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Sample records for fsh habitat enhancement

  1. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fsh Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R. Todd

    2001-12-31

    The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla River Basin Watershed Assessment assisted the project in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. Habitat enhancement projects continued to be maintained on 44 private properties, four riparian easements and one in-stream enhancement agreement were secured, two new projects implemented and two existing projects improved to enhance anadromous fish habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities in the Umatilla River Basin. New project locations included sites on the mid Umatilla River and Buckaroo Creek. Improvements were implemented at existing project sites on the upper Umatilla River and Wildhorse Creek. A stream bank stabilization project was implemented at approximately River Mile 37.4 Umatilla River to stabilize 760 feet of eroding stream bank and improve in-stream habitat diversity. Habitat enhancements at this site included construction of six rock barbs with one large conifer root wad incorporated into each barb, stinging approximately 10,000 native willow cuttings, planting 195 tubling willows and 1,800 basin wildrye grass plugs, and seeding 40 pounds of native grass seed. Staff time to assist in development of a subcontract and fence materials were provided to establish eight spring sites for off-stream watering and to protect wetlands within the Buckaroo Creek Watershed. A gravel bar was moved and incorporated into an adjacent point bar to reduce stream energy and stream channel confinement within the existing project area at River Mile 85 Umatilla River. Approximately 10,000 native willow cuttings were stung and trenched into the stream channel margins and stream banks, and 360

  2. Enhancement of FSH bioactivity in vivo using site-specific antisera.

    PubMed

    Ferasin, L; Gabai, G; Beattie, J; Bono, G; Holder, A T

    1997-03-01

    The ability of site-specific antipeptide antisera to enhance the biological activity of ovine FSH (oFSH) in vivo was investigated using hypopituitary Snell dwarf mice. These animals were shown to respond to increasing doses of oFSH (3.3-90 micrograms/day), administered in two daily injections over a 5-day treatment period, in a highly significant dose-dependent fashion. The responses measured were increases in uterine weight, ovarian weight and the index of keratinisation in vaginal smears. The dose-dependent response to oFSH confirmed the suitability of this animal model for these investigations and suggested the suboptimal dose of oFSH (20 micrograms/day) for use in enhancement studies. Five peptides derived from the beta subunit of bovine FSH (bFSH) (A, residues 33-47; B, 40-51; C, 69-80; D, 83-94; E, 27-39) were used to generate polyclonal antipeptide antisera. Of these peptides, only A and B produced an antiserum (raised in sheep) capable of recognising 125I-bFSH in a liquid phase RIA. Antisera prepared against peptide A or peptide B were found to significantly enhance the biological activity of 20 micrograms oFSH/day over a 5-day treatment period. The response to antipeptide antisera alone did not differ significantly from that observed in PBS-injected control animals, neither did the response to FSH alone differ from that observed in animals treated with FSH plus preimmune serum. Thus the enhanced responses are dependent upon the presence of FSH plus antipeptide antiserum. Peptides A and B are located in a region thought to be involved in receptor recognition, this may have implications for the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and/or the structure/function relationships of FSH. That FSH-enhancing antisera can be generated by immunisation of animals with peptides A and B suggests that it may be possible to develop these peptides as vaccines capable of increasing reproductive performance, such as ovulation rate. The high degree of sequence homology between

  3. Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Dosage Based on Body Weight Enhances Ovulatory Responses and Subsequent Embryo Production in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. R.; Rahman, M. M.; Wan Khadijah, W. E.; Abdullah, R. B.

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of porcine follicle stimulating hormone (pFSH) dosage based on body weight (BW) on ovarian responses of crossbred does. Thirty donor does were divided into 3 groups getting pFSH dosages of 3, 5, and 8 mg pFSH per kg BW, respectively, and were named as pFSH-3, pFSH-5 and pFSH-8, respectively. Estrus was synchronized by inserting a controlled internal drug release (CIDR) device and a single injection of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α). The pFSH treatments were administered twice a day through 6 decreasing dosages (25, 25, 15, 15, 10, and 10% of total pFSH amount; decreasing daily). Ovarian responses were evaluated on Day 7 after CIDR removal. After CIDR removal, estrus was observed 3 times in a day and pFSH treatments were initiated at 2 days before the CIDR removal. All does in pFSH-5 and pFSH-8 showed estrus signs while half of the does in pFSH-3 showed estrus signs. No differences (p>0.05) were observed on the corpus luteum and total ovarian stimulation among the treatment groups, while total and transferable embryos were higher (p<0.05) in pFSH-5 (7.00 and 6.71) than pFSH-3 (3.00 and 2.80) and pFSH-8 (2.00 and 1.50), respectively. In conclusion, 5 mg pFSH per kg BW dosage gave a higher number of embryos than 3 and 8 mg pFSH per kg BW dosages. The results indicated that the dosage of pFSH based on BW is an important consideration for superovulation in goats. PMID:25178370

  4. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1986-04-01

    This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

  6. Lack of FSH support enhances LIF-STAT3 signaling in granulosa cells of atretic follicles in cattle.

    PubMed

    Ilha, Gustavo Freitas; Rovani, Monique T; Gasperin, Bernardo G; Antoniazzi, Alfredo Quites; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Bordignon, Vilceu; Duggavathi, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Subordinate follicles (SFs) of bovine follicular waves undergo atresia due to declining FSH concentrations; however, the signalling mechanisms have not been fully deciphered. We used an FSH-induced co-dominance model to determine the effect of FSH on signalling pathways in granulosa cells of the second-largest follicles (SF in control cows and co-dominant follicle (co-DF2) in FSH-treated cows). The SF was smaller than DF in control cows while diameters of co-DF1 and co-DF2 in FSH-treated cows were similar. The presence of cleaved CASP3 protein confirmed that granulosa cells of SFs, but not of DFs and co-DFs, were apoptotic. To determine the effect of FSH on molecular characteristics of the second-largest follicles, we generated relative variables for the second largest follicle in each cow. For this, variables of SF or co-DF2 were divided by the variables of the largest follicle DF or co-DF1 in each cow. There was higher transcript abundance of MAPK1/3 and AKT1/2/3 but lower abundance of phosphorylated MAPK3/1 in SF than co-DF2 granulosa cells. Abundance of mRNA and phosphorylated protein of STAT3 was higher in granulosa cells of control SF than FSH-treated co-DF2. SF granulosa cells had higher levels of LIFR and IL6ST transcripts, the two receptors involved in STAT3 activation. Further, lower transcript abundance of interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R), another receptor involved in STAT3 activation, indicated that STAT3 activation in SF granulosa cells could be mainly due to leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signalling. These results indicate that atresia due to lack of FSH is associated with activated LIF-STAT3 signalling in SF granulosa cells, as FSH treatment reversed such activation. PMID:26336147

  7. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement. 1990 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  8. Enhancements of the "eHabitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, M.; Dubois, G.; Schulz, M.; Skøien, J. O.; Nativi, S.; Peedell, S.; Boldrini, E.

    2012-04-01

    standard discovery service; b) A Discovery Augmentation Component (DAC): this component builds on existing discovery and semantic services in order to provide the infrastructure with semantics enabled queries; c) A Data Access Broker: this component provides a seamless access of heterogeneous remote resources via a unique and standard service; d) Environmental Modeling Components (i.e. OGC WPS): these implement algorithms to predict evolution of protected areas This presentation introduces the advanced infrastructure developed to enhance the "eHabitat" use scenario. The presented infrastructure will be accessible through the GEO Portal and was used for demonstrating the "eHabitat" model at the last GEO Plenary Meeting - Istanbul, November 2011.

  9. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1985-06-01

    This volume contains reports on subprojects involving the determining of alternatives to enhance salmonid habitat on patented land in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, coordination activities for habitat projects occurring on streams within fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribes, and habitat and fish inventories in the Salmon River. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports. (ACR)

  10. Pharmacogenetics of FSH action

    PubMed Central

    Laan, Maris; Grigorova, Marina; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the review To review the current knowledge of genetic variants in the two genes affecting the individual responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) action—the FSH beta-subunit (FSHB) and the FSH receptor (FSHR), as well as the pharmacogenetic ramifications of the findings. Recent findings Four common variants in FSHB/FSHR were shown to exhibit significant effect on FSH action: linked FSHR variants Thr307Ala and Asn680Ser determining common receptorisoforms, andgene expression affecting polymorphisms FSHR –29G/A and FSHB–211G/T. In women, the FSHR Thr307Ala/Asn680Ser polymorphisms show consistent predictive value for estimating the most optimal rFSH dosage in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation(COH).The same variants exhibit a potential for the pharmacogenetic assessment of the treatment ofPCOS. The FSHR–29G/A variant was also shown to contribute to ovarian response to COH. Pilot studies have suggestedthe FSHB–211TT-homozygous oligozoospermicmen with genetically determined low concentration of FSH, as potentially the best responders to FSH treatment; furthermore, modulation of this response by FSHR polymorphisms is possible. Summary Genetic variants in FSHB/FSHRexhibit a potential for pharmacogenetic applications in selecting appropriate treatment options (timing and dosage) in male and female conditions requiring or benefitting from FSH therapy. PMID:22499219

  11. CITIZENS WATER QUALITY MONITORING & MARINE HABITAT ENHANCEMENT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plant 9,000 marsh grass plants along Bayou Lafourches banks, the regions hurricane protection levees, and the marshlands surrounding Bayou Lafourche, thereby enhancing coastal areas and marine habitat. These plantings will be designed to simultaneously raise community awareness ...

  12. Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Ken; Cain, Thomas C.; Heller, David A.

    1988-03-01

    Fisheries habitat improvement work is being done on priority drainages in the Clackamas and Rood River sub-basins under program measure 704(c), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This report describes the work completed in 1987 for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) project number 84-11, the Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program. The program is composed of six projects: Collawash River Habitat Improvement Project; Collawash River Falls Passage Improvement Project, Oak Grove Fork Habitat Improvement Project; Lake Branch/West Fork Hood River Habitat Improvement Project; Fifteenmile Creek Habitat Improvement Project; and Abundance, Behavior, and Habitat Utilization by Coho Salmon and Steelhead Trout in Fish Creek, Oregon, As Influenced by Habitat Enhancement. This ongoing program was initiated in 1984, although some of the projects were begun with BPA funding support as early as 1983. The projects are complemented by a variety of habitat improvement and management activities funded from a variety of Forest Service sources. This report describes the activities implemented for five of the six projects. A separate annual report on the 1987 habitat improvement and monitoring/evaluation efforts in the Fish Creek drainage has been prepared. Species for management emphasis include spring chinook and coho salmon, and summer and winter steelhead trout. Project work in 1987 primarily focused on increasing the quantity and quality of available rearing habitat, and improving access at passage barriers. The underlying theme of the improvement work has been to increase habitat diversity through the introduction of ''structure''. Structure provided by logs and boulders serves to deflect, pond, or otherwise disrupt flow patterns within a stream channel. This alteration of flow patterns results in formation of an increased number of habitat niches (i.e. pools, glides, alcoves, etc. ) in which a

  13. Duck Valley Habitat Enhancement and Protection, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, Guy; Pero, Vincent

    2000-01-01

    The Duck Valley Indian Reservations' Habitat Enhancement project is an ongoing project designed to enhance and protect the critical riparian areas, natural springs, and native fish spawning areas on the Reservation. The project was begun in 1997 with the hiring of a fisheries biologist and the creation of a new department for the Tribes. The project's goals are to protect and enhance the springs, Owyhee River, its tributaries, and to develop a database that can be used by other fisheries professionals which includes information on water quality and fish composition, health, abundance, and genetic makeup. One habitat portion of the project is a focus on protection the numerous springs that provide clean, cool water to the Owyhee River. This will be accomplished through enclosure fences of the spring heads and water troughs to provide clean cool drinking water for wildlife and livestock. Another habitat portion of the project involves protecting headwater areas of streams with native fish populations. This is accomplished through enclosure fencing and riparian plantings on any eroded or degraded banks in the enclosure area. Finally, we monitor and evaluate the areas protected and enhanced. This is accomplished through biological sampling for temperature, Oxygen, sedimentation, and measurements of water depth, bank height and undercut, and width of stream. With the habitat and biological indices we will be able to evaluate how well protective measures are doing, and where to focus future efforts.

  14. Enhancing and restoring habitat for the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abella, Scott R.; Berry, Kristin H.

    2016-01-01

    roads. Habitats will not necessarily recover naturally after severe disturbance and from centuries of degradation. A next step in recovering tortoise habitats could be implementing a set of integrated habitat enhancements (e.g., reducing non-native plants, improving forage quality, augmenting native perennial plants, and ameliorating altered hydrology) and monitoring short- and long-term indicators of habitat and tortoise health. This synthesis supports implementation of habitat enhancement measures described in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's 2011 Revised Recovery Plan for the desert tortoise.

  15. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.; Stennfeld, Scott P.

    2001-04-01

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian enclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2000 included: (1) Implementing 2 new projects in the Grande Ronde drainage, and retrofitting one old project that will protect

  16. Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

    2009-07-01

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state

  17. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report FY 1988.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Roger C.; Marx, Steven D.

    1989-04-01

    The goal of the Fifteenmile Creek Habitat Enhancement Project is to improve wild winter steelhead in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project is funded by through the Bonneville Power Administration. Cooperators in the habitat enhancement project include the USDA Forest Service, Wasco County Soil and Water Conservation District and the Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs. Installation of instream fish habitat structures was completed on four miles of Ramsey Creek and on one mile of Fifteenmile Creek. One hundred thirty-five structures were installed in treatment areas. Construction materials included logs and rock. Riparian protection fencing was completed on Dry Creek and Ramsey Creek worksites. Five and one-half miles of new fence was added to existing fence on Ramsey Creek to afford riparian protection to four miles of stream. Six miles of stream on Dry Creek will be afforded riparian protection by constructing 4.5 miles of fence to complement existing fence. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

    2008-12-30

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources are the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by

  19. Development of a flatfish-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Fsh using a recombinant chimeric gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Verdura, Sara; Mazón, María José; Boj, Mónica; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-09-15

    In flatfishes with asynchronous and semicystic spermatogenesis, such as the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis), the specific roles of the pituitary gonadotropins during germ cell development, particularly of the follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh), are still largely unknown in part due to the lack of homologous immunoassays for this hormone. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Senegalese sole Fsh was developed by generating a rabbit antiserum against a recombinant chimeric single-chain Fsh molecule (rFsh-C) produced by the yeast Pichia pastoris. The rFsh-C N- and C-termini were formed by the mature sole Fsh β subunit (Fshβ) and the chicken glycoprotein hormone common α subunit (CGA), respectively. Depletion of the antiserum to remove anti-CGA antibodies further enriched the sole Fshβ-specific antibodies, which were used to develop the ELISA using the rFsh-C for the standard curve. The sensitivity of the assay was 10 and 50 pg/ml for Fsh measurement in plasma and pituitary, respectively, and the cross-reactivity with a homologous recombinant single-chain luteinizing hormone was 1%. The standard curve for rFsh-C paralleled those of serially diluted plasma and pituitary extracts of other flatfishes, such as the Atlantic halibut, common sole and turbot. In Senegalese sole males, the highest plasma Fsh levels were found during early spermatogenesis but declined during enhanced spermiation, as found in teleosts with cystic spermatogenesis. In pubertal males, however, the circulating Fsh levels were as high as in adult spermiating fish, but interestingly the Fsh receptor in the developing testis containing only spermatogonia was expressed in Leydig cells but not in the primordial Sertoli cells. These results indicate that a recombinant chimeric Fsh can be used to generate specific antibodies against the Fshβ subunit and to develop a highly sensitive ELISA for Fsh measurements in diverse flatfishes. PMID:25449660

  20. Effects of Habitat Enhancement on Steelhead Trout and Coho Salmon Smolt Production, Habitat Utilization, and Habitat Availability in Fish Creek, Oregon, 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Everest, Fred H.; Reeves, Gordon H.; Hohler, David B.

    1987-06-01

    Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, was continued in fiscal year 1986 by the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The study began in 1982 when PNW entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to evaluate fish habitat improvements in the Fish Creek basin on the Estacada Ranger District. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (1982-1986) to be financed with Forest Service funds. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to cooperatively fund work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is guided by the Fish Creek Habitat Rehabilitation-Enhancement Framework developed cooperatively by the Estacada Ranger District, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Pacific Northwest Research Station (see Appendix 2). The framework examines potential factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin, and the appropriate habitat improvement measures needed to address the limiting factors. Habitat improvement work in the basin has been designed to: (1) improve quantity, quality, and distribution of spawning habitat for coho and spring chinook salmon and steelhead trout, (2) increase low flow rearing habitat for steelhead trout and coho salmon, (3) improve overwintering habitat for coho salmon and steelhead trout, (4) rehabilitate riparian vegetation to improve stream shading to benefit all species, and (5) evaluate improvement projects from a drainage wide perspective. The objectives of the evaluation include: (1) Drainage-wide evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat

  1. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.

    1999-05-01

    The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Improvement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore reparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin.

  2. Enhancing seedling production of native species to restore gypsum habitats.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, E M; Ballesteros, M; Foronda, A; Navarro, F B; Jiménez, M N; Lorite, J

    2015-11-01

    Gypsum habitats are widespread globally and are important for biological conservation. Nevertheless, they are often affected by human disturbances and thus require restoration. Sowing and planting have shown positive results, but these actions are usually limited by the lack of native plant material in commercial nurseries, and very little information is available on the propagation of these species. We address this issue from the hypothesis that gypsum added to a standard nursery growing medium (peat) can improve seedling performance of gypsum species and, therefore, optimise the seedling production for outplanting purposes. We test the effect of gypsum on emergence, survival, and growth of nine native plant species, including gypsophiles (exclusive to gypsum) and gypsovags (non-exclusive to gypsum). We used four treatments according to the proportions, in weight, of gypsum:standard peat (G:S), i.e. high-g (50G:50S), medium-g (25G:75S), low-g (10G:90S), and standard-p (0G:100S). Our results showed that the gypsum treatments especially benefited the emergence stage, gypsophiles as group, and Ononis tridentata as a taxon. In particular, the gypsum treatments enhanced emergence of seven species, survival of three species, and growth of two gypsophiles, while the use of the standard peat favoured only the emergence or growth of three gypsovags. Improving emergence and survival at the nursery can provide a reduction of costs associated with seed harvesting, watering, and space, while enlarging seedlings can favour the establishment of individuals after outplanting. Thus, we suggest adding gypsum to standard peat for propagating seedlings in species from gypsum habitats, thereby potentially cutting the costs of restoring such habitats. Our assessment enables us to provide particular advice by species. In general, we recommend using between 25 and 50% of gypsum to propagate gypsophiles, and between 0 and 10% for gypsovags. The results can benefit not only the production

  3. Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Hunter

    2009-07-23

    Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

  4. De Novo-Synthesized Retinoic Acid in Ovarian Antral Follicles Enhances FSH-Mediated Ovarian Follicular Cell Differentiation and Female Fertility.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Tomoko; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Richards, JoAnne S; Shimada, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is the active form of vitamin A and is synthesized from retinol by two key enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). As the physiological precursor of RA, retinol impacts female reproductive functions and fertility. The expression of Adh1 and Adh5 as well as Aldh1a1 and Aldh1a7 are significantly increased in the ovaries of mice treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin/FSH. The RA receptor is expressed and localized in granulosa cells and is activated by endogenous RA as indicated by LacZ expression in granulosa cells of RA-responsive transgene-LacZ transgenic mice (RA reporter mice). Coinjection of the ADH inhibitor, 4-methylpyrazole, with equine chorionic gonadotropin significantly decreases the number and developmental competence of oocytes ovulated in response to human chorionic gonadotropin/LH as compared with controls. Injections of RA completely reverse the effects of the inhibitor of ovulation and oocyte development. When mice were fed a retinol-free, vitamin A-deficient diet that significantly reduced the serum levels of retinol, the expression of the LH receptor (Lhcgr) was significantly lower in the ovaries of the vitamin A-deficient mice, and injections of human chorionic gonadotropin failed to induce genes controlling ovulation. These results indicate that ovarian de novo biosynthesis of RA is required for the follicular expression of Lhcgr in granulosa cells and their ability to respond to the ovulatory LH surge. PMID:27022678

  5. Umatilla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement : FY 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Northrop, Michael

    1990-01-01

    During the summer of 1990, construction continued on the Bonneville Power Administration funded anadromous fish habitat enhancement project in the Umatilla River sub-basin, Umatilla County, State of Oregon. Work started on 5/1/90 and ended 10/30/90. A total of five large log weirs, eight large rock weirs, 17 associated weir structures, 19 small to medium rock deflectors, four bank and island reinforcements, three rock flow controls, 19 woody debris placements, and 85 individual boulders were constructed in the South Fork of the Umatilla River. In addition, one large rock weir was constructed at the confluence of the North and South Forks of the Umatilla River, and repair work was completed on 33 structures in Thomas Creek. Also, 300 cubic yards of rock and some logs and woody material were moved on site for use in 1991. Preconstruction activity consisted of moving approximately 1,500 cubic yards of large boulders, and dive log truck loads of woody material to the construction site. Project monitoring consisted of sediment sampling above and below the project area and, mapping and photographing and structures. 7 figs.

  6. Assessing functional equivalency of nekton habitat in enhanced habitats: Comparison of terraced and unterraced marsh ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    La Peyre, M.K.; Gossman, B.; Nyman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    A primary goal of many coastal restoration programs is to increase nekton habitat in terms of both quantity and quality. Using shallow water ponds rehabilitated with a technique called marsh terracing, we examined the quality of nekton habitat created, using and comparing several metrics including nekton density and diversity, functional group composition, and weight-length relationships as indirect measures of habitat quality. We examined three paired terraced and unterraced marsh ponds in southwest Louisiana. Nekton, submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), and soil and water quality variables were sampled bimonthly from April 2004 through April 2005 at four subtidal habitat types: terraced nearshore, terraced open water, unterraced nearshore, and unterraced open water. Results indicate that terraced ponds had increased the habitat value of degrading unterraced ponds over open water areas for estuarine nekton; nekton density and richness were similar between terraced and unterraced nearshore habitat types, but greater at all nearshore as compared to open water sites. Analysis of the distribution of nekton functional groups and weight:length ratios indicates the terraced and unterraced pond habitats were not functioning similarly: distribution of nekton functional groups differed significantly between habitat types with greater percentages of benthic-oriented species at unterraced open water habitats and higher percentage of open water species in terraced ponds as compared to unterraced ponds, and two of the six numerically dominant fish species had greater weight-length relationships in unterraced ponds as compared to terraced ponds. This lack of functional equivalency may be attributed to environmental differences between terraced and unterraced ponds such as water depth or SAV biomass, or the relatively young age of the terraces studied, which may not have allowed for the development of some critical habitat variables, such as soil organic matter that was found to

  7. Characterization of FSH signalling networks in bovine cumulus cells: a perspective on oocyte competence acquisition.

    PubMed

    Khan, D R; Guillemette, C; Sirard, M A; Richard, F J

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating oocyte developmental competence is essential to enhance the clinical efficiency of assisted reproduction. FSH orchestrates the acquisition of oocyte competence, both in vivo and in vitro. Multiple pathways are implicated in FSH signalling; however, their precise coordination remains unresolved. A robust system to investigate FSH signalling is oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) and we have previously demonstrated better bovine embryo development after FSH addition for the first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated FSH signalling in cumulus through transcriptomic and pharmacological tools. We demonstrate modulation of cumulus transcriptome by FSH mainly through protein kinase A (PKA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathways. Differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism and oocyte competence. FSH required rouse-sarcoma oncogene (SRC) for EGF receptor transactivation. PKA and EGF pathway crosstalk was investigated using extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) phosphorylation as the functional end-point. FSH enhanced ERK1/2 activation by the EGF pathway with a simultaneous diminution through PKA. More specifically, FSH increased dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) transcripts via PKA although DUSP1 protein did not change since EGF was required to prevent degradation. Our findings implicate FSH in PKA and EGF pathway activation, which interact to maintain appropriate levels of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and eventually cumulus expansion, metabolism and steroidogenesis. Moreover, considering the implication of the EGF pathway in GDF9 and BMP15 actions, our findings suggest that FSH may have a role in modulation of the cumulus response to oocyte-secreted factors. This information has implications for improvement of IVM and hence oocyte developmental competence. PMID:26113519

  8. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1 of 2, 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Carl

    1987-03-01

    The tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, that will be used in conjunction with 1984 and 1985 fish and habitat pre-treatment (baseline) data to evaluate effects of habitat enhancement on the habitat and fish community in Bear Valley Creek overtime. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur in the upper-Salmon River basin. Subproject III involved fish inventories (pre-treatment) in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River, and habitat problem identification on Fivemile and Ramey Creek. Subproject IV involved baseline habitat and fish inventories on the East Fork of the Salmon River, Herd Creek and Big-Boulder Creek. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the four subproject reports. 20 refs., 37 figs., 22 tabs.

  9. Detailed seafloor habitat mapping to enhance marine-resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, David G.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    Pictures of the seafloor capture important information about the sediments, exposed geologic features, submerged aquatic vegetation, and animals found in a given habitat. With the emergence of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a favored tactic for preserving coral reef resources, knowledge of essential habitat components is paramount to designing effective management strategies. Surprisingly, detailed information on seafloor habitat components is not available in many areas that are being considered for MPA designation or that are already designated as MPAs. A task of the U.S. Geological Survey Coral Reef Ecosystem STudies (USGS CREST) project is addressing this issue.

  10. Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, David C.

    2003-03-01

    Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2001. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting willows at sites on Diggie Creek, Clear Creek and Spring Creek. In addition, many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). In 2001, exclosure fences were erected on Diggie Creek (250 m barbed wire; (70 m jack), Wood Creek (500 m jack), Clear Creek (20 m jack), Ross Fork Creek (200 m jack), West Fork Creek (200 m jack)) and the Portneuf River (1 km barbed wire; 100 m jack). Jack and rail exclosure fences that had deteriorated over the past ten years were repaired at numerous areas throughout the Reservation. Physical sampling during 2001 included sediment and depth surveys (SADMS) in Big Jimmy Creek and Diggie Creek. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for eight and nine strata in the Big Jimmy and Diggie Creek, respectively. Baseline SADM data was collected in Diggie Creek to monitor the effects of bank sloping and revegetation on channel morphology and sediment levels through time. Water temperature was monitored (hourly) in Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Ross Fork Creek and Big Jimmy Creek. Biotic sampling included invertebrate sampling in the 200 and 300 series of Clear Creek. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in Clear Creek 200 and 300 series. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Clear Creek 300 series remained similar to 2000 while numbers of fish in Clear Creek 200 series dropped to near pre project levels. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were significantly higher than 2000. A mark-recapture study was initiated in spring 2001 to estimate numbers of spawning adults using the Head End of Spring Creek

  11. Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK)-dependent Phosphorylation of Y-Box-binding Protein 1 (YB-1) Enhances Gene Expression in Granulosa Cells in Response to Follicle-stimulating Hormone (FSH).

    PubMed

    Donaubauer, Elyse M; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary E

    2016-06-01

    Within the ovarian follicle, immature oocytes are surrounded and supported by granulosa cells (GCs). Stimulation of GCs by FSH leads to their proliferation and differentiation, events that are necessary for fertility. FSH activates multiple signaling pathways to regulate genes necessary for follicular maturation. Herein, we investigated the role of Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) within GCs. YB-1 is a nucleic acid binding protein that regulates transcription and translation. Our results show that FSH promotes an increase in the phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) within 15 min that is maintained at significantly increased levels until ∼8 h post treatment. FSH-stimulated phosphorylation of YB-1(Ser(102)) is prevented by pretreatment of GCs with the PKA-selective inhibitor PKA inhibitor (PKI), the MEK inhibitor PD98059, or the ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK-2) inhibitor BI-D1870. Thus, phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) is PKA-, ERK-, and RSK-2-dependent. However, pretreatment of GCs with the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) inhibitor tautomycin increased phosphorylation of YB-1(Ser(102)) in the absence of FSH; FSH did not further increase YB-1(Ser(102)) phosphorylation. This result suggests that the major effect of RSK-2 is to inhibit PP1 rather than to directly phosphorylate YB-1 on Ser(102) YB-1 coimmunoprecipitated with PP1β catalytic subunit and RSK-2. Transduction of GCs with the dephospho-adenoviral-YB-1(S102A) mutant prevented the induction by FSH of Egfr, Cyp19a1, Inha, Lhcgr, Cyp11a1, Hsd17b1, and Pappa mRNAs and estradiol-17β production. Collectively, our results reveal that phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) via the ERK/RSK-2 signaling pathway is necessary for FSH-mediated expression of target genes required for maturation of follicles to a preovulatory phenotype. PMID:27080258

  12. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report FY 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Roger C.; Brown, Lawrence F.

    1990-03-31

    The goal of the Fifteenmile Creek Habitat Improvement project is to improve wild winter steelhead habitat in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin. This goal was addressed under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 703 (c) (1) - Action Item 4.2. Construction of fish habitat structures was completed on approximately 3.5 miles of Eightmile Creek and on approximately 8.5 miles of Fifteenmile Creek. A total of 15,435 yds of rock was placed to improve rearing and spawning habitat, and to improve water quality and reduce siltation. Riparian protection fencing was completed on 1.8 miles of Dry Creek, approximately 1.75 miles on Eightmile Creek, and 4.75 miles on Fifteenmile Creek. Approximately 10 miles of stream will receive protection from the 8 miles of new fencing installed and 6.5 miles of abandoned fence repaired. Irrigation withdrawal screens were installed at six irrigation pump withdrawals. These screens functioned satisfactorily during the irrigation season. Physical and biological monitoring of stream flows, water temperature, and macro-invertebrate communities was conducted.

  13. South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Nez Perce National Forest.

    SciTech Connect

    Siddall, Phoebe

    1992-04-01

    In 1984, the Nez Perce National forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement which provided for improvement of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout habitat in south Fork Clearwater River tributaries. Project work was completed in seven main locations: Crooked River, Red River, Meadow Creek Haysfork Gloryhole, Cal-Idaho Gloryhole, Fisher Placer and Leggett Placer. This report describes restoration activities at each of these sites.

  14. An Investigation on a Novel Anti-tumor Fusion Peptide of FSH33-53-IIKK

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runlin; Liu, Ping; Pan, Donghui; zhang, Pengjun; Bai, Zhicheng; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Xingdang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel fusion peptide FSH33-53-IIKK was designed and expected to combine the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) targeting and tumor toxicity. In vitro and in vivo study showed the anti-tumor activity of FSH33-53-IIKK was enhanced compared to that of IIKK only. FSH33-53-IIKK could inhibit the growth of tumor via apoptosis and autophagy pathways. In summary, combining the tumor marker-target peptide and anti-tumor peptide together may be an efficient way to search for better anti-tumor candidates. PMID:27313792

  15. An Investigation on a Novel Anti-tumor Fusion Peptide of FSH33-53-IIKK.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runlin; Liu, Ping; Pan, Donghui; Zhang, Pengjun; Bai, Zhicheng; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Xingdang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel fusion peptide FSH33-53-IIKK was designed and expected to combine the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) targeting and tumor toxicity. In vitro and in vivo study showed the anti-tumor activity of FSH33-53-IIKK was enhanced compared to that of IIKK only. FSH33-53-IIKK could inhibit the growth of tumor via apoptosis and autophagy pathways. In summary, combining the tumor marker-target peptide and anti-tumor peptide together may be an efficient way to search for better anti-tumor candidates. PMID:27313792

  16. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R. Todd

    1993-04-01

    The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower 1/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River (downstream of the Meacham Creek confluence upstream to the Reservation East Boundary). In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach consistent with other basin efforts and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. Maintenance of existing habitat improvement projects was included under this comprehensive approach. Maintenance of existing gravel traps, instream and bank stabilization structures was required within project areas during the reporting period due to spring flooding damage and high bedload movement. Maintenance activities were completed between river mile (RM) 0.0 and RM 0.25 Boston Canyon Creek, between RM 0.0 and RM 4 Meacham Creek and between RM 78.5 and RM 79 Umatilla River. Habitat enhancement areas were seeded with native grass, legume, shrub and wildflower mixes and planted with willow cuttings to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo

  17. A synthetic peptide corresponding to human FSH. beta. -subunit 33-53 binds to FSH receptor, stimulates basal estradiol biosynthesis, and is a partial antagonist of FSH

    SciTech Connect

    Santa Coloma, T.A.; Dattatreyamurty, B.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1990-02-06

    The authors have previously shown that hFSH-{beta} 34-37 (KTCT) and 49-52 (TRDL) inhibit binding of {sup 125}I-hFSH to FSH receptor in calf testis membranes and that hFSH-{beta} 33-53, which encompasses these tetrapeptides, inhibits binding with increased potency. hFSH-{beta} 33-53 rapidly dimerizes under conditions utilized in the receptor binding assay (pH 7.5) so that the binding inhibition reported earlier was due to the hFSH-{beta} 33-53 dimer rather than the monomer. At pH 6.5, conversion to dimer does not occur, and binding inhibition could be unequivocally attributed to the monomer. Radioiodinated and alkylated hFSH-{beta} 33-53 binds to the FSH receptor. The biological activity of hFSH-{beta} 33-53 was assessed by its ability to affect the conversion of androstenedione to estradiol in rat Sertoli cells cultures. This result demonstrates that the free R-SH group at Cys51 is not responsible for the inhibition. FSH-{beta} 33-53 also significantly stimulated basal levels of estradiol synthesis, but not to maximal levels observed with FSH (partial agonist). Neither the carbohydrate content of hFSH-{beta} nor the {alpha} subunit of FSH appears to be essential for signal transduction and expression of the hormone effect of FSH-{beta} 33-53.

  18. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the test done on certain days of your menstrual cycle. ... In women, FSH helps manage the menstrual cycle and stimulates the ovaries to produce eggs. The test is used to help diagnose or evaluate: Menopause Women who have polycystic ovary ...

  19. Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Scott

    1989-04-01

    The Collawash Falls Fish Passage Project began in August of 1987, and resulted in completion of Phase I of the construction of the fish passage facility. A core team of Forest Service personnel. led by fish passage specialists from R-10, Alaska, excavated a trench in the bedrock face of the falls that is approximately 95 feet long, 8 feet deep and 10 feet wide. Implementation of Phase II of the project was put on hold in July of 1988. when 50 yards of rock from the adjacent headwall sloughed into the trench. During September and October of 1988 the larger rocks were reduced in size by blasting. High water flows in November moved the blasted rock from the trench. The project is being done by the Mt. Hood National Forest with funds supplied by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 703(c). Action Item 4.2, in consultation with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODF&W). Successful modification of the Collawash Falls will allow anadromous fish full access to over 10 miles of acknowledged high quality spawning and rearing habitat. The total anadromous fish production benefits gained from utilization of this habitat, assuming a 10 year project life with a 4% discount factor is $1,690,019.00. In 1974, several partial barriers to anadromous fish in the form of small falls and cataracts located immediately above the trench, were modified for full passage by blasting. This work conducted by the Forest Service was fully successful in allowing fish passage through all but the main barrier in Collawash Falls. Other Collawash River fisheries projects include the 1984 construction of a fish liberation access site above the falls for the PGE/ODFW spring chinook trap and haul program. Funding for the project came from revenues generated by an adjacent Forest Service timber sale. In summer of 1985, 30,000 spring chinook presmolts were stocked at this liberation site. In spring of 1987. 10,000 coho pre-smolts were

  20. Quantitative estimate of commercial fish enhancement by seagrass habitat in southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandon, Abigayil; zu Ermgassen, Philine S. E.

