Science.gov

Sample records for fuel co2 monitoring

  1. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  2. Capnography: monitoring CO2.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-10-01

    MONITORING RESPIRATORY and metabolic function by using capnography to measure end tidal carbon dioxide is standard practice in anaesthesia. It is also becoming more common in intensive care units and during procedural sedation. End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) monitoring may also be used to assess effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Capnography is now emerging in general medical and surgical wards to monitor respiratory depression in patients using opioid analgesics. Using EtCO2 to monitor respiratory function offers many benefits over pulse oximetry. It is important to understand the differences between these two monitoring methods, and why capnography is increasingly favoured in many situations. An understanding of the physiological processes involved in CO2 excretion allows nurses to use capnography in a safe and meaningful way, while monitoring at-risk patients in acute care. PMID:26638570

  3. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  4. CO2 Sequestration Crosswell Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Luo, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2, a green house gas, represents an effort to reduce the large amount of CO2 generated as a by-product of fossil fuels combustion and emitted into the atmosphere. This process of sequestration involves CO2 storage deep underground into highly permeable porous media sealed by caprock. "4D seismics" is a natural non-intrusive monitoring technique which involves 3D time-lapse seismic surveys. The success of monitoring CO2 movement relies upon a proper description of the physics of the problem. We realize time-lapse migrations comparing acoustic, elastic (with or without Gassmann's formulae), and poroelastic simulations of 4D seismic imaging. This approach highlights the influence of using different physical theories on interpreting seismic data, and, more importantly, on extracting the CO2 signature from the seismic wave field. We investigate various types of inversions using (1) P-wave traveltimes, (2) P- & S-wave traveltimes and (3) P- & S-wave traveltimes and amplitudes. Simulations are performed using a spectral-element method, and finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, used in the non-linear iterative inversions, are calculated based on an adjoint method. Biot's equations are implemented in the forward and adjoint simulations to account for poroelastic effects.

  5. Use of Chia Plant to Monitor Urban Fossil Fuel CO2 Emission: An Example From Irvine, CA in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Stills, A.; Trumbore, S.; Randerson, J. T.; Yi, J.

    2011-12-01

    Δ14CO2 is a unique tracer for quantifying anthropogenic CO2 emissions. However, monitoring 14CO2 change and distribution in an urban environment is challenging because of its large spatial and temporal variations. We have tested the potential use of a chia plant (Salvia hispanica) as an alternative way to collect a time-integrated CO2 sample for radiocarbon analysis. The results show that Δ14C of the new growth of chia sprouts and chia leaves are consistent with the Δ14C of air samples collected during the growing period, indicating the new growth has no inherited C from seeds and thus records atmospheric 14CO2. Time-integrated air samples and chia leaf samples significantly reduced the noises of Δ14CO2 in an urban environment. We report here an example of monitoring 14CO2 change in Irvine, CA from Mar 2010 to Mar 2011 utilizing such a method. The results showed a clear seasonal cycle with high (close to remote air background level) Δ14C in summer and low Δ14C in winter months in this urban area. Excess (above remote air background) fossil fuel CO2 was calculated to be closed to 0 ppm in June to about 16 ppm from November 2010 to February 2011. Monthly mean Δ14CO2 was anti-correlated with monthly mean CO mixing ratio, indicating Δ14CO2 is mainly controlled by fossil fuel CO2 mixing with clean on-shore marine air. In summary, this study has shown encouraging result that chia plant can be potentially used as a convenient and inexpensive sampling method for time-integrated atmospheric 14CO2. Combined with other annual plants this provides the opportunity to map out time-integrated fossil fuel-derived CO2 in major cities at low cost. This in turn can be used to: 1) establish a baseline for fossil fuel emissions reductions in cities in the future; 2) provide invaluable information for validating emission models.

  6. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  7. Atmospheric measurement of point source fossil fuel CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G.; Bromley, T.; Norris, M.; Zondervan, A.

    2013-11-01

    We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Plant to examine methodologies for atmospheric monitoring of point source fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. The Kapuni plant, located in rural New Zealand, removes CO2 from locally extracted natural gas and vents that CO2 to the atmosphere, at a rate of ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. The plant is located in a rural dairy farming area, with no other significant CO2ff sources nearby, but large, diurnally varying, biospheric CO2 fluxes from the surrounding highly productive agricultural grassland. We made flask measurements of CO2 and 14CO2 (from which we derive the CO2ff component) and in situ measurements of CO2 downwind of the Kapuni plant, using a Helikite to sample transects across the emission plume from the surface up to 100 m a.g.l. We also determined the surface CO2ff content averaged over several weeks from the 14CO2 content of grass samples collected from the surrounding area. We use the WindTrax plume dispersion model to compare the atmospheric observations with the emissions reported by the Kapuni plant, and to determine how well atmospheric measurements can constrain the emissions. The model has difficulty accurately capturing the fluctuations and short-term variability in the Helikite samples, but does quite well in representing the observed CO2ff in 15 min averaged surface flask samples and in ~1 week integrated CO2ff averages from grass samples. In this pilot study, we found that using grass samples, the modeled and observed CO2ff emissions averaged over one week agreed to within 30%. The results imply that greater verification accuracy may be achieved by including more detailed meteorological observations and refining 14CO2 sampling strategies.

  8. Monitoring of near surface CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, E.; Möller, I.; Teschner, M.; Poggenburg, J.; Spickenbom, K.; Schulz, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring of near surface CO2 ECKHARD FABER1, INGO MÖLLER1, MANFRED TESCHNER1, JÜRGEN POGGENBURG1, KAI SPICKENBOM1, HANS-MARTIN SCHULZ1,2 1Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, e.faber@bgr.de 2present adress: GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), Telegrafenberg, D-14473 Potsdam Underground gas storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide is one of the methods to reduce the input of antropogenic CO2 into the atmosphere and its greenhouse effect. Storage of CO2 is planned in depleted reservoirs, in aquifers and in salt caverns. Storage sites must have very small leakage rates to safely store the CO2 for centuries. Thus, a careful investigation and site selection is crucial. However, any leakage of CO2 to the surface is potentially dangerous for humans and environment. Therefore, instruments and systems for the detection of any CO2 escaping the storage sites and reaching the atmosphere have to be developed. Systems to monitor gases in deep wells, groundwater and surface sediments for leaking CO2 are developed, tested and are contnuously improved. Our group is mainly analysing CO2 in shallow (down to 3 m) soil samples using automatically operating monitoring systems. The systems are equipped with sensors to measure CO2 (and other gases) concentrations and other environmental parameters (atmospheric pressure, ambient and soil temperatures, etc.). Data are measured in short intervals (minute to subminute), are stored locally and are transferred by telemetrical systems into the BGR laboratory (Weinlich et al., 2006). In addition to soil gases monitoring systems technical equipment is available for continuous underwater gas flow measurements. Several of those monitoring systems are installed in different areas like Czech Republic, Austria, Italy and Germany. To detect any leaking gas from a sequestration site after CO2 injection, the naturally existing CO2 concentration (before injection) must be known. Thus, the natural

  9. Atmospheric Verification of Point Source Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Norris, M. W.; Wiltshire, R.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G. W.; Bromley, T.

    2015-12-01

    Large point sources (electricity generation and large-scale industry) make up roughly one third of all fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. Currently, these emissions are determined from self-reported inventory data, and sometimes from smokestack emissions monitoring, and the uncertainty in emissions from individual power plants is about 20%. We examine the utility of atmospheric 14C measurements combined with atmospheric transport modelling as a tool for independently quantifying point source CO2ff emissions, to both improve the accuracy of the reported emissions and for verification as we move towards a regulatory environment. We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Facility as a test case. It is located in rural New Zealand with no other significant fossil fuel CO2 sources nearby, and emits CO2ff at ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. We use several different sampling methods to determine the 14C and hence the CO2ff content downwind of the emission source: grab flask samples of whole air; absorption of CO2 into sodium hydroxide integrated over many hours; and plant material which faithfully records the 14C content of assimilated CO2. We use a plume dispersion model to compare the reported emissions with our observed CO2ff mole fractions. We show that the short-term variability in plume dispersion makes it difficult to interpret the grab flask sample results, whereas the variability is averaged out in the integrated samples and we obtain excellent agreement between the reported and observed emissions, indicating that the 14C method can reliably be used to evaluated point source emissions.

  10. Monitoring of atmospheric 14CO2 in central European countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Světlík, I.; Tomášková, L.; Molnár, M.; Svingor, E.; Futó, I.; Pintér, T.; Rulík, P.; Michálek, V.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-14 is a radionuclide with global occurrence and partly natural origin. The main anthropogenic sources of the 14C were the nuclear weapon tests, namely at the beginning of the 1960s, nowadays the nuclear energy facilities are the main sources. Maximum in the atmospheric 14C activity was observed in 1963. In the following years the considerable 14C activity decrease was due to intensive carbon deposition into oceanic water and sediments particularly. At present the 14C activity approximates the level before nuclear age, corresponding to ˜0 ‰ Δ 14C. Another actual type of anthropogenic influence is the Suess effect, i.e., the dilution of 14C by fossil carbon (fuel combustion). This effect causes a decrease of the 14C activity on a global, regional and local scale. Thus, monitoring of actual reference level of 14C activity gives a possibility to indicate local or global anthropogenic influences. This paper reporting data from the atmospheric 14CO2 monitoring in the Czech Republic and Hungary compares the actual results with other European countries. The observed effects connected with local and regional CO2 releases from fossil fuel combustion are discussed.

  11. CO2 monitoring at the pilot-scale CO2 injection site in Nagaoka, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanase, D.; Xue, Z.; Watanabe, J.; Saito, H.

    2005-12-01

    A pilot-scale CO2 sequestration project supported by the Japanese Government (METI) has been conducted by Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth (RITE) in co-operation with Engineering Advancement Association of Japan (ENAA). The test site is located at the South Nagaoka gas field operated by Teikoku Oil Co., Ltd. in Nagaoka city, Niigata Prefecture, 200 km north of Tokyo. The targeted layer for the CO2 injection is a thin permeable zone intercalated in a 60 m thick sandstone bed of early Pleistocene age, which lies about 1,100 m below the ground surface. One injection well (IW-1) and three observation wells (OB-2, -3, -4) were drilled at the site. The CO2 injection started on 7 July 2003 and ended on 11 January 2005 with the total injected amount of 10,400 tonnes within eighteen months. Purchased CO2 of 99.9 % pure was injected in the supercritical state at the rate of 20-40 tonnes per day. A series of time-lapse CO2 monitoring consisted of geophysical well logging and cross-well seismic tomography has been performed at the injection site and the results provide valuable insight into the CO2 movement in the sandstone reservoir. Time-lapse well loggings of induction, gamma ray, neutron and sonic were performed almost once a month to monitor CO2 breakthrough at the three observation wells. On 10 March 2004, a breakthrough was first detected at OB-2, 40 m apart from the injection well, after the cumulative injection of 4,000 tonnes. As an evidence of CO2 breakthrough changes appeared in results of sonic, induction and neutron logs. The sonic P-wave velocity decreased significantly up to 23% after the breakthrough, and then results of sonic logging showed the CO2-bearing zone getting wider during the injection of CO2. Differences appeared also in widths of CO2-bearing zone of induction and neutron logs. On 16 July 2004, another breakthrough of CO2 was detected at OB-4 of 60 m away from the injection well as changes in sonic and neutron logs. No sign

  12. Multiple timescales for neutralization of fossil fuel CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, David; Kheshgi, Haroon; Maier-Reimer, Ernst

    The long term abiological sinks for anthropogenic CO2 will be dissolution in the oceans and chemical neutralization by reaction with carbonates and basic igneous rocks. We use a detailed ocean/sediment carbon cycle model to simulate the response of the carbonate cycle in the ocean to a range of anthropogenic CO2 release scenarios. CaCO3 will play only a secondary role in buffering the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere because CaCO3 reaction uptake capacity and kinetics are limited by the dynamics of the ocean carbon cycle. Dissolution into ocean water sequesters 70-80% of the CO2 release on a time scale of several hundred years. Chemical neutralization of CO2 by reaction with CaCO3 on the sea floor accounts for another 9-15% decrease in the atmospheric concentration on a time scale of 5.5-6.8 kyr. Reaction with CaCO3 on land accounts for another 3-8%, with a time scale of 8.2 kyr. The final equilibrium with CaCO3 leaves 7.5-8% of the CO2 release remaining in the atmosphere. The carbonate chemistry of the oceans in contact with CaCO3 will act to buffer atmospheric CO2 at this higher concentration until the entire fossil fuel CO2 release is consumed by weathering of basic igneous rocks on a time scale of 200 kyr.

