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Sample records for fronto-occipital fasciculus revisited

  1. Analysis of the volumetric relationship among human ocular, orbital and fronto-occipital cortical morphology.

    PubMed

    Masters, Michael; Bruner, Emiliano; Queer, Sarah; Traynor, Sarah; Senjem, Jess

    2015-10-01

    Recent research on the visual system has focused on investigating the relationship among eye (ocular), orbital, and visual cortical anatomy in humans. This issue is relevant in evolutionary and medical fields. In terms of evolution, only in modern humans and Neandertals are the orbits positioned beneath the frontal lobes, with consequent structural constraints. In terms of medicine, such constraints can be associated with minor deformation of the eye, vision defects, and patterns of integration among these features, and in association with the frontal lobes, are important to consider in reconstructive surgery. Further study is therefore necessary to establish how these variables are related, and to what extent ocular size is associated with orbital and cerebral cortical volumes. Relationships among these anatomical components were investigated using magnetic resonance images from a large sample of 83 individuals, which also included each subject's body height, age, sex, and uncorrected visual acuity score. Occipital and frontal gyri volumes were calculated using two different cortical parcellation tools in order to provide a better understanding of how the eye and orbit vary in relation to visual cortical gyri, and frontal cortical gyri which are not directly related to visual processing. Results indicated that ocular and orbital volumes were weakly correlated, and that eye volume explains only a small proportion of the variance in orbital volume. Ocular and orbital volumes were also found to be equally and, in most cases, more highly correlated with five frontal lobe gyri than with occipital lobe gyri associated with V1, V2, and V3 of the visual cortex. Additionally, after accounting for age and sex variation, the relationship between ocular and total visual cortical volume was no longer statistically significant, but remained significantly related to total frontal lobe volume. The relationship between orbital and visual cortical volumes remained significant for a number of occipital lobe gyri even after accounting for these cofactors, but was again found to be more highly correlated with the frontal cortex than with the occipital cortex. These results indicate that eye volume explains only a small amount of variation in orbital and visual cortical volume, and that the eye and orbit are generally more structurally associated with the frontal lobes than they are functionally associated with the visual cortex of the occipital lobes. Results also demonstrate that these components of the visual system are highly complex and influenced by a multitude of factors in humans. PMID:26250048

  2. The Role of the Arcuate Fasciculus in Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Byron; Ardila, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    In aphasia literature, it has been considered that a speech repetition defect represents the main constituent of conduction aphasia. Conduction aphasia has frequently been interpreted as a language impairment due to lesions of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) that disconnect receptive language areas from expressive ones. Modern neuroradiological…

  3. DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGING OF THE UNCINATE FASCICULUS IN FIRST-EPISODE SCHIZOPHRENIA

    E-print Network

    DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGING OF THE UNCINATE FASCICULUS IN FIRST-EPISODE SCHIZOPHRENIA DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGING OF THE UNCINATE FASCICULUS IN FIRST-EPISODE SCHIZOPHRENIA BACKGROUND This study compares diffusion) to those of age-matched controls (NCs). METHODS Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) were acquired on a 3T GE

  4. Does the Left Inferior Longitudinal Fasciculus Play a Role in Language? A Brain Stimulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Nouet, Aurelien; Gatignol, Peggy; Capelle, Laurent; Duffau, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    Although advances in diffusion tensor imaging have enabled us to better study the anatomy of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), its function remains poorly understood. Recently, it was suggested that the subcortical network subserving the language semantics could be constituted, in parallel with the inferior occipitofrontal fasciculus, by…

  5. Uncinate fasciculus abnormalities in recent onset schizophrenia and affective psychosis: A diffusion tensor imaging study

    E-print Network

    Uncinate fasciculus abnormalities in recent onset schizophrenia and affective psychosis of illness and specific to schizophrenia. Fifteen schizophrenia subjects and 15 affective psychosis within 4 years of first hospitalization (12 patients with schizophrenia and 12 patients with affective psychosis

  6. Pre-cue Fronto-Occipital Alpha Phase and Distributed Cortical Oscillations Predict Failures of Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Jordan P.; Dyckman, Kara A.; McDowell, Jennifer E.; Clementz, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive control is required for correct performance on antisaccade tasks, including the ability to inhibit an externally driven ocular motor repsonse (a saccade to a peripheral stimulus) in favor of an internally driven ocular motor goal (a saccade directed away from a peripheral stimulus). Healthy humans occasionally produce errors during antisaccade tasks, but the mechanisms associated with such failures of cognitive control are uncertain. Most research on cognitive control failures focuses on post-stimulus processing, although a growing body of literature highlights a role of intrinsic brain activity in perceptual and cognitive performance. The current investigation used dense array electroencephalography and distributed source analyses to examine brain oscillations across a wide frequency bandwidth in the period prior to antisaccade cue onset. Results highlight four important aspects of ongoing and preparatory brain activations that differentiate error from correct antisaccade trials: (i) ongoing oscillatory beta (20–30Hz) power in anterior cingulate prior to trial initiation (lower for error trials), (ii) instantaneous phase of ongoing alpha-theta (7Hz) in frontal and occipital cortices immediately before trial initiation (opposite between trial types), (iii) gamma power (35–60Hz) in posterior parietal cortex 100 ms prior to cue onset (greater for error trials), and (iv) phase locking of alpha (5–12Hz) in parietal and occipital cortices immediately prior to cue onset (lower for error trials). These findings extend recently reported effects of pre-trial alpha phase on perception to cognitive control processes, and help identify the cortical generators of such phase effects. PMID:22593071

  7. Anatomical Properties of the Arcuate Fasciculus Predict Phonological and Reading Skills in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Sherbondy, Anthony J.; Deutsch, Gayle K.; Wandell, Brian A.; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2011-01-01

    For more than a century, neurologists have hypothesized that the arcuate fasciculus carries signals that are essential for language function; however, the relevance of the pathway for particular behaviors is highly controversial. The primary objective of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging to examine the relationship between individual…

  8. Am J Psychiatry 159:5, May 2002 813 Uncinate Fasciculus Findings in Schizophrenia

    E-print Network

    Am J Psychiatry 159:5, May 2002 813 Article Uncinate Fasciculus Findings in Schizophrenia in schizophrenia. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) stud- ies, however, have not shown compelling integ- rity. The first three diffusion tensor imag- ing studies in schizophrenia showed lower

  9. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    E-print Network

    Takaya, Shigetoshi

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. ...

  10. A Combined fMRI and DTI Examination of Functional Language Lateralization and Arcuate Fasciculus Structure: Effects of Degree versus Direction of Hand Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Propper, Ruthe E.; O'Donnell, Lauren J.; Whalen, Stephen; Tie, Yanmei; Norton, Isaiah H.; Suarez, Ralph O.; Zollei, Lilla; Radmanesh, Alireza; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between hand preference degree and direction, functional language lateralization in Broca's and Wernicke's areas, and structural measures of the arcuate fasciculus. Results revealed an effect of degree of hand preference on arcuate fasciculus structure, such that consistently-handed individuals,…

  11. 'For the benefit of the people': the Dutch translation of the Fasciculus medicinae, Antwerp 1512.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with the Dutch translation of the Fasciculus medicinae based on the Latin edition, Venice 1495, with the famous woodcuts created in 1494 for the Italian translation of the original Latin edition of 1491. The woodcuts are compared with the Venetian model. New features in the Antwerp edition include the Skeleton and the Zodiac Man, bot originally based on German models. The text also deals with other woodcuts in the Low Countries based on these Venetian illustrations. The Appendices provide a short title catalog of all the editions and translations based on the Venetian edition and a stemma. PMID:19642255

  12. White matter and reading deficits after pediatric traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensor imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Chad Parker; Juranek, Jenifer; Swank, Paul R.; Kramer, Larry; Cox, Charles S.; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury often results in significant long-term deficits in mastery of reading ability. This study aimed to identify white matter pathways that, when damaged, predicted reading deficits in children. Based on the dual-route model of word reading, we predicted that integrity of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus would be related to performance in sight word identification while integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus would be related to performance in phonemic decoding. Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle. The connectivity of white matter pathways was used to predict reading deficits in children aged 6 to 16 years with traumatic brain injury (n = 29) and those with orthopedic injury (n = 27) using tract-based spatial statistics. Results showed that children with traumatic brain injury and reduced microstructural integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus demonstrated reduced word-reading ability on sight word and phonemic decoding tasks. Additionally, children with traumatic brain injury and microstructural changes involving the cingulum bundle demonstrated reduced reading fluency. Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding. No association was identified between the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and sight word reading or phonemic decoding. Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle. These findings support dissociable pathways predicting word reading and fluency using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and provide additional information for developing models of acquired reading deficits by specifying areas of brain damage which may predict reading deficits following recovery from the acute phase of TBI.

  13. Evidence of slow maturation of the superior longitudinal fasciculus in early childhood by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyang; Evans, Alan; Hermoye, Laurent; Lee, Seung-Koo; Wakana, Setsu; Zhang, Weihong; Donohue, Pamela; Miller, Michael I; Huang, Hao; Wang, Xiaoqing; van Zijl, Peter C M; Mori, Susumu

    2007-11-01

    While the majority of axonal organization is established by birth in mammalian brains, axonal wiring and pruning processes, as well as myelination, are known to extend to the postnatal periods, where environmental stimuli often play a major role. Normal axonal and myelin development of individual white matter tracts of human in this period is poorly understood and may have a major role in cognitive development of human. In this study, we applied diffusion tensor imaging and normalization-based population analyses to 44 preteen children and 30 adult images. We observed highly significant changes of fiber orientations at regions that correspond to the superior longitudinal fasciculus during the first 5 years. The result is attributed to slow axonal and/or myelin maturation of this tract, which is believed to be involved in language functions. PMID:17826183

  14. Interpersonal traits of psychopathy linked to reduced integrity of the uncinate fasciculus.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Richard C; Pujara, Maia S; Motzkin, Julian C; Newman, Joseph P; Kiehl, Kent A; Decety, Jean; Kosson, David S; Koenigs, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by callous lack of empathy, impulsive antisocial behavior, and criminal recidivism. Here, we performed the largest diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study of incarcerated criminal offenders to date (N?=?147) to determine whether psychopathy severity is linked to the microstructural integrity of major white matter tracts in the brain. Consistent with the results of previous studies in smaller samples, we found that psychopathy was associated with reduced fractional anisotropy in the right uncinate fasciculus (UF; the major white matter tract connecting ventral frontal and anterior temporal cortices). We found no such association in the left UF or in adjacent frontal or temporal white matter tracts. Moreover, the right UF finding was specifically related to the interpersonal features of psychopathy (glib superficial charm, grandiose sense of self-worth, pathological lying, manipulativeness), rather than the affective, antisocial, or lifestyle features. These results indicate a neural marker for this key dimension of psychopathic symptomatology. PMID:26219745

  15. Evidence of Slow Maturation of the Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus in Early Childhood by Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiangyang; Evans, Alan; Hermoye, Laurent; Lee, Seung-Koo; Wakana, Setsu; Zhang, Weihong; Donohue, Pamela; Miller, Michael I.; Huang, Hao; Wang, Xiaoqing; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Mori, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    While the majority of axonal organization is established by birth in mammalian brains, axonal wiring and pruning processes, as well as myelination, are known to extend to the postnatal periods, where environmental stimuli often play a major role. Normal axonal and myelin development of individual white matter tracts of human in this period is poorly understood and may have a major role in cognitive development of human. In this study, we applied diffusion tensor imaging and normalization-based population analyses to 44 preteen children and 30 adult images. We observed highly significant changes of fiber orientations at regions that correspond to the superior longitudinal fasciculus during the first five years. The result is attributed to slow axonal and/or myelin maturation of this tract, which is believed to be involved in language functions. PMID:17826183

  16. Psychopathic traits modulate microstructural integrity of right uncinate fasciculus in a community population

    PubMed Central

    Sobhani, Mona; Baker, Laura; Martins, Bradford; Tuvblad, Catherine; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with psychopathy possess emotional and behavioral abnormalities. Two neural regions, involved in behavioral control and emotion regulation, are often implicated: amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC). Recently, in studies using adult criminal populations, reductions in microstructural integrity of the white matter connections (i.e., uncinate fasciculus (UF)) between these two neural regions have been discovered in criminals with psychopathy, supporting the notion of neural dysfunction in the amygdala–VMPFC circuit. Here, a young adult, community sample is used to assess whether psychopathic traits modulate microstructural integrity of UF, and whether this relationship is dependent upon levels of trait anxiety, which is sometimes used to distinguish subtypes of psychopathy. Results reveal a negative association between psychopathic traits and microstructural integrity of UF, supporting previous findings. However, no moderation of the relationship by trait anxiety was discovered. Findings provide further support for the notion of altered amygdala–VMPFC connectivity in association with higher psychopathic traits. PMID:26106525

  17. Diffusion MRI properties of the human uncinate fasciculus correlate with the ability to learn visual associations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cibu; Avram, Alexandru; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Baker, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The uncinate fasciculus (UF) is a cortico-cortico white matter pathway that links the anterior temporal and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). In the monkey, transection of the UF causes significant impairments in learning conditional visual-visual associations, while object discrimination remains intact, suggesting an important role for the UF in mediating the learning of complex visual associations. Whether this functional role extends to the human UF has not been tested directly. Here, we used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) and behavioral experiments to examine the relation between learning visual associations and the structural properties of the human UF. In a group of healthy adults, we segmented the UF and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and derived dMRI measures of the structural properties of the two pathways. We also used a behavioral experiment adapted from the monkey studies to characterize the ability of these individuals to learn to associate a person's face with a group of specific scenes (conditional visual-visual association). We then tested whether the variability in the dMRI measures of the two pathways correlated with variability in the ability to rapidly learn the face-place associations. Our study suggests that in the human, the left UF may be important for mediating the rapid learning of conditional visual-visual associations whereas the right UF may play an important role in the immediate retrieval of visual-visual associations. These results provide preliminary evidence suggesting similarities and differences in the functional role of the UF in monkeys compared to humans. The findings presented here contribute to our understanding of the functional role of the UF in humans and the functional neuroanatomy of the brain networks involved in visual cognition. PMID:25742710

  18. Impairment of speech production predicted by lesion load of the left arcuate fasciculus

    PubMed Central

    Marchina, Sarah; Zhu, Lin L.; Norton, Andrea; Zipse, Lauryn; Wan, Catherine Y.; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Previous studies have suggested that patients’ potential for post-stroke language recovery is related to lesion size; however, lesion location may also be of importance, particularly when fiber tracts that are critical to the sensorimotor mapping of sounds for articulation (e.g. the arcuate fasciculus [AF]) have been damaged. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that lesion loads of the AF (i.e. volume of AF that is affected by a patient’s lesion) and of two other tracts involved in language processing (the extreme capsule [EmC] and the uncinate fasciculus [UF]) are inversely related to the severity of speech production impairments in stroke patients with aphasia. Methods Thirty chronic stroke patients with residual impairments in speech production underwent high-resolution anatomical MR imaging and a battery of cognitive and language tests. Impairment was assessed using three functional measures of spontaneous speech (e.g. rate, informativeness, and overall efficiency) as well as naming ability. To quantitatively analyze the relationship between impairment scores and lesion-load along the three fiber tracts, we calculated tract–lesion overlap volumes for each patient using probabilistic maps of the tracts derived from diffusion tensor images of ten age-matched healthy subjects. Results Regression analyses showed that AF-lesion load, but not EmC- or UF-lesion load or lesion size, significantly predicted rate, informativeness, and overall efficiency of speech, as well as naming ability. Conclusions A new variable, AF-lesion load, complements established voxel-based lesion-mapping techniques and, in the future, may potentially be used to estimate impairment and recovery potential after stroke and refine inclusion criteria for experimental rehabilitation programs. PMID:21719773

  19. Tract-based diffusion tensor imaging in patients with schizophrenia and their non-psychotic siblings.

    PubMed

    Boos, Heleen B M; Mandl, René C W; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Cahn, Wiepke; van Baal, G Caroline M; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2013-04-01

    Structural brain abnormalities have consistently been found in patients with schizophrenia. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to be a useful method to measure white matter (WM) integrity in this illness, but findings in the earlier disease stages are inconclusive. Moreover, the relationship between WM microstructure and the familial risk for developing schizophrenia remains unresolved. From 126 patients with schizophrenia, 123 of their non-psychotic siblings and 109 healthy control subjects, DTI images were acquired on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) was compared along averaged WM tracts, computed for the genu, splenium, left and right uncinate fasciculus, cingulum, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, fornix, arcuate fasciculus, and inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was assessed for its unique environmental and familial (possibly heritable) aspects associated with schizophrenia, using structural equation modeling for these white matter tracts. The results of this study show that young adult (mean age 26.7 years) patients with schizophrenia did not differ in mean FA from healthy controls along WM fibers; siblings of patients showed higher mean FA in the left and right arcuate fasciculus as compared to patients and controls. With increasing age, an excessive decline in mean FA was found in patients as compared to siblings and healthy controls in the genu, left uncinate fasciculus, left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Moreover, symptom severity was negatively correlated to mean FA in the arcuate fasciculus bilaterally in patients with schizophrenia. In young adult patients with schizophrenia integrity of individual tract-based (corticocortical) fibers can (still) be within normal limits. However, changes in the arcuate fasciculus may be relevant to (the risk to develop) psychosis, while a general and widespread loss of fiber integrity may be related to illness progression. PMID:22841128

  20. The vertical occipital fasciculus: A century of controversy resolved by in vivo measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yeatman, Jason D.; Weiner, Kevin S.; Pestilli, Franco; Rokem, Ariel; Mezer, Aviv; Wandell, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    The vertical occipital fasciculus (VOF) is the only major fiber bundle connecting dorsolateral and ventrolateral visual cortex. Only a handful of studies have examined the anatomy of the VOF or its role in cognition in the living human brain. Here, we trace the contentious history of the VOF, beginning with its original discovery in monkey by Wernicke (1881) and in human by Obersteiner (1888), to its disappearance from the literature, and recent reemergence a century later. We introduce an algorithm to identify the VOF in vivo using diffusion-weighted imaging and tractography, and show that the VOF can be found in every hemisphere (n = 74). Quantitative T1 measurements demonstrate that tissue properties, such as myelination, in the VOF differ from neighboring white-matter tracts. The terminations of the VOF are in consistent positions relative to cortical folding patterns in the dorsal and ventral visual streams. Recent findings demonstrate that these same anatomical locations also mark cytoarchitectonic and functional transitions in dorsal and ventral visual cortex. We conclude that the VOF is likely to serve a unique role in the communication of signals between regions on the ventral surface that are important for the perception of visual categories (e.g., words, faces, bodies, etc.) and regions on the dorsal surface involved in the control of eye movements, attention, and motion perception. PMID:25404310

  1. Axons from the medial habenular nucleus are topographically sorted in the fasciculus retroflexus.

    PubMed

    Ichijo, Hiroyuki; Toyama, Tomoko

    2015-09-01

    We generated transgenic mice lines with a construct consisting of the zif268/egr1 promoter and the gene for the normal long-life yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) with a membrane localization sequence. One of the lines exhibited topographic labeling in the medial habenular nucleus (MHb) during postnatal development, which confirmed the previous findings that the medial, lateral, and dorsal areas of MHb project to the ventral, dorsal, and lateral parts of the interpeduncular nucleus, respectively. In addition, the membranous localization of the labeling allowed us to observe spacial arrangement of the labeled axons in the fasciculus retroflexus (FR) in the transgenic mice. Here, we report topographic sorting of the MHb axons in the FR. At postnatal day (P) 5 and P10, the labeled axons from the medial MHb were fasciculated and ran through the narrow path in the core of the FR. At P24, the labeled axons from the medial and dorsal MHb were fasciculated and ran through the broad path in the FR core. No labeling occurred in the lateral MHb throughout development; correspondingly, parts of the FR core remained unlabeled. The results indicated that the axons from the medial and dorsal areas of the MHb are grouped together in the FR of this transgenic line and are sorted out from the axons from the lateral MHb. PMID:25145706

  2. Sex Differences of Uncinate Fasciculus Structural Connectivity in Individuals with Conduct Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jibiao; Gao, Junling; Shi, Huqing; Huang, Bingsheng; Wang, Xiang; Situ, Weijun; Cai, Weixiong; Yi, Jinyao; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Yao, Shuqiao

    2014-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is one of the most common behavior disorders in adolescents, such as impulsivity, aggression, and running from school. Males are more likely to develop CD than females, and two previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have demonstrated abnormal microstructural integrity in the uncinate fasciculus (UF) in boys with CD compared to a healthy control group. However, little is known about changes in the UF in females with CD. In this study, the UF was illustrated by tractography; then, the fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity, mean diffusion, radial diffusivity (RD), and the length and number of the UF fiber bundles were compared between male and female patients with CD and between female patients with CD and female healthy controls, as well as between males with CD and healthy males. We found that males with CD showed significantly higher FA of the bilateral UF and significantly lower RD of the left UF when comparing with females with CD. Meanwhile, significantly higher FA and lower RD of the bilateral UF were also found in boys with CD relative to the male healthy controls. Our results replicated previous reports that the microstructural integrity of the UF was abnormal in boys with CD. Additionally, our results demonstrated significant gender effects on the UF of patients with CD, which may indicate why boys have higher rates of conduct problems than girls. PMID:24829912

  3. Detection of the arcuate fasciculus in congenital amusia depends on the tractography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joyce L; Kumar, Sukhbinder; Williamson, Victoria J; Scholz, Jan; Griffiths, Timothy D; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The advent of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows researchers to virtually dissect white matter fiber pathways in the brain in vivo. This, for example, allows us to characterize and quantify how fiber tracts differ across populations in health and disease, and change as a function of training. Based on diffusion MRI, prior literature reports the absence of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in some control individuals and as well in those with congenital amusia. The complete absence of such a major anatomical tract is surprising given the subtle impairments that characterize amusia. Thus, we hypothesize that failure to detect the AF in this population may relate to the tracking algorithm used, and is not necessarily reflective of their phenotype. Diffusion data in control and amusic individuals were analyzed using three different tracking algorithms: deterministic and probabilistic, the latter either modeling two or one fiber populations. Across the three algorithms, we replicate prior findings of a left greater than right AF volume, but do not find group differences or an interaction. We detect the AF in all individuals using the probabilistic 2-fiber model, however, tracking failed in some control and amusic individuals when deterministic tractography was applied. These findings show that the ability to detect the AF in our sample is dependent on the type of tractography algorithm. This raises the question of whether failure to detect the AF in prior studies may be unrelated to the underlying anatomy or phenotype. PMID:25653637

  4. Lakatos Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Court, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Revisits and reviews Imre Lakatos' ideas on "Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes." Suggests that Lakatos' framework offers an insightful way of looking at the relationship between theory and research that is relevant not only for evaluating research programs in theoretical physics, but in the social sciences as…

  5. Abnormal Language Pathway in Children with Angelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Benjamin J.; Sundaram, Senthil K.; Huq, AHM; Jeong, Jeong-Won; Halverson, Stacey R.; Behen, Michael E.; Bui, Duy Q.; Chugani, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by pervasive developmental disability with failure to develop speech. We examined the basis for severe language delay in Angelman Syndrome patients using diffusion tensor imaging. Magnetic Resonance Imaging/diffusion tensor imaging was performed in seven genetically confirmed Angelman Syndrome children (age:70±26 months, five males) and four age-matched controls to investigate the microstructural integrity of arcuate fasciculus and other major association tracts. Six of seven Angelman Syndrome children had unidentifiable left arcuate fasciculus while all controls had identifiable arcuate fasciculus. The right arcuate fasciculus was absent in six of seven Angelman Syndrome children and one of four controls. Diffusion tensor imaging color map suggested aberrant morphology of the arcuate fasciculus region. Other association tracts, including uncinate fasciculus, inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior-longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract, were identifiable but showed decreased fractional anisotropy in Angelman Syndrome children. Increased apparent diffusion coefficient was seen in all tracts except uncinate fasciculus when compared to controls. Angelman Syndrome patients have global impairment of white matter integrity in association tracts, particularly, the arcuate fasciculus which shows severe morphological changes. This could be due to a potential problem with axon guidance during brain development possibly due to loss of UBE3A gene expression. PMID:21481743

  6. Extensive White Matter Abnormalities in Patients with First-Episode Schizophrenia: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Kubicki, Marek; Asami, Takeshi; Seidman, Larry J.; Goldstein, Jill M.; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; McCarley, Robert W.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous voxelwise Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) investigations of white matter in first-episode schizophrenia (FESZ) have been limited to the analysis of Fractional Anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), with their findings inconsistent in terms of the anatomical locations and extent of abnormalities. This study examines white matter abnormalities in FESZ, compared with healthy controls, using a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) approach applied to multiple measures of tract integrity, and correlates these findings with symptom severity. Methods Seventeen first-episode patients with schizophrenia and seventeen age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC) participated in this imaging study where FA, MD, and axial and radial diffusivity were compared between the two groups using TBSS. Results First-episode patients with schizophrenia showed lower FA values in the genu and body of corpus callosum, the internal capsule, the external capsule, the fornix, the superior, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the cingulum, and the uncinate fasciculus compared with HC. Increased MD and radial diffusivity were shown in virtually all white matter regions. There was no significant difference, however, observed for axial diffusivity between the two groups. Pearson correlation analysis showed that the FA values of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus were positively correlated with positive symptoms, negative symptoms, and total correct items of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. FA values of right external capsule also showed significant positive correlation with category completed scores of the WCST. Conclusions These data suggest extensive, possibly myelin related white matter disruptions in FESZ. PMID:23290268

  7. Secure attachment status is associated with white matter integrity in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Serra, Mauro; De Pisapia, Nicola; Rigo, Paola; Papinutto, Nico; Jager, Justin; Bornstein, Marc H; Venuti, Paola

    2015-12-16

    The present study investigates associations between security of attachment in the mother-child relationship and patterns of brain connectivity in young adults. We hypothesized that secure attachment would relate to more efficient connectivity in white matter association fibers due to increased myelination. Attachment security was measured in 53 young adults using the Kerns Security Scale; anatomical information was acquired using diffusion tensor imaging. Higher fractional anisotropy, an index of directionality of diffusion, related to security of attachment in four left-hemisphere white matter association fibers (uncinate fasciculus, cingulum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus). As expected, this result was mainly ascribable to increased myelination, which has been independently associated with attachment security. Security of attachment may have an identifiable biological basis. Our research demonstrates the feasibility of coupling neuroimaging tools with clinical investigation. PMID:26559724

  8. Lower structural integrity of the uncinate fasciculus is associated with a history of child maltreatment and future psychological vulnerability to stress

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jamie L; Knodt, Annchen R; Brigidi, Bartholomew D.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of child maltreatment is a significant risk factor for the development of later internalizing disorders such as depression and anxiety. This risk is particularly heightened after exposure to additional, more contemporaneous stress. While behavioral evidence exists for such “stress sensitization,” little is known about the mechanisms mediating such relationships, particularly within the brain. Here we report that the experience of child maltreatment independent of recent life stress, gender, and age is associated with reduced structural integrity of the uncinate fasciculus, a major white matter pathway between the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, in young adults. We further demonstrate that individuals with lower uncinate fasciculus integrity at baseline who subsequently experience stressful life events report higher levels of internalizing symptomatology at follow-up. Our findings suggest a novel neurobiological mechanism linking child maltreatment with later internalizing symptoms, specifically altered structural connectivity within the brain’s threat-detection and emotion regulation circuitry. PMID:26535947

  9. Lower structural integrity of the uncinate fasciculus is associated with a history of child maltreatment and future psychological vulnerability to stress.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jamie L; Knodt, Annchen R; Brigidi, Bartholomew D; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2015-11-01

    The experience of child maltreatment is a significant risk factor for the development of later internalizing disorders such as depression and anxiety. This risk is particularly heightened after exposure to additional, more contemporaneous stress. While behavioral evidence exists for such "stress sensitization," little is known about the mechanisms mediating such relationships, particularly within the brain. Here we report that the experience of child maltreatment independent of recent life stress, gender, and age is associated with reduced structural integrity of the uncinate fasciculus, a major white matter pathway between the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, in young adults. We further demonstrate that individuals with lower uncinate fasciculus integrity at baseline who subsequently experience stressful life events report higher levels of internalizing symptomatology at follow-up. Our findings suggest a novel neurobiological mechanism linking child maltreatment with later internalizing symptoms, specifically altered structural connectivity within the brain's threat-detection and emotion-regulation circuitry. PMID:26535947

  10. Microstructure of the superior longitudinal fasciculus predicts stimulation-induced interference with on-line motor control.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Herreros, Borja; Amengual, Julià L; Gurtubay-Antolín, Ane; Richter, Lars; Jauer, Philipp; Erdmann, Christian; Schweikard, Achim; López-Moliner, Joan; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Münte, Thomas F

    2015-10-15

    A cortical visuomotor network, comprising the medial intraparietal sulcus (mIPS) and the dorsal premotor area (PMd), encodes the sensorimotor transformations required for the on-line control of reaching movements. How information is transmitted between these two regions and which pathways are involved, are less clear. Here, we use a multimodal approach combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate whether structural connectivity in the 'reaching' circuit is associated to variations in the ability to control and update a movement. We induced a transient disruption of the neural processes underlying on-line motor adjustments by applying 1Hz rTMS over the mIPS. After the stimulation protocol, participants globally showed a reduction of the number of corrective trajectories during a reaching task that included unexpected visual perturbations. A voxel-based analysis revealed that participants exhibiting higher fractional anisotropy (FA) in the second branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF II) suffered less rTMS-induced behavioral impact. These results indicate that the microstructural features of the white matter bundles within the parieto-frontal 'reaching' circuit play a prominent role when action reprogramming is interfered. Moreover, our study suggests that the structural alignment and cohesion of the white matter tracts might be used as a predictor to characterize the extent of motor impairments. PMID:26143205

  11. "Sony Revisited," Revisited Another look at the paper that presaged

    E-print Network

    Hollaar, Lee A.

    "Sony Revisited," Revisited Another look at the paper that presaged Grokster and inducement of this paper is available at http://digital-law-online.info/papers/lah/sony-revisited.htm August 10, 2005 Draft Foreword In April 2004, I finished the first draft of the paper "Sony Revisited: A new look at contributory

  12. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. The unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language. PMID:26441551

  13. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R.; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N.; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. The unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language. PMID:26441551

  14. Decreased and Increased Anisotropy along Major Cerebral White Matter Tracts in Preterm Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shachar, Michal; Feldman, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    Premature birth is highly prevalent and associated with neurodevelopmental delays and disorders. Adverse outcomes, particularly in children born before 32 weeks of gestation, have been attributed in large part to white matter injuries, often found in periventricular regions using conventional imaging. To date, tractography studies of white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm have evaluated only a limited number of tracts simultaneously. The current study compares diffusion properties along 18 major cerebral white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm (n = 27) and full term (n = 19), using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. We found that compared to the full term group, the preterm group had significantly decreased FA in segments of the bilateral uncinate fasciculus and anterior segments of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Additionally, the preterm group had significantly increased FA in segments of the right and left anterior thalamic radiations, posterior segments of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and the right and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Increased FA in the preterm group was generally associated with decreased radial diffusivity. These findings indicate that prematurity-related white matter differences in later childhood and adolescence do not affect all tracts in the periventricular zone and can involve both decreased and increased FA. Differences in the patterns of radial diffusivity and axial diffusivity suggest that the tissue properties underlying group FA differences may vary within and across white matter tracts. Distinctive diffusion properties may relate to variations in the timing of injury in the neonatal period, extent of white matter dysmaturity and/or compensatory processes in childhood. PMID:26560745

  15. Lower white matter microstructure in the superior longitudinal fasciculus is associated with increased response time variability in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wolfers, Thomas; Onnink, A. Marten H.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Hoogman, Martine; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Kan, Cornelis C.; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Franke, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Response time variability (RTV) is consistently increased in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A right-hemispheric frontoparietal attention network model has been implicated in these patients. The 3 main connecting fibre tracts in this network, the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and the cingulum bundle (CB), show microstructural abnormalities in patients with ADHD. We hypothesized that the microstructural integrity of the 3 white matter tracts of this network are associated with ADHD and RTV. Methods We examined RTV in adults with ADHD by modelling the reaction time distribution as an exponentially modified Gaussian (ex-Gaussian) function with the parameters ?, ? and ?, the latter of which has been attributed to lapses of attention. We assessed adults with ADHD and healthy controls using a sustained attention task. Diffusion tensor imaging–derived fractional anisotropy (FA) values were determined to quantify bilateral microstructural integrity of the tracts of interest. Results We included 100 adults with ADHD and 96 controls in our study. Increased ? was associated with ADHD diagnosis and was linked to symptoms of inattention. An inverse correlation of ? with mean FA was seen in the right SLF of patients with ADHD, but no direct association between the mean FA of the 6 regions of interest with ADHD could be observed. Limitations Regions of interest were defined a priori based on the attentional network model for ADHD and thus we might have missed effects in other networks. Conclusion This study suggests that reduced microstructural integrity of the right SLF is associated with elevated ? in patients with ADHD. PMID:26079698

  16. Virtual in vivo interactive dissection of white matter fasciculi in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Catani, Marco; Howard, Robert J; Pajevic, Sinisa; Jones, Derek K

    2002-09-01

    This work reports the use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance tractography to visualize the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the major white matter fasciculi within living human brain. Specifically, we applied this technique to visualize in vivo (i) the superior longitudinal (arcuate) fasciculus, (ii) the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, (iii) the superior fronto-occipital (subcallosal) fasciculus, (iv) the inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, (v) the uncinate fasciculus, (vi) the cingulum, (vii) the anterior commissure, (viii) the corpus callosum, (ix) the internal capsule, and (x) the fornix. These fasciculi were first isolated and were then interactively displayed as a 3D-rendered object. The virtual tract maps obtained in vivo using this approach were faithful to the classical descriptions of white matter anatomy that have previously been documented in postmortem studies. Since we have been able to interactively delineate and visualize white matter fasciculi over their entire length in vivo, in a manner that has only previously been possible by histological means, "virtual in vivo interactive dissection" (VIVID) adds a new dimension to anatomical descriptions of the living human brain. PMID:12482069

  17. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  18. Introduction: Active Vision Revisited

    E-print Network

    Daume III, Hal

    Introduction: Active Vision Revisited Y. Aloimonos. University of Maryland What is, is identical results on Active Vision [2, 5], researchers are beginning to realize that perception (and intelligence that it performs. This viewpoint, known as Purposive, Qualitative or Animate Vision, is the natural evolution

  19. Revisiting Curriculum Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Zongyi

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the notion of curriculum potential by revisiting the ideas of Miriam Ben-Peretz and Joseph Schwab. Invoking the German "Didaktik" tradition and by way of a curriculum-making framework, the paper argues that interpreting curriculum materials for curriculum potential requires a careful analysis and unpacking of the meanings and…

  20. Colloquial Hebrew Imperatives Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolozky, Shmuel

    2009-01-01

    In revisiting Bolozky's [Bolozky, Shmuel, 1979. "On the new imperative in colloquial Hebrew." "Hebrew Annual Review" 3, 17-24] and Bat-El's [Bat-El, Outi, 2002. "True truncation in colloquial Hebrew imperatives." "Language" 78(4), 651-683] analyses of colloquial Hebrew imperatives, the article argues for restricting Imperative Truncation to the…

  1. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  2. Revisiting Bioaccumulation Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of workgroup 5 was to revisit the B(ioaccumulation) criteria that are currently being used to identify POPs under the Stockholm Convention and PBTs under CEPA, TSCA, REACh and other programs. Despite the lack of a recognized definition for a B substance, we defined ...

  3. Concept Image Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingolbali, Erhan; Monaghan, John

    2008-01-01

    Concept image and concept definition is an important construct in mathematics education. Its use, however, has been limited to cognitive studies. This article revisits concept image in the context of research on undergraduate students' understanding of the derivative which regards the context of learning as paramount. The literature, mainly on…

  4. Failure to Identify the Left Arcuate Fasciculus at Diffusion Tractography Is a Specific Marker of Language Dysfunction in Pediatric Patients with Polymicrogyria

    PubMed Central

    Paldino, Michael J.; Hedges, Kara; Gaab, Nadine; Galaburda, Albert M.; Grant, P. Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Polymicrogyric cortex demonstrates interindividual variation with regard to both extent of dyslamination and functional capacity. Given the relationship between laminar structure and white matter fibers, we sought to define the relationship between polymicrogyria (PMG), intrahemispheric association pathways, and network function. Methods. Each arcuate fasciculus (AF) was categorized as present or absent. Language was characterized by a pediatric neurologist. The presence of dysplastic cortex in the expected anatomic locations of Broca's (BA) and Wernicke's areas (WA) was evaluated by two pediatric neuroradiologists blinded to DTI and language data. Results. 16 PMG patients and 16 age/gender-matched controls were included. All normative controls had an identifiable left AF. 6/7 PMG patients with dysplastic cortex within BA and/or WA had no left AF; PMG patients without involvement of these regions had a lower frequency of absence of the left AF (p < 0.006). All patients without a left AF had some degree of language impairment. PMG patients without a left AF had a significantly greater frequency of language impairment compared to those PMG patients with a left AF (p < 0.003). Conclusion. In patients with PMG (1) the presence of dysplastic cortex within WA and/or BA is associated with absence of the left AF and (2) absence of the left AF is associated with language impairment. PMID:26180373

  5. Bohr's atomic model revisited

    E-print Network

    Francisco Caruso; Vitor Oguri

    2008-06-03

    Bohr's atomic model, its relationship to the radiation spectrum of the hydrogen atom and the inherent hypotheses are revisited. It is argued that Bohr could have adopted a different approach, focusing his analyzes on the stationary orbit of the electron and its decomposition on two harmonic oscillators and then imposing, as actually he did, Planck's quantization for the oscillators' energies. Some consequences of this procedure are examined.

  6. Revisiting Dialogues and Monologues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvernbekk, Tone

    2012-01-01

    In educational discourse dialogue tends to be viewed as being (morally) superior to monologue. When we look at them as basic forms of communication, we find that dialogue is a two-way, one-to-one form and monologue is a one-way, one-to-many form. In this paper I revisit the alleged (moral) superiority of dialogue. First, I problematize certain…

  7. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis of white matter changes in children with anisometropic amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Zhai, Liying; Jiang, Qinying; Qin, Wen; Li, Qingji; Yin, Xiaohui; Guo, Mingxia

    2015-06-15

    Amblyopia is a neurological disorder of vision that follows abnormal binocular interaction or visual deprivation during early life. Previous studies have reported multiple functional or structural cortical alterations. Although white matter was also studied, it still cannot be clarified clearly which fasciculus was affected by amblyopia. In the present study, tract-based spatial statistics analysis was applied to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate potential diffusion changes of neural tracts in anisometropic amblyopia. Fractional anisotropy (FA) value was calculated and compared between 20 amblyopic children and 18 healthy age-matched controls. In contrast to the controls, significant decreases in FA values were found in right optic radiation (OR), left inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (ILF/IFO) and right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) in the amblyopia. Furthermore, FA values of these identified tracts showed positive correlation with visual acuity. It can be inferred that abnormal visual input not only hinders OR from well developed, but also impairs fasciculi associated with dorsal and ventral visual pathways, which may be responsible for the amblyopic deficiency in object discrimination and stereopsis. Increased FA was detected in right posterior part of corpus callosum (CC) with a medium effect size, which may be due to compensation effect. DTI with subsequent measurement of FA is a useful tool for investigating neuronal tract involvement in amblyopia. PMID:25899779

  8. Reconstruction of the arcuate fasciculus for surgical planning in the setting of peritumoral edema using two-tensor unscented Kalman filter tractography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenrui; Tie, Yanmei; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Rigolo, Laura; Mehrtash, Alireza; Norton, Isaiah; Pasternak, Ofer; Rathi, Yogesh; Golby, Alexandra J.; O'Donnell, Lauren J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diffusion imaging tractography is increasingly used to trace critical fiber tracts in brain tumor patients to reduce the risk of post-operative neurological deficit. However, the effects of peritumoral edema pose a challenge to conventional tractography using the standard diffusion tensor model. The aim of this study was to present a novel technique using a two-tensor unscented Kalman filter (UKF) algorithm to track the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in brain tumor patients with peritumoral edema. Methods Ten right-handed patients with left-sided brain tumors in the vicinity of language-related cortex and evidence of significant peritumoral edema were retrospectively selected for the study. All patients underwent 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including a diffusion-weighted dataset with 31 directions. Fiber tractography was performed using both single-tensor streamline and two-tensor UKF tractography. A two-regions-of-interest approach was applied to perform the delineation of the AF. Results from the two different tractography algorithms were compared visually and quantitatively. Results Using single-tensor streamline tractography, the AF appeared disrupted in four patients and contained few fibers in the remaining six patients. Two-tensor UKF tractography delineated an AF that traversed edematous brain areas in all patients. The volume of the AF was significantly larger on two-tensor UKF than on single-tensor streamline tractography (p < 0.01). Conclusions Two-tensor UKF tractography provides the ability to trace a larger volume AF than single-tensor streamline tractography in the setting of peritumoral edema in brain tumor patients. PMID:26082890

  9. "Parallel" transport - revisited

    E-print Network

    Stasheff, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Parallel transport in a fibre bundle with respect to smooth paths in the base space B have recently been extended to representations of the smooth singular simplicial set Sing_{smooth}(B). Inspired by these extensions,I revisit the development of a notion of `parallel' transport in the topological setting of fibrations with the homotopy lifting property and then extend it to representations of Sing(B) on such fibrations. Closely related is the notion of (strong or `infty') homotopy action, which has variants under a variety of names.