    2014-03-01

    Seagrass provides many ecosystem services that are of considerable value to humans, including the provision of nursery habitat for commercial fish stock. Yet few studies have sought to quantify these benefits. As seagrass habitat continues to suffer a high rate of loss globally and with the growing emphasis on compensatory restoration, valuation of the ecosystem services associated with seagrass habitat is increasingly important. We undertook a meta-analysis of juvenile fish abundance at seagrass and control sites to derive a quantitative estimate of the enhancement of juvenile fish by seagrass habitats in southern Australia. Thirteen fish of commercial importance were identified as being recruitment enhanced in seagrass habitat, twelve of which were associated with sufficient life history data to allow for estimation of total biomass enhancement. We applied von Bertalanffy growth models and species-specific mortality rates to the determined values of juvenile enhancement to estimate the contribution of seagrass to commercial fish biomass. The identified species were enhanced in seagrass by 0.98 kg m-2 y-1, equivalent to ˜$A230,000 ha-1 y-1. These values represent the stock enhancement where all fish species are present, as opposed to realized catches. Having accounted for the time lag between fish recruiting to a seagrass site and entering the fishery and for a 3% annual discount rate, we find that seagrass restoration efforts costing $A10,000 ha-1 have a potential payback time of less than five years, and that restoration costing $A629,000 ha-1 can be justified on the basis of enhanced commercial fish recruitment where these twelve fish species are present.

  1. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.Todd

    1996-05-01

    During the 1995 - 96 project period, four new habitat enhancement projects were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatilla River Basin. A total of 38,644 feet of high tensile smooth wire fencing was constructed along 3.6 miles of riparian corridor in the Meacham Creek, Wildhorse Creek, Greasewood Creek, West Fork of Greasewood Creek and Mission Creek watersheds. Additional enhancements on Wildhorse Creek and the lower Greasewood Creek System included: (1) installation of 0.43 miles of smooth wire between river mile (RM) 10.25 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek (fence posts and structures had been previously placed on this property during the 1994 - 95 project period), (2) construction of 46 sediment retention structures in stream channels and maintenance to 18 existing sediment retention structures between RM 9.5 and RM 10.25 Wildhorse Creek, and (3) revegetation of stream corridor areas and adjacent terraces with 500 pounds of native grass seed or close species equivalents and 5,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funds were cost shared with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, provided under this project, to accomplish habitat enhancements. Water quality monitoring continued and was expanded for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Physical habitat surveys were conducted on the lower 13 river miles of Wildhorse Creek and within the Greasewood Creek Project Area to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area.

  2. Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

    1990-12-01

    Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. RESTORE CIRCULATION AND PROVIDE ECOLOGICAL ENHANCEMENT IN THE FT. DESOTO PARK AQUATIC HABITAT MANAGEMENT AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will result in the design and environmental enhancement as it re-established circuitous flow in the bak bays of Mullet Key within the Ft. DeSoto Park Aquatic Habitat Management Area. Pinellas County is designing the project will use GMP funds for a portion of the co...

  4. Kootenai River Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project : Long-term Bighorn Sheep/Mule Deer Winter and Spring Habitat Improvement Project : Wildlife Mitigation Project, Libby Dam, Montana : Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Yde, Chis

    1990-06-01

    The Libby hydroelectric project, located on the Kootenai River in northwestern Montana, resulted in several impacts to the wildlife communities which occupied the habitats inundated by Lake Koocanusa. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, in cooperation with the other management agencies, developed an impact assessment and a wildlife and wildlife habitat mitigation plan for the Libby hydroelectric facility. In response to the mitigation plan, Bonneville Power Administration funded a cooperative project between the Kootenai National Forest and Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to develop a long-term habitat enhancement plan for the bighorn sheep and mule deer winter and spring ranges adjacent to Lake Koocanusa. The project goal is to rehabilitate 3372 acres of bighorn sheep and 16,321 acres of mule deer winter and spring ranges on Kootenai National Forest lands adjacent to Lake Koocanusa and to monitor and evaluate the effects of implementing this habitat enhancement work. 2 refs.

  5. FSH Regulates mRNA Translation in Mouse Oocytes and Promotes Developmental Competence.

    PubMed

    Franciosi, Federica; Manandhar, Shila; Conti, Marco

    2016-02-01

    A major challenge in assisted reproductive technology is to develop conditions for in vitro oocyte maturation yielding high-quality eggs. Efforts are underway to assess whether known hormonal and local factors play a role in oocyte developmental competence and to identify the molecular mechanism involved. Here we have tested the hypothesis that FSH improves oocyte developmental competence by regulating the translational program in the oocyte. Accumulation of oocyte proteins (targeting protein for the Xenopus kinesin xklp2 and IL-7) associated with improved oocyte quality is increased when cumulus-oocyte complexes are incubated with FSH. This increase is due to enhanced translation of the corresponding mRNAs, as indicated by microinjection of constructs in which the 3' untranslated region of the Tpx2 or Il7 transcripts is fused to the luciferase reporter. A transient activation of the phosphatidyl-inositol 3-phosphate/AKT cascade in the oocyte preceded the increase in translation. When the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is down-regulated in follicular cells, the FSH-induced rate of maternal mRNA translation and AKT activation were lost, demonstrating that the effects of FSH are indirect and require EGF receptor signaling in the somatic compartment. Using Pten(fl/fl):Zp3cre oocytes in which the AKT is constitutively activated, translation of reporters was increased and was no longer sensitive to FSH stimulation. More importantly, the oocytes lacking the phosphate and tensin homolog gene showed increased developmental competence, even when cultured in the absence of FSH or growth factors. Thus, we demonstrate that FSH intersects with the follicular EGF network to activate the phosphatidyl-inositol 3-phosphate/AKT cascade in the oocyte to control translation and developmental competence. These findings provide a molecular rationale for the use of FSH to improve egg quality. PMID:26653334

  6. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R. Todd; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-02-01

    The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2001 project period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla Subbasin Watershed Assessment assisted the project in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. Projects continued to be maintained on 49 private properties, one 25-year Non-Exclusive Bureau of Indian Affairs' Easement was secured, six new projects implemented and two existing project areas improved to enhance anadromous fish habitat. New project locations included sites on the mid Umatilla River, upper Umatilla River, Mission Creek, Cottonwood Creek and Buckaroo Creek. New enhancements included: (1) construction of 11,264 feet of fencing between River Mile 43.0 and 46.5 on the Umatilla River, (2) a stream bank stabilization project implemented at approximately River Mile 63.5 Umatilla River to stabilize 330 feet of eroding stream bank and improve instream habitat diversity, included construction of eight root wad revetments and three boulder J-vanes, (3) drilling a 358-foot well for off-stream livestock watering at approximately River Mile 46.0 Umatilla River, (4) installing a 50-foot bottomless arch replacement culvert at approximately River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek, (5) installing a Geoweb stream ford crossing on Mission Creek (6) installing a 22-foot bottomless arch culvert at approximately River Mile 0.5 Cottonwood Creek, and (7) providing fence materials for construction of 21,300 feet of livestock exclusion fencing in the Buckaroo Creek Drainage. An approximate total of 3,800 native willow cuttings and 350 pounds of native grass seed was planted at new upper Umatilla River, Mission Creek and Cottonwood Creek project sites. Habitat improvements implemented at existing project sites included

  7. The potential of fruit trees to enhance converted habitats for migrating birds in southern Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Migration routes used by Nearctic migrant birds can cover great distances; they also differ among species, within species, and between years and seasons. As a result, migration routes for an entire migratory avifauna can encompass broad geographic areas, making it impossible to protect continuous stretches of habitat sufficient to connect the wintering and breeding grounds for most species. Consequently, ways to enhance habitats converted for human use (i.e. for pasture, crop cultivation, human settlement) as stopover sites for migrants are especially important. Shelterbelts around pastures and fields, if planted with species targeted to support migrant (and resident) bird species that naturally occupy mature forest habitats and that are at least partially frugivorous, could be a powerful enhancement tool for such species, if the birds will enter the converted areas to feed. I tested this approach for Nearctic migrant birds during the spring migration through an area in Chiapas, Mexico. Mature forest tree species whose fruits are eaten by birds were surveyed. Based on life form, crop size and fruit characteristics, I selected three tree species for study: Cymbopetalum mayanum (Annonaceae), Bursera simaruba (Burseraceae) and Trophis racemosa (Moraceae). I compared the use of fruits of these species by migrants and residents in forest with their use of the fruits of isolated individuals of the same species in pasture and cropland. All three plant species were useful for enhancing converted habitats for forest-occupying spring migrants, although species differed in the degree to which they entered disturbed areas to feed on the fruits. These tree species could probably enhance habitats for migrants at sites throughout the natural geographic ranges of the plants; in other geographic areas for other target bird groups, other tree species might be more appropriate.

  8. South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Crooked and Red Rivers : Annual Report, 1989.

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, William H.

    1990-01-01

    In 1983, the Nez Perce National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into an interagency agreement to enhance and improve habitat for two anadromous fish species, spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyscha) and summer steelhead trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss), in the South Fork Clearwater River tributaries. The South Fork Clearwater River was dammed in 1927 for hydroelectric development. Anadromous fish runs were virtually eliminated until the dam was removed in 1962. To complicate the problem, upstream spawning and rearing habitats were severely impacted by dredge and hydraulic mining, road building, timber harvest, and over-grazing. Fish habitat improvement projects under the above contract are being carried out in two major tributaries to the South Fork Clearwater River. Both the Red River and the Crooked River projects began in 1983 and will be completed in 1990. 12 figures., 1 tab.

  9. Abundance, Behavior, and Habitat Utilization by Coho Salmon and Steelhead Trout in Fish Creek, Oregon, as Influenced by Habitat Enhancement, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, John; Everest, Fred H.; Heller, David A.

    1986-09-01

    Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, was continued in fiscal year 1985 by the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The study began in 1982 when PNW entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to evaluate fish habitat improvements in the Fish Creek basin on the Estacada Ranger District. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (19824986) to be financed by Forest Service funds. Several factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin were identified during the first year of the study, and the scope of the habitat improvement effort was subsequently enlarged. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to provide additional funding for work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is designed to increase the annual number of chinook and coho salmon, and steelhead trout smolt outmigrants. The primary objectives of the evaluation include the: (1) Evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat Improvements. (2) Evaluation and quantification of changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements. (3) Evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of habitat improvements developed with BPA and Forest Service funds on Fish Creek. Several prototype enhancement projects were constructed and tested during the first three years of the study. The Intention was to identify successful techniques that could then be broadly applied within the bash. This stepwise procedure has been largely successful in identifying the most promising enhancement techniques for the Fish Creek

  10. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, Vance

    2003-08-01

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres

  11. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Jeff A.; Jerome, James P.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring chinook and summer steelhead within the subbasin through habitat enhancement and access improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in northeast Oregon. It is the goal of this program to preserve and enhance the unique genetic component of the stocks. By attaining this goal we will be able to rebuild fish runs in other Columbia River tributaries in the future, if desired. During 1991, 5 leases were signed adding 5.25 miles of stream to the program. Fence construction included 9.95 miles of riparian fence and 15 livestock water crossings. We constructed 3 log wiers for adult salmon holding, added 280 ft. of new channel, and placed 274 fish habitat boulders, 6 trees and 31 rootwads for juvenile rearing. We constructed 15 stream deflectors and 274 linear feet of bank riprap for streambank stabilization.

  12. Glycosylation Effects on FSH-FSHR Interaction Dynamics: A Case Study of Different FSH Glycoforms by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Dixit, Anshuman; Bousfield, George R.; Lushington, Gerald H.

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotropin known as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) plays a key role in regulating reproductive processes. Physiologically active FSH is a glycoprotein that can accommodate glycans on up to four asparagine residues, including two sites in the FSHα subunit that are critical for biochemical function, plus two sites in the β subunit, whose differential glycosylation states appear to correspond to physiologically distinct functions. Some degree of FSHβ hypo-glycosylation seems to confer advantages toward reproductive fertility of child-bearing females. In order to identify possible mechanistic underpinnings for this physiological difference we have pursued computationally intensive molecular dynamics simulations on complexes between the high affinity site of the gonadal FSH receptor (FSHR) and several FSH glycoforms including fully-glycosylated (FSH24), hypo-glycosylated (e.g., FSH15), and completely deglycosylated FSH (dgFSH). These simulations suggest that deviations in FSH/FSHR binding profile as a function of glycosylation state are modest when FSH is adorned with only small glycans, such as single N-acetylglucosamine residues. However, substantial qualitative differences emerge between FSH15 and FSH24 when FSH is decorated with a much larger, tetra-antennary glycan. Specifically, the FSHR complex with hypo-glycosylated FSH15 is observed to undergo a significant conformational shift after 5–10 ns of simulation, indicating that FSH15 has greater conformational flexibility than FSH24 which may explain the more favorable FSH15 kinetic profile. FSH15 also exhibits a stronger binding free energy, due in large part to formation of closer and more persistent salt-bridges with FSHR. PMID:26402790

  13. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Scheeler, Carl A.; Shaw, R.Todd

    1994-01-01

    The Umatilla habitat improvement program targets improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall Chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Enhancements included the construction of nine boulder deflectors, two boulder weirs with pools, and 4 instream boulder placements. Instream cover was improved through the placement of 38 instream cover trees that were cabled to anchor boulders and four rootwads placed and anchored in pools. High tensile fence was constructed along 1.2 miles of stream bank to exclude livestock from riparian areas.

  14. Artificial breakwaters as garbage bins: Structural complexity enhances anthropogenic litter accumulation in marine intertidal habitats.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Moisés A; Broitman, Bernardo R; Thiel, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Coastal urban infrastructures are proliferating across the world, but knowledge about their emergent impacts is still limited. Here, we provide evidence that urban artificial reefs have a high potential to accumulate the diverse forms of litter originating from anthropogenic activities around cities. We test the hypothesis that the structural complexity of urban breakwaters, when compared with adjacent natural rocky intertidal habitats, is a driver of anthropogenic litter accumulation. We determined litter abundances at seven sites (cities) and estimated the structural complexity in both urban breakwaters and adjacent natural habitats from northern to central Chile, spanning a latitudinal gradient of ∼15° (18°S to 33°S). Anthropogenic litter density was significantly higher in coastal breakwaters when compared to natural habitats (∼15.1 items m(-2) on artificial reefs versus 7.4 items m(-2) in natural habitats) at all study sites, a pattern that was temporally persistent. Different litter categories were more abundant on the artificial reefs than in natural habitats, with local human population density and breakwater extension contributing to increase the probabilities of litter occurrence by ∼10%. In addition, structural complexity was about two-fold higher on artificial reefs, with anthropogenic litter density being highest at intermediate levels of structural complexity. Therefore, the spatial structure characteristic of artificial reefs seems to enhance anthropogenic litter accumulation, also leading to higher residence time and degradation potential. Our study highlights the interaction between coastal urban habitat modification by establishment of artificial reefs, and pollution. This emergent phenomenon is an important issue to be considered in future management plans and the engineering of coastal ecosystems. PMID:27149151

  15. Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R. Todd

    1994-05-01

    The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower l/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River in the vicinity of Gibbon, Oregon. In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach, consistent with other basin efforts, and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. During the 1994-95 project period, a one river mile demonstration project was implemented on two privately owned properties on Wildhorse Creek. This was the first watershed improvement project to be implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) off of the Reservation. Four 15 year riparian easements and two right-of-way agreements were secured for enhancement of one river mile on Wildhorse Creek and l/2 river mile on Meacham Creek. Enhancements implemented between river mile (RM) 9.5 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek included: (1) installation of 1.43 miles of smooth wire high tensile fence line and placement of 0.43 miles of fence posts and structures to restrict livestock from the riparian corridor, (2) construction of eighteen sediment retention structures in the stream channel to speed riparian recovery by elevating the stream grade, slowing water velocities and

  16. Living shorelines can enhance the nursery role of threatened estuarine habitats.

    PubMed

    Gittman, Rachel K; Peterson, Charles H; Currin, Carolyn A; Fodrie, F Joel; Piehler, Michael F; Bruno, John F

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems provide numerous services, such as nutrient cycling, climate change amelioration, and habitat provision for commercially valuable organisms. Ecosystem functions and processes are modified by human activities locally and globally, with degradation of coastal ecosystems by development and climate change occurring at unprecedented rates. The demand for coastal defense strategies against storms and sea-level rise has increased with human population growth and development along coastlines world-wide, even while that population growth has reduced natural buffering of shorelines. Shoreline hardening, a common coastal defense strategy that includes the use of seawalls and bulkheads (vertical walls constructed of concrete, wood, vinyl, or steel), is resulting in a "coastal squeeze" on estuarine habitats. In contrast to hardening, living shorelines, which range from vegetation plantings to a combination of hard structures and plantings, can be deployed to restore or enhance multiple ecosystem services normally delivered by naturally vegetated shores. Although hundreds of living shoreline projects have been implemented in the United States alone, few studies have evaluated their effectiveness in sustaining or enhancing ecosystem services relative to naturally vegetated shorelines and hardened shorelines. We quantified the effectiveness of (1) sills with landward marsh (a type of living shoreline that combines marsh plantings with an offshore low-profile breakwater), (2) natural salt marsh shorelines (control marshes), and (3) unvegetated bulkheaded shores in providing habitat for fish and crustaceans (nekton). Sills supported higher abundances and species diversity of fishes than unvegetated habitat adjacent to bulkheads, and even control marshes. Sills also supported higher cover of filter-feeding bivalves (a food resource and refuge habitat for nekton) than bulkheads or control marshes. These ecosystem-service enhancements were detected on shores with

  17. John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie

    2009-07-15

    Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

  18. FSH (Follicle-Stimulating Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... FSH and LH may be ordered when a boy or girl does not appear to be entering puberty at ... hair Growth of the testicles and penis in boys Beginning of menstruation in girls ^ Back to top What does the test result ...

  19. Assessment of chevron dikes for the enhancement of physical-aquatic habitat within the Middle Mississippi River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, J. W.; Pinter, N.

    2012-12-01

    Along the Middle Mississippi River (MMR), rehabilitation of aquatic habitat is being undertaken using river-training structures such as the blunt-nose chevron dike. Chevron dikes were initially designed to concentrate flow and thus facilitate river navigation, but this new river-training structure is now justified, in part, as a tool for creating aquatic habitat and promoting habitat heterogeneity. The ability of chevrons to create and diversify physical-aquatic habitat has not been verified. In this study, we used 2-D hydrodynamic modeling and reach-scale habitat metrics to assess changes in physical habitat and habitat heterogeneity for pre-chevron and post-chevron along a 2- km reach of the Mississippi River at St. Louis, MO. A historic reference condition (circa 1890) was also modeled to compare physical habitat in a less engineered river channel versus the new physical-habitat patches created by chevron-dike enhancement. This modeling approach quantified changes in habitat availability and diversity among selected reference conditions for a wide range of in-channel flows. Depth-velocity habitat classes were used for assessment of change in physical-habitat patches, and spatial statistical tools were employed to evaluate the reach-scale habitat patch diversity. Modeling of post-chevron channel conditions revealed increases in deep to very deep (>3.0 m) areas of slow moving (<0.6 m/s) water downstream of these structures under emergent flow conditions (≤ 1.5 x mean annual flow[MAF]) relative to pre-construction conditions. Chevron construction increased potential over-wintering habitat (deep [>3.0 m], low velocity [<0.6 m/s]) by up to 7.6 ha. The addition of the chevrons to the river channel also created some (0.8-3.8 ha) shallow-water habitat (0-1.5 m depth with a 0-0.6 m/s velocity) for flows ≤2.0 x MAF and contributed to an 8-35% increase in physical-habitat diversity compared to pre-chevron channel conditions. Comparison of the historic reference

  20. Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Project; Implementation Plan, 1988-1992 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Medel, Ron; Hohler, David B.; MacDonald, Ken

    1988-01-01

    An Implementation Plan and Statement of Work is provided for high priority work in the Clackamas. Hood River and Fifteenmile sub-basins. These documents describe fish habitat improvement opportunities that can be implemented by the 1991 deadline established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. The Clackamas/Hood River Enhancement Program is an on-going project initiated in 1984. It is being cooperatively funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Wt. Hood National Forest. Species for management emphasis include spring chinook and coho salmon, and summer and winter steelhead trout. Improvement activities are designed to improve access at passage barriers and increase the quality and quantity of available rearing habitat. Project work will result in improved access to about 12.5 miles of high quality habitat, creation of nearly 70,000 square feet of off-channel habitat, and the addition of structure to approximately 32 miles of stream. At completion of the project, annual production capability from these two sub-basins will be increased by 85-100,000 smolts. Details of a monitoring and evaluation effort consistent with measure 200(d)(l) of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program are also provided.

  1. Duck Valley Habitat Enhancement and Protection, 2001-2002 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Mattie H.; Sellman, Jake

    2003-03-01

    The Duck Valley Indian Reservation's Habitat Enhancement project is an ongoing project designed to enhance and protect critical riparian areas, natural springs, the Owhyee River and its tributaries, and native fish spawning areas on the Reservation. The project commenced in 1997 and addresses the Northwest Power Planning Council's measures 10.8C.2, 10.8C.3, and 10.8C.5 of the 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The performance period covers dates from April 2001 through August 2002.

  2. Evaluation and Monitoring of Idaho Habitat Enhancement and Anadromous Fish Natural Production : Annual Report 1986.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

    1987-11-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been conducting an evaluation of existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for anadromous fish in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages over the last 3 years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by or proposed for funding by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production (i.e., yield) at full-seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat enhancement project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

  3. Wetland management strategies that enhance waterfowl habitats can also control mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Batzer, D P; Resh, V H

    1992-06-01

    Two studies in California wetlands and a third in Minnesota wetlands indicate that management practices designed to enhance habitat quality for waterfowl can concurrently reduce mosquito problems. In a seasonally flooded pickleweed wetland in Suisun Marsh, Solano Co., CA, we demonstrated that reducing plant-cover by 50% increased benthic densities of chironomid midge and dytiscid beetle larvae; these insects can be important in waterfowl diets. This manipulation also concentrated Aedes melanimon and Culiseta inornata mosquito larvae along wetland perimeters; thus, the need for control measures was greatly restricted spatially. A study in 9 experimental ponds in Suisun Marsh demonstrated that higher water levels could enhance populations of the macroinvertebrates important in waterfowl diets; general macroinvertebrate densities were higher at 60 cm depths than 20 cm or 40 cm depths. In contrast, Cs. inornata densities were lowest at 60 cm depths and highest at 20 cm depths. A study conducted in a perennial-water cattail wetland in Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN, demonstrated that a temporary water-level drawdown, designed to enhance waterfowl habitat quality of perennial-water wetlands, also reduced densities of Coquillettidia perturbans mosquito larvae. These mosquitoes disappeared immediately after the drawdown, but even after water depths were restored to pre-drawdown levels, significant numbers did not reappear until 4 years post-drawdown. Studies in 202 other Minnesota wetlands also demonstrated the susceptibility of Cq. perturbans populations to drawdown, but the impact of drawdown was greater in stands of emergent cattail than in floating cattail. PMID:1431852

  4. Ecological value of submerged breakwaters for habitat enhancement on a residential scale.

    PubMed

    Scyphers, Steven B; Powers, Sean P; Heck, Kenneth L

    2015-02-01

    Estuarine shorelines have been degraded since humans arrived in the coastal zone. In recent history, a major cause of habitat degradation has been the armoring of shorelines with vertical walls to protect property from erosive wave energy; however, a lack of practical alternatives that maintain or enhance ecological function has limited the options of waterfront residents and coastal zone managers. We experimentally investigated the habitat value of two configurations of submerged breakwaters constructed along an eroding shoreline in northwest Mobile Bay, AL (USA). Breakwaters comprised of bagged oyster shell or Reef Ball™ concrete domes were built by a community-based restoration effort. Post-deployment monitoring found that: bagged oyster breakwaters supported much higher densities of live ribbed mussels than Reef Ball breakwaters; both breakwater configurations supported increased species richness of juvenile and smaller fishes compared to controls; and that larger fishes did not appear to be affected by breakwater presence. Our study demonstrates that ecologically degraded shorelines can be augmented with small-scale breakwaters at reasonable cost and that these complex structures can serve as habitat for filter-feeding bivalves, mobile invertebrates, and young fishes. Understanding the degree to which these structures mitigate erosive wave energy and protect uplands will require a longer time frame than our 2-year-long study. PMID:25365947

  5. Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, John

    1990-01-01

    The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

  6. Ecological Value of Submerged Breakwaters for Habitat Enhancement on a Residential Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scyphers, Steven B.; Powers, Sean P.; Heck, Kenneth L.

    2015-02-01

    Estuarine shorelines have been degraded since humans arrived in the coastal zone. In recent history, a major cause of habitat degradation has been the armoring of shorelines with vertical walls to protect property from erosive wave energy; however, a lack of practical alternatives that maintain or enhance ecological function has limited the options of waterfront residents and coastal zone managers. We experimentally investigated the habitat value of two configurations of submerged breakwaters constructed along an eroding shoreline in northwest Mobile Bay, AL (USA). Breakwaters comprised of bagged oyster shell or Reef Ball™ concrete domes were built by a community-based restoration effort. Post-deployment monitoring found that: bagged oyster breakwaters supported much higher densities of live ribbed mussels than Reef Ball breakwaters; both breakwater configurations supported increased species richness of juvenile and smaller fishes compared to controls; and that larger fishes did not appear to be affected by breakwater presence. Our study demonstrates that ecologically degraded shorelines can be augmented with small-scale breakwaters at reasonable cost and that these complex structures can serve as habitat for filter-feeding bivalves, mobile invertebrates, and young fishes. Understanding the degree to which these structures mitigate erosive wave energy and protect uplands will require a longer time frame than our 2-year-long study.

  7. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Russ M.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    2004-04-01

    Work undertaken in 2003 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting 7.6 miles of stream (2) Completion of 0.7 miles of dredge tail leveling on Granite Creek. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (66.14 miles), watergaps (66), spring developments (33) and plantings were checked and repairs performed. (4) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 72.94 miles of stream protected using 131.1 miles of fence. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects we have 205.96 miles of fence protecting 130.3 miles of stream.

  8. Hypo-glycosylated Human Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (hFSH21/18) is much more active in vitro than Fully-glycosylated hFSH (hFSH24)

    PubMed Central

    Bousfield, George R.; Butnev, Vladimir Y.; Butnev, Viktor Y.; Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Harvey, David J.; May, Jeffrey V.

    2014-01-01

    Hypo-glycosylated hFSH21/18 (possesses FSHβ21 and FSH18 bands) was isolated from hLH preparations by immunoaffinity chromatography followed by gel filtration. Fully-glycosylated hFSH24 was prepared by combining the fully-glycosylated FSHβ24 variant with hCGα and isolating the heterodimer. The hFSH21/18 glycoform preparation was significantly smaller than the hFSH24 preparation and possessed 60% oligomannose glycans, which is unusual for hFSH. Hypo-glycosylated hFSH21/18 was 9- to 26-fold more active than fully-glycosylated hFSH24 in FSH radioligand assays. Significantly greater binding of 125I-hFSH21/18 tracer than hFSH24 tracer was observed in all competitive binding assays. In addition, higher binding of hFSH21/18 was noted in association and saturation binding assays, in which twice as much hFSH21/18 was bound as hFSH24. This suggests that more ligand binding sites are available to hFSH21/18 in FSHR than to hFSH24. Hypo-glycosylated hFSH21/18 also bound rat FSHRs more rapidly, exhibiting almost no lag in binding, whereas hFSH24 specific binding proceeded very slowly for almost the first hour of incubation. PMID:24291635

  9. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project: 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Scheeler, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    The Umatilla habitat improvement program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02, and targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Treatment areas included the lower 4 miles of Meacham Creek, the lower {1/4} mile of Boston Canyon Creek, and the Umatilla River between RM 78.5 and 80. The upper {1/2} of the Meacham Creek project area including Boston Canyon Creek, which were initially enhanced during 1989, were reentered for maintenance and continued enhancements. Approximately 2400 cu. yds. of boulders and 1000 cu. yds. of riprap was used in the construction of in-stream, stream bank and flood plain structures and in the anchoring of large organic debris (LOD) placements. In-stream structures were designed to increase instream cover and channel stability and develop of a defined thalweg to focus low summer flows. Flood plain structures were designed to reduce sediment inputs and facilitate deposition on flood plains. Riparian recovery was enhanced through the planting of over 1000 willow cuttings and 400 lbs. of grass seed mix and through the exclusion of livestock from the riparian corridor with 4.5 miles of high tensile smooth wire fence. Photo documentation and elevational transects were used to monitor changes in channel morphology and riparian recovery at permanent standardized points throughout the projects. Water quality (temperature and turbidity) data was collected at locations within the project area and in tributaries programmed for future enhancements.

  10. Grazer removal and nutrient enrichment as recovery enhancers for overexploited rocky subtidal habitats.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Stanislao; Vignes, Fabio; Fraschetti, Simonetta

    2014-07-01

    Increasing anthropogenic pressures are causing long-lasting regime shifts from high-diversity ecosystems to low-diversity degraded ones. Understanding the effects of multiple threats on ecosystems, and identifying processes allowing for the recovery of biodiversity, are the current major challenges in ecology. In several temperate marine areas, large parts of rocky subtidal habitats characterised by high diversity have been completely degraded to barren grounds by overfishing, including illegal date mussel fishing. Bare areas are characterized by the dominance of sea urchins whose grazing perpetuates the impact of overfishing. We investigated experimentally the separate and combined effects of nutrient enrichment and sea urchin exclusion on the recovery of barren grounds. Our results indicate that the two factors have a synergistic effect leading to the re-establishment of erect macroalgal canopies, enhancing the structural complexity of subtidal assemblages. In particular, in the overfished system considered here, the recovery of disturbed assemblages could occur only if sea urchins are removed. However, the recolonization of barren grounds by erect macroalgae is further enhanced under enriched conditions. This study demonstrates that the recovery of dramatically depleted marine habitats is possible, and provides useful indications for specific management actions, which at present are totally lacking, to achieve the restoration of barren grounds caused by human activity. PMID:24748204

  11. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Russ M.; Jerome, James P.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    2003-03-01

    Work undertaken in 2002 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting 6.0 miles of stream (2) Completion of 0.7 miles of dredge tail leveling on Granite Creek. (3) New fence construction (300ft) plus one watergap on Indian Creek/ Kuhl property. (4) Maintenance of all active project fences (58.76 miles), watergaps (56), spring developments (32) and plantings were checked and repairs performed. (5) Restoration and Enhancement projects protected 3 miles of stream within the basin. (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 67.21 miles of stream protected using 124.2 miles of fence. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects we have 199.06 miles of fence protecting 124.57 miles of stream.

  12. A Framework for Enhancing Bird Habitat Value of Urban Greenspaces in the Woonasquatucket Watershed, Rhode Island, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modifying greenspaces to enhance habitat value has been proposed as a means towards protecting or restoring biodiversity in urban landscapes. In this report, we provide a framework for developing low-cost, low-impact enhancements that can be incorporated during the restoration of...

  13. Umatilla River Basin, Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : Annual Report 1989.

    SciTech Connect

    Scheeler, Carl A.

    1990-03-01

    The Umatilla habitat improvement program targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The channelization of Meacham Creek by the Union Pacific Railroad combined with poor riparian livestock management created extreme channel instability and bedload movement within the project area. The resulting loss of riparian vegetation caused an increase in water temperatures, evaporative losses and sediment loading from upland sites. Four leases and nine right-of-way agreements were procured for the restoration of 2 miles of stream channel on Meacham Creek and lower Boston Canyon Creek. Treatments included: sloping of gravel deposits to reduce channel braiding and develop a more stable channel configuration, placement of rock and wood structures to reduce erosion of stream banks and encourage the deposition of fines for the establishment of riparian vegetation, placement of instream boulders, weirs and large organic debris to increase holding and hiding cover and to encourage the development of a stable thalweg, and the enhancement of riparian vegetation through planting of hardwood cuttings and grass and forb seeds. Baseline data on stream flows, water temperature and suspended sediments, and channel morphology was collected.

  14. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    2006-03-01

    Work undertaken in 2005 included: (1) Four new fence projects were completed thereby protecting 7.55 miles of stream with 9.1 miles of new riparian fence (2) Fence removal 1.7 miles of barbed wire. (3) Completed three spring developments (repair work on two BLM springs on Cottonwood Creek (Dayville), 1 solar on Rock Creek/ Collins property). (4) Dredge tail leveling completed on 0.9 miles of the Middle Fork of the John Day River (5) Cut, hauled and placed 30 junipers on Indian Creek/Kuhl property for bank stability. (6) Collected and planted 1500 willow cuttings on Mountain Creek/Jones property. (7) Conducted steelhead redd counts on Lake Cr./Hoover property and Cottonwood Cr./Mascall properties (8) Seeded 200 lbs of native grass seed on projects where the sites were disturbed by fence construction activities. (9) Maintenance of all active project fences (72.74 miles), watergaps (60), spring developments (30) were checked and repairs performed. (10) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Program in 1984 we have installed 156.06 miles of riparian fence on leased property protecting 88.34 miles of anadromous fish bearing stream. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects from 1996-2001, where the landowner received the materials, built and maintained the project we have a total of 230.92 miles of fence protecting 144.7 miles of stream and 3285 acres of riparian habitat.

  15. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Russ M.; Delano, Kenneth H.; Jerome, James P.

    2002-07-01

    Work undertaken in 2001 included: (1) 3335 structure posts were pounded on six new projects thereby protecting 10 miles of stream (2) Completion of 1000 ft. of barbed wire fence and one watergap on the Middle Fork of the John Day River/ Forrest property. (3) Fence removal of 5010 ft. of barbed wire fence on the Meredith project. (4) Maintenance of all active project fences (66 miles), watergaps (76), spring developments (32) and plantings were checked and repairs performed. (5) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 63.74 miles of stream protected using 106.78 miles of fence. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects we have 180.64 miles of fence protecting 120.6 miles of stream.

  16. Protection Enhances Community and Habitat Stability: Evidence from a Mediterranean Marine Protected Area

    PubMed Central

    Fraschetti, Simonetta; Guarnieri, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Stanislao; Terlizzi, Antonio; Boero, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Rare evidences support that Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) enhance the stability of marine habitats and assemblages. Based on nine years of observation (2001–2009) inside and outside a well managed MPA, we assessed the potential of conservation and management actions to modify patterns of spatial and/or temporal variability of Posidonia oceanica meadows, the lower midlittoral and the shallow infralittoral rock assemblages. Significant differences in both temporal variations and spatial patterns were observed between protected and unprotected locations. A lower temporal variability in the protected vs. unprotected assemblages was found in the shallow infralittoral, demonstrating that, at least at local scale, protection can enhance community stability. Macrobenthos with long-lived and relatively slow-growing invertebrates and structurally complex algal forms were homogeneously distributed in space and went through little fluctuations in time. In contrast, a mosaic of disturbed patches featured unprotected locations, with small-scale shifts from macroalgal stands to barrens, and harsh temporal variations between the two states. Opposite patterns of spatial and temporal variability were found for the midlittoral assemblages. Despite an overall clear pattern of seagrass regression through time, protected meadows showed a significantly higher shoot density than unprotected ones, suggesting a higher resistance to local human activities. Our results support the assumption that the exclusion/management of human activities within MPAs enhance the stability of the structural components of protected marine systems, reverting or arresting threat-induced trajectories of change. PMID:24349135

  17. Breed differences in clearance of porcine FSH in hypophysectomized rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extracts of anterior pituitary (AP) glands were infused iv into hypophysectomized male rats followed by sequential sampling of blood for 120 min. Determination of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations established that FSH from Chinese Meishan males decreased in the circulation of rats mo...