  13. Detection of CO2 leakage by the surface-soil CO2-concentration monitoring (SCM) system in a small scale CO2 release test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Gitak; Yu, Soonyoung; Sung, Ki-Sung; Choi, Byoung-Young; Park, Jinyoung; Han, Raehee; Kim, Jeong-Chan; Park, Kwon Gyu

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of CO2 release through the ground surface is essential to testify the safety of CO2 storage projects. We conducted a feasibility study of the multi-channel surface-soil CO2-concentration monitoring (SCM) system as a soil CO2 monitoring tool with a small scale injection. In the system, chambers are attached onto the ground surface, and NDIR sensors installed in each chamber detect CO2 in soil gas released through the soil surface. Before injection, the background CO2 concentrations were measured. They showed the distinct diurnal variation, and were positively related with relative humidity, but negatively with temperature. The negative relation of CO2 measurements with temperature and the low CO2 concentrations during the day imply that CO2 depends on respiration. The daily variation of CO2 concentrations was damped with precipitation, which can be explained by dissolution of CO2 and gas release out of pores through the ground surface with recharge. For the injection test, 4.2 kg of CO2 was injected 1 m below the ground for about 30 minutes. In result, CO2 concentrations increased in all five chambers, which were located less than 2.5 m of distance from an injection point. The Chamber 1, which is closest to the injection point, showed the largest increase of CO2 concentrations; while Chamber 2, 3, and 4 showed the peak which is 2 times higher than the average of background CO2. The CO2 concentrations increased back after decreasing from the peak around 4 hours after the injection ended in Chamber 2, 4, and 5, which indicated that CO2 concentrations seem to be recovered to the background around 4 hours after the injection ended. To determine the leakage, the data in Chamber 2 and 5, which had low increase rates in the CO2 injection test, were used for statistical analysis. The result shows that the coefficient of variation (CV) of CO2 measurements for 30 minutes is efficient to determine a leakage signal, with reflecting the abnormal change in CO2

  14. Design and package of a 14CO2 field analyzer: the Global Monitor Platform (GMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Bruno D. V.; Bright, Michelle; Gronniger, Glen

    2011-09-01

    Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is widely accepted as a means to reduce and eliminate the fossil fuel CO2 (ff- CO2) emissions from coal fired power plants. Success of CCS depends on near zero leakage rates over decadal time scales. Currently no commercial methods to determine leakage of ff-CO2 are available. The Global Monitor Platform (GMP) field analyzer provides high precision analysis of CO2 isotopes [12C (99%), 13C (<1%), 14C (1.2x10-10 %)] that can differentiate between fossil and biogenic CO2 emissions. Fossil fuels contain no 14C; their combustion should lower atmospheric amounts on local to global scales. There is a clear mandate for monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) of CCS systems nationally and globally to verify CCS integrity, treaty verification (Kyoto Protocol) and to characterize the nuclear fuel cycle. Planetary Emissions Management (PEM), working with the National Secure Manufacturing Center (NSMC), has the goal of designing, ruggedizing and packaging the GMP for field deployment. The system will conduct atmosphere monitoring then adapt to water and soil evaluations. Measuring 14CO2 in real time will provide quantitative concentration data for ff-CO2 in the atmosphere and CCS leakage detection. Initial results will be discussed along with design changes for improved detection sensitivity and manufacturability.

  15. Sensitivity of geochemical monitoring for CO2 sequestration in basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, N. V.; Goldberg, D.; Herron, M.; Grau, J.

    2010-12-01

    Continental flood basalts is a promising target for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage due to high storage capacity, presence of seals, and potential for geochemical trapping which results in binding CO2 into stable carbonate minerals. The success of long-term CO2 storage in igneous rocks highly depends on our ability to monitor mineralization under in situ conditions. The direct chemistry measurements on cores are costly and typically do not provide continuous coverage. In this study we investigate the potential of borehole geochemical logging for monitoring of CO2 mineralization in basalt. Neutron-induced capture gamma ray spectroscopy tools allow obtaining in-situ concentration logs for up to 10 major elements which can be used to construct a quantitative mineralogical model. While this usually provides good bulk mineralogy estimates, detecting small-volume mineral alteration in volcanic rocks remains challenging, especially if borehole conditions are poor. We analyze Schlumberger Elemental Capture Spectroscopy logs and chemical core analysis from the pilot CO2 sequestration project in the Columbia River flood basalt. We use the geochemical spectroscopy logs and quantitative modeling to quantify their sensitivity to secondary mineralization in basalt. We apply statistical analysis to explain the variance in elemental concentrations (and other logs) and establish detection limits for various mineral alteration products in basalt. We use these results to evaluate monitoring capabilities and limitations of geochemical logging for CO2 mineralization after underground injection in basalt and suggest areas for future research.

  16. Monitoring Atmospheric CO2 From Space: Challenge & Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Harrison, F. Wallace; Nehrir, Amin; Browell, Edward; Dobler, Jeremy; Campbell, Joel; Meadows, Byron; Obland, Michael; Kooi, Susan; Fan, Tai-Fang; Ismail, Syed

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 is the key radiative forcing for the Earth's climate and may contribute a major part of the Earth's warming during the past 150 years. Advanced knowledge on the CO2 distributions and changes can lead considerable model improvements in predictions of the Earth's future climate. Large uncertainties in the predictions have been found for decades owing to limited CO2 observations. To obtain precise measurements of atmospheric CO2, certain challenges have to be overcome. For an example, global annual means of the CO2 are rather stable, but, have a very small increasing trend that is significant for multi-decadal long-term climate. At short time scales (a second to a few hours), regional and subcontinental gradients in the CO2 concentration are very small and only in an order of a few parts per million (ppm) compared to the mean atmospheric CO2 concentration of about 400 ppm, which requires atmospheric CO2 space monitoring systems with extremely high accuracy and precision (about 0.5 ppm or 0.125%) in spatiotemporal scales around 75 km and 10-s. It also requires a decadal-scale system stability. Furthermore, rapid changes in high latitude environments such as melting ice, snow and frozen soil, persistent thin cirrus clouds in Amazon and other tropical areas, and harsh weather conditions over Southern Ocean all increase difficulties in satellite atmospheric CO2 observations. Space lidar approaches using Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) technique are considered to be capable of obtaining precise CO2 measurements and, thus, have been proposed by various studies including the 2007 Decadal Survey (DS) of the U.S. National Research Council. This study considers to use the Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar to monitor global atmospheric CO2 distribution and variability from space. Development and demonstration of space lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurements have been made through joint adventure of NASA Langley Research Center and

  17. Characterizing CO2 storage reservoir for above-zone monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, K. M.; Hovorka, S. D.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) provides an excellent opportunity for commercial sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Fluvial, strand plain, and deltaic sandstones of Oligocene and Miocene formations that extend across the Gulf Coast Basin were prolific oil producers for many decades and are also considered to be effective reservoirs for large scale carbon storage. A deep-seated salt dome, faulted anticlinal structure from Gulf coastal region is currently under investigation to develop a monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) plan as coordinated with commercial surveillance of an EOR site for injecting large volume (>1 Million ton/year) of CO2. Geophysical logs have been used to characterize the injection zone reservoir and overburden. One novel MVA element in design is above-zone pressure and geochemical monitoring for out-of-zone migration. Initial characterization with wireline logs demonstrates the extent and areal continuity of reservoir sands and geometries of faults that cut the reservoir. To develop the monitoring plan, we focus characterization on several elements: (1) input data for quick-look dynamic model of the extent of CO2 plume and amount and extent of accompanying pressure elevation, (2) characterization of the zones above the top-reservoir seal for above-zone pressure monitoring, and (3) intersection of faults with well-bores in intervals above the top-reservoir seal for thermal monitoring. Other uncertainties addressed during characterization are the upper extent of faults and juxtaposition of layers to assess the potential for cross-fault fluid migration. Such detail characterization will allow realistic assessment of the sensitivity of monitoring techniques such as temperature logging for tracking up-fault fluid migration and pressure change for out-of zone fluid migration. Successful use of such geophysical techniques for MVA based on uniting elements of existing regulatory monitoring expectations with commercial best practices will be

  18. Production of solar fuels by CO2 plasmolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert P. H.; Bongers, Waldo A.; Graswinckel, Martijn F.; M. C. M van de Sanden, Richard; Leins, Martina; Kopecki, Jochen; Schulz, Andreas; Walker, Mathias

    2014-12-01

    A storage scheme for Renewable Energy (RE) based on the plasmolysis of CO2into CO and O2 has been experimentally investigated, demonstrating high energy efficiency (>50%) combined with high energy density, rapid start-stop and no use of scarce materials. The key parameter controlling energy efficiency has been identified as the reduced electric field. Basic plasma parameters including density and temperature are derived from a simple particle and energy balance model, allowing parameter specification of an upscale 100 kW reactor. With RE powered plasmolysis as the critical element, a CO2 neutral energy system becomes feasible when complemented by effective capture of CO2 at the input and separation of CO from the output gas stream followed by downstream chemical processing into hydrocarbon fuels.

  19. 40 CFR 75.13 - Specific provisions for monitoring CO2 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring CO2... monitoring CO2 emissions. (a) CO 2 continuous emission monitoring system. If the owner or operator chooses to... operating requirements in § 75.10 for a CO2 continuous emission monitoring system and flow monitoring...

  20. 40 CFR 75.13 - Specific provisions for monitoring CO2 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring CO2... monitoring CO2 emissions. (a) CO 2 continuous emission monitoring system. If the owner or operator chooses to... operating requirements in § 75.10 for a CO2 continuous emission monitoring system and flow monitoring...

  1. Transport realization of high resolution fossil fuel CO2 emissions in an urban domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Gurney, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion are the largest net annual flux of carbon in the earth atmosphere system and energy consumption in urban environments is a major contributor to total fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Understanding how the emissions are transported in space and time, especially in urban environments and resolving contributions from individual sources of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions are an essential component of a complete reliable monitoring, reporting, and verification (MRV) system that are emerging at local, national, and international levels. As grid models are not designed to resolve concentrations on local scales, we tested the transport realization of fossil fuel CO2 emissions using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) model, a commonly used transport algorithm for small domain air quality studies, in the greater Indianapolis region, USA. A typical 24-hour point, mobile, and area sources fossil fuel CO2 emissions in four seasons (spring, summer, autumn and winter) were processed from hourly emissions data and prepared at 500-meter spatial resolution for the model inputs together with other parameters. The simulation result provides a complete 4-dimensional concentration matrix transported from all sources for the urban domain which can be analyzed in order to isolate individual sources or test sampling strategies for verification at selected time periods. In addition, the urban 4-dimensional concentration matrix can be visualized in a virtual environment, which provides a powerful education and outreach platform for researchers, students, and public.

  2. A novel approach toward noninvasive monitoring of transcutaneous CO(2).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Madhubanti; Ge, Xudong; Kostov, Yordan; Tolosa, Leah; Rao, Govind

    2014-01-01

    The continuous monitoring of transcutaneous gases is an integral part of neonatal intensive care. Present monitors measure the equilibrating values of these gases by raising the skin temperature to 42°C or above. Because neonatal skin is very sensitive and delicate, this often leads to serious skin injuries. In this work, we present a new approach to the noninvasive measurement of transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (tcpCO2) based on the initial pseudo steady state diffusion rates instead of the mass-transfer equilibrium. Because we are following initial diffusion rates, each measurement takes no more than a few minutes. Additionally, raising the surface temperature is not required, thus, skin irritation and burns are highly unlikely. A dual-chamber diffusion vessel with either porcine skin or dialysis membrane placed between the two chambers was used to mimic neonatal skin. LI-820 CO2 Analyzer was used to measure the CO2 diffusing through the membrane or skin. Initial experiments on adult human skin under varying physical activities, food intake and breathing patterns showed a strong influence of the various conditions on the amount of CO2 diffusing through skin. These initial findings suggest that this method can be used not only on neonates but to a wider population of patients. PMID:23931988

  3. Monitoring CO2 and CH4 concentrations along an urban-rural transect in London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Alex; Broquet, Gregoire; Clifford, Debbie; Chevallier, Frederic; Butterfield, David

    2013-04-01

    Cities are important sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Anthropogenic CO2 is released in the combustion of fossil fuels for heating, electricity and transport. The major sources of CH4 in city environments are natural gas leakage, landfill sites and transport emissions. Monitoring of urban greenhouse gas concentrations is crucial for cities aiming to reduce emissions through measures such as changes to the transport infrastructure and green planning. We present measurements of CO2 and CH4 concentrations using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) at four sites located in and around London, UK. Two sites were located in the inner city, one in the suburban fringe and the fourth in a rural location close to the city. This study was funded by Astrium Services Ltd as part of a pilot scheme to monitor city-scale GHG emissions and presented a unique opportunity to study changes in greenhouse gas concentrations across an urban to rural 'transect'. The CHIMERE chemistry-transport model is used to estimate CO2 and CH4 concentrations throughout the four month measurement period during the summer of 2012. Comparisons are made between the measured and modelled CO2 and CH4 concentrations and the representativity of the study sites for future urban greenhouse gas monitoring is considered. This study also examines the ability of a variety of measurement and modelling techniques to partition anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 sources.

  4. Monitoring and Modeling CO2 Dynamics in the Vadose Zone near an Abandoned Historic Oil Well: Implications for Detecting CO2 Leakage at Geological CO2 Sequestration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Romanak, K.; Hovorka, S.; Reedy, R. C.; Trevino, R.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Soil-gas monitoring is proposed for detecting CO2 leakage at geological CO2 sequestration sites. At the Cranfield oil field, about 25 km east of Natchez, Mississippi, an integrated near-surface monitoring program is being implemented where supercritical CO2 is being injected for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The purpose of the study is to understand how natural factors may affect soil CO2 monitoring at geologic carbon storage sites. A near-surface observatory, constructed on an engineered well pad near a 1950’s era open pit and plugged and abandoned well, was used to monitor atmospheric parameters such as air temperature, relative humility, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, solar radiation, and precipitation. Soil temperature, soil CO2 concentrations, water content, and matric potential were also monitored at various depths to a maximum of 5 m in the vadose zone. The integrated monitoring system was installed in September 2009 and continued collecting data each half hour for about 240 days. CO2 concentrations measured at 1.5 m depth are about two times that of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and show daily fluctuations. However, CO2 concentrations measured at 3 m depth decreased from 11% in November 2009 to 9% in January 2010, then gradually increased to 10.5% in June 2010. There should be no CO2 contribution from root respiration because the engineered pad is bare of vegetation. Monitored CO2 in the vadose zone at this site most likely is derived from oxidation of methane with a suspected source related to the 1950’s era plugged and abandoned well. A 1-D numerical model was also used to simulate variably saturated water flow, CO2 transport, CH4 oxidation for understanding mechanisms that dominate CO2 transport at this site. Results of this study suggest that CO2 transport in the vadose zone is very complicated and can be affected by many factors including precipitation, barometric pressure, soil temperature, oxidation of methane, and therefore may

  5. Pressure Monitoring and Analysis from CO2 Geologic Sequestration Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Kelley, M.; Zeller, E.; Gupta, N.; Bhattacharya, I.; Hammond, M.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a systematic procedure for the monitoring and analysis of bottom-hole pressure data during CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers. Our methodology builds upon pressure transient analysis techniques developed in the petroleum industry for fluid injection systems. The CO2 storage reservoir is conceptualized as a radial composite system, where the inner (invaded) zone consists of both supercritical CO2 and brine, and the outer (uninvaded) zone consists of undisturbed brine. Using established analytical solutions for composite systems at the injection well (e.g., Ambastha and Ramey, 1990) and at the observation well (e.g., Satman, 1991), it can be shown that the early-time pressure response at both wells will be affected by wellbore storage as well as characteristics of the inner zone, whereas the late-time response will be affected only by characteristics of the outer zone. Furthermore, the late-time derivative response from both injection and observation wells will be identical - reflecting the permeability-thickness product of the undisturbed brine-filled formation. Using field data from AEP's Mountaineer Plant CO2 geologic sequestration project, we show how late-time pressure falloff response at monitoring wells can be interpreted to estimate intrinsic permeability of the reservoir. Effective compressibility values estimated from detailed history matching of injection-falloff sequences at different times can also yield clues regarding the movement of the CO2 plume. Finally, we offer preliminary insights into trends in bottom-hole pressure and semi-log pressure derivative response as a function of cumulative injection.