  10. Lithium and GSK3-? Promoter Gene Variants Influence White Matter Microstructure in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Francesco; Bollettini, Irene; Barberi, Ignazio; Radaelli, Daniele; Poletti, Sara; Locatelli, Clara; Pirovano, Adele; Lorenzi, Cristina; Falini, Andrea; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Lithium is the mainstay for the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) and inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3-? (GSK3-?). The less active GSK3-? promoter gene variants have been associated with less detrimental clinical features of BD. GSK3-? gene variants and lithium can influence brain gray matter structure in psychiatric conditions. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of white matter (WM) integrity showed widespred disruption of WM structure in BD. In a sample of 70 patients affected by a major depressive episode in course of BD, we investigated the effect of ongoing long-term lithium treatment and GSK3-? promoter rs334558 polymorphism on WM microstructure, using DTI and tract-based spatial statistics with threshold-free cluster enhancement. We report that the less active GSK3-? rs334558*C gene-promoter variants, and the long-term administration of the GSK3-? inhibitor lithium, were associated with increases of DTI measures of axial diffusivity (AD) in several WM fiber tracts, including corpus callosum, forceps major, anterior and posterior cingulum bundle (bilaterally including its hippocampal part), left superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, left posterior thalamic radiation, bilateral superior and posterior corona radiata, and bilateral corticospinal tract. AD reflects the integrity of axons and myelin sheaths. We suggest that GSK3-? inhibition and lithium could counteract the detrimental influences of BD on WM structure, with specific benefits resulting from effects on specific WM tracts contributing to the functional integrity of the brain and involving interhemispheric, limbic, and large frontal, parietal, and fronto-occipital connections. PMID:22990942

  11. Adverse childhood experiences influence white matter microstructure in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Sara; Mazza, Elena; Bollettini, Irene; Locatelli, Clara; Cavallaro, Roberto; Smeraldi, Enrico; Benedetti, Francesco

    2015-10-30

    Integrity of brain white matter (WM) tracts in adulthood could be detrimentally affected by exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACE). Changes of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures suggesting WM disruption have been reported in patients with schizophrenia together with a history of childhood maltreatment. We therefore hypothesized that ACE could be associated with altered DTI measures of WM integrity in patients with schizophrenia. We tested this hypothesis in 83 schizophrenia patients using whole brain tract-based spatial statistics in the WM skeleton with threshold-free cluster enhancement of DTI measures of WM microstructure: axial, radial, and mean diffusivity (MD), and fractional anisotropy (FA). We observed an inverse correlation between severity of ACE and DTI measures of FA, and a positive correlation with MD in several WM tracts including corona radiata, thalamic radiations, corpus callosum, cingulum bundle, superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus. Lower FA and higher MD are indexes of a reduction in fibre coherence and integrity. The association of ACE to reduced FA and increased MD in key WM tracts contributing to the functional integrity of the brain suggests that ACE might contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia through a detrimental action on structural connectivity in critical cortico-limbic networks. PMID:26341951

  12. Gray- and white-matter anatomy of absolute pitch possessors.

    PubMed

    Dohn, Anders; Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Hansen, Mads; Lerch, Jason P; Vuust, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Absolute pitch (AP), the ability to identify a musical pitch without a reference, has been examined behaviorally in numerous studies for more than a century, yet only a few studies have examined the neuroanatomical correlates of AP. Here, we used MRI and diffusion tensor imaging to investigate structural differences in brains of musicians with and without AP, by means of whole-brain vertex-wise cortical thickness (CT) analysis and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis. APs displayed increased CT in a number of areas including the bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), the left inferior frontal gyrus, and the right supramarginal gyrus. Furthermore, we found higher fractional anisotropy in APs within the path of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The findings in gray matter support previous studies indicating an increased left lateralized posterior STG in APs, yet they differ from previous findings of thinner cortex for a number of areas in APs. Finally, we found a relation between the white-matter results and the CT in the right parahippocampal gyrus. In this study, we present novel findings in AP research that may have implications for the understanding of the neuroanatomical underpinnings of AP ability. PMID:24304583

  13. Higher integrity of the motor and visual pathways in long-term video game players

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guijin; Yang, Yongxin; Qin, Wen; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Long term video game players (VGPs) exhibit superior visual and motor skills compared with non-video game control subjects (NVGCs). However, the neural basis underlying the enhanced behavioral performance remains largely unknown. To clarify this issue, the present study compared the whiter matter integrity within the corticospinal tracts (CST), the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) between the VGPs and the NVGCs using diffusion tensor imaging. Compared with the NVGCs, voxel-wise comparisons revealed significantly higher fractional anisotropy (FA) values in some regions within the left CST, left SLF, bilateral ILF, and IFOF in VGPs. Furthermore, higher FA values in the left CST at the level of cerebral peduncle predicted a faster response in visual attention tasks. These results suggest that higher white matter integrity in the motor and higher-tier visual pathways is associated with long-term video game playing, which may contribute to the understanding on how video game play influences motor and visual performance. PMID:25805981

  14. White matter microstructure in bipolar disorder is influenced by the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, F; Bollettini, I; Poletti, S; Locatelli, C; Lorenzi, C; Pirovano, A; Smeraldi, E; Colombo, C

    2015-03-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with signs of widespread disruption of white matter (WM) integrity. A polymorphism in the promoter of the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) influenced functional cortico-limbic connectivity in healthy subjects and course of illness in BD, with the short (s) allele being associated with lower functional connectivity, and with earlier onset of illness and poor response to treatment. We tested the effects of 5-HTTLPR on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of WM microstructure in 140 inpatients, affected by a major depressive episode in course of BD, of Italian descent. We used whole brain tract-based spatial statistics in the WM skeleton with threshold-free cluster enhancement of DTI measures of WM microstructure: axial, radial and mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy. Compared with l/l homozygotes, 5-HTTLPR*s carriers showed significantly increased radial and mean diffusivity in several brain WM tracts, including corpus callosum, cingulum bundle, uncinate fasciculus, corona radiata, thalamic radiation, inferior and superior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. An increase of mean and radial diffusivity, perpendicular to the main axis of the WM tract, is thought to signify increased space between fibers, thus suggesting demyelination or dysmyelination, or loss of bundle coherence. The effects of 5-HTTLPR on the anomalous emotional processing in BD might be mediated by changes of WM microstructure in key WM tracts contributing to the functional integrity of the brain. PMID:25704032

  15. White matter changes in preclinical Alzheimer's disease: a magnetic resonance imaging-diffusion tensor imaging study on cognitively normal older people with positive amyloid ? protein 42 levels.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo, José Luis; Ripolles, Pablo; Simó, Marta; Lladó, Albert; Olives, Jaume; Balasa, Mircea; Antonell, Anna; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Rami, Lorena

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging measures to determine the existence of white matter microstructural differences in the preclinical phases of Alzheimer's disease, assessing cognitively normal older individuals with positive amyloid ? protein (A?42) levels (CN_A?42+) on the basis of normal cognition and cerebrospinal fluid A?42 levels below 500 pg/mL. Nineteen CN_A?42+ and 19 subjects with A?42 levels above 500 pg/mL (CN_A?42-) were included. We encountered increases in axial diffusivity (AxD) in CN_A?42+ relative to CN_A?42- in the corpus callosum, corona radiata, internal capsule, and superior longitudinal fasciculus bilaterally, and also in the left fornix, left uncinate fasciculus, and left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. However, no differences were found in other diffusion tensor imaging indexes. Cognitive reserve scores were positively associated with AxD exclusively in the CN_A?42+ group. The finding of AxD alteration together with preserved fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and radial diffusivity indexes in the CN_A?42+ group may indicate that, subtle axonal changes may be happening in the preclinical phases of Alzheimer's disease, whereas white matter integrity is still widely preserved. PMID:25002037

  16. Revisiting caspases in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, M; Jacob, A; Wang, P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening illness that occurs due to an abnormal host immune network which extends through the initial widespread and overwhelming inflammation, and culminates at the late stage of immunosupression. Recently, interest has been shifted toward therapies aimed at reversing the accompanying periods of immune suppression. Studies in experimental animals and critically ill patients have demonstrated that increased apoptosis of lymphoid organs and some parenchymal tissues contributes to this immune suppression, anergy and organ dysfunction. Immediate to the discoveries of the intracellular proteases, caspases for the induction of apoptosis and inflammation, and their striking roles in sepsis have been focused elaborately in a number of original and review articles. Here we revisited the different aspects of caspases in terms of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis and inflammation and focused their links in sepsis by reviewing several recent findings. In addition, we have documented striking perspectives which not only rewrite the pathophysiology, but also modernize our understanding for developing novel therapeutics against sepsis. PMID:25412304

  17. Revisiting Buruli ulcer.

    PubMed

    Yotsu, Rie R; Murase, Chiaki; Sugawara, Mariko; Suzuki, Koichi; Nakanaga, Kazue; Ishii, Norihisa; Asiedu, Kingsley

    2015-11-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), or Mycobacterium ulcerans infection, is a new emerging infectious disease which has been reported in over 33 countries worldwide. It has been noted not only in tropical areas, such as West Africa where it is most endemic, but also in moderate non-tropical climate areas, including Australia and Japan. Clinical presentation starts with a papule, nodule, plaque or edematous form which eventually leads to extensive skin ulceration. It can affect all age groups, but especially children aged between 5 and 15 years in West Africa. Multiple-antibiotic treatment has proven effective, and with surgical intervention at times of severity, it is curable. However, if diagnosis and treatment is delayed, those affected may be left with life-long disabilities. The disease is not yet fully understood, including its route of transmission and pathogenesis. However, due to recent research, several important features of the disease are now being elucidated. Notably, there may be undiagnosed cases in other parts of the world where BU has not yet been reported. Japan exemplifies the finding that awareness among dermatologists plays a key role in BU case detection. So, what about in other countries where a case of BU has never been diagnosed and there is no awareness of the disease among the population or, more importantly, among health professionals? This article will revisit BU, reviewing clinical features as well as the most recent epidemiological and scientific findings of the disease, to raise awareness of BU among dermatologists worldwide. PMID:26332541

  18. Searle's"Dualism Revisited"

    SciTech Connect

    P., Henry

    2008-11-20

    A recent article in which John Searle claims to refute dualism is examined from a scientific perspective. John Searle begins his recent article 'Dualism Revisited' by stating his belief that the philosophical problem of consciousness has a scientific solution. He then claims to refute dualism. It is therefore appropriate to examine his arguments against dualism from a scientific perspective. Scientific physical theories contain two kinds of descriptions: (1) Descriptions of our empirical findings, expressed in an every-day language that allows us communicate to each other our sensory experiences pertaining to what we have done and what we have learned; and (2) Descriptions of a theoretical model, expressed in a mathematical language that allows us to communicate to each other certain ideas that exist in our mathematical imaginations, and that are believed to represent, within our streams of consciousness, certain aspects of reality that we deem to exist independently of their being perceived by any human observer. These two parts of our scientific description correspond to the two aspects of our general contemporary dualistic understanding of the total reality in which we are imbedded, namely the empirical-mental aspect and the theoretical-physical aspect. The duality question is whether this general dualistic understanding of ourselves should be regarded as false in some important philosophical or scientific sense.

  19. The "Mushroom Cloud" Demonstration Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzarasa, Guido; Sparnacci, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A revisitation of the classical "mushroom cloud" demonstration is described. Instead of aniline and benzoyl peroxide, the proposed reaction involves household chemicals such as alpha-pinene (turpentine oil) and trichloroisocyanuric acid ("Trichlor") giving an impressive demonstration of oxidation and combustion reactions that…

  20. Principal eigenvector field segmentation for reproducible diffusion tensor tractography of white matter structures.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Ram K S; Gupta, Rakesh K; Agarwal, Shruti; Trivedi, Richa; Tripathi, Rajendra P; Awasthi, Rishi

    2011-10-01

    The study was aimed to test the feasibility of utilizing an algorithmically determinable stable fiber mass (SFM) map obtained by an unsupervised principal eigenvector field segmentation (PEVFS) for automatic delineation of 18 white matter (WM) tracts: (1) corpus callosum (CC), (2) tapetum (TP), (3) inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), (4) uncinate fasciculus (UNC), (5) inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), (6) optic pathways (OP), (7) superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), (8) arcuate fasciculus (AF), (9) fornix (FX), (10) cingulum (CG), (11) anterior thalamic radiation (ATR), (12) superior thalamic radiation (STR), (13) posterior thalamic radiation (PTR), (14) corticospinal/corticopontine tract (CST/CPT), (15) medial lemniscus (ML), (16) superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP), (17) middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) and (18) inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived fractional anisotropy (FA) and the principal eigenvector field have been used to create the SFM consisting of a collection of linear voxel structures which are grouped together by color-coding them into seven natural classes to provide PEVFS signature segments which greatly facilitate the selection of regions of interest (ROIs) for fiber tractography using just a single mouse click, as compared with a manual drawing of ROIs in the classical approach. All the 18 fiber bundles have been successfully reconstructed, in all the subjects, using the single ROIs provided by the SFM approach, with their reproducibility characterized by the fact that the ROI selection is user independent. The essentially automatic PEVFS method is robust, efficient and compares favorably with the classical ROI methods for diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). PMID:21664783

  1. Dynamic Topography Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, Louis

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic Topography Revisited Dynamic topography is usually considered to be one of the trinity of contributing causes to the Earth's non-hydrostatic topography along with the long-term elastic strength of the lithosphere and isostatic responses to density anomalies within the lithosphere. Dynamic topography, thought of this way, is what is left over when other sources of support have been eliminated. An alternate and explicit definition of dynamic topography is that deflection of the surface which is attributable to creeping viscous flow. The problem with the first definition of dynamic topography is 1) that the lithosphere is almost certainly a visco-elastic / brittle layer with no absolute boundary between flowing and static regions, and 2) the lithosphere is, a thermal / compositional boundary layer in which some buoyancy is attributable to immutable, intrinsic density variations and some is due to thermal anomalies which are coupled to the flow. In each case, it is difficult to draw a sharp line between each contribution to the overall topography. The second definition of dynamic topography does seem cleaner / more precise but it suffers from the problem that it is not measurable in practice. On the other hand, this approach has resulted in a rich literature concerning the analysis of large scale geoid and topography and the relation to buoyancy and mechanical properties of the Earth [e.g. refs 1,2,3] In convection models with viscous, elastic, brittle rheology and compositional buoyancy, however, it is possible to examine how the surface topography (and geoid) are supported and how different ways of interpreting the "observable" fields introduce different biases. This is what we will do. References (a.k.a. homework) [1] Hager, B. H., R. W. Clayton, M. A. Richards, R. P. Comer, and A. M. Dziewonski (1985), Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid, Nature, 313(6003), 541-545, doi:10.1038/313541a0. [2] Parsons, B., and S. Daly (1983), The relationship between surface topography, gravity anomalies, and temperature structure of convection, Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978-2012), 88(B2), 1129-1144, doi:10.1029/JB088iB02p01129. [3] Robinson, E. M., B. Parsons, and S. F. Daly (1987), The effect of a shallow low viscosity zone on the apparent compensation of mid-plate swells, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 82(3-4), 335-348, doi:10.1016/0012-821X(87)90207-X.

  2. Radiolytic Cryovolcanism Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Cooper, P. D.; Sittler, E. C.; Wesenberg, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Active geysers of water vapor and ice grains from the south pole of Enceladus are not yet definitively explained in terms of energy sources and processes. Other instances of hot (Io) and cold (Mars, Triton) volcanism beyond Earth are known if not fully understood. We revisit, in comparison to other models, the 'Old Faithful' theory of radiolytic gas-driven cryovolcanism first proposed by Cooper et al. [Plan. Sp. Sci. 2009]. In the energetic electron irradiation environment of Enceladus within Saturn's magnetosphere, a 10-percent duty cycle could be maintained for current geyser activity driven by gases from oxidation of ammonia to N2 and methane to CO2 in the thermal margins of a south polar sea. Much shorter duty cycles down to 0.01 percent would be required to account for thermal power output up to 16 GW, Steady accumulation of oxidant energy over four billion years could have powered all Enceladus emissions over the past four hundred thousand to four hundred million years. There could be separate energy sources driving mass flow and thermal emission over vastly different time scales. Since episodic tidal dissipation on 10 Myr time scales at 0.1 - 1 Gyr intervals [O'Neill and Nimmo, Nature 2010], and thus duty cycles 1 - 10 percent, could heat the polar sea to the current level, the radiolytic energy source could easily power and modulate the geyser mass flow on million-year time scales. Maximum thermal emission temperature 223 K [Abramov and Spencer, Icarus 2009] hints at thermal buffering in the basal and vent wall layers by a 1:1 H2O:H2O2 radiolytic eutectic, assuming deep ice crust saturation with H2O2 from long cumulative surface irradiation and downward ice convection. Due to density stratification the peroxide eutectic and salt water layers could separate, so that the denser peroxide layer (1.2 g/cc) descends to the polar sea while the lighter salt water (1.05 g/cc) rises along separate channels. Methane reservoirs could be found dissolved into the polar sea, or else trapped in hydrates [Kieffer et al., Science 2006] along flow paths and at the walls of the polar sea at surface depths below 20 km [Fortes, Icarus 2007]. Driver gas production for cryovolcanism could occur wherever these two layers come into contact under requisite temperature and pressure conditions, e.g. from 220 K and 10 bar at the 10-km basal layer of the overlying ice crust to 647 K and 220 bars at the liquid water limit, above the core-mantle boundary at 460 bars [Fortes, Icarus 2007]. We expect H2O2 oxidation to ignite at high temperatures but metallic minerals could catalyze reactions at lower temperatures nearer the basal layer. Pressure effects on oxidation rates are uncertain. Definitive modeling of Enceladus cryovolcanism likely involves synthesis of key processes from multiple models: Cold Faithful [Porco et al., Science 2006], Frigid Faithful [Keiffer et al., Science 2006], Frothy Faithful [Fortes, Icarus 2007], Old Faithful, and 'Perrier Ocean' recirculation [Matson et al., Icarus 2012].

  3. The ins and outs of meaning: Behavioral and neuroanatomical dissociation of semantically-driven word retrieval and multimodal semantic recognition in aphasia.

    PubMed

    Mirman, Daniel; Zhang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ze; Coslett, H Branch; Schwartz, Myrna F

    2015-09-01

    Theories about the architecture of language processing differ with regard to whether verbal and nonverbal comprehension share a functional and neural substrate and how meaning extraction in comprehension relates to the ability to use meaning to drive verbal production. We (re-)evaluate data from 17 cognitive-linguistic performance measures of 99 participants with chronic aphasia using factor analysis to establish functional components and support vector regression-based lesion-symptom mapping to determine the neural correlates of deficits on these functional components. The results are highly consistent with our previous findings: production of semantic errors is behaviorally and neuroanatomically distinct from verbal and nonverbal comprehension. Semantic errors were most strongly associated with left ATL damage whereas deficits on tests of verbal and non-verbal semantic recognition were most strongly associated with damage to deep white matter underlying the frontal lobe at the confluence of multiple tracts, including the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, and the anterior thalamic radiations. These results suggest that traditional views based on grey matter hub(s) for semantic processing are incomplete and that the role of white matter in semantic cognition has been underappreciated. PMID:25681739

  4. Facial affect recognition linked to damage in specific white matter tracts in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Genova, Helen M; Rajagopalan, Venkateswaran; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Binder, Allison; Deluca, John; Lengenfelder, Jeannie

    2015-01-01

    Emotional processing deficits have recently been identified in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), specifically in the domain of facial affect recognition. However, the neural networks underlying these impairments have yet to be identified. In the current study, 42 individuals with moderate to severe TBI and 23 healthy controls performed a task of facial affect recognition (Facial Emotion Identification Test (FEIT)) in order to assess their ability to identify and discriminate six emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, surprise, shame, and fear. These individuals also underwent structural neuroimaging including diffusion tensor imaging to examine white matter (WM) integrity. Correlational analyses were performed to determine where in the brain WM damage was associated with performance on the facial affect recognition task. Reduced performance on the FEIT was associated with reduced WM integrity (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity) in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus in individuals with TBI. Poor performance on the task was additionally associated with reduced gray matter (GM) volume in lingual gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus. The results implicate a pattern of WM and GM damage in TBI that may play a role in emotional processing impairments. PMID:25223759

  5. Separate parts of occipito-temporal white matter fibers are associated with recognition of faces and places.

    PubMed

    Tavor, Ido; Yablonski, Maya; Mezer, Aviv; Rom, Shirley; Assaf, Yaniv; Yovel, Galit

    2014-02-01

    A central finding of functional MRI studies is the highly selective response of distinct brain areas in the occipital temporal cortex to faces and places. However, little is known about the association of white matter fibers with the processing of these object categories. In the current study we used DTI-based tractography to reconstruct two main fibers that connect the occipital lobe with the anterior temporal lobe (inferior longitudinal fasciculus-ILF) and with the frontal lobe (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus-IFOF) in normal individuals. In addition to MRI scans subjects performed face, scene and body recognition tasks outside the scanner. Results show that recognition of faces and scenes were selectively associated with separate parts of the ILF. In particular, face recognition was highly associated with the fractional anisotropy (FA) of the anterior part of the ILF in the right hemisphere. In contrast, scene recognition was strongly correlated with the FA of the posterior and middle but not the anterior part of the ILF bilaterally. Our findings provide the first demonstration that faces and places are not only associated with distinct brain areas but also with separate parts of white matter fibers. PMID:23933304

  6. Lifelong Bilingualism Contributes to Cognitive Reserve against White Matter Integrity Declines in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Brian T.; Johnson, Nathan F.; Powell, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that lifelong bilingualism may contribute to cognitive reserve (CR) in normal aging. However, there is currently no neuroimaging evidence to suggest that lifelong bilinguals can retain normal cognitive functioning in the face of age-related neurodegeneration. Here we explored this issue by comparing white matter (WM) integrity and gray matter (GM) volumetric patterns of older adult lifelong bilinguals (N = 20) and monolinguals (N = 20). The groups were matched on a range of relevant cognitive test scores and on the established CR variables of education, socioeconomic status and intelligence. Participants underwent high-resolution structural imaging for assessment of GM volume and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessment of WM integrity. Results indicated significantly lower microstructural integrity in the bilingual group in several WM tracts. In particular, compared to their monolingual peers, the bilingual group showed lower fractional anisotropy and/or higher radial diffusivity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus bilaterally, the fornix, and multiple portions of the corpus callosum. There were no group differences in GM volume. Our results suggest that lifelong bilingualism contributes to CR against WM integrity declines in aging. PMID:24103400

  7. Emerging structure-function relations in the developing face processing system.

    PubMed

    Suzanne Scherf, K; Thomas, Cibu; Doyle, Jaime; Behrmann, Marlene

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate emerging structure-function relations in a neural circuit that mediates complex behavior, we investigated age-related differences among cortical regions that support face recognition behavior and the fiber tracts through which they transmit and receive signals using functional neuroimaging and diffusion tensor imaging. In a large sample of human participants (aged 6-23 years), we derived the microstructural and volumetric properties of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and control tracts, using independently defined anatomical markers. We also determined the functional characteristics of core face- and place-selective regions that are distributed along the trajectory of the pathways of interest. We observed disproportionately large age-related differences in the volume, fractional anisotropy, and mean and radial, but not axial, diffusivities of the ILF. Critically, these differences in the structural properties of the ILF were tightly and specifically linked with an age-related increase in the size of a key face-selective functional region, the fusiform face area. This dynamic association between emerging structural and functional architecture in the developing brain may provide important clues about the mechanisms by which neural circuits become organized and optimized in the human cortex. PMID:23765156

  8. Alterations in white matter pathways in Angelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    PETERS, SARIKA U; KAUFMANN, WALTER E; BACINO, CARLOS A; ANDERSON, ADAM W; ADAPA, PAVANI; CHU, ZILI; YALLAMPALLI, RAGINI; TRAIPE, ELFRIDES; HUNTER, JILL V; WILDE, ELISABETH A

    2010-01-01

    Aim Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability, absent speech, seizures, and outbursts of laughter. The aim of this study was to utilize diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine alterations in white matter pathways in Angelman syndrome, with an emphasis on correlations with clinical severity. Methods DTI was used to examine the arcuate fasciculus (AF), uncinate fasciculus (UF), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), and the corpus callosum (CC). We enrolled 14 children aged 8 to 17 years (mean age 10y 8mo; SD 2y 7mo) with Angelman syndrome (seven male; seven female) and 13 typically developing children, aged 8 to 17 years, for comparison (five male; eight female; mean age 12y; SD 2y 9mo). Individuals with Angelman syndrome were assessed using standardized measures of development, language, and behaviour. Results The children with Angelman syndrome exhibited lower fractional anisotropy and increased radial diffusivity values than the comparison group for the AF, UF, ILF, and CC (p<0.006 corrected for multiple comparisons). They also had lower fractional anisotropy values for the IFOF and higher radial diffusivity values for the left IFOF (p<0.006). Additionally, children with Angelman syndrome had significantly higher apparent diffusion coefficient values in the AF, CC, ILF, and the left IFOF (p<0.006). Significant correlations were noted between DTI parameters and some of the clinical assessment outcomes (e.g. language, socialization, cognition) for three of the temporal pathways (AF, UF, ILF; p<0.05). Interpretation Changes in DTI parameters in individuals with Angelman syndrome suggest decreased/delayed myelination, decreased axonal density or diameter, or aberrant axonal organization. Our findings suggest a generalized white matter alteration throughout the brain in those with Angelman syndrome; however, only the alterations in temporal white matter pathways were associated with language and cognitive and social functioning. PMID:21121904

  9. Altered white matter microstructure is associated with social cognition and psychotic symptoms in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Villalon-Reina, Julio E.; Karlsgodt, Katherine H.; Senturk, Damla; Chow, Carolyn; Thompson, Paul M.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2014-01-01

    22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome (22q11DS) is a highly penetrant genetic mutation associated with a significantly increased risk for psychosis. Aberrant neurodevelopment may lead to inappropriate neural circuit formation and cerebral dysconnectivity in 22q11DS, which may contribute to symptom development. Here we examined: (1) differences between 22q11DS participants and typically developing controls in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures within white matter tracts; (2) whether there is an altered age-related trajectory of white matter pathways in 22q11DS; and (3) relationships between DTI measures, social cognition task performance, and positive symptoms of psychosis in 22q11DS and typically developing controls. Sixty-four direction diffusion weighted imaging data were acquired on 65 participants (36 22q11DS, 29 controls). We examined differences between 22q11DS vs. controls in measures of fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD), using both a voxel-based and region of interest approach. Social cognition domains assessed were: Theory of Mind and emotion recognition. Positive symptoms were assessed using the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes. Compared to typically developing controls, 22q11DS participants showed significantly lower AD and RD in multiple white matter tracts, with effects of greatest magnitude for AD in the superior longitudinal fasciculus. Additionally, 22q11DS participants failed to show typical age-associated changes in FA and RD in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Higher AD in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO) and left uncinate fasciculus was associated with better social cognition in 22q11DS and controls. In contrast, greater severity of positive symptoms was associated with lower AD in bilateral regions of the IFO in 22q11DS. White matter microstructure in tracts relevant to social cognition is disrupted in 22q11DS, and may contribute to psychosis risk. PMID:25426042

  10. Galilei general relativistic quantum mechanics revisited

    E-print Network

    JanyÂ?ka, Josef

    Galilei general relativistic quantum mechanics revisited Arkadiusz Jadczyk Institute of Theoretical of Galilei relativistic quantum mechanics. The main concepts used are Galilei­Newton space­time, Newtonian : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 22 1.9 Classical particle mechanics : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 22 2 Quantum

  11. SLIM--An Early Work Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2008-07-25

    An early, but at the time illuminating, piece of work on how to deal with a general, linearly coupled accelerator lattice is revisited. This work is based on the SLIM formalism developed in 1979-1981.

  12. Belief Update Revisited Jer^ome Lang

    E-print Network

    Lang, Jérôme

    Belief Update Revisited J´er^ome Lang IRIT ­ CNRS / Universit´e Paul Sabatier 31062 Toulouse Cedex of such a taxonomy. A first step is taken towards this direction (for belief revision only) in [Friedman and Halpern

  13. Secret Public Key Protocols Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoon Wei; Paterson, Kenneth G.

    Password-based protocols are important and popular means of providing human-to-machine authentication. The concept of secret public keys was proposed more than a decade ago as a means of securing password-based authentication protocols against off-line password guessing attacks, but was later found vulnerable to various attacks. In this paper, we revisit the concept and introduce the notion of identity-based secret public keys. Our new identity-based approach allows secret public keys to be constructed in a very natural way using arbitrary random strings, eliminating the structure found in, for example, RSA or ElGamal keys. We examine identity-based secret public key protocols and give informal security analyses, indicating that they are secure against off-line password guessing and other attacks.

  14. Revisiting the cosmological coherent oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Kitajima, Naoya; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    It is often the case that scalar fields are produced in the early Universe in the form of coherent oscillation. These scalar fields may have huge abundances and affect the evolution of the Universe. In particular, if the lifetime is long enough, they may cause cosmological disasters. We revisit the issue of coherent oscillation of the scalar field when it couples with another oscillating scalar field, and find a situation that the abundance, or the amplitude of the oscillation, is significantly reduced by a variant type of the adiabatic suppression mechanism. As a concrete example, it is applied to the saxion, a flat direction in the supersymmetric axion model, and we show that the cosmological saxion problem is solved in a particular setup.

  15. Double Photoionization of Lithium Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehlitz, Ralf; Luki?, Dragan

    2009-05-01

    In a previous paperootnotetextR. Wehlitz, J.B. Bluett , and S.B. Whitfield, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 093002 (2002) we believed to have seen oscillations in the double-photoionization cross section of lithium. However, a recent investigation revealed that resonances at twice the photon energy (compared to the near-threshold energy region) are more pronounced than had been expectedootnotetextR. Wehlitz and P.N. Jurani'c, Phys. Rev. A 74, 042721 (2006). This prompted us to revisit the near-threshold region of the lithium double-to-single photoionization ratio. Using a slightly higher energy resolution in a new experiment on the same beamline, we could identify resonances in that ratio due to second-order light. While the second-order light contribution is small, so is the double-photoionization cross section in first-order light near threshold. The ``resonances'' observed near threshold match the inner-shell resonances at twice the photon energy fairly well and can indeed explain the previously seen ``oscillations''.

  16. White matter integrity, language, and childhood onset schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kristi; Narr, Katherine L.; O’Neill, Joseph; Levitt, Jennifer; Siddarth, Prabha; Phillips, Owen; Toga, Arthur; Caplan, Rochelle

    2012-01-01

    Background The heterogeneity of symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia can be explained by abnormal connectivity between brain regions. Childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) is a particularly severe form of schizophrenia, with an onset during a key time period for both cerebral pruning and myelination. Methods Diffusion tensor images were acquired from 18 children and adolescents with COS and 25 controls. The COS group was divided into two sub-groups--one with linguistic impairment (LI) and the other without (NLI). The fractional anisotropy (FA), axial (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) data from the two COS sub-groups were compared to each other and to the controls using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analyses, which is a voxel-based method used to identify regions of white matter abnormalities. Results TBSS identified several regions in the left hemisphere where the LI group had increased AD and RD relative to the NLI and the control groups. These areas primarily localized to linguistic tracts: left superior longitudinal fasciculus and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Regions of increased RD overlapped regions of increased AD, with the former showing more pronounced effects. Conclusions Studies of adult-onset schizophrenia typically identify areas of higher RD but unchanged AD; however, normal development studies have shown that while RD decreases are pronounced over this age range, smaller decreases in AD can also be detected. The observed increases in both RD and AD suggest that developmental disturbances affecting the structural connectivity of these pathways are more severe in COS accompanied by severe linguistic impairments. PMID:22405729

  17. White Matter Integrity in Physically Fit Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, B.Y.; Gundapuneedi, T.; Khan, M.A.; Diaz-Arrastia, R.; Levine, B.D.; Lu, H.; Huang, H.; Zhang, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background White matter (WM) integrity declines with normal aging. Physical activity may attenuate age-related WM integrity changes and improve cognitive function. This study examined brain WM integrity in Masters athletes who have engaged in life-long aerobic exercise training. We tested the hypothesis that life-long aerobic training is associated with improved brain WM integrity in older adults. Methods Ten Masters athletes (3 females, age=72.2±5.3yrs, endurance training>15yrs) and 10 sedentary older adults similar in age and educational level (2 females, age=74.5±4.3yrs) participated. MRI fluid-attenuated-inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images were acquired to assess white matter hyper intensities (WMH) volume. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to evaluate the WM microstructural integrity with a DTI-derived metric, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Results After normalization to whole-brain volume, Masters athletes showed an 83% reduction in deep WMH volume relative to their sedentary counterparts (0.05 ± 0.05% vs. 0.29 ± 0.29%, p<0.05). In addition, we found an inverse relationship between aerobic fitness (VO2max) and deep WMH volume (r=?0.78, p<0.001). Using TBSS, Masters athletes showed higher FA values in the right superior corona radiata (SCR), both sides of superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF). In addition, Masters athletes also showed lower MD values in the left posterior thalamic radiation (PTR) and left cingulum hippocampus. Conclusions These findings suggest that life-long exercise is associated with reduced WMH and may preserve WM fiber microstructural integrity related to motor control and coordination in older adults. PMID:23769914

  18. Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Ponnada A; Yu, Xintian; Hasan, Khader M; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Levin, Harvey S; Hunter, Jill V; Miller, Emmy R; Patel, Vipul Kumar S; Robertson, Claudia S; McCarthy, James J

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI) group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h) and at follow-up (~90 days). DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS). Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM). MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD) was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM) regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE) correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI. PMID:25610770

  19. Disconnection Mechanism and Regional Cortical Atrophy Contribute to Impaired Processing of Facial Expressions and Theory of Mind in Multiple Sclerosis: A Structural MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Mike, Andrea; Strammer, Erzsebet; Aradi, Mihaly; Orsi, Gergely; Perlaki, Gabor; Hajnal, Andras; Sandor, Janos; Banati, Miklos; Illes, Eniko; Zaitsev, Alexander; Herold, Robert; Guttmann, Charles R. G.; Illes, Zsolt

    2013-01-01

    Successful socialization requires the ability of understanding of others’ mental states. This ability called as mentalization (Theory of Mind) may become deficient and contribute to everyday life difficulties in multiple sclerosis. We aimed to explore the impact of brain pathology on mentalization performance in multiple sclerosis. Mentalization performance of 49 patients with multiple sclerosis was compared to 24 age- and gender matched healthy controls. T1- and T2-weighted three-dimensional brain MRI images were acquired at 3Tesla from patients with multiple sclerosis and 18 gender- and age matched healthy controls. We assessed overall brain cortical thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis and the scanned healthy controls, and measured the total and regional T1 and T2 white matter lesion volumes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Performances in tests of recognition of mental states and emotions from facial expressions and eye gazes correlated with both total T1-lesion load and regional T1-lesion load of association fiber tracts interconnecting cortical regions related to visual and emotion processing (genu and splenium of corpus callosum, right inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus). Both of these tests showed correlations with specific cortical areas involved in emotion recognition from facial expressions (right and left fusiform face area, frontal eye filed), processing of emotions (right entorhinal cortex) and socially relevant information (left temporal pole). Thus, both disconnection mechanism due to white matter lesions and cortical thinning of specific brain areas may result in cognitive deficit in multiple sclerosis affecting emotion and mental state processing from facial expressions and contributing to everyday and social life difficulties of these patients. PMID:24349280

  20. Individual structural differences in left inferior parietal area are associated with schoolchildrens' arithmetic scores

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Hu, Yuzheng; Wang, Yunqi; Weng, Jian; Chen, Feiyan

    2013-01-01

    Arithmetic skill is of critical importance for academic achievement, professional success and everyday life, and childhood is the key period to acquire this skill. Neuroimaging studies have identified that left parietal regions are a key neural substrate for representing arithmetic skill. Although the relationship between functional brain activity in left parietal regions and arithmetic skill has been studied in detail, it remains unclear about the relationship between arithmetic achievement and structural properties in left inferior parietal area in schoolchildren. The current study employed a combination of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) for high-resolution T1-weighted images and fiber tracking on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine the relationship between structural properties in the inferior parietal area and arithmetic achievement in 10-year-old schoolchildren. VBM of the T1-weighted images revealed that individual differences in arithmetic scores were significantly and positively correlated with the gray matter (GM) volume in the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Fiber tracking analysis revealed that the forceps major, left superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), bilateral inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) were the primary pathways connecting the left IPS with other brain areas. Furthermore, the regression analysis of the probabilistic pathways revealed a significant and positive correlation between the fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the left SLF, ILF and bilateral IFOF and arithmetic scores. The brain structure-behavior correlation analyses indicated that the GM volumes in the left IPS and the FA values in the tract pathways connecting left IPS were both related to children's arithmetic achievement. The present findings provide evidence that individual structural differences in the left IPS are associated with arithmetic scores in schoolchildren. PMID:24367320

  1. Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Ponnada A.; Yu, Xintian; Hasan, Khader M.; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Levin, Harvey S.; Hunter, Jill V.; Miller, Emmy R.; Patel, Vipul Kumar S.; Robertson, Claudia S.; McCarthy, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI) group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h) and at follow-up (~90 days). DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS). Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM). MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD) was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM) regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE) correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI. PMID:25610770

  2. Secrets of Nature: The Bacon Debates Revisited

    E-print Network

    Merchant, Carolyn

    Secrets of Nature: The Bacon Debates Revisited Carolyn Merchant Francis Bacon rose to power during, ``Francis Bacon, Feminist Historiography, and the Dominion of Nature,'' JHI, 69 (2008): 117­41. Vickers, controlled experimental method developed by Francis Bacon and his followers. Copyright by Journal

  3. Modeling skin permeation revisited Gabriel Wittum

    E-print Network

    Hackbusch, Wolfgang

    Modeling skin permeation revisited Gabriel Wittum Computing diffusion through human skin is usually diffusion through human skin using two and three dimensional models. First computations for this problem were made a decade ago, yielding new insight into permeation pathways through human skin, which were

  4. The Rotating Morse-Pekeris Oscillator Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuniga, Jose; Bastida, Adolfo; Requena, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The Morse-Pekeris oscillator model for the calculation of the vibration-rotation energy levels of diatomic molecules is revisited. This model is based on the realization of a second-order exponential expansion of the centrifugal term about the minimum of the vibrational Morse oscillator and the subsequent analytical resolution of the resulting…

  5. Revisiting the Regenerative Possibilities of Ortiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duques, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article revisits Simon Ortiz's poem, "From Sand Creek," in which the latter can in so few words convey both the horrific tragedy of conquest and colonization, while at the same time find a space for possibility, a means for recovery that is never about forgetting but always occurs as a kind of recuperative remembering. Ortiz…

  6. Phenomenology of n -n ¯ oscillations revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, S.; Jafari, E.

    2015-05-01

    We revisit the phenomenology of n -n ¯ oscillations in the presence of external magnetic fields, highlighting the role of spin. We show, contrary to long-held belief, that the n -n ¯ transition rate need not be suppressed, opening new opportunities for its empirical study.

  7. Biodiversity measures revisited Natalia Petrovskaya a

    E-print Network

    Petrovskaya, Natalia B.

    Biodiversity measures revisited Natalia Petrovskaya a , Sergei Petrovskii b,c,*, Bai-Lian Li c, Riverside, CA 92521-0124, USA 1. Introduction Loss of biodiversity in various ecosystems all over the world to recognize the main threats for communities functioning and reasons for biodiversity loss; examples

  8. The Evil of Banality: Arendt Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnich, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    "The banality of evil" (Arendt) remains controversial and useful. Ironically, the concept is now itself a banality. To revisit and extend it, we consider the "evil of banality", the profound dangers of cliched thoughtlessness. A distinction is proposed: "intensive" versus "extensive evils". The former takes…

  9. Phenomenology of n - n ¯ oscillations revisited

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardner, S.; Jafari, E.

    2015-05-22

    We revisit the phenomenology of n-n¯ oscillations in the presence of external magnetic fields, highlighting the role of spin. We show, contrary to long-held belief, that the n-n¯ transition rate need not be suppressed, opening new opportunities for its empirical study.

  10. Bohr’s ‘Light and Life’ revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    I revisit Niels Bohr’s famous 1932 ‘Light and Life’ lecture, confronting it with current knowledge. Topics covered include: life origin and evolution, quantum mechanics and life, brain and mind, consciousness and free will, and light as a tool for biology, with special emphasis on optical tweezers and their contributions to biophysics. Specialized knowledge of biology is not assumed.

  11. Broadcast Flooding Revisited: Survivability and Latency

    E-print Network

    Riedi, Rudolf H.

    Broadcast Flooding Revisited: Survivability and Latency Petteri Mannersalo VTT Technical Research University Email: riedi@rice.edu Abstract--This paper addresses the dynamics of broadcast flooding in random wireless ad hoc networks. In particular, we study the subset of nodes covered by a flood as well as timing

  12. Rational Secret Sharing, Revisited S. Dov Gordon

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Rational Secret Sharing, Revisited S. Dov Gordon Jonathan Katz July 11, 2006 Abstract We consider the problem of secret sharing among n rational players. This problem was introduced by Halpern and Teague. Contrary to their claim, we show a protocol for rational secret sharing among n = 2 players; our protocol

  13. The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited Ran Canetti

    E-print Network

    Goldreich, Oded

    The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited Ran Canetti y Oded Goldreich z Shai Halevi x February 15 in the Random Oracle Model, and the security of the schemes that result from implementing the random oracle: There exist signature and encryption schemes that are secure in the Random Oracle Model, but for which any

  14. The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited (preliminary version)

    E-print Network

    Goldreich, Oded

    The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited (preliminary version) Ran Canetti Oded Goldreich y Shai of cryptographic schemes in the Random Oracle Model, and the security of the schemes which result from implementing the random oracle by so called \\cryptographic hash functions". The mainresult of this paper is a negative one

  15. The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited (preliminary version)

    E-print Network

    Goldreich, Oded

    The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited (preliminary version) Ran Canetti \\Lambda Oded Goldreich y of cryptographic schemes in the Random Oracle Model, and the security of the schemes which result from implementing the random oracle by so called ``cryptographic hash functions''. The main result of this paper is a negative

  16. Ant Foraging Revisited Liviu Alexandru Panait1

    E-print Network

    Luke, Sean

    Ant Foraging Revisited Liviu Alexandru Panait1 and Sean Luke1 1. Department of Computer Science: lpanait@cs.gmu.edu Abstract Previous artificial (non-biological) ant foraging models have to date relied ants with the knowledge of the nest direction. In contrast, the work presented solves ant foraging

  17. Empirically Revisiting the Test Independence Assumption

    E-print Network

    Ernst, Michael

    Empirically Revisiting the Test Independence Assumption Sai Zhang, Darioush Jalali, Jochen Wuttke}@cs.washington.edu ABSTRACT In a test suite, all the test cases should be independent: no test should affect any other test's result, and running the tests in any order should produce the same test results. Techniques such as test

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Cytosolic potassium homeostasis revisited: 42

    E-print Network

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Cytosolic potassium homeostasis revisited: 42 K-tracer analysis in Hordeum vulgare of the flexibility, rather than strict homeostasis, of cellular K+ maintenance, and of the dynamic interaction analysis Æ 42 K Æ Hordeum Ion transport Æ Homeostasis Introduction Potassium (K+ ) availability in both

  19. Human Visual Perception and Kolmogorov Complexity: Revisited

    E-print Network

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Human Visual Perception and Kolmogorov Complexity: Revisited Vladik Kreinovich and Luc Longpr distribution instead. With this lim- itation in mind, we conclude that we cannot store arbitrary probability a mathematical foundations for the above theoretical explanation of the randomized-memorization phenomena. Human

  20. Human Visual Perception and Kolmogorov Complexity: Revisited

    E-print Network

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Human Visual Perception and Kolmogorov Complexity: Revisited Vladik Kreinovich and Luc Longpr store its probability distribution instead. With this lim­ itation in mind, we conclude that we cannot of the randomized­memorization phenomena. Human visual perception and complexity. If we see an image, how ac

  1. Mutual Exclusion Revisited Boleslaw K. Szymanski

    E-print Network

    Szymanski, Boleslaw K.

    Mutual Exclusion Revisited Boleslaw K. Szymanski Computer Science Department Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 Abstract A family of four mutual exclusion algorithms is pre- sented. Its members vary from a simple three-bit linear wait mutual exclusion to the four-bit first-come first- served

  2. Revisiting the Skills Agenda: A Complicated Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Angharad

    2011-01-01

    This paper revisits the skills agenda and suggests that in light of shifts from supply-side to demand-led provision within the UK higher education sector, there is a need to think more critically about the role and place of skills within university curricula. It suggests that if universities are to respond effectively to sector changes, then the…

  3. The LCA Problem Revisited Michael A. Bender

    E-print Network

    Danner, Andrew

    The LCA Problem Revisited Michael A. Bender SUNY Stony Brook Mart´in Farach-Colton ¡ Rutgers thus dispel the fre- quently held notion that an optimal LCA computation is unwieldy (LCA), Range Minimum Query (RMQ), Cartesian Tree. 1 Introduction One of the most fundamental

  4. The LCA Problem Revisited Michael A. Bender

    E-print Network

    Bender, Michael

    The LCA Problem Revisited Michael A. Bender£ SUNY Stony Brook Mart´in Farach-ColtonÝ Rutgers thus dispel the fre- quently held notion that an optimal LCA computation is unwieldy (LCA), Range Minimum Query (RMQ), Cartesian Tree. 1 Introduction One of the most fundamental

  5. The Do-Calculus Revisited Judea Pearl

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    The Do-Calculus Revisited Judea Pearl Keynote Lecture, August 17, 2012 UAI-2012 Conference and Pearl, 2006] and the graphi- cal criteria of [Tian and Shpitser, 2010] have laid this identification areas: mediation analysis [Pearl, 2012], trans- portability [Pearl and Bareinboim, 2011] and meta

  6. Vesicle model with bending energy revisited

    E-print Network

    Henri Gouin

    2015-10-16

    The equations governing the conditions of mechanical equilibrium in fluid membranes subject to bending are revisited thanks to the principle of virtual work. The note proposes systematic tools to obtain the shape equation and the line condition instead of Christoffel symbols and the complex calculations they entail. The method seems adequate to investigate all problems involving surface energies.

  7. Vesicle model with bending energy revisited

    E-print Network

    Gouin, Henri

    2015-01-01

    The equations governing the conditions of mechanical equilibrium in fluid membranes subject to bending are revisited thanks to the principle of virtual work. The note proposes systematic tools to obtain the shape equation and the line condition instead of Christoffel symbols and the complex calculations they entail. The method seems adequate to investigate all problems involving surface energies.