  18. New simple and rapid remote sensing technique for enhancement and visual interpretation of submerged habitats in coastal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moufaddal, W.

    Optical remote sensing data particularly those form Landsat TM and ETM and SPOT has been proven for more than two decades to be capable of resolving of coarse-level habitat distribution in coastal environments However capability of these sensors for interpreting and resolving all major submerged coastal habitats in one color display is confounded by their relative low spectral resolution as well as by limitation of the color mode input to only three wavelength bands In a reef environment for example a true color image blue green and red visible bands in a blue-green-red display from Landsat TM or SPOT is only capable for interpreting coral reef types and bottom changes However information on the other coastal habitats such as seagrasses macro-algae and other submerged aquatic vegetation SAV types are suppressed or lacked because of absence of their spectral signature in this band combination In order to display or to be able to visually interpret SAV habitats the analyst should replace the red visible band with the near-infrared band in the last band combination so that it can reflect the characteristic spectral signature of the aquatic vegetation This adds similar difficulty when one tries to digitally classify a coastal environment with reef substrate types and SAV habitats Unfortunately review of the remote sensing literature reveals that there is no one remote sensing technique to date can visually enhance all substrate habitat types simultaneously The present paper tries to solve this problem through providing a new

  19. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation

  20. Avian LH and FSH: comparison of several radioimmunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, A.R.; Follett, B.K.

    1983-04-01

    Comparisons were made between various LH and FSH radioimmunoassays currently being used to measure avian hormones. The two LH assays were the homologous chicken system of Follett et al. (1972) and the turkey assay of Burke et al. (1979). These assays were also used in heterologous arrangement by interchanging the iodinated LH fractions and antisera. Five FSH assays were analyzed: two homologous chicken systems (Scanes et al., 1977; Sakai and Ishii, 1980) an assay based on mammalian materials (rat FSH and anti-ovine FSH antiserum, and one using labelled turkey FSH (Burke et al., 1979) with an anti-chicken FSH antiserum. The potencies of purified chicken and turkey gonadotrophin preparations and of a range of plasma samples from Japanese quail were measured in each assay. The two LH systems showed some degree of species specificity, such that chicken LH was more active than turkey LH in the chicken assay, whereas the reverse was true in the turkey LH assay. The potency estimates of the purified hormones in the various FSH assays were very consistent. The qualitative changes in plasma hormone levels were similar in all assays, although there were some differences in the magnitude of the responses.

  1. Application of Wind Fetch and Wave Models for Habitat Rehabilitation and Enhancement Projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohweder, Jason J.; Rogala, James T.; Johnson, Barry L.; Anderson, Dennis; Clark, Steve; Chamberlin, Ferris; Runyon, Kip

    2008-01-01

    Models based upon coastal engineering equations have been developed to quantify wind fetch length and several physical wave characteristics including significant height, length, peak period, maximum orbital velocity, and shear stress. These models, developed using Environmental Systems Research Institute's ArcGIS 9.2 Geographic Information System platform, were used to quantify differences in proposed island construction designs for three Habitat Rehabilitation and Enhancement Projects (HREPs) in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Paul District (Capoli Slough and Harpers Slough) and St. Louis District (Swan Lake). Weighted wind fetch was calculated using land cover data supplied by the Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) for each island design scenario for all three HREPs. Figures and graphs were created to depict the results of this analysis. The difference in weighted wind fetch from existing conditions to each potential future island design was calculated for Capoli and Harpers Slough HREPs. A simplistic method for calculating sediment suspension probability was also applied to the HREPs in the St. Paul District. This analysis involved determining the percentage of days that maximum orbital wave velocity calculated over the growing seasons of 2002-2007 exceeded a threshold value taken from the literature where fine unconsolidated sediments may become suspended. This analysis also evaluated the difference in sediment suspension probability from existing conditions to the potential island designs. Bathymetric data used in the analysis were collected from the LTRMP and wind direction and magnitude data were collected from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Climatic Data Center.

  2. Regeneration in bottomland forest canopy gaps 6 years after variable retention harvests to enhance wildlife habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Somershoe, Scott G.

    2013-01-01

    To promote desired forest conditions that enhance wildlife habitat in bottomland forests, managers prescribed and implemented variable-retention harvest, a.k.a. wildlife forestry, in four stands on Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge, LA. These treatments created canopy openings (gaps) within which managers sought to regenerate shade-intolerant trees. Six years after prescribed harvests, we assessed regeneration in 41 canopy gaps and 4 large (>0.5-ha) patch cut openings that resulted from treatments and in 21 natural canopy gaps on 2 unharvested control stands. Mean gap area of anthropogenic gaps (582 m²) was greater than that of natural gaps (262 m²). Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) and red oaks (Quercus nigra, Q. nuttallii, and Q. phellos) were common in anthropogenic gaps, whereas elms (Ulmus spp.) and sugarberry (Celtis laevigata) were numerous in natural gaps. We recommend harvest prescriptions include gaps with diameter >25 m, because the proportion of shade-intolerant regeneration increased with gap area up to 500 m². The proportion of shade-intolerant definitive gap fillers (individuals likely to occupy the canopy) increased with gap area: 35 percent in natural gaps, 54 percent in anthropogenic gaps, and 84 percent in patch cuts. Sweetgum, green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), and red oaks were common definitive gap fillers.

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-08-04

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of approximately 1.5 miles of post and wire fence along Valley Creek in Stanley, Idaho. The proposed fence will meet or exceed BPA's minimum requirement of a 35-foot setback from the stream. Fence posts will be driven into the ground with a post ponder. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat through exclusion fencing.

  4. Application of Wind Fetch and Wave Models for Habitat Rehabilitation and Enhancement Projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohweder, Jason J.; Rogala, James T.; Johnson, Barry L.; Anderson, Dennis; Clark, Steve; Chamberlin, Ferris

    2012-01-01

    Models based upon coastal engineering equations have been developed to quantify wind fetch length and several physical wave characteristics including significant height, length, peak period, maximum orbital velocity, and shear stress. These models were used to quantify differences in proposed island construction designs for three Habitat Rehabilitation and Enhancement Projects (HREPs) in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Paul District (Capoli Slough and Harpers Slough) and St. Louis District (Swan Lake). Weighted wind fetch was calculated using land cover data supplied by the Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) for each island design scenario for all three HREPs. Figures and graphs were created to depict the results of this analysis. The difference in weighted wind fetch from existing conditions to each potential future island design was calculated for Capoli and Harpers Slough HREPs. A simplistic method for calculating sediment suspension probability was also applied to the HREPs in the St. Paul District. This analysis involved determining the percentage of days that maximum orbital wave velocity calculated over the growing seasons of 2002–2007 exceeded a threshold value taken from the literature where fine unconsolidated sediments may become suspended. This analysis also evaluated the difference in sediment suspension probability from existing conditions to the potential island designs. Bathymetric data used in the analysis were collected from the LTRMP and wind direction and magnitude data were collected from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Climatic Data Center. These models are scheduled to be updated to operate using the most current Environmental Systems Research Institute ArcGIS Geographic Information System platform, and have several improvements implemented to wave calculations, data processing, and functions of the toolbox.

  5. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, Supplement A: Habitat Enhancement Evaluation of Fish and Wash Creeks, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Everest, Fred

    1984-04-01

    Habitat improvements for anadromous salmonids on Fish Creek in the upper Clackamas Basin were evaluated. The primary objectives of the evaluation effort include: (1) evaluate and quantify the changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat improvements; (2) evaluate and quantify the changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements; and (3) evaluate the cost-effectiveness of habitat improvements developed with BPA and KV funds on Fish Creek. This report integrates data for the evaluation efforts collected in the Fish Creek Basin in 1982 and 1983. 3 references, 34 figures, 23 tables.

  6. Impact of urinary FSH price: a cost-effectiveness analysis of recombinant and urinary FSH in assisted reproduction techniques in the USA.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, K; Schertz, J; Falk, B; Beresniak, A

    2002-01-01

    This study compares the cost-effectiveness of recombinant human FSH (r(h)FSH, Gonal-F) and urinary FSH (uFSH) in assisted reproduction techniques in the USA, using several hypothetical prices for uFSH. A specifically designed Markov model and Monte-Carlo simulation techniques were used to model the possible outcomes during three treatment cycles. Data included in the model were derived from randomized clinical trials and databases. An expert panel determined probability distributions for each decision point throughout each virtual treatment cycle. The assumed unit cost of r(h)FSH was $58.52 (based on the average retail cost) and three unit prices ($49, $45, $40) were used for uFSH. A total of 5000 simulations was performed on a virtual cohort of 100,000 patients. The mean number of assisted reproduction treatment cycles/success (ongoing pregnancy at 12 weeks) was 4.34 with r(h)FSH and 4.75 with uFSH. The total number of pregnancies achieved was 40,665 and 37,890, respectively. The mean cost per successful pregnancy with r(h)FSH was $40 688. For uFSH at unit costs of $40, $45 and $49, the mean costs per successful pregnancy were $43,500, $44,400 and $45,000, respectively (each P < 0.0001 versus r(h)FSH). Thus, despite its greater cost per unit dose, r(h)FSH is more cost-effective than uFSH over a wide range of uFSH prices, reflecting the greater clinical efficacy of r(h)FSH. PMID:12470524

  7. Hungry Horse Dam Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project: Long-Term Habitat Management Plan, Elk and Mule Deer Winter Range Enhancement, Firefighter Mountain and Spotted Bear Winter Ranges.

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

    1990-06-01

    Project goals are to rehabilitate 1120 acres of big game (elk and mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus) winter range on the Hungry Horse and Spotted Bear Districts of Flathead National Forest lands adjacent to Hungry Horse Reservoir. This project represents the initial phase of implementation toward the mitigation goal. A minimum of 547 acres Trust-funded enhancements are called for in this plan. The remainder are part of the typical Forest Service management activities for the project area. Monitor and evaluate the effects of project implementation on the big game forage base and elk and mule deer populations in the project area. Monitor enhancement success to determine effective acreage to be credited against mitigation goal. Additional enhancement acreage will be selected elsewhere in the Flathead Forest or other lands adjacent'' to the reservoir based on progress toward the mitigation goal as determined through monitoring. The Wildlife Mitigation Trust Fund Advisory Committee will serve to guide decisions regarding future enhancement efforts. 7 refs.

  8. Induction of ovulation in seasonally anestrous mares under ambient lights using recombinant equine FSH (reFSH).

    PubMed

    Meyers-Brown, Geraldine A; McCue, Patrick M; Troedsson, Mats H T; Klein, Claudia; Zent, Walter; Ferris, Ryan A; Lindholm, Alicia R G; Scofield, David B; Claes, Anthony N; Morganti, Monica; Colgin, Mark A; Wetzel, Robert L; Peters, Andrew R; Roser, Janet F

    2013-09-15

    Traditionally, mares are put under artificial lights to advance the first ovulation of the year. The aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy of recombinant equine FSH (reFSH) in stimulating follicular development and advancing the first ovulation of the year in seasonally anestrous mares compared with anestrous mares given a placebo. Both groups of mares were housed under ambient light conditions. Sixty deep anestrous mares of light horse breeds (follicular diameters ≤ 20 mm in diameter and progesterone <1 ng/mL) were maintained under a natural photoperiod at three different sites: University of California, Davis, Colorado State University, and University of Kentucky Gluck Centre. Twenty mares at each site were randomly allocated to receive either 0.65 mg of reFSH (group A: treatment; n = 10) or a placebo (group B: control; n = 10) twice daily by im beginning on January 31. Treatment continued until one or more preovulatory follicles developed or up to a maximum of 15 days. Randomized treatments were blinded. Follicular development was closely monitored by transrectal ultrasonography. When the largest follicle reached ≥ 35 mm in diameter, reFSH treatment was discontinued and an injection of 2500 international units of hCG was administered iv 36 hours later to induce ovulation. Jugular blood samples were collected daily from all mares at University of California, Davis, and processed for LH, FSH, progesterone, estradiol-17β, and immunoreactive-inhibin by RIA. All 30 mares receiving reFSH (group A) developed follicles ≥ 35 mm within 7.4 ± 1.6 days of treatment. Twenty-three of the 30 reFSH-treated mares (group A) ovulated within 72 hours after hCG administration. In contrast, mares in group B (placebo, control) did not exhibit significant follicular development and none ovulated within the 15-day observation period. Mares in group A had significantly higher plasma levels of FSH, estradiol-17β, and immunoreactive-inhibin during treatment but

  9. Production, purification, and characterization of recombinant hFSH glycoforms for functional studies

    PubMed Central

    Butnev, Viktor Y.; Butnev, Vladimir Y.; May, Jeffrey V.; Shuai, Bin; Tran, Patrick; White, William K.; Brown, Alan; Hall, Aaron Smalter; Harvey, David J.; Bousfield, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Previously, our laboratory demonstrated the existence of a β-subunit glycosylation-deficient human FSH glycoform, hFSH21. A third variant, hFSH18, has recently been detected in FSH glycoforms isolated from purified pituitary hLH preparations. Human FSH21 abundance in individual female pituitaries progressively decreased with increasing age. Hypo-glycosylated glycoform preparations are significantly more active than fully-glycosylated hFSH preparations. The purpose of this study was to produce, purify and chemically characterize both glycoform variants expressed by a mammalian cell line. Recombinant hFSH was expressed in a stable GH3 cell line and isolated from serum-free cell culture medium by sequential, hydrophobic and immunoaffinity chromatography. FSH glycoform fractions were separated by Superdex 75 gel-filtration. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of both hFSH18 and hFSH21 glycoforms in the low molecular weight fraction, however, their electrophoretic mobilities differed from those associated with the corresponding pituitary hFSH variants. Edman degradation of FSH21/18 -derived β-subunit before and after peptide-N-glycanase F digestion confirmed that it possessed a mixture of both mono-glycosylated FSHβ subunits, as both Asn7 and Asn24 were partially glycosylated. FSH receptor-binding assays confirmed our previous observations that hFSH21/18 exhibits greater receptor-binding affinity and occupies more FSH binding sites when compared to fully-glycosylated hFSH24. Thus, the age-related reduction in hypo-glycosylated hFSH significantly reduces circulating levels of FSH biological activity that may further compromise reproductive function. Taken together, the ability to express and isolate recombinant hFSH glycoforms opens the way to study functional differences between them both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:25661536

  10. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Jed; Sexton, Amy D.

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. Six projects, two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and one property on the mainstem Walla Walla River were part of the exercise. Several thousand native plants as bare-root stock and cuttings were reintroduced to the sites and 18 acres of floodplain corridor was seeded with native grass seed. Pre and post-project monitoring efforts were included for all projects, incorporating methodologies from CTUIR's Draft Monitoring Plan.

  11. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Scheeler, Carl A.

    1993-01-01

    The Umatilla habitat improvement program targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning,and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall Chinook and coho salmon. This report covers work accomplished by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation from April 1991 through May 1992. This program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Measure 704 (d)(1) 34.02) as partial mitigation for construction of hydroelectric dams and the subsequent losses of anadromous fish throughout the Columbia River system.

  12. Costs and outcomes associated with IVF using recombinant FSH.

    PubMed

    Ledger, W; Wiebinga, C; Anderson, P; Irwin, D; Holman, A; Lloyd, A

    2009-09-01

    Cost and outcome estimates based on clinical trial data may not reflect usual clinical practice, yet they are often used to inform service provision and budget decisions. To expand understanding of assisted reproduction treatment in clinical practice, an economic evaluation of IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) data from a single assisted conception unit (ACU) in England was performed. A total of 1418 IVF/ICSI cycles undertaken there between October 2001 and January 2006 in 1001 women were analysed. The overall live birth rate was 22% (95% CI: 19.7-24.2), with the 30- to 34-year age group achieving the highest rate (28%). The average recombinant FSH (rFSH) dose/cycle prescribed was 1855 IU. Average cost of rFSH/cycle was 646 pound(SD: 219 pound), and average total cost/cycle was 2932 pound (SD: 422 pound). Economic data based on clinical trials informing current UK guidance assumes higher doses of rFSH dose/cycle (1750-2625 IU), higher average cost of drugs/cycle (1179 pound), and higher average total cost/cycle (3266 pound). While the outcomes in this study matched UK averages, total cost/cycle was lower than those cited in UK guidelines. Utilizing the protocols and (lower) rFSH dosages reported in this study may enable other ACU to provide a greater number of IVF/ICSI cycles to patients within given budgets. PMID:19778478

  13. Biodiversity in intertidal rock pools: informing engineering criteria for artificial habitat enhancement in the built environment.

    PubMed

    Firth, Louise B; Schofield, Meredith; White, Freya J; Skov, Martin W; Hawkins, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    Coastal defence structures are proliferating to counter rising and stormier seas. With increasing concern about the ecological value of built environments, efforts are being made to create novel habitat to increase biodiversity. Rock pools are infrequent on artificial structures. We compared biodiversity patterns between rock pools and emergent rock and assessed the role of pool depth and substratum incline in determining patterns of biodiversity. Rock pools were more taxon rich than emergent substrata. Patterns varied with depth and incline with algal groups being more positively associated with shallow than deeper habitats. Substratum incline had little influence on colonising epibiota, with the exception of canopy algae in deeper habitats where vertical surfaces supported greater taxon richness than horizontal surfaces. The creation of artificial rock pools in built environments will have a positive effect on biodiversity. Building pools of varying depths and inclines and shore heights will provide a range of habitats, increase environmental heterogeneity, therefore creating more possible ecological niches, promoting local biodiversity. PMID:24746927

  14. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Jed; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-04-01

    In 2001, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled six properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and one property on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Since 1997, approximately 7 miles of critical salmonid habitat has been secured for restoration and protection under this project. Major accomplishments to date include the following: Secured approximately $250,000 in cost share; Secured 7 easements; Planted 30,000+ native plants; Installed 50,000+ cuttings; and Seeded 18 acres to native grass. Pre and post-project monitoring efforts were included for all projects, incorporating methodologies from CTUIR's Draft Monitoring Plan. Basin-wide monitoring also included the deployment of 6 thermographs to collect summer stream temperatures.

  15. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Jed

    2005-12-01

    In 2002 and 2003, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts on private properties in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of this effort is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled nine properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and four properties on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Major accomplishments during the reporting period include the following: (1) Secured approximately $229,000 in project cost share; (2) Purchase of 46 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River to be protected perpetually for native fish and wildlife; (3) Developed three new 15 year conservation easements with private landowners; (4) Installed 3000 feet of weed barrier tarp with new plantings within project area on the mainstem Walla Walla River; (5) Expanded easement area on Couse Creek to include an additional 0.5 miles of stream corridor and 32 acres of upland habitat; (6) Restored 12 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River and 32 acres on Couse Creek to native perennial grasses; and (7) Installed 50,000+ new native plants/cuttings within project areas.

  16. John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Jeff A.; Jerome, James P.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    1999-02-01

    During 1998, three new projects were completed improving 1.8 miles of stream and riparian habitat. Protection for these reaches required the construction of 3.2 miles of riparian fence and 7 livestock water gaps. A previously leased property on the Mainstream was converted from apriarian pasture to a corridor fence after no significant recovery had occurred.

  17. Comparative assessment of the consistency and quality of a highly purified FSH extracted from human urine (urofollitropin) and a recombinant human FSH (follitropin alpha).

    PubMed

    Lispi, M; Bassett, R; Crisci, C; Mancinelli, M; Martelli, F; Ceccarelli, D; De Bellis, C; Mendola, D

    2006-08-01

    The revolutionary development of biotechnology-derived therapeutic proteins has provided the expected improvements in quality, purity and consistency, as demonstrated in recombinant human FSH (rhFSH). However, the development of urine-derived gonadotrophins has not always shown comparable improvements. More recently, highly purified urine-derived FSH (uFSH-HP) products have become widely available. The relative purity, level of urine-derived contaminants, and consistency of one such highly purified human uFSH (uhFSH) (urofollitropin) has been assessed and directly compared with rhFSH (follitropin alpha). It has been demonstrated that the highly purified urofollitropin contains variable levels of urine-derived contaminant proteins and demonstrates a variable level of FSH purity, FSH isoforms, and delivered dose. These variable factors may contribute to the control of ovarian stimulation. The relative purity, variable consistency and the presence of contaminants indicates that the urofollitropin is, at best, a partially purified uFSH that is not able to meet the quality attributes of follitropin alpha (rhFSH). PMID:16895630

  18. Energetic benefits of enhanced summer roosting habitat for little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) recovering from white-nose syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Alana; Willis, Craig K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat modification can improve outcomes for imperilled wildlife. Insectivorous bats in North America face a range of conservation threats, including habitat loss and white-nose syndrome (WNS). Even healthy bats face energetic constraints during spring, but enhancement of roosting habitat could reduce energetic costs, increase survival and enhance recovery from WNS. We tested the potential of artificial heating of bat roosts as a management tool for threatened bat populations. We predicted that: (i) after hibernation, captive bats would be more likely to select a roost maintained at a temperature near their thermoneutral zone; (ii) bats recovering from WNS at the end of hibernation would show a stronger preference for heated roosts compared with healthy bats; and (iii) heated roosts would result in biologically significant energy savings. We housed two groups of bats (WNS-positive and control) in separate flight cages following hibernation. Over 7.5 weeks, we quantified the presence of individuals in heated vs. unheated bat houses within each cage. We then used a series of bioenergetic models to quantify thermoregulatory costs in each type of roost under a number of scenarios. Bats preferentially selected heated bat houses, but WNS-affected bats were much more likely to use the heated bat house compared with control animals. Our model predicted energy savings of up to 81.2% for bats in artificially heated roosts if roost temperature was allowed to cool at night to facilitate short bouts of torpor. Our results are consistent with research highlighting the importance of roost microclimate and suggest that protection and enhancement of high-quality, natural roosting environments should be a priority response to a range of threats, including WNS. Our findings also suggest the potential of artificially heated bat houses to help populations recover from WNS, but more work is needed before these might be implemented on a large scale. PMID:27293749

  19. Energetic benefits of enhanced summer roosting habitat for little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) recovering from white-nose syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Alana; Willis, Craig K R

    2016-01-01

    Habitat modification can improve outcomes for imperilled wildlife. Insectivorous bats in North America face a range of conservation threats, including habitat loss and white-nose syndrome (WNS). Even healthy bats face energetic constraints during spring, but enhancement of roosting habitat could reduce energetic costs, increase survival and enhance recovery from WNS. We tested the potential of artificial heating of bat roosts as a management tool for threatened bat populations. We predicted that: (i) after hibernation, captive bats would be more likely to select a roost maintained at a temperature near their thermoneutral zone; (ii) bats recovering from WNS at the end of hibernation would show a stronger preference for heated roosts compared with healthy bats; and (iii) heated roosts would result in biologically significant energy savings. We housed two groups of bats (WNS-positive and control) in separate flight cages following hibernation. Over 7.5 weeks, we quantified the presence of individuals in heated vs. unheated bat houses within each cage. We then used a series of bioenergetic models to quantify thermoregulatory costs in each type of roost under a number of scenarios. Bats preferentially selected heated bat houses, but WNS-affected bats were much more likely to use the heated bat house compared with control animals. Our model predicted energy savings of up to 81.2% for bats in artificially heated roosts if roost temperature was allowed to cool at night to facilitate short bouts of torpor. Our results are consistent with research highlighting the importance of roost microclimate and suggest that protection and enhancement of high-quality, natural roosting environments should be a priority response to a range of threats, including WNS. Our findings also suggest the potential of artificially heated bat houses to help populations recover from WNS, but more work is needed before these might be implemented on a large scale. PMID:27293749

  20. Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, Will

    2004-01-01

    The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads

  1. Induction of Cyclin D2 in Rat Granulosa Cells Requires FSH-dependent Relief from FOXO1 Repression Coupled with Positive Signals from Smad*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngkyu; Maizels, Evelyn T.; Feiger, Zachary J.; Alam, Hena; Peters, Carl A.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Unterman, Terry G.; Lee, Eun Jig; Jameson, J. Larry; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Ovarian follicles undergo exponential growth in response to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), largely as a result of the proliferation of granulosa cells (GCs). In vitro under serum-free conditions, rat GCs differentiate in response to FSH but do not proliferate unless activin is also present. In the presence of FSH plus activin, GCs exhibit enhanced expression of cyclin D2 as well as inhibin-α, aromatase, steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1), cholesterol side chain (SCC), and epiregulin. In this report we sought to identify the signaling pathways by which FSH and activin promote GC proliferation and differentiation. Our results show that these responses are associated with prolonged Akt phosphorylation relative to time-matched controls and are dependent on phosphati-dylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and Smad2/3 signaling, based on the ability of the PI 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 or infection with adenoviral dominant negative Smad3 (DN-Smad3) mutant to attenuate induction of cyclin D2, inhibin-α, aromatase, SCC, SF-1, and epiregulin. The DN-Smad3 mutant also abolished prolonged Akt phosphorylation stimulated by FSH plus activin 24 h post-treatment. Infection with the adenoviral constitutively active forkhead box-containing protein, O subfamily (FOXO)1 mutant suppressed induction of cyclin D2, aromatase, inhibin-α, SF-1, and epiregulin. Transient transfections of GCs with constitutively active FOXO1 mutant also suppressed cyclin D2, inhibin-α, and epiregulin promoter-reporter activities. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results demonstrate in vivo the association of FOXO1 with the cyclin D2 promoter in untreated GCs and release of FOXO1 from the cyclin D2 promoter upon addition of FSH plus activin. These results suggest that proliferation and differentiation of GCs in response to FSH plus activin requires both removal of FOXO1-dependent repression and positive signaling from Smad2/3. PMID:15613482

  2. Host Habitat Volatiles Enhance the Olfactory Response of the Larval Parasitoid Holepyris sylvanidis to Specifically Host-Associated Cues.

    PubMed

    Fürstenau, Benjamin; Adler, Cornel; Schulz, Hartwig; Hilker, Monika

    2016-09-01

    Host foraging of parasitic wasps attacking insects living in stored food may be guided by volatile cues emanating from these postharvest products. However, little knowledge is available as to how habitat odor released from noninfested stored food affects the parasitoid's response to host-specific chemicals. In this study, we investigated the impact of wheat grist odor on the olfactory host search by the ectoparasitoid Holepyris sylvanidis This parasitoid attacks larvae of the confused flour beetle Tribolium confusum, a common pest of grain products. Olfactometer bioassays showed that female H. sylvanidis were attracted by volatiles released from host larval feces, whereas odor of noninfested wheat grist was neither attractive nor did it mask the host-indicating cues. We analyzed the odor of host larval feces and wheat grist by coupled gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and recorded the parasitoid's electroantennographic (EAG) responses to the detected volatiles. Two specifically host-associated components of the fecal odor, (E)-2-nonenal and 1-pentadecene, elicited strong EAG responses. Both components were attractive when tested individually, but less than larval feces. Attraction of parasitoids to these host-specific key compounds was enhanced by addition of (i) noninfested habitat substrate odor or (ii) a blend of 3 EAG-active (but not behaviorally active) volatiles that had been identified in odor of noninfested grist (benzaldehyde, 1-tetradecene, 1-hexadecene), but were also detected in the host fecal odor. The impact of these volatiles ubiquitously released in a food store by noninfested habitat substrate on the parasitoid's orientation to host-specific volatile cues is discussed. PMID:27261526

  3. Acclimatization to high-variance habitats does not enhance physiological tolerance of two key Caribbean corals to future temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Camp, Emma F; Smith, David J; Evenhuis, Chris; Enochs, Ian; Manzello, Derek; Woodcock, Stephen; Suggett, David J

    2016-05-25

    Corals are acclimatized to populate dynamic habitats that neighbour coral reefs. Habitats such as seagrass beds exhibit broad diel changes in temperature and pH that routinely expose corals to conditions predicted for reefs over the next 50-100 years. However, whether such acclimatization effectively enhances physiological tolerance to, and hence provides refuge against, future climate scenarios remains unknown. Also, whether corals living in low-variance habitats can tolerate present-day high-variance conditions remains untested. We experimentally examined how pH and temperature predicted for the year 2100 affects the growth and physiology of two dominant Caribbean corals (Acropora palmata and Porites astreoides) native to habitats with intrinsically low (outer-reef terrace, LV) and/or high (neighbouring seagrass, HV) environmental variance. Under present-day temperature and pH, growth and metabolic rates (calcification, respiration and photosynthesis) were unchanged for HV versus LV populations. Superimposing future climate scenarios onto the HV and LV conditions did not result in any enhanced tolerance to colonies native to HV. Calcification rates were always lower for elevated temperature and/or reduced pH. Together, these results suggest that seagrass habitats may not serve as refugia against climate change if the magnitude of future temperature and pH changes is equivalent to neighbouring reef habitats. PMID:27194698

  4. Kids Working with Nature: A Cooperative Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project in the Connelly Creek Nature Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherrer, Wendy Wollam

    1988-01-01

    Describes a project in the Bellingham Cooperative School (Washington) in which teachers and students, along with parents and community volunteers, are involved in a 24-acre wildlife enhancement effort. (TW)

  5. Biosimilar FSH preparations- are they identical twins or just siblings?

    PubMed

    Orvieto, Raoul; Seifer, David B

    2016-01-01

    As patents expire on innovator products, there is increasing interest in developing biosimilar products globally. Biosimilars are not exact copies and are not considered generic versions of the reference product. They may differ in strength, purity and contain different composition of isoforms and/or various glycosylation profiles, with the consequent alterations in clinical efficacy or safety. Recently 2 new recombinant FSH preparations were introduced to clinical practice following randomized controlled, phase 3 clinical trials. Both, Bemfola and Ovaleap® were referred to the FSH innovator product Gonal-f™ (Follitropin alpha), and were found to yield an equivalent number of oocytes (primary end-point), following a long GnRH agonist suppressive protocol in "ideal" patients, i.e., young, normal responders. However, a closer look at these RCTs reveals a non-significant 4 % difference in clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, in favor of Gonal f over the biosimilar products, accompanied by half the incidence of OHSS (2.9 vs 5.2 %, respectively). These studies were underpowered with reference to pregnancy rates, Thus, we believe that further comparative studies are needed in additional patient populations, e.g.,older,, poor responders, patients with repeated IVF failures and/or polycystic ovary syndrome, before the universal implementation of biosimilar products for clinical use. Biosimilars are actually a regulatory synonym, facilitating a fast track introduction of a FSH preparation to the COH armamentarium. We therefore recommend against interchanging or substituting innovator and biosimilar agents in clinical practice, and believe that the decision whether to use an innovator or a biosimilar product, should be reserved to the discretion of the treating physician. Furthermore, we believe the time has come that the measurement of the biological activity of FSH in humans should require other methods rather than the Steelman-Pohley assay, such as the determination

  6. Increased Prevalance of the −211 T Allele of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) β Subunit Promoter Polymorphism and Lower Serum FSH in Infertile Men

    PubMed Central

    Grigorova, Marina; Punab, Margus; Poolamets, Olev; Kelgo, Piret; Ausmees, Kristo; Korrovits, Paul; Vihljajev, Vladimir; Laan, Maris

    2010-01-01

    Context: The human FSHB promoter polymorphism (rs10835638; −211 G/T) has been associated with serum FSH in a cohort of young Estonian men. The minor allele carriers had reduced serum FSH (15.7% in GT heterozygotes; 40% in TT homozygotes) compared with GG homozygotes. Objective: Because FSH is essential for normal spermatogenesis and fertility, we speculated that abnormalities in FSH action could contribute to male infertility. We sought to study whether genetically inherited constitutively reduced FSH levels may affect male reproduction and replicate the association between rs10835638 and serum FSH among infertile male patients. Design: Genotyping of rs10835638 in a cohort of infertile men (n = 1029; Andrology Center of the Tartu University Clinics, Estonia), including idiopathic infertility cases (IIFC; n = 750). Patients: Patients included male partners (sperm concentration <20 × 106/ml) of infertile couples failing to conceive a child for 12 months or longer. Results: A significant excess of TT homozygotes (1.1 vs. 2.4%) as well as GT heterozygotes (22.4 vs. 25.1%) was detected among infertile men compared with the young male cohort (χ2 test, P < 0.05). The T allele of rs10835638 was associated with reduced serum FSH (analysis of covariance; full cohort: P = 1.20 × 10−6, F = 13.8; IIFC: P = 7.70 × 10−7, F = 14.3) as well as with low FSH to LH ratio (full cohort: P = 1.52 × 10−11, F = 25.6; IIFC: P = 3.25 × 10−9, F = 20.4). The median serum FSH levels differed between the GG and TT carriers by 48.5%. All IIFC with TT genotype exhibited low (<1.8) FSH to LH ratio. Conclusions: In perspective, this genetic marker may have clinical significance in molecular diagnostics of male reproductive success and a potential to identify positive responders to FSH treatment. PMID:19897680

  7. Effects of Flooding and Tamarisk Removal on Habitat for Sensitive Fish Species in the San Rafael River, Utah: Implications for Fish Habitat Enhancement and Future Restoration Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Daniel L.; Laub, Brian G.; Birdsey, Paul; Dean, David J.

    2014-09-01

    Tamarisk removal is a widespread restoration practice on rivers in the southwestern USA, but impacts of removal on fish habitat have rarely been investigated. We examined whether tamarisk removal, in combination with a large spring flood, had the potential to improve fish habitat on the San Rafael River in southeastern Utah. We quantified habitat complexity and the distribution of wood accumulation in a tamarisk removal site (treated) and a non-removal site (untreated) in 2010, 1 year prior to a large magnitude and long-duration spring flood. We used aerial imagery to analyze river changes in the treated and untreated sites. Areas of channel movement were significantly larger in the treated site compared to the untreated site, primarily because of geomorphic characteristics of the channel, including higher sinuosity and the presence of an ephemeral tributary. However, results suggest that tamarisk removal on the outside of meander bends, where it grows directly on the channel margins, can promote increased channel movement. Prior to the flood, wood accumulations were concentrated in sections of channel where tamarisk had been removed. Pools, riffles, and backwaters occurred more frequently within 30 m upstream and downstream of wood accumulations compared to areas within 30 m of random points. Pools associated with wood accumulations were also significantly larger and deeper than those associated with random points. These results suggest that the combination of tamarisk removal and wood input can increase the potential for channel movement during spring floods thereby diversifying river habitat and improving conditions for native fish.

  8. Effects of flooding and tamarisk removal on habitat for sensitive fish species in the San Rafael River, Utah: implications for fish habitat enhancement and future restoration efforts.