  6. High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Kevin R; Mendoza, Daniel L; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L; Miller, Chris C; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-07-15

    Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO2 measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of approximately 100 km2 and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO2 inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the "Vulcan" inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km2 and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Comparison to the global 1degree x 1 degree fossil fuel CO2 inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach. PMID:19708393

  7. Monitoring Exchange of CO2 - A KISS Workshop Report 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles; Wennberg, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The problem and context: Can top-down estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes resolve the anthropogenic emissions of China, India, the United States, and the European Union with an accuracy of +/-10% or better?The workshop "Monitoring Exchange of Carbon Dioxide" was convened at the Keck Institute for Space Studies in Pasadena, California in February 2010 to address this question. The Workshop brought together an international, interdisciplinary group of 24 experts in carbon cycle science, remote sensing, emissions inventory estimation, and inverse modeling. The participants reviewed the potential of space-based and sub-orbital observational and modeling approaches to monitor anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the presence of much larger natural fluxes from the exchange of CO2 between the land, atmosphere, and ocean. This particular challenge was motivated in part by the NRC Report "Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions" [Pacala et al., 2010]. This workshop report includes several recommendations for improvements to observing strategies and modeling frameworks for optimal and cost-effective monitoring of carbon exchange

  8. Separation of biospheric and fossil fuel fluxes of CO2 by atmospheric inversion of CO2 and 14CO2 measurements: Observation System Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sourish; Bharat Miller, John; Lehman, Scott

    2016-05-01

    National annual total CO2 emissions from combustion of fossil fuels are likely known to within 5-10 % for most developed countries. However, uncertainties are inevitably larger (by unknown amounts) for emission estimates at regional and monthly scales, or for developing countries. Given recent international efforts to establish emission reduction targets, independent determination and verification of regional and national scale fossil fuel CO2 emissions are likely to become increasingly important. Here, we take advantage of the fact that precise measurements of 14C in CO2 provide a largely unbiased tracer for recently added fossil-fuel-derived CO2 in the atmosphere and present an atmospheric inversion technique to jointly assimilate observations of CO2 and 14CO2 in order to simultaneously estimate fossil fuel emissions and biospheric exchange fluxes of CO2. Using this method in a set of Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), we show that given the coverage of 14CO2 measurements available in 2010 (969 over North America, 1063 globally), we can recover the US national total fossil fuel emission to better than 1 % for the year and to within 5 % for most months. Increasing the number of 14CO2 observations to ˜ 5000 per year over North America, as recently recommended by the National Academy of Science (NAS) (Pacala et al., 2010), we recover monthly emissions to within 5 % for all months for the US as a whole and also for smaller, highly emissive regions over which the specified data coverage is relatively dense, such as for the New England states or the NY-NJ-PA tri-state area. This result suggests that, given continued improvement in state-of-the art transport models, a measurement program similar in scale to that recommended by the NAS can provide for independent verification of bottom-up inventories of fossil fuel CO2 at the regional and national scale. In addition, we show that the dual tracer inversion framework can detect and minimize biases in

  9. Development of a mobile and high-precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, M.; Haszpra, L.; Major, I.; Svingor, É.; Veres, M.

    2009-04-01

    Nowadays one of the most burning questions for the science is the rate and the reasons of the recent climate change. Greenhouse gases (GHG), mainly CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere could affect the climate of our planet. However, the relation between the amount of atmospheric GHG and the climate is complex, full with interactions and feedbacks partly poorly known even by now. The only way to understand the processes, to trace the changes, to develop and validate mathematical models for forecasts is the extensive, high precision, continuous monitoring of the atmosphere. Fossil fuel CO2 emissions are a major component of the European carbon budget. Separation of the fossil fuel signal from the natural biogenic one in the atmosphere is, therefore, a crucial task for quantifying exchange flux of the continental biosphere through atmospheric observations and inverse modelling. An independent method to estimate trace gas emissions is the top-down approach, using atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements combined with simultaneous radiocarbon (14C) observations. As adding fossil fuel CO2 to the atmosphere, therefore, leads not only to an increase in the CO2 content of the atmosphere but also to a decrease in the 14C/12C ratio in atmospheric CO2. The ATOMKI has more than two decade long experience in atmospheric 14CO2 monitoring. As a part of an ongoing research project being carried out in Hungary to investigate the amount and temporal and spatial variations of fossil fuel CO2 in the near surface atmosphere we developed a mobile and high-precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station. We describe the layout and the operation of the measuring system which is designed for the continuous, unattended monitoring of CO2 mixing ratio in the near surface atmosphere based on an Ultramat 6F (Siemens) infrared gas analyser. In the station one atmospheric 14CO2 sampling unit is also installed which is developed and widely used since more than one decade by ATOMKI. Mixing ratio of CO2 is

  10. Spatial Relationships of Sector-Specific Fossil-fuel CO2 Emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.

    2011-07-01

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of sector-specific fossil fuel CO2 emissions provides strategic information to public and private decision-makers on climate change mitigation options and can provide critical constraints to carbon budget studies being performed at the national to urban scales. This study analyzes the spatial distribution and spatial drivers of total and sectoral fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the state and county levels in the United States. The spatial patterns of absolute versus per capita fossil fuel CO2 emissions differ substantially and these differences are sector-specific. Area-based sources such as those in the residential and commercial sectors are driven by a combination of population and surface temperature with per capita emissions largest in the northern latitudes and continental interior. Emission sources associated with large individual manufacturing or electricity producing facilities are heterogeneously distributed in both absolute and per capita metrics. The relationship between surface temperature and sectoral emissions suggests that the increased electricity consumption due to space cooling requirements under a warmer climate may outweigh the savings generated by lessened space heating. Spatial cluster analysis of fossil fuel CO2 emissions confirms that counties with high (low) CO2 emissions tend to be clustered close to other counties with high (low) CO2 emissions and some of the spatial clustering extends to multi-state spatial domains. This is particularly true for the residential and transportation sectors, suggesting that emissions mitigation policy might best be approached from the regional or multi-state perspective. Our findings underscore the potential for geographically focused, sector-specific emissions mitigation strategies and the importance of accurate spatial distribution of emitting sources when combined with atmospheric monitoring via aircraft, satellite and in situ measurements. Keywords: Fossil-fuel

  11. Geochemical monitoring of vadose zone retention ability on induced CO2 leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, G.; Loisy, C.; Cerepi, A.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 emissions in the atmosphere are increasing continually, which are mainly originated from burning of fossil fuels. The Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change Special Report on Carbon Capture and Storage in 2005 identified various knowledge gaps that need to be resolved before the large-scale implementation of CO2 geological storage is possible. One of them is to determine what would be the impact of a CO2 leakage from a geological storage on vadose zone and near surface environment. The CO2-Vadose Project aims at developing a facility around a room of a former underground limestone quarry in Saint-Emilion (Gironde, France) to perform experimental releases of CO2 under controlled conditions in order to study CO2 transport and geochemical reactions along the vadose zone and to test near-surface detection techniques. Experimental site was set up among others with more than forty gas probe in order to follow CO2 concentrations before and after injection thanks to µGC and infrared analyser. These probes have been set at different depths spatially distributed: in the soil at ten centimetres, at the contact between soil and limestone at about 40 centimetres depth, in limestone at about 90 centimetres depth, and in limestone all around the injection chamber. Micro-climatic parameters were also recorded by a weather station at the site surface (precipitation, barometric pressure, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, amount of sunshine) and around the injection room (barometric pressure, relative humidity, temperature). Natural ground and limestone CO2 concentrations were monitored during almost a year before CO2 injection. During this period, natural CO2 concentrations variations were observed in order to plot a natural baseline and so to determine the best period for the injection and to distinguish natural biogenic from injected CO2. Natural CO2 concentrations recorded vary between about 400 ppm in deeply limestone to more than 20,000 ppm in the upper part

  12. A Strategy for Monitoring of Geologic Sequestration of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, Larry R.

    2000-04-17

    Monitoring of geologic sequestration projects will require the measurement of many different parameters and processes at many different locations at the surface and in the subsurface. The greatest need for technology development is for monitoring of processes in the subsurface in the region between wells. The approach to fitting this need is to build upon decades of experience in use of geophysics in the oil and gas industry. These methods can be optimized for CO2 monitoring, and customized and extended in order to meet the need for cost-effective methods applicable to saline disposal sites, coal bed methane sites, as well as oil and gas reservoir sequestration sites. The strategy for development of cost-effective methods follows a three step iterative process of sensitivity analysis using numerical and experimental techniques, field testing at a range of scale in different formations, and analysis and integration of complimentary types of data.

  13. Stable carbon isotopes to monitor the CO2 source mix in the urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, F. R.; Wu, L.; Ramonet, M.; Broquet, G.; Worthy, D. E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Urban areas are said to be responsible for approximately 71% of fossil fuel CO2 emissions while comprising only two percent of the land area [IEA, 2008]. This limited spatial expansion could facility a monitoring of anthropogenic GHGs from atmospheric observations. As major sources of emissions, cities also have a huge potential to drive emissions reductions. To effectively manage emissions, cities must however, first establish techniques to validate their reported emission statistics. A pilot study which includes continues 13CO2 data from calibrated cavity ring-down spectrometers [Vogel et al. 2013] of two "sister sites" in the vicinity of Toronto, Canada is contrasted to recent observations of 13CO2 observations in Paris during significant pollution events. Using Miller-Tans plots [Miller and Tans, 2003] for our multi-season observations reveals significant changes of the source signatures of night time CO2 emissions which reflect the importance of natural gas burning in Megacities (up to 80% of fossil fuel sources) and show-case the potential of future isotope studies to determine source sectors. Especially the winter data this approach seems suitable to determine the source contribution of different fuel types (natural gas, liquid fuels and coal) which can inform the interpretation of other Greenhouse Gases and air pollution levels.

  14. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. 868... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a...

  15. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. 868.2480... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive...

  16. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. 868.2480... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive...

  17. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. 868.2480... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. 868... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a...

  19. Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing for CO2 Storage Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, W; Cover, W

    2004-05-14

    commercial hyperspectral image processing software. We have also begun to use the high resolution (0.6 meter) commercial satellite QuickBird in our technology development. This hyperspectral imaging project for CO2 leakage monitoring has focused on using the extensive hyperspectral imagery set that we acquired of the Rangely CO enhanced oil recovery field in August 2002. We have accomplished extensive analysis of this imagery. We have created highly detailed maps of soil types, plant coverages, plant health, local ecologies or habitats, water conditions, and manmade objects throughout the entire Rangely Oil field and surrounding areas. The results were verified during a field trip to Rangely CO in August 2003. These maps establish an environmental and ecological baseline against which any future CO2 leakage effects on the plants, plant habitats, soils and water conditions can be detected and verified. We have also seen signatures that may be subtle hidden faults. If confirmed these faults might provide pathways for upward CO2 migration if that occurred at any time during the future. We have found a result that was unexpected, new to us, and potentially very important to the task of monitoring for CO2 that has leaked to within the plant root depths near the surface. The discovery is that one of our analysis techniques has picked out finely detailed mapping of local ecologies. Some of which are found to extend across the entire Rangely oil field and into the surrounding areas. These ecologies appear to be made up of a fairly narrow range of percentage admixtures of two or three very specific plant types and soil types. It is likely that any large amounts of CO2 reaching the root depth near the surface would begin to modify the shapes of the habitats. These habitat changes will be easy to detect by repeat imaging of the area. The habitat modification signature is probably detectable earlier following the start of CO2 build up in the soil, than looking for individual plant

  20. CO2 laser tailored blank welding: process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Giuseppe; Borello, Elena; Pallaro, Nereo

    1996-09-01

    Tailored blank welding has been a rapidly growing segment of the automotive industry over the last five years. It allows to choose the optimal thickness of the sheets for different zones taking into account different mechanical stresses, vehicle safety reinforcement. Through the elimination of extra reinforcement parts, the use of tailored blanks allows to produce lighter car bodies and to simplify the production cycle. As more laser welding systems are being installed in industry, in order to increase the productivity and maintain constant quality of the products, the demand for the development of process monitoring systems increases. In this paper a monitoring system, based on the measurement of the radiation from the plasma plume during the CO2 tailored blanks laser welding, is presented. Using an appropriate combination of optical components, detectors and a special software, a complete apparatus has been developed. The signals were found to be correlated to weld quality parameters including the defects such as holes, overlapping and open butts.

  1. Quantifying fossil fuel CO2 from continuous measurements of APO: a novel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickers, Penelope; Manning, Andrew C.; Forster, Grant L.; van der Laan, Sander; Wilson, Phil A.; Wenger, Angelina; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Oram, David E.; Sturges, William T.