  8. Interactive Coding, Revisited Kai-Min Chung

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Interactive Coding, Revisited Kai-Min Chung Cornell University chung@cs.cornell.edu Rafael Pass and Hamming from the 1940's, initiating the study of error-correcting codes (ECC). But, even if we encode each, Schulman (FOCS'92, STOC'93) introduced the notion of interactive coding. We argue that whereas the method

  9. The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited Ran Canetti

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited Ran Canetti Oded Goldreich Shai Halevi§ August 6, 2002 in the Random Oracle Model, and the security of the schemes that result from implementing the random oracle: There exist signature and encryption schemes that are secure in the Random Oracle Model, but for which any

  10. k-Anonymization Revisited Aristides Gionis #1

    E-print Network

    Tassa, Tamir

    k-Anonymization Revisited Aristides Gionis #1 , Arnon Mazza 2 , Tamir Tassa 3 # Yahoo! Research of k-type anonymizations. Those notions achieve similar privacy goals as those aimed by Sweenie and Samarati when proposing the concept of k-anonymization: an adversary who knows the public data

  11. The flow along an external corner revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, Jim; Jewell, Nathaniel

    2013-11-01

    We revisit the problem of the flow of an almost inviscid fluid along an external corner made from the junction of two quarter infinite plates joined at an angle 0 < ? < ? / 2 . The structure of the boundary layer which develops along the corner is explored using a computational approach based upon a spectral element discretisation of the steady two-dimensional boundary-layer equations. We pay particular attention to the case when the angle ? is small, thus approximating the semi-infinte quarter plate problem considered by Stewartson (1961) and recently revisited by Duck & Hewitt (2012). Our results, which demonstrate a thickening of the boundary-layer near the sharp corner, will be discussed in the context of the asymptotic theory developed in the aforementioned papers.

  12. Copyright 1997 by Lixia Zhang. Network Architecture Revisited

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Copyright © 1997 by Lixia Zhang. Network Architecture Revisited: the case for datagrams Lixia Zhang UCLA UC Berkeley Multimedia Seminar April 23, 1997 2 Lixia Zhang/UCLA Acknowledgment . Steve Deering community #12; Copyright © 1997 by Lixia Zhang. 3 Lixia Zhang/UCLA Why revisit ``datagrams''? . today

  13. Deep Equality Revisited \\Lambda Serge Abiteboul Jan Van den Bussche

    E-print Network

    Abiteboul, Serge

    Deep Equality Revisited \\Lambda Serge Abiteboul Jan Van den Bussche INRIA Rocquencourt y Abstract We revisit the notion of deep equality among objects in an ob­ ject database from a formal point of view. We present three natural formalizations of deep equality: one based on the infinite value

  14. Zero Knowledge in the Random Oracle Model, Revisited Hoeteck Wee

    E-print Network

    Wee, Hoeteck

    Zero Knowledge in the Random Oracle Model, Revisited Hoeteck Wee Queens College, CUNY hoeteck@cs.qc.cuny.edu Abstract. We revisit previous formulations of zero knowledge in the random oracle model due to Bellare of these formulations. The hierarchy relates to the programmability of the random oracle, previously studied by Nielsen

  15. Covert face recognition without the fusiform-temporal pathways.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell; Bobes, Maria A; Quiñones, Ileana; Garcia, Lorna; Valdes-Hernandez, Pedro A; Iturria, Yasser; Melie-Garcia, Lester; Lopera, Francisco; Asencio, José

    2011-08-01

    Patients with prosopagnosia are unable to recognize faces consciously, but when tested indirectly they can reveal residual identification abilities. The neural circuitry underlying this covert recognition is still unknown. One candidate for this function is the partial survival of a pathway linking the fusiform face area (FFA) and anterior-inferior temporal (AIT) cortex, which has been shown to be essential for conscious face identification. Here we performed functional magnetic, and diffusion tensor imaging in FE, a patient with severe prosopagnosia, with the goal of identifying the neural substrates of his robust covert face recognition. FE presented massive bilateral lesions in the fusiform gyri that eliminated both FFAs, and also disrupted the fibers within the inferior longitudinal fasciculi that link the visual areas with the AITs and medial temporal lobes. Therefore participation of the fusiform-temporal pathway in his covert recognition was precluded. However, face-selective activations were found bilaterally in his occipital gyri and in his extended face system (posterior cingulate and orbitofrontal areas), the latter with larger responses for previously-known faces than for faces of strangers. In the right hemisphere, these surviving face selective-areas were connected via a partially persevered inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. This suggests an alternative occipito-frontal pathway, absent from current models of face processing, that could explain the patient's covert recognition while also playing a role in unconscious processing during normal cognition. PMID:21570471

  16. Structural correlates of facial emotion recognition deficits in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Baggio, H C; Segura, B; Ibarretxe-Bilbao, N; Valldeoriola, F; Marti, M J; Compta, Y; Tolosa, E; Junqué, C

    2012-07-01

    The ability to recognize facial emotion expressions, especially negative ones, is described to be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Previous neuroimaging work evaluating the neural substrate of facial emotion recognition (FER) in healthy and pathological subjects has mostly focused on functional changes. This study was designed to evaluate gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) correlates of FER in a large sample of PD. Thirty-nine PD patients and 23 healthy controls (HC) were tested with the Ekman 60 test for FER and with magnetic resonance imaging. Effects of associated depressive symptoms were taken into account. In accordance with previous studies, PD patients performed significantly worse in recognizing sadness, anger and disgust. In PD patients, voxel-based morphometry analysis revealed areas of positive correlation between individual emotion recognition and GM volume: in the right orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala and postcentral gyrus and sadness identification; in the right occipital fusiform gyrus, ventral striatum and subgenual cortex and anger identification, and in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and disgust identification. WM analysis through diffusion tensor imaging revealed significant positive correlations between fractional anisotropy levels in the frontal portion of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and the performance in the identification of sadness. These findings shed light on the structural neural bases of the deficits presented by PD patients in this skill. PMID:22640663

  17. Pathways to seeing music: enhanced structural connectivity in colored-music synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Schlaug, Gottfried; Eagleman, David M; Loui, Psyche

    2013-07-01

    Synesthesia, a condition in which a stimulus in one sensory modality consistently and automatically triggers concurrent percepts in another modality, provides a window into the neural correlates of cross-modal associations. While research on grapheme-color synesthesia has provided evidence for both hyperconnectivity-hyperbinding and disinhibited feedback as potential underlying mechanisms, less research has explored the neuroanatomical basis of other forms of synesthesia. In the current study we investigated the white matter correlates of colored-music synesthesia. As these synesthetes report seeing colors upon hearing musical sounds, we hypothesized that they might show unique patterns of connectivity between visual and auditory association areas. We used diffusion tensor imaging to trace the white matter tracts in temporal and occipital lobe regions in 10 synesthetes and 10 matched non-synesthete controls. Results showed that synesthetes possessed hemispheric patterns of fractional anisotropy, an index of white matter integrity, in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), a major white matter pathway that connects visual and auditory association areas to frontal regions. Specifically, white matter integrity within the right IFOF was significantly greater in synesthetes than controls. Furthermore, white matter integrity in synesthetes was correlated with scores on audiovisual tests of the Synesthesia Battery, especially in white matter underlying the right fusiform gyrus. Our findings provide the first evidence of a white matter substrate of colored-music synesthesia, and suggest that enhanced white matter connectivity is involved in enhanced cross-modal associations. PMID:23454047

  18. Pathways to Seeing Music: Enhanced Structural Connectivity in Colored-Music Synesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Zamm, Anna; Schlaug, Gottfried; Eagleman, David M.; Loui, Psyche

    2013-01-01

    Synesthesia, a condition in which a stimulus in one sensory modality consistently and automatically triggers concurrent percepts in another modality, provides a window into the neural correlates of cross-modal associations. While research on grapheme-color synesthesia has provided evidence for both hyperconnectivity/hyperbinding and disinhibited feedback as possible underlying mechanisms, less research has explored the neuroanatomical basis of other forms of synesthesia. In the current study we investigated the white matter correlates of colored-music synesthesia. As these synesthetes report seeing colors upon hearing musical sounds, we hypothesized they might show different patterns of connectivity between visual and auditory association areas. We used diffusion tensor imaging to trace the white matter tracts in temporal and occipital lobe regions in 10 synesthetes and 10 matched non-synesthete controls. Results showed that synesthetes possessed different hemispheric patterns of fractional anisotropy, an index of white matter integrity, in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), a major white matter pathway that connects visual and auditory association areas to frontal regions. Specifically, white matter integrity within the right IFOF was significantly greater in synesthetes than controls. Furthermore, white matter integrity in synesthetes was correlated with scores on audiovisual tests of the Synesthesia Battery, especially in white matter underlying the right fusiform gyrus. Our findings provide the first evidence of a white matter substrate of colored-music synesthesia, and suggest that enhanced white matter connectivity is involved in enhanced cross-modal associations. PMID:23454047

  19. Brain white matter microstructure in deficit and non-deficit subtypes of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Spalletta, Gianfranco; De Rossi, Pietro; Piras, Fabrizio; Iorio, Mariangela; Dacquino, Claudia; Scanu, Francesca; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Chiapponi, Chiara

    2015-03-30

    Dividing schizophrenia into its deficit (SZD) and nondeficit (SZND) subtypes may help to identify specific and more homogeneous pathophysiological characteristics. Our aim was to define a whole brain voxelwise map specifically characterizing white matter tracts of schizophrenia patients with and without the deficit syndrome. We compared microstructural diffusion-related parameters as measured by diffusion tensor imaging in 21 SZD patients, 21 SZND patients, and 21 healthy controls, age- and gender-matched. Results showed that fractional anisotropy was reduced in the right precentral area in SZND patients, and in the left corona radiata of the schizophrenia group as a whole. Axial diffusivity was reduced in the left postcentral area of SZD patients and in the left cerebellum of the whole schizophrenia group. Radial diffusivity was increased in the left forceps minor of SZD patients, in the left internal capsule of SZND patients, and in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus in the whole schizophrenia group. Mean diffusivity was increased from healthy controls to SZD patients to SZND patients in the right occipital lobe. In conclusion, SZD patients are not simply at the extreme end of a severity continuum of white matter disruption. Rather, the SZD and SZND subtypes are associated with distinct and specific brain microstructural anomalies that are consistent with their peculiar psychopathological dimensions. PMID:25649975

  20. 42 CFR 488.30 - Revisit user fee for revisit surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...defined in § 488.1, and ambulatory surgical centers, transplant centers, and religious...If a provider or supplier believes an error of fact has been made in the application of the revisit user fee, such as clerical errors, billing for a fee already paid,...

  1. Consistency of the triplet seesaw model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Fonseca, Renato M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-10-01

    Adding a scalar triplet to the Standard Model is one of the simplest ways of giving mass to neutrinos, providing at the same time a mechanism to stabilize the theory's vacuum. In this paper, we revisit these aspects of the type-II seesaw model pointing out that the bounded-from-below conditions for the scalar potential in use in the literature are not correct. We discuss some scenarios where the correction can be significant and sketch the typical scalar boson profile expected by consistency.

  2. Revisiting Gribov's copies inside the horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landim, R. R.; Lemes, V. E. R.; Ventura, O. S.; Vilar, L. C. Q.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we revisit the problem of legitimate topologically trivial Gribov copies inside the Gribov horizon. We avoid the reducibility problem which hampered the standard construction of van Baal, and then we are able to build a valid example with spherical symmetry. We also apply the same technique in the presence of a background of a Polyakov instanton in a Euclidian 3D spacetime, in order to study the effect of a non-trivial environment in the generation of multiple copies inside the horizon.

  3. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  4. Orthorhombic Zr2Co11 phase revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. -Z.; Zhang, W. Y.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Zhao, X.; Nguyen, M. C.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2014-10-01

    The structure of the orthorhombic Zr2Co11 phase was revisited in the present work. Selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) and high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) techniques were used to investigate the structure. They show the orthorhombic Zr2Co11 phase has a 1-D incommensurate modulated structure. The structure can be approximately described as a B-centered orthorhombic lattice. The lattice parameters of the orthorhombic Zr2Co11 phase have been determined by a tilt series of SAED patterns. A hexagonal network with a modulation wave has been observed in the HREM image and the hexagonal motif is considered as the basic structural unit.

  5. Double-letter processing in surface dyslexia and dysgraphia following a left temporal lesion: A multimodal neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    Tomasino, Barbara; Marin, Dario; Maieron, Marta; D'Agostini, Serena; Fabbro, Franco; Skrap, Miran; Luzzatti, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Neuropsychological data about acquired impairments in reading and writing provide a strong basis for the theoretical framework of the dual-route models. The present study explored the functional neuroanatomy of the reading and spelling processing system. We describe the reading and writing performance of patient CF, an Italian native speaker who developed an extremely selective reading and spelling deficit (his spontaneous speech, oral comprehension, repetition and oral picture naming were almost unimpaired) in processing double letters associated with surface dyslexia and dysgraphia, following a tumor in the left temporal lobe. In particular, the majority of CF's errors in spelling were phonologically plausible substitutions, errors concerning letter numerosity of consonants, and syllabic phoneme-to-grapheme conversion (PGC) errors. A similar pattern of impairment also emerged in his reading behavior, with a majority of lexical stress errors (the only possible type of surface reading errors in the Italian language, due the extreme regularity of print-to-sound correspondence). CF's neuropsychological profile was combined with structural neuroimaging data, fiber tracking, and functional maps and compared to that of healthy control participants. We related CF's deficit to a dissociation between impaired ventral/lexical route (as evidenced by a fractional anisotropy - FA decrease along the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus - IFOF) and relatively preserved dorsal/phonological route (as evidenced by a rather full integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus - SLF). In terms of functional processing, the lexical-semantic ventral route network was more activated in controls than in CF, while the network supporting the dorsal route was shared by CF and the control participants. Our results are discussed within the theoretical framework of dual-route models of reading and spelling, emphasize the importance of the IFOF both in lexical reading and spelling, and offer a better comprehension of the neurological and functional substrates involved in written language and, in particular, in surface dyslexia and dysgraphia and in doubling/de-doubling consonant sounds and letters. PMID:26407482

  6. Abnormalities of cortical thickness, subcortical shapes, and white matter integrity in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Thong, Jamie Yu Jin; Du, Jia; Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Dong, Yanhong; Soon, Hock Wei; Saini, Monica; Tan, Ming Zhen; Ta, Anh Tuan; Chen, Christopher; Qiu, Anqi

    2014-05-01

    Subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (sVCI) is caused by lacunar infarcts or extensive and/or diffuse lesions in the white matter that may disrupt the white matter circuitry connecting cortical and subcortical regions and result in the degeneration of neurons in these regions. This study used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) techniques to examine cortical thickness, subcortical shapes, and white matter integrity in mild vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (VCIND Mild) and moderate-to-severe VCI (MSVCI). Our study found that compared to controls (n = 25), VCIND Mild (n = 25), and MSVCI (n = 30) showed thinner cortex predominantly in the frontal cortex. The cortex in MSVCI was thinner in the parietal and lateral temporal cortices than that in VCIND Mild. Moreover, compared to controls, VCIND Mild and MSVCI showed smaller shapes (i.e., volume reduction) in the thalamus, putamen, and globus pallidus and ventricular enlargement. Finally, compared to controls, VCIND Mild, and MSVCI showed an increased mean diffusivity in the white matter, while decreased generalized fractional anisotropy was only found in the MSVCI subjects. The major axonal bundles involved in the white matter abnormalities were mainly toward the frontal regions, including the internal capsule/corona radiata, uncinate fasciculus, and anterior section of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and were anatomically connected to the affected cortical and subcortical structures. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in cortical, subcortical, and white matter morphology in sVCI occur in anatomically connected structures, and that abnormalities progress along a similar trajectory from the mild to moderate and severe conditions. PMID:23861356

  7. Relationship between aberrant brain connectivity and clinical features in Angelman Syndrome: a new method using tract based spatial statistics of DTI color-coded orientation maps

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vijay N.; Jeong, Jeong-won; Wilson, Benjamin J.; Behen, Michael E; Chugani, Harry T.; Sundaram, Senthil K.

    2013-01-01

    Aim In order to relate brain structural abnormalities to clinical features of Angelman Syndrome (AS), we determined the locations of abnormal regional white matter architecture in AS children using a sensitive and objective whole brain approach to analyze diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) color-coded orientation maps. Methods Using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) of DTI color-coded orientation maps, the fraction of fibers oriented in the anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML) and superioinferior (SI) directions were determined in whole brain white matter of 7 children with AS (mean age: 70 ± 25.78 months, 5 males) and 7 children with typical development (TD, mean age: 79.8 ± 17.25 months, 4 males). TBSS of FA map was also performed for comparison. Results Children with AS had a significantly lower AP component than the TD group in 9 clusters (3 bilateral and 3 unilateral). Bilateral clusters were located in inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation and arcuate fasciculus regions. Unilateral clusters involved left brainstem, left cingulum and right uncinate regions. Similarly, children with AS had significantly lower ML component than the TD group in 4 clusters (2 in corpus callosum and 2 unilateral clusters). Unilateral clusters were located in the left cingulum and left anterior thalamic radiation regions. SI component was lower in children with AS in two clusters compared to TD (corticospinal tract and corpus callosum). FA map clusters mostly corresponded with component clusters. Interpretation Children with AS have a global impairment of white matter integrity including AP, ML and SI components in whole brain suggesting a potential underlying error with axon guidance mechanisms during brain development possibly due to loss of UBE3A gene expression. Some of this aberrant connectivity can be related to the clinical features of AS. PMID:21827860

  8. Microstructural white matter correlates of emotion recognition impairment in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Chiara; Cerami, Chiara; Dodich, Alessandra; Canessa, Nicola; Arpone, Marta; Iannaccone, Sandro; Corbo, Massimo; Lunetta, Christian; Scola, Elisa; Falini, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F

    2014-04-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is associated in about half of the cases with behavioral and cognitive disorders, including impairments in socio-emotional processing, considered as key-features for the diagnosis of the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD). The neurostructural bases of emotional deficits in ALS, however, still remain largely unexplored. Here we aim to assess emotion recognition in non-demented sporadic ALS patients compared with healthy controls, and to explore for the first time its microstructural white-matter correlates. Twenty-two subjects with either probable or definite diagnosis of ALS and 55 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls were recruited in the study. All participants performed the Ekman 60-Faces Test, assessing the recognition of six basic emotions (i.e., anger, disgust, fear, sadness, surprise and happiness). A subgroup of subjects, comprising 19 patients and 20 healthy controls, also underwent a Diffusion Tensor Imaging scanning. Behavioral analysis highlighted a significant decline of emotion recognition skills in patients compared to controls, particularly affecting the identification of negative emotions. Moreover, the Diffusion Tensor Imaging analyses revealed a correlation between this impairment and the alteration of white-matter integrity along the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Our findings indicate the presence of an early emotion recognition deficit in non-demented sporadic ALS patients, associated with microstructural changes in ventral associative bundles connecting occipital, temporo-limbic and orbitofrontal regions in the right hemisphere. These changes may represent a frontotemporal-limbic microstructural marker of socio-emotional impairment in ALS. PMID:24534360

  9. The Microstructural Status of the Corpus Callosum Is Associated with the Degree of Motor Function and Neurological Deficit in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fanrong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-01-01

    Human neuroimaging studies and animal models have suggested that white matter damage from ischemic stroke leads to the functional and structural reorganization of perilesional and remote brain regions. However, the quantitative relationship between the transcallosal tract integrity and clinical motor performance score after stroke remains unexplored. The current study employed a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the relationship between white matter diffusivity changes and the clinical scores in stroke patients. Probabilistic fiber tracking was also used to identify structural connectivity patterns in the patients. Thirteen ischemic stroke patients and fifteen healthy control subjects participated in this study. TBSS analyses showed that the corpus callosum (CC) and bilateral corticospinal tracts (CST) in the stroke patients exhibited significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and increased axial and radial diffusivity compared with those of the controls. Correlation analyses revealed that the motor and neurological deficit scores in the stroke patients were associated with the value of diffusivity indices in the CC. Compared with the healthy control group, probabilistic fiber tracking analyses revealed that significant changes in the inter-hemispheric fiber connections between the left and right motor cortex in the stroke patients were primarily located in the genu and body of the CC, left anterior thalamic radiation and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, bilateral CST, anterior/superior corona radiate, cingulum and superior longitudinal fasciculus, strongly suggesting that ischemic induces inter-hemispheric network disturbances and disrupts the white matter fibers connecting motor regions. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that DTI-derived measures in the CC can be used to predict the severity of motor skill and neurological deficit in stroke patients. Changes in structural connectivity pattern tracking between the left and right motor areas, particularly in the body of the CC, might reflect functional reorganization and behavioral deficit. PMID:25875333

  10. A disconnection account of subjective empathy impairments in diffuse low-grade glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Herbet, Guillaume; Lafargue, Gilles; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Costi, Emanuele; Bonnetblanc, François; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-04-01

    Human empathic experience is a multifaceted psychological construct which arises from functional integration of multiple neural networks. Despite accumulating knowledge about the cortical circuitry of empathy, almost nothing is known about the connectivity that may be concerned in conveying empathy-related neural information. To bridge this gap in knowledge, we studied dispositional empathy in a large-sized cohort of 107 patients who had undergone surgery for a diffuse low-grade glioma. The self-report questionnaire used enabled us to obtain a global measure of subjective empathy but also, importantly, to assess the two main components of empathy (cognitive and emotional). Data were processed by combining voxelwise and tractwise lesion-symptom analyses. Several major findings emerged from our analyses. First of all, topological voxelwise analyses were inconclusive. Conversely, tractwise multiple regression analyses, including all major associative white matter pathways as potential predictors, yielded to significant models explaining substantial part of the behavioural variance. Among the main results, we found that disconnection of the left cingulum bundle was a strong predictor of a low cognitive empathy (p<0.0005 Bonferroni-corrected). Similarly, we found that disconnection of the right uncinate fasciculus and the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus predicted, respectively, a low (p<0.05 Bonferroni-corrected) and a high (p<0.05 Bonferroni-corrected) subjective empathy. Finally, although we failed to relate emotional empathy to disruption of a specific tract, correlation analyses indicated a positive association between this component of empathy and the volumes of residual lesion infiltration in the right hemisphere (p<0.01). Taken as a whole, these findings provide key fundamental insights into the anatomical connectivity of empathy. They may help to better understand the pathophysiology of empathy impairments in pathological conditions characterized by abnormalities of long-range anatomical connectivity, such as autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia and fronto-temporal dementia. PMID:25687031

  11. A Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study Assessing White Matter Fiber Tracts after Sports-Related Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Murugavel, Murali; Cubon, Valerie; Putukian, Margot; Echemendia, Ruben; Cabrera, Javier; Osherson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The extent of structural injury in sports-related concussion (SRC) is central to the course of recovery, long-term effects, and the decision to return to play. In the present longitudinal study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to assess white matter (WM) fiber tract integrity within 2 days, 2 weeks, and 2 months of concussive injury. Participants were right-handed male varsity contact-sport athletes (20.2±1.0 years of age) with a medically diagnosed SRC (no loss of consciousness). They were compared to right-handed male varsity non-contact-sport athletes serving as controls (19.9±1.7 years). We found significantly increased radial diffusivity (RD) in concussed athletes (n=12; paired t-test, tract-based spatial statistics; p<0.025) at 2 days, when compared to the 2-week postinjury time point. The increase was found in a cluster of right hemisphere voxels, spanning the posterior limb of the internal capsule (IC), the retrolenticular part of the IC, the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (sagittal stratum), and the anterior thalamic radiation. Post-hoc, univariate, between-group (controls vs. concussed), mixed-effects analysis of the cluster showed significantly higher RD at 2 days (p=0.002), as compared to the controls, with a trend in the same direction at 2 months (p=0.11). Results for fractional anisotropy (FA) in the same cluster showed a similar, but inverted, pattern; FA was decreased at 2 days and at 2 months postinjury, when compared to healthy controls. At 2 weeks postinjury, no statistical differences between concussed and control athletes were found with regard to either RD or FA. These results support the hypothesis of increased RD and reduced FA within 72?h postinjury, followed by recovery that may extend beyond 2 weeks. RD appears to be a sensitive measure of concussive injury. PMID:24786666

  12. Repeatability of quantitative metrics derived from MR diffusion tractography in paediatric patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, K; Rodrigues, K M; Barboriak, D P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the test–retest repeatability of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography in a cohort of paediatric patients with localization-related epilepsy. Methods: 30 patients underwent 2 DTI acquisitions [repetition time/echo time (ms), 7000/90; flip, 90°; b-value, 1000?s?mm?2; voxel (mm), 2?×?2?×?2]. Two observers used Diffusion Toolkit and TrackVis (www.trackvis.org) to segment and analyse the following tracts: corpus callosum, corticospinal tracts, arcuate fasciculi, inferior longitudinal fasciculi and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi. Mean MD and mean FA were calculated for each tract. Each observer independently analysed one of the DTI data sets for every patient. Results: Segmentation identified all tracts in all subjects, except the arcuate fasciculus. There was a highly consistent relationship between repeated observations of MD (r?=?0.993; p?fasciculus, Cohen's ? for agreement between the observers (identifiable vs not identifiable) was 1.0. Conclusion: We quantified the repeatability of two commonly utilized scalar metrics derived from DTI tractography. For an individual patient, changes greater than the repeatability coefficient or 95% CLs for change are unlikely to be related to variability in their measurement. Advances in knowledge: Reproducibility of these metrics will aid in the design of future studies and might one day be used to guide management in patients with epilepsy. PMID:24720623

  13. Asymmetrical white matter networks for attending to global versus local features

    PubMed Central

    Chechlacz, Magdalena; Mantini, Dante; Gillebert, Celine R.; Humphreys, Glyn W.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to draw objects is a complex process depending on an array of cognitive mechanisms including routines for spatial coding, attention and the processing of both local and global features. Previous studies using both neuropsychological and neuroimaging data have reported hemispheric asymmetries in attending to local versus global features linked to a variety of cortical loci. However, it has not been examined to date whether such asymmetries exist at the level of white matter pathways sub-serving global/local attention. The current study provides a comprehensive analysis of brain-behaviour relationships in the processing of local versus global features based on data from a large cohort of sub-acute stroke patients (n = 248) and behavioural measures from a complex figure copy task. The data analysis used newly developed methods for automated delineation of stroke lesions combined with track-wise lesion deficits procedures. We found (i) that reproduction of local features in figure copying was supported by a neural network confined to the left hemisphere, consisting of cortical loci within parietal, occipital and insular lobes and interconnected by the inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), and (ii) that global feature processing was associated with a right hemisphere network interconnected by the third branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus and the long segment of the perisylvian network. The data support the argument that asymmetrical white matter disconnections within long–range association pathways predict poor complex figure drawing resulting from deficits in hierarchical representation. We conclude that hemispheric asymmetries in attending to local versus global features exist on the level of both cortical loci and the supporting white matter pathways. PMID:25727548

  14. Asymmetrical white matter networks for attending to global versus local features.

    PubMed

    Chechlacz, Magdalena; Mantini, Dante; Gillebert, Celine R; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2015-11-01

    The ability to draw objects is a complex process depending on an array of cognitive mechanisms including routines for spatial coding, attention and the processing of both local and global features. Previous studies using both neuropsychological and neuroimaging data have reported hemispheric asymmetries in attending to local versus global features linked to a variety of cortical loci. However, it has not been examined to date whether such asymmetries exist at the level of white matter pathways sub-serving global/local attention. The current study provides a comprehensive analysis of brain-behaviour relationships in the processing of local versus global features based on data from a large cohort of sub-acute stroke patients (n = 248) and behavioural measures from a complex figure copy task. The data analysis used newly developed methods for automated delineation of stroke lesions combined with track-wise lesion deficits procedures. We found (i) that reproduction of local features in figure copying was supported by a neural network confined to the left hemisphere, consisting of cortical loci within parietal, occipital and insular lobes and interconnected by the inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), and (ii) that global feature processing was associated with a right hemisphere network interconnected by the third branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus and the long segment of the perisylvian network. The data support the argument that asymmetrical white matter disconnections within long-range association pathways predict poor complex figure drawing resulting from deficits in hierarchical representation. We conclude that hemispheric asymmetries in attending to local versus global features exist on the level of both cortical loci and the supporting white matter pathways. PMID:25727548

  15. Structural Variability within Frontoparietal Networks and Individual Differences in Attentional Functions: An Approach Using the Theory of Visual Attention.

    PubMed

    Chechlacz, Magdalena; Gillebert, Celine R; Vangkilde, Signe A; Petersen, Anders; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2015-07-29

    Visuospatial attention allows us to select and act upon a subset of behaviorally relevant visual stimuli while ignoring distraction. Bundesen's theory of visual attention (TVA) (Bundesen, 1990) offers a quantitative analysis of the different facets of attention within a unitary model and provides a powerful analytic framework for understanding individual differences in attentional functions. Visuospatial attention is contingent upon large networks, distributed across both hemispheres, consisting of several cortical areas interconnected by long-association frontoparietal pathways, including three branches of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF I-III) and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF). Here we examine whether structural variability within human frontoparietal networks mediates differences in attention abilities as assessed by the TVA. Structural measures were based on spherical deconvolution and tractography-derived indices of tract volume and hindrance-modulated orientational anisotropy (HMOA). Individual differences in visual short-term memory (VSTM) were linked to variability in the microstructure (HMOA) of SLF II, SLF III, and IFOF within the right hemisphere. Moreover, VSTM and speed of information processing were linked to hemispheric lateralization within the IFOF. Differences in spatial bias were mediated by both variability in microstructure and volume of the right SLF II. Our data indicate that the microstructural and macrostrucutral organization of white matter pathways differentially contributes to both the anatomical lateralization of frontoparietal attentional networks and to individual differences in attentional functions. We conclude that individual differences in VSTM capacity, processing speed, and spatial bias, as assessed by TVA, link to variability in structural organization within frontoparietal pathways. PMID:26224851

  16. Altered Structural and Functional Connectivity in Late Preterm Preadolescence: An Anatomic Seed-Based Study of Resting State Networks Related to the Posteromedial and Lateral Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Degnan, Andrew J.; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Choi, SoYoung; Ceschin, Rafael; Bhushan, Chitresh; Leahy, Richard M.; Corby, Patricia; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Objective Late preterm birth confers increased risk of developmental delay, academic difficulties and social deficits. The late third trimester may represent a critical period of development of neural networks including the default mode network (DMN), which is essential to normal cognition. Our objective is to identify functional and structural connectivity differences in the posteromedial cortex related to late preterm birth. Methods Thirty-eight preadolescents (ages 9–13; 19 born in the late preterm period (?32 weeks gestational age) and 19 at term) without access to advanced neonatal care were recruited from a low socioeconomic status community in Brazil. Participants underwent neurocognitive testing, 3-dimensional T1-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and resting state functional MRI (RS-fMRI). Seed-based probabilistic diffusion tractography and RS-fMRI analyses were performed using unilateral seeds within the posterior DMN (posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus) and lateral parietal DMN (superior marginal and angular gyri). Results Late preterm children demonstrated increased functional connectivity within the posterior default mode networks and increased anti-correlation with the central-executive network when seeded from the posteromedial cortex (PMC). Key differences were demonstrated between PMC components with increased anti-correlation with the salience network seen only with posterior cingulate cortex seeding but not with precuneus seeding. Probabilistic tractography showed increased streamlines within the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus within late preterm children while decreased intrahemispheric streamlines were also observed. No significant differences in neurocognitive testing were demonstrated between groups. Conclusion Late preterm preadolescence is associated with altered functional connectivity from the PMC and lateral parietal cortex to known distributed functional cortical networks despite no significant executive neurocognitive differences. Selective increased structural connectivity was observed in the setting of decreased posterior interhemispheric connections. Future work is needed to determine if these findings represent a compensatory adaptation employing alternate neural circuitry or could reflect subtle pathology resulting in emotional processing deficits not seen with neurocognitive testing. PMID:26098888

  17. Connectivity-based whole brain dual parcellation by group ICA reveals tract structures and decreased connectivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Calhoun, Vince D; Jung, Rex E; Caprihan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Mapping brain connectivity based on neuroimaging data is a promising new tool for understanding brain structure and function. In this methods paper, we demonstrate that group independent component analysis (GICA) can be used to perform a dual parcellation of the brain based on its connectivity matrix (cmICA). This dual parcellation consists of a set of spatially independent source maps, and a corresponding set of paired dual maps that define the connectivity of each source map to the brain. These dual maps are called the connectivity profiles of the source maps. Traditional analysis of connectivity matrices has been used previously for brain parcellation, but the present method provides additional information on the connectivity of these segmented regions. In this paper, the whole brain structural connectivity matrices were calculated on a 5 mm(3) voxel scale from diffusion imaging data based on the probabilistic tractography method. The effect of the choice of the number of components (30 and 100) and their stability were examined. This method generated a set of spatially independent components that are consistent with the canonical brain tracts provided by previous anatomic descriptions, with the high order model yielding finer segmentations. The corpus-callosum example shows how this method leads to a robust parcellation of a brain structure based on its connectivity properties. We applied cmICA to study structural connectivity differences between a group of schizophrenia subjects and healthy controls. The connectivity profiles at both model orders showed similar regions with reduced connectivity in schizophrenia patients. These regions included forceps major, right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, thalamic radiation, and corticospinal tract. This paper provides a novel unsupervised data-driven framework that summarizes the information in a large global connectivity matrix and tests for brain connectivity differences. It has the potential for capturing important brain changes related to disease in connectivity-based disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 36:4681-4701, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26291689

  18. Poisson Compound and Empirical Bayes Estimation, Revisited1 Lawrence Brown

    E-print Network

    Brown, Lawrence D.

    . The approach we take is consistent with Robbins original empirical Bayes proposal. Write 1 Poisson Compound and Empirical Bayes Estimation, Revisited1 Lawrence investigate a classical non-parametric Poisson empirical Bayes estimation problem

  19. Revisiting the Supply-Side Effects of Government Spending

    E-print Network

    Angeletos, George-Marios

    We revisit the macroeconomic effects of government consumption in the neoclassical growth model when agents face uninsured idiosyncratic investment risk. Under complete markets, a permanent increase in government consumption ...

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Revisiting and modelling the woodland farming system

    E-print Network

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Revisiting and modelling the woodland farming system of the early Neolithic Linear of woodland areas for foddering more livestock, which itself can then provide more manure for the fields

  1. A Revisiting of Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives on

    E-print Network

    Broschat, Shira Lynn

    by James Clerk Maxwell is generally acknowledged as one of the most innovative concepts ever introducedA Revisiting of Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives on Maxwell's Displacement Current; Maxwell equations; Maxwell; scientific approach 1. Introduction Maxwell's electromagnetic theory is one

  2. Benes and Butterfly schemes revisited Jacques Patarin, Audrey Montreuil

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Benes and Butterfly schemes revisited Jacques Patarin, Audrey Montreuil Universitâ??e de Versailles Butterfly is enough to get security when m # 2 n (Benes schemes and Butterfly schemes are defined in section

  3. Revisiting the Potentialities of a Mechanical Thesaurus Uta Priss, L. John Old

    E-print Network

    Old, L. John

    Revisiting the Potentialities of a Mechanical Thesaurus Uta Priss, L. John Old Napier University, School of Computing, u.priss@napier.ac.uk, j.old@napier.ac.uk Abstract. This paper revisits the lattice

  4. Herpetologists' League The Polytypic Species Revisited: Morphological Differentiation among Tiger Salamanders

    E-print Network

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    Herpetologists' League The Polytypic Species Revisited: Morphological Differentiation among Tiger REVISITED: MORPHOLOGICAL DIFFERENTIATION AMONG TIGER SALAMANDERS (AMBYSTOMA TIGRINUM) (AMPHIBIA: CAUDATA Ambystoma tigrinum and two closely related members of the tiger salamander complex, A. californiense and A

  5. Waugh revisited : destabilizing language and structure in Vile bodies, A handful of dust, and Brideshead revisited by Jabe Ziino.

    E-print Network

    Ziino, Jabe (Jabe S.)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Last Fall semester I had only a very vague idea of a thesis topic: with a broad interest in the conflict between romantic love and religion inspired in part by a summertime reading of Brideshead Revisited, I ...

  6. 6.302 Feedback Systems Recitation 7: Black's Formula Revisited, and Lead Compensation

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Joel

    Page 6.302 Feedback Systems Recitation 7: Black's Formula Revisited, and Lead Compensation Prof(s)| #12;Page 2 6.302 Feedback Systems Recitation 7: Black's Formula Revisited, and Lead Compensation Prof =03 F =0 log0 |·| #12;Page 3 6.302 Feedback Systems Recitation 7: Black's Formula Revisited, and Lead

  7. ALFVEN WAVES IN SHEAR FLOWS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh.

    2012-01-10

    We revisit our earlier study of the evolution of an initial propagating Alfven wave in a magnetic-field-aligned flow with a cross-field velocity shear. Our goal is to show how the Alfven wave drives up plasma density fluctuations which might be observed and serve as a signature of the presence of Alfven waves in regions such as the solar corona which are inaccessible to direct observations. Here, we introduce a new initial condition which takes into account the initial distortion of the streamlines by the Alfven wave, and we present new analytical results for the driven waves. We find that the density fluctuations of a properly placed linearly polarized Alfven wave in a shear flow are much smaller than we originally estimated.

  8. Visser's massive graviton bimetric theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Roany, Alain de; Chauvineau, Bertrand; Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. de

    2011-10-15

    A massive gravity theory was proposed by Visser in the late 1990s. This theory, based on a background metric b{sub {alpha}{beta}} and on an usual dynamical metric g{sub {alpha}{beta}} has the advantage of being free of ghosts as well as discontinuities present in other massive theories proposed in the past. In the present investigation, the equations of Visser's theory are revisited with particular care on the related conservation laws. It will be shown that a multiplicative factor is missing in the graviton tensor originally derived by Visser, which has no incidence on the weak field approach but becomes important in the strong field regime when, for instance, cosmological applications are considered. In this case, contrary to some previous claims found in the literature, we conclude that a nonstatic background metric is required in order to obtain a solution able to mimic the {Lambda}CDM cosmology.

  9. L'enfant et les sortilèges revisited.

    PubMed

    Hindle, D

    2000-12-01

    The author discusses 'L'Enfant et les sortilèges', an opera by Ravel based on a short story by Colette, which traces the trials and tribulations of a young boy whose bad behaviour leads to his being sent to his room, left alone and given only tea and bread until dinner. His progression from anger to persecution and fear, the various defences he employs to protect himself from feeling overwhelmed and his despair are graphically illustrated through words and music. The author considers the opera in relation to Klein's theory of the paranoidschizoid position and the struggle involved in maintaining contact with good objects, externally and internally. Revisiting the opera in light of Meltzer's contribution to psychoanalytic thinking provides a wider perspective in which to explore what he has termed the aesthetic conflict and its place in relation to the depressive position and developmental processes. PMID:11144856

  10. Revisiting ice nucleation from precipitation samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, M. D.; Wright, T. P.

    2015-10-01

    An emerging and unsolved question is the sensitivity of cloud processes, precipitation, and climate to the atmospheric ice nucleus spectrum. This work revisits estimation of atmospheric ice-nucleating particle concentration derived from cloud water and precipitation samples representing a wide range of geographical locations, seasons, storm systems, precipitation types, instruments, concentrations, and temperatures. Concentrations of ice-nucleating particles are shown to vary over 10 orders of magnitude. High variability is observed in the -5°C to -12°C range which is suggested to be biologically derived nuclei whose life cycle is associated with intermittent source and efficient sink processes. The highest ever observed nucleus concentrations at -8°C are 3 orders of magnitude lower than observed ice crystal concentrations in tropical cumuli at the same temperature. The observed upper and lower limits of the nucleus spectrum provide a possible constraint on minimum enhancement factors for secondary ice formation processes.

  11. Predator-prey interactions, resource depression and patch revisitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Generalist predators may be confronted by different types of prey in different patches: sedentary and conspicuous, cryptic (with or without refugia), conspicuous and nonsocial, or conspicuous and social. I argue that, where encounter rates with prey are of most importance, patch revisitation should be a profitable tactic where prey have short 'recovery' times (conspicuous, nonsocial prey), or where anti-predator response (e.g. shoaling) may increase conspicuousness. Predictions are made for how temporal changes in prey encounter rates should affect revisit schedules and feeding rates for the 4 different prey types.

  12. Revisiting Classical Diamagnetism: A Surprise of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Narendra; Krishnamurthy, Vijay Kumar

    2009-03-01

    The Classic Bohr-van Leeuwen (BvL) theorem states that the orbital diamagnetism of a classical system of charged particles in thermal equilibrium is identically zero. This theorem is universally accepted and has entered textbooks. Physically, the theorem derives from the exact cancellation of the orbital diamagnetic moment associated with the completed cyclotron orbits of the charged particles by the paramagnetic moment subtended by the incomplete orbits skipping the boundary cuspidally in the opposite sense. In this work we have revisited the problem of this crucial but subtle role of the boundary by considering the case of a finite but unbounded system, namely that of a charged particle moving on a sphere in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field. The orbital moment calculated on the basis of the classical Langevin equation in the infinite time limit now indeed turns out to be non-zero, and has the diamagnetic sign. This violates the BvL theorem as stated in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of non-zero classical diamagnetism. It is explicitly owing to the above avoided cancellation. We also present possible experimental realization of the predicted classical diamagnetism.

  13. Revisiting Twomey's approximation for peak supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipway, B. J.

    2015-04-01

    Twomey's seminal 1959 paper provided lower and upper bound approximations to the estimation of peak supersaturation within an updraft and thus provides the first closed expression for the number of nucleated cloud droplets. The form of this approximation is simple, but provides a surprisingly good estimate and has subsequently been employed in more sophisticated treatments of nucleation parametrization. In the current paper, we revisit the lower bound approximation of Twomey and make a small adjustment that can be used to obtain a more accurate calculation of peak supersaturation under all potential aerosol loadings and thermodynamic conditions. In order to make full use of this improved approximation, the underlying integro-differential equation for supersaturation evolution and the condition for calculating peak supersaturation are examined. A simple rearrangement of the algebra allows for an expression to be written down that can then be solved with a single lookup table with only one independent variable for an underlying lognormal aerosol population. While multimodal aerosol with N different dispersion characteristics requires 2N+1 inputs to calculate the activation fraction, only N of these one-dimensional lookup tables are needed. No additional information is required in the lookup table to deal with additional chemical, physical or thermodynamic properties. The resulting implementation provides a relatively simple, yet computationally cheap, physically based parametrization of droplet nucleation for use in climate and Numerical Weather Prediction models.

  14. Pair Production Constraints on Superluminal Neutrinos Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.

    2012-02-16

    We revisit the pair creation constraint on superluminal neutrinos considered by Cohen and Glashow in order to clarify which types of superluminal models are constrained. We show that a model in which the superluminal neutrino is effectively light-like can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint. In summary, any model for which the CG pair production process operates is excluded because such timelike neutrinos would not be detected by OPERA or other experiments. However, a superluminal neutrino which is effectively lightlike with fixed p{sup 2} can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint because of energy-momentum conservation. The coincidence involved in explaining the SN1987A constraint certainly makes such a picture improbable - but it is still intrinsically possible. The lightlike model is appealing in that it does not violate Lorentz symmetry in particle interactions, although one would expect Hughes-Drever tests to turn up a violation eventually. Other evasions of the CG constraints are also possible; perhaps, e.g., the neutrino takes a 'short cut' through extra dimensions or suffers anomalous acceleration in matter. Irrespective of the OPERA result, Lorentz-violating interactions remain possible, and ongoing experimental investigation of such possibilities should continue.