    PubMed

    Keller, Daniel L; Laub, Brian G; Birdsey, Paul; Dean, David J

    2014-09-01

    Tamarisk removal is a widespread restoration practice on rivers in the southwestern USA, but impacts of removal on fish habitat have rarely been investigated. We examined whether tamarisk removal, in combination with a large spring flood, had the potential to improve fish habitat on the San Rafael River in southeastern Utah. We quantified habitat complexity and the distribution of wood accumulation in a tamarisk removal site (treated) and a non-removal site (untreated) in 2010, 1 year prior to a large magnitude and long-duration spring flood. We used aerial imagery to analyze river changes in the treated and untreated sites. Areas of channel movement were significantly larger in the treated site compared to the untreated site, primarily because of geomorphic characteristics of the channel, including higher sinuosity and the presence of an ephemeral tributary. However, results suggest that tamarisk removal on the outside of meander bends, where it grows directly on the channel margins, can promote increased channel movement. Prior to the flood, wood accumulations were concentrated in sections of channel where tamarisk had been removed. Pools, riffles, and backwaters occurred more frequently within 30 m upstream and downstream of wood accumulations compared to areas within 30 m of random points. Pools associated with wood accumulations were also significantly larger and deeper than those associated with random points. These results suggest that the combination of tamarisk removal and wood input can increase the potential for channel movement during spring floods thereby diversifying river habitat and improving conditions for native fish. PMID:24993795

  9. Superovulation in ewes by a single injection of pFSH dissolved in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP): effects of PVP molecular weight, concentration and schedule of treatment.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, A G; Martemucci, G; Colonna, M A; Borghese, A; Terzano, M G; Bellitti, A

    2001-03-30

    Three experiments were carried out to evaluate induction in ewes of superovulation and embryo production by a single injection of a porcine pituitary extract (pFSH) dissolved in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), investigating the effects of PVP molecular weight and its concentration (Experiment I), time and method of treatment (Experiments II and III). All ewes were synchronized for estrus by vaginal sponges impregnated with fluorogestone acetate (FGA; 30 mg, 9 days) plus PGF(2alpha) (Cloprostenol, 50 microg, 48h before sponge removal - s.r.), and superovulated by 250 IU pFSH. In Experiment I, 60 Gentile di Puglia ewes were subdivided into five experimental groups (n = 12): Group A, the control, received six decreasing intramuscular (i.m.) doses of pFSH, 12 h apart, beginning 48h before s.r.; Groups B and C were given 48 h before s.r. a single i.m. injection of pFSH dissolved in PVP with MW = 10,000, respectively, at concentrations of 15 and 30% w/v; Groups D and E received the same treatments as for B and C using PVP with MW = 40,000. None of the pFSH-PVP treatments were effective in inducing superovulation. In Experiment II, 22 Leccese ewes were subdivided into two groups (n = 11): Group A, control received i.m. four decreasing doses of pFSH, beginning 24 h before s.r., 12h apart; Group B was given a single i.m. injection of pFSH dissolved in PVP (MW = 40,000 at 30% w/v), 24 h before s.r. The pFSH-PVP treatment provided an ovulation rate similar to the control and tended to enhance embryo yield (4.4 versus 2.4, P>0.05). In Experiment III, 60 Leccese ewes were subdivided into six treatment groups (n = 10). Groups A and D served as controls and received i.m. 12 h apart, six doses (from 48 h before s.r.) and four doses (from 24h before s.r.) of pFSH, respectively. Groups B and C were treated by a single injection of pFSH in PVP (MW = 10,000; 30% w/v) 48 h before s.r., respectively by i.m. or subcutaneous (s.c.) administration. Groups E and F received the same treatments

  10. Predicted effect of landscape position on wildlife habitat value of Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program wetlands in a tile-drained agricultural region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otis, David L.; Crumpton, William R.; Green, David; Loan-Wilsey, Anna; Cooper, Tom; Johnson, Rex R.

    2013-01-01

    Justification for investment in restored or constructed wetland projects are often based on presumed net increases in ecosystem services. However, quantitative assessment of performance metrics is often difficult and restricted to a single objective. More comprehensive performance assessments could help inform decision-makers about trade-offs in services provided by alternative restoration program design attributes. The primary goal of the Iowa Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program is to establish wetlands that efficiently remove nitrates from tile-drained agricultural landscapes. A secondary objective is provision of wildlife habitat. We used existing wildlife habitat models to compare relative net change in potential wildlife habitat value for four alternative landscape positions of wetlands within the watershed. Predicted species richness and habitat value for birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles generally increased as the wetland position moved lower in the watershed. However, predicted average net increase between pre- and post-project value was dependent on taxonomic group. The increased average wetland area and changes in surrounding upland habitat composition among landscape positions were responsible for these differences. Net change in predicted densities of several grassland bird species at the four landscape positions was variable and species-dependent. Predicted waterfowl breeding activity was greater for lower drainage position wetlands. Although our models are simplistic and provide only a predictive index of potential habitat value, we believe such assessment exercises can provide a tool for coarse-level comparisons of alternative proposed project attributes and a basis for constructing informed hypotheses in auxiliary empirical field studies.

  11. Discordances between follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in female infertility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) represent the two most frequently utilized laboratory tests in determining ovarian reserve (OR). This study determined the clinical significance of their concordance and discordance in female infertility patients. Methods We investigated 366 consecutive infertility patients (350 reached IVF), excluding women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). They were considered to have normal FSH and AMH if values fell within age-specific (as-) 95% confidence intervals (CI), and to suffer from diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) if FSH exceeded and/or AMH fell below those. The two hormones, thus, could be concordant (Group I), both normal (IA) or abnormal (IB), show normal AMH/abnormal FSH (Group II) or normal FSH/abnormal AMH (Group III). Oocyte yields, stratified for age categories, were then studied in each group as reflection of OR. Results Oocyte yields significantly decreased from groups IA to II to III and IB. Predictive values of as-FSH/AMH patterns changed, however, at different ages. Except at very young and very old ages, normal as-AMH better predicted higher oocytes yields than normal as-FSH, though above age 42 years normal as-FSH predicts good oocyte yields even with abnormally low AMH. Under age 42 discrepancies between as- FSH and as-AMH remain similarly predictive of oocyte yields at all ages. Discussion Concordances and discordances between as-FSH and as-AMH improve OR assessments and predictability of oocyte yields in IVF. PMID:20565808

  12. The effect of increased dietary intake on superovulatory response to FSH in heifers.

    PubMed

    Gong, J G; Armstrong, D G; Baxter, G; Hogg, C O; Garnsworthy, P C; Webb, R

    2002-04-01

    We have previously shown that the number of ovarian follicles <4 mm in diameter can be increased by enhanced dietary intake in heifers. This study investigated the effect of the same dietary treatment on superovulatory response. The estrous cycles of 24 mature Hereford x Friesian heifers were synchronized by a standard progesterone plus prostaglandin protocol. The animals were fed with either 100% (group M, n = 12) or 200% (group 2M, n = 12) maintenance requirements for a 3-week period. Starting from day 4 of the synchronized estrous cycle, all the animals were superovulated using a standard 4-day FSH regime followed by an injection of GnRH analogue (GnRHa) to induce ovulation. Rectal ultrasound scanning was carried out to assess ovarian follicular populations at the start of FSH treatment and on the day of GnRHa injection, and to determine the number of corpora lutea 5 days after GnRHa injection. The body weight (BW) and body condition score (BCS) were recorded weekly and plasma samples were collected throughout the experimental period. There were no differences in either BW or BCS between two groups at the start of the experiment. The BW and BCS were maintained during the experiment in the group M, whilst animals in the group 2M showed a non-significant (P > 0.05) increase in BW and BCS. Circulating concentrations of insulin were significantly (P < 0.01) higher in heifers from the group 2M throughout the controlled feeding period. The group 2M had significantly (P < 0.05) more follicles 2-4 mm in diameter at the start of FSH treatment and more (P < 0.01) follicles >9 mm in diameter on the day of GnRHa injection, when compared with the group M. Similarly, 5 days after GnRHa injection there were significantly (P < 0.01) more corpora lutea in the group 2M (18.1+/-2.2) than in the group M (10.6+/-3.0). In addition, plasma progesterone concentrations following GnRHa injection were significantly (P < 0.01) higher in heifers from the group 2M. In conclusion, these

  13. A Wildlife Habitat Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for Eight Federal Hydroelectric Facilities in the Willamette River Basin: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    The development and operation of eight federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin impacted 30,776 acres of prime wildlife habitat. This study proposes mitigative measures for the losses to wildlife and wildlife habitat resulting from these projects, under the direction of the Columbia River Basin (CRB) Fish and Wildlife Program. The CRB Fish and Wildlife Program was adopted in 1982 by the Northwest Power Planning Council, pursuant to the Northwest Power Planning Act of 1980. The proposed mitigation plan is based on the findings of loss assessments completed in 1985, that used a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) to assess the extent of impact to wildlife and wildlife habitat, with 24 evaluation species. The vegetative structure of the impacted habitat was broken down into three components: big game winter range, riparian habitat and old-growth forest. The mitigation plan proposes implementation of the following, over a period of 20 years: (1) purchase of cut-over timber lands to mitigate, in the long-term, for big game winter range, and portions of the riparian habitat and old-growth forest (approx. 20,000 acres); (2) purchase approximately 4,400 acres of riparian habitat along the Willamette River Greenway; and (3) three options to mitigate for the outstanding old-growth forest losses. Monitoring would be required in the early stages of the 100-year plan. The timber lands would be actively managed for elk and timber revenue could provide O and M costs over the long-term.

  14. How the FSH/LH ratio and dose numbers in the p-FSH administration treatment regimen, and insemination schedule affect superovulatory response in ewes.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, A G; Martemucci, G; Taibi, L

    2005-04-01

    We wished to evaluate the effects of FSH/LH ratio and number of doses of p-FSH during a superovulatory treatment on ovulation rate and embryo production (Experiment I). In Experiment II, we studied the efficacy of fertilization after various insemination schedules in superovulated donors. In Experiment I estrus was synchronized in 40 ewes (FGA, for 9 days plus PGF2alpha on Day 7) and the ewes were randomly assigned to four treatment groups as follows (n = 10 ewes each): Group A: four p-FSH doses with the FSH/LH ratio held constant (1.6); Group B: four p-FSH doses with the FSH/LH ratio decreasing (FSH/LH 1.6-1.0-0.6-0.3); Group C: eight p-FSH doses with the FSH/LH ratio held constant (1.6); Group D: eight p-FSH doses and FSH/LH ratio decreasing (1.6-1.6, 1.0-1.0, 0.6-0.6, 0.3-0.3). p-FSH administrations were performed twice daily 12 h apart. The ewes were mated at the onset of estrus and again after 12 and 24 h; then, one ram per four ewes was maintained with the ewes for two additional days. Ovarian response and embryo production were assessed on Day 7 after estrus. Experiment II. Three groups (n = 10 each) of superovulated ewes were inseminated as follows: Group M: mated at onset of estrus; Group AI: artificial insemination 30 h after onset of estrus; M + AI) mating at onset of estrus and intrauterine AI performed 30 h from estrus with fresh semen. Results of Experiment I showed that treatment (D) improved (P < 0.05) ovulatory response in comparison to Groups (C) and (A). The fertilization rate was lower (P < 0.01) in Group D) than Group (A). Also the proportion of transferable embryos was lower in Group (D) in comparison to all the other treatments (P < 0.01). Group A gave the best production of embryos (7.3/ewe; 89.0% transferable). In Experiment II, combined mating plus AI improved fertilization rate (80.3%) compared to both mating (P < 0.01) and AI (P < 0.02) alone. PMID:15763116

  15. Evaluation of a small beach nourishment project to enhance habitat suitability for horseshoe crabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Nancy L.; Smith, David R.; Tiyarattanachai, Ronnachai; Nordstrom, Karl F.

    2007-09-01

    This field study evaluates the effect of nourishing an estuarine beach with gravel to enhance spawning rates by horseshoe crabs. A total of 564 m 3 of coarse sand and gravel were emplaced in two 90 m-long treatment segments at Bowers Beach, Delaware, USA from 9 to 11 April 2002. Field data were gathered between 6 April and 24 May 2002 to characterize the two fill segments and the un-nourished segments between them as well as two control segments at the adjacent Ted Harvey Beach. Sediment samples were taken from the foreshore surface and at depth before and after the nourishment. Bay water levels, wave heights, and beach ground water characteristics were monitored over a 12-hour tidal cycle at one of the nourished (15 May 2002) and the unnourished segment (16 May 2002) at Bowers Beach and at one of the control segments at Ted Harvey Beach (21 May 2002) using piezometers and pressure transducers inserted in wells. The beaches were cored to estimate the density of horseshoe crab eggs deposited during the spawning season. Horseshoe crab eggs were buried in pouches at 0.15 to 0.20 m depth for 30 to 40 days to evaluate their survival in developing into embryo or larval stage. Bulk sediment samples were taken to evaluate moisture characteristics near locations where egg pouches were buried. Density of spawning females at Bowers Beach was 1.04 m - 2 in 2001 and 1.20 m - 2 in 2002. These rates are lower than at Ted Harvey Beach but reveal an increase in spawning while Ted Harvey Beach underwent a considerable decrease (2.63 m - 2 to 1.35 m - 2 ). Sediments low on the foreshore remained nearly saturated throughout the tidal cycle at both beaches. The average hydraulic conductivity on the upper foreshore at the non-treatment section at Bowers Beach (0.19 cm s - 1 ) was less than at Ted Harvey Beach (0.27 cm s - 1 ), and the finer, better sorted sediments at depth at Bowers Beach resulted in a higher porosity, creating greater moisture retention potential. Egg development was

  16. Evaluation of a small beach nourishment project to enhance habitat suitability for horseshoe crabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, N.L.; Smith, D.R.; Tiyarattanachai, R.; Nordstrom, K.F.

    2007-01-01

    This field study evaluates the effect of nourishing an estuarine beach with gravel to enhance spawning rates by horseshoe crabs. A total of 564??m3 of coarse sand and gravel were emplaced in two 90??m-long treatment segments at Bowers Beach, Delaware, USA from 9 to 11 April 2002. Field data were gathered between 6 April and 24 May 2002 to characterize the two fill segments and the un-nourished segments between them as well as two control segments at the adjacent Ted Harvey Beach. Sediment samples were taken from the foreshore surface and at depth before and after the nourishment. Bay water levels, wave heights, and beach ground water characteristics were monitored over a 12-hour tidal cycle at one of the nourished (15 May 2002) and the unnourished segment (16 May 2002) at Bowers Beach and at one of the control segments at Ted Harvey Beach (21 May 2002) using piezometers and pressure transducers inserted in wells. The beaches were cored to estimate the density of horseshoe crab eggs deposited during the spawning season. Horseshoe crab eggs were buried in pouches at 0.15 to 0.20??m depth for 30 to 40??days to evaluate their survival in developing into embryo or larval stage. Bulk sediment samples were taken to evaluate moisture characteristics near locations where egg pouches were buried. Density of spawning females at Bowers Beach was 1.04??m- 2 in 2001 and 1.20??m- 2 in 2002. These rates are lower than at Ted Harvey Beach but reveal an increase in spawning while Ted Harvey Beach underwent a considerable decrease (2.63??m- 2 to 1.35??m- 2). Sediments low on the foreshore remained nearly saturated throughout the tidal cycle at both beaches. The average hydraulic conductivity on the upper foreshore at the non-treatment section at Bowers Beach (0.19??cm s- 1) was less than at Ted Harvey Beach (0.27??cm s- 1), and the finer, better sorted sediments at depth at Bowers Beach resulted in a higher porosity, creating greater moisture retention potential. Egg development was

  17. Endocrine control of spermatogenesis: Role of FSH and LH/ testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Suresh; Weinbauer, Gerhard F

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of testicular functions (production of sperm and androgens) is an important aspect of preclinical safety assessment and testicular toxicity is comparatively far more common than ovarian toxicity. This chapter focuses (1) on the histological sequelae of disturbed reproductive endocrinology in rat, dog and nonhuman primates and (2) provides a review of our current understanding of the roles of gonadotropins and androgens. The response of the rodent testis to endocrine disturbances is clearly different from that of dog and primates with different germ cell types and spermatogenic stages being affected initially and also that the end-stage spermatogenic involution is more pronounced in dog and primates compared to rodents. Luteinizing hormone (LH)/testosterone and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) are the pivotal endocrine factors controlling testicular functions. The relative importance of either hormone is somewhat different between rodents and primates. Generally, however, both LH/testosterone and FSH are necessary for quantitatively normal spermatogenesis, at least in non-seasonal species. PMID:26413400

  18. Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2003-01-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

  19. Some effects of adding p-LH in defined amounts to purified p-FSH to modify FSH/LH ratios during the superovulatory treatment of anestrous ewes.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, A; Martemucci, G; Colonna, M A; Cafueri, C; Toteda, F

    1997-05-01

    Nonlactating Leccese ewes (n = 61) were used during seasonal anestrus to investigate the effects on ovarian response and embryo production of adding defined amounts of p-LH to purified p-FSH as well as decreasing the FSH/LH ratio during treatment. The ewes were synchronized with FGA-impregnated intravaginal pessaries for 9 days and prostaglandin F2 alpha (Cloprostenol) injected on the seventh day. They were divided into six treatment groups in a 3 x 2 factorial design: three amounts of purified p-LH (100, 50 or 25% equivalent to 525, 262 or 131 IU p-LH) x 2 regimen of p-FSH and p-LH administration (constant or decreasing FSH/LH ratio). Each ewe received a total of 525 IU p-FSH at a decreasing dose, twice daily over a 3-day period. Group I (n = 11), Group II (n = 10) and Group III (n = 10) were treated with p-FSH supplemented with p-LH at 100%, 50% and 25%, respectively, of p-FSH dose and a constant FSH/LH ratio throughout the treatment period. Group IV (n = 10), Group V (n = 10) and Group VI (n = 10) were treated with p-FSH supplemented with p-LH at 100%, 50% and 25%, respectively, of p-FSH dose but with a decreasing FSH/LH ratio over the 3 days of the treatment: 1.7-0.86-0.43 for Group IV; 3.4-1.7-0.86 for Group V; 6-3-1.5 for Group VI. Embryos were flushed surgically on Day 6 after estrus. The ovulation rate did not differ among the groups (8-12.8). Superovulation with 100% p-LH and decreasing the FSH/LH ratio (Group IV) resulted in: (i) the highest ova recovery (9.8 +/- 1.7), and this was significantly different (P < 0.05) from the 25% p-LH treated group (Group VI; 5.0 +/- 1.7), (ii) the highest fertilization rate (90.6 +/- 9.2%), with a significant (P < 0.01) difference compared with the constant ratio regimen (Group I; 62.6 +/- 8.3%); (iii) the highest transferable embryo yield (6.4 +/- 1.1), differing significantly (P < 0.01) from Group VI (2.2 +/- 1.1) and Group I (2.7 +/- 1.0). It is concluded that decreasing the amount of p-LH added to purified p-FSH did

  20. Fasting lowers gastrin-releasing peptide and FSH mRNA in the ovine anterior pituitary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor beta (ER-ß), LH, and FSH are important mediators of reproduction. FSH stimulates follicle recruitment and development. During anorexia, serum concentrations of FSH and LH decrease. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuromedin B (NMB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...

  1. Fasting lowers gastrin-releasing peptide and Fsh mRNA in the ovine anterior pituitary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor beta (ER-ß), LH, and FSH are important mediators of reproduction. FSH stimulates follicle recruitment and development. During anorexia, serum concentrations of FSH and LH decrease. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuromedin B (NMB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...

  2. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Santa-Coloma, T.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium.

  3. Estuarine and Tidal Freshwater Habitat Cover Types Along the Lower Columbia River Estuary Determined from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Garono, Ralph; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01

    Developing an understanding of the distribution and changes in estuarine and tidal floodplain ecosystems is critical to the management of biological resources in the lower Columbia River. Columbia River plants, fish, and wildlife require specific physicochemical and ecological conditions to sustain their populations. As habitats are degraded or lost, this capability is altered, often irretrievably; those species that cannot adapt are lost from the ecosystem. The Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) completed a comprehensive ecosystem protection and enhancement plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary in 1999 (Jerrick, 1999). The plan identified habitat loss and modification as a critical threat to the integrity of the lower Columbia River ecosystem and called for a habitat inventory as a key first step in its long term restoration efforts. In 2000, the Estuary Partnership initiated a multiphase project to produce a spatial data set describing the current location and distribution of estuarine and tidal freshwater habitat cover types along the lower Columbia River from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam using a consistent methodology and data sources (Fig. 1). The first phase of the project was the development of a broadbrush description of the estuarine and tidal freshwater habitat cover classes for the entire study area ({approx}146 river miles) using Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite imagery. Phase II of the project entailed analysis of the classified satellite imagery from Phase I. Analysis of change in landcover and a summary of the spatial relationships between cover types are part of Phase II. Phase III of the project included the classification of the high resolution hyperspectral imagery collected in 2000 and 2001 for key focal areas within the larger study area. Finally, Phase IV consists of this final report that presents results from refining the Landsat ETM+ classification and provides recommendations for future actions

  4. FSH treatment of male idiopathic infertility improves pregnancy rate: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Santi, D; Granata, A R M; Simoni, M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to comprehensively evaluate whether FSH administration to the male partner of infertile couples improves pregnancy rate, spontaneously and/or after assisted reproductive techniques (ART). Methods Meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials in which FSH was administered for male idiopathic infertility, compared with placebo or no treatment. Randomization was not considered as an inclusion criterion. Results We found 15 controlled clinical studies (614 men treated with FSH and 661 treated with placebo or untreated). Concerning the type of FSH, eight studies used recombinant FSH, whereas seven studies used purified FSH. Nine studies evaluated spontaneous pregnancy rate, resulting in an overall odds ratio (OR) of about 4.5 (CI: 2.17–9.33). Eight studies evaluated pregnancy rate after ART, showing a significant OR of 1.60 (CI: 1.08–2.37). Sub-dividing studies according to the FSH preparations (purified/recombinant), pregnancy rate improvement remained significant for each preparation. Eleven studies considered sperm quality after FSH treatment, finding a significant improvement of sperm concentration (2.66×106/ml, CI: 0.47–4.84), but not of concentration of sperm with progressive motility (1.22×106/ml, CI: −0.07 to 2.52). Three trials evaluated testicular volume, showing a non-significant increase in men treated (1.35 ml, CI: −0.44 to 3.14). Conclusion The results of controlled clinical trials available in the literature indicate an improvement of pregnancy rate after FSH administration to the male partner of infertile couples, both spontaneously and after ART. However, the heterogeneity of studies, the high risk of bias and the lack of precise criteria to guide FSH administration limit the strength of these results. Future studies should be designed to identify the markers of FSH response which are helpful in the decision-making process. Meanwhile, the use of FSH in the treatment of male infertility should be cautious

  5. Comparisons of mRNA expression for aromatase, FSH receptor, and IGF-I in the granulosa of small ovarian follicles between cattle selected and unselected for twin ovulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term selection of cattle for the production of twin ovulations and births has enhanced the development of preantral and antral ovarian follicles and increased the frequency of twin or triplet ovulations to greater than 60%. However, these differences have not been linked to differences in FSH s...

  6. Inter-nesting habitat-use patterns of loggerhead sea turtles: Enhancing satellite tracking with benthic mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristen M.; Zawada, David G.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Lidz, Barbara H.

    2010-01-01

    The loggerhead sea turtle Caretta caretta faces declining nest numbers and bycatches from commercial longline fishing in the southeastern USA. Understanding spatial and temporal habitat-use patterns of these turtles, especially reproductive females in the neritic zone, is critical for guiding management decisions. To assess marine turtle habitat use within the Dry Tortugas National Park (DRTO), we used satellite telemetry to identify core-use areas for 7 loggerhead females inter-nesting and tracked in 2008 and 2009. This effort represents the first tracking of DRTO loggerheads, a distinct subpopulation that is 1 of 7 recently proposed for upgrading from threatened to endangered under the US Endangered Species Act. We also used a rapid, high-resolution, digital imaging system to map benthic habitats in turtle core-use areas (i.e. 50% kernel density zones). Loggerhead females were seasonal residents of DRTO for 19 to 51 d, and individual inter-nesting habitats were located within 1.9 km (2008) and 2.3 km (2009) of the nesting beach and tagging site. The core area common to all tagged turtles was 4.2 km2 in size and spanned a depth range of 7.6 to 11.5 m. Mapping results revealed the diversity and distributions of benthic cover available in the core-use area, as well as a heavily used corridor to/from the nesting beach. This combined tagging-mapping approach shows potential for planning and improving the effectiveness of marine protected areas and for developing spatially explicit conservation plans.

  7. Enhanced drought-tolerance in the homoploid hybrid species Pinus densata: implication for its habitat divergence from two progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Zhao, Changming; Milne, Richard; Ji, Mingfei; Chen, Litong; Liu, Jianquan

    2010-01-01

    The homoploid hybrid species Pinus densata is restricted to alpine habitats that exceed the altitude range of its two parental species, Pinus tabulaeformis and Pinus yunnanensis. Alpine habitats usually generate cold-induced water stress in plants. To understand the ecological differentiation between these three species, we examined their physiological responses to drought stress. Potted seedlings of three species were subjected to low, mild, moderate and severe water stress in an automatic-controlled glasshouse. Fifteen indicators of fitness were measured for each species in each treatment, and most of these decreased as drought increased. Pinus densata exhibited higher fitness than both parental species in terms of total dry mass production (TDM) and long-term water use efficiency (WUE(L)) across all treatments; several other ecophysiological traits were also extreme but not across every treatment, and not always in the highest stress treatment. These results indicate that extreme characters that have become well fixed in P. densata, confer a faster seedling growth rate and more efficient water use, which in turn should confer increased drought tolerance. These traits of P. densata likely promoted its ecological separation from its parental species and facilitated its successful colonization and establishment in high-altitude habitats. PMID:19804499

  8. Greater amberjack Fsh, Lh, and their receptors: Plasma and mRNA profiles during ovarian development.

    PubMed

    Nyuji, Mitsuo; Kazeto, Yukinori; Izumida, Daisuke; Tani, Kosuke; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Hamada, Kazuhisa; Mekuchi, Miyuki; Gen, Koichiro; Soyano, Kiyoshi; Okuzawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    To understand the endocrine regulation of ovarian development in a multiple spawning fish, the relationship between gonadotropins (Gths; follicle-stimulating hormone [Fsh] and luteinizing hormone [Lh]) and their receptors (Gthrs; Fshr and Lhr) were investigated in greater amberjack (Seriola dumerili). cDNAs encoding the Gth subunits (Fshβ, Lhβ, and glycoprotein α [Gpα]) and Gthrs were cloned. The in vitro reporter gene assay using recombinant hormones revealed that greater amberjack Fshr and Lhr responded strongly to their own ligands. Competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed for measuring greater amberjack Fsh and Lh. Anti-Fsh and anti-Lh antibodies were raised against recombinant chimeric single-chain Gths consisting of greater amberjack Fshβ (or Lhβ) with rabbit GPα. The validation study showed that the ELISAs were precise (intra- and inter-assay coefficient of variation, <10%) and sensitive (detection limit of 0.2ng/ml for Fsh and 0.8ng/ml for Lh) with low cross-reactivity. A good parallelism between the standard curve and serial dilutions of greater amberjack plasma and pituitary extract were obtained. In female greater amberjack, pituitary fshb, ovarian fshr, and plasma E2 gradually increased during ovarian development, and plasma Fsh significantly increased during the post-spawning period. This suggests that Fsh plays a role throughout ovarian development and during the post-spawning period. Pituitary lhb, ovarian lhr, and plasma Lh were high during the spawning period, suggesting that the synthesis and secretion of Lh, and Lhr expression are upregulated to induce final oocyte maturation and ovulation. PMID:26519759

  9. Channel Morphology and Bed Sediment Characteristics Before and After Habitat Enhancement Activities in the Uridil Property, Platte River, Nebraska, Water Years 2005-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinzel, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Fluvial geomorphic data were collected by the United States Geological Survey from July 2005 to June 2008 (a time period within water years 2005 to 2008) to monitor the effects of habitat enhancement activities conducted in the Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust's Uridil Property, located along the Platte River, Nebraska. The activities involved the removal of vegetation and sand from the tops of high permanent islands and the placement of the sand into the active river channel. This strategy was intended to enhance habitat for migratory water birds by lowering the elevations of the high islands, thereby eliminating a visual obstruction for roosting birds. It was also thought that the bare sand on the lowered island surfaces could serve as potential habitat for nesting water birds. Lastly, the project supplied a local source of sediment to the river to test the hypothesis that this material could contribute to the formation of lower sandbars and potential nesting sites downstream. Topographic surveys on the islands and along river transects were used to quantify the volume of removed sand and track the storage and movement of the introduced sand downstream. Sediment samples were also collected to map the spatial distribution of river bed sediment sizes before and after the management activities. While the project lowered the elevation of high islands, observations of the sand addition indicated the relatively fine-grained sand that was placed in the active river channel was rapidly transported by the flowing water. Topographic measurements made 3 months after the sand addition along transects in the area of sediment addition showed net aggradation over measurements made in 2005. In the year following the sand addition, 2007, elevated river flows from local rain events generally were accompanied by net degradation along transects within the area of sediment addition. In the spring of 2008, a large magnitude flow event of approximately 360 cubic meters per

  10. Expression of FSH receptor in the hamster ovary during perinatal development

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Prabuddha; Roy, Shyamal K.

    2014-01-01

    FSH plays an important role in ovarian follicular development, and it functions via the G-protein coupled FSH receptor. The objectives of the present study were to determine if full-length FSHR mRNA and corresponding protein were expressed in fetal through postnatal hamster ovaries to explain the FSH-induced primordial follicle formation, and if FSH or estrogen (E) would affect the expression. A full-length and two alternately spliced FSHR transcripts were expressed from E14 through P20. The level of the full-length FSHR mRNA increased markedly through P7 before stabilizing at a lower level with the formation and activation of primordial follicles. A predicted 87kDa FSHR protein band was detected in fetal through P4 ovaries, but additional bands appeared as ovary developed. FSHR immunosignal was present in undifferentiated somatic cells and oocytes in early postnatal ovaries, but was granulosa cells specific after follicles formed. Both eCG and E significantly up-regulated full-length FSHR mRNA levels. Therefore, FSHR is expressed in the hamster ovary from the fetal life to account for FSH-induced primordial follicle formation and cAMP production. Further, FSH or E regulates the receptor expression. PMID:25462586

  11. Blocking antibody to the β-subunit of FSH prevents bone loss by inhibiting bone resorption and stimulating bone synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Blair, Harry; Cao, Jay; Yuen, Tony; Latif, Rauf; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L.; Li, Jianhua; Davies, Terry F.; Sun, Li; Bian, Zhuan; Rosen, Clifford; Zallone, Alberta; New, Maria I.; Zaidi, Mone

    2012-01-01

    Low estrogen levels undoubtedly underlie menopausal bone thinning. However, rapid and profuse bone loss begins 3 y before the last menstrual period, when serum estrogen is relatively normal. We have shown that the pituitary hormone FSH, the levels of which are high during late perimenopause, directly stimulates bone resorption by osteoclasts. Here, we generated and characterized a polyclonal antibody to a 13-amino-acid-long peptide sequence within the receptor-binding domain of the FSH β-subunit. We show that the FSH antibody binds FSH specifically and blocks its action on osteoclast formation in vitro. When injected into ovariectomized mice, the FSH antibody attenuates bone loss significantly not only by inhibiting bone resorption, but also by stimulating bone formation, a yet uncharacterized action of FSH that we report herein. Mesenchymal cells isolated from mice treated with the FSH antibody show greater osteoblast precursor colony counts, similarly to mesenchymal cells isolated from FSH receptor (FSHR)−/− mice. This suggests that FSH negatively regulates osteoblast number. We confirm that this action is mediated by signaling-efficient FSHRs present on mesenchymal stem cells. Overall, the data prompt the future development of an FSH-blocking agent as a means of uncoupling bone formation and bone resorption to a therapeutic advantage in humans. PMID:22908268

  12. Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and associated benthic habitats: A hyperspectral remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Deepak R.; Narumalani, Sunil; Rundquist, Donald; Lawson, Merlin; Perk, R.

    2007-08-01

    Coral reefs and associated benthic habitats are heterogeneous in nature. A remote sensor designed to discriminate these environments requires a high number of narrow, properly placed bands which are not currently available in existing satellite sensors. Optical hyperspectral sensors mounted on aerial platforms seem to be appropriate for overcoming the lack of both high spectral and spatial resolution of satellite sensors. This research presents results of an innovative coral reef application by such a sensor. Using hyperspectral Airborne Imaging Spectroradiometer for Applications (AISA) Eagle data, the approach presented solves the confounding influence of water column attenuation on substrate reflectance on a per-pixel basis. The hyperspectral imagery was used in band ratio algorithms to derive water depth and water column optical properties (e.g., absorption and backscattering coefficients). The water column correction technique produced a bottom albedo image which revealed that the dark regions comprised of sea grasses and benthic algae had albedo values ≈15%, whereas sand- and coral-dominated areas had albedos >30% and ≈15-35%, respectively. The retrieved bottom albedo image was then used to classify the benthos, generating a detailed map of benthic habitats, followed by accuracy assessment.

  13. Habitat automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swab, Rodney E.

    1992-01-01

    A habitat, on either the surface of the Moon or Mars, will be designed and built with the proven technologies of that day. These technologies will be mature and readily available to the habitat designer. We believe an acceleration of the normal pace of automation would allow a habitat to be safer and more easily maintained than would be the case otherwise. This document examines the operation of a habitat and describes elements of that operation which may benefit from an increased use of automation. Research topics within the automation realm are then defined and discussed with respect to the role they can have in the design of the habitat. Problems associated with the integration of advanced technologies into real-world projects at NASA are also addressed.

  14. Pre-diagnostic circulating follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations and ovarian cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    McSorley, MA; Alberg, AJ; Allen, DS; Allen, NE; Brinton, LA; Dorgan, JF; Kaaks, R; Rinaldi, S; Helzlsouer, KJ

    2009-01-01

    Gonadotropins have been indicted in ovarian carcinogenesis but direct evidence has been limited and inconsistent. The aim of this study was to determine the association between pre-diagnostic levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and subsequent development of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. A nested case-control study was conducted using cases and controls drawn from three cohorts: CLUE I and CLUE II of Washington County, MD, and the Island of Guernsey Study, UK. In total, 67 incident invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases were each matched to one to two controls on age, menopausal status, time since last menstrual period, current hormone use, and other relevant factors. FSH concentrations were classified into ranked thirds of low, medium, or high based on the distribution among controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) across increasing thirds of FSH concentrations. Results of the analysis showed that ovarian cancer risk decreased with higher FSH concentrations (p-trend =0.005). Compared to the lowest third of FSH concentrations, the odds ratio among those in the middle and highest thirds were 0.45 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.20– 1.00) and 0.26 (95% CI 0.10–0.70), respectively. Associations persisted after excluding cases diagnosed within five years of follow-up. In conclusion, a reduction in subsequent risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer was observed among women with higher circulating FSH concentrations. These findings contradict the hypothesized role of FSH as a risk factor in ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:19444906

  15. In Estimated Good Prognosis Patients Could Unexpected "Hyporesponse" to Controlled Ovarian Stimulation be Related to Genetic Polymorphisms of FSH Receptor?