    2016-04-01

    Using atmospheric measurements to accurately quantify CO2 emissions from fossil fuel sources requires the separation of biospheric and anthropogenic CO2 fluxes. The ability to quantify the fossil fuel component of CO2 (ffCO2) from atmospheric measurements enables more accurate 'top-down' verification of CO2 emissions inventories, which frequently have large uncertainty. Typically, ffCO2 is quantified (in ppm units) from discrete atmospheric measurements of Δ14CO2, combined with higher resolution atmospheric CO measurements, and with knowledge of CO:ffCO2 ratios. In the United Kingdom (UK), however, measurements of Δ14CO2 are often significantly biased by nuclear power plant influences, which limit the use of this approach. We present a novel approach for quantifying ffCO2 using measurements of APO (Atmospheric Potential Oxygen; a tracer derived from concurrent measurements of CO2 and O2) from two measurement sites in Norfolk, UK. Our approach is similar to that used for quantifying ffCO2 from CO measurements (ffCO2(CO)), whereby ffCO2(APO) = (APOmeas - APObg)/RAPO, where (APOmeas - APObg) is the APO deviation from the background, and RAPO is the APO:CO2 combustion ratio for fossil fuel. Time varying values of RAPO are calculated from the global gridded COFFEE (CO2 release and Oxygen uptake from Fossil Fuel Emission Estimate) dataset, combined with NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment) transport model footprints. We compare our ffCO2(APO) results to results obtained using the ffCO2(CO) method, using CO:CO2 fossil fuel emission ratios (RCO) from the EDGAR (Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research) database. We find that the APO ffCO2 quantification method is more precise than the CO method, owing primarily to a smaller range of possible APO:CO2 fossil fuel emission ratios, compared to the CO:CO2 emission ratio range. Using a long-term dataset of atmospheric O2, CO2, CO and Δ14CO2 from Lutjewad, The Netherlands, we examine the

  2. Fuel from Bacteria, CO2, Water, and Solar Energy: Engineering a Bacterial Reverse Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Harvard is engineering a self-contained, scalable Electrofuels production system that can directly generate liquid fuels from bacteria, carbon dioxide (CO2), water, and sunlight. Harvard is genetically engineering bacteria called Shewanella, so the bacteria can sit directly on electrical conductors and absorb electrical current. This current, which is powered by solar panels, gives the bacteria the energy they need to process CO2 into liquid fuels. The Harvard team pumps this CO2 into the system, in addition to water and other nutrients needed to grow the bacteria. Harvard is also engineering the bacteria to produce fuel molecules that have properties similar to gasoline or diesel fuel—making them easier to incorporate into the existing fuel infrastructure. These molecules are designed to spontaneously separate from the water-based culture that the bacteria live in and to be used directly as fuel without further chemical processing once they’re pumped out of the tank.

  3. Monitoring a CO2-Storage site with Passive Image Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassenmeier, Martina; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Korn, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In seismology, Passive Image Interferometry (PII), based on ambient seismic noise, can be used to detect small temporal changes in the propagation of the seismic wavefield. As these changes can be related to changes of elastic properties in the propagation medium, PII can be used to observe dynamic processes in the earth's crust. This technique was successfully applied, inter alia, to monitor seasonal variations in response to environmental changes or stress changes caused by earthquakes or material changes due to the eruption of volcanoes. PII is based on the possibility of reconstructing the Green's function between a pair of receivers from continuous records of seismic noise. With two seismometers as receivers, the Green's Function describes the propagation of a seismic wave between the two receivers. It can be reconstructed by cross-correlating the ambient seismic noise, recorded at the receivers. A change in the medium between the seismometers directly affects the shape of the cross-correlation functions (CCFs), from which a change in the seismic velocities can be derived. Our idea is to investigate the potential application of this technique to monitor the emplacement of CO2 at the test site for CO2 sequestration in Ketzin (Brandenburg, Germany). We calculated CCFs of the ambient noise field for a time period of about 4 years from the beginning of the injection. The analysis of the cross-correlations showed that they are asymmetric and dominated by a phase traveling with about 300 m/s, which is consistent with Rayleigh waves traveling in the shallow sediments. The noise direction was analysed with an optimal rotation algorithm over 1 month of data and showed a prominant direction incoming from north-east in a frequency range between 0.5 and 4 Hz. This direction matches with the location of a large windpark a few km away from the array. For lower frequencies, the noise is dominantly incident from north-west. To analyse possible velocity changes for each day

  4. Long-term results from an urban CO2 monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehleringer, J.; Pataki, D. E.; Lai, C.; Schauer, A.

    2009-12-01

    High-precision atmospheric CO2 has been monitored in several locations through the Salt Lake Valley metropolitan region of northern Utah over the past nine years. Many parts of this semi-arid grassland have transitioned into dense urban forests, supported totally by extensive homeowner irrigation practices. Diurnal changes in fossil-fuel energy uses and photosynthesis-respiration processes have resulted in significant spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric CO2. Here we present an analysis of the long-term patterns and trends in midday and nighttime CO2 values for four sites: a midvalley residential neighborhood, a midvalley non-residential neighborhood, an undeveloped valley-edge area transitioning from agriculture, and a developed valley-edge neighborhood with mixed residential and commercial activities; the neighborhoods span an elevation gradient within the valley of ~100 m. Patterns in CO2 concentrations among neighborhoods were examined relative to each other and relative to the NOAA background station, a desert site in Wendover, Utah. Four specific analyses are considered. First, we present a statistical analysis of weekday versus weekend CO2 patterns in the winter, spring, summer, and fall seasons. Second, we present a statistical analysis of the influences of high-pressure systems on the elevation of atmospheric CO2 above background levels in the winter versus summer seasons. Third, we present an analysis of the nighttime CO2 values through the year, relating these patterns to observed changes in the carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric CO2. Lastly, we examine the rate of increase in midday urban CO2 over time relative to regional and global CO2 averages to determine if the amplification of urban energy use is statistically detectable from atmospheric trace gas measurements over the past decade. These results show two important patterns. First, there is a strong weekday-weekend effect of vehicle emissions in contrast to the temperature

  5. Plasmolysis for efficient CO2 -to-fuel conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooij, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    The strong non-equilibrium conditions provided by the plasma phase offer the opportunity to beat traditional thermal process energy efficiencies via preferential excitation of molecular vibrational modes. It is therefore a promising option for creating artificial solar fuels from CO2as raw material using (intermittently available) sustainable energy surpluses, which can easily be deployed within the present infrastructure for conventional fossil fuels. In this presentation, a common microwave reactor approach is evaluated experimentally with Rayleigh scattering and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to assess gas temperatures and conversion degrees, respectively. The results are interpreted on basis of estimates of the plasma dynamics obtained with electron energy distribution functions calculated with a Boltzmann solver. It indicates that the intrinsic electron energies are higher than is favourable for preferential vibrational excitation due to dissociative excitation, which causes thermodynamic equilibrium chemistry still to dominate the initial experiments. Novel reactor approaches are proposed to tailor the plasma dynamics to achieve the non-equilibrium in which vibrational excitation is dominant. In collaboration with Dirk van den Bekerom, Niek den Harder, Teofil Minea, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Eindhoven, Netherlands; Gield Berden, Institute for Molecules and Materials, FELIX facility, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands; Richard Engeln, Applied Physics, Plasma en Materials Processing, Eindhoven University of Technology; and Waldo Bongers, Martijn Graswinckel, Erwin Zoethout, Richard van de Sanden, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Eindhoven, Netherlands.

  6. Model Selection for Monitoring CO2 Plume during Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-31

    The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly includes four steps: (1) assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, (2) model clustering using multidimensional scaling coupled with k-mean clustering, (3) model selection using the Bayes' rule in the reduced model space, (4) model expansion using iterative resampling of the posterior models. The fourth step expresses one of the advantages of the method: it provides a built-in means of quantifying the uncertainty in predictions made with the selected models. In our application to plume monitoring, by expanding the posterior space of models, the final ensemble of representations of geological model can be used to assess the uncertainty in predicting the future displacement of the CO2 plume. The software implementation of this approach is attached here.

  7. Model Selection for Monitoring CO2 Plume during Sequestration

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-12-31

    The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly includes four steps: (1) assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, (2) model clustering using multidimensional scaling coupled with k-mean clustering, (3) model selection using the Bayes' rule in the reduced model space, (4) model expansion using iterative resampling of the posterior models. The fourth step expresses one of the advantages of the method: it provides a built-in means ofmore » quantifying the uncertainty in predictions made with the selected models. In our application to plume monitoring, by expanding the posterior space of models, the final ensemble of representations of geological model can be used to assess the uncertainty in predicting the future displacement of the CO2 plume. The software implementation of this approach is attached here.« less

  8. [Monitoring Atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C (CO2) Background Levels at Shangdianzi Station in Beijing, China].

    PubMed

    Xia, Ling-ju; Zhou, Ling-xi; Liu, Li-xin; Zhang, Gen

    2016-04-15

    The study presented time series of atmospheric CO2 concentrations from flask sampling at SDZ regional station in Beijing during 2007 and 2013, together with delta(13)CO2) values during 2009 and 2013. The "representative data" of CO2 and delta(13)C (CO2) were selected from the complete data for further analysis. Annual CO2 concentrations increased from 385.6 x 10(-6) in 2007 to 398.1 x 10(-6) in 2013, with an average growth rate of 2.0 x 10(-6) a(-1), while the delta(13)C values decreased from -8.38% per hundred in 2009 to -8.52% per hundred in 2013, with a mean growth rate of -0.03% per hundred x a(-1). The absolute increase of CO2 from 2007 to 2008 reached the lowest level during 2007 and 2013, possibly due to relatively less carbon emissions during the 2008 Olympic Games period. The peak-to-peak amplitudes of atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C seasonal variations were 23. 9 x 10 -6 and 1. 03%o, respectively. The isotopic signatures of CO2 sources/sinks were also discussed in this study. The delta8 value for heating season I (Jan. 01-Mar. 14) was -21.30% per hundred, while -25.39% per hundred for heating season 11 (Nov. 15-Dec.31) , and for vegetative season (Mar. 15-Nov. 14) the delta(bio) value was estimated to be -21.28% per hundred, likely suggesting the significant impact of fossil fuel and corn straw combustions during winter heating season and biological activities during vegetative season. PMID:27548943

  9. PERSPECTIVE: Keeping a closer eye on fossil fuel CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter F.

    2009-12-01

    all have a major influence on progress to an international agreement. It is important that the political challenges are not underestimated. Long-term observers of the negotiations necessary for global agreements (Inman 2009) are pessimistic about the chances for success at COP15, and argue that agreements between smaller groups of countries may be more effective. China and other developing countries clearly expect greater emission cuts by developed nations as a condition for a successful deal (Pan 2009). Conversely, the constraints on US climate policies are considerable, notably those imposed by fears that an international agreement that does not include equitable emission control measures for developing countries like China and India, will compromise the agreement and reduce its effectiveness (Skodvin and Andresen 2009). In this context the need for earlier, and more reliable, information on emissions is a high priority. Myhre and coworkers (Myhre et al 2009) provide an efficient method for calculating global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion by combining industry statistics with data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC; http://cdiac.ornl.gov/). Recent analyses of carbon dioxide emission data show a worrying acceleration in emissions, beyond even the most extreme IPCC projections, but are based largely on the CDIAC which gives information about emissions released two to three years before real time (Canadell et al 2007, Raupach et al 2007). The approach used by Myhre et al (2009) uses BP annual statistics of fossil fuel consumption and has a much shorter lag, of the order of six months. Of significant concern is that their analysis of the data also reveals that the recent strong increase in fossil fuel CO2 is largely driven by an increase in emissions from coal, most significantly in China. By contrast, emissions from oil and gas continue to follow longer-term historical trends. Earlier and accurate data on CO2 emissions is

  10. Wine ethanol 14C as a tracer for fossil fuel CO2 emissions in Europe: Measurements and model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Karstens, Ute; Streurman, Harm-Jan; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2008-11-01

    14C (radiocarbon) in atmospheric CO2 is the most direct tracer for the presence of fossil-fuel-derived CO2 (CO2-ff). We demonstrate the 14C measurement of wine ethanol as a way to determine the relative regional atmospheric CO2-ff concentration compared to a background site ("regional CO2-ff excess") for specific harvest years. The carbon in wine ethanol is directly back traceable to the atmospheric CO2 that the plants assimilate. An important advantage of using wine is that the atmosphere can be monitored annually back in time. We have analyzed a total of 165 wines, mainly from harvest years 1990-1993 and 2003-2004, among which is a semicontinuous series (1973-2004) of wines from one vineyard in southwest Germany. The results show clear spatial and temporal variations in the regional CO2-ff excess values. We have compared our measured regional CO2-ff excess values of 2003 and 2004 with those simulated by the REgional MOdel (REMO). The model results show a bias of almost +3 parts per million (ppm) CO2-ff compared with those of the observations. The modeled differences between 2003 and 2004, however, which can be used as a measure for the variability in atmospheric mixing and transport processes, show good agreement with those of the observations all over Europe. Correcting for interannual variations using modeled data produces a regional CO2-ff excess signal that is potentially useful for the verification of trends in regional fossil fuel consumption. In this fashion, analyzing 14C from wine ethanol offers the possibility to observe fossil fuel emissions back in time on many places in Europe and elsewhere.

  11. Sensitivity of simulated CO2 concentration to sub-annual variations in fossil fuel CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Gurney, Kevin R.; Rayner, Peter; Baker, David; Liu, Yu-ping

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) emission inventories enable sensitivity tests of simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations to sub-annual variations in FFCO2 emissions and what this implies for the interpretation of observed CO2. Six experiments are conducted to investigate the potential impact of three cycles of FFCO2 emission variability (diurnal, weekly and monthly) using a global tracer transport model. Results show an annual FFCO2 rectification varying from -1.35 to +0.13 ppm from the combination of all three cycles. This rectification is driven by a large negative diurnal FFCO2 rectification due to the covariation of diurnal FFCO2 emissions and diurnal vertical mixing, as well as a smaller positive seasonal FFCO2 rectification driven by the covariation of monthly FFCO2 emissions and monthly atmospheric transport. The diurnal FFCO2 emissions are responsible for a diurnal FFCO2 concentration amplitude of up to 9.12 ppm at the grid cell scale. Similarly, the monthly FFCO2 emissions are responsible for a simulated seasonal CO2 amplitude of up to 6.11 ppm at the grid cell scale. The impact of the diurnal FFCO2 emissions, when only sampled in the local afternoon, is also important, causing an increase of +1.13 ppmv at the grid cell scale. The simulated CO2 concentration impacts from the diurnally and seasonally varying FFCO2 emissions are centered over large source regions in the Northern Hemisphere, extending to downwind regions. This study demonstrates the influence of sub-annual variations in FFCO2 emissions on simulated CO2 concentration and suggests that inversion studies must take account of these variations in the affected regions.