  15. Extrasynaptic NMDA Receptor in Excitotoxicity: Function Revisited.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianju; Chen, Zhuoyou; Yun, Wenwei; Ren, Jianhua; Li, Chengwei; Wang, Hongbing

    2015-08-01

    It is generally accepted that proper activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) promotes neuronal survival and supports neuroplasticity, and excessive NMDAR activation leads to pathological outcomes and neurodegeneration. As NMDARs are found at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites, there is significant interest in determining how NMDARs at different subcellular locations differentially regulate physiological as well as pathological functions. Better understanding of this issue may support the development of therapeutic strategies to attenuate neuronal death or promote normal brain function. Although the current prevailing theory emphasizes the major role of extrasynaptic NMDARs in neurodegeneration, there is growing evidence indicating the involvement of synaptic receptors. It is also evident that physiological functions of the brain also involve extrasynaptic NMDARs. Our recent studies demonstrate that the degree of cell death following neuronal insults depends on the magnitude and duration of synaptic and extrasynaptic receptor co-activation. These new results underscore the importance of revisiting the function of extrasynaptic NMDARs in cell fate. Furthermore, the development of antagonists that preferentially inhibit synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors may better clarify the role of NMDARs in neurodegeneration. PMID:25168337

  16. Meta-analysis in clinical trials revisited.

    PubMed

    DerSimonian, Rebecca; Laird, Nan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we revisit a 1986 article we published in this Journal, Meta-Analysis in Clinical Trials, where we introduced a random-effects model to summarize the evidence about treatment efficacy from a number of related clinical trials. Because of its simplicity and ease of implementation, our approach has been widely used (with more than 12,000 citations to date) and the "DerSimonian and Laird method" is now often referred to as the 'standard approach' or a 'popular' method for meta-analysis in medical and clinical research. The method is especially useful for providing an overall effect estimate and for characterizing the heterogeneity of effects across a series of studies. Here, we review the background that led to the original 1986 article, briefly describe the random-effects approach for meta-analysis, explore its use in various settings and trends over time and recommend a refinement to the method using a robust variance estimator for testing overall effect. We conclude with a discussion of repurposing the method for Big Data meta-analysis and Genome Wide Association Studies for studying the importance of genetic variants in complex diseases. PMID:26343745

  17. Carbon emission from global hydroelectric reservoirs revisited.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Zhang, Quanfa

    2014-12-01

    Substantial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from hydropower reservoirs have been of great concerns recently, yet the significant carbon emitters of drawdown area and reservoir downstream (including spillways and turbines as well as river reaches below dams) have not been included in global carbon budget. Here, we revisit GHG emission from hydropower reservoirs by considering reservoir surface area, drawdown zone and reservoir downstream. Our estimates demonstrate around 301.3 Tg carbon dioxide (CO2)/year and 18.7 Tg methane (CH4)/year from global hydroelectric reservoirs, which are much higher than recent observations. The sum of drawdown and downstream emission, which is generally overlooked, represents 42 % CO2 and 67 % CH4 of the total emissions from hydropower reservoirs. Accordingly, the global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 92 g CO2/kWh and 5.7 g CH4/kWh. Nonetheless, global hydroelectricity could currently reduce approximate 2,351 Tg CO2eq/year with respect to fuel fossil plant alternative. The new findings show a substantial revision of carbon emission from the global hydropower reservoirs. PMID:24943886

  18. Statistical properties of soil moisture images revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldak, Anna; Pachepsky, Yakov; Jackson, Thomas J.; Rawls, Walter J.

    2002-01-01

    Data from passive microwave remote sensing with an ESTAR L-band radiometer, deployed on an aircraft, were used to produce soil moisture images over the area of the Little Washita watershed in Oklahoma in 1992. This area was revisited during the Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment. This offered an opportunity to evaluate the time-specificity of the conclusions, relating to scaling of the surface soil moisture, that have been reported for 1992. The objective of this work was to compare scaling properties of soil moisture fields observed in 1992 and 1997. We analyzed one 1992 data set and three 1997 data sets, each covering several days of continuous drydown. Different resolutions were introduced by aggregating the pixels of original 200-m resolution into bigger square cells. Scaling in dependencies on resolution was observed for the variance of moisture content, for the within-cell variance, and for the first six moments about zero, the latter indicating multiscaling. Parameters of the scaling equations differed among four drying periods studied. However, once a scaling dependency on resolution was established in the beginning of a drying period, its shape was maintained during the drydown both in 1992 and 1997. Slopes of the dependencies changed only slightly, whereas the intercepts decreased as the drying progressed. Having constant slopes and intercepts dependent on average area water contents gives an opportunity to reduce the volume of observations needed to predict scaling of surface soil moisture during drydowns.

  19. The Sakharov Experiment Revisited for Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Tracy

    2013-06-01

    Sakharov and co-workers in 1965 proposed an experiment in which a sinusoidal perturbation in a planar wave evolves as it travels through a material. More recent, Liu and co-workers utilized gas gun techniques rather than explosives to drive the shock wave, resulting in a better defined input. The technique has been applied to liquids such as water and mercury as well as solids such as aluminum. All analyses of the experiments conducted to date have utilized a viscous fluid approach, even for the solids. Here, the concept of the decay of a perturbation in a shock wave is revisited and applied to granular materials. Simulations utilizing continuum models for the granular materials as well as mesoscale models in which individual particles are resolved are utilized. It is found that the perturbation decay is influenced by the strength (deviatoric behavior) used in the continuum model. In the mesocale calculations, the simulation parameters as well as the computational approach influence the results. Finally, initial experimental results for the technique using granular tungsten carbide are presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Channel Blocking of MspA Revisited Ayomi S. Perera,*,

    E-print Network

    Turro, Claudia

    Channel Blocking of MspA Revisited Ayomi S. Perera,*, Hongwang Wang, Matthew T. Basel, Megh Raj constriction zone, allowing stable binding of various analytes thereby blocking the channel. Investigation of channel blocking of mycobacterial porins is of significance in developing alternate treatment methods

  1. Revisiting Key Schedule's Diffusion In Relation With Round Function's Diffusion

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Revisiting Key Schedule's Diffusion In Relation With Round Function's Diffusion Jialin Huang that the key schedules poorly distribute key bits in the diffusion path of round function. This reminds us of the importance of the diffusion's relation between key schedule and round function. We present new cryptanalysis

  2. Montgomery Modular Multiplication on ARM-NEON Revisited

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Montgomery Modular Multiplication on ARM-NEON Revisited Hwajeong Seo1 , Zhe Liu2 , Johann Großsch NEON) has initiated a massive body of research on vector-parallel implementations of Montgomery modular modular multiplication on ARM-NEON platforms. Detailed benchmarking results obtained on an ARM Cortex-A9

  3. Multi-Key Security: The Even-Mansour Construction Revisited

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Multi-Key Security: The Even-Mansour Construction Revisited Nicky Mouha1,2 and Atul Luykx1 1 Dept multiple independent keys, the Even-Mansour construction sur- prisingly offers similar security as an ideal block cipher with the same block and key size. Note that this multi-key setting is of high practical

  4. Artificial Intelligence 120 (2000) 2942 Optimal auctions revisited 6

    E-print Network

    Monderer, Dov

    2000-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence 120 (2000) 29­42 Optimal auctions revisited 6 Dov Monderer , Moshe. Tennenholtz / Artificial Intelligence 120 (2000) 29­42 game theory [5]. In particular, the design of protocols aspects of multi-agent activity in Artificial Intelligence has grown rapidly in the recent years. Work

  5. Magnetic Braking Revisited: Activities for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireson, Gren; Twidle, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper revisits the demonstration of Lenz by dropping magnets down a non-magnetic tube. Recent publications are reviewed and ideas for undergraduate laboratory investigations are suggested. Finally, an example of matching theory to observation is presented. (Contains 4 tables, 5 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  6. Revisiting the Trust Effect in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.

    2013-01-01

    More than a decade after Goddard, Tschannen-Moran, and Hoy (2001) found that collective faculty trust in clients predicts student achievement in urban elementary schools, we sought to identify a plausible link for this relationship. Our purpose in revisiting the trust effect was twofold: (1) to test the main effect of collective faculty trust on…

  7. Antidote for Zero Tolerance: Revisiting a "Reclaiming" School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farner, Conrad D.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a revisit to the Frank Lloyd Wright Middle School, which implemented strategies to deal with disciplinary problems. The school continues to progress towards creating the type of reclaiming environment necessary to ensure the needs of all students. Strategies used include alternatives to zero tolerance policy; smaller teams of students;…

  8. NOTES AND COMMENTS Revisiting powdered sugar for varroa control on

    E-print Network

    Delaplane, Keith S.

    NOTES AND COMMENTS Revisiting powdered sugar for varroa control on honey bees (Apis mellifera L, accepted for publication 1 September 2012. Keywords: Varroa destructor, IPM, powdered sugar, dusts Journal sugar has been examined as a remedial control for Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman (varroa). Two

  9. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 221 Pathology on Game Trees Revisited,

    E-print Network

    Nau, Dana S.

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 221 Pathology on Game Trees Revisited, and an Alternative to Minimaxing the existence of many game trees and evaluation functions which are 'pathological' in the sense that searching, it is shown that whenever the evaluation function satisfies certain properties, pathology will occur on any

  10. Adaptively Secure Coin-Flipping, Revisited Shafi Goldwasser1

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Adaptively Secure Coin-Flipping, Revisited Shafi Goldwasser1 , Yael Tauman Kalai2 , and Sunoo Park3' bits, can tolerate t(n) = O( n) even in the presence of adaptive corruptions, and they conjectured of corrupt players? We introduce a model of strong adaptive corruptions, in which an adversary sees all

  11. January/February 1996 Tracheal Mites -Revisited Seeds in Citrus

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Yuko

    that lead to "honey bee parasitic mite syndrome" (colony collapse). Protecting your wintering bees, BEFORE Tracheal Mites - Revisited With the arrival of the more feared Varroa mite, the honey bee tracheal mite edition of The Hive and the Honey Bee has detailed instructions on how to find the mites. If infestation

  12. Multiprecision multiplication on AVR revisited Michael Hutter Peter Schwabe

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Multiprecision multiplication on AVR revisited Michael Hutter · Peter Schwabe July 31, 2014, and by the European Cooperation in Science and Technol- ogy (COST) Action IC1204 (Trustworthy Manufacturing and Uti.hutter@iaik.tugraz.at Peter Schwabe Radboud University Nijmegen Digital Security Group PO Box 9010, 6500GL Nijmegen

  13. 1 The problem of power 2 Classical results revisited

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    channel symbol to compute the syndrome. The only way around this would be if it were somehow pos- sible to easily compute the syndrome: this leads directly to sparse-graph codes like LDPCs or low-density parityOutline: 1 The problem of power 2 Classical results revisited 3 A computational model 4 Fundamental

  14. Adhesivity is not enough: Local Church-Rosser revisited

    E-print Network

    Baldan, Paolo

    Adhesivity is not enough: Local Church-Rosser revisited Paolo Baldan1 , Fabio Gadducci2 , and Pawel Abstract. Adhesive categories provide an abstract setting for the double- pushout approach to rewriting, including the local Church-Rosser theorem, can be proven in adhesive categories, provided that one restricts

  15. January 2013 BEE CULTURE 23 Revisiting Powdered Sugar For

    E-print Network

    Delaplane, Keith S.

    January 2013 BEE CULTURE 23 Revisiting Powdered Sugar For Varroa Control On Honey Bees (Apis dust bees with powder sugar as a means of removing mites. Dusting with powder sugar was also gaining conducted a study which examined the efficacy of powder sugar and found it did not help in controlling

  16. Revisiting Multimode Coupled Bridge Flutter: Some New Insights

    E-print Network

    Kareem, Ahsan

    Revisiting Multimode Coupled Bridge Flutter: Some New Insights Xinzhong Chen1 and Ahsan Kareem2 and torsional modes offers valuable insight into multimode coupled flutter, which has primarily been the major on the selection of critical structural modes and the role of different force components in multimode coupled

  17. Invited Review The life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi revisited

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    Invited Review The life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi revisited K.M. Tyler*, D.M. Engman Department 2001 Abstract The basic features of the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi have been known for nearly Ostensibly, the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi has been elucidated for nearly a century (Chagas, 1909

  18. "An analysis of the classical Doppler Effect"[1] revisited

    E-print Network

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Corina Nafornita

    2004-03-26

    After having shown that the formula which describes the Doppler effect in the general case holds only in the case of the "very high" frequency assumption, we derive free of assumptions Doppler formulas for two scenarios presented in the revisited paper.

  19. The Importance of Being a Complement: CED Effects Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurka, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation revisits subject island effects (Ross 1967, Chomsky 1973) cross-linguistically. Controlled acceptability judgment studies in German, English, Japanese and Serbian show that extraction out of specifiers is consistently degraded compared to extraction out of complements, indicating that the Condition on Extraction domains (CED,…

  20. Open Mushrooms: Stickiness revisited Carl P. Dettmann 1

    E-print Network

    Dettmann, Carl

    Open Mushrooms: Stickiness revisited Carl P. Dettmann 1 and Orestis Georgiou 1 1 School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, United Kingdom We investigate mushroom billiards, a class of dynamical a generalized mushroom and using properties of continued fractions, we describe a zero measure set of control

  1. Decay of the neutron deficient {sup 32}Ar, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Borge, M. J. G.; Blank, B.; Matea, I.; Adimi, N.; Thomas, J. C.

    2007-11-30

    The aim of this work is to revisit the decay of Argon {sup 32}Ar with special emphasis in the p-{gamma} coincidences. The study was motivated by the increase in granularity and sensitivity of the charged particle detectors and by the high sensitivity and large angular coverage obtained by the use of CLOVER detectors.

  2. Instructional Efficiency: Revisiting the Original Construct in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gog, Tamara; Paas, Fred

    2008-01-01

    This article revisits Paas and Van Merrienboer's (1993) measure of instructional efficiency, which can be applied by educational researchers to compare the effects of different instructional conditions on learning. This measure relied on performance and mental effort on the test, and as such gave an indication of the quality of learning outcomes.…

  3. The Fault Attack ECDLP Revisited Mingqiang Wang1

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The Fault Attack ECDLP Revisited Mingqiang Wang1 Xiaoyun Wang1,2 , and Tao Zhan3 1. School: wangmingqiang@sdu.edu.cn Abstract Biehl et al.[2] proposed a fault-based attack on elliptic curve cryptog- raphy. In this paper, we refined the fault attack method. An elliptic curve E is defined over prime field Fp with base

  4. DNS Zones Revisited Ward van Wanrooij, Aiko Pras

    E-print Network

    Pras, Aiko

    DNS Zones Revisited Ward van Wanrooij, Aiko Pras Abstract - Recent research suggests that, due investigates the correct configuration of DNS zones, by checking if main configuration requirements, recommendations and best- practices rules have been followed. Our research shows that almost one out of four zones

  5. Programming the Memory Hierarchy Revisited: Supporting Irregular Parallelism in Sequoia

    E-print Network

    Aiken, Alex

    Programming the Memory Hierarchy Revisited: Supporting Irregular Parallelism in Sequoia Michael-up in Sequoia and we present an experimental evaluation on a number of irregular applications. 1. Introduction. Dense matrix multiplication in Sequoia. chip, and global memory. The Roadrunner petaflop supercomputer

  6. Titan interaction with Saturn's magnetosphere: Voyager 1 results revisited

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Titan interaction with Saturn's magnetosphere: Voyager 1 results revisited E. C. Sittler Jr., R. E March 2005; published 10 September 2005. [1] We investigate the details of Titan's interaction in the outermost region with respect to Titan's ``ionopause,'' followed by CH4 + at intermediate distances and N2

  7. Nurse Rostering and Integer Programming Revisited John Thornton

    E-print Network

    Thornton, John

    Nurse Rostering and Integer Programming Revisited John Thornton School of Information Technology and limited problem domains. In this paper, we consider a large, real world scheduling problem of nurse are introduced to evaluate the automated nurse schedules. Finally, we conclude that an integer programming

  8. WAC Revisited: You Get What You Pay for

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perelman, Les

    2011-01-01

    In 1982, the author wrote an essay for the second issue of "The Writing Instructor," "Approaches to Comprehensive Writing: Integrating Writing into the College Curriculum," reviewing the early stages of the modern Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)/Writing in the Disciplines (WID) movement. In this article, the author revisits his essay and…

  9. Language Transmission Revisited: Family Type, Linguistic Environment and Language Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schupbach, Doris

    2009-01-01

    This article revisits factors in intergenerational language maintenance and shift within the family. It does so through an in-depth analysis of what 14 migrants to Australia from German-speaking Switzerland reported in written life stories and subsequent life story interviews. The participants represent four family types and a wide age range, and…

  10. The Linux Pseudorandom Number Generator Revisited Patrick Lacharme

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The Linux Pseudorandom Number Generator Revisited Patrick Lacharme Andrea Röck Vincent Strubel Marion Videau § Abstract The Linux pseudorandom number generator (PRNG) is a PRNG with entropy inputs]. Our work describes the Linux PRNG of kernel versions 2.6.30.7 and upwards. We detail the PRNG

  11. KRONER'S FORMULA FOR DISLOCATION LOOPS REVISITED NICOLAS VAN GOETHEM

    E-print Network

    Lisbon, University of

    KR¨ONER'S FORMULA FOR DISLOCATION LOOPS REVISITED NICOLAS VAN GOETHEM 1. Introduction Several dislocation theories coexist in the literature and in general each emphasizes a particular aspect of the physics of dislocations and disclinations. For a physical approach let us refer to [1

  12. Re-Visiting Health Informatics What is Health Informatics?

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    Re-Visiting Health Informatics HINF1100 Fall 2008 #12;What is Health Informatics? · Health the effective organization, analysis, management and use of health information to improve the delivery and practice of healthcare · Health Informatics is the study of applying information and technology to improve

  13. Environmental Education and Politics: Snakes and Ladders Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David

    2004-01-01

    This paper revisits the history of environmental education in Australia in the 1970s and 1980s and draws parallels between these and current events in four countries, including Australia. It is argued that little has changed and that few environmental educators confront the inherently political nature of their work. It is concluded that…

  14. Literary Origins of the Term "School Psychologist" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research on the literary origins of the term "school psychologist" is revisited, and conclusions are revised in light of new evidence. It appears that the origin of the term in the American literature occurred as early as 1898 in an article by Hugo Munsterberg, predating the usage by Wilhelm Stern in 1911. The early references to the…

  15. Revisiting Dedicated and Block Cipher based Hash Functions Anupam Pattanayak

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Revisiting Dedicated and Block Cipher based Hash Functions Anupam Pattanayak Computer Science used in many fields of computer science such as hash table in data structure, checksum algorithms-string of the hash function is commonly referred as "message digest" or simply "digest", or just "hash". #12;Hash

  16. Polite Theories Revisited Dejan Jovanovic and Clark Barrett

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Clark W.

    Polite Theories Revisited Dejan Jovanovi´c and Clark Barrett New York University dejan-infinite. Unfortunately, some important theories do not fall into this category (e.g. the theory of bit-vectors). To remedy this problem, previous work introduced the notion of polite theories. Polite theories can

  17. Polite Theories Revisited Dejan Jovanovic and Clark Barrett

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Clark W.

    Polite Theories Revisited Dejan Jovanovi´c and Clark Barrett New York University dejan- sion procedures requires the theories to be stably-infinite. Unfortunately, some important theories do not fall into this category (e.g. the theory of bit-vectors). To remedy this problem, previous work

  18. The Master-Slave Architecture for Evolutionary Computations Revisited

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    The Master-Slave Architecture for Evolutionary Computations Revisited Christian Gagn´e, Marc efficiently both Beowulfs and networks of heterogeneous workstations we argue that the classic master-slave with processing nodes. In contrast, the master-slave model has all required features. One issue that needs

  19. Extended Nested Dual System Groups, Revisited Junqing Gong

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Extended Nested Dual System Groups, Revisited Junqing Gong Jie Chen Xiaolei Dong Zhenfu Cao§ Shaohua Tang¶ October 7, 2015 Abstract The notion of extended nested dual system groups (ENDSG groups based on Chen and Wee's prime-order instantiation of nested dual system groups [CRYPTO 2013

  20. Pockets of Participation: Revisiting Child-Centred Participation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Myfanwy

    2011-01-01

    This article revisits the theme of the clash of interests and power relations at work in participatory research which is prescribed from above. It offers a possible route toward solving conflict between adult-led research carried out by young researchers, funding requirements and organisational constraints. The article explores issues of…

  1. HARE++: Hardware Assisted Reverse Execution Revisited Ioannis Doudalis

    E-print Network

    Prvulovic, Milos

    HARE++: Hardware Assisted Reverse Execution Revisited Ioannis Doudalis Georgia Institute which unfortu- nately are not consolidation-friendly. HARE was the first hardware technique to create are proposing HARE++, a redesign of the orig- inal HARE that addresses the shortcomings of the original tech

  2. Plant species effects on nutrient cycling: revisiting litter feedbacks

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Plant species effects on nutrient cycling: revisiting litter feedbacks Sarah E. Hobbie Department in light of recent research, focusing on feedbacks to NPP operating through litter decomposition. I decomposition of roots compared to leaf litter. I further conclude that predictive understanding of plant

  3. Prediction of Prokaryotic Transcription Units from Microarray Data Revisited

    E-print Network

    Hochreiter, Sepp

    Prediction of Prokaryotic Transcription Units from Microarray Data Revisited Ulrich Bodenhofer, Wilhelm Lichtberger, Frank Klawonn In prokaryotic genomes, a transcription unit is a set of one or more co the knowledge about E.coli. For less investigated prokaryotes, it allows to infer hypotheses about transcription

  4. DIGITAL SEARCH TREES AGAIN REVISITED: THE INTERNAL PATH LENGTH PERSPECTIVE

    E-print Network

    Prodinger, Helmut

    DIGITAL SEARCH TREES AGAIN REVISITED: THE INTERNAL PATH LENGTH for the inte* *rnal path length in a symmetric digital search tree. The problem was open up to no* *w. We prove that for the binary digital search tree the variance is asymptotica* *lly equal

  5. DIGITAL SEARCH TREES AGAIN REVISITED: THE INTERNAL PATH LENGTH PERSPECTIVE

    E-print Network

    Prodinger, Helmut

    DIGITAL SEARCH TREES AGAIN REVISITED: THE INTERNAL PATH LENGTH PERSPECTIVE Peter Kirschenhofery digital search tree. The problem was open up to now. We prove that for the binary digital search tree indicator how well the digital trees are balanced. We shall show that the digital search tree is the best

  6. Revisiting the Role of Communication in Adolescent Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messinger, Adam M.; Rickert, Vaughn I.; Fry, Deborah A.; Lessel, Harriet; Davidson, Leslie L.

    2012-01-01

    A growing literature suggests that communication strategies can promote or inhibit intimate partner violence (IPV). Research on communication is still needed on a group ripe for early IPV intervention: high school-aged adolescents. This article revisits our previous analyses of young female reproductive clinic patients (Messinger, Davidson, &…

  7. CRISPR revisited: structure prediction of CRISPR repeats Sita Lange1

    E-print Network

    Will, Sebastian

    CRISPR revisited: structure prediction of CRISPR repeats Sita Lange1 , Omer S. Alkhnbashi 1 Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs), illustrated to the right. The CRISPR transcripts sequences have been found to match foreign virus or plasmid DNA. A set of CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins

  8. Friction versus dilation revisited: Insights from theoretical and numerical models

    E-print Network

    Einat, Aharonov

    Friction versus dilation revisited: Insights from theoretical and numerical models N. Makedonska,1 controlled by the frictional strength of the fault gouge, a granular layer that accumulates between the fault friction coefficient) of such granular layers is the systems resistance to dilation, a byprocess

  9. Revisiting Botnet Models and Their Implications for Takedown Strategies

    E-print Network

    Reiter, Michael

    Revisiting Botnet Models and Their Implications for Takedown Strategies Ting-Fang Yen1 and Michael-peer botnets, particularly in evaluating the effectiveness of strategies aimed at taking down a botnet. We according to the Waledac botnet protocol, and on network traces of bots from a honeynet running in the wild

  10. Two Optimum Secret Sharing Schemes Revisited Zhengjun Cao Olivier Markowitch

    E-print Network

    Markowitch, Olivier

    Two Optimum Secret Sharing Schemes Revisited Zhengjun Cao Olivier Markowitch Department of Computer, caoamss@gmail.com Abstract In 2006, Obana et al proposed two optimum secret shar- ing schemes secure efficient because they only extend the secret to an array of two elements. The new scheme for a single se

  11. Rational Secret Sharing, Revisited S. Dov Gordon # Jonathan Katz #+

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Rational Secret Sharing, Revisited S. Dov Gordon # Jonathan Katz #+ July 11, 2006 Abstract We consider the problem of secret sharing among n rational players. This problem was introduced by Halpern # 3. Contrary to their claim, we show a protocol for rational secret sharing among n = 2 players; our

  12. Ant Foraging Revisited Liviu A. Panait and Sean Luke

    E-print Network

    Turk, Greg

    Ant Foraging Revisited Liviu A. Panait and Sean Luke George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 lpanait@cs.gmu.edu, sean@cs.gmu.edu Abstract Most previous artificial ant foraging algorithms have to date the artificial ants with the knowledge of the nest direction. In contrast, the work presented solves ant foraging

  13. Ant Foraging Revisited Liviu A. Panait and Sean Luke

    E-print Network

    Luke, Sean

    Ant Foraging Revisited Liviu A. Panait and Sean Luke George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 lpanait@cs.gmu.edu, sean@cs.gmu.edu Abstract Most previous artificial ant foraging models have to date re the artificial ants with the knowledge of the nest direction. In contrast, the work presented solves ant foraging

  14. Perceptual Issues in Augmented Reality Revisited Ernst Kruijff

    E-print Network

    Swan II, J. Edward

    Perceptual Issues in Augmented Reality Revisited Ernst Kruijff 1 J. Edward Swan II 2 Steven Feiner--Artificial, augmented, and virtual realities; H.5.2 [Infor- mation Interfaces and Presentation]: User Interfaces-- Ergonomics, Evaluation/methodology, Screen design Additional Keywords: Human perception, augmented reality

  15. DNA Compression Challenge Revisited: a Dynamic Programming Approach

    E-print Network

    Lonardi, Stefano

    DNA Compression Challenge Revisited: a Dynamic Programming Approach Behshad Behzadi and Fabrice Le Fessant LIX, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, FRANCE June 21 2005 B. Behzadi, F. Le Fessant (LIX) DNA Compression June 21 2005 1 / 38 #12;Outline 1 DNA Compression Challenge 2 Tools and Methods 3 DNA Compression

  16. A SIMPLE CARD GUESSING GAME REVISITED Arnold Knopfmacher

    E-print Network

    Prodinger, Helmut

    A SIMPLE CARD GUESSING GAME REVISITED Arnold Knopfmacher://www.wits.ac.za/helmut/index.htm Submitted: January 4, 2000; Accepted: March 3, 2000. Abstract. A deck of cards consisting of m red and n black cards is given.* * A guess is made as to the colour of the top card, after which

  17. A Wearable Technology Revisited for Cardio-Respiratory Functional Exploration

    E-print Network

    Fontecave-Jallon, Julie

    A Wearable Technology Revisited for Cardio-Respiratory Functional Exploration: Stroke Volume-respiratory (CR) measure is a well-known wearable solution. We applied time-scale analysis to estimate cardiac of vital and behavioral signs is an emerging concept of healthcare. Although wearable technology is more

  18. Revisiting Smart Dust with RFID Sensor Networks Michael Buettner

    E-print Network

    Hochberg, Michael

    deployment of RFID for industrial supply-chain applications such as tracking pal- lets and individual itemsRevisiting Smart Dust with RFID Sensor Networks Michael Buettner University of Washington Ben and computation platforms that leverage RFID technology can realize "smart-dust" ap- plications that have eluded

  19. The LCA Problem Revisited Michael A. Bender1

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    The LCA Problem Revisited Michael A. Bender1 and Mart´in Farach-Colton2 1 Department of Computer the frequently held notion that opti- mal LCA computation is unwieldy and unimplementable. Interestingly fundamental algorithmic problems on trees is how to find the Least Common Ancestor (LCA) of a pair of nodes

  20. Facilitating Grade Acceleration: Revisiting the Wisdom of John Feldhusen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culross, Rita R.; Jolly, Jennifer L.; Winkler, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the 1986 Feldhusen, Proctor, and Black recommendations on grade skipping. These recommendations originally appeared as 12 guidelines. In this article, the guidelines are grouped into three general categories: how to screen accelerant candidates, how to engage with the adults in the acceleration process (e.g., teachers,…

  1. Information Systems Revisited: The General Continuous Dieter Spreen

    E-print Network

    Spreen, Dieter

    Information Systems Revisited: The General Continuous Case Dieter Spreen Theoretische Informatik system is introduced. It is shown that the information systems of this kind generate exactly the continuous domains. The new information systems are of the same logic-oriented style as the information

  2. Revisiting Methodological Issues in Transcript Analysis: Negotiated Coding and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, D. R.; Cleveland-Innes, M.; Koole, Marguerite; Kappelman, James

    2006-01-01

    Transcript analysis is an important methodology to study asynchronous online educational discourse. The purpose of this study is to revisit reliability and validity issues associated with transcript analysis. The goal is to provide researchers with guidance in coding transcripts. For validity reasons, it is suggested that the first step is to…

  3. A Feminist Revisit to the First-Year Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Anita

    1996-01-01

    A seminar at Chicago-Kent College of Law (Illinois) that reviews six first-year law school courses by focusing on feminist issues in course content and structure is described. The seminar functions as both a review and a shift in perspective. Courses revisited include civil procedure, contracts, criminal law, justice and the legal system,…

  4. Of pungency, pain, and naked mole rats: chili peppers revisited

    E-print Network

    Borges, Renee M

    Clipboard Of pungency, pain, and naked mole rats: chili peppers revisited Capsaicinoids are unique to the chili pepper genus Capsicum within the plant family Solanaceae. The family is also known for species ranging from dry dehiscent capsules to fleshy drupes and berries. Botanically speaking, chili peppers

  5. Gale-Shapley Stable Marriage Problem Revisited: Strategic Issues

    E-print Network

    Sethuraman, Jay

    Gale-Shapley Stable Marriage Problem Revisited: Strategic Issues and Applications Chung-Piaw Teo@nus.edu.sg · jay@ieor.columbia.edu We study strategic issues in the Gale-Shapley stable marriage model behavior of the students need not be a major concern. (Stable Marriage; Strategic Issues; Gale

  6. Revisiting Constructivist Teaching Methods in Ontario Colleges Preparing for Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    At the time of writing, the first community colleges in Ontario were preparing for transition to an accreditation model from an audit system. This paper revisits constructivist literature, arguing that a more pragmatic definition of constructivism effectively blends positivist and interactionist philosophies to achieve both student centred…

  7. 240 CITE: D. Catling (2009) "Revisiting Darwin's Voyage", in Darwin: For The Love of Science (Eds. A. Kelly and M. Kelly), Bristol Cultural Development Partnership, Bristol, England, pp.240-251. Revisiting Darwin's Voyage 241 Charles Darwin's voyage aroun

    E-print Network

    Winglee, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    -251. Revisiting Darwin's Voyage 241 Charles Darwin's voyage around the world from 1831 to 1836 on HMS Beagle240 CITE: D. Catling (2009) "Revisiting Darwin's Voyage", in Darwin: For The Love of Science (Eds photographs in this chapter are by the author). ReVISItINg DaRwIN'S Voyage by David Catling (dcatling

  8. Regional vulnerability of longitudinal cortical association connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ceschin, Rafael; Lee, Vince K.; Schmithorst, Vince; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Preterm born children with spastic diplegia type of cerebral palsy and white matter injury or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), are known to have motor, visual and cognitive impairments. Most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies performed in this group have demonstrated widespread abnormalities using averaged deterministic tractography and voxel-based DTI measurements. Little is known about structural network correlates of white matter topography and reorganization in preterm cerebral palsy, despite the availability of new therapies and the need for brain imaging biomarkers. Here, we combined novel post-processing methodology of probabilistic tractography data in this preterm cohort to improve spatial and regional delineation of longitudinal cortical association tract abnormalities using an along-tract approach, and compared these data to structural DTI cortical network topology analysis. DTI images were acquired on 16 preterm children with cerebral palsy (mean age 5.6 ± 4) and 75 healthy controls (mean age 5.7 ± 3.4). Despite mean tract analysis, Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) demonstrating diffusely reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) reduction in all white matter tracts, the along-tract analysis improved the detection of regional tract vulnerability. The along-tract map-structural network topology correlates revealed two associations: (1) reduced regional posterior–anterior gradient in FA of the longitudinal visual cortical association tracts (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, optic radiation, posterior thalamic radiation) correlated with reduced posterior–anterior gradient of intra-regional (nodal efficiency) metrics with relative sparing of frontal and temporal regions; and (2) reduced regional FA within frontal–thalamic–striatal white matter pathways (anterior limb/anterior thalamic radiation, superior longitudinal fasciculus and cortical spinal tract) correlated with alteration in eigenvector centrality, clustering coefficient (inter-regional) and participation co-efficient (inter-modular) alterations of frontal–striatal and fronto-limbic nodes suggesting re-organization of these pathways. Both along tract and structural topology network measurements correlated strongly with motor and visual clinical outcome scores. This study shows the value of combining along-tract analysis and structural network topology in depicting not only selective parietal occipital regional vulnerability but also reorganization of frontal–striatal and frontal–limbic pathways in preterm children with cerebral palsy. These finding also support the concept that widespread, but selective posterior–anterior neural network connectivity alterations in preterm children with cerebral palsy likely contribute to the pathogenesis of neurosensory and cognitive impairment in this group. PMID:26509119

  9. Five years on: Revisiting GSN data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, L. S.; Nettles, M.; Ekstrom, G.; Davis, J. P.; Ringler, A. T.; Storm, T. L.; Wilson, D.; Anderson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    In 2010, the Lamont Waveform Quality Center (WQC) conducted an in-depth review of ten stations in the Global Seismographic Network (GSN). IU stations (CASY, DAV, KIP, KONO, WCI), IC stations (SSE, XAN), and II stations (ALE, DGAR, RPN) were analyzed using a scaling analysis based on data-synthetic comparisons, evaluation of noise levels, assessment of inter-sensor coherence, and polarization analysis. These reports (available from http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/~ekstrom/Projects/WQC.html) highlighted a number of significant problems in GSN data quality, including the frequency-dependent loss of gain in the STS-1 seismometer (Ekström et al., 2006) that has been attributed to the presence of humidity in the electronics, cables, and connectors (Yuki and Ishihara, 2002; Hutt and Ringler, 2011). The reports from the WQC spurred a number of changes in the operation of the GSN, including the adoption of the policy of annual calibrations and the development of new tools and metrics to monitor, evaluate, and communicate data quality. In parallel, the USGS' Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) and UCSD's Project IDA worked with the IRIS Consortium to upgrade GSN stations with new data acquisition systems, to refurbish the STS-1 seismometers with new electronics, and to expand the deployment of secondary broadband sensors. We revisit the 2010 reports, using the tools of the WQC as well as a number of newly developed tools such as the USGS' Data Quality Analyzer and IRIS' MUSTANG, and provide an update on GSN data quality. Our initial focus is on CASY and KIP, the first two stations reviewed by the WQC. Our goal is to evaluate progress in the last five years and assess our ability to quantify data quality as well as to identify potential problems that could compromise data quality in the future. Ekström, G., C. A. Dalton, and M. Nettles (2006). Observations of time-dependent errors in long-period instrument gain at global seismic stations. Seismological Research Letters, 77 (1), 12-22. Hutt, C.R. and A.T. Ringler (2011). Some possible causes of and corrections for STS-1 response changes in the Global Seismographic Network, Seis. Res. Lett., 82 (4), 560-571. Yuki, Y., and Y. Ishihara (2002). Methods for maintaining the performance of STS-1 seismometer. Frontier Research on Earth Evolution 2, 1-5.

  10. LETTER TO THE EDITOR Reply to: Comment on ``Revisiting the Ramachandran plot from a new angle''

    E-print Network

    Regan, Lynne

    LETTER TO THE EDITOR Reply to: Comment on ``Revisiting the Ramachandran plot from a new angle on ``Revisiting the Ramachandran plot from a new angle'' assert that sidechain hydrogen bonding is the primary 40 ). Our manuscript ``revis- iting the Ramachandran plot from a new angle''2 shows that steric

  11. Security of Blind Signatures Revisited Dominique Schroder 1 and Dominique Unruh2

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Security of Blind Signatures Revisited Dominique Schr¨oder 1 and Dominique Unruh2 1 University of Maryland, USA 2 University of Tartu, Estonia Abstract. We revisit the definition of unforgeability of blind that this established definition falls short in two ways of what one would intuitively expect from a secure blind

  12. Revisiting Read Wear: Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of a Footprints Scrollbar

    E-print Network

    Greenberg, Saul

    Revisiting Read Wear: Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of a Footprints Scrollbar Jason Alexander1. Document revisitation, read wear, scrolling. ACM Classification Keywords. H.5. Information interfaces of the entire document. Hill et al. [18] used a similar approach to denote the read wear that occurs with use

  13. On the Joint Security of Encryption and Signature, Revisited Kenneth G. Paterson1

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    On the Joint Security of Encryption and Signature, Revisited Kenneth G. Paterson1 , Jacob C for Information Security, AIST, Japan 3 University of Bristol Abstract. We revisit the topic of joint security and are sometimes used in practice. We give a general construction for a combined public key scheme having joint

  14. StateTransition Machines, Revisited David A. Schmidt # (schmidt@cis.ksu.edu)

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, David A.

    State­Transition Machines, Revisited David A. Schmidt # (schmidt@cis.ksu.edu) Computing+Business Media, Inc. Manufactured in The Netherlands. revisited.tex; 25/09/2006; 12:40; p.1 #12; 2 of BË?ohm trees

  15. The Revisiting Problem in Mobile Robot Map Building: A Hierarchical Bayesian Approach

    E-print Network

    Washington at SeattleUniversity of

    The Revisiting Problem in Mobile Robot Map Building: A Hierarchical Bayesian Approach Benjamin of hierarchical Bayesian estimation to robot map building. The revisiting problem occurs when a robot has problems in mobile robotics. As a robot explores an unknown environment, it incrementally builds a map

  16. A Hierarchical Bayesian Approach to the Revisiting Problem in Mobile Robot Map Building

    E-print Network

    Washington at SeattleUniversity of

    A Hierarchical Bayesian Approach to the Revisiting Problem in Mobile Robot Map Building Dieter Fox1 present an application of hierarchical Bayesian estimation to robot map build- ing. The revisiting problem of the fundamental problems in mobile robotics. As a robot explores an unknown environment, it incrementally builds

  17. Unwarranted Return: A Response to McVee, Dunsmore, and Gavelek's (2005) "Schema Theory Revisited"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasny, Karen A.; Sadoski, Mark; Paivio, Allan

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to McVee, Dunsmore, and Gavelek's "Schema Theory Revisited." In "Schema Theory Revisited," McVee, Dunsmore, and Gavelek (2005) proposed a rearticulation of schema theory intended to encompass the ideas that schemata and other cognitive processes are embodied, that knowledge is situated in the transaction…

  18. Revisiting ADOPT-ing and its Feedback Schemes Marius C. Silaghi

    E-print Network

    Yokoo, Makoto

    Revisiting ADOPT-ing and its Feedback Schemes Marius C. Silaghi Florida Institute of Technology Makoto Yokoo Kyushu University Abstract Here we revisit ADOPT-ing and bring two new contribu- tions. One of ADOPT- ing can be removed without effects on efficiency while de- creasing the space complexity

  19. Effects of a Balanced Translocation between Chromosomes 1 and 11 Disrupting the DISC1 Locus on White Matter Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, Heather C.; Dimitrova, Rali; Sprooten, Emma; Dauvermann, Maria R.; Romaniuk, Liana; Duff, Barbara; Watson, Andrew R.; Moorhead, Bill; Bastin, Mark; Semple, Scott I.; Giles, Stephen; Hall, Jeremy; Thomson, Pippa; Roberts, Neil; Hughes, Zoe A.; Brandon, Nick J.; Dunlop, John; Whitcher, Brandon; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Lawrie, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Individuals carrying rare, but biologically informative genetic variants provide a unique opportunity to model major mental illness and inform understanding of disease mechanisms. The rarity of such variations means that their study involves small group numbers, however they are amongst the strongest known genetic risk factors for major mental illness and are likely to have large neural effects. DISC1 (Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1) is a gene containing one such risk variant, identified in a single Scottish family through its disruption by a balanced translocation of chromosomes 1 and 11; t(1;11) (q42.1;q14.3). Method Within the original pedigree, we examined the effects of the t(1;11) translocation on white matter integrity, measured by fractional anisotropy (FA). This included family members with (n = 7) and without (n = 13) the translocation, along with a clinical control sample of patients with psychosis (n = 34), and a group of healthy controls (n = 33). Results We report decreased white matter integrity in five clusters in the genu of the corpus callosum, the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, acoustic radiation and fornix. Analysis of the mixed psychosis group also demonstrated decreased white matter integrity in the above regions. FA values within the corpus callosum correlated significantly with positive psychotic symptom severity. Conclusions We demonstrate that the t(1;11) translocation is associated with reduced white matter integrity in frontal commissural and association fibre tracts. These findings overlap with those shown in affected patients with psychosis and in DISC1 animal models and highlight the value of rare but biologically informative mutations in modeling psychosis. PMID:26102360

  20. Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

  1. Diffuse alterations in grey and white matter associated with cognitive impairment in Shwachman–Diamond syndrome: Evidence from a multimodal approach

    PubMed Central

    Perobelli, Sandra; Alessandrini, Franco; Zoccatelli, Giada; Nicolis, Elena; Beltramello, Alberto; Assael, Baroukh M.; Cipolli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Shwachman–Diamond syndrome is a rare recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in SBDS gene, at chromosome 7q11. Phenotypically, the syndrome is characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, bone marrow dysfunction, skeletal dysplasia and variable cognitive impairments. Structural brain abnormalities (smaller head circumference and decreased brain volume) have also been reported. No correlation studies between brain abnormalities and neuropsychological features have yet been performed. In this study we investigate neuroanatomical findings, neurofunctional pathways and cognitive functioning of Shwachman–Diamond syndrome subjects compared with healthy controls. To be eligible for inclusion, participants were required to have known SBDS mutations on both alleles, no history of cranial trauma or any standard contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging. Appropriate tests were used to assess cognitive functions. The static images were acquired on a 3 × 0 T magnetic resonance scanner and blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected both during the execution of the Stroop task and at rest. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to assess brain white matter. The Tract-based Spatial Statistics package and probabilistic tractography were used to characterize white matter pathways. Nine participants (5 males), half of all the subjects aged 9–19 years included in the Italian Shwachman–Diamond Syndrome Registry, were evaluated and compared with nine healthy subjects, matched for sex and age. The patients performed less well than norms and controls on cognitive tasks (p = 0.0002). Overall, cortical thickness was greater in the patients, both in the left (+10%) and in the right (+15%) hemisphere, significantly differently increased in the temporal (left and right, p = 0.04), and right parietal (p = 0.03) lobes and in Brodmann area 44 (p = 0.04) of the right frontal lobe. The greatest increases were observed in the left limbic-anterior cingulate cortex (?43%, p < 0.0004). Only in Broca's area in the left hemisphere did the patients show a thinner cortical thickness than that of controls (p = 0.01). Diffusion tensor imaging showed large, significant difference increases in both fractional anisotropy (+37%, p < 0.0001) and mean diffusivity (+35%, p < 0.005); the Tract-based Spatial Statistics analysis identified six abnormal clusters of white matter fibres in the fronto-callosal, right fronto-external capsulae, left fronto-parietal, right pontine, temporo-mesial and left anterior–medial–temporal regions. Brain areas activated during the Stroop task and those active during the resting state, are different, fewer and smaller in patients and correlate with worse performance (p = 0.002). Cognitive impairment in Shwachman–Diamond syndrome subjects is associated with diffuse brain anomalies in the grey matter (verbal skills with BA44 and BA20 in the right hemisphere; perceptual skills with BA5, 37, 20, 21, 42 in the left hemisphere) and white matter connectivity (verbal skills with alterations in the fronto-occipital fasciculus and with the inferior-longitudinal fasciculus; perceptual skills with the arcuate fasciculus, limbic and ponto-cerebellar fasciculus; memory skills with the arcuate fasciculus; executive functions with the anterior cingulated and arcuate fasciculus). PMID:25844324

  2. Diffuse alterations in grey and white matter associated with cognitive impairment in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome: evidence from a multimodal approach.