    PubMed

    Alviggi, Carlo; Conforti, Alessandro; Caprio, Francesca; Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Strina, Ida; Pagano, Tiziana; De Rosa, Pasquale; Carbone, Floriana; Colacurci, Nicola; De Placido, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    It has been reported that 10% to 15% of young normogonadotrophic women show suboptimal response to standard gonadotropin-releasing hormone-a long protocol. These patients require higher doses of exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). This phenomenon could be associated with genetic characteristics. In this study, FSH receptor polymorphism was retrospectively evaluated in 42 normoresponder young women undergoing an in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycle; patients were stratified according to recombinant human FSH (r-hFSH) consumption. We selected 17 normoresponder young patients who required a cumulative dose of recombinant FSH (rFSH) >2500 UI (group A). A control group was randomly selected among patients who required a cumulative dose of rFSH <2500 UI (group B). Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R) 307Ala and 680Ser variants were analyzed in all our patients. Our results show that the mean number of rFSH vials (36.3 ± 7.5 vs 28.6 ± 4.5, P = .0001) and days of stimulation (12.7 ± 2.4 vs 10.8 ± 2.8, P = .03) were significantly lower in group B, whereas the number of oocytes retrieved (7.1 ± 1.5 vs 9.6 ± 2.4; P = .0005) and the average number of embryos transferred (2.1 ± 0.7 vs 2.7 ± 0.4; P = .001) were significantly lower in group A. Estradiol serum levels on the human chorionic gonadotrophin day were significantly lower in group A (997.8 ± 384.9 pg/mL vs 1749.1 ± 644.4; P = .0001). The incidence of the Ser/Ser genotype was higher in patients with higher r-hFSH consumption (group A; P = .02). Based on our results, we hypothesize an association between the FSH-R polymorphisms and a "hyporesponse" to exogenous FSH. PMID:26902430

  16. Habitat conservation and creation: Invoking the flood-pulse concept to enhance fisheries in the lower Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schramm, H.L., Jr.; Eggleton, M.A.; Mayo, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of four years of growth data failed to identify a single temperature or hydrologic variable that consistently accounted for variation in annual growth of catfishes (Ictaluridae). Instead, a composite variable that measured duration of floodplain inundation when water temperature exceeded minima for active feeding was directly related to growth. Results indicated that floodplain inundation have provided little direct energetic benefit to fishes when water temperatures were sub-optimal for active feeding, but floodplain resources were exploited when thermal conditions were sufficient for active feeding and growth. Thus, the flood-pulse concept applies to the lower Mississippi River (LMR) when modified to consider temperature. Managing the existing leveed floodplain to prolong inundation, increase water temperatures during spring flooding, and maintain connectivity of floodplain habitats with the main river channel should benefit fish production in the LMR.

  17. Addition of low dose hCG to rFSh benefits older women during ovarian stimulation for IVF

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To compare the outcome of IVF cycles in women receiving controlled ovarian stimulation with recFSH or recFSH plus low dose hCG. Methods A retrospective case control study, performed at a private practice affiliated with an academic institute. Patients were infertile women who were treated with IVF/ICSI and controlled ovarian stimulation in a long GnRH agonist protocol using either low dose hCG in addition to recFSH [N = 88] or recFSH alone [N = 99]. Primary outcomes were mean FSH dose, number of mature eggs, number of fertilized eggs, and serum levels of estradiol. Secondary outcomes were endometrial thickness, cycle cancellations and pregnancy rates. Results A significant increase in number of mature and fertilized eggs was observed in women over 40 years of age using low dose hCG in addition to recFSH. The estradiol level was significantly higher on the day of hCG administration and the serum level of FSH on cycle day 7 and on the day of hCG administration were lower. Conclusion Addition of low dose hCG to recFSH compared with recFSH alone significantly modified cycle characteristics in patients >/= 40 years and could be of potential benefit for IVF cycles in older infertile women. PMID:22866896

  18. FSH in vitro versus LH in vivo: similar genomic effects on the cumulus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The use of gonadotropins to trigger oocyte maturation both in vivo and in vitro has provided precious and powerful knowledge that has significantly increased our understanding of the ovarian function. Moreover, the efficacy of most assisted reproductive technologies (ART) used in both humans and livestock species relies on gonadotropin input, mainly FSH and LH. Despite the significant progress achieved and the huge impact of gonadotropins, the exact molecular pathways of the two pituitary hormones, FSH and LH, still remain poorly understood. Moreover, these pathways may not be the same when moving from the in vivo to the in vitro context. This misunderstanding of the intricate synergy between these two hormones leads to a lack of consensus about their use mainly in vitro or in ovulation induction schedules in vivo. In order to optimize their use, additional work is thus required with a special focus on comparing the in vitro versus the in vivo effects. In this context, this overview will briefly summarize the downstream gene expression pathways induced by both FSH in vitro and LH in vivo in the cumulus compartment. Based on recent microarray comparative analysis, we are reporting that in vitro FSH stimulation on cumulus cells appears to achieve at least part of the gene expression activity after in vivo LH stimulation. We are then proposing that the in vitro FSH-response of cumulus cells have similitudes with the in vivo LH-response. PMID:24066945

  19. Androgen and FSH synergistically stimulate lipoprotein degradation and utilization by ovary granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.R.; Nakamura, K.; Schmit, V.; Weinstein, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Androgen can directly modulate the induction of steroidogenic enzymes by FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) in ovary granulosa cells. In studies of its mechanism of action, the authors examined the androgen effect on granulosa cell interaction with lipoproteins, the physiologic source of cholesterol. After granulosa cells were cultured for 48 hours with and without androgen and/or FSH, the cells were incubated for 24 hours with /sup 125/I-lipoproteins (human high density lipoprotein (HDL), rat HDL, or human low density lipoprotein (LDL)). The media were then analyzed for lipoprotein protein coat degradation products (mainly /sup 125/I-monoiodotyrosine) and progestin (mainly 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone (20 alpha-DHP)). In the absence of FSH and androgen, 2 X 10(5) granulosa cells degraded basal levels of all three lipoproteins, but produced no measurable 20 alpha-DHP. The addition of 10(-7) M androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) had no effect on lipoprotein protein degradation or 20 alpha-DHP production. FSH alone stimulated lipoprotein protein degradation by 50 to 300% while the addition of androgen synergistically augmented the FSH-stimulated 20 alpha-DHP production as well as protein coat degradation of all three lipoproteins. DHT and T were both effective, indicating that androgens themselves, and not estrogen products, were responsible for the effect on lipoprotein protein degradation and 20 alpha-DHP production.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of biologically active recombinant elk and horse FSH.

    PubMed

    Fachal, María Victoria; Furlan, Mike; Clark, Rena; Card, Claire E; Chedrese, P Jorge

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to clone and express the elk and horse common alpha-subunit and FSH beta-subunit cDNAs, and to produce recombinant FSH from both species in vitro. The RNAs extracted from elk and horse pituitary glands were reverse-transcribed and amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The cDNAs corresponding to both subunits of elk and horse were cloned into the expression vector pBudCE4.1 and transfected into CRL-9096 cells. Expression of both genes was determined in the transfected cells by Northern and Western blot analysis. Recombinant elk and horse FSH secreted in culture media were characterized by an in vitro bioassay and RIA. When the recombinant products were assessed as activity over mass of FSH measured by RIA, the horse product was 5.6 times more potent than the elk product. The recombinant products injected to immature female Wistar rats stimulated ovarian growth. The results suggest that the products obtained correspond to recombinant versions of the native elk and horse FSH. The availability of these recombinant products may aid in the development of more predictable and efficient techniques of ovarian stimulation in cervids, equids, and other species as well. PMID:19500922

  1. Follicular development and embryo recovery following 3 versus 8 FSH injections in heifers.

    PubMed

    Purwantara, B; Schmidt, M; Callesen, H; Greve, T

    1994-01-01

    Ovarian follicular dynamics and embryo yield were studied during 2 different FSH regimens for superovulation of cattle. Twenty heifers were given intramuscular injections of FSH (total of 35 mg NIH) either once daily for 3 days (Group 3x1) or twice daily for 4 days (Group 4x2). At 72 h after the first FSH injection, each animal was injected with 0.75 mg cloprostenol. Inseminations were performed at 12 h and 24 h after the onset of heat. Transrectal ultrasonography was performed on the day of the first FSH injection, the day of cloprostenol injection, the day of insemination and finally on the day of embryo recovery (day 6 or 7 after heat). The numbers of small (2-4 mm), medium (5-9 mm) and large (> 10 mm) size follicles were recorded. The total number of corpora lutea, eggs and transferable embryos were recorded on the day of embryo recovery. No differences were found between the 2 groups in either of the parameters studied (p > 0.05). It can be concluded that treatment with this FSH preparation once daily for 3 days gives a folliculogenic and superovulatory response similar to a treatment regimen where it is given twice daily for 4 days. PMID:8209824

  2. Pubertal Onset in Girls is Strongly Influenced by Genetic Variation Affecting FSH Action

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Casper P.; Sørensen, Kaspar; Aksglaede, Lise; Mouritsen, Annette; Mieritz, Mikkel G.; Tinggaard, Jeanette; Wohlfart-Veje, Christine; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Main, Katharina M.; Meyts, Ewa Rajpert-De; Almstrup, Kristian; Juul, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Age at pubertal onset varies substantially in healthy girls. Although genetic factors are responsible for more than half of the phenotypic variation, only a small part has been attributed to specific genetic polymorphisms identified so far. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates ovarian follicle maturation and estradiol synthesis which is responsible for breast development. We assessed the effect of three polymorphisms influencing FSH action on age at breast deveopment in a population-based cohort of 964 healthy girls. Girls homozygous for FSHR -29AA (reduced FSH receptor expression) entered puberty 7.4 (2.5–12.4) months later than carriers of the common variants FSHR -29GG+GA, p = 0.003. To our knowledge, this is the strongest genetic effect on age at pubertal onset in girls published to date. PMID:25231187

  3. Ultrastructure of Sheep Primordial Follicles Cultured in the Presence of Indol Acetic Acid, EGF, and FSH

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Evelyn Rabelo; Maddox-Hyttel, Poul; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda Da Cruz; Viana Silva, José Roberto; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo; Seneda, Marcelo Marcondes; Figueiredo, José Ricardo; Toniolli, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ultrastructural characteristics of primordial follicles after culturing of sheep ovarian cortical slices in the presence of indol acetic acid (IAA), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), and FSH. To evaluate ultrastructure of primordial follicles cultured in MEM (control) or in MEM containing IAA, EGF, and FSH, fragments of cultured tissue were processes for transmission electron microscopy. Except in the control, primordial follicles cultured in supplemented media for 6 d were ultrastructurally normal. They had oocyte with intact nucleus and the cytoplasm contained heterogeneous-sized lipid droplets and numerous round or elongated mitochondria with intact parallel cristae were observed. Rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) was rarely found. The granulosa cells cytoplasm contained a great number of mitochondria and abundant RER. In conclusion, the presence of IAA, EGF, and FSH helped to maintain ultrastructural integrity of sheep primordial follicles cultured in vitro. PMID:21188166

  4. FSH and LH plasma levels in bitches with differences in risk for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Reichler, Iris Margaret; Hung, Elisabeth; Jöchle, Wolfgang; Piché, Claude A; Roos, Malgorzata; Hubler, Madeleine; Arnold, Susi

    2005-05-01

    To determine whether the height of the plasma gonadotropin levels after spaying is associated with urinary incontinence, the concentrations of plasma follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) were determined once in 191 intact and 308 spayed bitches. The bitches were grouped according to their risk for urinary incontinence and the medians of their respective gonadotropin levels were compared. For intact anestrous bitches, the FSH- and LH-plasma concentrations were 5.2 (4, 8) ng/mL (median (Q1, Q3)) and 0.5 (0.5-0.5) ng/mL, respectively. In the first year after spaying, the gonadotropin concentrations rose significantly, then stabilised at a level around 10 times those of intact bitches (FSH 62.5 (44, 91) ng/mL; LH 6.1(4, 11) ng/mL). The plasma gonadotropin concentrations of long-term spayed (>12 months) continent bitches (n=209) were higher (FSH 66.8 (46, 104) ng/mL; LH 6.5 (4, 11) ng/mL) than in spayed incontinent bitches (n=60) (FSH 51.5 (38, 74) ng/mL; LH 5.5 (3, 8) ng/mL), the latter also had a higher body weight. Multiple regression analysis showed that the FSH-plasma concentration and not the body weight was decisive for the occurrence of urinary incontinence. The results of this study suggest that levels of gonadotropins are associated, directly or indirectly in the pathophysiology of urinary incontinence after spaying. PMID:15826681

  5. FSH and bFGF regulate the expression of genes involved in Sertoli cell energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Regueira, Mariana; Riera, María Fernanda; Galardo, María Noel; Camberos, María Del Carmen; Pellizzari, Eliana Herminia; Cigorraga, Selva Beatriz; Meroni, Silvina Beatriz

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if FSH and bFGF regulate fatty acid (FA) metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in Sertoli cells (SC). SC cultures obtained from 20-day-old rats were incubated with 100ng/ml FSH or 30ng/ml bFGF for 6, 12, 24 and 48h. The expression of genes involved in transport and metabolism of FA such as: fatty acid transporter CD36 (FAT/CD36), carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long- and medium-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenases (LCAD, MCAD), and of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis such as: nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF1, NRF2) and transcription factor A (Tfam), was analyzed. FSH stimulated FAT/CD36, CPT1, MCAD, NRF1, NRF2 and Tfam mRNA levels while bFGF only stimulated CPT1 expression. A possible participation of PPARβ/δ activation in the regulation of gene expression and lactate production was then evaluated. SC cultures were incubated with FSH or bFGF in the presence of the PPARβ/δ antagonist GSK3787 (GSK; 20μM). bFGF stimulation of CPT1 expression and lactate production were inhibited by GSK. On the other hand, FSH effects were not inhibited by GSK indicating that FSH regulates the expression of genes involved in FA transport and metabolism and in mitochondrial biogenesis, independently of PPARβ/δ activation. FA oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis as well as lactate production are essential for the energetic metabolism of the seminiferous tubule. The fact that these processes are regulated by hormones in a different way reflects the multifarious regulation of molecular mechanisms involved in Sertoli cell function. PMID:26315388

  6. Fsh and Lh direct conserved and specific pathways during flatfish semicystic spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Crespo, Diego; Planas, Josep V; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-10-01

    The current view of the control of spermatogenesis by Fsh and Lh in non-mammalian vertebrates is largely based on studies carried out in teleosts with cystic and cyclic spermatogenesis. Much less is known concerning the specific actions of gonadotropins during semicystic germ cell development, a type of spermatogenesis in which germ cells are released into the tubular lumen where they transform into spermatozoa. In this study, using homologous gonadotropins and a candidate gene approach, for which the genes' testicular cell-type-specific expression was established, we investigated the regulatory effects of Fsh and Lh on gene expression during spermatogenesis in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis), a flatfish with asynchronous and semicystic germ cell development. During early spermatogenesis, Fsh and Lh upregulated steroidogenesis-related genes and nuclear steroid receptors, expressed in both somatic and germ cells, through steroid-dependent pathways, although Lh preferentially stimulated the expression of downstream genes involved in androgen and progestin syntheses. In addition, Lh specifically promoted the expression of spermatid-specific genes encoding spermatozoan flagellar proteins through direct interaction with the Lh receptor in these cells. Interestingly, at this spermatogenic stage, Fsh primarily regulated genes encoding Sertoli cell growth factors with potentially antagonistic effects on germ cell proliferation and differentiation through steroid mediation. During late spermatogenesis, fewer genes were regulated by Fsh or Lh, which was associated with a translational and posttranslational downregulation of the Fsh receptor in different testicular compartments. These results reveal that conserved and specialized gonadotropic pathways regulate semicystic spermatogenesis in flatfish, which may spatially adjust cell germ development to maintain a continuous reservoir of spermatids in the testis. PMID:25024405

  7. Fsh Stimulates Spermatogonial Proliferation and Differentiation in Zebrafish via Igf3.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Rafael Henrique; Morais, Roberto Daltro Vidal de Souza; Crespo, Diego; de Waal, Paul P; de França, Luiz Renato; Schulz, Rüdiger W; Bogerd, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Growth factors modulate germ line stem cell self-renewal and differentiation behavior. We investigate the effects of Igf3, a fish-specific member of the igf family. Fsh increased in a steroid-independent manner the number and mitotic index of single type A undifferentiated spermatogonia and of clones of type A differentiating spermatogonia in adult zebrafish testis. All 4 igf gene family members in zebrafish are expressed in the testis but in tissue culture only igf3 transcript levels increased in response to recombinant zebrafish Fsh. This occurred in a cAMP/protein kinase A-dependent manner, in line with the results of studies on the igf3 gene promoter. Igf3 protein was detected in Sertoli cells. Recombinant zebrafish Igf3 increased the mitotic index of type A undifferentiated and type A differentiating spermatogonia and up-regulated the expression of genes related to spermatogonial differentiation and entry into meiosis, but Igf3 did not modulate testicular androgen release. An Igf receptor inhibitor blocked these effects of Igf3. Importantly, the Igf receptor inhibitor also blocked Fsh-induced spermatogonial proliferation. We conclude that Fsh stimulated Sertoli cell production of Igf3, which promoted via Igf receptor signaling spermatogonial proliferation and differentiation and their entry into meiosis. Because previous work showed that Fsh also released spermatogonia from an inhibitory signal by down-regulating anti-Müllerian hormone and by stimulating androgen production, we can now present a model, in which Fsh orchestrates the activity of stimulatory (Igf3, androgens) and inhibitory (anti-Müllerian hormone) signals to promote spermatogenesis. PMID:26207345

  8. The BET protein FSH functionally interacts with ASH1 to orchestrate global gene activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The question of how cells re-establish gene expression states after cell division is still poorly understood. Genetic and molecular analyses have indicated that Trithorax group (TrxG) proteins are critical for the long-term maintenance of active gene expression states in many organisms. A generally accepted model suggests that TrxG proteins contribute to maintenance of transcription by protecting genes from inappropriate Polycomb group (PcG)-mediated silencing, instead of directly promoting transcription. Results and discussion Here we report a physical and functional interaction in Drosophila between two members of the TrxG, the histone methyltransferase ASH1 and the bromodomain and extraterminal family protein FSH. We investigated this interface at the genome level, uncovering a widespread co-localization of both proteins at promoters and PcG-bound intergenic elements. Our integrative analysis of chromatin maps and gene expression profiles revealed that the observed ASH1-FSH binding pattern at promoters is a hallmark of active genes. Inhibition of FSH-binding to chromatin resulted in global down-regulation of transcription. In addition, we found that genes displaying marks of robust PcG-mediated repression also have ASH1 and FSH bound to their promoters. Conclusions Our data strongly favor a global coactivator function of ASH1 and FSH during transcription, as opposed to the notion that TrxG proteins impede inappropriate PcG-mediated silencing, but are dispensable elsewhere. Instead, our results suggest that PcG repression needs to overcome the transcription-promoting function of ASH1 and FSH in order to silence genes. PMID:23442797

  9. Effects of oestradiol on LH, FSH and prolactin in ovariectomized ewes.

    PubMed

    Rozell, T G; Keisler, D H

    1990-03-01

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the rate (dose/time) at which oestradiol-17 beta (oestradiol) is presented to the hypothalamo-pituitary axis influences secretion of LH, FSH and prolactin. A computer-controlled infusion system was used to produce linearly increasing serum concentrations of oestradiol in ovariectomized ewes over a period of 60 h. Serum samples were collected from ewes every 2 h from 8 h before to 92 h after start of infusion, and assayed for oestradiol, LH, FSH and prolactin. Rates of oestradiol increase were categorized into high (0.61-1.78 pg/h), medium (0.13-0.60 pg/h) and low (0.01-0.12 pg/h). Ewes receiving high rates of oestradiol (N = 11) responded with a surge of LH 12.7 +/- 2.0 h after oestradiol began to increase, whereas ewes receiving medium (N = 15) and low (N = 11) rates of oestradiol responded with a surge of LH at 19.4 +/- 1.7 and 30.9 +/- 2.0 h, respectively. None of the surges of LH was accompanied by a surge of FSH. Serum concentrations of FSH decreased and prolactin increased in ewes receiving high and medium rates of oestradiol, when compared to saline-infused ewes (N = 8; P less than 0.05). We conclude that rate of increase in serum concentrations of oestradiol controls the time of the surge of LH and secretion of prolactin and FSH in ovariectomized ewes. We also suggest that the mechanism by which oestradiol induces a surge of LH may be different from the mechanism by which oestradiol induces a surge of FSH. PMID:2109071

  10. Validation of a noninvasive diagnostic tool to verify neuter status in dogs: The urinary FSH to creatinine ratio.

    PubMed

    Albers-Wolthers, C H J; de Gier, J; Oei, C H Y; Schaefers-Okkens, A C; Kooistra, H S

    2016-09-15

    Determining the presence of functional gonadal tissue in dogs can be challenging, especially in bitches during anestrus or not known to have been ovariectomized, or in male dogs with nonscrotal testes. Furthermore, in male dogs treated with deslorelin, a slow-release GnRH agonist implant for reversible chemical castration, the verification of complete downregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis can be difficult, especially if pretreatment parameters such as the size of the testes or prostate gland are not available. The aims of this study were to validate an immunoradiometric assay for measurement of FSH in canine urine, to determine if the urinary FSH to creatinine ratio can be used to verify the neuter status in bitches and male dogs, as an alternative to the plasma FSH concentration, and to determine if downregulation of the HPG axis is achieved in male dogs during deslorelin treatment. Recovery of added canine FSH and serial dilutions of urine reported that the immunoradiometric assay measures urinary FSH concentration accurately and with high precision. Plasma FSH concentrations (the mean of two samples, taken 40 minutes apart) and the urinary FSH to creatinine ratio were determined before gonadectomy and 140 days (median, range 121-225 days) and 206 days (median, range 158-294 days) after gonadectomy of 13 bitches and five male dogs, respectively, and in 13 male dogs before and 132 days (median, range 117-174 days) after administration of a deslorelin implant. In both bitches and male dogs, the plasma FSH concentration and the urinary FSH to creatinine ratio were significantly higher after gonadectomy, with no overlapping of their ranges. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of the urinary FSH to creatinine ratio revealed a cut-off value of 2.9 in bitches and 6.5 in males to verify the presence or absence of functional gonadal tissue. In male dogs treated with deslorelin, the plasma FSH concentrations and urinary FSH to

  11. Balance of insulin and FSH concentrations improves the in vitro development of isolated goat preantral follicles in medium containing GH.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A C A; Maside, C; Sá, N A R; Guerreiro, D D; Correia, H H V; Leiva-Revilla, J; Lobo, C H; Araújo, V R; Apgar, G A; Brandão, F Z; Figueiredo, J R; Campello, C C

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different combinations of insulin and FSH concentrations in culture media containing GH on the in vitro follicle morphology, antrum formation, growth rates, estradiol (E2) production, oocyte viability and maturation as well as gene expression for FSHR, GHR, INSR, CYP19A1, CYP17, 3ßHSD. Secondary follicles were individually cultured for 18 days in a basic medium containing 50ng/mL GH supplemented with low insulin concentration (INS-LW: 10ng/mL) or high insulin concentration (INS-HG: 10μg/mL) alone or with a fixed FSH concentration (FSH100: 100ng/mL) or with increasing FSH concentrations (FSH-SEQ: 100ng/mL, days 0-6; 500ng/mL, days 6-12; 1000ng/mL days 12-18). In the INS-LW treatment was observed a higher (P<0.05) incidence of normal follicles at day 18 of culture. However, overall higher (P<0.05) follicular growth, oocyte diameter and meiotic resumption rates were obtained using INS-HG+FSH 100. The INS-HG and INS-HG+FSH100 treatments showed higher E2 production and mRNA levels for CYP19A1, CYP17, 3βHSD when compared to INS-LW and INS-LW+FSH100. However, the addition of increasing FSH concentration, regardless of insulin concentration, did not improve the follicular growth, meotic resumption, E2 production or gene expression of steroidogenic enzymes when compared with INS-HG+FSH100. In conclusion, in presence of GH, a basic medium supplemented with 10μg/mL insulin and 100μg/mL FSH throughout the culture period, improves follicular and oocyte growth, oocyte meiotic resumption and E2 production from isolated preantral caprine follicles cultured in vitro. PMID:26723481

  12. Efficacy of a single intramuscular injection of porcine FSH in hyaluronan prior to ovum pick-up in Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Vieira, L M; Rodrigues, C A; Netto, A Castro; Guerreiro, B M; Silveira, C R A; Freitas, B G; Bragança, L G M; Marques, K N G; Sá Filho, M F; Bó, G A; Mapletoft, R J; Baruselli, P S

    2016-03-15

    Plasma FSH profiles, in vitro embryo production (IVP) after ovum pickup (OPU), and establishment of pregnancy with IVP embryos were compared in untreated Holstein oocyte donors and those superstimulated with multiple injections or a single intramuscular (IM) injection of porcine FSH (pFSH) in hyaluronan (HA). Plasma FSH profiles were determined in 23 heifers randomly allocated to one of four groups. Controls received no treatment, whereas the F200 group received 200 mg of pFSH in four doses, 12 hours apart. The F200HA and F300HA groups received 200- or 300-mg pFSH in 5 mL or 7.5 mL, respectively of a 0.5% HA solution by a single IM injection. Plasma FSH levels were determined before the first pFSH treatment and every 6 hours over 96 hours. All data were analyzed by orthogonal contrasts. Circulating FSH area under curve (AUC) in pFSH-treated animals was greater than that in the control group (P = 0.02). Although the AUC did not differ among FSH-treated groups (P = 0.56), the total period with elevated plasma FSH was greater in the F200 group than in the HA groups (P < 0.0001). However, the F300HA group had a greater AUC than the F200HA group (P = 0.006), with a similar total period with elevated plasma FSH (P = 0.17). The IVP was performed in 90 nonlactating Holstein cows randomly allocated to one of the four treatment groups as in the first experiment. A greater proportion of medium-sized (6-10 mm) follicles was observed in cows receiving pFSH, regardless of the treatment group (P < 0.0001). Also, numbers of follicles (P = 0.01), cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) retrieved (P = 0.01) and matured (P = 0.02), cleavage rates (P = 0.002), and blastocysts produced per OPU session (P = 0.06) were greater in cows receiving pFSH, regardless of the treatment group. Cows in the F200HA group had a greater recovery rate (P = 0.009), number of COCs cultured (P = 0.04), and blastocysts produced per OPU session (P = 0.06) than cows in the F300HA group. Similar pregnancy rates were

  13. Conservation planning and monitoring avian habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, D.J.; Loesch, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    Migratory bird conservation plans should not only develop population goals, they also should establish attainable objectives for optimizing avian habitats. Meeting population goals is of paramount importance, but progress toward established habitat objectives can generally be monitored more easily than can progress toward population goals. Additionally, local or regional habitat objectives can be attained regardless of perturbations to avian populations that occur outside the geographic area covered by conservation plans. Assessments of current avian habitats, obtained from remotely sensed data, and the historical distribution of habitats should be used in establishing habitat objectives. Habitat planning and monitoring are best conducted using a geographic information system. Habitat objectives are assigned to three categories: maintaining existing habitat, restoring habitat, and creating new or alternative habitat. Progress toward meeting habitat objectives can be monitored through geographic information systems by incorporating georeferenced information on public lands, private lands under conservation easements, corporate lands under prescribed management, habitat restoration areas, and private lands under alternative management to enhance wildlife values. We recommend that the area and distribution of habitats within the area covered by conservation plans be reassessed from remotely sensed imagery at intervals appropriate to detect predicted habitat changes.

  14. IGF-I Signaling Is Essential for FSH Stimulation of AKT and Steroidogenic Genes in Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Baumgarten, Sarah C.; Wu, Yanguang; Bennett, Jill; Winston, Nicola; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    FSH and IGF-I synergistically stimulate gonadal steroid production; conversely, silencing the FSH or the IGF-I genes leads to infertility and hypogonadism. To determine the molecular link between these hormones, we examined the signaling cross talk downstream of their receptors. In human and rodent granulosa cells (GCs), IGF-I potentiated the stimulatory effects of FSH and cAMP on the expression of steroidogenic genes. In contrast, inhibition of IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) activity or expression using pharmacological, genetic, or biochemical approaches prevented the FSH- and cAMP-induced expression of steroidogenic genes and estradiol production. In vivo experiments demonstrated that IGF-IR inactivation reduces the stimulation of steroidogenic genes and follicle growth by gonadotropins. FSH or IGF-I alone stimulated protein kinase B (PKB), which is also known as AKT and in combination synergistically increased AKT phosphorylation. Remarkably, blocking IGF-IR expression or activity decreased AKT basal activity and abolished AKT activation by FSH. In GCs lacking IGF-IR activity, FSH stimulation of Cyp19 expression was rescued by overexpression of constitutively active AKT. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that in human, mouse, and rat GCs, the well-known stimulatory effect of FSH on Cyp19 and AKT depends on IGF-I and on the expression and activation of the IGF-IR. PMID:23340251

  15. A FSH-Secreting Pituitary Macroadenoma Causing A Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Ge, Li; Cui, Yuanqing; Lang, Cuihong; Hao, Cuifang

    2014-04-01

    FSH-secreting pituitary adenomas can affect sexual and reproductive function. In this article, we have reported the case of a 32-year-old male with secondary infertility. The patient had sexual and reproductive disturbances. The test results of the blood samples indicated obviously decreased testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) levels. Based on previous hormonal results, the patient received pituitary stimulation and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) tests. Both follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) showed low response during the pituitary stimulation test. The results of the hCG test indicated that T/E2 could recover to a normal level. In addition, this patient was diagnosed with pituitary macroadenoma, which was supported by the pituitary MRI. The man's sexual and reproductive functions recovered following surgery. The pathological results confirmed that the tumor tissue was an FSH-secreting pituitary adenoma by immunohistochemical staining. The purpose of this report was to review the relative literature and discuss the influence of FSH-secreting pituitary adenomas on hormones through the hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis. PMID:24696774

  16. High levels of testosterone inhibit ovarian follicle development by repressing the FSH signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Cui, Yu-qian; Zhao, Han; Liu, Hong-bin; Zhao, Shi-dou; Gao, Yuan; Mu, Xiao-li; Gao, Fei; Chen, Zi-jiang

    2015-10-01

    The effect of high concentrations of testosterone on ovarian follicle development was investigated. Primary follicles and granulosa cells were cultured in vitro in media supplemented with a testosterone concentration gradient. The combined effects of testosterone and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on follicular growth and granulosa cell gonadotropin receptor mRNA expression were also investigated. Follicle growth in the presence of high testosterone concentrations was promoted at early stages (days 1-7), but inhibited at later stage (days 7-14) of in vitro culture. Interestingly, testosterone-induced follicle development arrest was rescued by treatment with high concentrations of FSH (400 mIU/mL). In addition, in cultured granulosa cells, high testosterone concentrations induced cell proliferation, and increased the mRNA expression level of FSH receptor (FSHR), and luteinized hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor. It was concluded that high concentrations of testosterone inhibited follicle development, most likely through regulation of the FSH signaling pathway, although independently from FSHR downregulation. These findings are an important step in further understanding the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:26489629

  17. Effect of sialylation and complexity of FSH oligosaccharides on inhibin production by granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Loreti, Nazareth; Ambao, Verónica; Andreone, Luz; Trigo, Romina; Bussmann, Ursula; Campo, Stella

    2013-02-01

    Granulosa cell (GC) inhibin A and B production is regulated by FSH and gonadal factors. This gonadotrophin is released as a mixture of glycoforms, which induce different biological responses in vivo and in vitro. Our aim was to determine the effect of recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) glycosylation variants on inhibin A and B production by rat GCs. Preparative isoelectro focusing was used to isolate more acidic/sialylated (pH <4.00) and less acidic/sialylated (pH >5.00) rhFSH charge analogues. Concanavalin A was used to isolate unbound and firmly bound rhFSH glycoforms on the basis of their oligosaccharide complexity. GCs, obtained from oestrogen-primed immature rats, were cultured with either native rhFSH or its glycosylation variants. Inhibin A and B were determined using specific ELISAs. Results were expressed as mean±s.e.m. Under basal conditions, inhibin A was the predominant dimer produced (inhibin A: 673±55; inhibin B: 80±4  pg/ml). More acidic/sialylated charge analogues stimulated inhibin B production when compared to inhibin A at all doses studied; by contrast, less acidic/sialylated charge analogues stimulated inhibin A production and elicited no effect on inhibin B. Glycoforms bearing complex oligosaccharides showed a potent stimulatory effect on inhibin B when compared to inhibin A production (i.e. dose 1  ng/ml: 4.9±0.5 vs 0.9±0.1-fold stimulation, P<0.001). Glycoforms bearing hybrid-type oligosaccharides favoured inhibin A production (i.e. dose 4  ng/ml 2.9±0.1 vs 1.6±0.1-fold stimulation, P<0.05). These results show that the sialylation degree as well as the complexity of oligosaccharides present in the rhFSH molecule may be considered additional factors that differentially regulate dimeric inhibin production by rat GCs. PMID:23166369

  18. Reproductive Physiology in Young Men Is Cumulatively Affected by FSH-Action Modulating Genetic Variants: FSHR -29G/A and c.2039 A/G, FSHB -211G/T

    PubMed Central

    Grigorova, Marina; Punab, Margus; Punab, Anna Maria; Poolamets, Olev; Vihljajev, Vladimir; Žilaitienė, Birutė; Erenpreiss, Juris; Matulevičius, Valentinas; Laan, Maris

    2014-01-01

    Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor (FSHR) -29G/A polymorphism (rs1394205) was reported to modulate gene expression and reproductive parameters in women, but data in men is limited. We aimed to bring evidence to the effect of FSHR -29G/A variants in men. In Baltic young male cohort (n = 982; Estonians, Latvians, Lithuanians; aged 20.2±2.0 years), the FSHR -29 A-allele was significantly associated with higher serum FSH (linear regression: effect 0.27 IU/L; P = 0.0019, resistant to Bonferroni correction for multiple testing) and showed a non-significant trend for association with higher LH (0.19 IU/L) and total testosterone (0.93 nmol/L), but reduced Inhibin B (−7.84 pg/mL) and total testes volume (effect −1.00 mL). Next, we extended the study and tested the effect of FSHR gene haplotypes determined by the allelic combination of FSHR -29G/A and a well-studied variant c.2039 A/G (Asn680Ser, exon 10). Among the FSHR -29A/2039G haplotype carriers (A-Ser; haplotype-based linear regression), this genetic effect was enhanced for FSH (effect 0.40 IU/L), Inhibin B (−16.57 pg/mL) and total testes volume (−2.34 mL). Finally, we estimated the total contribution of three known FSH-action modulating SNPs (FSHB -211G/T; FSHR -29G/A, c.2039 A/G) to phenotypic variance in reproductive parameters among young men. The major FSH-action modulating SNPs explained together 2.3%, 1.4%, 1.0 and 1.1% of the measured variance in serum FSH, Inhibin B, testosterone and total testes volume, respectively. In contrast to the young male cohort, neither FSHR -29G/A nor FSHR haplotypes appeared to systematically modulate the reproductive physiology of oligozoospermic idiopathic infertile patients (n = 641, Estonians; aged 31.5±6.0 years). In summary, this is the first study showing the significant effect of FSHR -29G/A on male serum FSH level. To account for the genetic effect of known common polymorphisms modulating FSH-action, we suggest haplotype-based analysis of FSHR SNPs

  19. WILDLIFE HABITAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat change statistics were used to estimate the effects of alternative future scenarios for agriculture on non-fish vertebrate diversity in Iowa farmlands. Study areas were two watersheds in central Iowa of about 50 and 90 square kilometers, respectively. Future scenarios w...