  12. Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 at the building/street level for large US cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurney, K. R.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Song, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions from the bottom-up perspective is a critical element in emerging plans on a global, integrated, carbon monitoring system (CMS). A space/time explicit emissions data product can act as both a verification and planning system. It can verify atmospheric CO2 measurements (in situ and remote) and offer detailed mitigation information to management authorities in order to optimize the mix of mitigation efforts. Here, we present the Hestia Project, an effort aimed at building a high resolution (eg. building and road link-specific, hourly) fossil fuel CO2 emissions data product for the urban domain as a pilot effort to a CMS. A complete data product has been built for the city of Indianapolis and preliminary quantification has been completed for Los Angeles and Phoenix (see figure). The effort in Indianapolis is now part of a larger effort aimed at a convergent top-down/bottom-up assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, called INFLUX. Our urban-level quantification relies on a mixture of data and modeling structures. We start with the sector-specific Vulcan Project estimate at the mix of geocoded and county-wide levels. The Hestia aim is to distribute the Vulcan result in space and time. Two components take the majority of effort: buildings and onroad emissions. In collaboration with our INFLUX colleagues, we are transporting these high resolution emissions through an atmospheric transport model for a forward comparison of the Hestia data product with atmospheric measurements, collected on aircraft and cell towers. In preparation for a formal urban-scale inversion, these forward comparisons offer insights into both improving our emissions data product and measurement strategies. A key benefit of the approach taken in this study is the tracking and archiving of fuel and process-level detail (eg. combustion process, other pollutants), allowing for a more thorough understanding and analysis of energy throughputs in the urban

  13. Energy and climate impacts of producing synthetic hydrocarbon fuels from CO(2).

    PubMed

    van der Giesen, Coen; Kleijn, René; Kramer, Gert Jan

    2014-06-17

    Within the context of carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization there is an increasing interest in using CO2 as a resource to produce sustainable liquid hydrocarbon fuels. When these fuels are produced by solely using solar energy they are labeled as solar fuels. In the recent discourse on solar fuels intuitive arguments are used to support the prospects of these fuels. This paper takes a quantitative approach to investigate some of the claims made in this discussion. We analyze the life cycle performance of various classes of solar fuel processes using different primary energy and CO2 sources. We compare their efficacy with respect to carbon mitigation with ubiquitous fossil-based fuels and conclude that producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels starting from CO2 by using existing technologies requires much more energy than existing fuels. An improvement in life cycle CO2 emissions is only found when solar energy and atmospheric CO2 are used. Producing fuels from CO2 is a very long-term niche at best, not the panacea suggested in the recent public discourse. PMID:24832016

  14. Atmospheric Modeling and Verification of Point Source Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, E. D.; Turnbull, J. C.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G. W.; Bromley, T.; Norris, M. W.; Zondervan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Emissions from large point sources (electricity generation and large-scale industry) of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions are currently determined from self-reported "bottom-up" inventory data, with an uncertainty of about 20% for individual power plants. As the world moves towards a regulatory environment, there is a need for independent, objective measurements of these emissions both to improve the accuracy of and to verify the reported amounts. "Top-down" atmospheric methods have the potential to independently constrain point source emissions, combining observations with atmospheric transport modeling to derive emission estimates. We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Plant to examine methodologies and model sensitivities for atmospheric monitoring of point source fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. The Kapuni plant, located in rural New Zealand, removes and vents CO2 from locally extracted natural gas at a rate of ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. We measured the CO2ff content in three different types of observations: air samples collected in flasks over a period of a few minutes, sodium hydroxide solution exposed the atmosphere, and grass samples from the surrounding farmland, the latter two representing ~1 week integrated averages. We use the WindTrax Lagrangian plume dispersion model to compare these atmospheric observations with "expected" values given the emissions reported by the Kapuni plant. The model has difficulty accurately capturing the short-term variability in the flask samples but does well in representing the longer-term averages from grass samples, suggesting that passive integrated-sampling methods have the potential to monitor long-term emissions. Our results indicate that using this method, point source emissions can be verified to within about 30%. Further improvements in atmospheric transport modelling are needed to reduce uncertainties. In view of this, we discuss model strengths and weaknesses and explore model sensitivity to meteorological conditions

  15. Atmospheric observations of carbon monoxide and fossil fuel CO2 emissions from East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Jocelyn C.; Tans, Pieter P.; Lehman, Scott J.; Baker, David; Conway, Thomas J.; Chung, Y. S.; Gregg, Jay; Miller, John B.; Southon, John R.; Zhou, Ling-Xi

    2011-12-01

    Flask samples from two sites in East Asia, Tae-Ahn Peninsula, Korea (TAP), and Shangdianzi, China (SDZ), were measured for trace gases including CO2, CO and fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff, derived from Δ14CO2observations). The five-year TAP record shows high CO2ff when local air comes from the Korean Peninsula. Most samples, however, reflect air masses from Northeastern China with lower CO2ff. Our small set of SDZ samples from winter 2009/2010 have strongly elevated CO2ff. Biospheric CO2 contributes substantially to total CO2variability at both sites, even in winter when non-fossil CO2 sources (including photosynthesis, respiration, biomass burning and biofuel use) contribute 20-30% of the total CO2 enhancement. Carbon monoxide (CO) correlates strongly with CO2ff. The SDZ and TAP far-field (China influenced) samples have CO: CO2ff ratios (RCO:CO2ff) of 47 ± 2 and 44 ± 3 ppb/ppm respectively, consistent with recent bottom-up inventory estimates and other observational studies. Locally influenced TAP samples fall into two distinct data sets, ascribed to air sourced from South Korea and North Korea. The South Korea samples have low RCO:CO2ffof 13 ± 3 ppb/ppm, slightly higher than bottom-up inventories, but consistent with emission ratios for other developed nations. We compare our CO2ff observations with modeled CO2ff using the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model convolved with a bottom-up CO2ff emission inventories. The modeled annual mean CO2ff mole fractions are consistent with our observations when the model inventory includes the reported 63% increase in Chinese emissions from 2004 to 2010, whereas a model version which holds Chinese emissions flat is unable to replicate the observations.

  16. Δ14C level of annual plants and fossil fuel derived CO2 distribution across different regions of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, X. T.; Ding, X. F.; Fu, D. P.; Zhou, L. P.; Liu, K. X.

    2013-01-01

    The 14C level in annual plants is a sensitive tracer for monitoring fossil fuel derived CO2 in the atmosphere. Corn leave samples were selected from different regions of China, including high mountains in the Tibetan Plateau, grassland in Inner Mongolia, and inland and coastal cities during the summer of 2010. The 14C/12C ratio of the samples was measured with the NEC compact AMS system at the Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The fossil fuel derived CO2 was estimated by comparing the measured Δ14C values of corn leave samples to background atmospheric Δ14C level. The influences of topography, meteorological conditions and carbon cycling processes on the fossil fuel derived CO2 concentration are considered when interpreting the data. Our results show a clear association of the low Δ14C values with regions where human activities are intensive.

  17. Geophysical monitoring of near surface CO2 injection at Svelvik - Learnings from the CO2FieldLab experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querendez, Etor; Romdhane, Anouar; Jordan, Michael; Eliasson, Peder; Grimstad, Alv-Arne

    2014-05-01

    A CO2 migration field laboratory for testing monitoring methods and tools has been established in the glaciofluvial-glaciomarine Holocene deposits of the Svelvik ridge, near Oslo (Norway). At the site, feasibility, sensitivity, acquisition geometry and usefulness of various surface and subsurface monitoring tools are investigated during controlled CO2 injection experiments. In a first stage, a shallow CO2 injection experiment was conducted in September 2011. Approximately 1700 kg of CO2 was injected at 18 m depth below surface in an unconsolidated sand formation. The objectives of this experiment were to (i) detect and, where possible, quantify migrated CO2 concentrations at the surface and very shallow subsurface, (ii) evaluate the sensitivity of the monitoring tools and (iii) study the impact of the vadose zone on observed measurements. Results showed that all deployed monitoring tools (for surface and near-surface gas monitoring, subsurface water monitoring and subsurface geophysical monitoring) where able to detect the presence of CO2 even though the CO2 plume did not migrate vertically as expected in what was thought to be an homogeneous unconsolidated sand structure. The upper part of the site revealed to be more heterogeneous than expected, mainly due to the highly variable lamination and channelling of the morainic sediments and to the presence of pebble and cobble beds sporadically showing throughout the deposits. Building on the learnings from the 18m depth injection experiment, a second experiment is being planned for a deeper injection, at a depth of 65m. Re-processing of the appraisal 2D multi-channel seismic with state-of-the-art processing techniques, like Linear Radon coherent and random noise attenuation and Full Waveform Inversion followed by pre-stack depth migration, corroborate the presence of heterogeneities at the near surface. Based on the re-interpreted seismic sections, a more realistic 3D geomodel, where the complex topography of the site

  18. Hydrological and geochemical monitoring for a CO2 sequestration pilot in a brine formation

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten; Benson, Sally M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Gunter, William D.

    2004-05-17

    Hydrological and geochemical monitoring are key components of site characterization and CO2 plume monitoring for a pilot test to inject CO2 into a brine-bearing sand of the fluvial-deltaic Frio formation in the upper Texas Gulf Coast. In situ, injected CO2 forms a supercritical phase that has gas-like properties (low density and viscosity) compared to the surrounding brine, while some CO2 dissolves in the brine. The pilot test employs one injection well and one monitor well, with continuous pressure and flow-rate monitoring in both wells, and continuous surface fluid sampling and periodic down-hole fluid sampling from the monitor well. Pre-injection site-characterization includes pump tests with pressure-transient analysis to estimate single-phase flow properties, establish hydraulic connectivity between the wells, determine appropriate boundary conditions, and analyze ambient phase conditions within the formation. Additionally, a pre-injection tracer test furnishes estimates of kinematic porosity and the geometry of flow paths between injection and monitor wells under single-phase conditions. Pre-injection geochemical sampling provides a baseline for subsequent geochemical monitoring and helps determine the optimal tracers to accompany CO2 injection. During CO2 injection, hydrological monitoring enables estimation of two-phase flow properties and helps track the movement of the injected CO2 plume, while geochemical sampling provides direct evidence of the arrival of CO2 and tracers at the monitor well. Furthermore, CO2-charged water acts as a weak acid, and reacts to some extent with the minerals in the aquifer, producing a distinct chemical signature in the water collected at the monitor well. Comparison of breakthrough curves for the single-phase tracer test and the CO2 (and its accompanying tracers) illuminates two-phase flow processes between the supercritical CO2 and native brine, an area of current uncertainty that must be better understood to effectively

  19. CO2-water-mineral reactions during CO2 leakage into glauconitic sands: geochemical and isotopic monitoring of batch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humez, P.; Lions, J.; Lagneau, V.; Negrel, Ph.

    2012-04-01

    The assessment of environmental impacts of carbon dioxide geological storage requires the investigation of the potential CO2 leakages into fresh groundwater reserves. The Albian aquifer of the Paris Basin was chosen as a case of study because i) the Paris Basin contains deep saline Jurassic and Triassic aquifers identified as targets by the French national program of CO2 geological storage and ii) the Albian aquifer is a deep freshwater resource of strategic national importance, above the Jurassic and Triassic formations. An experimental and a geochemical modelling approach were carried out in order to better understand the rock-water-CO2 interactions with two main objectives: to assess the evolution of the chemistry of the formation water and of the mineralogy of the solid phase during the interaction and to design a monitoring program for freshwater resources. The main focus is to select and develop suitable indirect indicators of the presence of CO2 in the aquifer. We present here the experimental results, which combines both major and trace elements and isotopic tools, some of them new in the CCS field. Batch reactors with a liquid/solid ratio of 10 made of appropriate materials (PTFE, stainless steel) were equipped with simultaneous controls on several parameters (pH measurement, gas phase composition, pressure, tightness…) after CO2 injection (PCO2= 2 bar; room temperature). Ten reactors were run simultaneously, over pre-determined durations of CO2-water-rock interaction (1, 7, 15 and 30 days). During the batch experiment, we observed major changes in several chemical parameters due to the CO2 injection. A sharp drop in pH from 6.6 to 4.9 was noticeable, immediately after the injection, due to CO2 dissolution in the water phase. Alkalinity varies from 1.3 mmol.L-1 in the initial water to 2.0 mmol.L-1 at the end of the 1-month experiment. Four types of ion behaviors are observed: (1) calcium, silicon and magnesium concentrations increase during the 1-month

  20. Reduction of CO2 to C1 products and fuel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mill, T.; Ross, D.

    2002-01-01

    Photochemical semiconductor processes readily reduced CO2 to a broad range of C1 products. However the intrinsic and solar efficiencies for the processes were low. Improved quantum efficiencies could be realized utilizing quantum-sized particles, but at the expense of using less of the visible solar spectrum. Conversely, semiconductors with small bandgaps used more of the visible solar spectrum at the expense of quantum efficiency. Thermal reduction of CO2 with Fe(II) was thermodynamically favored for forming many kinds of organic compounds and occurred readily with olivine and other Fe(II) minerals above 200??C to form higher alkanes and alkenes. No added hydrogen was required.