    PubMed

    Perobelli, Sandra; Alessandrini, Franco; Zoccatelli, Giada; Nicolis, Elena; Beltramello, Alberto; Assael, Baroukh M; Cipolli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a rare recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in SBDS gene, at chromosome 7q11. Phenotypically, the syndrome is characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, bone marrow dysfunction, skeletal dysplasia and variable cognitive impairments. Structural brain abnormalities (smaller head circumference and decreased brain volume) have also been reported. No correlation studies between brain abnormalities and neuropsychological features have yet been performed. In this study we investigate neuroanatomical findings, neurofunctional pathways and cognitive functioning of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome subjects compared with healthy controls. To be eligible for inclusion, participants were required to have known SBDS mutations on both alleles, no history of cranial trauma or any standard contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging. Appropriate tests were used to assess cognitive functions. The static images were acquired on a 3 × 0 T magnetic resonance scanner and blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected both during the execution of the Stroop task and at rest. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to assess brain white matter. The Tract-based Spatial Statistics package and probabilistic tractography were used to characterize white matter pathways. Nine participants (5 males), half of all the subjects aged 9-19 years included in the Italian Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Registry, were evaluated and compared with nine healthy subjects, matched for sex and age. The patients performed less well than norms and controls on cognitive tasks (p = 0.0002). Overall, cortical thickness was greater in the patients, both in the left (+10%) and in the right (+15%) hemisphere, significantly differently increased in the temporal (left and right, p = 0.04), and right parietal (p = 0.03) lobes and in Brodmann area 44 (p = 0.04) of the right frontal lobe. The greatest increases were observed in the left limbic-anterior cingulate cortex (?43%, p < 0.0004). Only in Broca's area in the left hemisphere did the patients show a thinner cortical thickness than that of controls (p = 0.01). Diffusion tensor imaging showed large, significant difference increases in both fractional anisotropy (+37%, p < 0.0001) and mean diffusivity (+35%, p < 0.005); the Tract-based Spatial Statistics analysis identified six abnormal clusters of white matter fibres in the fronto-callosal, right fronto-external capsulae, left fronto-parietal, right pontine, temporo-mesial and left anterior-medial-temporal regions. Brain areas activated during the Stroop task and those active during the resting state, are different, fewer and smaller in patients and correlate with worse performance (p = 0.002). Cognitive impairment in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome subjects is associated with diffuse brain anomalies in the grey matter (verbal skills with BA44 and BA20 in the right hemisphere; perceptual skills with BA5, 37, 20, 21, 42 in the left hemisphere) and white matter connectivity (verbal skills with alterations in the fronto-occipital fasciculus and with the inferior-longitudinal fasciculus; perceptual skills with the arcuate fasciculus, limbic and ponto-cerebellar fasciculus; memory skills with the arcuate fasciculus; executive functions with the anterior cingulated and arcuate fasciculus). PMID:25844324

  3. Reading Impairment in a Patient with Missing Arcuate Fasciculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauschecker, Andreas M.; Deutsch, Gayle K.; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Schwartzman, Armin; Perry, Lee M.; Dougherty, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the case of a child ("S") who was treated with radiation therapy at age 5 for a recurrent malignant brain tumor. Radiation successfully abolished the tumor but caused radiation-induced tissue necrosis, primarily affecting cerebral white matter. "S" was introduced to us at age 15 because of her profound dyslexia. We assessed cognitive…

  4. A practical method of predicting client revisit intention in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyun Jick

    2005-01-01

    Data mining (DM) models are an alternative to traditional statistical methods for examining whether higher customer satisfaction leads to higher revisit intention. This study used a total of 906 outpatients' satisfaction data collected from a nationwide survey interviews conducted by professional interviewers on a face-to-face basis in South Korea, 1998. Analyses showed that the relationship between overall satisfaction with hospital services and outpatients' revisit intention, along with word-of-mouth recommendation as intermediate variables, developed into a nonlinear relationship. The five strongest predictors of revisit intention were overall satisfaction, intention to recommend to others, awareness of hospital promotion, satisfaction with physician's kindness, and satisfaction with treatment level. PMID:15923917

  5. Dark matter relic density in scalar-tensor gravity revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, Michael T.; Whittingham, Ian B.

    2015-12-01

    We revisit the calculation of dark matter relic abundances in scalar-tensor gravity using a generic form A(varphi*) = e?varphi*2/2 for the coupling between the scalar field varphi* and the metric, for which detailed Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints are available. We find that BBN constraints restrict the modified expansion rate in these models to be almost degenerate with the standard expansion history at the time of dark matter decoupling. In this case the maximum level of enhancement of the dark matter relic density was found to be a factor of ~ 3, several orders of magnitude below that found in previous investigations.

  6. Hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian chain statistics revisited

    E-print Network

    P. Polinska; C. Gillig; J. P. Wittmer; J. Baschnagel

    2015-08-15

    Conformational properties of regular dendrimers and more general hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian statistics for the spacer chains between branching points are revisited numerically. We investigate the scaling for asymptotically long chains especially for fractal dimensions $d_f = 3$ (marginally compact) and $d_f = 2.5$ (diffusion limited aggregation). Power-law stars obtained by imposing the number of additional arms per generation are compared to truly self-similar stars. We discuss effects of weak excluded volume interactions and sketch the regime where the Gaussian approximation should hold in dense solutions and melts for sufficiently large spacer chains.

  7. Chaos control: The problem of a bouncing ball revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M. Cristina; Huerta, D. A.; Sosa, Victor

    2009-09-01

    The problem of a body bouncing on a periodically oscillating surface is revisited to demonstrate chaos control. When the bouncing body is magnetic, it is possible to modify its behavior by adding a magnetic driving force. The mechanism of chaos control may be understood by means of a mechanical analysis which shows that the main result of applying the driving force is to shift the bifurcation diagram in such a way that chaotic behavior is replaced by periodic behavior and vice versa. A simple experiment is presented, along with a numerical simulation, that provides insight into chaos control.

  8. Revisiting the Level Scheme of the Proton Emitter 151Lu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Sun, B. H.; Liu, Z.; Scholey, C.; Ashley, S. F.; Bianco, L.; Cullen, D. M.; Cullen, I. J.; Darby, I. G.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jones, G. A.; Jones, P.; Joss, D. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kettelhut, S.; Khan, S.; Kishada, A.; Leino, M.; Niikura, M.; Nyman, M.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Pietri, S.; Podolyak, Z.; Rahkila, P.; Rigby, S.; Saren, J.; Seweryniak, D.; Shizuma, T.; Simpson, J.; Sorri, J.; Steer, S.; Thompson, N. J.; Uusitalo, J.; Walker, P. M.; Williams, S.

    An experiment aiming to search for new isomers in the region of proton emitter 151Lu was performed at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä (JYFL), by combining the high resolution ?-ray array JUROGAM, gas-filled RITU separator and GREAT detectors with the triggerless total data readout acquisition (TDR) system. In this proceeding, we revisit the level scheme of 151Lu by using the proton-tagging technique. A level scheme consistent with the latest experimental results is obtained, and 3 additional levels are identified at high excitation energies.

  9. Closed-set-based Discovery of Representative Association Rules Revisited

    E-print Network

    Balcázar, José L

    2010-01-01

    The output of an association rule miner is often huge in practice. This is why several concise lossless representations have been proposed, such as the "essential" or "representative" rules. We revisit the algorithm given by Kryszkiewicz (Int. Symp. Intelligent Data Analysis 2001, Springer-Verlag LNCS 2189, 350-359) for mining representative rules. We show that its output is sometimes incomplete, due to an oversight in its mathematical validation, and we propose an alternative complete generator that works within only slightly larger running times.

  10. A parcel of muddling muckworms’: revisiting Habermas and the Early Modern English coffee-houses 

    E-print Network

    Laurier, Eric; Philo, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the context of a research project concerned with contemporary cafés, one in which coffee-shops have loomed large, it has been appropriate to revisit Habermas’s famous 1962/1989 work on the transformation of the ‘public ...

  11. Thee'tale Tits process of Jordan algebras revisited Holger P. Petersson

    E-print Network

    Thee'tale Tits process of Jordan algebras revisited Holger. Geburtstag gewidmet 0. Introduction The 'etale Tits process, which was called the toral Tits process by Petersson-R* *acine [12], may be viewed as a Jordan-theoretical method

  12. Akihiro Kanamori Putnam's Constructivization Abstract. We revisit Putnam's constructivization argument from his Models and Real-

    E-print Network

    Kanamori, Akihiro

    Akihiro Kanamori Putnam's Constructivization Argument Abstract. We revisit Putnam be specifically seen and cast, respecting its underlying logic and in light of Putnam's contributions to mathematical logic. Keywords: constructibility, V = L, model-theoretic argument, metaphysical realism. Hilary

  13. Short Communication Revisit on the evolutionary relationship between alternative splicing and

    E-print Network

    Gu, Xun

    Short Communication Revisit on the evolutionary relationship between alternative splicing and gene duplication Alternative splicing Copy number variation Exon­intron structure Gene duplications and alternative sophisticated hypothesis, invoking that less alternative splicing genes tend to be duplicated more frequently

  14. Streptophyte Algae and the Origin of Land Plants Revisited Using Heterogeneous Models with Three New Algal

    E-print Network

    Davis, Charles

    Letter Streptophyte Algae and the Origin of Land Plants Revisited Using Heterogeneous Models algae, but different lineages of streptophytes have been suggested to be the sister group of land plants chloroplast genomes from streptophyte algae: Coleochaetae orbicularis (Coleochaetales), Nitella hookeri

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Food Services Revisited

    E-print Network

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Food Services....................................................................................... 4 Problems with UBC Food Services in Explorer (the formatting doesn't work in Netscape) #12;UBC Food Services Revisited From the Six Corners

  16. Revisiting the VLAD image representation Jonathan Delhumeau , Philippe-Henri Gosselin , Herv Jgou and Patrick Prez

    E-print Network

    Gosselin, Philippe-Henri

    Revisiting the VLAD image representation Jonathan Delhumeau , Philippe-Henri Gosselin , Hervé Jégou and Patrick Pérez· : INRIA Rennes · : Technicolor R&I, Rennes ABSTRACT Recent works on image retrieval have

  17. Plasmon-Assisted Two-Slit Transmission: Young's Experiment Revisited H. F. Schouten,1

    E-print Network

    Visser, Taco D.

    that lies at the heart of wave physics, namely, that of Thomas Young. We do, however, not focus on the wellPlasmon-Assisted Two-Slit Transmission: Young's Experiment Revisited H. F. Schouten,1 N. Kuzmin,2 G

  18. Revisiting the block method for evaluating thermal conductivities of clay and granite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of thermal conductivities of porous media using the contact method is revisited and revalidated with consideration of thermal contact resistance. Problems that limit the accuracy of determination of thermal conductivities of porous media are discussed. Thermal conductivities of granite...

  19. Virtual crystal approximation revisited: Application to dielectric and piezoelectric properties of perovskites

    E-print Network

    Vanderbilt, David

    to predict the anomalous dielectric and piezoelectric properties of perovskite solid solutions. A secondARTICLES Virtual crystal approximation revisited: Application to dielectric and piezoelectric properties of perovskites L. Bellaiche Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas

  20. Thermal conductivity of nanotubes revisited: Effects of chirality, isotope impurity, tube length, and temperature

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Thermal conductivity of nanotubes revisited: Effects of chirality, isotope impurity, tube length study the dependence of the thermal conductivity of single-walled nanotubes on chirality, isotope. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive

  1. Engineered nanoparticles: Revisiting safety concerns in light of ethno medicine

    PubMed Central

    Palkhiwala, Suhani; Bakshi, Sonal R.

    2014-01-01

    The nanoparticles are a miracle invention of the century that has opened novel avenues of applications in various fields. The safety aspect of exposure to nanoparticles for humans, plants, animals, soil micro-flora, and ecosystem at large has been questioned. The safety concern can be addressed by laboratory studies to assess the actual risk and recommend exposure limits and related regulation. There is also a suggestion for considering the nanoparticle form of conventional compounds as a new chemical and subject it to safety assessment in line with the chemical regulatory agencies. In the light of the current scenario of popularity and safety concerns regarding nanoparticles, the use of ancient metal based forms like, Bhasma is revisited in the present article. The current approach of green synthesis of nanoparticles is compared with the Ayurveda Rasayana Shastra guidelines of Bhasma preparation and modern preparation of engineered nanoparticles. Since the benefits of nanotechnology are undeniable, and safety concerns are also not ungrounded, there is a pressing need to revisit the ways nanoparticles are manufactured, and to carry out safety assessment by the techniques specially adapted for this novel compound. PMID:26664232

  2. Model & Main Result Mathematical setting revisited Discrete Duality Finite Volume Schemes DDFV Scheme for the Model Problem Convergence Analysis Convergence of finite volume schemes for

    E-print Network

    Jeanjean, Louis

    Model & Main Result Mathematical setting revisited Discrete Duality Finite Volume Schemes DDFV Scheme for the Model Problem Convergence Analysis Convergence of finite volume schemes revisited Discrete Duality Finite Volume Schemes DDFV Scheme for the Model Problem Convergence Analysis Plan

  3. Revisiting the scattering greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds

    E-print Network

    Kitzmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide ice clouds are thought to play an important role for cold terrestrial planets with thick CO2 dominated atmospheres. Various previous studies showed that a scattering greenhouse effect by carbon dioxide ice clouds could result in a massive warming of the planetary surface. However, all of these studies only employed simplified two-stream radiative transfer schemes to describe the anisotropic scattering. Using accurate radiative transfer models with a general discrete ordinate method, this study revisits this important effect and shows that the positive climatic impact of carbon dioxide clouds was strongly overestimated in the past. The revised scattering greenhouse effect can have important implications for the early Mars, but also for planets like the early Earth or the position of the outer boundary of the habitable zone.

  4. Energy in synthetic fertilizers and pesticides: Revisited. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, M.G.; English, B.C.; Turhollow, A.F.; Nyangito, H.O.

    1994-01-01

    Agricultural chemicals that are derived from fossil-fuels are the major energy intensive inputs in agriculture. Growing scarcity of the world`s fossil resources stimulated research and development of energy-efficient technology for manufacturing these chemicals in the last decade. The purpose of this study is to revisit the energy requirements of major plant nutrients and pesticides. The data from manufacturers energy survey conducted by The Fertilizer Institute are used to estimate energy requirements of fertilizers. Energy estimates for pesticides are developed from consulting previously published literature. The impact of technical innovation in the fertilizer industry to US corn, cotton, soybean and wheat producers is estimated in terms of energy-saving.

  5. How clonal are Neisseria species? The epidemic clonality model revisited

    PubMed Central

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    The three species Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Neisseria lactamica are often regarded as highly recombining bacteria. N. meningitidis has been considered a paradigmatic case of the “semiclonal model” or of “epidemic clonality,” demonstrating occasional bouts of clonal propagation in an otherwise recombining species. In this model, occasional clonality generates linkage disequilibrium in the short term. In the long run, however, the effects of clonality are countered by recombination. We show that many data are at odds with this proposal and that N. meningitidis fits the criteria that we have proposed for predominant clonal evolution (PCE). We point out that (i) the proposed way to distinguish epidemic clonality from PCE may be faulty and (ii) the evidence of deep phylogenies by microarrays and whole-genome sequencing is at odds with the predictions of the semiclonal model. Last, we revisit the species status of N. meningitidis, N. gonorrheae, and N. lactamica in the light of the PCE model. PMID:26195766

  6. Stimulated Brillouin scattering revisited: Strong coupling regime and Rabi splitting

    E-print Network

    Huy, Kien Phan; Tchahame, Joel Cabrel; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical waveguides is a fundamental interaction between light and acoustic waves mediated by electrostriction and photoelasticity. In this paper, we revisit the usual theory of this inelastic scattering process to get a joint system in which the acoustic wave is strongly coupled to the interference pattern between the optical waves. We show in particular that, when the optoacoustic coupling rate is comparable to the phonon damping rate, the system enters in the strong coupling regime, giving rise to avoided crossing of the dispersion curve and Rabi-like splitting. We further find that optoacoustic Rabi splitting could in principle be observed using backward stimulated Brillouin scattering in sub-wavelength diameter tapered optical fibers with moderate peak pump power.

  7. Impulsive Spot Heating and Thermal Explosion of Interstellar Grains Revisited

    E-print Network

    Ivlev, A V; Vasyunin, A; Caselli, P

    2015-01-01

    The problem of impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically, with the aim to better understand leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. It is rigorously shown that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., heating of mantles by cosmic rays), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number $\\lambda$. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: When $\\lambda$ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain -- this regime is commonly known as the whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of the physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, the calculations suggest tha...

  8. Feedback instability in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system: Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.-H.

    2010-02-15

    A coupled set of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic and the two-fluid equations is applied to the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) feedback interactions in relation to growth of quite auroral arcs. A theoretical analysis revisiting the linear feedback instability reveals asymptotic behaviors of the dispersion relation and a non-Hermite property in the M-I coupling. A nonlinear simulation of the feedback instability in the M-I coupling system manifests growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like mode in the magnetosphere as the secondary instability. The distorted vortex and field-aligned current profiles propagating as the shear Alfven waves lead to spontaneous deformation of ionospheric density and current structures associated with auroral arcs.

  9. Revisiting time reversal and holography with spacetime transformations

    E-print Network

    Bacot, Vincent; Eddi, Antonin; Fink, Mathias; Fort, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Wave control is usually performed by spatially engineering the properties of a medium. Because time and space play similar roles in wave propagation, manipulating time boundaries provides a complementary approach. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the relevance of this concept by introducing instantaneous time mirrors. We show with water waves that a sudden change of the effective gravity generates time-reversed waves that refocus at the source. We generalize this concept for all kinds of waves introducing a universal framework which explains the effect of any time disruption on wave propagation. We show that sudden changes of the medium properties generate instant wave sources that emerge instantaneously from the entire space at the time disruption. The time-reversed waves originate from these "Cauchy sources" which are the counterpart of Huygens virtual sources on a time boundary. It allows us to revisit the holographic method and introduce a new approach for wave control.

  10. Revisiting the 100 Year Old Radioactivity Lectures of Frederick Soddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, Christine

    2008-04-01

    Between 1908 and 1922, Frederick Soddy, MA., FRS (Dr. Lee`s Professor of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Univ. of Oxford) published four editions of a compendium of his experimental lectures delivered at the University of Glasgow, under the title ``The Interpretation of Radium, and the Structure of the Atom''. Professor Soddy taught his students about `radium writing' and the emanation of radium. He presented a radium clock designed by Professor Strutt; showed students `Pleochroic Halos'; and described the separation of `ionium' from its isotope, thorium. The process of constructing a cohesive logic to empirical observations of this newly discovered phenomenon of radioactivity was a challenging one. Some aspects did not stand the test of time. However, revisiting these lectures after 100 years gives us fascinating insight into the mental processes of the early pioneers in radioactivity.

  11. Neuroticism and vigilance revisited: A transcranial doppler investigation.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Arielle R; Becker, Alexandra; VanAndel, Aaron; Nelson, Andrew; Shaw, Tyler H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting for vigilance assignments remains an important factor in human performance research. The current study revisits the potential relationship between vigilance performance and trait neuroticism, in light of two possible theories. The first theory suggests that neuroticism impairs vigilance performance by competing for available resources. The second theory, attentional control theory, posits that high neuroticism can result in similar or superior performance levels due to the allocation of compensatory effort. In the present study, Transcranial Doppler Sonography was used to investigate the neurophysiological underpinnings of neuroticism during a 12-min abbreviated vigilance task. Performance results were not modified by level of neuroticism, but high neuroticism was associated with higher initial CBFV levels and a greater CBFV decrement over time. These findings indicate that participants higher in neuroticism recruited additional cognitive resources in order to achieve similar performance, suggesting that there is more of an effect on processing efficiency than effectiveness. PMID:26057404

  12. Reprogramming and the mammalian germline: the Weismann barrier revisited.

    PubMed

    Sabour, Davood; Schöler, Hans R

    2012-12-01

    The germline represents a unique cell type that can transmit genetic material to the next generation. During early embryonic development, somatic cells give rise to a small population of cells known as germ cells, which eventually differentiate into mature gametes. Germ cells undergo a process of removing and resetting relevant epigenetic information, mainly by DNA demethylation. This extensive epigenetic reprogramming leads to the conversion of germ cells into immortal cells that can pass on the genome to the next generation. In the absence of germline-specific reprogramming, germ cells would preserve the old, parental epigenetic memory, which would prevent the transfer of heritable information to the offspring. On the contrary, somatic cells cannot reset epigenetic information by preserving the full methylation pattern on imprinting genes. In this review, we focus on the capacity of germ cells and somatic cells (soma) to transfer genetic information to the next generation, and thus revisit the Weismann theory of heredity. PMID:22947493

  13. A short revisit to Kuo-Brown effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoBao; Dong, GuoXiang

    2015-10-01

    This paper is a short revisit to Kuo-Brown effective interaction derived from the Hamada-Johnston nucleon-nucleon potential, done by Gerry Brown and Tom Kuo. This effective interaction, derived in year 1966, is the first attempt to describe nuclear structure properties from the free nucleon-nucleon potential. Nowadays much progress has been achieved for the effective interactions in shell model. We would compare the effective interactions obtained in the 1966 paper with up-to-date shell-model interactions in sd-shell and pf-shell model space. Recent knowledge of effective interactions on nuclear structure, can also be traced in the Kuo- Brown effective interaction, i.e., the universal roles of central and tensor forces, which reminds us that such discovery should be noticed much earlier.

  14. How clonal are Neisseria species? The epidemic clonality model revisited.

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    The three species Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Neisseria lactamica are often regarded as highly recombining bacteria. N. meningitidis has been considered a paradigmatic case of the "semiclonal model" or of "epidemic clonality," demonstrating occasional bouts of clonal propagation in an otherwise recombining species. In this model, occasional clonality generates linkage disequilibrium in the short term. In the long run, however, the effects of clonality are countered by recombination. We show that many data are at odds with this proposal and that N. meningitidis fits the criteria that we have proposed for predominant clonal evolution (PCE). We point out that (i) the proposed way to distinguish epidemic clonality from PCE may be faulty and (ii) the evidence of deep phylogenies by microarrays and whole-genome sequencing is at odds with the predictions of the semiclonal model. Last, we revisit the species status of N. meningitidis, N. gonorrheae, and N. lactamica in the light of the PCE model. PMID:26195766

  15. Revisiting Mental Simulation in Language Comprehension: Six Replication Attempts

    PubMed Central

    Zwaan, Rolf A.; Pecher, Diane

    2012-01-01

    The notion of language comprehension as mental simulation has become popular in cognitive science. We revisit some of the original empirical evidence for this. Specifically, we attempted to replicate the findings from earlier studies that examined the mental simulation of object orientation, shape, and color, respectively, in sentence-picture verification. For each of these sets of findings, we conducted two web-based replication attempts using Amazon's Mechanical Turk. Our results are mixed. Participants responded faster to pictures that matched the orientation or shape implied by the sentence, replicating the original findings. The effect was larger and stronger for shape than orientation. Participants also responded faster to pictures that matched the color implied by the sentence, whereas the original studies obtained mismatch advantages. We argue that these results support mental simulation theory, show the importance of replication studies, and show the viability of web-based data collection. PMID:23300547

  16. Revisiting NMR composite pulses for broadband 2H excitation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ming; Roopchand, Rabia; Mananga, Eugene S.; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Chen, Qun; Boutis, Gregory S.; Hu, Bingwen

    2014-01-01

    Quadrupolar echo NMR spectroscopy of static solids often requires RF excitation that covers spectral widths exceeding 100 kHz, which is difficult to obtain due to instrumental limitations. In this work we revisit four well-known composite pulses (COM-I, II, III and IV) for broadband excitation in deuterium quadrupolar echo spectroscopy. These composite pulses are combined with several phase cycling schemes that were previously shown to decrease finite pulse width distortions in deuterium solid-echo experiments performed with two single pulses. The simulations and experiments show that COM-II and IV composite pulses combined with an 8-step phase cycling aid in achieving broadband excitation with limited pulse width distortions. PMID:25583576

  17. Revisiting Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we revisit Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows. The oblique collision between a particle and a flat wall is analyzed by adopting the classic rigid-body theory and a more realistic semianalytical model. Based on the kinetic granular theory, the input parameter for the partial-slip boundary conditions, specularity coefficient, which is not measurable in experiments, is then interpreted as a function of the particle-wall restitution coefficient, the frictional coefficient, and the normalized slip velocity at the wall. An analytical expression for the specularity coefficient is suggested for a flat, frictional surface with a low frictional coefficient. The procedure for determining the specularity coefficient for a more general problem is outlined, and a working approximation is provided.

  18. Revisiting Public Health Challenges in the New Millennium

    PubMed Central

    Anish, TS; Sreelakshmi, PR

    2013-01-01

    Positive Health of the communities could only be brought out through the interrelationship between conventional health sector and other development sectors. It was a dream that came true when World Health Organization (WHO) accepted Primary Health Care (PHC) as the major tool to achieve its proposed goal of Health For All (HFA) by 2000 A.D., but we could not succeed as expected. Now we have the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), which place health at the heart of development but the achievements in health is still challenging. The literature search in this article has been conducted in Pub Med and Google scholar, with the aim to draw references to discuss the major health issues and ways to tackle them. The current article briefly narrates the burden and complexities of challenges faced by the present global health. Revisiting the concept of PHC and reaffirming our solidarity to this philosophy is the need of this hour. PMID:24116303

  19. The Randomized Iterate Revisited -Almost Linear Seed Length PRGs from A Broader Class of One-way Functions

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The Randomized Iterate Revisited - Almost Linear Seed Length PRGs from A Broader Class of One-way Functions Yu Yu Dawu Gu Xiangxue Li Jian Weng§ Abstract We revisit "the randomized iterate" technique abstract out a technical lemma (which is folklore in leakage resilient cryptography), and use it to provide

  20. Open mushrooms: stickiness revisited This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-print Network

    Goussev, Arseni O.

    Open mushrooms: stickiness revisited This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please) doi:10.1088/1751-8113/44/19/195102 Open mushrooms: stickiness revisited Carl P Dettmann and Orestis Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysA/44/195102 Abstract We investigate mushroom billiards, a class

  1. Eyeblink Classical Conditioning and Awareness Revisited Author(s): Michelle Papka, Richard B. Ivry and Diana S. Woodruff-Pak

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Lucia

    (CRs) has been debatedfor more than half a century(e.g., Grant, 1973;Kimble, 1962;Spence& Taylor,1951Eyeblink Classical Conditioning and Awareness Revisited Author(s): Michelle Papka, Richard B. Ivry;EYEBLINK CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND AWARENESS REVISITED MichellePapka,1RichardB. Ivry,2andDianaS. Woodruff

  2. Impulsive Spot Heating and Thermal Explosion of Interstellar Grains Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivlev, A. V.; Röcker, T. B.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P.

    2015-05-01

    The problem of the impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically with the aim of better understanding the leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. We rigorously show that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., the heating of mantles by cosmic rays (CRs)), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number ?. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: when ? exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain—this regime is commonly known as whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, our calculations suggest that heavy CR species (e.g., iron ions) colliding with dust are able to trigger the explosion. Based on recently calculated local CR spectra, we estimate the expected rate of explosive desorption. The efficiency of the desorption, which in principle affects all solid species independent of their binding energy, is shown to be comparable to other CR desorption mechanisms typically considered in the literature. Also, the theory allows us to estimate the maximum abundances of reactive species that may be stored in the mantles, which provides important constraints on the available astrochemical models.

  3. Advanced Single-Aisle Transport Propulsion Design Options Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Tong, Michael T.; Haller, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Future propulsion options for advanced single-aisle transports have been investigated in a number of previous studies by the authors. These studies have examined the system level characteristics of aircraft incorporating ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) turbofans (direct drive and geared) and open rotor engines. During the course of these prior studies, a number of potential refinements and enhancements to the analysis methodology and assumptions were identified. This paper revisits a previously conducted UHB turbofan fan pressure ratio trade study using updated analysis methodology and assumptions. The changes incorporated have decreased the optimum fan pressure ratio for minimum fuel consumption and reduced the engine design trade-offs between minimizing noise and minimizing fuel consumption. Nacelle drag and engine weight are found to be key drivers in determining the optimum fan pressure ratio from a fuel efficiency perspective. The revised noise analysis results in the study aircraft being 2 to 4 EPNdB (cumulative) quieter due to a variety of reasons explained in the paper. With equal core technology assumed, the geared engine architecture is found to be as good as or better than the direct drive architecture for most parameters investigated. However, the engine ultimately selected for a future advanced single-aisle aircraft will depend on factors beyond those considered here.

  4. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    PubMed Central

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided. PMID:26587391

  5. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today's periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  6. The Zeta Herculis binary system revisited. Calibration and seismology

    E-print Network

    P. Morel; G. Berthomieu; J. Provost; F. Thevenin

    2001-09-29

    We have revisited the calibration of the visual binary system Zeta Herculis with the goal to give the seismological properties of the G0 IV sub-giant Zeta Her A. We have used the most recent physical and observational data. For the age we have obtained 3387 Myr, for the masses respectively 1.45 and 0.98 solar mass, for the initial helium mass fraction 0.243, for the initial mass ratio of heavy elements to hydrogen 0.0269 and for the mixing-length parameters respectively 0.92 and 0.90 using the Canuto & Mazitelli (1991, 1992) convection theory. Our results do not exclude that Zeta Her A is itself a binary sub-system; the mass of the hypothetical unseen companion would be smaller than 0.05 solar mass. The adiabatic oscillation spectrum of Zeta Her A is found to be a complicated superposition of acoustic and gravity modes; some of them have a dual character. This greatly complicates the classification of the non-radial modes. The echelle diagram used by the observers to extract the frequencies will work for ell=0, 2, 3. The large difference is found to be of the order of 42 mu Hz, in agreement with the Martic et al. (2001) seismic observations.

  7. Magnetic field-gas density relation and observational implications revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritsis, A.; Panopoulou, G. V.; Mouschovias, T. Ch.; Tassis, K.; Pavlidou, V.

    2015-08-01

    We revisit the relation between magnetic-field strength (B) and gas density (?) for contracting interstellar clouds and fragments (or, cores), which is central in observationally determining the dynamical importance of magnetic fields in cloud evolution and star formation. Recently, it has been claimed that a relation B ? ?2/3 is statistically preferred over B ? ?1/2 in molecular clouds, when magnetic-field detections and non-detections from Zeeman observations are combined. This finding has unique observational implications on cloud and core geometry: the relation B ? ?2/3 can only be realized under spherical contraction. However, no indication of spherical geometry can be found for the objects used in the original statistical analysis of the B-? relation. We trace the origin of the inconsistency to simplifying assumptions in the statistical model used to arrive at the B ? ?2/3 conclusion and to an underestimate of observational uncertainties in the determination of cloud and core densities. We show that, when these restrictive assumptions are relaxed, B ? ?1/2 is the preferred relation for the (self-gravitating) molecular-cloud data, as theoretically predicted four decades ago.

  8. Rim curvature anomaly in thin conical sheets revisited

    E-print Network

    Jin W. Wang

    2011-12-01

    This paper revisits one of the puzzling behaviors in a developable cone (d-cone), the shape obtained by pushing a thin sheet into a circular container of radius $ R $ by a distance $ \\eta $ [E. Cerda, S. Chaieb, F. Melo, and L. Mahadevan, {\\sl Nature} {\\bf 401}, 46 (1999)]. The mean curvature was reported to vanish at the rim where the d-cone is supported [T. Liang and T. A. Witten, {\\sl Phys. Rev. E} {\\bf 73}, 046604 (2006)]. We investigate the ratio of the two principal curvatures versus sheet thickness $h$ over a wider dynamic range than was used previously, holding $ R $ and $ \\eta $ fixed. Instead of tending towards 1 as suggested by previous work, the ratio scales as $(h/R)^{1/3}$. Thus the mean curvature does not vanish for very thin sheets as previously claimed. Moreover, we find that the normalized rim profile of radial curvature in a d-cone is identical to that in a "c-cone" which is made by pushing a regular cone into a circular container. In both c-cones and d-cones, the ratio of the principal curvatures at the rim scales as $ (R/h)^{5/2}F/(YR^{2}) $, where $ F $ is the pushing force and $ Y $ is the Young's modulus. Scaling arguments and analytical solutions confirm the numerical results.

  9. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today’s periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  10. Revisiting the quantum Szilard engine with fully quantum considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hai; School of Information and Electronics Engineering, Shandong Institute of Business and Technology, Yantai 264000 ; Zou, Jian; Li, Jun-Gang; Shao, Bin; Wu, Lian-Ao; IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, ES-48011 Bilbao

    2012-12-15

    By considering level shifting during the insertion process we revisit the quantum Szilard engine (QSZE) with fully quantum consideration. We derive the general expressions of the heat absorbed from thermal bath and the total work done to the environment by the system in a cycle with two different cyclic strategies. We find that only the quantum information contributes to the absorbed heat, and the classical information acts like a feedback controller and has no direct effect on the absorbed heat. This is the first demonstration of the different effects of quantum information and classical information for extracting heat from the bath in the QSZE. Moreover, when the well width L{yields}{infinity} or the temperature of the bath T{yields}{infinity} the QSZE reduces to the classical Szilard engine (CSZE), and the total work satisfies the relation W{sub tot}=k{sub B}Tln2 as obtained by Sang Wook Kim et al. [S.W. Kim, T. Sagawa, S. De Liberato, M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 (2011) 070401] for one particle case. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the first time analyze the QSZE by considering energy level shifts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Find different roles played by classical and quantum information in the QSZE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of work extracted depends on the cyclic strategies of the QSZE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Verify that the QSZE will reduce to the CSZE in the classical limits.

  11. Revisiting multicomponent dark matter with new AMS-02 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Huang, Da; Lai, Chang

    2015-05-01

    We revisit the multicomponent leptonically decaying dark matter (DM) scenario to explain the possible electron/positron excesses with the recently updated AMS-02 data. We find that both the single- and two-component DM models can fit the positron fraction and e+/e- respective fluxes, in which the two-component ones provide better fits. However, for the single-component models, the recent AMS-02 data on the positron fraction limit the DM cutoff to be smaller than 1 TeV, which conflicts with the high-energy behavior of the AMS-02 total e++e- flux spectrum, while the two-component DM models do not possess such a problem. We also discuss the constraints from the Fermi-LAT measurement of the diffuse ? -ray spectrum. We show that the two-component DM models are consistent with the current DM lifetime bounds. In contrast, the best-fit DM lifetimes in the single-component models are actually excluded.

  12. Psychological Well-Being Revisited: Advances in Science and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ryff, Carol D.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the research and interventions that have grown up around a model of psychological well-being (Ryff, 1989) generated more than two decades ago to address neglected aspects of positive functioning, such as purposeful engagement in life, realization of personal talents and capacities, and enlightened self-knowledge. The conceptual origins of this formulation are revisited and scientific products emerging from six thematic areas are examined: (1) how well-being changes across adult development and later life, (2) what are the personality correlates of well-being, (3) how well-being is linked with experiences in family life, (4) how well-being relates to work and other community activities, (5) what are the connections between well-being and health, including biological risk factors, (6) and via clinical and intervention studies, how psychological well-being can be promoted for ever greater segments of society. Together, these topics illustrate flourishing interest across diverse scientific disciplines in understanding adults as striving, meaning-making, proactive organisms who are actively negotiating the challenges of life. A take-home message is that increasing evidence supports the health protective features of psychological well-being in reducing risk for disease and promoting length of life. A recurrent and increasingly important theme is resilience – the capacity to maintain or regain well-being in the face of adversity. Implications for future research and practice are considered. PMID:24281296

  13. Biogas from Macroalgae: is it time to revisit the idea?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The economic and environmental viability of dedicated terrestrial energy crops is in doubt. The production of large scale biomass (macroalgae) for biofuels in the marine environment was first tested in the late 1960’s. The culture attempts failed due to the engineering challenges of farming offshore. However the energy conversion via anaerobic digestion was successful as the biochemical composition of macroalgae makes it an ideal feedstock. The technology for the mass production of macroalgae has developed principally in China and Asia over the last 50 years to such a degree that it is now the single largest product of aquaculture. There has also been significant technology transfer and macroalgal cultivation is now well tried and tested in Europe and America. The inherent advantage of production of biofuel feedstock in the marine environment is that it does not compete with food production for land or fresh water. Here we revisit the idea of the large scale cultivation of macroalgae at sea for subsequent anaerobic digestion to produce biogas as a source of renewable energy, using a European case study as an example. PMID:23186536

  14. Automated Guidance for Thermodynamics Essays: Critiquing Versus Revisiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Dermot F.; Vitale, Jonathan M.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2015-05-01

    Middle school students struggle to explain thermodynamics concepts. In this study, to help students succeed, we use a natural language processing program to analyze their essays explaining the aspects of thermodynamics and provide guidance based on the automated score. The 346 sixth-grade students were assigned to either the critique condition where they criticized an explanation or the revisit condition where they reviewed visualizations. Within each condition, the student was assigned one of two types of tailored guidance based on the sophistication of their original essay. Both forms of guidance led to significant improvement in student understanding on the posttest. Guidance was more effective for students with low prior knowledge than for those with high prior knowledge (consistent with regression toward the mean). However, analysis of student responses to the guidance illustrates the value of aligning guidance with prior knowledge. All students were required to revise their essay as an embedded assessment. While effective, teachers involved in this study reported that revising is resisted by students and does not align with typical, vocabulary-focused classroom writing activities.

  15. Revisiting the sadomasochistic marriage: the paranoid-masochistic relationship.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The sadomasochistic marriage is thought to be very resistant to change because of the object relations of each member of a couple as well as the sadomasochistic dynamics within the couple. However, the picture may be even more complex because there are times when a psychoanalytic therapist may mistakenly believe he or she is treating a sadomasochistic couple when the couple actually is functioning in a paranoid-masochistic relationship. The present paper reexamines the sadomasochistic marriage by revisiting the work of Nydes, who formulated the concept of paranoid-masochism in individuals and contrasted it to the more commonly understood sadomasochist dynamic. This paper applies his concepts to couples: Just as we understand some couples to be sadomasochistic, other couples may have paranoid-masochistic dynamics, which may require a somewhat different kind of understanding and technical approach than the dynamics of a sadomasochistic couple at the same level of object relations. This may be the reason why some marriages, misdiagnosed as sadomasochistic, are even more difficult to treat than others, because they might be more accurately treated as paranoid-masochistic. PMID:25247285

  16. Quantization table design revisited for image/video coding.

    PubMed

    Yang, En-Hui; Sun, Chang; Meng, Jin

    2014-11-01

    Quantization table design is revisited for image/video coding where soft decision quantization (SDQ) is considered. Unlike conventional approaches, where quantization table design is bundled with a specific encoding method, we assume optimal SDQ encoding and design a quantization table for the purpose of reconstruction. Under this assumption, we model transform coefficients across different frequencies as independently distributed random sources and apply the Shannon lower bound to approximate the rate distortion function of each source. We then show that a quantization table can be optimized in a way that the resulting distortion complies with certain behavior. Guided by this new design principle, we propose an efficient statistical-model-based algorithm using the Laplacian model to design quantization tables for DCT-based image coding. When applied to standard JPEG encoding, it provides more than 1.5-dB performance gain in PSNR, with almost no extra burden on complexity. Compared with the state-of-the-art JPEG quantization table optimizer, the proposed algorithm offers an average 0.5-dB gain in PSNR with computational complexity reduced by a factor of more than 2000 when SDQ is OFF, and a 0.2-dB performance gain or more with 85% of the complexity reduced when SDQ is ON. Significant compression performance improvement is also seen when the algorithm is applied to other image coding systems proposed in the literature. PMID:25248184

  17. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training.

    PubMed

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-10-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided. PMID:26587391

  18. Groundwater and river water interaction on Cikapundung River: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darul, A.; Irawan, D. E.; Trilaksono, N. J.

    2015-09-01

    The interaction between groundwater and Cikapundung river water has not changed significantly in 16 years of period. This paper revisit the similar research based on 43 measurement points: 13 dug wells, 2 springs, and 24 river, distributed along the riverbank at Curug Dago to Batununggal segment. The field measurements were taken in rainy season of April to May 2014 using portable instruments. Six parameters were measured: water level, temperature, total dissolved solids (TDS), dissolved-oxygen (DO), and pH. The new model is unable to detect significant change in water flow, however it finds two local anomalies in Dago Pojok and Cikapayang area. Both locations show local drawdown circle which can induce influent stream in overal effluent environment. Moreover, water quality parameters indicate mixing processes between groundwater and river water, with erratic pattern both in effluent and influent stream. Also some DO and TDS readings exceed the permissible limit. These values suggest a lifted groundwater mineralization from organic and non-organic sources and change of chemical stability. The source of contamination is still under further examination.

  19. Finite size effect on classical ideal gas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S.; Mitra, J.; Bera, N.

    2015-09-01

    Finite size effects on classical ideal gas are revisited. The micro-canonical partition function for a collection of ideal particles confined in a box is evaluated using Euler-Maclaurin’s as well as Poisson's summation formula. In Poisson's summation formula there are some exponential terms which are absent in Euler-Maclaurin’s formula. In the thermodynamic limit the exponential correction is negligibly small but in the macro/nano dimensions and at low temperatures they may have a great significance. The consequences of finite size effects have been illustrated by redoing the calculations in one and three dimensions keeping the exponential corrections. Global and local thermodynamic properties, diffusion driven by the finite size effect, and effect on speed of sound have been discussed. Thermo-size effects, similar to thermoelectric effects, have been described in detail and may be a theoretical basis with which to design nano-scaled devices. This paper can also be very helpful for undergraduate and graduate students in physics and chemistry as an instructive exercise for a good course in statistical mechanics.

  20. Neural network modelling of CIMIS-ET0 (revisited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahart, R. J.; Ghani, N. Ab

    2009-04-01

    This paper will revisit the use of four independent hydrometeorological variables to predict 'reference crop evapotranspiration' in a neural network model - calculated as CIMIS-ET0 (Kisi, 2006; Aytek et al., 2008). The two earlier studies are coalesced and their published findings positioned in a broader environmental modelling context. Four models developed on similar datasets are compared and contrasted in the current exercise: a multiple linear regression model (MLIN: Pearson, 1896), a piecewise multiple linear regression model (M5 Model Tree; M5MT: Quinlan, 1992; Wang & Witten, 1997) and two neural network models developed on different optimisation algorithms - Conjugate Gradient (CGNN: Hestenes & Stiefel, 1952) and Levenberg-Marquet (LMNN: Levenberg, 1944; Marquardt, 1963). The results are presented using residual scatterplots so that the exact nature of the each individual modelling solution can be determined: permitting outputs to be interpreted in terms of structures, symmetries, orientations, local features and outliers. The reported inspection and interpretation of plots is matched against a selection of traditional numerical modelling statistics that were computed on HydroTest (http://www.hydrotest.org.uk; Dawson et al., 2007). The reported closeness of earlier neurocomputing outputs to predicted values estimated using a counterpart multiple linear regression model is explained in detail.

