SVG-ir varicose fibres were seen in the granulosa layer of the cerebellum, the nucleus isthmi, and the obex of the spinal cord. SVG-ir fibres were also seen by the alar plate of the rombencephalon. In the diencephalon, the antiserum stained parvocellular neurons of the preoptic nucleus (PON) which extended their dendrites into the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) of the third ventricle and projected their ependymofugal fibres to the zona externa (ZE) of the median eminence. Immunopositive fibres were also present in the medial forebrain bundle at the chiasmatic field, the posterior thalamus, the pretectal gray, and the ventrocaudal hypothalamus. In the telencephalon (forebrain), SVG-ir fibres were seen in the medial septum, the lateral septum, and the amygdala. The SVG immunoreactivity could not be detected after using the SVG antiserum previously immunoabsorbed with synthetic SVG (0.1 microM), but immunoblock of the antiserum with sucker (Catostomus commersoni) urotensin I (sUI), sole (Hippoglossoides elassodon) urotensin I, sucker CRF, rat/human CRF, or ovine CRF (0.1-10 microM) did not eliminate visualization of the immunoreactivity. In radioimmunoassay, the SVG antiserum did not crossreact with sUI, or the SVG fragments SVG1-16, SVG16-27, and SVG26-34, but it recognized the C-terminal fragment SVG35-40. Crossreaction with mammalian ovine CRF and rat/human CRF was negligible. Both hypothalamic and mesencephalic extracts gave parallel displacement curves to SVG. The results suggest the presence in the bullfrog brain of a SVG-like neuropeptide, i.e., a peptide of the CRF family, that either is SVG or shares high homology with the C-terminus of that peptide. The function of this neuropeptide in amphibians is not known at this time, but based on its anatomical distribution to the ZE it could affect the release of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) or other substances from the amphibian pars distalis. Involvement of the SVG-like peptide in behavioural (forebrain), visual (thalamus-tegmentum mesencephali-pretectal gray-optic tectum), motor coordination (cerebellum), and autonomic (spinal) functions, as well as an undefined interaction with the CSF in the bullfrog, seems likely. PMID:8822168

Gonzalez, G C; Bountzioukas, S; Gonzalez, E S; McMaster, D; Ko, D; Lederis, K; Lukowiak, K

1996-02-01

295

[From the abducens nucleus to spatial memory: an ocular motor journey].  

PubMed

Advances in our knowledge on eye movements over the last 25 years are reviewed, focusing on the author's experience. First, the advantages of binocular frontal vision, which is a common characteristic of all predator mammals, are compared to those of lateral vision, characterizing their preys. Binocular frontal vision implies a perfect parallelism of both eyes, which is ensured in the pons by means of the abducens nucleus, controlling abduction as well as adduction. The pathological example of the "one-and-a-half" syndrome, in which the abducens nucleus and the adjacent medial longitudinal fasciculus are simultaneously impaired, is described. The main brainstem syndromes involving vertical eye movements are also reviewed: in particular, the third nerve nucleus syndrome, in which both ipsilateral third nerve paralysis and contralateral superior rectus paralysis (with hypotropia) result from a unilateral third nerve nucleus lesion. A case of upbeat nystagmus (in the primary position of gaze) due to a small upper pontine lesion, probably affecting the ventral tegmental tract (VTT) is also reported. This is an opportunity to emphasize that, although a number of cases of upbeat nystagmus due to focal brainstem lesions affecting the upward vestibular pathway (UVP)--either at the upper pontine (VTT) or caudal medullary level--exist in the literature, no convincing cases with downbeat nystagmus (in the primary position of gaze) due to a focal brainstem lesion have been reported. Downbeat nystagmus could result from a UVP hyperactivity (secondary to a floccular lesion) and the notion that this pathway is physiologically predominant compared to the downward pathway, maybe due to gravity, is developed. A new hypothesis about the role of the caudal medulla in UVP is also proposed. Next, the cortical control of saccadic eye movements is reviewed, with a reminder that reflexive saccades are mainly triggered by the parietal eye field whereas intentional saccades depend upon the frontal eye field. The inhibition of reflexive saccades is mainly controlled by the dorsolateral frontal cortex (DLPFC), i.e. area 46 of Brodmann. A few examples of the use of saccades as a research tool and model in cognitive neurosciences are given. The use of memory-guided saccades allowed us to study spatial memory and led us to propose a relatively original conception of the cortical control of spatial memory in which the DLPFC, the parahippocampal cortex and the hippocampal formation could be involved successively according to specific periods of time. An experiment using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a paradigm studying decision is described, again with the involvement of the DLPFC in the decisional process. Lastly, the usefulness of eye movements in clinical neuro-ophthalmology at the bedside as well as in neurophysiological or even neuropsychological research in the laboratory is emphasized. PMID:16106806

Pierrot-Deseilligny, C

2005-05-01

296

The organization of monoamine-containing neurons in the brain of the sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus) as revealed by fluorescence microscopy.  

PubMed

The morphological organization of the monoamine-containing neurons in the brain of the sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus) was studied by means of the Falck-Hillarp histofluorescence method. No attempt was made to distinguish between norepinephrine and dopamine, both primary catecholamines (CA) yielding a similar yellow-green fluorescence after paraformaldehyde treatment. In the brain stem of this teleost fish, three groups of CA-containing neuronal somata have been found. First, there is a small collection of CA perikarya located just caudal to the obex of the fourth ventricle. The neurons of this medullo-sinal group give rise to numerous CA fibers many of which ascend within the central portion of the medulla. Intermingled with these CA fibers are some CA cells that constitute the central medullary group. The CA perikarya of this group are scattered between the levels of cranial nerves X and VIII. The tegmentum of the isthmus also contains a small group of very closely packed CA neurons. The large-sized CA cells of the isthmal group are located dorsolateral to the medial longitudinal fasciculus, partly within the periventricular gray. High densities of CA varicosities were also disclosed in various brain stem structures such as the optic tectum, the torus semicircularis and the cerebeller valvula. In addition, numerous serotonin (5-HT)-type neuronal somata were found in the raphe region of the brain stem, particularly at caudal mesencephalic, isthmal and rostral medullary levels. A large number of CA cell bodies were visualized in the sunfish hypothalamus. Most of them form two populations of small, round cells that are located along and partly within the ependymal walls of the posterior and lateral recesses of the third ventricle. These bipolar cells possess one short club-like process protruding into the ventricle and their thin ependymofugal processes contribute to the CA innervation of numerous hypothalamic regions. Large CA neurons apparently without direct CSF contact also occur in the area of nucleus posterior tuberis, at the level of the mesodiencephalic junction. Although the hypothalamic inferior lobes are devoid of CA cell bodies they are heavily innervated by CA axons. The sunfish telencephalon also receives a strikingly massive and complex monoaminergic innervation. Numerous CA fibers which are first observed at the level of the preoptic area, ascend through the central zone of the telencephalon and arborize profusely particularly within the medial zone of area dorsalis telencephali. Other CA fibers, as well as abundant fine 5-HT varicosities were found in the lateral zone of area dorsalis. Although the exact origin of the telencephalic CA afferents in Lepomis is not known, part of it may arise from the isthmal CA cell group which appears similar to the locus coeruleus of reptiles, birds and mammals. PMID:721968

Parent, A; Dube, L; Braford, M R; Northcutt, R G

1978-12-01