  1. Quantification of uncertainty associated with United States high resolution fossil fuel CO2 emissions: updates, challenges and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurney, K. R.; Chandrasekaran, V.; Mendoza, D. L.; Geethakumar, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Vulcan Project has estimated United States fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the hourly time scale and at spatial scales below the county level for the year 2002. Vulcan is built from a wide variety of observational data streams including regulated air pollutant emissions reporting, traffic monitoring, energy statistics, and US census data. In addition to these data sets, Vulcan relies on a series of modeling assumptions and constructs to interpolate in space, time and transform non-CO2 reporting into an estimate of CO2 combustion emissions. The recent version 2.0 of the Vulcan inventory has produced advances in a number of categories with particular emphasis on improved temporal structure. Onroad transportation emissions now avail of roughly 5000 automated traffic count monitors allowing for much improved diurnal and weekly time structure in our onroad transportation emissions. Though the inventory shows excellent agreement with independent national-level CO2 emissions estimates, uncertainty quantification has been a challenging task given the large number of data sources and numerous modeling assumptions. However, we have now accomplished a complete uncertainty estimate across all the Vulcan economic sectors and will present uncertainty estimates as a function of space, time, sector and fuel. We find that, like the underlying distribution of CO2 emissions themselves, the uncertainty is also strongly lognormal with high uncertainty associated with a relatively small number of locations. These locations typically are locations reliant upon coal combustion as the dominant CO2 source. We will also compare and contrast Vulcan fossil fuel CO2 emissions estimates against estimates built from DOE fuel-based surveys at the state level. We conclude that much of the difference between the Vulcan inventory and DOE statistics are not due to biased estimation but mechanistic differences in supply versus demand and combustion in space/time.

  2. Monitoring CO2 injection with a buried geophone array: Stage 2C of CO2CRC Otway Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urosevic, M.; Gurevich, B.; Pevzner, R.; Tertyshnikov, K.; Shulakova, V.; Glubokovskikh, S.; Popik, D.; Kepic, A.; Robertson, M.; Freifeld, B. M.; Daley, T. M.; Singh, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Stage 2 of the CO2CRC project involves injection of a small quantity of CO2, 15 Kt, into the Paaratte formation, a saline aquifer located at a depth of around 1500 m in the Otway basin, Victoria, Australia. The project aims to investigate the limits of time lapse seismic methodologies in order to devise an optimal monitoring program. That includes time lapse signal and noise prediction, time lapse data acquisition design and finally data analysis. The strength of the time lapse (TL) seismic is governed by the magnitudes of both the time lapse signal and time lapse noise. They are in turn both dependent on numerous factors which need to be addressed through modelling studies and data acquisition technologies. Geological information is used to build a detailed 3D static model for the dynamic reservoir simulations and analysis of CO2 plume distribution for small quantities of CO2 injected into the deepest Paaratte member. Various lithological scenarios and variations in permeability distribution are tested until arriving at the "most likely" solution. The final model is used initially for 1D and subsequently for the full 3D time lapse modelling. These time lapse modelling results, combined with field tests and noise analysis, show clearly that small quantities of CO2 injected into a relatively thin (~20 m in thickness) saline aquifer would benefit from utilizing a permanent 3D seismic array to achieve desired repeatability, that is reduction in time lapse seismic noise. Buried receiver array was designed and deployed at the CO2CRC Otway during January and February. The array comprises 908 high-sensitivity geophones deployed at 4 m depth below the surface. Baseline 3D was acquired in March 2015. Some 3003 shots were acquired by a crew of 7 people over 9 days. Benchmark tests show a significant improvement in data quality compared to surface geophones. With this approach there are no cables or other seismic infrastructure on the surface. This significantly reduces

  3. Potential for the Use of Wireless Sensor Networks for Monitoring of CO2 Leakage Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, R.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Han, Q.; Jayasumana, A.

    2015-12-01

    Storage of supercritical CO2 in deep saline geologic formation is under study as a means to mitigate potential global climate change from green house gas loading to the atmosphere. Leakage of CO2 from these formations poses risk to the storage permanence goal of 99% of injected CO2 remaining sequestered from the atmosphere,. Leaked CO2 that migrates into overlying groundwater aquifers may cause changes in groundwater quality that pose risks to environmental and human health. For these reasons, technologies for monitoring, measuring and accounting of injected CO2 are necessary for permitting of CO2 sequestration projects under EPA's class VI CO2 injection well regulations. While the probability of leakage related to CO2 injection is thought to be small at characterized and permitted sites, it is still very important to protect the groundwater resources and develop methods that can efficiently and accurately detect CO2 leakage. Methods that have been proposed for leakage detection include remote sensing, soil gas monitoring, geophysical techniques, pressure monitoring, vegetation stress and eddy covariance measurements. We have demonstrated the use of wireless sensor networks (WSN) for monitoring of subsurface contaminant plumes. The adaptability of this technology for leakage monitoring of CO2 through geochemical changes in the shallow subsurface is explored. For this technology to be viable, it is necessary to identify geochemical indicators such as pH or electrical conductivity that have high potential for significant change in groundwater in the event of CO2 leakage. This talk presents a conceptual approach to use WSNs for CO2 leakage monitoring. Based on our past work on the use of WSN for subsurface monitoring, some of the challenges that need to be over come for this technology to be viable for leakage detection will be discussed.

  4. CO2 and H2O diluted oxy-fuel combustion for zero-emission power

    SciTech Connect

    G A Richards; K H Casleton; B T Chorpening

    2005-01-01

    Concerns about climate change have encouraged significant interest in concepts for zero-emission power generation systems. These systems are intended to produce power without releasing CO2 into the atmosphere. One method to achieve this goal is to produce hydrogen from the gasification of fossil or biomass fuels. Using various membrane and reforming technologies, the carbon in the parent fuel can be shifted to CO2 and removed from the fuel stream, followed by direct CO2 sequestration. The hydrogen fuel can be used directly in gas turbines fitted with low-NOx combustors. A second approach to producing zero-emission power is to replace the nitrogen diluent that accompanies conventional combustion in air with either CO2 or H2O. In this concept, CO2 or H2O is added to oxygen to control combustion temperatures in oxygen–fuel reactions. In the absence of nitrogen, the primary combustion products for any hydrocarbon under lean conditions are then simply CO2 and H2O. Thus, merely cooling the exhaust stream condenses the water and produces an exhaust of pure CO2, ready for sequestration. The dilute oxy-fuel combustion strategy can be incorporated in power cycles that are similar to Brayton or Rankine configurations, using CO2 or H2O as the primary diluent respectively. While the relativemerits of the various strategies to zero-emission power are the subject of various technical and economic studies, very little work has focused on defining the combustion issues associated with the dilute oxy-fuel option. In this paper, the expected combustion performance of CO2 and H2O diluted systems are compared. Experimental results from a high-pressure oxy-fuel combustor are also presented.

  5. Preliminary Constraints on Fossil-fuel CO2: Comparison of Tracers CO and SF6 With Measurements of 14CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Lehman, S. J.; Sparks, R. J.; Tans, P. P.

    2004-12-01

    CO2 derived from the combustion of fossil fuels is a significant component of the carbon balance of North America. However, on the sub-continental spatial scales and sub-annual time scales relevant to the objectives of the North American Carbon Program, estimates of combustion CO2 from traditional economic inventories are unlikely to be accurate, and may contribute to biases in the interpretation of atmospheric CO2 measurements. Indirect estimates of the combustion CO2 component can also be obtained from measured CO:CO2 ratios and SF6:CO2 ratios. The low cost and ease of measurement allow the application of these methods in intensive measurement campaigns. However, the accuracy of the combustion CO2 detection capability relies on accurately determining the emission ratio of CO:CO2 or SF6:CO2 at relevant time and space scales. In the case of CO, atmospheric chemical biases and non fossil fuel sources must also be understood. CO2 derived from fossil fuels contains no 14C, whereas other sources have a 14C content close to that of ambient air. Measurement of the 14C content in CO2 thus provides a direct tracer for fossil fuel derived CO2, without the biases associated with the indirect tracer methods. We used high-precision accelerator mass spectrometry to determine the 14C content of CO2 at several North American sites (Niwot Ridge, CO, Harvard Forest, MA and New Hampshire) during 2003 and 2004, and calculate the fossil fuel CO2 contribution in each case. We compare these results with CO:CO2 and SF6:CO2 measurements on the same samples to evaluate the indirect tracer methods at these sites. Preliminary results for wintertime measurements (when biological CO2 exchange fluxes are small) support the accuracy of the 14C method. The back-calculated emission ratios for SF6:CO2 vary significantly and consistently underestimate the global average. While the back-calculated CO:CO2 ratios are more consistent, they also underestimate the predicted values from emissions

  6. Will elevated CO2 alter fuel characteristics and flammability of eucalypt woodlands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Luke; Resco, Victor; Boer, Matthias; Bradstock, Ross; Sawyer, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 may enhance forest productivity via CO2 fertilisation and increased soil moisture associated with water savings, potentially resulting in increased woody plant abundance i.e. woody thickening. Changes to vegetation structure via woody thickening, as well as changes to vegetation properties (e.g. leaf characteristics and moisture content), may have important implications for ecosystem flammability and fire regimes. Understanding how elevated CO2 alters flammability and fire regimes will have implications for ecosystem dynamics, particularly carbon sequestration and emissions. We present data from Free Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) and whole tree growth chamber (WTC) experiments to assess the effect of elevated CO2 on fuel properties and flammability of eucalypt woodlands. Experiments involved ambient (˜400 ppm) and elevated CO2treatments, with elevated treatments being +150 ppm and +240 ppm at EucFACE and the WTCs respectively. We examined the response of vegetation parameters known to influence ecosystem flammability, namely (i) understorey vegetation characteristics (ii) understorey fuel moisture and (iii) leaf flammability. Understorey growth experiments at EucFACE using seedlings of two common woody species (Hakea sericia, Eucalyptus tereticornis) indicate that elevated CO2 did not influence stem and leaf biomass, height or crown dimensions of seedlings after 12 months exposure to experimental treatments. Temporal changes to understorey live fuel moisture were assessed at EucFACE over an 18 month period using time lapse cameras. Understorey vegetation greenness was measured daily from digital photos using the green chromatic coordinate (GCC), an index that is highly correlated with live fuel moisture (R2 = 0.90). GCC and rates of greening and browning were not affected by elevated CO2, though they were highly responsive to soil moisture availability and temperature. This suggests that there is limited potential for elevated CO2 to alter

  7. Core-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring of CO2-brine mixture in Fontainebleau sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, David; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Bellmunt, Fabian; Luquot, Linda; Gouze, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The main goal of the monitoring stage of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is to obtain an accurate estimation of the subsurface CO2 accumulation and to detect any possible leakage. Laboratory experiments are necessary to investigate the small scale processes governing the CO2-brine-rock interaction. They also provide a means to calibrate the results coming from field scale geophysical methods. In this work we set up an experimental system which is able to perform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements on centimeter-scale rock samples at various P-T conditions. We present the results of two new experiments related to CO2 monitoring, performed on a cylindrical (4 × 8 cm) Fontainebleau rock sample. In the first one, we have quantified the CO2 saturation at different volume fractions, representing zones from a deep saline aquifer with varying degrees of saturation. In the second one, we have monitored and quantified the effect of CO2 dissolution in the brine at a pressure of 40 bar during eight days, emulating the invasion of CO2 into a shallow aquifer. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the contribution of surface conductivity in highly CO2-saturated regions, even in clay-free rocks, and also for brine conductivity variation due to CO2 dissolution. Ignoring any of these effects will end up in a CO2 saturation underestimation. We present a modified CO2 saturation equation to account for these two influences.

  8. Towards space/time resolved uncertainty quantification of urban fossil fuel CO2 emissions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurney, K. R.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Patarasuk, R.; Song, Y.; O'Keeffe, D.; Huang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions from the bottom-up perspective is a critical element in emerging plans on a global, integrated, carbon monitoring system (CMS). A space/time explicit emissions data product can act as both a verification and planning system. It can verify atmospheric CO2 measurements (in situ and remote) and offer detailed mitigation information to management authorities in order to optimize the mix of mitigation efforts. Quantification of the uncertainty associated with bottom-up emission data products remains a challenging endeavor. There are a number of reasons for this. First, bottom-up source data is often produced by a regulatory agency, which has strict legal limits to the amount and type of information available. Even in cases where legal limitations are not at work, there is no standard for uncertainty reporting and hence, little reliable uncertainty estimation is made. The Hestia Project is an effort aimed at building high-resolution (eg. building and road link-specific, hourly) fossil fuel CO2 emissions data products at the scale of buildings/street segments for entire urban domains. A complete data product has been built for the city of Indianapolis and preliminary quantification has been completed for Los Angeles and Salt Lake City. The effort in Indianapolis is now part of a larger effort aimed at a convergent top-down/bottom-up assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, called INFLUX. In the course of this work, we have attempted to quantify uncertainty. In some cases, this is driven by parameter sensitivity, in other cases through the comparison of independent datasets reporting on the same entity. Expert judgment is also deployed where no alternative exists. Here, I will provide a review of some of these techniques with examples from our urban case studies. Total fossil fuel CO2 emissions for Marion County, IN, for the year 2002: (a) top view with numbered zones and (b) blowups of the numbered zones. Color units: log10 kg C

  9. Effective CO2 sequestration monitoring using joint inversion result of seismic and electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, K.; Jeong, S.; Seol, S. J.; Byun, J.; Kwon, T.

    2015-12-01

    Man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere is a significant contributor to the greenhouse gas effect and related global warming. Sequestration of CO2 into saline aquifers has been proposed as one of the most practical options of all geological sequestration possibilities. During CO2 geological sequestration, monitoring is indispensable to delineate the change of CO2 saturation and migration of CO2 in the subsurface. Especially, monitoring of CO2 saturation in aquifers provides useful information for determining amount of injected CO2. Seismic inversion can provide the migration of CO2 plume with high resolution because velocity is reduced when CO2 replaces the pore fluid during CO2 injection. However, the estimation of CO2 saturation using the seismic method is difficult due to the lower sensitivity of the velocity to the saturation when the CO2 saturation up to 20%. On the other hand, marine controlled-source EM (mCSEM) inversion is sensitive to the resistivity changes resulting from variations in CO2 saturation, even though it has poor resolution than seismic method. In this study, we proposed an effective CO2 sequestration monitoring method using joint inversion of seismic and mCSEM data based on a cross-gradient constraint. The method was tested with realistic CO2 injection models in a deep brine aquifer beneath a shallow sea which is selected with consideration for the access convenience for the installation of source and receiver and an environmental safety. Resistivity images of CO2 plume by the proposed method for different CO2 injection stages have been significantly improved over those obtained from individual EM inversion. In addition, we could estimate a reliable CO2 saturation by rock physics model (RPM) using the P-wave velocity and the improved resistivity. The proposed method is a basis of three-dimensional estimation of reservoir parameters such as porosity and fluid saturation, and the method can be also applied for detecting a

  10. Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-01-19

    ''Hidden'' geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has moderate solubility in water. We carried out numerical simulations of a CO2 migration scenario to calculate the magnitude of expected fluxes and concentrations. Our results show that CO2 concentrations can reach high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are predominantly controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include the infrared gas analyzer, the accumulation chamber method, the eddy covariance method, hyperspectral imaging, and light detection and ranging. To meet the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. The proposed monitoring plan initially focuses on rapid, economical, reliable measurements of CO2 subsurface concentrations and surface fluxes and statistical analysis of the collected data. Based on this analysis, are as with a high probability

  11. Acetylene fuel from atmospheric CO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars mission scenario proposed by Baker and Zubrin (1990) intended for an unmanned preliminary mission is extended to maximize the total impulse of fuel produced with a minimum mass of hydrogen from Earth. The hydrogen along with atmospheric carbon dioxide is processed into methane and oxygen by the exothermic reaction in an atmospheric processing module. Use of simple chemical reactions to produce acetylene/oxygen rocket fuel on Mars from hydrogen makes it possible to produce an amount of fuel that is nearly 100 times the mass of hydrogen brought from earth. If such a process produces the return propellant for a manned Mars mission, the required mission mass in LEO is significantly reduced over a system using all earth-derived propellants.