  1. Revisiting Interpretation of Canonical Correlation Analysis: A Tutorial and Demonstration of Canonical Commonality Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimon, Kim; Henson, Robin K.; Gates, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    In the face of multicollinearity, researchers face challenges interpreting canonical correlation analysis (CCA) results. Although standardized function and structure coefficients provide insight into the canonical variates produced, they fall short when researchers want to fully report canonical effects. This article revisits the interpretation of…

  2. Service-Learning in Crisis Communication Education: Revisiting Coombs' Objectives for the Crisis Communication Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maresh-Fuehrer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to revisit Coombs' suggestions for teaching the crisis communication course using service-learning as a framework. The author sought to assess the effectiveness of using this method in terms of the benefits to both students and the partnering organization and students' perceptions of whether they met the learning…

  3. CUCKOO HASHING REVISITED motivated by Luc Devroye, jointly worked out with Reinhard Kutzelnigg

    E-print Network

    Drmota, Michael

    CUCKOO HASHING REVISITED motivated by Luc Devroye, jointly worked out with Reinhard Kutzelnigg;Contents · Cuckoo Hashing · Cuckoo Graph · Random Bipartite Graphs · Asymptotic Results · Generating Functions · Double Saddle Points #12;Cuckoo Hashing [Pagh and Rodler, 2001] · 2 tables T1, T2 of size m · 2

  4. Revisiting Molecular Dissociation in Density Functional Theory: A Simple David G. Tempel,1

    E-print Network

    Revisiting Molecular Dissociation in Density Functional Theory: A Simple Model David G. Tempel,1 orbital has on the Kohn-Sham potential as the molecule dissociates. We repro- duce the characteristic step in the dissociation limit. We show that the onset of the step is coincident with the internuclear separation at which

  5. Sunday School Revisited: An Alternative to Christian Education of the Church Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Nam Soon

    2013-01-01

    This article attempts to demonstrate similarities between the socioeconomic, cultural, and religious contexts of 18th-century England and 21st-century Canada. Revisiting the Sunday School movement in 18th-century England provides insights for the development of renewed Sunday School models in the current Canadian context of transnational…

  6. The Penrose dodecahedron revisited Jordan E. Massad and P. K. Aravind

    E-print Network

    Aravind, Padmanabhan K.

    The Penrose dodecahedron revisited Jordan E. Massad and P. K. Aravind Physics Department, Worcester This paper gives an elementary account of the ``Penrose dodecahedron,'' a set of 40 states of a spin-3 2 particle used by Zimba and Penrose Stud. Hist. Phil. Sci. 24, 697­720 1993 to give a proof of Bell

  7. Revisiting Levy flight search patterns of wandering albatrosses, bumblebees and deer

    E-print Network

    Buldyrev, Sergey

    LETTERS Revisiting Le´vy flight search patterns of wandering albatrosses, bumblebees and deer importance1 , and exemplifies the wider scientific problem of optimizing search strategies2 . Le´vy flights,4 , such that clusters of short steps are con- nected by rare long steps. Le´vy flights display fractal properties, have

  8. Search Versus Knowledge in Game-Playing Programs Revisited Andreas Junghanns, Jonathan Schaeffer

    E-print Network

    Schaeffer, Jonathan

    to our under- standing of the relationship between search and knowledge in game-playing programs: FigureSearch Versus Knowledge in Game-Playing Programs Revisited Andreas Junghanns, Jonathan Schaeffer the performance of two-player game-playing programs has been on enhanced search, usually by faster hardware and

  9. Faug`ere's F5 Algorithm Revisited Thesis For The Degree Of

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Faug`ere's F5 Algorithm Revisited Thesis For The Degree Of Diplom-Mathematiker By Till Stegers`ere's F5 Algorithm 13 3.1 Syzygies and reductions to zero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3.2 Foundations of F5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 3.3 Pseudo

  10. DIVERGENCE TIMES AND THE EVOLUTION OF EPIPHYTISM IN FILMY FERNS (HYMENOPHYLLACEAE) REVISITED

    E-print Network

    DIVERGENCE TIMES AND THE EVOLUTION OF EPIPHYTISM IN FILMY FERNS (HYMENOPHYLLACEAE) REVISITED Sabine and Science, 4-1-1 Amakubo, Tsukuba 305-0005, Japan Although the phylogeny of the filmy fern family to examine the diversification of filmy ferns and the evolution of their ecology within a temporal context

  11. Beyond the Stars: Revisiting Virtual Cluster Embeddings Matthias Rost Carlo Fuerst Stefan Schmid

    E-print Network

    Schmid, Stefan

    Beyond the Stars: Revisiting Virtual Cluster Embeddings Matthias Rost Carlo Fuerst Stefan Schmid TU the application with the illusion of a virtual cluster: a star-shaped virtual network topology connecting virtual around the virtual cluster embedding problem. First, we show that the virtual cluster embedding problem

  12. Property Preserving Symmetric Encryption Revisited Sanjit Chatterjee1 and M. Prem Laxman Das2

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    ], attribute-based encryption [27, 25, 22], functional encryption [17, 1, 16, 15, 6, 26] and format preserving encryption of a quadratic residue based property. We observe that this property is captured by testingProperty Preserving Symmetric Encryption Revisited Sanjit Chatterjee1 and M. Prem Laxman Das2 1

  13. OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre,1,2

    E-print Network

    Howk, Jay Christopher

    OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre´,1,2 C. M. Oliveira,2 J. C. Howk,2 R. Ferlet,1 J gas-phase oxygen abundance along the sight lines toward 19 early-type Galactic stars at an average magÀ1 with a standard deviation of 15% is consistent with previous surveys. The mean oxygen abundance

  14. TC-Star: Cross-Language Voice Conversion Revisited David Sundermann1,2

    E-print Network

    Suendermann, David

    V T L T speech V T L S voice conversion speech synthesis text translation speech recognition FigureTC-Star: Cross-Language Voice Conversion Revisited David S¨undermann1,2 , Harald H¨oge1 , Antonio tasks is cross-language voice conver- sion. In the recent second evaluation campaign, five participants

  15. ON FREYD'S GENERATING HYPOTHESIS Abstract. We revisit Freyd's generating hypothesis in stable homotopy the-

    E-print Network

    Hovey, Mark

    ON FREYD'S GENERATING HYPOTHESIS MARK HOVEY Abstract. We revisit Freyd's generating hypothesis in stable homotopy the- ory. We derive new equivalent forms of the generating hypothesis and some new- quence of the generating hypothesis, that the homotopy of a finite spectrum that is not a wedge

  16. The Relationship between Undergraduate Attendance and Performance Revisited: Alignment of Student and Instructor Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, James W.; Perez-Batres, Luis A.; Coffey, Betty S.; Pouder, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the relationship between attendance and performance in the undergraduate university setting and apply agency theory in the instructor-student context. Building on agency theory propositions in the educational setting advanced by Smith, Zsidisin, and Adams (2005), we propose that the student and instructor must align goals to promote the…

  17. Revisiting nutrient utilization in the glacial Antarctic: Evidence from a new method for diatom-bound

    E-print Network

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    Revisiting nutrient utilization in the glacial Antarctic: Evidence from a new method for diatom of biologically available iron was not so great as to become significant relative to the iron supply from below to develop an adequate picture of the glacial Antarctic nutrient field. INDEX TERMS: 4806 Oceanography

  18. Hydrogen-induced intergranular failure in nickel revisited M.L. Martin a,e

    E-print Network

    Ritchie, Robert

    Hydrogen-induced intergranular failure in nickel revisited M.L. Martin a,e , B.P. Somerday b,e , R-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy, the basic mechanisms of hydrogen-induced intergranular in establishing the conditions for hydrogen-induced crack initiation and propagation along a grain boundary

  19. The Gulf of Lion continental margin (NW Mediterranean) revisited by IBS: an overview

    E-print Network

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    The Gulf of Lion continental margin (NW Mediterranean) revisited by IBS: an overview MICHEL St and mechanisms of extension of the continental margin. Structural and sedimentological studies onshore led a partitioning of the extensional deformation processes across the continental margin. 3D gravity modelling

  20. REVISITING THE CODON ADAPTATION INDEX FROM A WHOLE-GENOME PERSPECTIVE

    E-print Network

    Carbone, Alessandra

    at the interface between sequence analysis, gene expression prediction and genome comparison carried on in ourREVISITING THE CODON ADAPTATION INDEX FROM A WHOLE-GENOME PERSPECTIVE: GENE EXPRESSION, CODON BIAS functions. Statistical analysis of DNA sequences and in particular of codon bias were performed from

  1. Revisiting Disturbance: A New Guide for Keeping Dry Mixed Conifer Forests Healthy through Fuel Management

    E-print Network

    1 Revisiting Disturbance: A New Guide for Keeping Dry Mixed Conifer Forests Healthy through Fuel Program, has published A Comprehensive Guide to Fuel Management Practices for Dry Mixed Conifer Forests mixed conifer forests of western North America, we have learned the hard way that trying to extinguish

  2. Patterns and Procedural Content Generation Revisiting Mario in World 1 Level 1

    E-print Network

    Togelius, Julian

    populating the game world and together with quests, the story provide purpose to the challenges the playerPatterns and Procedural Content Generation Revisiting Mario in World 1 Level 1 Steve Dahlskog Malmö game. The types of game content that have been generated range from game worlds, levels and items

  3. Relative Age Effects and the PhD 1 Revisiting Gladwell's Hockey Players

    E-print Network

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Relative Age Effects and the PhD 1 Revisiting Gladwell's Hockey Players: Influence of Relative Age examine the influence of relative age effects (RAE) upon whether someone earns the PhD. Drawing, or conclusions contained in this report. #12;Relative Age Effects and the PhD 2 1. INTRODUCTION Parental

  4. Revisiting synchronous gamete release by fucoid algae in the intertidal zone: fertilization success and beyond?

    E-print Network

    Borges, Rita

    Revisiting synchronous gamete release by fucoid algae in the intertidal zone: fertilization success fertilization and settlement are critical processes linking adult and early juvenile life-history phases of fertilization success in this group. Temporal patterns and synchrony of spawning in natural populations

  5. DNA as Genetic Material: Revisiting Classic Experiments through a Simple, Practical Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malago, Wilson, Jr.; Soares-Costa, Andrea; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2009-01-01

    In 1928, Frederick Griffith demonstrated a transmission process of genetic information by transforming "Pneumococcus". In 1944, Avery et al. demonstrated that Griffith's transforming principle was DNA. We revisited these classic experiments in a practical class for undergraduate students. Both experiments were reproduced in simple, adapted forms.…

  6. Critical Language Awareness in the United States: Revisiting Issues and Revising Pedagogies in a Resegregated Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alim, H. Samy

    2005-01-01

    As scholars examine the successes and failures of more than 50 years of court-ordered desegregation since "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas," and 25 years of language education of Black youth since "Martin Luther King Elementary School Children v. Ann Arbor School District Board," this article revisits the key issues involved in those…

  7. The HMA-LMA Dichotomy Revisited: an Electron Microscopical Survey of 56 Sponge Species

    E-print Network

    Pawlik, Joseph

    The HMA-LMA Dichotomy Revisited: an Electron Microscopical Survey of 56 Sponge Species VOLKER. The dichotomy between high microbial abun- dance (HMA) and low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges has been long recognized. In the present study, 56 sponge species from three geographic regions (greater Ca- ribbean

  8. Where Are They Now? LJ Revisits a Decade's Worth of Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzyk, Raya

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author revisits 11 graduates who were profiled as part of LJ's annual Placements & Salaries issue. Armed with a library science degree from various institutions, they had just secured jobs in librarianship and were off to a good start forging their careers. Since then, they have worked at elementary school, college, and…

  9. Teacher Communication Concerns Revisited: Calling into Question the Gnawing Pull towards Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dannels, Deanna P.

    2015-01-01

    This study revisits the long-standing teacher communication concerns framework originating over three decades ago. Analysis of 10 years of contemporary GTA teacher communication concerns reveals a typology of 10 concerns, which taken together construct teaching as a process of negotiating relationships, managing identities, and focusing attention.…

  10. Behavioral/Cognitive Revisiting the Role of Infralimbic Cortex in Fear Extinction

    E-print Network

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    Behavioral/Cognitive Revisiting the Role of Infralimbic Cortex in Fear Extinction with Optogenetics) subregion of the medial prefrontal cortex in extinction of auditory fear conditioning. However in one of two phases: extinction training or extinction retrieval. Activating IL neurons during

  11. INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS AND GROUP PROCESSES Sex Differences in Mate Preferences Revisited: Do People Know What

    E-print Network

    Reber, Paul J.

    -relationship initiation. 1 Some evolutionary perspectives also predict that other sex differences will emerge within exclusively on the sex differences in the stated importance of physical attractiveness and earning prospectsINTERPERSONAL RELATIONS AND GROUP PROCESSES Sex Differences in Mate Preferences Revisited: Do

  12. Sanio's Laws revisited. Size-dependent1 changes in the xylem architecture of trees.2

    E-print Network

    Mencuccini, Maurizio

    1 Sanio's Laws revisited. Size-dependent1 changes in the xylem architecture of trees.2 3 4 5 6 7 construction costs associated with the xylem conduit walls. The model was run by7 either a) assuming constant calculated from the gross gains in carbon minus the construction costs of the xylem17 walls for varying

  13. FAULT ATTACKS ON PAIRING-BASED PROTOCOLS REVISITED SANJIT CHATTERJEE, KORAY KARABINA, AND ALFRED MENEZES

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    FAULT ATTACKS ON PAIRING-BASED PROTOCOLS REVISITED SANJIT CHATTERJEE, KORAY KARABINA, AND ALFRED MENEZES Abstract. Several papers have studied fault attacks on computing a pairing value e(P, Q), where P with specific symmetric pairings. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the fault attacks on a public

  14. The CH4 structure in Titan's upper atmosphere revisited R. V. Yelle,2

    E-print Network

    Yelle, Roger V.

    The CH4 structure in Titan's upper atmosphere revisited J. Cui,1 R. V. Yelle,2 D. F. Strobel,3 I. C the CH4 structure in Titan's upper atmosphere combining the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS on Titan. Ignoring ionospheric chemistry, the optimal CH4 loss rate is $3 Â 1027 sÀ1 or 80 kg sÀ1

  15. EPR before EPR: A 1930 Einstein-Bohr thought Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, Hrvoje

    2012-01-01

    In 1930, Einstein argued against the consistency of the time-energy uncertainty relation by discussing a thought experiment involving a measurement of the mass of the box which emitted a photon. Bohr seemingly prevailed over Einstein by arguing that Einstein's own general theory of relativity saves the consistency of quantum mechanics. We revisit

  16. Improving Revisitation in Fisheye Views with Visit Wear Amy Skopik and Carl Gutwin

    E-print Network

    Lawrie, Dawn J.

    Improving Revisitation in Fisheye Views with Visit Wear Amy Skopik and Carl Gutwin Computer Science to remember items and locations in the data space. In this paper we introduce the idea of visit wear in spaces affected by distortion. We outline the design dimensions of visit wear, and report on two studies

  17. Revisiting Read Wear: Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of a Footprints Scrollbar

    E-print Network

    Greenberg, Saul

    1 Revisiting Read Wear: Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of a Footprints Scrollbar Jason Alexander1, read wear, scrolling. ACM Classification Keywords. H.5. Information interfaces and presentation: User al. [18] used a similar approach to denote the read wear that occurs with use ­ the marks portray how

  18. Globalisation, the Singapore Developmental State and Education Policy: A Thesis Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopinathan, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article I revisit and extend arguments made in 1996 and 1997 about the relationship between globalisation, the state and education policy. I was particularly concerned then to see how a small but strong state, Singapore, was responding in the education arena to globalisation. I also wished to draw attention to the literature on the high…

  19. The Peter Effect Revisited: Reading Habits and Attitudes of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Anthony J.; Applegate, Mary DeKonty; Mercantini, Martha A.; McGeehan, Catherine M.; Cobb, Jeanne B.; DeBoy, Joanne R.; Modla, Virginia B.; Lewinski, Kimberly E.

    2014-01-01

    Certainly a primary goal of literacy education is the creation of avid, enthusiastic, and highly motivated readers. However, in this article revisiting the Peter Effect (Applegate & Applegate, 2004), researchers surveyed more than 1,000 college sophomores and found strikingly low levels of enthusiasm for reading. Only 46.6% of surveyed…

  20. Revisiting the Training of Logic Models of Protein Signaling Networks with a Formal

    E-print Network

    Schaub, Torsten

    Revisiting the Training of Logic Models of Protein Signaling Networks with a Formal Approach based encompassing hundreds of proteins. An approach to train (Boolean) logic models to high-throughput phospho. Keywords: Logic modeling, answer set programming, protein signaling networks 1 Introduction Cells perceive

  1. The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Joanne; Machin, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This report revisits the debate about why social mobility levels are relatively low in Great Britain and the United States of America compared to other countries. It focuses on three main areas within this debate: (1) the changing role of educational inequalities; (2) the expectation of ever higher levels of education as revealed in increasing…

  2. Bearing capacity of spatially random soil: the undrained clay Prandtl problem revisited

    E-print Network

    Bearing capacity of spatially random soil: the undrained clay Prandtl problem revisited D. V, an investigation has been performed into the bearing capacity of undrained clays with spatially vary- ing shear- tion of the soil's undrained shear strength impact on the statistics of the bearing capacity

  3. Nuclear winter revisited with a modern climate model and current nuclear arsenals: Still catastrophic consequences

    E-print Network

    Robock, Alan

    Nuclear winter revisited with a modern climate model and current nuclear arsenals: Still of climate model simulations of the response to smoke and dust from a massive nuclear exchange between the superpowers could be summarized as ``nuclear winter,'' with rapid temperature, precipitation, and insolation

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. , NO. , 1 Synthetic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Revisited

    E-print Network

    Maitra, Ranjan

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. , NO. , 1 Synthetic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Revisited Ranjan Maitra and John J. Riddles Abstract--Synthetic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an approach MAGNETIC Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a radiologic tool ([1], [2], [3]) used to visualize tissue structure

  5. Revisiting Ackermann-Hardness for Lossy Counter Machines and Reset Petri Nets

    E-print Network

    Doyen, Laurent

    Revisiting Ackermann-Hardness for Lossy Counter Machines and Reset Petri Nets Ph. Schnoebelen LSV verification problems for lossy channel systems are Ackermann-hard and hence cannot be answered in primitive counters and Reset Petri nets. Hardness Theorem (in the Introduction of [18]). Reachability, termination

  6. Tickets and Currencies Revisited: Extensions to Multi-Resource Lottery Scheduling

    E-print Network

    Tickets and Currencies Revisited: Extensions to Multi-Resource Lottery Scheduling David G. Sullivan, Robert Haas, Margo I. Seltzer Harvard University Abstract Lottery scheduling's ticket and currency and the current state of the system. We also propose flexible access controls for currencies through extensible

  7. Tickets and Currencies Revisited: Extensions to MultiResource Lottery Scheduling

    E-print Network

    Tickets and Currencies Revisited: Extensions to Multi­Resource Lottery Scheduling David G. Sullivan, Robert Haas, Margo I. Seltzer Harvard University Abstract Lottery scheduling's ticket and currency and the current state of the system. We also propose flexible access controls for currencies through extensible

  8. The Somigliana ring dislocation revisited 1. Papkovich potential solutions for dislocations in an infinite space

    E-print Network

    Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    The Somigliana ring dislocation revisited 1. Papkovich potential solutions for dislocations or couple, a dislocation or a dislo- cation loop (dipole). Within the framework of elasticity these entities wide application in elastic and plastic analysis. In fracture mechanics, for example, dislocation

  9. Commentary: Revisiting "Guidelines for Using Technology to Prepare Social Studies Teachers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartshorne, Richard; Waring, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    In Hicks, Lee, Berson, Bolick, and Diem (2014), the authors revisited and revised a series of principles focusing on the preparation of social studies teachers for using digital technologies in the classroom, originally presented in the inaugural issue of "Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education" (Mason et al., 2000).…

  10. REVISITING THE DEFINITION OF ANIMAL TOOL USE ST. AMANT & HORTON: ANIMAL TOOL USE

    E-print Network

    Young, R. Michael

    , continue to advance our understanding of the behavioral and cognitive capabilities of animals today researchers in animal behavior. In this article, we analyze the criteria on which definitions of tool use1 REVISITING THE DEFINITION OF ANIMAL TOOL USE ST. AMANT & HORTON: ANIMAL TOOL USE ROBERT ST. AMANT

  11. Resampling Methods Revisited: Advancing the Understanding and Applications in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan; Pan, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Resampling methods including randomization test, cross-validation, the jackknife and the bootstrap are widely employed in the research areas of natural science, engineering and medicine, but they lack appreciation in educational research. The purpose of the present review is to revisit and highlight the key principles and developments of…

  12. Revisiting the Age-Old Question: Does Money Matter in Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    This policy brief revisits the long and storied literature on whether money matters in providing a quality education. Increasingly, political rhetoric adheres to the unfounded certainty that money doesn't make a difference in education, and that reduced funding is unlikely to harm educational quality. Such proclamations have even been used to…

  13. The Concept of Experience by John Dewey Revisited: Conceiving, Feeling and "Enliving"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohr, Hansjorg

    2013-01-01

    "The concept of experience by John Dewey revisited: conceiving, feeling and 'enliving'." Dewey takes a few steps towards a differentiation of the concept of experience, such as the distinction between primary and secondary experience, or between ordinary (partial, raw, primitive) experience and complete, aesthetic experience. However, he does not…

  14. Atmospheric Entry Heating of Micrometeorites Revisited: Higher Temperatures and Potential Biases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, S.; Alexander, C. M. OD.

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric entry heating model of Love and Brownlee appears to have overestimated evaporation rates by as much as two orders of magnitude. Here we revisit the issue of atmospheric entry heating, using a revised prescription for evaporation rates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Revisiting the Metaphor of the Island: Challenging "World Culture" from an Island Misunderstood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappleye, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This article revisits the newly "discovered" island that world culture theorists have repeatedly utilised to explain their theoretical stance, conceptual preferences and methodological approach. Yet, it seeks to (re)connect world culture with the real world by replacing their imagined atoll with a real one--the island-nation of Japan. In…

  16. DAA-related APIs in TPM2.0 Revisited Trusted Computing and Information Assurance Laboratory

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    DAA-related APIs in TPM2.0 Revisited Li Xi Trusted Computing and Information Assurance Laboratory is implemented by several APIs which can be utilized as a static Diffie- Hellman oracle. In this paper, we how to utilize these DAA-related APIs to break forward anonymity. Then we propose new APIs which

  17. Asian Lifelong Learning in the Context of a Global Knowledge Economy: A Task Re-Visited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Soonghee

    2007-01-01

    This article revisits and reinterprets my previous paper. It is a snapshot of the lifelong learning system building in selected Asian countries, reflected in the mirror of the Asian Financial Crisis in the 1997s and the aftermath of that event. I reconsidered the arguments (1) the economic recession had delivered a global dimension of lifelong…

  18. Transformation of Learning in Education and Training: Key Qualifications Revisited. CEDEFOP Reference Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamarainen, Pekka, Ed.; Attwell, Graham, Ed.; Brown, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 15 papers examining European approaches to the theme of key qualifications. The following papers are included: "Key Qualifications Revisited: An Introduction" (Pekka Kamarainen); "Exploring Key Qualifications: Context, Theory, and Practice in Europe" (Pekka Kamarainen); "Rethinking Key Qualifications: Towards a New Framework"…

  19. Ever-fluctuating single enzyme molecules: Michaelis-Menten equation revisited

    E-print Network

    Kou, Samuel

    Ever-fluctuating single enzyme molecules: Michaelis-Menten equation revisited Brian P English1, Wei Kou3 & X Sunney Xie1 Enzymes are biological catalysts vital to life processes and have attracted description of catalytic activities for large ensembles of enzyme molecules. Here we tested the Michaelis

  20. Eggs as Energy: Revisiting the Scaling of Egg Size and Energetic Content Among Echinoderms

    E-print Network

    Eggs as Energy: Revisiting the Scaling of Egg Size and Energetic Content Among Echinoderms A. L-his- tory diversity, of which egg size is one fundamental param- eter. The size of an egg is generally. Egg size and energy are thought to scale isometrically. We investigated this relation- ship

  1. Re-Visit to the School Nurse and Adolescents' Medicine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borup, Ina K.; Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjorn E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine if students who re-visit the school nurse use medicines differently than other students when exposed to aches and psychological problems. Methods: The study includes all 11-, 13- and 15-year-old students from a random sample of schools in Denmark, response rate 87 per cent, n = 5,205. The data collection followed the…

  2. Observa(onal Constraints on Brown Dwarf Forma(on Revisited

    E-print Network

    Joergens, Viki

    Observa(onal Constraints on Brown Dwarf Forma(on Revisited Kevin Luhman (Penn State) #12;If a large frac(on of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs form (10x) IC348 Chamaeleon #12;Taurus Width of IMF and abundance of brown dwarfs

  3. Adaptation Versus Retrieval Trade-Off Revisited: an Analysis of Boundary Conditions

    E-print Network

    Muñoz-Avila, Héctor

    Adaptation Versus Retrieval Trade-Off Revisited: an Analysis of Boundary Conditions Stephen Lee-off between adaptation and retrieval effort traditionally held as a principle in case-based reasoning. This principle states that the time needed for adaptation reduces with the time spent searching for an adequate

  4. Validation of SeaWiFS chlorophyll a concentrations in the Southern Ocean: A revisit

    E-print Network

    Daly, Kendra L.

    Validation of SeaWiFS chlorophyll a concentrations in the Southern Ocean: A revisit Marina Marrari 15 July 2006 Abstract Surface chlorophyll a concentrations (Ca, mg m-3 ) in the Southern Ocean be attributed to the relatively low concentrations of chlorophyll b (Cb/Ca =0.023±0.034, n=482) and relatively

  5. The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited Ran Canetti y Oded Goldreich z Shai Halevi x

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited #3; Ran Canetti y Oded Goldreich z Shai Halevi x August 6 in the Random Oracle Model, and the security of the schemes that result from implementing the random oracle: There exist signature and encryption schemes that are secure in the Random Oracle Model, but for which any

  6. The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited \\Lambda Ran Canetti y Oded Goldreich z Shai Halevi x

    E-print Network

    Goldreich, Oded

    The Random Oracle Methodology, Revisited \\Lambda Ran Canetti y Oded Goldreich z Shai Halevi x of cryptographic schemes in the Random Oracle Model, and the security of the schemes that result from implementing the random oracle by so called ``cryptographic hash functions''. The main result of this paper is a negative

  7. Revisiting "Grutter" and "Gratz" in the Wake of "Fisher": Looking Back to Move Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledesma, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the University of Michigan's 2003 affirmative action cases, "Grutter v. Bollinger" and "Gratz v. Bollinger." Through the aid of critical textual analysis and critical race theory, the author looks back at the predominant narratives that framed the challenge to, and defense of, race-conscious affirmative action policy in the…

  8. Author's personal copy Revisiting dirt cracking as a physical weathering process in warm deserts

    E-print Network

    Dorn, Ron

    Author's personal copy Revisiting dirt cracking as a physical weathering process in warm deserts August 2011 Keywords: Calcrete Desert geomorphology Dust Nanoscale Physical weathering A half century ago and bedrock shatters. Although desert physical weathering by "dirt cracking" has occasionally been cited

  9. The Best and the Rest: Revisiting the Norm of Normality of Individual Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Boyle, Ernest, Jr.; Aguinis, Herman

    2012-01-01

    We revisit a long-held assumption in human resource management, organizational behavior, and industrial and organizational psychology that individual performance follows a Gaussian (normal) distribution. We conducted 5 studies involving 198 samples including 633,263 researchers, entertainers, politicians, and amateur and professional athletes.…

  10. Mentoring, Advocacy, and Leadership: Revisiting First-Year Student Advocate Award Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michelle M.; Anttonen, Ralph G.

    2007-01-01

    This study revisited research on award-winning campus leaders who were effective change agents working on the behalf of first-year students (Anttonen & Chaskes, 2002). Participants were recipients of the "Outstanding First-Year Student Advocate Award" given annually by the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in…

  11. Kunitz-type Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor Revisited: Refined Structure of its Complex with Porcine Trypsin

    E-print Network

    Suh, Se Won

    Kunitz-type Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor Revisited: Refined Structure of its Complex with Porcine-type trypsin inhibitor from soybean (STI) consists of 181 amino acid residues with two disul®de bridges. Its; soybean trypsin inhibitor; b-trefoil fold; inhibition of plasminogen activator*Corresponding author

  12. Gale-Shapley Stable Marriage Problem Revisited: Strategic Issues and Applications

    E-print Network

    Sethuraman, Jay

    Gale-Shapley Stable Marriage Problem Revisited: Strategic Issues and Applications (Extended studied by Gale and Shapley [2]. In a stable marriage problem we have two finite sets of players between the stable marriage model as described here, and the problem faced by the primary school students

  13. MOBILE ROBOT LOCALIZATION. REVISITING THE TRIANGULATION METHODS Josep Maria Font, Joaquim A. Batlle

    E-print Network

    Font, Josep Maria

    MOBILE ROBOT LOCALIZATION. REVISITING THE TRIANGULATION METHODS Josep Maria Font, Joaquim A. Batlle of the fundamental problems in mobile robot navigation. In this context, triangulation is used to determine the robot is the preferred one because it is independent of the robot heading. Nevertheless, it becomes undetermined when

  14. Decoding information in the honeybee dance: revisiting the tactile hypothesis Mariana Gil*, Rodrigo J. De Marco

    E-print Network

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    Decoding information in the honeybee dance: revisiting the tactile hypothesis Mariana Gil*, Rodrigo-00526 Keywords: Apis mellifera dance communication honeybee mechanosensory input tactile stimulus waggle dance The waggle dance of honeybees, Apis mellifera, is one of the most remarkable communication systems

  15. Revisiting a Limit on Efficient Quantum Computation Tarsem S. Purewal Jr.

    E-print Network

    Geller, Michael R.

    Revisiting a Limit on Efficient Quantum Computation Tarsem S. Purewal Jr. Department of Computer and no knowledge of quan- tum mechanics. Keywords Computational Complexity, Quantum Computing 1. INTRODUCTION In the race to build a quantum computer, the question of whether or not such a machine will be more useful

  16. Scheduling a Major College Basketball Conference|Revisited Technical Note, Revised Version ( rst submission: March 4 1998)

    E-print Network

    Henz, Martin

    Scheduling a Major College Basketball Conference|Revisited Technical Note, Revised Version (#12;rst;nding a timetable for the 1997/98 Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) in basketball. Their solution, found

  17. Large Torsional Oscillations in Suspension Bridges Revisited: Fixing an Old Approximation Author(s): P. J. McKenna

    E-print Network

    McKenna, Joseph

    Large Torsional Oscillations in Suspension Bridges Revisited: Fixing an Old Approximation Author to The American Mathematical Monthly. http://www.jstor.org #12;LargeTorsionalOscillations in SuspensionBridges

  18. Revisiting the Force-Joint Angle Relationship After Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Molly C; Allen, David L; Batliner, Matthew E; Byrnes, William C

    2015-12-01

    Welsh, MC, Allen, DL, Batliner, ME, and Byrnes, WC. Revisiting the force-joint angle relationship after eccentric exercise. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2015-The purpose of this study was to evaluate force-angle curve fitting techniques pre-eccentric exercise, quantify changes in curve characteristics postexercise, and examine the relationship between curve changes and markers of muscle damage. Fourteen males unaccustomed to eccentric exercise performed 60 eccentric muscle actions of the elbow flexors. Maximal voluntary isometric force was measured throughout a range of angles pre- (Pre1 and Pre2), immediately post (IP), and 1, 2, 4, and 7 days postexercise. Force-angle curves for each visit were constructed using second-order polynomials. Changes in curve characteristics (optimal angle, peak force, curve height), range of motion, soreness, and creatine kinase activity were quantified. Optimal joint angle and force at optimal angle were significantly correlated from Pre1 to Pre2 (ICC = 0.821 and 0.979, respectively). Optimal angle was significantly right shifted (p = 0.035) by 10.4 ± 12.9° from Pre2 to IP and was restored by 1 day post exercise. Interestingly, the r value for curve fit was significantly decreased (p < 0.001) from Pre2 (r = 0.896) to IP (r = 0.802) and 1 day post exercise (r = 0.750). Curve height was significantly decreased (39%) IP and restored to pre-exercise height by 4 days postexercise. There was no correlation between optimal angle or curve height and other damage markers. In conclusion, force-angle relationships can be accurately described using second-order polynomials. After eccentric exercise, the force-angle curve is flattened and shifted (downward and rightward), but these changes are not correlated to other markers of muscle damage. Changes in the force-angle relationship are multifaceted, but determining the physiological significance of these changes requires further investigation. PMID:25970492

  19. PHOTOEVAPORATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS REVISITED: THE DUST-FREE CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2013-08-20

    Photoevaporation by stellar ionizing radiation is believed to play an important role in the dispersal of disks around young stars. The mass-loss model for dust-free disks developed by Hollenbach et al. is currently regarded as the conventional one and has been used in a wide variety of studies. However, the rate in this model was derived using the crude so-called 1+1D approximation of ionizing radiation transfer, which assumes that diffuse radiation propagates in a direction vertical to the disk. In this study, we revisit the photoevaporation of dust-free disks by solving the two-dimensional axisymmetric radiative transfer for steady-state disks. Unlike that solved by the conventional model, we determine that direct stellar radiation is more important than the diffuse field at the disk surface. The radial density distribution at the ionization boundary is represented by a single power law with index -3/2 in contrast to the conventional double power law. For this distribution, the photoevaporation rate from the entire disk can be written as a function of the ionizing photon emissivity {Phi}{sub EUV} from the central star and the disk outer radius r{sub d} as follows: M-dot{sub PE} = 5.4 x 10{sup -5} ({Phi}{sub EUV}/10{sup 49} s{sup -1}){sup 1/2} (r{sub d}/1000 AU){sup 1/2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This new rate depends on the outer disk radius rather than on the gravitational radius as in the conventional model, because of the enhanced contribution to the mass loss from the outer disk annuli. In addition, we discuss its applications to present-day as well as primordial star formation.

  20. Cannabis arteritis revisited--ten new case reports.

    PubMed

    Disdier, P; Granel, B; Serratrice, J; Constans, J; Michon-Pasturel, U; Hachulla, E; Conri, C; Devulder, B; Swiader, L; Piquet, P; Branchereau, A; Jouglard, J; Moulin, G; Weiller, P J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to revisit the old concept of cannabis arteritis first described in the 1960s and report 10 new cases. Ten male patients, with a median age of 23.7 years developed subacute distal ischemia of lower or upper limbs, leading to necrosis in the toes and/or fingers and sometimes to distal limb gangrene. Two of the patients also presented with venous thrombosis and three patients were suffering from a recent Raynaud's phenomenon. Biological test results did not show evidence of the classical vascular risk factors for thrombosis. Arteriographic evaluation in all cases revealed distal abnormalities in the arteries of feet, legs, forearms, and hands resembling those of Buerger's disease. A collateral circulation sometimes with opacification of the vasa nervorum was noted. In some cases, arterial proximal atherosclerotic lesions and venous thrombosis were observed. All patients were moderate tobacco smokers and regular cannabis users. Despite treatment with ilomedine and heparin in all cases, five amputations were necessary in four patients. The vasoconstrictor effect of cannabis on the vascular system has been known for a long time. It has been shown that delta-8- and delta-9-tetrahydrocanabinols may induce peripheral vasoconstrictor activity. Cannabis arteritis resembles Buerger's disease, but patients were moderate tobacco smokers and regular cannabis users. These cases show that prolonged use of cannabis could be an additive risk factor for juvenile and young adult arteritis. Cannabis arteritis is a forgotten and severe occlusive vascular disease occurring in young adults. Search for cannabis use may be an important tool for a better knowledge of arteritis in young smokers. PMID:11205926

  1. The Lumbar Lordosis in Males and Females, Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Ori; Dar, Gali; Abbas, Janan; Stein, Dan; May, Hila; Masharawi, Youssef; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether differences exist in male and female lumbar lordosis has been debated by researchers who are divided as to the nature of variations in the spinal curve, their origin, reasoning, and implications from a morphological, functional and evolutionary perspective. Evaluation of the spinal curvature is constructive in understanding the evolution of the spine, as well as its pathology, planning of surgical procedures, monitoring its progression and treatment of spinal deformities. The aim of the current study was to revisit the nature of lumbar curve in males and females. Methods Our new automated method uses CT imaging of the spine to measure lumbar curvature in males and females. The curves extracted from 158 individuals were based on the spinal canal, thus avoiding traditional pitfalls of using bone features for curve estimation. The model analysis was carried out on the entire curve, whereby both local and global descriptors were examined in a single framework. Six parameters were calculated: segment length, curve length, curvedness, lordosis peak location, lordosis cranial peak height, and lordosis caudal peak height. Principal Findings Compared to males, the female spine manifested a statistically significant greater curvature, a caudally located lordotic peak, and greater cranial peak height. As caudal peak height is similar for males and females, the illusion of deeper lordosis among females is due partially to the fact that the upper part of the female lumbar curve is positioned more dorsally (more backwardly inclined). Conclusions Males and females manifest different lumbar curve shape, yet similar amount of inward curving (lordosis). The morphological characteristics of the female spine were probably developed to reduce stress on the vertebral elements during pregnancy and nursing. PMID:26301782

  2. Coarse woody debris dynamics: revisiting a boreal black spruce chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond-Lamberty, B.; Gower, S. T.

    2007-12-01

    We re-visited a seven-stand boreal chronosequence west of Thompson, Manitoba, Canada, in which coarse woody debris (CWD) and its instantaneous decomposition were measured in 2000. New CWD levels and tree and snag fall rates were measured in 2007, and the resulting data used to evaluate how well CWD changes can be modeled using one- and three-pool decay class models. Thus this study compared three independent measures of decomposition (k): direct measurements of CWD respiration; rates based on a seven-year resampling effort; and rates inferred from the chronosequence progression itself. Measured CWD was between 3.3 and 80.4 Mg ha-1, with the lowest and highest values in the 77- and 18-year-old stands, respectively. Spatial variability was high, and thus at most stands CWD levels had not changed significantly from 2000 to 2007. Snag fall rate varied by an order of magnitude, from 1.4% yr-1 in the 43-year-old stand to 10.4% yr-1 in the 12-year-old stand. A one-pool model based on these inputs underestimated actual 2000-2007 CWD decomposition, implying that fragmentation was at least as important a process as heterotrophic respiration; the mean overall k was 0.08 for most stands. The three-pool model was hampered by limited data on decay class transition rates and performed no better than the one-pool model. Although the computed k values implied a failure in chronosequence site selection for at least one site, the overall CWD trend was consistent with a larger number of sites surveyed in the region.

  3. Photoevaporation of Circumstellar Disks Revisited: The Dust-free Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2013-08-01

    Photoevaporation by stellar ionizing radiation is believed to play an important role in the dispersal of disks around young stars. The mass-loss model for dust-free disks developed by Hollenbach et al. is currently regarded as the conventional one and has been used in a wide variety of studies. However, the rate in this model was derived using the crude so-called 1+1D approximation of ionizing radiation transfer, which assumes that diffuse radiation propagates in a direction vertical to the disk. In this study, we revisit the photoevaporation of dust-free disks by solving the two-dimensional axisymmetric radiative transfer for steady-state disks. Unlike that solved by the conventional model, we determine that direct stellar radiation is more important than the diffuse field at the disk surface. The radial density distribution at the ionization boundary is represented by a single power law with index -3/2 in contrast to the conventional double power law. For this distribution, the photoevaporation rate from the entire disk can be written as a function of the ionizing photon emissivity ?EUV from the central star and the disk outer radius r d as follows: \\dot{M}_PE = 5.4 \\times 10^{-5} (\\Phi _EUV/10^{49}\\ s^{-1})^{1/2} (r_d/1000\\ AU)^{1/2} \\ M_\\odot \\ yr^{-1}. This new rate depends on the outer disk radius rather than on the gravitational radius as in the conventional model, because of the enhanced contribution to the mass loss from the outer disk annuli. In addition, we discuss its applications to present-day as well as primordial star formation.

  4. Revisiting the Interpretation of Thorium Abundances at Hansteen Alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, D. J.; Hawke, B. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Prettyman, T. H.; Vaniman, D. T.

    2004-01-01

    Hansteen Alpha is one of the few remaining locations on the Moon thought to be formed by highlands volcanism. Hansteen Alpha is a triangular shaped feature located in the southern portion of Oceanus Procellarum (12 degrees W, 50 degrees S) and its size is approximately 25 km on each side. As described by Hawke et al., there is clear evidence that: 1) Hansteen Alpha was emplaced by extrusive volcanic processes; and 2) it was formed by a viscous lava that should be enriched in Th. However, in the study of Hawke et al. using available Lunar Prospector (LP) Th data, it was concluded that the Hansteen Alpha region was not greatly enriched in Th as would be expected for a highly evolved, viscous lava. It was further concluded based on other compositional data that the magma that formed Hansteen Alpha did not correspond to any known rock type. Here we revisit the interpretation of Th abundances at Hansteen Alpha for a couple of reasons. First, the size of Hansteen Alpha is smaller than the spatial resolution of the LP Gamma-ray Spectrometer (LP-GRS) from which the Th abundances were derived. Therefore, the LP-GRS pixels covering Hansteen Alpha may not truly represent the Th abundance of the Hansteen Alpha feature. Second, recent work has led to a much greater understanding of the Th spatial distribution for small-area features on the lunar surface. In particular, using forward modeling techniques, we have developed the ability to obtain information about Th abundances for features that are at or smaller than the FWHM spatial resolution (approximately [80 square kilometers]) of the LP-GRS data.

  5. Simultaneous Extratympanic Electrocochleography and Auditory Brainstem Responses Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Minaya, Carlos; Atcherson, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to revisit the two-channel, simultaneous click-evoked extratympanic electrocochleography and auditory brainstem response (ECoG/ABR) recording technique for clinical use in normal hearing participants. Recording the compound action potential (AP) of the ECoG simultaneously with ABR may be useful when Wave I of the ABR is small or diminished in patients with sensorineural or retrocochlear disorder and minimizes overall test time. In contrast to some previous studies that used the extratympanic electrode both as non-inverting electrode for the ECoG and inverting electrode for ABR, this study maintained separate recording channel montages unique to conventional click-evoked ECoG and ABR recordings. That is, the ABR was recorded using a vertical channel (Cz to ipsilateral earlobe), while the ECoG with custom extratympanic electrode was recorded using a horizontal channel (tympanic membrane to contralateral earlobe). The extratympanic electrode is easy to fabricate in-house, or can be purchased commercially. Maintaining the conventional ABR montage permits continued use of traditional normative data. Broadband clicks at a fixed level of 85 dB nHL were presented with alternating polarity at stimulus rates of 9.3, 11.3, and 15.3/s. Different stimulation rates were explored to identify the most efficient rate without sacrificing time or waveform morphology. Results revealed larger ECoG AP than ABR Wave I, as expected, and no significant difference across stimulation rate and no interaction effect. Extratympanic electrode placement takes little additional clinic time and may improve the neurodiagnostic utility of the ABR. PMID:26557358

  6. Mental health and poverty in developing countries: revisiting the relationship.

    PubMed

    Das, Jishnu; Do, Quy-Toan; Friedman, Jed; McKenzie, David; Scott, Kinnon

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between poverty and mental health has received considerable attention in the recent literature. However, the associations presented in existing studies typically rely on limited samples of individuals and on proxy indicators for poverty such as education, the lack of tap water, or being unemployed. We revisit the relationship between poverty and mental health using data from nationally representative household surveys in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Indonesia and Mexico, along with special surveys from India and Tonga. As in previous studies, we find that individuals who are older, female, widowed, and in poor health are more likely to report worse mental health outcomes. Individuals living with others with poor mental health are significantly more likely to report worse mental health themselves. The size of the coefficients and their significance are comparable across the five countries. In contrast to previous studies, the relationship between higher education and better mental health is weak or non-existent. Furthermore, there is no consistent association between consumption poverty and mental health - in two countries mental health measures are marginally worse for the poor; in two countries there is no association; and in one country mental health measures are better for the poor compared to the non-poor. Moreover, the sizes of the coefficients for both education and consumption poverty are small compared to other factors considered here. While the lack of an association between consumption poverty and mental health implies that poor mental health is not a "disease of affluence", neither is it a disease of poverty. Changes in life circumstances brought on, for instance, by illness may have a greater impact on mental health than levels of poverty. Effective public health policy for mental health should focus on protecting individuals and households from adverse events and on targeted interventions following such adverse changes. PMID:17462803

  7. NeuroQuantology | March 2009 | Vol 7 | Issue 1 | Page 138-151 Glicksohn J. Time production and EEG alpha revisited

    E-print Network

    Donchin, Opher

    Revisited Joseph Glicksohn* , Aviva Berkovich Ohana Tal Balaban Dotan , Abraham Goldstein , Opher Donchin posited, what Corresponding author: Joseph Glicksohn, Ph.D. Address:*Department of Criminology, Bar

  8. Stern, C.D. (1991) Mesoderm formation in the chick embryo, revisited. In: Gastrulation: movements, patterns and molecules (ed. R. Keller, W.H. Clark Jr and F. Griffin). New York

    E-print Network

    Stern, Claudio

    1991-01-01

    Stern, C.D. (1991) Mesoderm formation in the chick embryo, revisited. In: Gastrulation: movements;Stern, C.D. (1991) Mesoderm formation in the chick embryo, revisited. In: Gastrulation: movements;Stern, C.D. (1991) Mesoderm formation in the chick embryo, revisited. In: Gastrulation: movements

  9. Revisiting Scaling Relations for Giant Radio Halos in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassano, R.; Ettori, S.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Dolag, K.; Markevitch, M.