  20. Cumulus expansion, nuclear maturation and connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2 and FSH receptor mRNA expression in equine cumulus-oocyte complexes cultured in vitro in the presence of FSH and precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena; Caillaud, Maud; Maritato, Filippo; Martoriati, Alain; Gérard, Nadine; Aiudi, Giulio; Minoia, Paolo; Goudet, Ghylène

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cumulus expansion, nuclear maturation and expression of connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2 and FSH receptor transcripts in equine cumuli oophori during in vivo and in vitro maturation in the presence of equine FSH (eFSH) and precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis. Equine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) were cultured in a control defined medium supplemented with eFSH (0 to 5 micrograms/ml), Fetal Calf Serum (FCS), precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis or glutamine according to the experiments. After in vitro maturation, the cumulus expansion rate was increased with 1 microgram/ml eFSH, and was the highest with 20% FCS. It was not influenced by precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis or glutamine. The expression of transcripts related to cumulus expansion was analyzed in equine cumulus cells before maturation, and after in vivo and in vitro maturation, by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with specific primers. Connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and FSH receptor (FSHr) mRNA were detected in equine cumulus cells before and after maturation. Their level did not vary during in vivo or in vitro maturation and was influenced neither by FSH nor by precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis. Results indicate that previously reported regulation of connexin 43 and COX-2 proteins during equine COC maturation may involve post-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:15212696

  1. Spawning by walleye (Sander vitreus) and white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) in the Detroit River: Implications for spawning habitat enhancement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, B.A.; Kennedy, G.W.; Boase, J.C.; Allen, J.D.; Roseman, E.F.

    2010-01-01

    Few active fish spawning grounds have been found in channels connecting the Great Lakes. Here, we describe one near Belle Isle in the Detroit River, part of the channel connecting lakes Huron and Erie. There, in 2005, we collected 1,573 fish eggs, cultured them, and identified the hatched larvae as walleye (Sander vitreus) and white sucker (Catostomus commersoni). Walleye spawning peaked during the week of April 12-19; white sucker spawning peaked on May 10. Average areal rate of egg deposition by walleye and white sucker at this spawning ground in 2005 was 346 and 25 eggs/m2, respectively. Our environmental measurements showed that bottom substrates on this spawning ground were largely sand, not optimal for fish reproduction. We hypothesize that reproduction of these fish at this spawning ground could be enhanced by adding rock and gravel substrates for protection of deposited fish eggs and suggest that reproduction by walleye in the Detroit River may add resilience to production of walleye in western Lake Erie. ?? 2010.

  2. From Augmentation to Conservation of Entomopathogenic Nematodes: Trophic Cascades, Habitat Manipulation and Enhanced Biological Control of Diaprepes abbreviatus Root Weevils in Florida Citrus Groves

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, R. J.; El-Borai, F. E.; Duncan, L. W.

    2008-01-01

    The use of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) for management of the root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus, in Florida citrus groves is considered a biological control success story and typically involves augmentation in which EPN are applied inundatively as biopesticides to quickly kill the pest. However, recent evidence indicates that efficacy of EPN applications in Florida citrus depends on soil type. They are very effective in the well drained coarse sands of the Central Ridge but often less so in poorly drained fine-textured soils of the Flatwoods. Moreover, groves on the Central Ridge can harbor rich communities of endemic EPN that might often suppress weevil populations below economic thresholds, whereas Flatwoods groves tend to have few endemic EPN and frequent weevil problems. Current research is examining the ecological dynamics of EPN in Florida citrus groves, the potential impact of EPN augmentation on soil food webs, especially endemic EPN, and whether habitat manipulation and inoculation strategies might be effective for conserving and enhancing EPN communities to achieve long-term control in problem areas. Conservation biological control could extend the usefulness of EPN in Florida citrus and be especially appropriate for groves with persistent weevil problems. PMID:19259523

  3. Incipient habitat race formation in an amphibian.

    PubMed

    Van Buskirk, J

    2014-03-01

    Theory defines conditions under which sympatric speciation may occur, and several possible examples of the process in action have been identified. In most cases, organisms specialize onto habitats that fall into discrete categories, such as host species used by herbivores and parasites. Ecological specialization within a continuous habitat gradient is theoretically possible, but becomes less likely with increasing gene flow among clinal habitat types. Here, I show that habitat race formation is underway in a frog, Rana temporaria, along a continuous and spatially mosaic habitat gradient. Tadpoles from 23 populations raised in an outdoor mesocosm experiment showed adaptive phenotypic variation correlated with the predator density in their pond of origin. A survey of microsatellite markers in 48 populations found that neutral genetic divergence was enhanced between ponds with very different densities of predators. This represents a new example of habitat specialization along a continuous habitat gradient with no spatial autocorrelation in habitat. PMID:26230250

  4. FSHB promoter polymorphism within evolutionary conserved element is associated with serum FSH level in men

    PubMed Central

    Grigorova, Marina; Punab, Margus; Ausmees, Kristo; Laan, Maris

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND No polymorphisms affecting serum FSH levels have been described in the human FSHB gene. We have identified a potential regulatory single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs10835638; G/T) 211 bp upstream from the FSHB mRNA transcription start-site, located within a highly conserved region among placental mammals. We aimed to determine the correlation of carrier status of rs10835638 alternative alleles with serum FSH level in men, and testicular and hormonal parameters. METHODS A quantitative genetic association study using a cohort of healthy men (n = 554; age 19.2 ± 1.7 years) visiting the Centre of Andrology, Tartu University Hospital, Estonia. RESULTS Rs10835638 (allele frequencies: G 87.6%, T 12.4%) was significantly associated with serum FSH level (analysis of variance: F = 13.0, P = 0.0016, df = 1; regression testing for a linear trend: P = 0.0003). Subjects with the GG genotype exhibited higher FSH levels (3.37 ± 1.79 IU/l, n = 423) compared with heterozygotes (2.84 ± 1.54 IU/l, n = 125) (P = 0.0005), the group of T-allele carriers (GT+TT, 2.78 ± 1.51 IU/l, n = 131) (P = 0.0005) and TT-homozygotes (2.02 ± 0.81 IU/L, n = 6) (P = 0.031). Rs10835638 was also associated with significant (P < 0.05) reduction in free testosterone index and testes volume, but increased semen volume, sex hormone-binding globulin, serum testosterone and estradiol. LH and inhibin-B levels did not differ significantly between groups. CONCLUSIONS The identification of a regulatory SNP in FSHB promoter paves the way to study the effect of constitutively low FSH on male health and fertility. As FSH contributes to follicular development and sex steroid production in women, the role of this FSHB variant in female reproductive success is still to be addressed. PMID:18567894

  5. Regulation of Sertoli-Germ Cell Adhesion and Sperm Release by FSH and Nonclassical Testosterone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shupe, John; Cheng, Jing; Puri, Pawan; Kostereva, Nataliya

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone and FSH act in synergy to produce the factors required to maximize the production of spermatozoa and male fertility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these hormones support spermatogenesis are not well established. Recently, we identified a nonclassical mechanism of testosterone signaling in cultured rat Sertoli cells. We found that testosterone binding to the androgen receptor recruits and activates Src tyrosine kinase. Src then causes the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, which results in the phosphorylation and activation of the ERK MAPK and the cAMP response element-binding protein transcription factor. In this report, we find that FSH inhibits testosterone-mediated activation of ERK and the MAPK pathway in Sertoli cells via the protein kinase A-mediated inhibition of Raf kinase. In addition, FSH, as well as inhibitors of Src and ERK kinase activity, reduced germ cell attachment to Sertoli cells in culture. Using pathway-specific androgen receptor mutants we found that the nonclassical pathway is required for testosterone-mediated increases in germ cell attachment to Sertoli cells. Studies of seminiferous tubule explants determined that Src kinase, but not ERK kinase, activity is required for the release of sperm from seminiferous tubule explants. These findings suggest the nonclassical testosterone-signaling pathway acts via Src and ERK kinases to facilitate the adhesion of immature germ cells to Sertoli cells and through Src to permit the release of mature spermatozoa. In contrast, FSH acts to limit testosterone-mediated ERK kinase activity and germ cell attachment. PMID:21177760

  6. Mars habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The College of Engineering & Architecture at Prairie View A&M University has been participating in the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program since 1986. The interdisciplinary nature of the program allowed the involvement of students and faculty throughout the College of Engineering & Architecture for the last five years. The research goal for the 1990-1991 year is to design a human habitat on Mars that can be used as a permanent base for 20 crew members. The research is being conducted by undergraduate students from the Department of Architecture.

  7. Serum LH and FSH Responses to Synthetic LH-RH in Normal Infants, Children and Patients With Turner's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwa, Seizo; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) on LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release were studied in 26 normal children and six patients (from 1-to 14-years-old) with Turner's syndrome. (Author)

  8. The effect of Ramadan fasting on LH, FSH, oestrogen, progesterone and leptin in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Khoshdel, A; Kheiri, S; Hashemi-Dehkordi, E; Nasiri, J; Shabanian-Borujeni, S; Saedi, E

    2014-10-01

    Many pregnant Muslim women fast during Ramadan. Leptin has an important role in the reproductive system and hormones. In this study, FSH, LH, oestrogen, progesterone and leptin were measured in the first, second and fourth week of Ramadan and the second week post-Ramadan, in 30 fasting pregnant women. Data were analysed using repeated measures ANOVA by SPSS. The weight and BMI did not change during the study. A significant change in FSH, oestrogen, progesterone and leptin was observed (p < 0.05). The lowest value of FSH was in the second week of Ramadan. Progesterone increased at the end of Ramadan and the second week after. Oestrogen increased significantly during Ramadan and decreased after Ramadan. A decreasing trend was seen in LH during the Ramadan and 2 weeks after (p < 0.1). Leptin decreased significantly 2 weeks after Ramadan. We found poor weight gain and hypoleptinaemia in pregnant fasted women during the study. Food restriction in pregnant fasted women during Ramadan may induce poor weight gain during pregnancy. These data confirm that Ramadan fasting by pregnant women may have potential risks during pregnancy. We recommend further study to evaluate long-term effects of Ramadan fasting during pregnancy in different countries with different food habits and traditions, to obtain reliable and documented data. PMID:24914688

  9. FSHR polymorphism p.N680S mediates different responses to FSH in vitro.

    PubMed

    Casarini, Livio; Moriondo, Valeria; Marino, Marco; Adversi, Francesca; Capodanno, Francesco; Grisolia, Chiarina; La Marca, Antonio; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Simoni, Manuela

    2014-08-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism p.N680S of the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor (FSHR) is a discrete marker of ovarian response but previous in vitro studies failed to demonstrate differences in the response to FSH between N and S carrier cells. Here we demonstrate that p.N680S mediates different kinetics of the response to FSH in vitro. Intracellular cAMP production is faster in p.N680S N than in S homozygous human granulosa cells (45 versus 90 min to achieve the plateau, respectively; Mann-Whitney's U-test; p < 0.005; n = 4). Reflecting the cAMP kinetics, phospho-ERK1/2 and -CREB activation, AREG and STARD1 gene expressions and progesterone production were qualitatively and quantitatively different in N versus S homozygous cells. Finally, the blockade of ERK pathway by U0126 abolishes the genotype-mediated different effects on gene expression and progesterone production (Mann-Whitney's U-test; p ≥ 0.005; n = 3). PMID:24970684

  10. Urinary hMG (Meropur) versus recombinant FSH plus recombinant LH (Pergoveris) in IVF: a multicenter, prospective, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pacchiarotti, Alessandro; Sbracia, Marco; Frega, Antonio; Selman, Helmy; Rinaldi, Leonardo; Pacchiarotti, Arianna

    2010-11-01

    To compare IVF outcome in ovarian stimulation protocols with recombinant FSH plus recombinant LH versus hMG, 122 patients were randomized into two study groups: group A, patients treated with urinary hMG, and group B, patients treated with rFSH plus rLH. The two groups proved to be comparable to the main IVF outcome (pregnancy rate, implantation rate, oocytes, and embryos quality), with an increasing risk of ovarian hyperstimulation in the Pergoveris group. PMID:20537626

  11. Pituitary sensitivity to 50 micro g LH/FSH-RH in subjects with anorexia nervosa in acute and recovery stages.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, R L; Crisp, A H; Mackinnoh, P C; Franklin, M; Bonnar, J; Wheeler, M

    1975-01-01

    Gonadotrophic output was measured in response to a 50-mug dose of luteinizing hormone/follicle stimulating hormone-releasing hormone (LH/FSH-RH) in subjects with anorexia nervosa. A diminished response was found in subjects of low body weight, and in some a response occurred with increments of plasma FSH greater than those of LH. With restoration of body weight the response to the releasing factor was similar to that usually observed in healthy men and women. PMID:1089445

  12. Selective effects of charge on G protein activation by FSH-receptor residues 551-555 and 650-653.

    PubMed

    Grasso, P; Deziel, M R; Reichert, L E

    1995-01-01

    Two cytosolic regions of the rat testicular FSH receptor (FSHR), residues 533-555 and 645-653, have been identified as G protein-coupling domains. We localized the activity in these domains to their C-terminal sequences, residues 551-555 (KIAKR, net charge +3) and 650-653 (RKSH, net charge +3), and examined the effects of charge on G protein activation by the C-terminal peptides, using synthetic analogs containing additions, through alanine (A) linkages, of arginine (R, +), histidine (H, +) or both. RA-KIAKR (net charge +4) mimicked the effect of FSHR-(551-555) on guanine nucleotide exchange in rat testis membranes, but reduced its ability to inhibit FSH-stimulated estradiol biosynthesis in cultured rat Sertoli cells. Further increasing net charge by the addition of H (HARA-KIAKR, net charge +5) increased guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) binding, but eliminated FSHR-(551-555) effects on FSH-stimulated steroidogenesis. HA-RKSH (net charge +4) significantly inhibited guanine nucleotide exchange in rat testis membranes, but stimulated basal and potentiated FSH-induced estradiol biosynthesis in cultured rat Sertoli cells. Addition of two H residues (HAHA-RKSH, net charge +5) restored GTP binding and further potentiated basal and FSH-stimulated steroidogenesis. These results suggest that positive charges in G protein-coupling domains of the FSHR play a role in modulating G protein activation and postbinding effects of FSH, such as steroidogenesis. PMID:8589550

  13. FSH supplementation to culture medium is beneficial for activation and survival of preantral follicles enclosed in equine ovarian tissue.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, F L N; Lunardi, F O; Lima, L F; Rocha, R M P; Bruno, J B; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Cibin, F W S; Nunes-Pinheiro, D C S; Gastal, M O; Rodrigues, A P R; Apgar, G A; Gastal, E L; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of adding different concentrations of bovine recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone on the IVC of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue fragments. Randomized ovarian fragments were fixed immediately (fresh noncultured control) or cultured for 1 or 7 days in α-MEM(+) supplemented with 0, 10, 50, and 100 ng/mL FSH and subsequently analyzed by classical histology. Culture media collected on Day 1 or Day 7 and were analyzed for steroids (estradiol and progesterone) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). After Day 1 and Day 7 of culture, 50-ng/mL FSH treatment had a greater (P < 0.05) percentage of morphologically normal follicles when compared to the other groups, except the 10-ng/mL FSH treatment at Day 1 of culture. The percentage of developing follicles (transition, primary, and secondary), and follicular and oocyte diameters were higher (P < 0.05) in the 50-ng/mL FSH treatment compared to the other groups after Day 7 of culture. Furthermore, estradiol secretion and ROS production were maintained (P > 0.05) throughout the culture in the 50-ng/mL FSH treatment. In conclusion, the addition of 50 ng/mL of FSH promoted activation of primordial follicles to developing follicles, improved survival of preantral follicles, and maintained estradiol and ROS production of equine ovarian tissue after 7 days of culture. PMID:26723132

  14. Elevated basal FSH levels, if it is under 15 IU/L, will not reflect poor ART outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Koji; Nakashima, Akira; Horikawa, Takashi; Ohgi, Shirei; Saito, Hidekazu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose For this study, the impact of basal FSH levels on ART outcomes was assessed. Methods From June 2003 to May 2006, 191 ART cycles were performed in our hospital. All cases were treated with GnRH-a long protocol. The patients were classified according to their basal FSH level as follows: group A: FSH < 10 IU/l, group B: 10 ≦ FSH < 15 IU/l, and group C: 15 IU/l ≦ FSH. ART outcomes were compared among the three groups. Results The number of retrieved oocytes in group A was significantly higher than in group B, but fertilized oocytes and the pregnancy rates were comparable. The pregnancy rate in group C was not significantly lower than those found in either group A or B, but the trend was lower. Conclusion Oocytes retrieved from the patients who showed basal FSH levels below 15 IU/l were found to possess significant pregnancy potential. PMID:18228128

  15. Genetically Determined Dosage of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Affects Male Reproductive Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Grigorova, Marina; Punab, Margus; Ẑilaitienė, Birutė; Erenpreiss, Juris; Ausmees, Kristo; Matuleviĉius, Valentinas; Tsarev, Igor; Jørgensen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Context: The detailed role of FSH in contributing to male testicular function and fertility has been debated. We have previously identified the association between the T-allele of the FSHB promoter polymorphism (rs10835638; G/T, −211 bp from the mRNA start) and significantly reduced male serum FSH. Objective: In the current study, the T-allele carriers of the FSHB −211 G/T single nucleotide polymorphism represented a natural model for documenting downstream phenotypic consequences of insufficient FSH action. Design and Subjects: We genotyped rs10835638 in the population-based Baltic cohort of young men (n = 1054; GG carriers, n = 796; GT carriers, n = 244; TT carriers, n = 14) recruited by Andrology Centres in Tartu, Estonia; Riga, Latvia; and Kaunas, Lithuania. Marker-trait association testing was performed using linear regression (additive, recessive models) adjusted by age, body mass index, smoking, and recruitment center. Results: Serum hormones directly correlated with the T-allele dosage of rs10835638 included FSH (additive model, P = 1.11 × 10−6; T-allele effect, −0.41 IU/liter), inhibin-B (P = 2.16 × 10−3; T-allele effect, −14.67 pg/ml), and total testosterone (P = 9.30 × 10−3; T-allele effect, −1.46 nmol/liter). Parameters altered only among TT homozygotes were reduced testicular volume (recessive model, P = 1.19 × 10−4; TT genotype effect, −9.47 ml) and increased serum LH (P = 2.25 × 10−2; TT genotype effect, 1.07 IU/liter). The carrier status of rs10835638 alternative genotypes did not affect sperm motility and morphology, calculated free testosterone, serum SHBG, and estradiol concentrations. Conclusion: We showed for the first time that genetically determined low FSH may have wider downstream effects on the male reproductive system, including impaired testes development, altered testicular hormone levels (inhibin-B, total testosterone, LH), and affected male reproductive potential. PMID:21733993

  16. Effects of ecosystem development on benthic secondary production in restored and created mangrove habitats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetland creation, enhancement, and restoration activities are commonly implemented to compensate for wetland loss or degradation. However, functional equivalence in restored and created wetland habitats is often poorly understood. In estuarine habitats, changes in habitat qualit...

  17. Comparison of marmoset and human FSH using synthetic peptides of the β-subunit L2 loop region and anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kutteyil, Susha S; Kulkarni, Bhalchandra J; Mojidra, Rahul; Joseph, Shaini; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-06-01

    Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is a glycoprotein hormone required for female and male gametogenesis in vertebrates. Common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World primate monkey, used as animal model in biomedical research. Observations like, requirement of extremely high dose of human FSH in marmosets for superovulation compared to other primates and generation of antibodies in marmoset against human FSH after repeated superovulation cycles, point towards the possibility that FSH-FSH receptor (FSHR) interaction in marmosets might be different than in the humans. In this study we attempted to understand some of these structural differences using FSH peptides and anti-peptide antibody approach. Based on sequence alignment, in silico modeling and docking studies, L2 loop of FSH β-subunit (L2β) was found to be different between marmoset and human. Hence, peptides corresponding to region 32-50 of marmoset and human L2β loop were synthesized, purified and characterized. The peptides displayed dissimilarity in terms of molecular mass, predicted isoelectric point, predicted charge and in the ability to inhibit hormone-receptor interaction. Polyclonal antibodies generated against both the peptides were found to exhibit specific binding for the corresponding peptide and parent FSH in ELISA and Western blotting respectively and exhibited negligible reactivity to cross-species peptide and FSH in ELISA. The anti-peptide antibody against marmoset FSH was also able to detect native FSH in marmoset plasma samples and pituitary sections. In summary, the L2β loop of marmoset and human FSH has distinct receptor interaction ability and immunoreactivity indicating possibility of subtle conformational and biochemical differences between the two regions which may affect the FSH-FSHR interaction in these two primates. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27282136

  18. The Habitat Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Consists of activities which address the causes of habitat destruction and the effects of habitat loss on animals and plants. Identifies habitat loss as the major reason for the endangerment and extinction of plant and animal species. (ML)

  19. Habitat Demonstration Unit - Deep Space Habitat Configuration

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animated video shows the process of transporting, assembling and testing the Habitat Demonstration Unit - Deep Space Habitat (HDU DSH) configuration, which will be deployed during the 2011 Des...

  20. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  1. Differential thermal stability of human, bovine and ovine Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH) quaternary structures.

    PubMed

    Haj Hassan, Maya; Cahoreau, Claire; Jégot, Gwenhael; Jouanny, Camille; Mariot, Julie; Lecompte, François; Klett, Danièle; Combarnous, Yves

    2015-02-01

    Quaternary structure of human, bovine and ovine Follicle-Stimulating Hormones (hFSH, bFSH and oFSH) and Luteinizing Hormone was assessed in sandwich ELISAs using monoclonal anti-oFSHβ or anti-oLHβ antibodies, respectively, for capture and a biotinylated anti-hFSHα (α4 epitope) for detection. Neither free subunit gave any signal in this assay so that it was possible to measure the residual heterodimeric fraction after thermal treatment of the gonadotropins under study. The hormones were subjected to 5-min heating between 37 and 90 °C before rapid cooling in melting ice before ELISA. The data show half-dissociation of natural and recombinant human and ovine FSH preparations between 68 and 74 °C whereas bovine FSH preparations exhibited lower stability in these conditions with half-dissociation between 61 and 64 °C. Moreover, whereas all human and bovine as well as most ovine FSH preparations were fully dissociated at temperatures above 80 °C, one natural oFSH and one recombinant hLH preparations contained an important fraction that resisted dissociation even at 93 °C and retained in vitro bioactivity. This suggests the existence of gonadotropin αβ heterodimer with covalently linked subunits. Similarly, about 20% of the recombinant hLH preparation was also found withstand heat denaturation and also probably to have cross-linked subunits. The origin and chemical nature of these inter-subunit bonds remain to be determined. PMID:24732063

  2. Level of nutrition modulates the dynamics of oestradiol feedback on plasma FSH in ovariectomized ewes.

    PubMed

    Adams, N R; Briegel, J R; Sanders, M R; Blackberry, M A; Martin, G B

    1997-05-01

    The frequency of multiple ovulations in mature, cyclic ewes is strongly influenced by the level of nutrition, but it is difficult to demonstrate concurrent changes in plasma concentrations of gonadotropins. The failure to do so might be a consequence of rapid compensation by the homeostatic feedback mechanism linking secretion by the hypothalamus/pituitary gland and ovarian hormones. Most experimental models have examined the components of the homeostatic feedback system after steady state relationships had been established. We hypothesised that the effects of nutrition might be observed more readily if the system were disrupted and then examined while equilibrium was being re-established. This hypothesis was tested in three experiments in Merino ewes by allowing gonadotropin secretion to escape feedback for 5 days after ovariectomy and then replacing ovarian hormones and examining effects of feeding regimen on the return of plasma concentrations of FSH to baseline values. In all three experiments, oestrogen replacement caused plasma concentrations of FSH to decline more rapidly (P < 0.05) in ewes fed at 0.5x maintenance, than in ewes fed at 1.4x maintenance, with groups fed at maintenance being intermediate. No effect of diet was observed on plasma FSH concentrations in the absence of oestradiol, and neither progesterone nor charcoal-treated bovine follicular fluid influenced the effect of nutrition. Plasma concentrations of oestradiol were 9.8% lower on average (NS) in ewes fed above maintenance than in the sheep fed below maintenance over the three experiments, suggesting that there may have been a reduced clearance of oestradiol which contributed to the result. We conclude that feeding regimen affects the secretion or clearance of gonadotropins in mature ewes, as in the mature ram, and that this is one mechanism by which ovulation rate may be affected. PMID:9233506

  3. Mink aging is associated with a reduction in ovarian hormone release and the response to FSH and ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Mertin, Dušan; Süvegová, Karina; Lauričik, Jozef; Morovič, Martin; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Kotwica, Jan

    2016-09-15

    The endocrine mechanisms of mink ovarian hormones release and reproductive aging are poorly investigated. The aims of our study were to: (1) identify hormones produced by mink ovaries (the steroids progesterone [P] and estradiol [E], the peptide hormone oxytocin [OT], and the prostaglandin F [PGF] and prostaglandin E [PGE]); (2) examine the effect of FSH and ghrelin on the release of the hormones listed previously; and (3) understand whether these hormones can be involved in the control of mink reproductive aging, i.e., whether aging can be associated with changes (a) in the basal release of P, E, OT, PGF, or PGE and (b) their response to FSH and ghrelin. Fragments of ovaries of young (yearlings) and old (3-5 years of age) minks were cultured with and without FSH and ghrelin (0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/mL), and the release of hormones was analyzed by EIA/RIA. We found that isolated ovaries were able to release P, E, OT, PGF, and PGE, and the levels of P produced in the ovaries of old animals were lower than those produced in the ovaries of young animals, whereas the levels of other hormones did not differ. FSH was able to stimulate P and E and suppress OT and PGF and did not affect PGE release. Aging was associated with the inhibition of the effect of FSH on ovarian P and E, the appearance of the inhibitory action of FSH on OT, and the disappearance of this action on ovarian PGF. PGE was not affected by FSH, irrespective of animal age. Ghrelin was able to promote E (but not P) and suppress OT, PGF, and PGE output. Aging was associated with the appearance of an inhibitory influence of ghrelin on ovarian OT and PGE and with the disappearance of this influence on PGF output. Aging did not affect the action of ghrelin on ovarian P and E. Our observations (1) confirm the production of P and E and show that OT, PGF, and PGE are released from mink ovaries, (2) confirm the involvement of FSH and demonstrate the involvement of ghrelin in the control of mink ovarian hormone

  4. Development of specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determining LH and FSH levels in tilapia, using recombinant gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Joseph; Kasuto, Harel; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2007-01-01

    We recently produced Oreochromis niloticus recombinant LH and FSH as single-chain polypeptides in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Glycoprotein subunit alpha was joined with tilapia (t) LHbeta or tFSHbeta mature protein-coding sequences to form a fusion gene that encodes a ;;tethered" polypeptide, in which the gonadotropin beta-subunit forms the N-terminal part and the alpha-subunit forms the C-terminal part. Recombinant (r) gonadotropins were used to develop specific and homologous competitive ELISAs for measurements of FSH and LH in the plasma and pituitary of tilapia, using primary antibodies against rtLHbeta or rtFSHbeta, respectively, and rtLHbetaalpha or rtFSHbetaalpha for the standard curves. The wells were coated with either rtLHbeta (2ng/ml) or rtFSHbeta (0.5ng/well), and the final concentrations of the antisera were 1:5000 (for tLH) or 1:50,000 (for tFSH). The sensitivity of the assay was 15.84pg/ml for tLH and 0.24pg/ml for tFSH measurements in the plasma, whereas for the measurements in the pituitary, the sensitivity was 2.43ng/ml and 1.52ng/ml for tLH and tFSH, respectively. The standard curves for tFSH and tLH paralleled those of serially diluted pituitary extracts of other cichlids, as well as of serially diluted pituitary extract of seabream, European seabass and hybrid bass. We examined plasma tFSH and tLH levels in the course of one reproductive cycle, between two successive spawnings, in three individual tilapia females. Plasma levels of both FSH and LH increased during the second day after the eggs had been removed, probably related to the vitellogenic phase. LH levels increased toward spawning, which occurred on the 11th day. FSH levels also increased on day of cycle, probably due to recruitment of a new generation of follicles for the successive spawning. The development of specific ELISAs using recombinant gonadotropins is expected to advance the study of the distinct functions of each of these important hormones. PMID:17507016

  5. FSH regulates fat accumulation and redistribution in aging through the Gαi/Ca2+/CREB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-Mei; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Ding, Guo-Lian; Cai, Jie; Song, Yang; Wang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Dan; Chen, Hui; Yu, Mei Kuen; Wu, Yan-Ting; Qu, Fan; Liu, Ye; Lu, Yong-Chao; Adashi, Eli Y; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Increased fat mass and fat redistribution are commonly observed in aging populations worldwide. Although decreased circulating levels of sex hormones, androgens and oestrogens have been observed, the exact mechanism of fat accumulation and redistribution during aging remains obscure. In this study, the receptor of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), a gonadotropin that increases sharply and persistently with aging in both males and females, is functionally expressed in human and mouse fat tissues and adipocytes. Follicle-stimulating hormone was found to promote lipid biosynthesis and lipid droplet formation; FSH could also alter the secretion of leptin and adiponectin, but not hyperplasia, in vitro and in vivo. The effects of FSH are mediated by FSH receptors coupled to the Gαi protein; as a result, Ca2+ influx is stimulated, cAMP-response-element-binding protein is phosphorylated, and an array of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis is activated. The present findings depict the potential of FSH receptor-mediated lipodystrophy of adipose tissues in aging. Our results also reveal the mechanism of fat accumulation and redistribution during aging of males and females. PMID:25754247

  6. Characteristics and functions of a minor FSH surge near the end of an interovulatory interval in Bos taurus heifers.

    PubMed

    Ginther, O J; Baldrighi, J M; Siddiqui, M A R; Wolf, C A

    2016-07-01

    The apparent function of a minor FSH surge based on temporality with follicular events was studied in 10 heifers with 2 follicular waves per interovulatory interval. Individual follicles were tracked from their emergence at 2 mm until their outcome was known, and a blood sample was collected for FSH and LH assay every 12 h from day -14 (day 0 = ovulation) to day 4. A minor FSH surge occurred in each heifer (peak, day -4.6 ± 0.2). Concentration of LH increased (P < 0.05) during the FSH increase of the minor surge but did not decrease during the FSH decrease. A minor follicular wave with 8.2 ± 2.0 follicles occurred in 6 of 10 heifers. The maximal diameter (mean, 3.4 ± 0.9 mm) of 77% of the minor-wave follicles occurred in synchrony on day -4.4 ± 0.4. Most (59%) of minor-wave follicles regressed before ovulation and 41% decreased and then increased in diameter (recovered) on day -1.9 ± 0.3 to become part of the subsequent wave 1. A mean of 3.7 ± 0.9 regressing subordinate follicles from wave 2 recovered on the day before or at the peak of the minor FSH surge. The growth rate of the preovulatory follicle decreased (P < 0.02) for 3 d before the peak of the minor FSH surge and then increased (P < 0.03). Concentration of LH increased slightly but significantly temporally with the resurgence in growth rate of the preovulatory follicle. A minor LH surge peaked (P < 0.0002) on day 3 at the expected deviation in growth rates between the future dominant and subordinate follicles. Results indicated on a temporal basis that the recovery of some regressing subordinate follicles of wave 2 was attributable to the minor FSH surge. The hypothesis was supported that some regressing follicles from the minor follicular wave recover to become part of wave 1. PMID:27131335

  7. Habitat cascades: the conceptual context and global relevance of facilitation cascades via habitat formation and modification.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Mads S; Wernberg, Thomas; Altieri, Andrew; Tuya, Fernando; Gulbransen, Dana; McGlathery, Karen J; Holmer, Marianne; Silliman, Brian R

    2010-08-01

    The importance of positive interactions is increasingly acknowledged in contemporary ecology. Most research has focused on direct positive effects of one species on another. However, there is recent evidence that indirect positive effects in the form of facilitation cascades can also structure species abundances and biodiversity. Here we conceptualize a specific type of facilitation cascade-the habitat cascade. The habitat cascade is defined as indirect positive effects on focal organisms mediated by successive facilitation in the form of biogenic formation or modification of habitat. Based on a literature review, we demonstrate that habitat cascades are a general phenomenon that enhances species abundance and diversity in forests, salt marshes, seagrass meadows, and seaweed beds. Habitat cascades are characterized by a hierarchy of facilitative interactions in which a basal habitat former (typically a large primary producer, e.g., a tree) creates living space for an intermediate habitat former (e.g., an epiphyte) that in turn creates living space for the focal organisms (e.g., spiders, beetles, and mites). We then present new data on a habitat cascade common to soft-bottom estuaries in which a relatively small invertebrate provides basal habitat for larger intermediate seaweeds that, in turn, generate habitat for focal invertebrates and epiphytes. We propose that indirect positive effects on focal organisms will be strongest when the intermediate habitat former is larger and different in form and function from the basal habitat former. We also discuss how humans create, modify, and destroy habitat cascades via global habitat destruction, climatic change, over-harvesting, pollution, or transfer of invasive species. Finally, we outline future directions for research that will lead to a better understanding of habitat cascades. PMID:21558196

  8. Effect of FSH and LH hormones on oocyte maturation of buffalo and gene expression analysis of their receptors and Cx43 in maturing oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Alok; Gupta, S C; Gupta, Neelam

    2010-08-01

    Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are commonly added to maturation media to improve cumulus expansion known to be a predictor of oocyte maturation. Therefore, effects of various concentrations of FSH (1000 ng/ml), LH (1000 ng/ml) and FSH + LH (1000 ng/ml each) in comparison with control (without FSH + LH) cultured oocytes were investigated. FSH and LH (1000 ng/ml each) induced significantly more cumulus expansion and polar body numbers, as compared with control and treatments of 1000 ng/ml FSH and 1000 ng/ml LH alone. Expression of FSH receptor (r), LHr and Cx43 mRNAs was determined by real-time PCR in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and denuded oocytes at different maturation times. Expression of all three genes was higher in COCs compared with denuded oocytes, confirming the importance of cumulus cells in oocyte maturation. FSHr and connexin 43 (Cx43) mRNA abundance in both COCs and denuded oocytes was highest at 0-6 h of maturation and decreased subsequently. However, LHr mRNA abundance increased from 6 h up to 24 h of maturation. The study concluded that FSH, LH receptors and Cx43 gene expression regulation is an index related to oocyte maturation. PMID:20128947

  9. Western habitats - Session summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Titus, K.; Fuller, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Determining the status of all habitats in the nine western states considered in this symposium is a difficult task. The authors of habitat status papers commented that the diversity of habitat classification systems limited their ability to relate habitat status to raptors. Differences of scale, objectives and survey design have hindered integration of habitat classification methods used by land managers with the habitat relationships understood by wildlife biologists, but examples now exist for successful integration of these methods. We suggest that land managers and wildlife biologists use common survey and classification schemes so that data can be combined and that results will be applicable over broader areas.