  12. Mass balance monitoring of geological CO2 storage with a superconducting gravimeter - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Neumeyer, Juergen; Kao, Ricky; Kabirzadeh, Hojjat

    2015-03-01

    Although monitoring of geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is possible with a number of geophysical and geodetic techniques (e.g., seismic survey), gravimetric monitoring is known to be the most accurate method for measuring total mass changes. Therefore, it can be used for detection of storage pore space content changes and migration of CO2 plumes. A superconducting gravimeter (SG) installed on the Earth's surface provides precise and continuous records of gravity variations over time for periods from minutes to decades, which are required for monitoring subsurface CO2 storage. Due to the fact that gravimeter records combine the gravity effects of surface displacement and subsurface mass change, these two effects must be separated properly for observing CO2 mass balance. The Newtonian attraction gravity effect of stored CO2 is modeled as a function of reservoir depth and CO2 mass for different locations of the gravimeter over the reservoir. The gravity effect of the surface deformation is considered according to the modeled and measured displacement above the CO2 reservoir at the gravimeter's position. For estimation of the detection threshold, an assessment is carried out for the gravity corrections, which must be subtracted from the raw gravity data before obtaining the gravity signal of the stored CO2. A CO2 signal larger than about 0.5 μGal can be detected with an SG's continuous recordings. A measured gravity profile along the reservoir can support the continuous measurements. For providing objective evidence of a CO2 stored gravity signal, real measured raw SG gravity data of the MunGyung site in Korea were superimposed with an artificial uniformly continuous gravity signal up to 1.7 μGal, representing a gravity signal from a CO2 storage site with increasing injections up to about 105 kt at a depth of 600 m. These data were analyzed, and the CO2 storage signal could be clearly identified.

  13. Tracing fossil fuel CO2 using Δ14C in Xi'an City, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Wu, Shugang; Huo, Wenwen; Xiong, Xiaohu; Cheng, Peng; Lu, Xuefeng; Niu, Zhenchuan

    2014-09-01

    Radiocarbon can be used to trace fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) in the atmosphere, because radiocarbon has been depleted in fossil fuels. Here we present our study on the spatial distribution and temporal variations of CO2ff in Xi'an City, China using Δ14C of both green foxtail (Setaria viridis, L. Beauv.) leaf samples and urban air samples collected in the recent years. Our results show that the CO2ff indicated by green foxtail ranged from 14.7 ± 1.7 to 52.6 ± 1.7 ppm, reflecting high CO2ff mole fractions in downtown, industrial areas, and at road sites, and low CO2ff mole fractions in public parks. Meanwhile, the monthly CO2ff reflected by air samples showed higher value in winter (57.8 ± 17.1 ppm) than that in summer (20.2 ± 9.8 ppm) due to the enhancement usage of coal burning and the poor dispersion condition of atmosphere. This study displays that the increased fossil fuel emission is associated with the fast development of Xi'an City in China. It is worth mentioning that the green foxtail samples can be used to map out the CO2ff spatial distribution on large scale quickly and conveniently, while the air samples can be used to trace the CO2ff temporal variations with high resolution effectively. Therefore the Δ14C of both green foxtail and air samples is a good indicator of CO2ff emission.

  14. Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the building/street scale for a large US city

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, Kevin R.; Razlivanov, I.; Song, Yang; Zhou, Yuyu; Benes, Bedrich; Abdul- Massih, Michel

    2012-08-15

    In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface, build an effective carbon monitoring system and contribute to quantitatively-based U.S. climate change policy interests, fine spatial and temporal quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gas, is essential. Called the ‘Hestia Project’, this research effort is the first to use bottom-up methods to quantify all fossil fuel CO2 emissions down to the scale of individual buildings, road segments, and industrial/electricity production facilities on an hourly basis for an entire urban landscape. a large city (Indianapolis, Indiana USA). Here, we describe the methods used to quantify the on-site fossil fuel CO2 emissions across the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. This effort combines a series of datasets and simulation tools such as a building energy simulation model, traffic data, power production reporting and local air pollution reporting. The system is general enough to be applied to any large U.S. city and holds tremendous potential as a key component of a carbon monitoring system in addition to enabling efficient greenhouse gas mitigation and planning. We compare our estimate of fossil fuel emissions from natural gas to consumption data provided by the local gas utility. At the zip code level, we achieve a bias adjusted pearson r correlation value of 0.92 (p<0.001).

  15. Biofuels from Bacteria, Electricity, and CO2: Biofuels from CO2 Using Ammonia or Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria in Reverse Microbial Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Electrofuels Project: Columbia University is using carbon dioxide (CO2) from ambient air, ammonia—an abundant and affordable chemical, and a bacteria called N. europaea to produce liquid fuel. The Columbia University team is feeding the ammonia and CO2 into an engineered tank where the bacteria live. The bacteria capture the energy from ammonia and then use that energy to convert CO2 into a liquid fuel. When the bacteria use up all the ammonia, renewable electricity can regenerate it and pump it back into the system—creating a continuous fuel-creation cycle. In addition, Columbia University is also working with the bacteria A. ferrooxidans to capture and use energy from ferrous iron to produce liquid fuels from CO2.

  16. Reducing Risk in CO2 Sequestration: A Framework for Integrated Monitoring of Basin Scale Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, C. J.; Haidari, A. S.; McRae, G. J.

    2009-12-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2 is an option for stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Technical ability to safely store CO2 in the subsurface has been demonstrated through pilot projects and a long history of enhanced oil recovery and acid gas disposal operations. To address climate change, current injection operations must be scaled up by a factor of 100, raising issues of safety and security. Monitoring and verification is an essential component in ensuring safe operations and managing risk. Monitoring provides assurance that CO2 is securely stored in the subsurface, and the mechanisms governing transport and storage are well understood. It also provides an early warning mechanism for identification of anomalies in performance, and a means for intervention and remediation through the ability to locate the CO2. Through theoretical studies, bench scale experiments and pilot tests, a number of technologies have demonstrated their ability to monitor CO2 in the surface and subsurface. Because the focus of these studies has been to demonstrate feasibility, individual techniques have not been integrated to provide a more robust method for monitoring. Considering the large volumes required for injection, size of the potential footprint, length of time a project must be monitored and uncertainty, operational considerations of cost and risk must balance safety and security. Integration of multiple monitoring techniques will reduce uncertainty in monitoring injected CO2, thereby reducing risk. We present a framework for risk management of large scale injection through model based monitoring network design. This framework is applied to monitoring CO2 in a synthetic reservoir where there is uncertainty in the underlying permeability field controlling fluid migration. Deformation and seismic data are used to track plume migration. A modified Ensemble Kalman filter approach is used to estimate flow properties by jointly assimilating flow and geomechanical

  17. Study of CO2 recovery in a carbonate fuel cell tri-generation plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Giorgio; McLarty, Dustin; Brouwer, Jack; Lanzini, Andrea; Santarelli, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of separating and recovering CO2 in a biogas plant that co-produces electricity, hydrogen, and heat is investigated. Exploiting the ability of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) to concentrate CO2 in the anode exhaust stream reduces the energy consumption and complexity of CO2 separation techniques that would otherwise be required to remove dilute CO2 from combustion exhaust streams. Three potential CO2 concentrating configurations are numerically simulated to evaluate potential CO2 recovery rates: 1) anode oxidation and partial CO2 recirculation, 2) integration with exhaust from an internal combustion engine, and 3) series connection of molten carbonate cathodes initially fed with internal combustion engine (ICE) exhaust. Physical models have been calibrated with data acquired from an operating MCFC tri-generating plant. Results illustrate a high compatibility between hydrogen co-production and CO2 recovery with series connection of molten carbonate systems offering the best results for efficient CO2 recovery. In this case the carbon capture ratio (CCR) exceeds 73% for two systems in series and 90% for 3 MCFC in series. This remarkably high carbon recovery is possible with 1.4 MWe delivered by the ICE system and 0.9 MWe and about 350 kg day-1 of H2 delivered by the three MCFC.

  18. Quantification of space/time explicit fossil fuel CO2 emissions in urban domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurney, K. R.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Song, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions from the bottom-up perspective is a critical element in development of a carbon monitoring system. A space/time explicit emissions data product can verify atmospheric CO2 measurements and offer practical information to authorities in order to optimize mitigation efforts. Here, we present the Hestia Project, an effort aimed at building a high resolution (eg. building and road link-specific, hourly) fossil fuel CO2 emissions data product for the urban domain. A complete data product has been built for the city of Indianapolis and work is ongoing in Los Angeles. The work in Indianapolis is now part of a larger effort, INFLUX, aimed at a convergent top-down/bottom-up assessment of greenhouse gas emissions. The work in Los Angeles with JPL colleagues is aimed at building an operational carbon monitoring system with focus on global megacities. Our urban-level quantification relies on a mixture of data and modeling structures. We start with the sector-specific Vulcan Project estimate using Hestia to distribute emissions in space and time. Two components take the majority of effort: buildings and onroad emissions. For the buildings, we utilize an energy building model constrained with multiple local data streams. For onroad emissions, we use a combination of traffic data and GIS road layers maintaining vehicle class information. In collaboration with our INFLUX colleagues, we are transporting these high resolution emissions through an atmospheric transport model for a forward comparison of the Hestia data product with atmospheric measurements, collected on aircraft and cell towers. In collaboration with our JPL colleagues, we are testing the feasibility of quantifying a megacity domain and how it might integrate with remote sensing and in situ measurement systems. The Hestia effort also holds promise for a useable policy tool at the city scale. With detailed information on energy consumption and emissions with process

  19. Multi-Channel Auto-Dilution System for Remote Continuous Monitoring of High Soil-CO2 Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.

    2009-04-23

    Geological sequestration has the potential capacity and longevity to significantly decrease the amount of anthropogenic CO2 introduced into the atmosphere by combustion of fossil fuels such as coal. Effective sequestration, however, requires the ability to verify the integrity of the reservoir and ensure that potential leakage rates are kept to a minimum. Moreover, understanding the pathways by which CO2 migrates to the surface is critical to assessing the risks and developing remediation approaches. Field experiments, such as those conducted at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) project test site in Bozeman, Montana, require a flexible CO2 monitoring system that can accurately and continuously measure soil-surface CO2 fluxes for multiple sampling points at concentrations ranging from background levels to several tens of percent. To meet this need, PNNL is developing a multi-port battery-operated system capable of both spatial and temporal monitoring of CO2 at concentrations from ambient to at least 150,000 ppmv. This report describes the system components (sampling chambers, measurement and control system, and power supply) and the results of a field test at the ZERT site during the late summer and fall of 2008. While the system performed well overall during the field test, several improvements to the system are suggested for implementation in FY2009.

  20. An example of innovative application in fuel cell system development: CO 2 segregation using Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusardi, M.; Bosio, B.; Arato, E.

    CO 2 is one of the main causes of the greenhouse effect and serious attention is being given to CO 2 abatement at the moment. In this work, the feasibility of segregating CO 2 from the exhaust of a Gas Turbine using a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell system is studied. In particular, different plant configurations are simulated using a commercial code integrated with proprietary MCFC Fortran blocks. The opportunity of an additional CO 2 separation stage downstream MCFC is also discussed. The results of the simulations are presented and the possibility of producing electrical energy and being able to respect Kyoto Protocol and IPCC environmental requirements is analysed.

  1. Long-term fate and impacts of fossil fuel CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, D. D.; Brovkin, V.

    2006-12-01

    Several modeling studies have recently predicted the lifetime of fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere, and their conclusions are quite consistent with each other, that a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2 will continue to affect climate for millennia. The main points of difference between the models are the time scale for CaCO3 neutralization, the effects of rising CO2 and climate change on weathering rates, and the extent of an ocean warming CO2 solubility feedback. The long tail of the CO2 lifetime will be important for the future evolution of ice sheets, and could lead to a prolonged period of interglacial climate. An interglacial climate state accelerates the global rate of CO2 uptake by igneous rock weathering, by exposing unweathered bedrock in the Canadian shield. If our current interglacial climate state lasts as long as the time scale of the silicate weathering feedback (order 100,000 years), the change in weathering regime will have time to further affect atmospheric CO2.

  2. Photocatalytic conversion of CO2 into value-added and renewable fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lan; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2015-07-01

    The increasing energy crisis and the worsening global climate caused by the excessive utilization of fossil fuel have boosted tremendous research activities about CO2 capture, storage and utilization. Artificial photosynthesis that uses solar light energy to convert CO2 to form value-added and renewable fuels such as methane or methanol has been consistently drawing increasing attention. It is like killing two birds with one stone since it can not only reduce the greenhouse effects caused by CO2 emission but also produce value added chemicals for alternative energy supplying. This review provides a brief introduction about the basic principles of artificial photosynthesis of CO2 and the progress made in exploring more efficient photocatalysts from the viewpoint of light harvesting and photogenerated charge carriers boosting. Moreover, the undergoing mechanisms of CO2 photoreduction are discussed with selected examples, in terms of adsorption of reactants, CO2 activation as well as the possible reaction pathways. Finally, perspectives on future research directions and open issues in CO2 photoreduction are outlined.