    2013-11-01

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R 500 as P_{1.4} \\sim L^{2.1+/- 0.2}_{500}. Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L 500 > 5 × 1044 erg s-1) clusters branch into two populations—radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P 1.4 scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R 500, measured by Planck, as P_{1.4}\\sim Y^{2.05+/- 0.28}_{500}, in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that "SZ-luminous" Y 500 > 6 × 10-5 Mpc2 clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle acceleration.

  10. Revisiting Scaling Relations for Giant Radio Halos in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassano, R.; Ettori, S.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Dolag, K.; Markevitch, Maxim L.

    2013-01-01

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R(sub 500) as P(sub 1.4) approx. L(2.1+/-0.2) - 500). Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L(sub 500) > 5 × 10(exp 44) erg/s)) clusters branch into two populations-radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P(sub 1.4) scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R(sub 500), measured by Planck, as P(sub 1.4) approx. Y(2.05+/-0.28) - 500), in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that "SZ-luminous" Y(sub 500) > 6×10(exp -5) Mpc(exp 2) clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle acceleration.

  11. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated by large-scale structure motions deep inside dark matter halos, redistributing it only in the vicinity of the disc.

  12. Distant future of the Sun and Earth revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, K.-P.; Connon Smith, Robert

    2008-05-01

    We revisit the distant future of the Sun and the Solar system, based on stellar models computed with a thoroughly tested evolution code. For the solar giant stages, mass loss by the cool (but not dust-driven) wind is considered in detail. Using the new and well-calibrated mass-loss formula of Schröder & Cuntz, we find that the mass lost by the Sun as a red giant branch (RGB) giant (0.332Msolar, 7.59 Gyr from now) potentially gives planet Earth a significant orbital expansion, inversely proportional to the remaining solar mass. According to these solar evolution models, the closest encounter of planet Earth with the solar cool giant photosphere will occur during the tip-RGB phase. During this critical episode, for each time-step of the evolution model, we consider the loss of orbital angular momentum suffered by planet Earth from tidal interaction with the giant Sun, as well as dynamical drag in the lower chromosphere. As a result of this, we find that planet Earth will not be able to escape engulfment, despite the positive effect of solar mass loss. In order to survive the solar tip-RGB phase, any hypothetical planet would require a present-day minimum orbital radius of about 1.15 au. The latter result may help to estimate the chances of finding planets around white dwarfs. Furthermore, our solar evolution models with detailed mass-loss description predict that the resulting tip-AGB (asymptotic giant branch) giant will not reach its tip-RGB size. Compared to other solar evolution models, the main reason is the more significant amount of mass lost already in the RGB phase of the Sun. Hence, the tip-AGB luminosity will come short of driving a final, dust-driven superwind, and there will be no regular solar planetary nebula (PN). The tip-AGB is marked by a last thermal pulse, and the final mass loss of the giant may produce a circumstellar (CS) shell similar to, but rather smaller than, that of the peculiar PN IC 2149 with an estimated total CS shell mass of just a few hundredths of a solar mass.

  13. REVISITING SCALING RELATIONS FOR GIANT RADIO HALOS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Pratt, G. W.; Markevitch, M.

    2013-11-10

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R{sub 500} as P{sub 1.4}?L{sup 2.1±0.2}{sub 500}. Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L{sub 500} > 5 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}) clusters branch into two populations—radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P{sub 1.4} scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R{sub 500}, measured by Planck, as P{sub 1.4}?Y{sup 2.05±0.28}{sub 500}, in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that 'SZ-luminous' Y{sub 500} > 6 × 10{sup –5} Mpc{sup 2} clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle acceleration.

  14. Mountain Wave-Induced Turbulence - "Lower Turbulent Zones" Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Lukas; Grubiši?, Vanda; Serafin, Stefano; Mühlgassner, Rita

    2014-05-01

    In their seminal 1974 paper on "Lower Turbulent Zones Associated with Mountain Lee Waves" P. F. Lester and W. A. Fingerhut attempted to characterize regions of low-level turbulence in the lee of mountain ranges that are commonly associated with large-amplitude mountain waves aloft. For their study, they made extensive use of airborne measurements with small research aircraft that penetrated into the "lower turbulent zone" (LTZ). The Lester and Fingerhut study complemented previous work on wave-induced LTZs by J. P. Kuettner and others in the 1950s who were among the first to employ sailplanes as scientific measurement platforms. Given the limitations of scientific instrumentation on research aircraft in the 1970s (e.g., no GPS) and, in particular, on sailplanes in the 1950s, credit has to be given to these authors for their remarkably detailed account and classification of LTZs. Ever since then, scientists have been trying to refine the conceptual model of the LTZ and shed more light on the origin of turbulence therein. The Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX, Sierra Nevada, California, 2006) is the most recent, major effort organized to investigate the characteristics of LTZs by studying the coupled mountain-wave, rotor, and boundary-layer system. During T-REX, comprehensive ground-based and airborne, in situ and remote sensing measurements were collected during 15 Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs). In this study, we make use of the extensive T-REX datasets to revisit the LTZ concept. During T-REX IOPs, the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) research aircraft flew straight-and-level legs aligned with the mean wind direction to document the variation of flow and turbulence over and downwind of the Sierra Nevada. In order to characterize the structure and intensity of turbulence within the LTZ, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and eddy-dissipation rate (EDR) were computed from UWKA research flights. In contrast to the rough average values of TKE and EDR obtained by Lester and Fingerhut, high-rate measurements by the UWKA allow documentation of the turbulent flow field at unprecedented spatial resolution and accuracy. Using TKE and EDR obtained from UWKA measurements from the T-REX IOPs with strong low-level turbulence, an attempt is made to summarize the T-REX findings on low-level turbulence and place them in the context of the extant conceptual models of the LTZ. Given the rich variety and complexity of mountain-wave cases observed during the campaign, simple conceptual models, while helpful, provide merely rough guidelines for a possible LTZ classification.

  15. Revisit boundary conditions for the self-adjoint angular flux formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yaqi; Gleicher, Frederick N.

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the boundary conditions for SAAF. We derived the equivalent parity variational form ready for coding up. The more rigorous approach of evaluating odd parity should be solving the odd parity equation coupled with the even parity. We proposed a symmetric reflecting boundary condition although neither positive definiteness nor even-odd decoupling is achieved. A simple numerical test verifies the validity of these boundary conditions.

  16. The NonRadial Velocity Theorem revisited Fakultat fur Mathematik und Physik

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Ralf

    The Non­Radial Velocity Theorem revisited R. Kaiser Fakult¨at f¨ur Mathematik und Physik Universit Abstract The paper presents evidence that non-radial flows, i.e. flows v with v ·r 0, in a fluid action in stably stratified planetary cores, where (e.g. precession-driven) non-radial motions may well

  17. Revisiting the model predicting maximal 2-3 mixing and CP violation for neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasugi, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    The model of the neutrino mass matrix that we proposed in 2000 is revisited in the light of the recent T2K experiments. This model has the special property that it predicts maximal 2-3 mixing and CP violation under some simple condition. In this model, if the condition is relaxed, the 2-3 angle and the CP violation deviate from their maximal values and are related. We present such relations for typical cases.

  18. Why is it so difficult to compare treebanks? TIGER and TuBa-D/Z revisited

    E-print Network

    van Genabith, Josef

    Why is it so difficult to compare treebanks? TIGER and T¨uBa-D/Z revisited Ines Rehbein and Josef a thorough comparison of two German treebanks: the TIGER treebank and the T¨uBa-D/Z. We use simple statistics evaluation of a set of 100 sentences from the T¨uBa- D/Z, manually annotated in the TIGER as well as in the T

  19. Taï chimpanzees anticipate revisiting high-valued fruit trees from further distances.

    PubMed

    Ban, Simone D; Boesch, Christophe; Janmaat, Karline R L

    2014-11-01

    The use of spatio-temporal memory has been argued to increase food-finding efficiency in rainforest primates. However, the exact content of this memory is poorly known to date. This study investigated what specific information from previous feeding visits chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus), in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, take into account when they revisit the same feeding trees. By following five adult females for many consecutive days, we tested from what distance the females directed their travels towards previously visited feeding trees and how previous feeding experiences and fruit tree properties influenced this distance. To exclude the influence of sensory cues, the females' approach distance was measured from their last significant change in travel direction until the moment they entered the tree's maximum detection field. We found that chimpanzees travelled longer distances to trees at which they had previously made food grunts and had rejected fewer fruits compared to other trees. In addition, the results suggest that the chimpanzees were able to anticipate the amount of fruit that they would find in the trees. Overall, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that chimpanzees act upon a retrieved memory of their last feeding experiences long before they revisit feeding trees, which would indicate a daily use of long-term prospective memory. Further, the results are consistent with the possibility that positive emotional experiences help to trigger prospective memory retrieval in forest areas that are further away and have fewer cues associated with revisited feeding trees. PMID:24950721

  20. Revisiting the physical characterisitics of the subduction interplate seismogenic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuret, Arnauld; Lallemand, Serge; Funiciello, Francesca; Piromallo, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    Based on the Centennial earthquake catalog, the revised 1964-2007 EHB hypocenters catalog and the 1976-2007 CMT Harvard catalog, we have extracted the hypocenters, nodal planes and seismic moments of worldwide subduction earthquakes for the 1900-2007 period. For the 1976-2007 period, we combine the focal solutions provided by Harvard and the revised hypocenters from Engdahl et al. (1998). Older events are extracted from the Centennial catalogue (Engdahl and Villasenor, 2002) and they are used to estimate the cumulated seismic moment only. The selection criteria for the subduction earthquakes are similar to those used by Mc Caffrey (1994), i.e., we test if the focal mechanisms are consistent with 1/ shallow thrust events (depth > 70 km, positive slips, and at least one nodal plane gets dip < 45°), and, 2/ the plate interface local geometry and orientation (one nodal plane is oriented toward the volcanic arc, the azimuth of this nodal plane ranges between ± 45° with respect to the trench one, its dip ranges between ± 20° with respect to the slab one and the epicentre is located seaward of the volcanic arc). Our study concerns segments of subduction zones that fit with estimated paleoruptures associated with major events (M > 8). We assume that the seismogenic zone coincides with the distribution of 5.5 < M < 7 subduction earthquakes. We provide a map of the interplate seismogenic zones for 80% of the trench systems including dip, length, downdip and updip limits, we revisit the statistical study done by Pacheco et al. (1993) and test some empirical laws obtained for example by Ruff and Kanamori (1980) in light of a more complete, detailed, accurate and uniform description of the subduction interplate seismogenic zone. Since subduction earthquakes result from stress accumulation along the interplate and stress depends on plates kinematics, subduction zone geometry, thermal state and seismic coupling, we aim to isolate some correlations between parameters. The statistical analysis reveals that: 1- vs, the subduction velocity is the first order controlling parameter of seismogenic zone variability, both in term of geometry and seismic behaviour; 2- steep dip, large vertical extent and narrow horizontal extent of the seismogenic zone are associated to fast subductions, and cold slabs, the opposite holding for slow subductions and warm slabs; the seismogenic zone usually ends in the fore-arc mantle rather than at the upper plate Moho depth; 3- seismic rate (?) variability is coherent with the geometry of the seismogenic zone: ? increases with the dip and with the vertical extent of the seismogenic zone, and it fits with vs and with the subducting plate thermal state; 4- mega-events occurrence determines the level of seismic energy released along the subduction interface, whatever ? is; 5- to some extent, the potential size of earthquakes fits with vs and with the seismogenic zone geometry, but second order controlling parameters are more difficult to detect; 6- the plate coupling, measured through Upper Plate Strain, is one possible second order parameter: mega-events are preferentially associated to neutral subductions, i.e. moderate compressive stresses along the plate interface; high plate coupling (compressive UPS) is thought to inhibit mega-events genesis by enhancing the locking of the plate interface and preventing the rupture to extend laterally. This research was supported as part of the Eurohorcs/ESF — European Young Investigators Awards Scheme (resp. F.F.), by funds from the National Research Council of Italy and other National Funding Agencies participating in the 3rd Memorandum of Understanding, as well as from the EC Sixth Framework Programme.

  1. Risk Prediction of Emergency Department Revisit 30 Days Post Discharge: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shiying; Jin, Bo; Shin, Andrew Young; Zhao, Yifan; Zhu, Chunqing; Li, Zhen; Hu, Zhongkai; Fu, Changlin; Ji, Jun; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Yingzhen; Dai, Dorothy; Culver, Devore S.; Alfreds, Shaun T.; Rogow, Todd; Stearns, Frank; Sylvester, Karl G.; Widen, Eric; Ling, Xuefeng B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Among patients who are discharged from the Emergency Department (ED), about 3% return within 30 days. Revisits can be related to the nature of the disease, medical errors, and/or inadequate diagnoses and treatment during their initial ED visit. Identification of high-risk patient population can help device new strategies for improved ED care with reduced ED utilization. Methods and Findings A decision tree based model with discriminant Electronic Medical Record (EMR) features was developed and validated, estimating patient ED 30 day revisit risk. A retrospective cohort of 293,461 ED encounters from HealthInfoNet (HIN), Maine's Health Information Exchange (HIE), between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012, was assembled with the associated patients' demographic information and one-year clinical histories before the discharge date as the inputs. To validate, a prospective cohort of 193,886 encounters between January 1, 2013 and June 30, 2013 was constructed. The c-statistics for the retrospective and prospective predictions were 0.710 and 0.704 respectively. Clinical resource utilization, including ED use, was analyzed as a function of the ED risk score. Cluster analysis of high-risk patients identified discrete sub-populations with distinctive demographic, clinical and resource utilization patterns. Conclusions Our ED 30-day revisit model was prospectively validated on the Maine State HIN secure statewide data system. Future integration of our ED predictive analytics into the ED care work flow may lead to increased opportunities for targeted care intervention to reduce ED resource burden and overall healthcare expense, and improve outcomes. PMID:25393305

  2. Revisiting Deng et al.'s Multiparty Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Hwang, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chun-Wei; Li, Chuan-Ming

    2011-09-01

    The multiparty quantum secret sharing protocol [Deng et al. in Chin. Phys. Lett. 23: 1084-1087, 2006] is revisited in this study. It is found that the performance of Deng et al.'s protocol can be much improved by using the techniques of block-transmission and decoy single photons. As a result, the qubit efficiency is improved 2.4 times and only one classical communication, a public discussion, and two quantum communications between each agent and the secret holder are needed rather than n classical communications, n public discussions, and 3n/2 quantum communications required in the original scheme.

  3. Revisiting Valley Development on Martian Volcanoes Using MGS and Odyssey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.

    2005-01-01

    The valley networks found on the slopes of Martian volcanoes represent an interesting subset of the Martian valley networks. Not only do the volcanoes constrain the possible geologic settings, they also provide a window into Martian valley development through time, as the volcanoes formed throughout the geologic history of Mars. Here I take another look at this intriguing subset of networks by revisiting conclusions reached in my earlier studies using the Viking imagery and the valleys on Hawaii as an analog. I then examine more recent datasets.

  4. Predicting Results of the Research Excellence Framework using Departmental h-Index -- Revisited

    E-print Network

    Mryglod, O; Holovatch, Yu; Berche, B

    2015-01-01

    We revisit our recent study [Predicting results of the Research Excellence Framework using departmental h-index, Scientometrics, 2014, 1-16; arXiv:1411.1996] in which we attempted to predict outcomes of the UK's Research Excellence Framework (REF~2014) using the so-called departmental $h$-index. Here we report that our predictions failed to anticipate with any accuracy either overall REF outcomes or movements of individual institutions in the rankings relative to their positions in the previous Research Assessment Exercise (RAE~2008).

  5. 2-Hy­droxy-3-meth­oxy­benzaldehyde (o-vanillin) revisited

    PubMed Central

    Shin, David; Müller, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The structure of ortho-vanillin, C8H8O3, has been revisited with modern methods and at low temperature (100?K). The previous structure [Iwasaki et al. (1976 ?). Acta Cryst. B32, 1264–1266] is confirmed, but geometric precision is improved by an order of magnitude. The C atom of the meth­oxy group lies close to the benzene ring plane, which is the most common geometry for –OMe groups lying ortho to –OH groups on an aromatic ring. The crystal structure displays one intra­molecular O—H?O and three weak inter­molecular C—H?O hydrogen bonds. PMID:22904806

  6. EPR before EPR: a 1930 Einstein-Bohr thought experiment revisited

    E-print Network

    H. Nikolic

    2012-05-28

    In 1930 Einstein argued against consistency of the time-energy uncertainty relation by discussing a thought experiment involving a measurement of mass of the box which emitted a photon. Bohr seemingly triumphed over Einstein by arguing that the Einstein's own general theory of relativity saves the consistency of quantum mechanics. We revisit this thought experiment from a modern point of view at a level suitable for undergraduate readership and find that neither Einstein nor Bohr was right. Instead, this thought experiment should be thought of as an early example of a system demonstrating nonlocal "EPR" quantum correlations, five years before the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paper.

  7. The importance of jet bending in gamma-ray AGNs—revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, P. J.; Tingay, S. J.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the hypothesis that ?-ray-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have a greater tendency for jet bending than ?-ray-loud AGNs, revisiting the analysis of Tingay et al. We perform a statistical analysis using a large sample of 351 radio-loud AGNs along with ?-ray identifications from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Our results show no statistically significant differences in jet-bending properties between ?-ray-loud and ?-ray-quiet populations, indicating that jet bending is not a significant factor for ?-ray detection in AGNs.

  8. Long, cold, early r process? Neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis in He shells revisited.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Haxton, W C; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2011-05-20

    We revisit a ?-driven r-process mechanism in the He shell of a core-collapse supernova, finding that it could succeed in early stars of metallicity Z ? 10?³ Z(?), at relatively low temperatures and neutron densities, producing A ~ 130 and 195 abundance peaks over ~10-20 s. The mechanism is sensitive to the ? emission model and to ? oscillations. We discuss the implications of an r process that could alter interpretations of abundance data from metal-poor stars, and point out the need for further calculations that include effects of the supernova shock. PMID:21668217

  9. Conservation laws for steady flow and solitons in a multifluid plasma revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, R. L.; McKenzie, J. F.; Webb, G. M.

    2007-01-15

    The conservation laws used in constructing the governing equations for planar solitons in multifluid plasmas are revisited. In particular, the concept of generalized vorticity facilitates the derivation of some general ''Bernoulli theorems,'' which reduce, in specific instances, to conservation laws previously deduced by other means. These theorems clarify the underlying physical principles that give rise to the conserved quantities. As an example of the usefulness of the techniques, even for relatively simple flows and progressive waves, the equations governing stationary nonlinear whistler waves propagating parallel to an ambient magnetic field are derived using generalized vorticity concepts.

  10. EPR before EPR: a 1930 Einstein-Bohr thought experiment revisited

    E-print Network

    Nikolic, H

    2012-01-01

    In 1930 Einstein argued against consistency of the time-energy uncertainty relation by discussing a thought experiment involving a measurement of mass of the box which emitted a photon. Bohr seemingly triumphed over Einstein by arguing that the Einstein's own general theory of relativity saves the consistency of quantum mechanics. We revisit this thought experiment from a modern point of view and find that neither Einstein nor Bohr was right. Instead, this thought experiment should be thought of as an early example of a system demonstrating nonlocal "EPR" quantum correlations, five years before the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paper.

  11. Revisiting silicon budgets at a tropical continental shelf: Silica standing stocks in sponges surpass those in diatoms

    E-print Network

    Maldonado, Manuel

    Revisiting silicon budgets at a tropical continental shelf: Silica standing stocks in sponges in five habitats of an extensive continental shelf area of the Mesoamerican Caribbean. In most habitats-ocean blue water, it may not realistically reflect the situation on at least some continental shelves, which

  12. Today's Teens, Their Problems, and Their Literature: Revisiting G. Robert Carlsen's "Books and the Teenage Reader" Thirty Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Pamela Sissi

    1997-01-01

    Revisits G. Robert Carlsen's call for the use of young adult literature in the classroom by looking specifically at the emotional and reading needs of older adolescents, those in the upper grades. Discusses problems associated with adolescence in the late twentieth century and lists recommended young adult books that touch on those issues. (TB)

  13. arXiv:cs.LO/0605008v12May2006 The complexity of acyclic conjunctive queries revisited

    E-print Network

    Durand, Arnaud - �quipe de Logique Mathématique, Université Paris 7

    arXiv:cs.LO/0605008v12May2006 The complexity of acyclic conjunctive queries revisited Arnaud Durand the complexity of the evaluation problem for conjunctive queries described by such kind of formulas. A natural) acyclic conjunctive query with inequalities can be evaluated in time f(|Q|).|db|.|Q(db)|. A second

  14. Revisiting Work-Life Issues in Canada: The 2012 National Study on Balancing Work and Caregiving in

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    1 Revisiting Work-Life Issues in Canada: The 2012 National Study on Balancing Work and Caregiving the first national study of work-life conflict in Canada to "explore how the changing relationship between family and work affects organizations, families and employers." Just over 10 years ago (2001) we

  15. Revisiting the 1897 Shillong and 1905 Kangra earthquakes in northern India: Site Response, Moho reflections and a Triggered Earthquake

    E-print Network

    Bilham, Roger

    1 Revisiting the 1897 Shillong and 1905 Kangra earthquakes in northern India: Site Response, Moho reflections and a Triggered Earthquake Susan E. Hough(1), Roger Bilham(2), Nicolas Ambraseys(3), and Nicole distributions for the Mw8.0 Shillong Plateau earthquake of 1897 and the Mw7.8 Kangra earthquake of 1905

  16. The Somigliana ring dislocation revisited 2. Solutions for dislocations in a half space and in one of two

    E-print Network

    Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    The Somigliana ring dislocation revisited 2. Solutions for dislocations in a half space and in one of the circular prismatic Volterra dislocation loop was first solved by Kroupa [1]. Solutions for the circular Somigliana radial edge dislocation and the circular Volterra glide dislocation were given by Demir et al. [2

  17. Revelle revisited: Buffer factors that quantify the response of ocean chemistry to changes in DIC and alkalinity

    E-print Network

    Morel, François M. M.

    Revelle revisited: Buffer factors that quantify the response of ocean chemistry to changes in DIC in DIC and Alk. For example, diurnal and seasonal variations in pH and W caused by photosynthesis that changes in DIC and Alk have on seawater chemistry. They should also help illuminate the role that various

  18. COMPLEXITY MEASURE REVISITED: A NEW ALGORITHM FOR CLASSIFYING CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS U.Ayesta, L. Serrano, I. Romero

    E-print Network

    Ayesta, Urtzi

    COMPLEXITY MEASURE REVISITED: A NEW ALGORITHM FOR CLASSIFYING CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS U.Ayesta, L - Turkey October, 25-28 2001 GOAL ·Classification of cardiac arrhythmias with low complexity algorithm-RECORDED FROM BODY SURFACE RT, same [6] 81 90 [4] SPRT NA 93 96 MIT-BIH MALIGNANT ARRHYTHMIA DATABASE CWA 100 50

  19. Revisiting "Kindergarten as Academic Boot Camp": A Nationwide Study of Ability Grouping and Psycho-Social Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catsambis, Sophia; Buttaro, Anthony, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit Harry L. Gracey's perspective of kindergarten as academic boot camp where, at school entry, children acquire the student role through a structured program of activities. We provide further insights into the crucial mechanisms of socialization that occur in U.S. kindergartens by examining the relationship between within-class ability…

  20. From Revisiting the LCA-based Approach to a New Semantics-based Approach for XML Keyword Search

    E-print Network

    Ling, Tok Wang

    From Revisiting the LCA-based Approach to a New Semantics-based Approach for XML Keyword Search for data-centric XML documents are based on the compu- tation of Lowest Common Ancestors (LCA), such as SLCA and MLCA. In this paper, we show that the LCA is not always a correct search model for processing

  1. Heating and cooling of protons in the fast solar wind between 0.3 and 1 AU: Helios revisited

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Heating and cooling of protons in the fast solar wind between 0.3 and 1 AU: Helios revisited Petr of the proton parallel and perpendicular temperature, nonnegligible parallel cooling and perpendicular heating are necessary. Around 1 AU heating is needed in both directions. We also calculate the corresponding rates

  2. We revisit memory hierarchy design viewing memory as an inter-operation communication agent. This perspective leads to

    E-print Network

    Sohi, Guri S.

    Abstract We revisit memory hierarchy design viewing memory as an inter-operation communication agent. This perspective leads to the development of novel methods of performing inter-operation memory structure called the Transient Value Cache (TVC). The TVC captures memory values that are short

  3. THE PHANTOM SPA METHOD: AN INVENTORY PROBLEM REVISITED \\Lambda Felisa J. V'azquezAbad and Manuel CepedaJuneman

    E-print Network

    Vázquez-Abad, Felisa J.

    THE PHANTOM SPA METHOD: AN INVENTORY PROBLEM REVISITED \\Lambda Felisa J. V'azquez­Abad and Manuel­ ficiency can dramatically improve from the gain in correlation (variance reduction) as well as the gain is the In­ finitesimal Perturbation Analysis (IPA) method. A simple inventory model is considered

  4. Iron isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite revisited: New insights based on a multi-direction

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Clark M.

    Iron isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite revisited: New insights based on a multi-direction approach to equilibrium and isotopic exchange rate modification Andrew J. Frierdich a in revised form 7 May 2014; Available online 15 May 2014 Abstract The Fe isotope compositions of naturally

  5. An Agenda for Research on Teachers and Schools: Revisiting NCES' Schools and Staffing Survey. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Richard M.

    This paper outlines an agenda of research on teachers and schooling utilizing the National Center for Education Statistics Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS focuses on teachers and schools, and consists of linked surveys of schools, districts, principals, and teachers. The primary purpose of this paper is to revisit the genesis of SASS in…

  6. Revisiting Risk in the 21st Century. Forum Focus. Volume 3, Issue 1, January-February 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forum for Youth Investment, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Over the past year, dozens of articles have been published about excessive youth borrowing and spending (leading to high amounts of debt), new reactions to negative body image (such as plastic surgery), as well as more familiar risks like premarital sex and smoking. In Forum Focus: Revisiting Risk in the 21st Century, we explore these challenges…

  7. Metal-ion rescue revisited: Biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA folding

    E-print Network

    Das, Rhiju

    Metal-ion rescue revisited: Biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA-dimensional architectures of RNA molecules, divalent metal ions populate specific locations, shedding their water molecules make essential contributions to function. Defining the locations of these site-bound metal ions remains

  8. Rehabilitation Counseling's Phoenix Project: Re-Visiting the Call for Unification of the Professional Associations in Rehabilitation Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Michael J.; Tarvydas, Vilia M.; Phillips, Brian N.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this white paper is to re-visit the call for unification of the professional associations representing rehabilitation counseling. The current status and issues associated with the multiple associations representing the discipline will be briefly reviewed. A brief history of collaborative efforts between these organizations, salient…

  9. Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Low-to-intermediate frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2015-09-01

    A previous paper [P. H. Yoon, "Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Formal results," Phys. Plasmas 22, 082309 (2015)] revisited the second-order nonlinear kinetic theory for turbulence propagating in directions parallel/anti-parallel to the ambient magnetic field, in which the original work according to Yoon and Fang [Phys. Plasmas 15, 122312 (2008)] was refined, following the paper by Gaelzer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 032310 (2015)]. The main finding involved the dimensional correction pertaining to discrete-particle effects in Yoon and Fang's theory. However, the final result was presented in terms of formal linear and nonlinear susceptibility response functions. In the present paper, the formal equations are explicitly written down for the case of low-to-intermediate frequency regime by making use of approximate forms for the response functions. The resulting equations are sufficiently concrete so that they can readily be solved by numerical means or analyzed by theoretical means. The derived set of equations describe nonlinear interactions of quasi-parallel modes whose frequency range covers the Alfvén wave range to ion-cyclotron mode, but is sufficiently lower than the electron cyclotron mode. The application of the present formalism may range from the nonlinear evolution of whistler anisotropy instability in the high-beta regime, and the nonlinear interaction of electrons with whistler-range turbulence.

  10. Road work on memory lane--functional and structural alterations to the learning and memory circuit in adults born very preterm.

    PubMed

    Salvan, Piergiorgio; Froudist Walsh, Seán; Allin, Matthew P G; Walshe, Muriel; Murray, Robin M; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; McGuire, Philip K; Williams, Steven C R; Nosarti, Chiara

    2014-11-15

    Very preterm (VPT) birth is considered a risk factor not only for neurological impairment, but also for reduced function in several cognitive domains in childhood and later in life. Individuals who were born VPT are more likely to demonstrate learning and memory difficulties compared to term-born controls. These problems contribute to more VPT-born children repeating grades and underachieving in school. This, in turn, affects their prospects in adult life. Here we aimed to 1) study how the VPT-born adult brain functionally recruited specific areas during learning, i.e. encoding and recall across four repeated blocks of verbal stimuli, and to investigate how these patterns of activation differed from term-born subjects; and 2) probe the microstructural differences of white-matter tracts connecting these areas to other parts of the learning and memory network. To investigate these functional-structural relationships we analyzed functional and diffusion-weighted MRI. Functional-MRI and a verbal paired associate learning (VPAL) task were used to extract Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) activity in 21 VPT-born adults (<33 weeks of gestation) (mean age: 19.68 years ± 0.85; IQ: 99.86 ± 11.20) and 10 term-born controls (mean age: 19.87 years ± 2.04; IQ: 108.9 ± 13.18). Areas in which differences in functional activation were observed between groups were used as seed regions for tractography. Fractional anisotropy (FA) of the tract-skeleton was then compared between groups on a voxel-wise basis. Results of functional MRI analysis showed a significantly different pattern of activation between groups during encoding in right anterior cingulate-caudate body, and during retrieval in left thalamus, hippocampus and parts of left posterior parahippocampal gyrus. The number of correctly recalled word pairs did not statistically differ between individuals who were born VPT and controls. The VPT-born group was found to have reduced FA in tracts passing through the thalamic/hippocampal region that was differently activated during the recall condition, with the hippocampal fornix, inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus particularly affected. Young adults who were born very preterm display a strikingly different pattern of activation during the process of learning in key structures of the learning and memory network, including anterior cingulate and caudate body during encoding and thalamus/parahippocampal gyrus during cued recall. Altered activation in thalamus/parahippocampal gyrus may be explained by reduced connections between these areas and the hippocampus, which may be a direct consequence of neonatal hypoxic/ischemic injury. These results could reflect the effect of adaptive plastic processes associated with high-order cognitive functions, at least when the cognitive load remains relatively low, as ex-preterm young adults displayed unimpaired performance in completing the verbal paired associate learning task. PMID:24368264

  11. Uncinate Fasciculus Abnormalities in Recent Onset Schizophrenia and Affective Psychosis: A Diffusion Tensor

    E-print Network

    Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, McLean Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, U.S.A Abstract Two of the most frequently

  12. Beyond the Arcuate Fasciculus: Consensus and Controversy in the Connectional Anatomy of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Tremblay, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    The growing consensus that language is distributed into large-scale cortical and subcortical networks has brought with it an increasing focus on the connectional anatomy of language, or how particular fibre pathways connect regions within the language network. Understanding connectivity of the language network could provide critical insights into…

  13. Anatomical Properties of the Arcuate Fasciculus Predict Phonological and Reading Skills in Children

    E-print Network

    Wandell, Brian A.

    in the left arcuate correlate with phonological awareness skills and arcuate volume lateralization correlates network model of language processing in the brain (Wernicke, 1874). His view of cortical com- putations portrayed the brain as a mosaic of sensory and motor representations, where new functions arise from novel

  14. Cingulate Fasciculus Integrity Disruption in Schizophrenia: A Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor

    E-print Network

    : Evidence suggests that a disruption in limbic system network integrity and, in particular, the cingulate tract in the limbic system, has not been evaluated in schizophrenia using the new technology to and from other components of Broca's "grand limbic lobe." Of note, cingulate gyrus abnormal- ities have

  15. White Matter Microstructure in Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus Associated with Spatial Working Memory Performance in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vestergaard, Martin; Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Baare, William F. C.; Skimminge, Arnold; Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Ramsoy, Thomas Z.; Gerlach, Christian; Akeson, Per; Paulson, Olaf B.; Jernigan, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    During childhood and adolescence, ongoing white matter maturation in the fronto-parietal cortices and connecting fiber tracts is measurable with diffusion-weighted imaging. Important questions remain, however, about the links between these changes and developing cognitive functions. Spatial working memory (SWM) performance improves significantly…

  16. Safe Removal of an Encrusted Nephrostomy Tube Using a Vascular Sheath: A Technique Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Farooq, Ammad Agarwal, Sanjay; Jones, Vaughan

    2013-06-15

    With the advent of interventional radiology and the decrease in mortality from chronic ailments, especially malignancy, percutaneous nephrostomy has become a commonly used safe technique for temporary relief of renal tract obstruction or for urinary diversion. However, these are associated with risks of infection, particularly septicaemia, colonisation, and blockage. Another significant complication is difficulty in removal due to encrustation. We describe a useful technique used in our department for the past few years and cite four cases of variable presentation and complexity for removal of an encrusted nephrostomy tube. No mention of this technique was found recent literature. An almost similar technique was described in the 1980s ''Pollack and Banner (Radiology 145:203-205, 1982), Baron and McClennan (Radiology 141:824, 1981)''. It is possible that experienced operators may have used this technique. We revisit it with pictographic representation, describing its use with currently available equipment, for benefit of operators who are not aware of this technique.

  17. Revisiting the symmetric reactions for synthesis of super-heavy nuclei of Z?120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, R. K.; Gupta, Y. K.

    2014-04-01

    Extensive efforts have been made experimentally to reach nuclei in the super-heavy mass region of Z=110 and above with suitable choices of projectile and target nuclei. The cross sections for production of these nuclei are seen to be in the range of a few picobarn or less, and pose great experimental challenges. Theoretically, there have been extensive calculations for highly asymmetric (hot-fusion) and moderately asymmetric (cold-fusion) collisions and only a few theoretical studies are available for near-symmetric collisions to estimate the cross sections for production of super-heavy nuclei. In the present article, we revisit the symmetric heavy ion reactions with suitable combinations of projectile and target nuclei in the rare-earth region, that will lead to super-heavy nuclei of Z?120 with measurable fusion cross sections.

  18. What drives health care expenditure?--Baumol's model of 'unbalanced growth' revisited.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Jochen

    2008-05-01

    The share of health care expenditure in GDP rises rapidly in virtually all OECD countries, causing increasing concern among politicians and the general public. Yet, economists have to date failed to reach an agreement on what the main determinants of this development are. This paper revisits Baumol's [Baumol, W.J., 1967. Macroeconomics of unbalanced growth: the anatomy of urban crisis. American Economic Review 57 (3), 415-426] model of 'unbalanced growth', showing that the latter offers a ready explanation for the observed inexorable rise in health care expenditure. The main implication of Baumol's model in this context is that health care expenditure is driven by wage increases in excess of productivity growth. This hypothesis is tested empirically using data from a panel of 19 OECD countries. Our tests yield robust evidence in favor of Baumol's theory. PMID:18164773

  19. Optimal random searches of revisitable targets: Crossover from superdiffusive to ballistic random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M. C.; Raposo, E. P.; Viswanathan, G. M.; da Luz, M. G. E.

    2004-09-01

    One of the most important aspects in the general search problem of finding randomly located target sites concerns how to characterize the role played by the non-revisitability delay time ? during which a previously found target becomes unavailable to the searcher. By using an appropriate parameterization of the number of random walk steps undertaken between successive targets, we show that for the case of sparse randomly distributed sites the optimal search strategy shifts from a superdiffusive to a ballistic strategy consisting of essentially rectilinear motion between the targets, as ? increases from ? ? 0 to ? ? ?, respectively. The crossover between these limiting regimes occurs as a function of ?. These conclusions are shown to hold even if dissipative phenomena are considered in the searching dynamics. We discuss the results in the context of their application to animal foraging.

  20. Biochemical reactions in crowded environments: Revisiting the effects of volume exclusion with simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, David; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Molecular crowding is ubiquitous within cells and affects many biological processes including protein-protein binding, enzyme activities and gene regulation. Here we revisit some generic effects of crowding using a combination of lattice simulations and reaction-diffusion simulations with the program ReaDDy. Specifically, we implement three reactions, simple binding, a diffusion-limited reaction and a reaction with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Histograms of binding and unbinding times provide a detailed picture how crowding affects these reactions and how the separate effects of crowding on binding equilibrium and on diffusion act together. In addition, we discuss how crowding affects processes related to gene expression such as RNA polymerase-promoter binding and translation elongation.

  1. Complex Langevin dynamics in the SU(3) spin model at nonzero chemical potential revisited

    E-print Network

    Gert Aarts; Frank A. James

    2012-01-25

    The three-dimensional SU(3) spin model is an effective Polyakov loop model for QCD at nonzero temperature and density. It suffers from a sign problem at nonzero chemical potential. We revisit this model using complex Langevin dynamics and assess in particular the justification of this approach, using analyticity at small mu^2 and the criteria for correctness developed recently. Finite-stepsize effects are discussed in some detail and a higher-order algorithm is employed to eliminate leading stepsize corrections. Our results strongly indicate that complex Langevin dynamics is reliable in this theory in both phases, including the critical region. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the XY model, where correct results were obtained in only part of the phase diagram.

  2. Ortho/para ratio of H2O+ toward Sagittarius B2(M) revisited.

    PubMed

    Schilke, Peter; Lis, Dariusz C; Bergin, Edwin A; Higgins, Ronan; Comito, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The HIFI instrument aboard the Herschel satellite has allowed the observation and characterization of light hydrides, the building blocks of interstellar chemistry. In this article, we revisit the ortho/para ratio for H2O(+) toward the Sgr B2(M) cloud core. The line of sight toward this star forming region passes through several spiral arms and the gas in the Bar potential in the inner Galaxy. In contrast to earlier findings, which used fewer lines to constrain the ratio, we find a ratio of 3, which is uniformly consistent with high-temperature formation of the species. In view of the reactivity of this ion, this matches the expectations. PMID:23713712

  3. Revisiting the Prominent Anti-Tumoral Potential of Pre-mNK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guimont-Desrochers, Fanny; Lesage, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDC) were first described for their outstanding anti-tumoral properties. The “IKDC” terminology implied the description of a novel DC subset and initiated a debate on their cellular lineage origin. This debate shifted the focus away from their notable anti-tumoral potential. IKDC were recently redefined as precursors to mature NK (mNK) cells and consequently renamed pre-mNK cells. Importantly, a putative human equivalent of pre-mNK cells was recently associated with improved disease outcome in cancer patients. It is thus timely to revisit the functional attributes as well as the therapeutic potential of pre-mNK cells in line with their newly defined NK-cell precursor function. PMID:24376447

  4. Revisiting benzene cluster cations for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide and select volatile organic compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, M. J.; Zoerb, M. C.; Campbell, N. R.; Zimmermann, K. J.; Blomquist, B. W.; Huebert, B. J.; Bertram, T. H.

    2015-10-01

    Benzene cluster cations were revisited as a sensitive and selective reagent ion for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and a select group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Laboratory characterization was performed using both a new set of compounds (i.e. DMS, ?-caryophyllene) as well as previously studied VOCs (i.e., isoprene, ?-pinene). Using a field deployable chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-ToFMS), benzene cluster cations demonstrated high sensitivity (> 1 ncps ppt?1) to DMS, isoprene, and ?-pinene standards. Parallel measurements conducted using a chemical-ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer, with a weaker electric field, demonstrated that ion-molecule reactions likely proceed through amore »combination of ligand-switching and direct charge transfer mechanisms. Laboratory tests suggest that benzene cluster cations may be suitable for the selective ionization of sesquiterpenes, where minimal fragmentation (R2=0.80) over a wide range of sampling conditions.« less

  5. Ab initio phase diagram of BaTiO3 under epitaxial strain revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünebohm, Anna; Marathe, Madhura; Ederer, Claude

    2015-09-01

    We revisit the phase diagram of BaTiO3 under biaxial strain using a first principles-based effective Hamiltonian approach. We show that, in addition to the tetragonal (c), quasi-rhombohedral (r), and quasi-orthorhombic (aa) ferroelectric phases that have been discussed previously, there are temperature and strain regions, in particular, under tensile strain, where the system decomposes into multi-domain structures. In such cases, the strained system, at least on a local level, recovers the same phase sequence as the unclamped bulk material. Furthermore, we extend these results from the case of "uniform" biaxial strain to the situation where the two in-plane lattice constants are strained differently and show that similar considerations apply in this case.

  6. resonance contribution to two-photon exchange in electron-proton scattering revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai-Qing; Yang, Shin Nan

    2015-08-01

    We revisit the question of the contributions of the two-photon exchange with excitation to the electron-proton scattering in a hadronic model. Three improvements over the previous calculations are made, namely, correct vertex function for , realistic form factors, and coupling constants. The discrepancy between the values of extracted from Rosenbluth technique and polarization transfer method can be reasonably accounted for if the data of Andivahis et al. (Phys. Rev. D 50, 5491 (1994)) are analyzed. However, substantial discrepancy remains if the data of Qattan et al. (nucl-ex/0610006) are used. For the ratio between scatterings, our predictions appear to be in satisfactory agreement with the preliminary data from VEPP-3. The agreement between our model predictions and the recent measurements on single spin asymmetry, transverse and longitudinal recoil proton polarizations ranges from good to poor.

  7. Revisiting the symmetric reactions for synthesis of super heavy nuclei of $Z\\geq $120

    E-print Network

    R. K. Choudhury; Y. K. Gupta

    2013-08-26

    Extensive efforts have been made experimentally to reach nuclei in the super heavy mass region of Z = 110 and above with suitable choices of projectile and target nuclei. The cross sections for production of these nuclei are seen to be in the range of a few picobarn or less, and pose great experimental challenges. Theoretically, there have been extensive calculations for highly asymmetric (hot-fusion) and moderately asymmetric (cold-fusion) collisions and only a few theoretical studies are available for near symmetric collisions to estimate the cross sections for production of super-heavy nuclei. In the present article, we revisit the symmetric heavy ion reactions with suitable combinations of projectile and target nuclei in the rare-earth region, that will lead to compound systems with very low excitation energy and with better neutron-to-proton ratio for higher stability.

  8. The growth of galactic bulges through mergers in LCDM haloes revisited. I. Present-day properties

    E-print Network

    Zavala, Jesus; Firmani, Claudio; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) We use the combined data-sets of the Millennium I and II N-body cosmological simulations to revisit the impact of mergers in the growth of bulges in central galaxies in the LCDM scenario. To do so, we seed galaxies within the growing CDM haloes at each epoch using empirical relations to assign stellar and gaseous masses, and an analytical treatment to estimate the transfer of stellar mass to the bulge after a galaxy merger. Our results show that this model roughly reproduces the observed correlation between the bulge-to-total (B/T) mass ratio and stellar mass in present-day central galaxies as well as their observed demographics, although low-mass B/T merger-driven scenario, bulges have a composite stellar population made of (i) stars acquired from infalling satellites, (ii) stars transferred from the primary disc due to the strong merger-induced perturbations, and (iii) newly formed stars in starbursts trigger...