  10. Habitats of North American sea ducks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derksen, Dirk V.; Petersen, Margaret R.; Savard, Jean-Pierre L.

    2015-01-01

    Breeding, molting, fall and spring staging, and wintering habitats of the sea duck tribe Mergini are described based on geographic locations and distribution in North America, geomorphology, vegetation and soil types, and fresh water and marine characteristics. The dynamics of habitats are discussed in light of natural and anthropogenic events that shape areas important to sea ducks. Strategies for sea duck habitat management are outlined and recommendations for international collaboration to preserve key terrestrial and aquatic habitats are advanced. We follow the definition of habitat advanced by Odum (1971), which is the place or space where an organism lives. Weller (1999) emphasized that habitats for waterbirds required presence of sufficient resources (i.e., food, water, cover, space) for maintenance during a portion of their annual cycle. Habitats exploited by North American sea ducks are diverse, widespread across the continent and adjacent marine waters and until recently, most were only superficially known. Even following a 15-year-long effort through the Sea Duck Joint Venture and U.S. and Canadian Endangered/Threatened Species programs to fund research focused on sea duck habitats there are still important gaps in our understanding of key elements required by some species during various life stages. Importantly, many significant habitats, especially staging and wintering sites, have been and continue to be destroyed or altered, largely as a result of anthropogenic effects. Our goal here is to develop a comprehensive summary of marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats and their characteristics by considering sea duck species with similar needs as groups (e.g., eiders) within the tribe Mergini. Additionally, this chapter will examine threats and changes to sea duck habitats from human-caused and natural events. Finally, we will evaluate conservation and management programs underway or available for maintenance and enhancement of habitats critical for

  11. Influence of hormonal contraceptives on the pituitary response to LH/FSH-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Carol, W; Lauterbach, H; Klinger, G; Möller, R

    1978-03-01

    In the pre-ovulatory phase the absolute and relative LH increase was much greater than during the luteal phase and less pronounced in the early follicular phase of the normal cycle. FSH release was affected only during the pre-ovulatory period, where a retarded, 3- or 4-fold increase compared to basal levels was recorded. In the women taking oral contraceptives of the conventional type the first LH-RH test showed gonadotropin responses similar to those obtained during the luteal phase of the controls. The second test brought a significantly lower LH response, suggesting an increasing exogenous steroid inhibition at the pituitary level in the course of the therapeutic cycle. This inhibition seems to be reversed during the monthly tablet-free interval. A particularly small and retarded gonadotropin response was observed in patients taking Deposiston. These results are discussed as to their clinical significance. PMID:357145

  12. Novel FSH receptor mutation in a case of spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome with successful pregnancy outcome

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Anahita R.; Prasad, Madhva; Chamariya, Sumit; Achrekar, Swati; Mahale, Smita D.; Mittal, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    The objective is to study the FSH receptor (FSHR) for mutations in a case of spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (sOHSS). This is a single case study and it examined patient who presented with spontaneous critical OHSS in early pregnancy and had successful good obstetric outcome. Intervention of this study was analysis of blood for genetic analysis of FSHR postdelivery. The main outcome measure noted was FSHR mutation. The study resulted in a novel, here though unreported, heterozygous mutation in FSHR gene at nucleotide position 1346 (AC1346T to AAT) in exon 10 yielding a threonine to asparagine (Thr449Asn) substitution in the transmembrane domain helix 3 of the FSHR. To conclude FSHR gene analysis can add to our understanding of sOHSS. PMID:26752859

  13. Body Mass Index and Gonadotropin Hormones (LH & FSH) Associate With Clinical Symptoms Among Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Seddigheh; Andarieh, Maryam Ghanbari; Ghadimi, Reza; Delavar, Mouloud Agajani

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the relevance of body mass index (BMI), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and LH/FSH ratio with clinical symptoms in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) women. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of all women visited in the PCOS Clinic of Babol (Iran) from 2008 to 2012. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted on 175 PCOS women; aged 18–38 years diagnosed based on the Rotterdam criteria. Among the PCOs women, the prevalence of oligomenorrhea, acne, and hirsutism were found to be 92.0%, 31.4%, and 78.9%, respectively. Positive finding of polycystic ovaries was observed in 89.1% of PCOS women with by using sonography. A total of 69.2% overweight/obesity patients had polycystic ovary morphology on ultrasound image. Compared with non- overweight/obesity, the adjusted OR of PCOS women for sonographic view of polycystic ovaries was 4.33 (95% CI, 1.42-13.15, p=0.001), Nevertheless, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) showed no significant associations between LH, FSH, and LH/FSH ratio with clinical symptoms in these women. The findings of this study indicated that the overweight/obese women with PCOS are at an increased risk for sonographic view of polycystic ovaries. Therefore, it is suggested that successful weight loss is the most effective method of restoring ovulation, menstruation that should be used as major advice in obese PCOS patients. PMID:25716399

  14. Blocking antibody to the beta-subunit of FSH prevents bone loss by inhibiting bone resorption and stimulating bone synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low estrogen levels undoubtedly underlie menopausal bone thinning. However, rapid and profuse bone loss begins three years prior to the last menstrual period, when serum estrogen is relatively normal. We have shown that the pituitary hormone FSH, the levels of which are high during the late peri-men...

  15. Disruption of periovulatory FSH and LH surges during induced anovulation by an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis in mares.

    PubMed

    Ginther, O J; Cuervo-Arango, J; Beg, M A

    2011-06-01

    The role of passage of follicular fluid into the peritoneal cavity during ovulation in the transient disruption in the periovulatory FSH and LH surges was studied in ovulatory mares (n=7) and in mares with blockage of ovulation by treatment with an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis (n=8). Mares were pretreated with hCG when the largest follicle was ≥32 mm (Hour 0). Ultrasonic scanning was done at Hours 24 and 30 and every 2h thereafter until ovulation or ultrasonic signs of anovulation. Blood samples were collected at Hours 24, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 48, and 60. Ovulation in the ovulatory group occurred at Hours 38 (five mares), 40, and 44. Until Hour 36, diameter of the follicle and concentrations of FSH, LH, and estradiol-17β (estradiol) were similar between groups. Between Hours 34 and 36, a novel transient increase in estradiol occurred in each group, and color-Doppler signals of blood flow in the follicular wall decreased in the ovulatory group and increased in the anovulatory group. In each group, FSH and LH periovulatory surges were disrupted by a decrease or plateau between Hours 38 and 48 and an increase between Hours 48 and 60. The discharge of hormone-laden follicular fluid into the peritoneal cavity at ovulation was not an adequate sole explanation for the temporally associated transient depression in FSH and LH. Other routes from follicle to circulation for gonadotropin inhibitors played a role, based on similar depression in the ovulatory and anovulatory groups. PMID:21571458

  16. Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer Is Associated With Reduced Serum Testosterone and Increased FSH and LH

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti Svartberg, Johan; Carlsen, Erik; Dueland, Svein; Haug, Egil; Skovlund, Eva; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Marianne G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: It is known that scattered radiation to the testes during pelvic radiotherapy can affect fertility, but there is little knowledge on its effects on male sex hormones. The aim of this study was to determine whether radiotherapy for rectal cancer affects testosterone production. Methods and Materials: All male patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Patients treated with surgery alone were randomly selected from the same registry as control subjects. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were analyzed, and free testosterone was calculated (N = 290). Information about the radiotherapy treatment was collected from the patient hospital charts. Results: Serum FSH was 3 times higher in the radiotherapy group than in the control group (median, 18.8 vs. 6.3 IU/L, p <0.001), and serum LH was 1.7 times higher (median, 7.5 vs. 4.5 IU/l, p <0.001). In the radiotherapy group, 27% of patients had testosterone levels below the reference range (8-35 nmol/L), compared with 10% of the nonirradiated patients (p <0.001). Irradiated patients had lower serum testosterone (mean, 11.1 vs. 13.4 nmol/L, p <0.001) and lower calculated free testosterone (mean, 214 vs. 235 pmol/L, p <0.05) than control subjects. Total testosterone, calculated free testosterone, and gonadotropins were related to the distance from the bony pelvic structures to the caudal field edge. Conclusions: Increased serum levels of gonadotropins and subnormal serum levels of testosterone indicate that curative radiotherapy for rectal cancer can result in permanent testicular dysfunction.

  17. Predictive Seagrass Habitat Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restoration of ecosystem services provided by seagrass habitats in estuaries requires a firm understanding of the modes of action of multiple interacting stressors including nutrients, climate change, coastal land-use change, and habitat modification. We explored the application...

  18. MODELING PHYSICAL HABITAT PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonid populations can be affected by alterations in stream physical habitat. Fish productivity is determined by the stream's physical habitat structure ( channel form, substrate distribution, riparian vegetation), water quality, flow regime and inputs from the watershed (sedim...

  19. Effects and interactions of tachykinins and dynorphin on FSH and LH secretion in developing and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Pino, F; Garcia-Galiano, D; Manfredi-Lozano, M; Leon, S; Sánchez-Garrido, M A; Roa, J; Pinilla, L; Navarro, V M; Tena-Sempere, M

    2015-02-01

    Kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin (KNDy) neurons, which coexpress kisspeptins (Kps), neurokinin B (NKB), and dynorphin (Dyn), regulate gonadotropin secretion. The KNDy model proposes that NKB (a stimulator, through NK3R) and Dyn (an inhibitor, through κ-opioid receptor) shape Kp secretion onto GnRH neurons. However, some aspects of this paradigm remain ill defined. Here we aimed to characterize the following: 1) the effects of NKB signaling on FSH secretion and 2) the role of Dyn in gonadotropin secretion after NK3R activation; 3) additionally, we explored the roles of other tachykinin receptors, NK1R and NK2R, on gonadotropin release. Thus, the effects of the NK3R agonist, senktide, on FSH release were explored across postnatal development in male and female rats; gonadotropin responses to agonists of NK1R substance P and NK2R [neurokinin A (NKA)] were also monitored. Moreover, the effects of senktide on gonadotropin secretion were assessed after antagonizing Dyn actions by nor-binaltorphimine didydrochloride. Before puberty, rats of both sexes showed increased FSH secretion to senktide (and Kp-10). Conversely, adult female rats were irresponsive to senktide in terms of FSH, despite proven LH responses, whereas the adult males did not display FSH or LH responses to senktide, even at high doses. In turn, substance P and NKA stimulated gonadotropin secretion in prepubertal rats, whereas in adults modest gonadotropin responses to NKA were detected. By pretreatment with a Dyn antagonist, adult males became responsive to senktide in terms of LH secretion and displayed elevated basal LH and FSH levels; nor-binaltorphimine didydrochloride treatment uncovered FSH responses to senktide in adult females. Furthermore, the expression of Pdyn and Opkr1 (encoding Dyn and κ-opioid receptor, respectively) in the mediobasal hypothalamus was greater in males than in females at prepubertal ages. Overall, our data contribute to refining our understanding on how the elements of the

  20. The subunit structure of the follitropin (FSH) receptor. Photoaffinity labeling of the membrane-bound receptor follitropin complex in situ.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Branca, A A; Reichert, L E

    1985-11-15

    Human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH) was acylated with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB) and radioiodinated (55 microCi/micrograms) for use as a photoaffinity probe to investigate the subunit structure of the FSH receptor in calf testis. After incubation with the photoaffinity probe and photolysis with UV light, the cross-linked hormone-receptor complex was solubilized from the membrane and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Autoradiography of the polyacrylamide gels revealed two major bands, 64 kDa and 84 kDa. These were equivalent in molecular mass to those observed in a previous study (Branca, A. A., Sluss, P. M., Smith, A. A., and Reichert, L. E., Jr. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 9988-9993) in which performed hormone-receptor complexes were solubilized with detergent prior to formation of covalent cross-linkages through the use of homobifunctional cross-linking reagents. Reduction with dithiothreitol resulted in the loss of radioactivity from the 84-kDa band with a concomitant increase in the intensity of the 64-kDa band. Since dithiothreitol increases the dissociation of intact radioiodinated azidobenzoyl-FSH into subunits, it is suggested that the conversion of the 84-kDa band to the 64-kDa band by dithiothreitol is due to the loss of non-cross-linked hFSH subunit from the 84-kDa band and that the two bands observed after photoaffinity labeling arise from covalent bond formation between hFSH and a receptor subunit having a relative molecular weight (Mr) of 48,000. In addition to the predominant photolabeling of the receptor to yield the 64-kDa and 84-kDa bands, several other, less intense bands (54 kDa, 76 kDa, 97 kDa, and 116 kDa) were also consistently observed on autoradiographs. The appearance of all bands, however, was inhibited by the inclusion of unlabeled hFSH in the initial binding incubation mixtures. The results of this study indicate

  1. Supplemented base medium containing Amburana cearensis associated with FSH improves in vitro development of isolated goat preantral follicles.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, B B; Macedo, T J S; Santos, J M S; Barberino, R S; Menezes, V G; Müller, M C; Almeida, J R G S; Figueiredo, J R; Matos, M H T

    2016-09-15

    The effects of Amburana cearensis ethanolic extract, with or without addition of a mix of supplements associated or not with FSH, on in vitro morphology and development of caprine secondary follicles were evaluated. In experiment 1, isolated follicles (250 μm in diameter) were cultured for 12 days in alpha-modified minimal essential medium (α-MEM) alone (control) or in medium composed of different concentrations of A. cearensis extract (Amb 0.1; 0.2, or 0.4 mg/mL). In experiment 2, culture media were α-MEM or Amb 0.2 mg/mL (both without supplements), or these same media supplemented with BSA, insulin, transferrin, selenium, glutamine, hypoxanthine, and ascorbic acid (referred as α-MEM(+) and Amb 0.2(+), respectively), or these last groups also supplemented with sequential FSH (100 ng/mL from Day 0 to Day 6; 500 ng/mL from Day 6 to Day 12), constituting groups α-MEM(+) + FSH and Amb 0.2(+) + FSH. At the end of culture in experiment 1, control medium (α-MEM) and Amb 0.2 mg/mL had higher percentages (P < 0.05) of morphologically normal follicles and percentage of fully grown oocytes, i.e., oocyte greater than 110 μm, compared to the other A. cearensis extract concentrations. In experiment 2, all supplemented media had higher percentages (P < 0.05) of normal follicles and antrum formation than nonsupplemented media. In addition, follicles cultured in Amb 0.2(+) + FSH showed an average increase in diameter higher (P < 0.05) than the other treatments. Oocytes cultured in both treatments supplemented with FSH showed greater glutathione and active mitochondria levels than nonsupplemented media but similar to the other treatments. In conclusion, A. cearensis extract (0.2 mg/mL) added by supplements and FSH improves follicular growth. Therefore, it can be an alternative culture medium for goat preantral follicle development. PMID:27287468

  2. Treatment with recombinant equine follicle stimulating hormone (reFSH) followed by recombinant equine luteinizing hormone (reLH) increases embryo recovery in superovulated mares.

    PubMed

    Meyers-Brown, G; Bidstrup, L A; Famula, T R; Colgin, M; Roser, J F

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of ovarian follicular development depend on a timely interaction of gonadotropins and gonadal feedback in the mare. The development and efficacy of genetically cloned recombinant equine gonadotropins (reFSH and reLH) increase follicular activity and induce ovulation, respectively, but an optimum embryo recovery regimen in superovulated mares has not been established. The objective of this study was to determine if treatment with reFSH followed by reLH would increase the embryo per ovulation ratio and the number of embryos recovered after superovulation in mares. Sixteen estrous cycling mares of light horse breeds (4-12 years) were randomly assigned to one of two groups: Group 1; reFSH (0.65mg)/PBS (n=8) and Group 2; reFSH (0.65mg)/reLH (1.5mg) (n=8). On the day of a 22-25mm follicle post-ovulation mares were injected IV twice daily with reFSH for 3 days (PGF(2α) given IM on the second day of treatment) and once per day thereafter until a follicle or cohort of follicles reached 29mm after which either PBS or reLH was added and both groups injected IV twice daily until the presence of a 32mm follicles, when reFSH was discontinued. Thereafter, mares were injected three times daily IV with only PBS or reLH until a majority of follicles reached 35-38mm when treatment was discontinued. Mares were given hCG IV (2500IU) to induce ovulation and bred. Embryo recovery was performed on day 8 day post-treatment ovulation. Daily jugular blood samples were collected from the time of first ovulation until 8 days post-treatment ovulation. Blood samples were analyzed for LH, FSH, estradiol, progesterone and inhibin by validated RIA. Duration of treatment to a ≥35mm follicle(s) and number of ovulatory size follicles were similar between reFSH/reLH and reFSH/PBS treated mares. The number of ovulations was greater (P<0.01) in the reFSH/reLH group, while the number of anovulatory follicles was less (P<0.05) compared to the reFSH/PBS group. Number of total embryos

  3. Biodiversity: Habitat Suitability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat suitability quantifies the relationship between species and habitat, and is evaluated according to the species’ fitness (i.e. proportion of birth rate to death rate). Even though it might maximize evolutionary success, species are not always in habitat that optimizes fit...

  4. Urban Areas. Habitat Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The overview discusses the city as an ecosystem, changing urban habitats, urban wildlife habitats, values of wildlife, habitat management, and…

  5. Enhanced sediment delivery in a changing climate in semi-arid mountain basins: Implications for water resource management and aquatic habitat in the northern Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, Jaime R.; Luce, Charles H.; Buffington, John M.

    2012-02-01

    The delivery and transport of sediment through mountain rivers affects aquatic habitat and water resource infrastructure. While climate change is widely expected to produce significant changes in hydrology and stream temperature, the effects of climate change on sediment yield have received less attention. In the northern Rocky Mountains, we expect climate change to increase sediment yield primarily through changes in temperature and hydrology that promote vegetation disturbances (i.e., wildfire, insect/pathogen outbreak, drought-related die off). Here, we synthesize existing data from central Idaho to explore (1) how sediment yields are likely to respond to climate change in semi-arid basins influenced by wildfire, (2) the potential consequences for aquatic habitat and water resource infrastructure, and (3) prospects for mitigating sediment yields in forest basins. Recent climate-driven increases in the severity and extent of wildfire suggest that basin-scale sediment yields within the next few years to decades could be greater than the long-term average rate of 146 T km - 2 year - 1 observed for central Idaho. These elevated sediment yields will likely impact downstream reservoirs, which were designed under conditions of historically lower sediment yield. Episodic erosional events (massive debris flows) that dominate post-fire sediment yields are impractical to mitigate, leaving road restoration as the most viable management opportunity for offsetting climate-related increases in sediment yield. However, short-term sediment yields from experimental basins with roads are three orders of magnitude smaller than those from individual fire-related events (on the order of 10 1 T km - 2 year - 1 compared to 10 4 T km - 2 year - 1 , respectively, for similar contributing areas), suggesting that road restoration would provide a relatively minor reduction in sediment loads at the basin-scale. Nevertheless, the ecologically damaging effects of fine sediment (material < 6 mm

  6. Genetic evidence that lower circulating FSH levels lengthen menstrual cycle, increase age at menopause and impact female reproductive health

    PubMed Central

    Ruth, Katherine S.; Beaumont, Robin N.; Tyrrell, Jessica; Jones, Samuel E.; Tuke, Marcus A.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Murray, Anna

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How does a genetic variant in the FSHB promoter, known to alter FSH levels, impact female reproductive health? SUMMARY ANSWER The T allele of the FSHB promoter polymorphism (rs10835638; c.-211G>T) results in longer menstrual cycles and later menopause and, while having detrimental effects on fertility, is protective against endometriosis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The FSHB promoter polymorphism (rs10835638; c.-211G>T) affects levels of FSHB transcription and, as a result, circulating levels of FSH. FSH is required for normal fertility and genetic variants at the FSHB locus are associated with age at menopause and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION We used cross-sectional data from the UK Biobank to look at associations between the FSHB promoter polymorphism and reproductive traits, and performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for length of menstrual cycle. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS We included white British individuals aged 40–69 years in 2006–2010, in the May 2015 release of genetic data from UK Biobank. We tested the FSH-lowering T allele of the FSHB promoter polymorphism (rs10835638; c.-211G>T) for associations with 29, mainly female, reproductive phenotypes in up to 63 350 women and 56 608 men. We conducted a GWAS in 9534 individuals to identify genetic variants associated with length of menstrual cycle. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The FSH-lowering T allele of the FSHB promoter polymorphism (rs10835638; MAF 0.16) was associated with longer menstrual cycles [0.16 SD (c. 1 day) per minor allele; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12–0.20; P = 6 × 10−16], later age at menopause (0.13 years per minor allele; 95% CI 0.04–0.22; P = 5.7 × 10−3), greater female nulliparity [odds ratio (OR) = 1.06; 95% CI 1.02–1.11; P = 4.8 × 10−3] and lower risk of endometriosis (OR = 0.79; 95% CI 0.69–0.90; P = 4.1 × 10−4). The FSH-lowering T allele was not associated with other female

  7. Pueraria tuberosa DC Extract Improves Androgenesis and Sexual Behavior via FSH LH Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Nagendra Singh; Sharma, Vikas; Christine Helena Frankland Sawaya, Alexandra; Dixit, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ethanolic extract of Pueraria tuberosa (PT) on sexual behaviour and androgenic activity. Male albino rats were divided into four groups of six animals each: control group 1 (2% acacia solution), PT-treated group 2 (50 mg/Kg), PT-treated group 3 (100 mg/Kg), and PT-treated group 4 (150 mg/Kg). Sexual behavior of male rats in the presence of a female rat was recorded. The treated groups were evaluated for sexual parameters. The extract was characterized using LC-MS. The effect of treatment on anabolic and weight of secondary sexual organs was determined. The histological changes in section of testis and epididymis after treatment were observed. Sperm count in epididymis and fructose content in seminal vesicles were also measured. Levels of hormones like FSH, LH, and T were determined. A dose-dependent increase in sexual behaviors was evidenced in the animals of extract treated groups. Increase in testis weight was recorded in PT. At the highest dose PT also affects the hormones level. The four compounds namely puerarin, daidzein, biochanin-A and formononetin were identified in ethanolic extract using LC-MS. It concluded that PT extract possesses androgenic effect and it significantly increased the sexual behaviour and hormones level. PMID:24489512

  8. Photoperiod-gonadotropin mismatches induced by treatment with acyline or FSH in Siberian hamsters: impacts on ovarian structure and function.

    PubMed

    Zysling, D A; Park, S-U; McMillan, E L; Place, N J

    2012-11-01

    Many seasonal breeders time their reproductive efforts to specific times of the year to ensure adequate resources for the production and care of young. For long-day (LD) breeders, females born before the summer solstice (LDs) reach sexual maturity quickly and often breed that same year, whereas females born after the summer solstice (short days (SDs)) may delay reproductive development to the following spring when environmental conditions are favorable for reproduction. In Siberian hamsters, development in SD is associated with structural and functional differences in the ovary compared with females held in LD, including a greater number of primordial follicles and an abundance of hypertrophied granulosa cells (HGCs), which are immunoreactive for anti-Müllerian hormone. The goal of this study was to determine whether SD-induced gonadotropin suppression is responsible for these phenotypic differences. Gonadotropin levels were suppressed in LD hamsters using the GNRH antagonist acyline. Conversely, to determine whether the SD ovarian phenotype is completely reversed by gonadotropin stimulation, recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) was administered. Our treatments were successful in mimicking FSH concentrations of the opposite photoperiod, but they did not produce a comparable change in the ovarian phenotype. Most notable was the lack of HGCs in the ovaries of acyline-treated LD females. Similarly, HGCs were maintained in the ovaries of SD females treated with rhFSH. Our data suggest that gonadotropins alone do not account for the SD ovarian phenotype. Future studies will determine whether SD-induced changes in other factors underlie these phenotypic changes. PMID:22936286

  9. [Dependence of serum hormones (T, FSH, LH) on morphometric testicular findings after chemo- and radiotherapy in patients with malignant testicular tumors].

    PubMed

    Barth, V; Schönfelder, M

    1990-01-01

    Correlations which exist between morphometric parameters of remaining testicular tissue, on the one hand, and serum hormones on the other (testosterone = T, follicle-stimulating hormone = FSH, luteinising hormone = LH), depending on therapeutic action taken on patients for malignant testicular tumours, seem to suggest that decline in epithelial thickness together with increase in wall thickness leads to rise in FSH. No unambiguous relations, on the other hand, were found to exist between testosterone or luteotrophic hormone and morphometric findings. Hence, FSH seems to characterise the severity of damage to germ epithelium and thus the degree of impairment to spermatogenesis. FSH may be accepted as a criterion for fertility disorders in sexually active men. PMID:2122615

  10. Surface Habitat Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2009-01-01

    The Surface Habitat Systems (SHS) Focused Investment Group (FIG) is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) effort to provide a focused direction and funding to the various projects that are working on human surface habitat designs and technologies for the planetary exploration missions. The overall SHS-FIG effort focuses on directing and guiding those projects that: 1) develop and demonstrate new surface habitat system concepts, innovations, and technologies to support human exploration missions, 2) improve environmental systems that interact with human habitats, 3) handle and emplace human surface habitats, and 4) focus on supporting humans living and working in habitats on planetary surfaces. The activity areas of the SHS FIG described herein are focused on the surface habitat project near-term objectives as described in this document. The SHS-FIG effort focuses on mitigating surface habitat risks (as identified by the Lunar Surface Systems Project Office (LSSPO) Surface Habitat Element Team; and concentrates on developing surface habitat technologies as identified in the FY08 gap analysis. The surface habitat gap assessment will be updated annually as the surface architecture and surface habitat definition continues to mature. These technologies are mapped to the SHS-FIG Strategic Development Roadmap. The Roadmap will bring to light the areas where additional innovative efforts are needed to support the development of habitat concepts and designs and the development of new technologies to support of the LSSPO Habitation Element development plan. Three specific areas of development that address Lunar Architecture Team (LAT)-2 and Constellation Architecture Team (CxAT) Lunar habitat design issues or risks will be focused on by the SHS-FIG. The SHS-FIG will establish four areas of development that will help the projects prepare in their planning for surface habitat systems development. Those development areas are

  11. Superovulation in heifers given FSH initiated either at day 2 or day 10 of the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Goulding, D; Williams, D H; Duffy, P; Boland, M P; Roche, J F

    1990-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if initiation of superovulation in heifers during the time of development of the first dominant follicle (Days 2 to 6) would give equivalent ovulation and embryo production rates as treatment initiated at mid-cycle. Estrus was synchronized in 60 beef heifers using luprostiol (PG) and they were randomly allocated to treatment with 4.5, 3.5, 2.5 and 1.5 mg of porcine follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) administered twice daily, either on Days 2, 4, 5 and 6 (Day-2 group), respectively, or with similar doses at four consecutive days during mid-cycle (Day-10 group, initiation on Day 9 to 11). All heifers received 500 mug cloprostenol at the fifth FSH injection and 250 mug at the sixth injection. Blood samples for progesterone determination were collected at the time of FSH injections. Heifers were slaughtered 7 d post estrus, and the number of ovulations and large follicles (>/=10mm) were determined on visual inspection of the ovary. Following flushing of the uterine horns the quality of embryos and the fertilization rate were determined. Significant differences between treatments were determined using a two-sided t-test, and frequency distributions were compared using Chi-square tests. The mean number (+/-SEM) of ovulations for heifers in the Day-10 group was 12.9+/-1.0, and 8.5+/-0.9 embryos were recovered. Both the number of ovulations (6.7+/-0.8) and embryos recovered (4.1+/-0.6) were lower (P=0.0001) in heifers in the Day-2 group. Following grading based on a morphological basis, a higher number (P=0.002) of embryos was categorized as Grades 1 and 2 (4.1+/-0.6) and Grade 3 (2.1+/-0.4) in Day-10 heifers than in the Day-2 group (Grade 1 and 2, 1.9+/-0.3; Grade 3, 0.7+/-0.2). The number of Grade 4 and 5 embryos (Day 10, 1.6+/-0.2; Day 2, 1.4+/-0.2) and the number of unfertilized ova (Day 10, 0.7+/-0.4; Day 2, 0.2+/-0.1) did not differ between treatments. Progesterone concentrations were lower (P=0.0001) in Day-2 heifers at FSH

  12. Schoolyard Habitat Project Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Rich

    This project aims to provide basic steps for students to restore and create wildlife habitats on school grounds. Four chapters are included in this guide, and each chapter is divided into teacher and student sections. Chapter 1 provides necessary information for starting a habitat project. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 discuss the details for the Forest…

  13. The Habitat Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Habitat Project is a multiday, differentiated, interdisciplinary environmental science lesson that incorporates skill-building and motivational strategies to internalize ecosystem vocabulary. Middle school students research an animal, display its physical characteristics on a poster, build a three-dimensional habitat and present their work…

  14. Advanced Plant Habitat (APH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Reed, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) hardware will be a large growth volume plant habitat, capable of hosting multigenerational studies, in which environmental variables (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, carbon dioxide level light intensity and spectral quality) can be tracked and controlled in support of whole plant physiological testing and Bio-regenerative Life Support System investigations.

  15. The effect of androgens on ovarian follicle maturation: Dihydrotestosterone suppress FSH-stimulated granulosa cell proliferation by upregulating PPARγ-dependent PTEN expression.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Jou; Chou, Chia-Hung; Chen, Shee-Uan; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Yang, Yu-Shih; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2015-01-01

    Intraovarian hyperandrogenism is one of the determining factors of follicular arrest in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Using androgenized rat models, we investigated the effects of androgens on metabolism, as well as on factors involved in follicular arrest and the reduced number of estrus cycles. The dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated rats had fewer estrus cycles, higher numbers of large arrested follicles and an increased in body weight gain compared with the dehydroepiandrostenedione (DHEA)- and placebo-treated rats. In cultured rat granulosa cells, DHT suppressed follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced granulosa cell proliferation and increased the accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. DHT decreased phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) and cyclin D1 levels through increasing PTEN. DHT-promoted PTEN expression was regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in granulosa cells. Meanwhile, in the large follicles of the DHT-treated rats, the expressions of PPARγ and PTEN were higher, but the expression of p-Akt and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were lower. Conclusively, DHT and DHEA produced differential effects on metabolism in prepubertal female rats like clinical manifestations of women with PCOS. DHT treatment may affect ovarian follicular maturation by altering granulosa cell proliferation through the regulation of enhancing PPARγ dependent PTEN/p-Akt expression in the granulosa cells. PMID:26674985

  16. Insect management in deciduous orchard ecosystems: Habitat manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedders, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    Current literature pertaining to habitat manipulation of deciduous fruit and nut orchards for pest control is reviewed. The hypothesis of pesticide-induced pest problems in deciduous orchards as well as the changing pest population dynamics of deciduous orchards is discussed An experimental habitat manipulation program for pecans, utilizing vetch cover crops to enhance lady beetle populations for pecan aphid control is presented

  17. Regulation of expression of ovarian mRNA encoding steroidogenic enzymes and gonadotrophin receptors by FSH and GH in hypogonadotrophic cattle.

    PubMed

    Garverick, H A; Baxter, G; Gong, J; Armstrong, D G; Campbell, B K; Gutierrez, C G; Webb, R

    2002-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of FSH and bovine somatotrophin on the expression of mRNA encoding the gonadotrophin receptors and steroidogenic enzymes in ovarian follicles of cattle rendered hypogonadotrophic by treatment with a GnRH agonist. Hereford x Friesian heifers were allotted into two pretreatment groups: controls (n = 10) and GnRH agonist-treated (n = 20). Ovaries of control cows were removed on day 2 of the first follicular wave after synchronized oestrus. GnRH agonist-treated heifers were given either FSH or no FSH. FSH was infused at 50 microg h(-1) for 48 h. Ovaries in GnRH agonist-treated heifers were removed at the end of exogenous hormone treatment. The control, GnRH agonist and GnRH agonist plus FSH treatment groups were divided further into bovine somatotrophin or no bovine somatotrophin treatments (n = 5 per treatment). Bovine somatotrophin (25 mg day(-1) by s.c. injection) was administered for 3 days. Ovaries were scanned once a day by ultrasonography. Blood samples for hormone measurements were collected three times a day from oestrus until the time of removal of ovaries. Expression of mRNAs for the FSH and LH receptors and cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc), cytochrome P450 17alpha-hydroxylase (P450c17) and cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom) enzymes was localized by in situ hybridization and quantified by image analysis. Ovarian follicular growth was arrested at < or = 4.5 mm in diameter in GnRH agonist-treated heifers. There was no effect of bovine somatotrophin on follicular dynamics, gonadotrophin secretion or expression of mRNA for either the gonadotrophin receptors or steroidogenic enzymes. Infusion of FSH to GnRH agonist-treated heifers increased FSH concentrations in serum to the physiological concentrations observed in controls and stimulated growth of follicles to a size similar (5.5-8.0 mm in diameter) to recruited follicles in control cows. FSH induced mRNA expression of P450scc and P450arom in

  18. Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Vertical Cylinder Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Alan; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Gill, Tracy R.; Tri, Terry O.; Toups, Larry; Howard, Robert I.; Spexarth, Gary R.; Cavanaugh, Stephen; Langford, William M.; Dorsey, John T.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Architecture Team defined an outpost scenario optimized for intensive mobility that uses small, highly mobile pressurized rovers supported by portable habitat modules that can be carried between locations of interest on the lunar surface. A compact vertical cylinder characterizes the habitat concept, where the large diameter maximizes usable flat floor area optimized for a gravity environment and allows for efficient internal layout. The module was sized to fit into payload fairings for the Constellation Ares V launch vehicle, and optimized for surface transport carried by the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) mobility system. Launch and other loads are carried through the barrel to a top and bottom truss that interfaces with a structural support unit (SSU). The SSU contains self-leveling feet and docking interfaces for Tri-ATHLETE grasping and heavy lift. A pressurized module needed to be created that was appropriate for the lunar environment, could be easily relocated to new locations, and could be docked together in multiples for expanding pressurized volume in a lunar outpost. It was determined that horizontally oriented pressure vessels did not optimize floor area, which takes advantage of the gravity vector for full use. Hybrid hard-inflatable habitats added an unproven degree of complexity that may eventually be worked out. Other versions of vertically oriented pressure vessels were either too big, bulky, or did not optimize floor area. The purpose of the HDU vertical habitat module is to provide pressurized units that can be docked together in a modular way for lunar outpost pressurized volume expansion, and allow for other vehicles, rovers, and modules to be attached to the outpost to allow for IVA (intra-vehicular activity) transfer between them. The module is a vertically oriented cylinder with a large radius to allow for maximal floor area and use of volume. The modular, 5- m-diameter HDU vertical habitat

  19. SMALL MAMMALS: CONSEQUENCES OF STOCHASTIC DATA VARIATION FOR MODELING INDICATORS OF HABITAT SUITABILITY FOR A WELL-STUDIED RESOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasingly, models of physical habitat variables (i.e. vegetation, soil) are utilized as indicators of small mammal habitat suitability or quality. Presumably, use of physical habitat models indicating habitat suitability or quality would be improved and enhanced by the extens...

  20. Estrus response and follicular development in Boer does synchronized with flugestone acetate and PGF2α or their combination with eCG or FSH.

    PubMed

    Bukar, Muhammad Modu; Yusoff, Rosnina; Haron, Abd Wahid; Dhaliwal, Gurmeet Kaur; Khan, Mohd Azam Goriman; Omar, Mohammed Ariff

    2012-10-01

    The effects of different estrus synchronization techniques on follicular development and estrus response were studied in 81 nulliparous Boer does. The does were divided into nine groups. Eight of the nine groups were synchronized with prostaglandin F2-alpha (PGF(2α)) or flugestone acetate (FGA) or their combinations, and the ninth group was a control group. In addition to the above combinations, four of the eight synchronized groups were given 5 mg follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and the remaining four groups were administered 300 IU equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG). Posttreatment follicular development was monitored until ovulation occurred using a real-time B-mode ultrasound scanner (Aloka, 500 SSD, Japan), with a 7.5-MHz transrectal linear probe. All the does from the synchronized groups that were given eCG exhibited oestrus while only 88.9% of the does synchronized with FSH showed estrus. The estrus response was observed to be the least among the does synchronized with PGF(2α) + FSH (33.3%) combination followed closely by the FGA + FSH (42.9%) combinations. It was observed that the combinations of FGA + PGF(2α) + FSH resulted in increased percentage of estrus response, duration of estrus, and ovulation. The number of follicles was higher (P < 0.05) in FSH-synchronized groups than the eCG-synchronized groups. It was concluded that the best estrus synchronization protocol in goats is the FGA + eCG with or without PGF(2α). However, the PGF(2α) + FGA + FSH method of estrus synchronization is the most promising combination for further development as a better alternative to estrus synchronization with eCG in does. PMID:22461200

  1. Effects of eCG and FSH on ovarian response, recovery rate and number and quality of oocytes obtained by ovum pick-up in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Sendag, Sait; Cetin, Yunus; Alan, Muhammet; Hadeler, Klaus-Gerd; Niemann, Heiner

    2008-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to compare the ovarian response, oocyte yields per animal, and the morphological quality of oocytes collected by ultrasound guided follicular aspiration from Holstein cows treated either with FSH or eCG. Twenty four normal cyclic, German Holstein cows were randomly divided into two groups. Fourteen cows received 3000 IU eCG on day-4 prior to ovum pick-up (OPU) (day 0), 2 days later (day-2), 625 microg cloprostenol was administered. On day-1 GnRH was administered i.m. and 24h later OPU (day 0) was performed. In ten cows a total dose of 500 IU follicle stimulating hormone (Pluset) was administered intramuscularly in a constant dosage for 4 days with intervals of 12h, starting on day-5. Luteolysis was induced by application of 625 microg cloprostenol on day-2. On day-1 (24h after the last FSH treatment) GnRH was administered i.m. and 24h later OPU (day 0) was performed. Ovarian follicles were visualized on the ultrasound monitor, counted and recorded. All visible antral follicles were punctured. Recovered oocytes were graded morphologically based on the cumulus investment. Average follicle number in ovaries was higher in FSH group than eCG group (p<0.05). Oocyte yields per animal did not differ between FSH and eCG groups. The proportion of grade A oocytes was higher in the FSH group in the than eCG group (p<0.05). Likewise, rate of grade C oocytes in FSH group were lower than eCG group (p<0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that ovarian response, follicle number in ovaries and oocyte quality are affected by the type of gonadotropin and FSH is better alternative than eCG for OPU treatment. PMID:18294785

  2. Effects of different batches of /sup 125/iodine on properties of /sup 125/I-hFSH and characteristics of radioligand-receptor assays

    SciTech Connect

    Melson, B.E.; Sluss, P.M.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1987-02-01

    Radioiodination of highly purified human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH) (4000 IU/mg) was performed every other week for 23 weeks using 2 mCI carrier free Na/sup 125/I (Amersham Corp., 15 mCi/micrograms I2) in the presence of lactoperoxidase. Incorporation of /sup 125/I into hFSH was determined by the method of R. C. Greenwood, W. M. Hunter, and J. S. Grover (1963) Biochem. J. 89, 114). Hormone binding was studied in vitro under steady-state conditions (16 h, 20 degrees C) using different calf testis membrane preparations having similar receptor characteristics. Each /sup 125/I-hFSH preparation was characterized for maximum bindability, specific activity of bindable radioligand as determined by self-displacement analysis, and by determination of Ka and Rt. Incorporation of /sup 125/I into FSH was relatively constant over the large number of experiments (62.4 +/- 6.4 microCi/micrograms; n = 23). By comparison, however, specific radioactivity of the receptor bindable fraction of /sup 125/I-hFSH was related to the lot of /sup 125/I utilized, and was significantly (P less than or equal to 0.01) lower and more variable (28.7 +/- 10.5 microCi/micrograms). Maximum bindability of /sup 125/I-hFSH was not correlated to specific activity (r = 0.06) but was negatively correlated to hFSH /sup 125/I incorporation (r = -0.47; P less than or equal to 0.05). These observations demonstrate the need to assess the quality of each batch of radioligand before undertaking radioligand-receptor assays and suggest that differences in Na/sup 125/I lots affect specific radioactivity of the radioligand and its receptor binding characteristics.

  3. Comparison of ovulation induction and pregnacy outcomes in IVF patients with normal ovarian reserve who underwent long protocol with recombinant-FSH and highly purified-hMG

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Cem; Sofuoğlu, Kenan; Selçuk, Selçuk; Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Abalı, Remzi; Çetingöz, Elçin; Baykal, Bahar; Uludoğan, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Objective Gonadotropins used in controlled ovarian stimulation have been increasing in number. Beside the recombinant preparations such as rec-FSH, rec-LH and h-hMG human-derived preparations have entered the market. We decided to compare the effects of rec-FSH and HP-hMG with GnRHa on embryo quality and pregnancy outcome in women undergoing an IVF cycle. Material and Methods In this study, data of 87 patients who had applied to our center from 2007 to 2008 and who had met all inclusion criteria, were analyzed. The patients underwent controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with HP-hMG, rec-FSH following down-regulation with a GnRHa in a long protocol, selected according to determined criteria and acquired embryo via IVF transfer. Results Of the 87 patients, 44 were stimulated with rec-FSH and 43 with HP-hMG. Distribution of infertility causes was similar between the groups. Duration of gonadotropin administration (p=0.677, Student’s t-test) and the total dose of gonadotropin received (p=0.392, Student’s t-test) were similar between the two groups. The fertilization rate of the rec-FSH group was significantly higher than the HP-hMG group (p=0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). No significant differences were observed between the study groups in biochemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy parameters. Conclusion The higher oocyte yield with rec-FSH does not result in higher quality embryos. LH activity in combination with FSH activity positively affected the oocyte and embryo maturation. Therefore, when we consider the clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates there is no inferiority of HP-hMG in controlled ovarian stimulation. PMID:24591951

  4. Schoolyard Habitats--Learning Locally: Facilitator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This course is designed for educators, natural resource professionals, and others who will be working with students, teachers, school systems, youth groups and their leaders, community groups, and others to plan, design, and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement projects, primarily on school grounds. It provides an introduction to planning,…

  5. Pneumatically erected rigid habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salles, Bradley

    1992-01-01

    The pneumatically erected rigid habitat concept consists of a structure based on an overexpanded metal bellows. The basic concept incorporates the advantages of both inflatable and rigid structures. The design and erection detail are presented with viewgraphs.

  6. Effects of paint thinner exposure on serum LH, FSH and testosterone levels and hypothalamic catecholamine contents in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, B; Kutlu, S; Canpolat, S; Sandal, S; Ayar, A; Mogulkoc, R; Kelestimur, H

    2001-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of thinner inhalation on serum LH, FSH and testosterone levels together with changes in hypothalamic catecholaminergic system in the male rat. A control group inhaled normal air ventilation. The remaining animals were divided into two groups and exposed to paint thinner in a glassy cage for 15 or 30 d. Toluene concentration (the largest constituent in thinner, 66%) was set at 3000 ppm in the inhalation air. At the end, all animals were decapitated and blood samples obtained. Serum LH and FSH levels were measured by RIA and testosterone by enzyme immunoassay. Following removal of brains on dry ice, medial preoptic area, suprachiasmatic nucleus, median eminence and arcuate nucleus were isolated by micropunch technique. Noradrenaline, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) and dopamine concentrations of these hypothalamic areas were determined by HPLC-ECD. Fifteen-day thinner inhalation significantly suppressed serum LH and testosterone levels in parallel (p<0.001) compared to control group values (LH: 0.77+/-0.07; testosterone: 2.67+/-0.39). Thirty-day exposure markedly decreased LH levels (p<0.001), but surprisingly had no significant effect on testosterone. Serum FSH levels were not significantly altered in either group. Thinner inhalation for 15 or 30 d did not cause any significant change in noradrenaline, DHPG or dopamine concentrations in the hypothalamic regions examined (except in the arcuate nucleus). These results suggest that paint thinner has an anti-gonadotropic effect and may cause long-term endocrine disturbances in the male. It is thought that the hypothalamic catecholaminergic system is not involved in thinner inhibition of LH and testosterone secretion. PMID:11217085

  7. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) alternative skipping of exon 2 or 3 affects ovarian response to FSH

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Cengiz; Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Hobbs, Rebecca J.; Gerasimova, Tsilya; Uyar, Asli; Erdem, Mehmet; Oktem, Mesut; Erdem, Ahmet; Gumuslu, Seyhan; Ercan, Deniz; Sakkas, Denny; Comizzoli, Pierre; Seli, Emre; Lalioti, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Genes critical for fertility are highly conserved in mammals. Interspecies DNA sequence variation, resulting in amino acid substitutions and post-transcriptional modifications, including alternative splicing, are a result of evolution and speciation. The mammalian follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene encodes distinct species-specific forms by alternative splicing. Skipping of exon 2 of the human FSHR was reported in women of North American origin and correlated with low response to ovarian stimulation with exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). To determine whether this variant correlated with low response in women of different genetic backgrounds, we performed a blinded retrospective observational study in a Turkish cohort. Ovarian response was determined as low, intermediate or high according to retrieved oocyte numbers after classifying patients in four age groups (<35, 35–37, 38–40, >40). Cumulus cells collected from 96 women undergoing IVF/ICSI following controlled ovarian hyperstimulation revealed four alternatively spliced FSHR products in seven patients (8%): exon 2 deletion in four patients; exon 3 and exons 2 + 3 deletion in one patient each, and a retention of an intron 1 fragment in one patient. In all others (92%) splicing was intact. Alternative skipping of exons 2, 3 or 2 + 3 were exclusive to low responders and was independent of the use of agonist or antagonist. Interestingly, skipping of exon 3 occurs naturally in the ovaries of domestic cats—a good comparative model for human fertility. We tested the signaling potential of human and cat variants after transfection in HEK293 cells and FSH stimulation. None of the splicing variants initiated cAMP signaling despite high FSH doses, unlike full-length proteins. These data substantiate the occurrence of FSHR exon skipping in a subgroup of low responders and suggest that species-specific regulation of FSHR splicing plays diverse roles in mammalian ovarian function. PMID

  8. Involvement of ERK1/2 signaling pathway in atrazine action on FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 expression in rat granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Glisic, Branka; Kaisarevic, Sonja; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide used herbicide atrazine is linked to reproductive dysfunction in females. In this study, we investigated the effects and the mechanism of atrazine action in the ovary using a primary culture of immature granulosa cells. In granulosa cells, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) activates both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) cascades, with cAMP pathway being more important for luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and aromatase (CYP19A1) mRNA expression. We report that 48 h after atrazine exposure the FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA expression and estradiol synthesis were decreased, with LHR mRNA being more sensitive to atrazine than CYP19A1 mRNA. Inadequate acquisition of LHR in the FSH-stimulated and atrazine-exposed granulosa cells renders human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) ineffective to stimulate amphiregulin (Areg), epiregulin (Ereg), and progesterone receptor (Pgr) mRNA expression, suggesting anti-ovulatory effect of atrazine. To dissect the signaling cascade involved in atrazine action in granulosa cells, we used U0126, a pharmacological inhibitor of ERK1/2. U0126 prevents atrazine-induced decrease in LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in the FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. ERK1/2 inactivation restores the ability of hCG to induce expression of the ovulatory genes in atrazine-exposed granulosa cells. Cell-based ELISA assay revealed that atrazine does not change the FSH-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in granulosa cells. The results from this study reveal that atrazine does not affect but requires ERK1/2 phosphorylation to cause decrease in the FSH-induced LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in immature granulosa cells, thus compromising ovulation and female fertility. - Highlights: • Atrazine inhibits estradiol production in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine inhibits LHR and Cyp19a1 mRNA expression in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine

  9. Impact of infertility regimens on breast cancer cells: FSH and LH lack a direct effect on breast cell proliferation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Boukaidi, Samir Alexandre; Cooley, Anne; Hardy, Ashley; Matthews, Laura; Zelivianski, Stanislav; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the impact of hormones used for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) on normal and malignant breast cell growth and proliferation. DESIGN In vitro study of cultured normal and malignant breast cell lines. SETTING Academic medical center INTERVENTIONS Normal and malignant breast cell lines were cultured in two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) systems and treated with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), or FSH with LH or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Effects of treatment on cell proliferation in 2D culture using the MTS assay and on colony growth in 3D culture. RESULTS Compared with untreated cells, normal MCF-10A cells showed a decrease in proliferation and colony size when exposed to a combination of FSH and hCG. HCC 1937 cells treated with FSH and LH also showed a decrease in colony growth but no change in proliferation. None of the treatments had an effect on the proliferation or colony size of the MCF-7 cells. CONCLUSION FSH, LH, and hCG do not appear to cause an increase in cell proliferation or colony growth in either normal or malignant mammary epithelial cell lines. The potential risk for mammary cell transformation associated with these agents may be related to indirect endocrine effects on breast cell physiology. PMID:22188984

  10. Structural Health System for Crew Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history of JPL, and its affilation with CalTech and NASA. It continues by examining some of the sensors, and systems to ensure structural health that JPL has developed. It also reviews some of the habitat designs that are being developed for the lunar base. With these crew habitats, there is a requirement to have embedded systems health monitoring, to alert the crew in time about adverse structural conditions. The use of sensing technologies and smart materials are being developed to assure mechanical flexibility, minimumally invasive, autonomous, and enhanced reliability.

  11. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  12. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  13. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Muskellunge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, Mark F.; Solomon, R. Charles

    1987-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the muskellunge (Esox masquinongy Mitchell). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  14. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Bobcat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyle, Katherine A.; Fendley, Timothy T.

    1987-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the bobcat (Felis rufus). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  15. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Pronghorn

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.; Cook, John G.; Armbruster, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    This is one of a series of publications that provide information on the habitat requirements of selected fish and wildlife species. Literature describing the relationship between habitat variables related to life requisites and habitat suitability for the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) are synthesized. These data are subsequently used to develop Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models. The HSI models are designed to provide information that can be used in impact assessment and habitat management.

  16. 75 FR 38768 - Ashley National Forest, UT, High Uintas Wilderness-Colorado River Cutthroat Trout Habitat...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Forest Service Ashley National Forest, UT, High Uintas Wilderness--Colorado River Cutthroat Trout Habitat...) populations to suitable habitats within the High Uintas Wilderness. Implementation of this proposal would... nonnative fish is necessary to enhance habitat and restore genetically pure CRCT populations to...

  17. An unbalanced translocation unmasks a recessive mutation in the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene and causes FSH resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kuechler, Amla; Hauffa, Berthold P; Köninger, Angela; Kleinau, Gunnar; Albrecht, Beate; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Gromoll, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) mediated by its receptor (FSHR) is pivotal for normal gametogenesis. Inactivating FSHR mutations are known to cause hypergonadotropic hypogonadism with disturbed follicular maturation in females. So far, only very few recessive point mutations have been described. We report on a 17-year-old female with primary amenorrhea, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and disturbed folliculogenesis. Chromosome analysis detected a seemingly balanced translocation 46,XX,t(2;8)(p16.3or21;p23.1)mat. FSHR sequence analysis revealed a novel non-synonymous point mutation in exon 10 (c.1760C>A, p.Pro587His), but no wild-type allele. The mutation was also found in the father, but not in the mother. Furthermore, molecular-cytogenetic analyses of the breakpoint region on chromosome 2 showed the translocation to be unbalanced, containing a deletion with one breakpoint within the FSHR gene. The deletion size was narrowed down by array analysis to approximately 163 kb, involving exons 9 and 10 of the FSHR gene. Functional studies of the mutation revealed the complete lack of signal transduction presumably caused by a changed conformational structure of transmembrane helix 6. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a compound heterozygosity of an inactivating FSHR point mutation unmasked by a partial deletion. This coincidence of two rare changes caused clinical signs consistent with FSH resistance. PMID:20087398

  18. Novel Action of FSH on Stem Cells in Adult Mammalian Ovary Induces Postnatal Oogenesis and Primordial Follicle Assembly.

    PubMed

    Bhartiya, Deepa; Parte, Seema; Patel, Hiren; Sriraman, Kalpana; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Adult mammalian ovary has been under the scanner for more than a decade now since it was proposed to harbor stem cells that undergo postnatal oogenesis during reproductive period like spermatogenesis in testis. Stem cells are located in the ovary surface epithelium and exist in adult and menopausal ovary as well as in ovary with premature failure. Stem cells comprise two distinct populations including spherical, very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs which express nuclear OCT-4 and other pluripotent and primordial germ cells specific markers) and slightly bigger ovarian germ stem cells (OGSCs with cytoplasmic OCT-4 which are equivalent to spermatogonial stem cells in the testes). These stem cells have the ability to spontaneously differentiate into oocyte-like structures in vitro and on exposure to a younger healthy niche. Bone marrow may be an alternative source of these stem cells. The stem cells express FSHR and respond to FSH by undergoing self-renewal, clonal expansion, and initiating neo-oogenesis and primordial follicle assembly. VSELs are relatively quiescent and were recently reported to survive chemotherapy and initiate oogenesis in mice when exposed to FSH. This emerging understanding and further research in the field will help evolving novel strategies to manage ovarian pathologies and also towards oncofertility. PMID:26635884

  19. Novel Action of FSH on Stem Cells in Adult Mammalian Ovary Induces Postnatal Oogenesis and Primordial Follicle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bhartiya, Deepa; Parte, Seema; Patel, Hiren; Sriraman, Kalpana; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Adult mammalian ovary has been under the scanner for more than a decade now since it was proposed to harbor stem cells that undergo postnatal oogenesis during reproductive period like spermatogenesis in testis. Stem cells are located in the ovary surface epithelium and exist in adult and menopausal ovary as well as in ovary with premature failure. Stem cells comprise two distinct populations including spherical, very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs which express nuclear OCT-4 and other pluripotent and primordial germ cells specific markers) and slightly bigger ovarian germ stem cells (OGSCs with cytoplasmic OCT-4 which are equivalent to spermatogonial stem cells in the testes). These stem cells have the ability to spontaneously differentiate into oocyte-like structures in vitro and on exposure to a younger healthy niche. Bone marrow may be an alternative source of these stem cells. The stem cells express FSHR and respond to FSH by undergoing self-renewal, clonal expansion, and initiating neo-oogenesis and primordial follicle assembly. VSELs are relatively quiescent and were recently reported to survive chemotherapy and initiate oogenesis in mice when exposed to FSH. This emerging understanding and further research in the field will help evolving novel strategies to manage ovarian pathologies and also towards oncofertility. PMID:26635884

  20. Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor-γ Mediates Bisphenol A Inhibition of FSH-Stimulated IGF-1, Aromatase, and Estradiol in Human Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwintkiewicz, Jakub; Nishi, Yoshihiro; Yanase, Toshihiko; Giudice, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical used as a plasticizer, is a potent endocrine disruptor that, even in low concentrations, disturbs normal development and functions of reproductive organs in different species. Objectives We investigated whether BPA affects human ovarian granulosa cell function. Methods We treated KGN granulosa cells and granulosa cells from subjects undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), BPA, or BPA plus FSH in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We then evaluated expression of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), aromatase, and transcription factors known to mediate aromatase induction by FSH [including steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1), GATA4, cAMP response element binding protein-1 (CREB-1), and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ (PPARγ)], as well as 17β-estradiol (E2) secretion. KGN cells were transfected with a PPARγ-containing vector, followed by assessment of aromatase and IGF-I expression. Results BPA reduced FSH-induced IGF-1 and aromatase expression and E2 secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. Similar effects on aromatase were observed in IVF granulosa cells. SF-1 and GATA4, but not CREB-1, were reduced after BPA treatment, although PPARγ, an inhibitor of aromatase, was significantly up-regulated by BPA in a dose-dependent manner, with simultaneous decrease of aromatase. Overexpression of PPARγ in KGN cells reduced FSH-stimulated aromatase and IGF-1 mRNAs, with increasing concentrations of the transfected expression vector, mimicking BPA action. Also, BPA reduced granulosa cell DNA synthesis without changing DNA fragmentation, suggesting that BPA does not induce apoptosis. Conclusions Overall, the data demonstrate that BPA induces PPARγ, which mediates down-regulation of FSH-stimulated IGF-1, SF-1, GATA4, aromatase, and E2 in human granulosa cells. These observations support a potential role of altered steroidogenesis and proliferation within the ovarian follicular

  1. Differences between follicular waves 1 and 2 in patterns of emergence of 2-mm follicles, associated FSH surges, and ovarian vascular perfusion in heifers.

    PubMed

    Ginther, O J; Siddiqui, M A R; Baldrighi, J M; Wolf, C A; Greene, J M

    2015-10-01

    The emergence (first detection) of 2-mm follicles, FSH surges, and ovarian vascular perfusion for follicular wave 1 and surge 1 (n = 26) and wave 2 and surge 2 (n = 25) were studied daily in heifers. The day the future dominant follicle was closest to 5.5 mm was designated Day 0 for each wave. In wave 1, many 2-mm follicles (41%) emerged on Days -5 to -3, whereas FSH surge 1 did not begin until Day -3. Concentration of FSH increased abruptly in 1 day to a peak on the day of maximal number of emerging 2-mm follicles, although the day of maximal number relative to Day 0 differed among individuals. The first emergence of 2-mm follicles in wave 2 occurred concurrently with the first increase in the FSH of surge 2. In wave 1, ovarian resistance to vascular perfusion was negatively correlated (r = -0.48, P < 0.05) with a number of 2-mm follicles on Days -4 to -1 for ovaries that did not contain the preovulatory follicle; vascular perfusion increased with an increase in the number of small follicles. The following hypotheses were supported for wave 1 but not for wave 2: (1) an increase in the number of emerging 2-mm follicles of a follicular wave occurs before the beginning of an increase in FSH, (2) the day of maximal number of emerging 2-mm follicles occurs concurrently with an abrupt FSH increase on different days among individuals, and (3) the association between the number of emerging 2-mm follicles and the extent of ovarian vascular perfusion is positive. PMID:26159090

  2. Effects of ovum pick-up frequency and FSH stimulation: a retrospective study on seven years of beef cattle in vitro embryo production.

    PubMed

    De Roover, R; Feugang, J M N; Bols, P E J; Genicot, G; Hanzen, Ch

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the number of follicles, cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) and cultured In Vitro Produced (IVP) embryos obtained from 1396 non-stimulated Ovum Pick-up (OPU) sessions on 81 donor animals in a twice weekly OPU scheme. Results were obtained from 640 sessions following FSH-LH superstimulation, on 112 donors subjected to OPU once every 2 weeks. The stimulation protocol started with the insertion of an ear implant containing 3 mg norgestomet (Crestar, Intervet, Belgium) 8 days before puncture (day -8). The dominant follicle was ablated by ultrasound-guided follicle puncture on day -6. On day -3 and day -2, cows were injected with FSH (Ovagen, ICP) twice daily (8 am to 8 pm), i.e. a total dose of 160 mug FSH and 40 mug LG per donor per stimulation cycle. Animals were punctured 48 h after the last FSH injection (day 0). Progesterone implants were removed the next day. Stimulated donor cows were treated with this protocol at 14-day intervals. Follicles were visualized with a Dynamic Imaging ultrasound scanner, equipped with a 6.5 MHz sectorial probe. Follicles were punctured with 55 cm long, 18 gauge needles at an aspiration pressure corresponding to a flow rate of 15 ml/min. Cumulus oocyte complexes were recovered and processed in a routine IVF set-up. Results demonstrate that, expressed per session, FSH stimulation prior to OPU increases production efficiency with significantly more follicles punctured and oocytes retrieved. However, when overall results during comparable 2-week periods are considered (four non-stimulated sessions vs one stimulated), more follicles are punctured and more oocytes are retrieved using the non-stimulated protocol. No significant differences in the number of cultured embryos could be detected, indicating that FSH/LH stimulation prior to OPU might have a positive effect on in vitro oocyte developmental competence as more embryos are cultured with less, presumably better-quality, oocytes. PMID

  3. Effects of 31 kDa bovine inhibin on FSH and LH in rat pituitary cells in vitro: antagonism of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists.

    PubMed

    Farnworth, P G; Robertson, D M; de Kretser, D M; Burger, H G

    1988-11-01

    The effects of 31 kDa bovine inhibin on the release of FSH and LH stimulated by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or its agonist analogue buserelin have been studied using 5-day-old cultures of pituitary cells prepared from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Exposure of cultures to increasing concentrations of inhibin for 3 days before and during a 4-h stimulation with GnRH resulted in the progressive suppression of both basal and stimulated gonadotrophin release. At the highest inhibin concentrations FSH release was abolished (inhibin median inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 0.15 U/ml) whereas LH release was suppressed by 75% (IC50 = 0.93 U/ml). To correct for the reduced size of the FSH pool resulting from inhibin pretreatment, the amount of FSH or LH released by an agonist was expressed as a proportion of the total hormone available for release in each case. Following this adjustment, concentrations of inhibin producing maximal effects increased the GnRH median effective concentration for FSH release 4.1-fold and that for LH release 2.2-fold, with inhibin IC50 values of 0.45 and 0.32 U/ml respectively. Inhibin also suppressed the maximum proportion of both FSH and LH that excess GnRH released in 4 h by 36%, with IC50 values of 0.53 and 0.76 U/ml respectively. These effects were not changed by reduction of the inhibin pretreatment period from 3 days to 1 day or by exclusion of inhibin during the stimulation period. After a 3-day pretreatment, inhibin inhibited gonadotrophin release by buserelin less effectively than that by GnRH, but the pattern of antagonism was the same.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3143796

  4. Habitat goes green

    SciTech Connect

    Kriescher, P.; Smith, M.

    1999-12-01

    A Denver family enjoys the financial and personal benefits of owning an affordable, energy-efficient home. On Earth Day, April 22, 1997, Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver witnessed the realization of a dream. As Luis and Estella Valadez and their four children cut the ribbon on their 1,100 square foot (102 m{sup 2}) northwest Denver home, it signified the completion of the Denver Habitat affiliate's first ``Green'' home. Building this dream involved developing a plan to build affordable Habitat homes that also embodied a sense of stewardship of the Earth's environment. The affiliate also wanted to use this effort to achieve the additional goal of reducing the homeowner's utility and maintenance bills.

  5. PIVET rFSH dosing algorithms for individualized controlled ovarian stimulation enables optimized pregnancy productivity rates and avoidance of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yovich, John L; Alsbjerg, Birgit; Conceicao, Jason L; Hinchliffe, Peter M; Keane, Kevin N

    2016-01-01

    The first PIVET algorithm for individualized recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) dosing in in vitro fertilization, reported in 2012, was based on age and antral follicle count grading with adjustments for anti-Müllerian hormone level, body mass index, day-2 FSH, and smoking history. In 2007, it was enabled by the introduction of a metered rFSH pen allowing small dosage increments of ~8.3 IU per click. In 2011, a second rFSH pen was introduced allowing more precise dosages of 12.5 IU per click, and both pens with their individual algorithms have been applied continuously at our clinic. The objective of this observational study was to validate the PIVET algorithms pertaining to the two rFSH pens with the aim of collecting ≤15 oocytes and minimizing the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. The data set included 2,822 in vitro fertilization stimulations over a 6-year period until April 2014 applying either of the two individualized dosing algorithms and corresponding pens. The main outcome measures were mean oocytes retrieved and resultant embryos designated for transfer or cryopreservation permitted calculation of oocyte and embryo utilization rates. Ensuing pregnancies were tracked until live births, and live birth productivity rates embracing fresh and frozen transfers were calculated. Overall, the results showed that mean oocyte numbers were 10.0 for all women <40 years with 24% requiring rFSH dosages <150 IU. Applying both specific algorithms in our clinic meant that the starting dose was not altered for 79.1% of patients and for 30.1% of those receiving the very lowest rFSH dosages (≤75 IU). Only 0.3% patients were diagnosed with severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, all deemed avoidable due to definable breaches from the protocols. The live birth productivity rates exceeded 50% for women <35 years and was 33.2% for the group aged 35-39 years. Routine use of both algorithms led to only 11.6% of women generating >15 oocytes

  6. PIVET rFSH dosing algorithms for individualized controlled ovarian stimulation enables optimized pregnancy productivity rates and avoidance of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yovich, John L; Alsbjerg, Birgit; Conceicao, Jason L; Hinchliffe, Peter M; Keane, Kevin N

    2016-01-01

    The first PIVET algorithm for individualized recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) dosing in in vitro fertilization, reported in 2012, was based on age and antral follicle count grading with adjustments for anti-Müllerian hormone level, body mass index, day-2 FSH, and smoking history. In 2007, it was enabled by the introduction of a metered rFSH pen allowing small dosage increments of ~8.3 IU per click. In 2011, a second rFSH pen was introduced allowing more precise dosages of 12.5 IU per click, and both pens with their individual algorithms have been applied continuously at our clinic. The objective of this observational study was to validate the PIVET algorithms pertaining to the two rFSH pens with the aim of collecting ≤15 oocytes and minimizing the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. The data set included 2,822 in vitro fertilization stimulations over a 6-year period until April 2014 applying either of the two individualized dosing algorithms and corresponding pens. The main outcome measures were mean oocytes retrieved and resultant embryos designated for transfer or cryopreservation permitted calculation of oocyte and embryo utilization rates. Ensuing pregnancies were tracked until live births, and live birth productivity rates embracing fresh and frozen transfers were calculated. Overall, the results showed that mean oocyte numbers were 10.0 for all women <40 years with 24% requiring rFSH dosages <150 IU. Applying both specific algorithms in our clinic meant that the starting dose was not altered for 79.1% of patients and for 30.1% of those receiving the very lowest rFSH dosages (≤75 IU). Only 0.3% patients were diagnosed with severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, all deemed avoidable due to definable breaches from the protocols. The live birth productivity rates exceeded 50% for women <35 years and was 33.2% for the group aged 35–39 years. Routine use of both algorithms led to only 11.6% of women generating >15 oocytes

  7. Leptin receptor null mice with reexpression of LepR in GnRHR expressing cells display elevated FSH levels but remain in a prepubertal state.

    PubMed

    Allen, Susan J; Garcia-Galiano, David; Borges, Beatriz C; Burger, Laura L; Boehm, Ulrich; Elias, Carol F

    2016-06-01

    Leptin signals energy sufficiency to the reproductive hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Studies using genetic models have demonstrated that hypothalamic neurons are major players mediating these effects. Leptin receptor (LepR) is also expressed in the pituitary gland and in the gonads, but the physiological effects of leptin in these sites are still unclear. Female mice with selective deletion of LepR in a subset of gonadotropes show normal pubertal development but impaired fertility. Conditional deletion approaches, however, often result in redundancy or developmental adaptations, which may compromise the assessment of leptin's action in gonadotropes for pubertal maturation. To circumvent these issues, we adopted a complementary genetic approach and assessed if selective reexpression of LepR only in gonadotropes is sufficient to enable puberty and improve fertility of LepR null female mice. We initially assessed the colocalization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) and LepR in the HPG axis using GnRHR-IRES-Cre (GRIC) and LepR-Cre reporter (tdTomato or enhanced green fluorescent protein) mice. We found that GRIC and leptin-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 are expressed in distinct hypothalamic neurons. Whereas LepR-Cre was observed in theca cells, GRIC expression was rarely found in the ovarian parenchyma. In contrast, a subpopulation of gonadotropes expressed the LepR-Cre reporter gene (tdTomato). We then crossed the GRIC mice with the LepR null reactivable (LepR(loxTB)) mice. These mice showed an increase in FSH levels, but they remained in a prepubertal state. Together with previous findings, our data indicate that leptin-selective action in gonadotropes serves a role in adult reproductive physiology but is not sufficient to allow pubertal maturation in mice. PMID:27101301

  8. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Marten

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.

    1982-01-01

    Habitat preferences and species characteristics of the pine marten (Martes americana) are described in this publication. It is one of a series of Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models and was developed through an analysis of available scientific data on the species-habitat requirements of the pine marten. Habitat use information is presented in a review of the literature, followed by the development of a HSI model. The model is presented in three formats: graphic, word and mathematical. Suitability index graphs quantify the species-habitat relationship. These data are then synthesized into a model which is designed to provide information for use in impact assessment and habitat management activities.

  9. Habitat Suitability Information: Blacknose Dace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trial, Joan G.; Stanley, Jon G.; Batcheller, Mary; Gebhart, Gary; Maughan, O. Eugene; Nelson, Patrick C.

    1983-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop riverine and lacustrine habitat models for Blacknose dace, a freshwater species. The models are scaled to produce an index of habitat suitability between 0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1 (optimally suitable habitat) for freshwater, marine, and estuarine areas of the continental United States. Habitat suitability indexes (HSI's) are designed for use with the habitat evaluation procedures developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Also included are discussions of Suitability Index (SI) curves as used in the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) and SI curves available for an IFIM analysis of Blacknose dace.

  10. Modeling sensitive elasmobranch habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennino, M. Grazia; Muñoz, Facundo; Conesa, David; López-Quílez, Antonio; Bellido, José Marí; a

    2013-10-01

    Basic information on the distribution and habitat preferences of ecologically important species is essential for their management and protection. In the Mediterranean Sea there is increasing concern over elasmobranch species because their biological (ecological) characteristics make them highly vulnerable to fishing pressure. Their removal could affect the structure and function of marine ecosystems, inducing changes in trophic interactions at the community level due to the selective elimination of predators or prey species, competitors and species replacement. In this study Bayesian hierarchical spatial models are used to map the sensitive habitats of the three most caught elasmobranch species (Galeus melastomus, Scyliorhinus canicula, Etmopterus spinax) in the western Mediterranean Sea, based on fishery-dependent bottom trawl data. Results show that habitats associated with hard substrata and sandy beds, mainly in deep waters and with a high seabed gradient, have a greater probability registering the presence of the studied species than those associated with muddy shallow waters. Temperature and chlorophyll-α concentration show a negative relationship with S. canicula occurrence. Our results identify some of the sensitive habitats for elasmobranchs in the western Mediterranean Sea (GSA06 South), providing essential and easy-to-use interpretation tools, such as predictive distribution maps, with the final aim of improving management and conservation of these vulnerable species.