  9. Implicit and explicit control of motor actions: revisiting some early evidence.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Richard; Hardy, Lew; Oldham, Anthony

    2007-02-01

    Two studies have questioned Masters' (1992) contention that skills acquired in implicit practice conditions are less likely to fail under pressure than those acquired explicitly. The studies produced conflicting results. The aim of the present study was to revisit the designs of both studies in an attempt to clarify the situation. Thirty-two participants were allocated to one of three separate implicit training groups or an explicit training group, and practised putting golf balls. Participants were exposed to an anxiety intervention at two points during practice. Putting performance across practice and anxiety phases were analysed using the number of putts successfully completed as the main dependent variable. We found further evidence for the suggestion that motor skills are robust under pressure when acquired in implicit practice conditions. PMID:17319055

  10. Summing parquet diagrams using the functional renormalization group: X-ray problem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Philipp; Drukier, Casper; Sharma, Anand; Kopietz, Peter

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple method for summing so-called parquet diagrams of fermionic many-body systems with competing instabilities using the functional renormalization group. Our method is based on partial bosonization of the interaction using multi-channel Hubbard-Stratonovich transformations. A simple truncation of the resulting flow equations, retaining only the frequency-independent parts of the two-point and three-point vertices amounts to solving coupled Bethe-Salpeter equations for the effective interaction to leading logarithmic order. We apply our method by revisiting the X-ray problem and deriving the singular frequency dependence of the X-ray response function and the particle-particle susceptibility. Our method is quite general and should be useful in many-body problems involving strong fluctuations in several scattering channels.

  11. Revisiting the Quantitative-Qualitative Debate: Implications for Mixed-Methods Research

    PubMed Central

    SALE, JOANNA E. M.; LOHFELD, LYNNE H.; BRAZIL, KEVIN

    2015-01-01

    Health care research includes many studies that combine quantitative and qualitative methods. In this paper, we revisit the quantitative-qualitative debate and review the arguments for and against using mixed-methods. In addition, we discuss the implications stemming from our view, that the paradigms upon which the methods are based have a different view of reality and therefore a different view of the phenomenon under study. Because the two paradigms do not study the same phenomena, quantitative and qualitative methods cannot be combined for cross-validation or triangulation purposes. However, they can be combined for complementary purposes. Future standards for mixed-methods research should clearly reflect this recommendation. PMID:26523073

  12. Language planning for the 21st century: revisiting bilingual language policy for deaf children.

    PubMed

    Knoors, Harry; Marschark, Marc

    2012-01-01

    For over 25 years in some countries and more recently in others, bilingual education involving sign language and the written/spoken vernacular has been considered an essential educational intervention for deaf children. With the recent growth in universal newborn hearing screening and technological advances such as digital hearing aids and cochlear implants, however, more deaf children than ever before have the potential for acquiring spoken language. As a result, the question arises as to the role of sign language and bilingual education for deaf children, particularly those who are very young. On the basis of recent research and fully recognizing the historical sensitivity of this issue, we suggest that language planning and language policy should be revisited in an effort to ensure that they are appropriate for the increasingly diverse population of deaf children. PMID:22577073

  13. Revisiting competition in a classic model system using formal links between theory and data.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Burgin, Jacqueline R; Marshall, Dustin J

    2012-09-01

    Formal links between theory and data are a critical goal for ecology. However, while our current understanding of competition provides the foundation for solving many derived ecological problems, this understanding is fractured because competition theory and data are rarely unified. Conclusions from seminal studies in space-limited benthic marine systems, in particular, have been very influential for our general understanding of competition, but rely on traditional empirical methods with limited inferential power and compatibility with theory. Here we explicitly link mathematical theory with experimental field data to provide a more sophisticated understanding of competition in this classic model system. In contrast to predictions from conceptual models, our estimates of competition coefficients show that a dominant space competitor can be equally affected by interspecific competition with a poor competitor (traditionally defined) as it is by intraspecific competition. More generally, the often-invoked competitive hierarchies and intransitivities in this system might be usefully revisited using more sophisticated empirical and analytical approaches. PMID:23094373

  14. Phenomenological approach to the critical dynamics of the QCD phase transition revisited

    E-print Network

    T. Koide

    2005-07-12

    The phenomenological dynamics of the QCD critical phenomena is revisited. Recently, Son and Stephanov claimed that the dynamical universality class of the QCD phase transition belongs to model H. In their discussion, they employed a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation for the net baryon number density, which is a conserved quantity. We derive the Langevin equation for the net baryon number density, i.e., the Cahn-Hilliard equation. Furthermore, they discussed the mode coupling induced through the {\\it irreversible} current. Here, we show the {\\it reversible} coupling can play a dominant role for describing the QCD critical dynamics and that the dynamical universality class does not necessarily belong to model H.

  15. Revisiting a pre-inflationary radiation era and its effect on the CMB power spectrum

    E-print Network

    Suratna Das; Gaurav Goswami; Jayanti Prasad; Raghavan Rangarajan

    2015-06-04

    We revisit the scenario where inflation is preceded by a radiation era by considering that the inflaton too could have been in thermal equilibrium early in the radiation era. Hence we take into account not only the effect of a pre-inflationary era on the inflaton mode functions but also that of a frozen thermal distribution of inflaton quanta. We initially discuss in detail the issues relevant to our scenario of a pre-inflationary radiation dominated era and then obtain the scalar power spectrum for this scenario. We find that the power spectrum is free from infrared divergences. We then use the WMAP and Planck data to determine the constraints on the inflaton comoving `temperature' and on the duration of inflation. We find that the best fit value of the duration of inflation is less than 1 e-folding more than what is required to solve cosmological problems, while only an upper bound on the inflaton temperature can be obtained.

  16. Revisiting the age of enlightenment from a collective decision making systems perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Marko A; Watkins, Jennifer H

    2009-01-01

    The ideals of the eighteenth century's Age of Enlightenment are the foundation of modern democracies. The era was characterized by thinkers who promoted progressive social reforms that opposed the long-established aristocracies and monarchies of the time. Prominent examples of such reforms include the establishment of inalienable human rights, self-governing republics, and market capitalism. Twenty-first century democratic nations can benefit from revisiting the systems developed during the Enlightenment and reframing them within the techno-social context of the Information Age. This article explores the application of social algorithms that make use of Thomas Paine's (English: 1737--1809) representatives, Adam Smith's (Scottish: 1723--1790) self-interested actors, and Marquis de Condorcet's (French: 1743--1794) optimal decision making groups. It is posited that technology-enabled social algorithms can better realize the ideals articulated during the Enlightenment.

  17. Magnetocaloric properties of the hexagonal HoMnO3 single crystal revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balli, M.; Roberge, B.; Vermette, J.; Jandl, S.; Fournier, P.; Gospodinov, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of the hexagonal HoMnO3 single crystal have been revisited. It was found that the magnetocaloric effect shown by HoMnO3 strongly depends on the crystal orientation in respect to the applied magnetic field. Consequently, a large thermal effect can be induced by spinning the single crystal HoMnO3 around the a (or b) axis in a constant magnetic field instead of the conventional magnetization-demagnetization process. Under 7 T, the maximum rotating entropy change was evaluated to be about 8 J/kg K. The associated adiabatic temperature change reaches a value of about 5 K. These values are comparable to those of the other oxides exhibiting a large rotating magnetocaloric effect. The presence of both conventional and rotating thermal effects makes the hexagonal HoMnO3 more interesting from a practical point of view.

  18. WHO, RECIST, and immune-related response criteria: is it time to revisit pembrolizumab results?

    PubMed Central

    Ades, Felipe; Yamaguchi, Nise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, with the rise of immunotherapeutic agents for cancer treatment, we have observed a paradigm shift in oncology drug development. One common problem accompanying such paradigm shifts is how to build research strategies to fit the mechanism of action of the newer compounds. Developing immunotherapy in oncology requires us to address the unique characteristics of immunotherapeutic agents and to provide adequate tools for their evaluation, including the adjustment of clinical trial endpoints. Immunotherapy creates patterns of response different from those of chemotherapy, and thus they are not captured by the traditional World Health Organisation (WHO) tumour response criteria or the RECIST. Revisiting the results of pembrolizumab in patients with melanoma can help to evaluate the efficacy of the immune-related response criteria (irRC) as the gold standard for evaluating the clinical response of immunologic agents in oncology. PMID:26715941

  19. Revisiting the tunneling spectrum and information recovery of a general charged and rotating black hole

    E-print Network

    Ge-Rui Chen; Yong-Chang Huang

    2015-01-15

    In this paper we revisit the tunneling spectrum of a charged and rotating black hole--Kerr-Newman black hole by using Parikh and Wilczek's tunneling method and get the most general result compared with the works [9, 10]. We find an ambiguity in Parikh and Wilczek's tunneling method, and give a reasonable description. We use this general spectrum to discuss the information recovery based on the Refs. [11-13]. For the tunneling spectrum we obtained, there exit correlations between sequential Hawking radiations, information can be carried out by such correlations, and the entropy is conserved during the radiation process. So we resolve the information loss paradox based on the methods [11-13] in the most general case.

  20. Mass-Radius relation of low-mass stars revisited with the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demory, B.-O.; Ségransan, D.; Forveille, T.; Queloz, D.; Delfosse, X.; Perrier, C.

    2009-02-01

    We report the measurements of 5 single, low-mass and very low-mass stars angular diameter obtained with VINCI (VLT Interferometer Commissioning Instrument) in 2002 and AMBER (Astronomical Multi-BEam Recombiner) since 2007 on the VLTI array. We determined radii with accuracies of 1 to 5% for low-mass and very low mass stars ranging from M5.5V to K0.5V, thus encompassing a good fraction of the M-R relation for low-mass stars. Those results allow to revisit the current state of mass-radius relation for those objects from which a good agreement with models is shown up to about 0.6-0.7 solar masses. We explore remaining discrepancies in the upper part of the mass-radius relation and point out effects that may be due to stellar metallicity.

  1. A new approach for agroecosystems monitoring using high-revisit multitemporal satellite data series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, M.; Moclán, C.; Romo, A.; Pirondini, F.

    2014-10-01

    With increasing population pressure throughout the world and the need for increased agricultural production there is a definite need for improved management of the world's agricultural resources. Comprehensive, reliable and timely information on agricultural resources is necessary for the implementation of effective management decisions. In that sense, the demand for high-quality and high-frequency geo-information for monitoring of agriculture and its associated ecosystems has been growing in the recent decades. Satellite image data enable direct observation of large areas at frequent intervals and therefore allow unprecedented mapping and monitoring of crops evolution. Furthermore, real time analysis can assist in making timely management decisions that affect the outcome of the crops. The DEIMOS-1 satellite, owned and operated by ELECNOR DEIMOS IMAGING (Spain), provides 22m, 3-band imagery with a very wide (620-km) swath, and has been specifically designed to produce high-frequency revisit on very large areas. This capability has been proved through the contracts awarded to Airbus Defence and Space every year since 2011, where DEIMOS-1 has provided the USDA with the bulk of the imagery used to monitor the crop season in the Lower 48, in cooperation with its twin satellite DMCii's UK-DMC2. Furthermore, high density agricultural areas have been targeted with increased frequency and analyzed in near real time to monitor tightly the evolution. In this paper we present the results obtained from a campaign carried out in 2013 with DEIMOS-1 and UK-DMC2 satellites. These campaigns provided a high-frequency revisit of target areas, with one image every two days on average: almost a ten-fold frequency improvement with respect to Landsat-8. The results clearly show the effectiveness of a high-frequency monitoring approach with high resolution images with respect to classic strategies where results are more exposed to weather conditions.

  2. Revisiting the classics: considering nonconsumptive effects in textbook examples of predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    Peckarsky, Barbara L; Abrams, Peter A; Bolnick, Daniel I; Dill, Lawrence M; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Luttbeg, Barney; Orrock, John L; Peacor, Scott D; Preisser, Evan L; Schmitz, Oswald J; Trussell, Geoffrey C

    2008-09-01

    Predator effects on prey dynamics are conventionally studied by measuring changes in prey abundance attributed to consumption by predators. We revisit four classic examples of predator-prey systems often cited in textbooks and incorporate subsequent studies of nonconsumptive effects of predators (NCE), defined as changes in prey traits (e.g., behavior, growth, development) measured on an ecological time scale. Our review revealed that NCE were integral to explaining lynx-hare population dynamics in boreal forests, cascading effects of top predators in Wisconsin lakes, and cascading effects of killer whales and sea otters on kelp forests in nearshore marine habitats. The relative roles of consumption and NCE of wolves on moose and consequent indirect effects on plant communities of Isle Royale depended on climate oscillations. Nonconsumptive effects have not been explicitly tested to explain the link between planktonic alewives and the size structure of the zooplankton, nor have they been invoked to attribute keystone predator status in intertidal communities or elsewhere. We argue that both consumption and intimidation contribute to the total effects of keystone predators, and that characteristics of keystone consumers may differ from those of predators having predominantly NCE. Nonconsumptive effects are often considered as an afterthought to explain observations inconsistent with consumption-based theory. Consequently, NCE with the same sign as consumptive effects may be overlooked, even though they can affect the magnitude, rate, or scale of a prey response to predation and can have important management or conservation implications. Nonconsumptive effects may underlie other classic paradigms in ecology, such as delayed density dependence and predator-mediated prey coexistence. Revisiting classic studies enriches our understanding of predator-prey dynamics and provides compelling rationale for ramping up efforts to consider how NCE affect traditional predator-prey models based on consumption, and to compare the relative magnitude of consumptive and NCE of predators. PMID:18831163

  3. A revisit of the papers on the theory of relativity: Reconsideration of the hypothesis of ether-dragging

    E-print Network

    Masanori Sato

    2009-11-13

    This paper revisits previous papers related to the theory of relativity. Afterwards, a reconsideration of the hypothesis of ether-dragging is discussed. The ether is compatible with the theory of relativity and historical experiments; this paper explains the Michelson-Morley experiment using the ether-dragging hypothesis without the orthodox interpretation that the speed c is a fixed constant in terms of any system of inertial coordinates.

  4. A review of "England's Wars of Religion, Revisited" edited by Charles W. A. Prior and Glenn Burgess 

    E-print Network

    Langley, Chris R.

    2012-01-01

    audience. Charles W. A. Prior and Glenn Burgess, eds. England?s Wars of Religion, Revisited. Farnham and Burlington: Ashgate, 2011. xiv + 335 pp. + 2 illustrations. $115.00. Review by ?? ? . ???????, ? ?? ? ?? ?? ?? ?. ? e fourteen essays produced... of the Parliamentarians, was simultaneously couched in classical and religious imagery. Charles Prior?s essay earlier in the volume, shows how the application of the ecclesiastical Canons of 1640 raised issues of sovereignty as opponents disapproved of the Canons...

  5. Ortega Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asheim, Lester

    1982-01-01

    Reexamines Ortega y Gasset's proposition that the professional role of the librarian is to act as a selective "filter between man and the torrent of books." Responsibilities of the librarian in light of the increasing volume of information, increases in speed of access to information, and information overload, are discussed. (Author/JL)

  6. Pseudodiagnosticity Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crupi, Vincenzo; Tentori, Katya; Lombardi, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    In the psychology of reasoning and judgment, the pseudodiagnosticity task has been a major tool for the empirical investigation of people's ability to search for diagnostic information. A novel normative analysis of this experimental paradigm is presented, by which the participants' prevailing responses turn out not to support the generally…

  7. PACER revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1988-10-04

    This paper discusses a modified version of the PACER concept for power and nuclear material production, which changes the working fluid in the cavity from steam to the molten salt, LiF + BeF/sub 2/. In the PACER concept, a 20-kt peaceful nuclear explosion is contained in a cavity about 200 m in diameter, filled with 200 atm of 500/degree/C steam. Energy from the explosion is used to produce power, and the neutrons are used to produce materials such as /sup 233/U, Pu, /sup 60/Co, and T. The present idea is to modify the PACER concept in three ways, to improve the practicality, predictability, and safety of power production from this technology and thus improve public acceptance of this power source. These improvements are line the cavity with steel; replace the steam with molten salt; and reduce the explosive yield to about 2 kt. This concept is the only fusion power concept where the underlying technology is proven and in hand today. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Endosymbiosis Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribe, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    Presents insights into the endosymbiotic theory based on a re-examination of evidence from investigations into the archaebacteria and other strange organisms inhabiting the hindguts of wood-eating insects. Examines the mechanism of evolutionary change and the speed with which it occurs. (RT)

  9. Panspermia revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, Gerda

    "Panspermia", coined by S. Arrhenius in 1903, suggests that microscopic forms of life, e.g., bacterial spores, can be dispersed in space by the radiation pressure from the Sun thereby seeding life from one planet to another or even beyond our Solar System. Being ignored for almost the rest of the century, the scenario of interplanetary transfer of life has received increased support from recent discoveries, such as the detection of Martian meteorites and the high resistance of microorganisms to outer space conditions. With the aid of space technology and adequate laboratory devices the following decisive step required for viable transfer from one planet to another have been tested: (i) the escape process, i.e. impact ejection into space; (ii) the journey through space over extended periods of time; and (iii) the landing process, i.e. non-destructive deposition of the biological material on another planet. In systematic shock recovery experiments within a pressure range observed in Martian meteorites (5-50 GPa) a vital launch window of 5-40 GPa has been determined for spores of Bacillus subtilis and the lichen Xanthoria elegans, whereas this window was restricted to 5-10 GPa for the endolithic cyanobaterium Chroococcidiopsis. Traveling through space implies exposure to high vacuum, an intense radiation regime of cosmic and solar origin and high temperature fluctuations. In several space experiments the biological efficiency of these different space parameters has been tested: extraterrestrial solar UV radiation has exerted the most deleterious effects to viruses, as well as to bacterial and fungal spores; however shielding against this intense insolation resulted in 70 % survival of B. subtilis spores after spending 6 years in outer space. Lichens survived 2 weeks in space, even without any shielding. The entry process of microorganisms has been recently tested in the STONE facility attached to the heat shield of a reentry capsule. The data support the scenario of "Lithopanspermia", which assumes that impact-expelled rocks serve as interplanetary transfer vehicles for microorganisms colonizing those rocks. Literature: St¨ffler D, Horneck G, Ott S, Hornemann, U, Cockell CS, Moeller R, Meyer C, de Vera J-P, o Fritz J, Artemieva NA,.Experimental evidence for the potential impact ejection of viable microorganisms from Mars and Mars-like planets (2007) Icarus, 186, 585-588. Sancho, L.G., de la Torre, R., Horneck, G., Ascaso, C., de los Rios, A., Pintado, A., Wierzchos, J. and Schuster, M. (2007) Lichens survive in space: Results from the 2005 LICHENS experiment. Astrobiology, 7, 443-454. Mileikowsky C, Cucinotta F, Wilson J W, Gladman B, Horneck G, Lindegren L, Melosh J, Rickman H, Valtonen M, Zheng J Q (2000) Natural transfer of viable microbes In space, Part 1: From Mars to Earth and Earth to Mars, Icarus, 145, 391-427. Nicholson WL, Munakata N, Horneck G, Melosh HJ, and Setlow P (2000) Resistance of Bacillus endospores to extreme terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments, Microb. Mol. Biol. Rev. 64, 548-572.

  10. Cheiloscopy: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Rachana V; Dinkar, Ajit D; Prabhu, Vishnudas Dinesh; Rao, Prasanna Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Identification plays a very important role in any crime investigation. Cheiloscopy helps in identifying the humans based on the lips’ traces. The pattern of wrinkles on the lips has individual characteristics like fingerprints. A review of the literature reveals very little research done on lip prints so far. The present article reviews in detail the history, scope of cheiloscopy, and the use of lip prints in crime detection. It also highlights the current research carried out in the field of cheiloscopy. An effort has been made to help the researchers by reviewing in detail the various methods of classifying and analyzing the lip prints. It concludes by enlightening the readers with the fact that the possibilities to use the red part of lips to identify a human being are wider than it is commonly thought. PMID:23087583

  11. Hubble Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Daniel; Duerbeck, Hilmar; Hawley, S. A.; Jenkner, H.

    Arguably the single most successful scientific instrument ever built, the Hubble Space telescope continues to dazzle. In recent months it has discovered the most distant known galaxy and the most massive known star, and has been at the front lines of all the most pressing questions in astrophysics: the age of the Universe, the nature of gamma-ray bursters, the discovery of extrasolar planets. In The Discovery Machine, the authors of the widely acclaimed Hubble: A New Window to the Universe bring you an exciting, detailed, gorgeously illustrated account of Hubble's breathtaking new discoveries. Acclaim for Hubble: A New Window to the Universe "Wonderful to behold. Buy it and feast your eyes." Scientific American "A wonderful volume...a clear and insightful explanation is included for each and every image." The Planetarian

  12. Polymyxins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Landman, David; Georgescu, Claudiu; Martin, Don Antonio; Quale, John

    2008-01-01

    The global emergence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli has spurred a renewed interest in polymyxins. Once discarded due to concerns regarding nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity, polymyxins now hold an important role in the antibiotic armamentarium. However, more reliable information is needed to determine the optimal dosing of these agents. Also, unanswered questions regarding in vitro testing remain, including questions regarding the reliability of automated systems and the establishment of appropriate breakpoints for defining susceptibility. Most contemporary clinical studies examining the use of these agents have involved patients with infections due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. It has been reassuring that polymyxin therapy for resistant bacteria has resulted in clinical responses and toxicity rates similar to those for carbapenem therapy for susceptible isolates. While most surveillance studies demonstrated high rates of susceptibility, several reports noted the emergence of polymyxin-resistant nosocomial pathogens. Polymyxins have assumed an important antibiotic niche for therapy for hospital-acquired infections; further studies defining the optimal use of these agents will likely extend the duration of their clinical usefulness. PMID:18625681

  13. Exobiology revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, H. P.

    The term ``Exobiology'' was introduced about 25 years ago, at a time when intensive discussions were under way concerning plans for the biological exploration of Mars. The search for life on Mars was to be a critical test of the concept of chemical evolution- not an end in itself. After the Viking mission, when it became apparent that prospects were dim for the discovery of extraterrestrial life within our solar system, many people concluded that this new field of endeavor would soon expire. Quite the contrary, over the past decade, the field has broadened considerably into a multidisciplinary approach to understanding the circumstances that led to the origin of life and the interplay between the evolution of this planet and its biota.

  14. Ichthammol revisited.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alan S

    2010-07-01

    Scientific research has greatly expanded the therapeutic options for patients with cutaneous disease. This expansion, however, has not been without its drawbacks. While newer medications and procedures not only typically offer better disease control but they are also often associated with increased expense and problematic toxicities. Older medications often relegated to the dustbin of history may provide effective treatment of common dermatologic maladies and deserves reconsideration. Ichthammol, derived from shale oil, has been employed in the therapy of psoriasis, eczematous dermatitis, leg ulcers, seborrheic dermatitis, and furuncles for over a century and remains a useful topical medicament. PMID:20618493

  15. Desflurane - Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra; Vakamudi, Mahesh

    2012-01-01

    The search for an ideal inhalational general anesthetic agent continues. Desflurane, which was recently introduced in the Indian market, possesses favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and is closer to the definition of an ideal agent. It offers the advantage of precise control over depth of anesthesia along with a rapid, predictable, and clear-headed recovery with minimal postoperative sequelae, making it a valuable anesthetic agent for maintenance in adults and pediatric patients in surgeries of all durations. The agent has advantages when used in extremes of age and in the obese. Its use may increase the direct costs of providing anesthetic care. Methods or techniques, such as low-flow anesthesia, to reduce the overall cost and along with minimal environmental implications must be followed. PMID:22345954

  16. Speechreading Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woll, Bencie

    2012-01-01

    Although speechreading has always served an important role in the communication of deaf people, educational interest in speechreading has decreased in recent decades. This paper reviews speechreading in terms of speech processing, neural activity and literacy, and suggests that it has an important role in intervention programmes for all deaf…

  17. Siphons, Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richert, Alex; Binder, P. -M.

    2011-01-01

    The siphon is a very useful example of early technology, the operation of which has long been well understood. A recent article makes the claim that established beliefs regarding this device are incorrect and proposes a "chain model" in which intermolecular forces within the fluid play a large role while atmospheric pressure does not. We have…

  18. Coadaptation revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, B. )

    1991-03-01

    During the four decades or more since Dobzhansky introduced the term 'coadaptation' to refer to the commonly observed selective superiority of inversion heterozygotes in populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura, the definition of the term has evolved, as have views concerning the rapidity with which coadaptation might occur. Indeed, the paucity of demonstrated instances of linkage disequilibrium in natural populations has led many to dismiss coadaptation as a factor in evolutionary change. The present article reviews the reasons why coadaptation (and the equivalent expression, 'integration of gene pools') was proposed as a phenomenon occurring in local (or experimental) populations, offers supporting data obtained through a reanalysis of data on irradiated populations of D. melanogaster, and concludes that sound evidence supports coadaptation as a factor in the genetic change of populations.65 references.

  19. Amyoplasia revisited.

    PubMed

    Hall, Judith G; Aldinger, Kimberly A; Tanaka, Kimi I

    2014-03-01

    Amyoplasia is a specific type and the most common form of arthrogryposis (multiple congenital contractures). It is a clinical diagnosis at this time. Care should be used making the diagnosis because of the implications for recurrence, natural history, associated anomalies, and both etiology and pathogenesis. We reviewed over 600 published reports and 2,500 individual records to identify the 560 individuals reported here. Affected limbs had characteristic positions with fatty-fibrous replacement of muscle. Upper limb involvement was usually characterized by extended elbows. Lower limbs were held in various positions at birth; however, equinovarus positioning of feet was almost always present. Symmetric involvement was common. Among 560 affected individuals, subtypes were identified: four-limb symmetric involvement (331/560 = 55.9%), severe involvement (41/560 = 7.3%), three-limb involvement (27/560 = 4.8%), upper limb only Amyoplasia (ULA; 94/560 = 16.8%), and lower limb only Amyoplasia (LLA; 25/560 = 15.5%). Discordant monozygotic twinning was increased, occurring in 6.6% (37/560; OR 10.9). A variety of additional anomalies were seen, attributed to apparent vascular compromise. Gastrointestinal vascular compromise-type anomalies were present in 9.1% (51/560), trunk muscle defects in another 2.7% (15/560), digit compromise in 12.1% (68/560), constriction rings in 4.3% (24/560), and perinatal long bone fractures in 10.5% (59/560). Although prenatal ultrasound became the standard of care in 1990, only about one quarter of affected pregnancies were diagnosed prenatally since 1990. Amyoplasia appears to be completely sporadic. Novel pathogenetic mechanisms for the congenital anomalies seen in Amyoplasia need to be identified. PMID:24459070

  20. Theistareykir revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stracke, Andreas; Zindler, Alan; Salters, Vincent J. M.; McKenzie, Dan; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Albarède, Francis; GröNvold, Karl

    2003-02-01

    Postglacial basalts from Theistareykir (younger than 10,000 years), northern Iceland, define the depleted end of the spectrum of chemical and isotopic compositions observed in Icelandic volcanics but extend to some of the most enriched chemical and isotopic compositions found in Icelandic tholeiites. A spectacular feature of these basalts is the impressive correlations observed between radiogenic isotope ratios (Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb) and almost the entire spectrum of major and trace element concentrations and ratios. The radiogenic isotope and major and trace element compositions are little affected by crystal fractionation and are essentially unaffected by interaction with the preexisting crust. The Theistareykir basalts must therefore be relatively close in composition to primary melts from the mantle. Consequently, their chemical and isotopic compositions provide a unique opportunity to investigate the nature of melting beneath Iceland and the geochemical character and origin of the mantle source. Large variations in incompatible element abundances require source heterogeneity, as well as variable extents of melting, to be important factors in determining the final chemical composition of the melts. Melting integrates over a large pressure range and is dominated by melting a depleted peridotite similar to the ambient depleted North Atlantic mantle. The isotopically enriched component is of relatively minor abundance and probably has a lower solidus temperature compared to the depleted component. More than one isotopically enriched component must be involved, but it is difficult to identify the end-member compositions using those of the lavas because of preeruptive averaging and damping of the enriched isotopic signals by mixing with the ambient depleted mantle or melts thereof, suggesting that the isotopic signals in Icelandic melts represent a somewhat muted isotopic signal of the enriched component(s) in the Icelandic source mantle. Comparison of the isotopic arrays of Icelandic basalts with those of global OIB suggests that the dominant enriched component may have a HIMU (high ?) affinity rather than representing a component similar to the enriched end of the Iceland isotopic arrays, and small amounts of an enriched component similar to enriched mantle (EMI)- type OIB sources are probably also involved.

  1. Einstein Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    A brief description on the work and life of the great physicist scientist Albert Einstein is presented. The photoelectric paper written by him in 1905 led him to the study of fluctuations in the energy density of radiation and from there to the incomplete nature of the equipartition theorem of classical mechanics, which failed to account for…

  2. Marijuana Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, James, Jr.; Lopata, Ann

    1979-01-01

    This review examines recent research on psychological effects of marijuana. The article contains material on potency, research problems, use patterns in the United States, and expectancy, as well as a review of research on acute effects, including psychosis, toxic delirium, acute anxiety, and brain damage. (Author)

  3. Excellence Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Linda Kreger, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Excellence in education of gifted children is the focus of this journal theme issue. Two articles are featured: (1) "Making Connections for the At-Risk Gifted Child" by Mary Kay Finholt and Kathy Peckron, describing an exemplary support system developed for at-risk gifted students in the Rockwood School District in Missouri, which provides…

  4. Power, Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscigno, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    Power is a core theoretical construct in the field with amazing utility across substantive areas, levels of analysis and methodologies. Yet, its use along with associated assumptions--assumptions surrounding constraint vs. action and specifically organizational structure and rationality--remain problematic. In this article, and following an…

  5. Pestalotiopsis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Maharachchikumbura, S.S.N.; Hyde, K.D.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Xu, J.; Crous, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    Species of Pestalotiopsis occur commonly as plant pathogens, and represent a fungal group known to produce a wide range of chemically novel, diverse metabolites. In the present study, we investigated 91 Pestalotiopsis isolates from the CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre (CBS) culture collection. The phylogeny of the Amphisphaeriaceae was constructed based on analysis of 28S nrRNA gene (LSU) sequence data, and taxonomic changes are proposed to reflect more natural groupings. We combined morphological and DNA data, and segregated two novel genera from Pestalotiopsis, namely Neopestalotiopsis and Pseudopestalotiopsis. The three genera are easily distinguishable on the basis of their conidiogenous cells and colour of their median conidial cells. We coupled morphological and combined sequence data of internal transcribed spacer (ITS), partial ?-tubulin (TUB) and partial translation elongation factor 1-alpha (TEF) gene regions, which revealed 30 clades in Neopestalotiopsis and 43 clades in Pestalotiopsis. Based on these data, 11 new species are introduced in Neopestalotiopsis, 24 in Pestalotiopsis, and two in Pseudopestalotiopsis. Several new combinations are proposed to emend monophyly of Neopestalotiopsis, Pestalotiopsis and Pseudopestalotiopsis. PMID:25492988

  6. Leukemia revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  7. Revisiting Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winebrenner, Susan

    2007-01-01

    With the passage of the "No Child Left Behind Act" (NCLB), the emphasis is for all children to reach proficient levels. Since they already work above this benchmark, the needs of gifted students are often de-emphasized. If teachers define learning as moving forward from the knowledge a student already has, they find that those who are at greatest…

  8. Programming revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulthess, Thomas C.

    2015-05-01

    Writing efficient scientific software that makes best use of the increasing complexity of computer architectures requires bringing together modelling, applied mathematics and computer engineering. Physics may help unite these approaches.

  9. Balloons Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeskova, Z.; Featonby, D.; Fekova, V.

    2012-01-01

    Whilst everyone is familiar with the process of blowing up a balloon, few of us have gone further to quantify the actual pressures involved at different stages in the inflation process. This paper seeks to describe experiments to fill some of those gaps and examine some of the apparently anomalous behaviour of connected balloons. (Contains 12…

  10. A review of "The Nature of English Revolution Revisited: Essays in Honour of John Morrill" edited by Stephen Taylor and Grant Tapsell 

    E-print Network

    Schwarz, Marc

    2014-01-01

    stream_source_info Review of %22The Nature of English Revolution Revisited Essas in Honour of John Morrill%22 eds Taylor and Tapsell reviewer Schwarz.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7020 Content-Encoding UTF-8... stream_name Review of %22The Nature of English Revolution Revisited Essas in Honour of John Morrill%22 eds Taylor and Tapsell reviewer Schwarz.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 reviews 59 demonstrate how, after the Civil Wars...

  11. Revisiting Low Energy Deuteron Production of [18F] Fluoride and Fluorine for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhart, T.E.; Nickles, R.J.; Roberts, A.D.

    2003-08-26

    Fluorine-18 is currently the most widely used radioisotope in PET imaging. While much attention has been paid in recent years to production methods from 18O(p,n)18F, the current work revisits production techniques using non-enriched neon targets and the 20Ne(d,{alpha})18F reaction. While this reaction was originally pursued, and ultimately replaced by the higher yielding 18O reactions, there is an opportunity using high current low-energy deuteron accelerators and the inherent simplicity of gas targetry to provide viable alternatives to the costly 18O water target systems. 18F production systems have been developed for the gas-phase 20Ne(d,{alpha})18F reaction with deuterons from a 3MV NEC 9SDH-2 electrostatic tandem accelerator. High power target systems allowing for irradiation in excess of 100uA provided [18F]F2 yields to 86% of the theoretical maximum, and [18F]F- yields with a wash-off system of 80% of the maximum.

  12. Revisiting the NIOSH Criteria for a Recommended Standard: Occupational Noise Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, William J.; Franks, John R.

    2002-05-01

    In 1998, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) revised the Criteria for a Recommended Standard: Occupational Noise Exposure [DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 98-126]. NIOSH reevaluated the recommended exposure limit (REL) for occupational noise exposure and reaffirms support for 85-dBA REL. Based upon scientific evidence, NIOSH recommends a 3-dB exchange rate. NIOSH recommends that significant threshold shift be identified as an increase of 15 dB in the hearing threshold level at 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, or 6000 Hz in either ear, with two consecutive audiometric tests. The new criterion has the advantages of a high identification rate and a low false-positive rate. In contrast with the former 1972 criterion, NIOSH no longer recommends age correction on individual audiograms. NIOSH has revisited its recommendations on the using of single-number laboratory-derived Noise Reduction Rating (NRR) required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for labeling of hearing protectors sold within the United States. In 1972, NIOSH recommended the use of the full NRR value; however, the new criterion recommends derating the NRR by 25%, 50%, and 70% for earmuffs, formable earplugs, and all other earplugs, respectively. This presentation will compare and contrast current regulations against the NIOSH recommendations.

  13. Iron chelators in photodynamic therapy revisited: synergistic effect by novel highly active thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Serda, Maciej; Musiol, Robert; Malecki, Grzegorz; Szurko, Agnieszka; Muchowicz, Angelika; Golab, Jakub; Ratuszna, Alicja; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2014-04-10

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), a noninvasive anticancer treatment, visible light, is used as a magic bullet selectively destroying cancer cells by a photosensitizer that is nontoxic in the dark. Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is a natural photosensitizer synthesized in the cell, which is also a chelating agent that if bonded to Fe(2+) forms heme, a central component of hemoglobin. Therefore, xenobiotic iron chelators can disturb iron homeostasis, increasing the accumulation of PpIX, obstructing the last step of heme biosynthesis, and enhancing PDT efficiency. However, the attempts to use this promising idea have not proved to be hugely successful. Herein, we revisited this issue by analyzing the application of iron chelators highly toxic in the dark, which should have higher Fe(2+) affinity than the nontoxic chelators used so far. We have designed and prepared thiosemicarbazones (TSC) with the highest dark cellular cytotoxicity among TSCs ever reported. We demonstrate that compound 2 exerts powerful PDT enhancement when used in combination with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a precursor of PpIX. PMID:24900837

  14. Revisiting the Reactivity of Uracil During Collision Induced Dissociation: Tautomerism and Charge-Directed Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Daniel G.; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2012-05-01

    In our recent work towards the nontarget identification of products of nucleic acid (NA) damage in urine, we have found previous work describing the dissociation of NA bases not adequate to fully explain their observed reactivity. Here we revisit the gas-phase chemistry of protonated uracil (U) during collision induced dissociation (CID) using two modern tandem mass spectrometry techniques; quadrupole ion trap (QIT) and quadrupole time of flight (Q-TOF). We present detailed mechanistic proposals that account for all observed products of our experiments and from previous isotope labeling data, and that are supported by previous ion spectroscopy results and theoretical work. The diverse product-ions of U cannot be explained adequately by only considering the lowest energy form of protonated U as a precursor. The tautomers adopted by U during collisional excitation make it possible to relate the complex reactivity observed to reasonable mechanistic proposals and feasible product-ion structures for this small highly conjugated heterocycle. These reactions proceed from four different stable tautomers, which are excited to a specific activated precursor from which dissociation can occur via a charge-directed process through a favorable transition state to give a stabilized product. Understanding the chemistry of uracil at this level will facilitate the identification of new modified uracil derivatives in biological samples based solely on their reactivity during CID. Our integrated approach to describing ion dissociation is widely applicable to other NA bases and similar classes of biomolecules.

  15. Revisiting Hartle's model using perturbed matching theory to second order: amending the change in mass

    E-print Network

    Borja Reina; Raül Vera

    2015-08-08

    Hartle's model describes the equilibrium configuration of a rotating isolated compact body in perturbation theory up to second order in General Relativity. The interior of the body is a perfect fluid with a barotropic equation of state, no convective motions and rigid rotation. That interior is matched across its surface to an asymptotically flat vacuum exterior. Perturbations are taken to second order around a static and spherically symmetric background configuration. Apart from the explicit assumptions, the perturbed configuration is constructed upon some implicit premises, in particular the continuity of the functions describing the perturbation in terms of some background radial coordinate. In this work we revisit the model within a modern general and consistent theory of perturbative matchings to second order, which is independent of the coordinates and gauges used to describe the two regions to be joined. We explore the matching conditions up to second order in full. The main particular result we present is that the radial function $m_0$ (in the setting of the original work) of the second order perturbation tensor, contrary to the original assumption, presents a jump at the surface of the star, which is proportional to the value of the energy density of the background configuration there. As a consequence, the change in mass needed by the perturbed configuration to keep the value of the central energy density unchanged must be amended. We also discuss some subtleties that arise when studying the deformation of the star.

  16. Revisiting XENON100's constraints (and signals?) for low-mass dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan

    2013-09-01

    Although observations made with the CoGeNT and CDMS experiments have been interpreted as possible signals of low-mass ( ? 7–10 GeV) dark matter particles, constraints from the XENON100 collaboration appear to be incompatible with this hypothesis, at least at face value. In this paper, we revisit XENON100's constraint on dark matter in this mass range, and consider how various uncertainties and assumptions made might alter this conclusion. We also note that while XENON100's two nuclear recoil candidates each exhibit very low ratios of ionization-to-scintillation signals, making them difficult to attribute to known electronic or neutron backgrounds, they are consistent with originating from dark matter particles in the mass range favored by CoGeNT and CDMS. We argue that with lower, but not implausible, values for the relative scintillation efficiency of liquid xenon (L{sub eff}), and the suppression of the scintillation signal in liquid xenon at XENON100's electric field (S{sub nr}), these two events could consistently arise from dark matter particles with a mass and cross section in the range favored by CoGeNT and CDMS. If this interpretation is correct, we predict that the LUX experiment, with a significantly higher light yield than XENON100, should observe dark matter induced events at an observable rate of ? 3–24 per month.

  17. Positive and negative analyte ion yield in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenkamp, F.; Wäfler, E.; Jecklin, M. C.; Zenobi, R.

    2009-08-01

    The most commonly accepted model for the formation of analyte ions in MALDI-MS assumes a primary ionization of the matrix e.g., by photoionization, leading among others to stable protonated and deprotonated matrix ions, respectively. Peptide and protein ions are then formed by secondary proton transfer reactions in the expanding plume. This model had been checked experimentally by comparing the yield of positive to negative ions of three peptides (Bradykinin, Angiotensin I and Fibrinopeptide A) and six matrices ([alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamicacid (CHCA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoicacid (DHB), 6-aza-2-thiothymine (ATT), 4-nitroaniline (4-NA), 2-amino-5-nitro-4-picoline (ANP), 5-aminoquinolione (5-AQ)), differing in gas-phase basicity by about 100 kJ/mole [M. Dashtiev, E. Wäfler, U. Röhling, M. Gorshkov, F. Hillenkamp, R. Zenobi, Int. J. Mass Spetrom. 268 (2007) 122]. The data have been revisited for a more general and in-depth analysis. Model predictions are presented for a wide range of experimental parameters, in particular for ranges of the gas-phase basicity and acidity of analyte and matrix and for different molar ratios of analyte to matrix as well as the yield of primary matrix ions. It is shown that the observed ion yields cannot be explained by any single and consistent set of parameters. It is concluded that the existing simple model needs be modified to fully explain the experimental findings. Such modifications should primarily address the formation of negative matrix and analyte ions.

  18. The Galactic Cepheid period-luminosity relation revisited using bona fide cluster Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Richard I.; Mowlavi, Nami; Eyer, Laurent

    2013-02-01

    Classical Cepheids in Galactic open clusters (cluster Cepheids: CCs) have been studied extensively for multiple decades, thanks to their importance as calibrators of the Galactic Cepheid period-luminosity relation (PLR). Here we revisit the calibration of the Galactic PLR using a new sample of CCs, since even recent calibrations show significant discrepancies. The CC sample employed for the calibration is based on the preliminary results of a self-consistent, eight-dimensional all-sky census. This census is based mostly on literature data, supplemented with high-precision radial-velocity observations from both hemispheres. New CCs are identified from our census and the degree of confidence in membership is quantified for known candidates. Using only bona fide CCs, we obtain MV = (-3.08 +/- 0.50) log P + (-0.94 +/- 0.42) mag, which is in perfect agreement with the results by Sandage, Tammann, and Reindl, albeit with larger error bars and an rms of 0.21 mag. The key to obtaining a meaningful calibration is to employ accurate cluster distance moduli and space reddening values. A homogeneous study of all bona fide host clusters would be desirable to increase precision and confidence in the calibration.

  19. Melting point equations for the ternary system water/sodium chloride/ethylene glycol revisited.

    PubMed

    Benson, James D; Bagchi, Aniruddha; Han, Xu; Critser, John K; Woods, Erik J

    2010-12-01

    Partial phase diagrams are of considerable utility in the development of optimized cryobiological procedures. Recent theoretical predictions of the melting points of ternary solutions of interest to cryobiology have caused us to re-examine measurements that our group made for the ethylene-glycol-sodium chloride-water phase diagram. Here we revisit our previous experiments by measuring melting points at five ethylene-glycol to sodium chloride ratios (R values; R=5, 10, 15, 30, and 45) and five levels of concentration for each ratio. Melting points were averaged from three measurements and plotted as a function of total solute concentration for each R value studied. The new measurements differed from our original experimental values and agreed with predicted values from both theoretical models. Additionally, the data were fit to the polynomial described in our previous report and the resulting equation was obtained: T(m) = (38.3-2.145 x 10?¹ R)w + (81.19 - 2.909×10?¹ R)w², where w is the total solute mass fraction. This new equation provided good fits to the experimental data as well as published values and relates the determined polynomial constants to the R value of the corresponding isopleths of the three dimensional phase diagram, allowing the liquids curve for any R value to be obtained. PMID:20955693

  20. “Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome”—Revisiting the Structural Basis of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Sehgel, Nancy L.; Vatner, Stephen F.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the pervasiveness of increased arterial stiffness in patients with cardiovascular disease has become increasingly apparent. Though, this phenomenon has been well documented in humans and animal models of disease for well over a century, there has been surprisingly limited development in a deeper mechanistic understanding of arterial stiffness. Much of the historical literature has focused on changes in extracellular matrix proteins—collagen and elastin. However, extracellular matrix changes alone appear insufficient to consistently account for observed changes in vascular stiffness, which we observed in our studies of aortic stiffness in aging monkeys. This led us to examine novel mechanisms operating at the level of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)—that include increased cell stiffness and adhesion to extracellular matrix—which that may be interrelated with other mechanisms contributing to arterial stiffness. We introduce these observations as a new concept—the Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome (SMCSS)—within the field of arterial stiffness and posit that stiffening of vascular cells impairs vascular function and may contribute stiffening to the vasculature with aging and cardiovascular disease. Importantly, this review article revisits the structural basis of arterial stiffness in light of these novel findings. Such classification of SMCSS and its contextualization into our current understanding of vascular mechanics may be useful in the development of strategic therapeutics to directly target arterial stiffness. PMID:26635621