  3. Deployment of a carbon isotope ratiometer for the monitoring of CO2 sequestration leakage.

    PubMed

    McAlexander, Ian; Rau, Greg H; Liem, Jimmy; Owano, Thomas; Fellers, Ray; Baer, Douglas; Gupta, Manish

    2011-08-15

    In an effort to monitor leakage from underground CO(2) storage, a field-deployable analyzer capable of rapidly measuring the CO(2) mixing ratio and δ(13)C values (±0.05 ppm(v) ± 0.2‰, 60 s) was deployed to distinguish between biogenic and fossil CO(2) sources. The analyzer was interfaced with a multiport inlet unit to allow autonomous sampling from multiple locations. The instrument and inlet interface were deployed at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) site (Bozeman, Montana, July 14-22, 2009) during a controlled, subsurface release of CO(2) depleted in (13)C. A biogenic diurnal cycle was observed far from the release, and the associated Keeling plot suggested a CO(2) source (δ(13)C = -27.0 ± 0.5‰) consistent with local C(3) vegetation. Inlets near the leak showed large CO(2) mixing ratios (388/>40 000 ppm(v)) whose predominant source was the release CO(2) (inferred δ(13)C = -58.2 ± 0.7‰). Measurements 3 m from the source showed diurnal CO(2) cycles (382-2400 ppm(v)) influenced by leaked CO(2), possibly due to diel air mixing. Finally, the data from all of the sampling inlets was combined to spatially localize the leak position. PMID:21740048

  4. Dynamics of fossil fuel CO2 neutralization by marine CaCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, David; Kheshgi, Haroon; Maier-Reimer, Ernst

    1998-06-01

    A detailed model of the ocean circulation and carbon cycle was coupled to a mechanistic model of CaCO3 diagenesis in deep sea sediments to simulate the millennium-scale response of the oceans to future fossil fuel CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and deep sea. Simulations of deep sea injection of CO2 show that CaCO3 dissolution is sensitive to passage of high-CO2 waters through the Atlantic Ocean, but CaCO3 dissolution has a negligible impact on atmospheric pCO2 or the atmospheric stabilization CO2 emission in the coming centuries. The ultimate fate of the fossil fuel CO2 will be to react with CaCO3 on the seafloor and on land. An initial CaCO3 dissolution spike reverses the net sedimentation rate in the ocean until it is attenuated by an enhanced vertical gradient of alkalinity after about 1000 years. The magnitude of the initial spike is sensitive to assumptions about the kinetics for CaCO3 dissolution, but subsequent behavior appears to be less model dependent. Neutralization by seafloor CaCO3 occurs on a timescale of 5-6 kyr, and is limited to at most 60-70% of the fossil fuel release, even if the fossil fuel release is smaller than the seafloor erodible inventory of CaCO3. Additional neutralization by terrestrial CaCO3 restores a balance between CaCO3 weathering and seafloor accumulation on a timescale of 8.5 kyr, while the deficit of seafloor CaCO3 (the lysocline) is replenished with an e-folding timescale of approximately 18 kyr. The final equilibrium with CaCO3 leaves 7-8% of the fossil fuel CO2 remaining in the atmosphere, to be neutralized by the silicate rock cycle on a time frame of hundreds of thousands of years.

  5. Thermocatalytic CO2-Free Production of Hydrogen from Hydrocarbon Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    University of Central Florida

    2004-01-30

    The main objective of this project is the development of an economically viable thermocatalytic process for production of hydrogen and carbon from natural gas or other hydrocarbon fuels with minimal environmental impact. The three major technical goals of this project are: (1) to accomplish efficient production of hydrogen and carbon via sustainable catalytic decomposition of methane or other hydrocarbons using inexpensive and durable carbon catalysts, (2) to obviate the concurrent production of CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts and drastically reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the process, and (3) to produce valuable carbon products in order to reduce the cost of hydrogen production The important feature of the process is that the reaction is catalyzed by carbon particulates produced in the process, so no external catalyst is required (except for the start-up operation). This results in the following advantages: (1) no CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts are generated during hydrocarbon decomposition stage, (2) no expensive catalysts are used in the process, (3) several valuable forms of carbon can be produced in the process depending on the process conditions (e.g., turbostratic carbon, pyrolytic graphite, spherical carbon particles, carbon filaments etc.), and (4) CO{sub 2} emissions could be drastically reduced (compared to conventional processes).

  6. Geophysical Monitoring at the Aquistore CO2 Storage Site, Saskatchewan, Canada (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Aquistore Project, located near Estevan, Saskatchewan, is designed to demonstrate CO2 storage in a deep saline aquifer. CO2 captured from the nearby Boundary Dam coal-fired power plant will be injected into a brine-filled sandstone formation at ~3300 m depth, starting in November, 2013. A key element of the Aquistore research program is the further development of geophysical methods to monitor the security and subsurface distribution of the injected CO2. Toward this end, a spectrum of geophysical techniques are being tested at the Aquistore site. Various time-lapse seismic methods, including 3D surface and vertical seismic profiles (VSP) as well as crosswell seismic tomography, are designed to provide monitoring of the CO2 plume. Novel components of the seismic monitoring include use of a sparse permanent array and borehole recording using a fiber optic distributed acoustic sensor (DAS) system. Gravity and electromagnetic methods are providing complementary monitoring. Pre-injection baseline surveys have been acquired for each of these methods. In addition, continuous pre-injection monitoring has been ongoing since the summer of 2012 to establish background surface deformation patterns and local seismicity prior to the start of CO2 injection. A network of GPS stations, surface tiltmeters and InSAR reflectors has been deployed to monitor injection-related surface deformation. Passive seismic monitoring is being conducted using two orthogonal linear arrays of surface geophones.

  7. CO2 Injection Test in a Shallow Aquifer: Monitoring via Use of Different Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamert, H.; Dietrich, P.; Werban, U.; Steinbrueckner, D.; Schulz, A.; Peter, A.; Grossmann, J.; Beyer, M.

    2011-12-01

    A promising tool for the reduction of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere is CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage). However, the availability of efficient methods for the detection and monitoring of potential CO2 degassing is a prerequisite for CO2 sequestration as well as for the public acceptance of this controversially discussed technology in general. Before implementing the CCS technology, a sound risk assessment and monitoring strategy is absolutely necessary. The aim of the project is to emulate a CO2 leakage scenario by injecting gaseous CO2 into a shallow aquifer. This field study was performed at a former military air field over a period of ten days in March and April 2011. One of the main objectives is to develop and test different monitoring methods applied to controlled CO2 intrusion in a shallow groundwater system. Thirty-four installed monitoring wells, predominantly oriented to the main groundwater flow direction, allow the sampling of groundwater during the injection test. Gaseous CO2 injection into the groundwater causes increasing electric resistivity. The subsequent dissolution and dissociation processes lead, in general, to decreasing pH and increasing electric conductivity. Installed wells were equipped with electrodes at different depths to detect changes in electric resistivity in the underground. Initial results show significant breakthrough curves of the electric resistivity signal affected by the injected CO2. Groundwater samples were taken before, during and after the injection test to validate these data. Field parameters (pH, electric conductivity) and stable isotope data were compared with the measured geoelectric data. Thus, the electric resistivity changes can be clearly related to the geochemically changed groundwater caused by the injected CO2.

  8. Strategies for satellite-based monitoring of CO2 from distributed area and point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Miller, Charles E.; Duren, Riley M.; Natraj, Vijay; Eldering, Annmarie; Gunson, Michael R.; Crisp, David

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric CO2 budgets are controlled by the strengths, as well as the spatial and temporal variabilities of CO2 sources and sinks. Natural CO2 sources and sinks are dominated by the vast areas of the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere. In contrast, anthropogenic and geogenic CO2 sources are dominated by distributed area and point sources, which may constitute as much as 70% of anthropogenic (e.g., Duren & Miller, 2012), and over 80% of geogenic emissions (Burton et al., 2013). Comprehensive assessments of CO2 budgets necessitate robust and highly accurate satellite remote sensing strategies that address the competing and often conflicting requirements for sampling over disparate space and time scales. Spatial variability: The spatial distribution of anthropogenic sources is dominated by patterns of production, storage, transport and use. In contrast, geogenic variability is almost entirely controlled by endogenic geological processes, except where surface gas permeability is modulated by soil moisture. Satellite remote sensing solutions will thus have to vary greatly in spatial coverage and resolution to address distributed area sources and point sources alike. Temporal variability: While biogenic sources are dominated by diurnal and seasonal patterns, anthropogenic sources fluctuate over a greater variety of time scales from diurnal, weekly and seasonal cycles, driven by both economic and climatic factors. Geogenic sources typically vary in time scales of days to months (geogenic sources sensu stricto are not fossil fuels but volcanoes, hydrothermal and metamorphic sources). Current ground-based monitoring networks for anthropogenic and geogenic sources record data on minute- to weekly temporal scales. Satellite remote sensing solutions would have to capture temporal variability through revisit frequency or point-and-stare strategies. Space-based remote sensing offers the potential of global coverage by a single sensor. However, no single combination of orbit

  9. Using the Bongwana natural CO2 release to understand leakage processes and develop monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David; Johnson, Gareth; Hicks, Nigel; Bond, Clare; Gilfillan, Stuart; Kremer, Yannick; Lister, Bob; Nkwane, Mzikayise; Maupa, Thulani; Munyangane, Portia; Robey, Kate; Saunders, Ian; Shipton, Zoe; Pearce, Jonathan; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Natural CO2 leakage along the Bongwana Fault in South Africa is being studied to help understand processes of CO2 leakage and develop monitoring protocols. The Bongwana Fault crops out over approximately 80 km in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. In outcrop the fault is expressed as a broad fracture corridor in Dwyka Tillite, with fractures oriented approximately N-S. Natural emissions of CO2 occur at various points along the fault, manifest as travertine cones and terraces, bubbling in the rivers and as gas fluxes through soil. Exposed rock outcrop shows evidence for Fe-staining around fractures and is locally extensively kaolinitised. The gas has also been released through a shallow water well, and was exploited commercially in the past. Preliminary studies have been carried out to better document the surface emissions using near surface gas monitoring, understand the origin of the gas through major gas composition and stable and noble gas isotopes and improve understanding of the structural controls on gas leakage through mapping. In addition the impact of the leaking CO2 on local water sources (surface and ground) is being investigated, along with the seismic activity of the fault. The investigation will help to build technical capacity in South Africa and to develop monitoring techniques and plans for a future CO2 storage pilot there. Early results suggest that CO2 leakage is confined to a relatively small number of spatially-restricted locations along the weakly seismically active fault. Fracture permeability appears to be the main method by which the CO2 migrates to the surface. The bulk of the CO2 is of deep origin with a minor contribution from near surface biogenic processes as determined by major gas composition. Water chemistry, including pH, DO and TDS is notably different between CO2-rich and CO2-poor sites. Soil gas content and flux effectively delineates the fault trace in active leakage sites. The fault provides an effective testing ground for

  10. Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-15

    Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

  11. Advanced CO2 removal process control and monitor instrumentation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Dalhausen, M. J.; Klimes, R.

    1982-01-01

    A progam to evaluate, design and demonstrate major advances in control and monitor instrumentation was undertaken. A carbon dioxide removal process, one whose maturity level makes it a prime candidate for early flight demonstration was investigated. The instrumentation design incorporates features which are compatible with anticipated flight requirements. Current electronics technology and projected advances are included. In addition, the program established commonality of components for all advanced life support subsystems. It was concluded from the studies and design activities conducted under this program that the next generation of instrumentation will be greatly smaller than the prior one. Not only physical size but weight, power and heat rejection requirements were reduced in the range of 80 to 85% from the former level of research and development instrumentation. Using a microprocessor based computer, a standard computer bus structure and nonvolatile memory, improved fabrication techniques and aerospace packaging this instrumentation will greatly enhance overall reliability and total system availability.

  12. Geophysical Techniques for Monitoring CO2 Movement During Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Erika Gasperikova; G. Michael Hoversten

    2005-11-15

    The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques are examined as monitoring tools for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques for two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. EOR/sequestration projects in general and Schrader Bluff in particular represent relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}). This model represents the most difficult end member of a complex spectrum of possible sequestration scenarios. The time-lapse performance of seismic, gravity, and EM techniques are considered for the Schrader Bluff model. The second scenario is a gas field that in general resembles conditions of Rio Vista reservoir in the Sacramento Basin of California. Surface gravity, and seismic measurements are considered for this model.

  13. High-resolution simulations of the Δ14CO2 gradients from fossil fuels and nuclear power plants over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhinova, D.; van der Molen, M. K.; Palstra, S. W.; Meijer, H. A.; Krol, M. C.; Peters, W.

    2012-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14CO2) can be used to quantify fossil fuel CO2 addition to the atmosphere, since fossil CO2 is void of 14C. However, the current observational network is not dense enough to constrain regional emissions in most parts of the world. Furthermore, most sampling sites are not as informative for the regional anthropogenic emissions because they are located outside polluted regions. High resolution modeling of regional fossil fuel CO2 dispersion can help to define sampling locations at which Δ14CO2 gradients will be strong enough to estimate regional fossil fuel emissions. However, an important consideration should be the 14CO2 enrichment due to nuclear power plant 14CO2 production. These point sources contribute little to the global radiocarbon budget, but on a regional scale their importance for the atmospheric Δ14CO2 signature can be considerable. We therefore simulate the fossil fuel CO2 and nuclear 14CO2 transport for Western Europe using the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF-Chem) and evaluate the gradients and resulting Δ14CO2. We verify our modeling framework with integrated 14CO2, CO2, and meteorological observations. We find that the gradients in daytime fossil fuel CO2 addition can be as high as 10 ppm. Additionally, the effects of the nuclear 14CO2 emitted from the strongest source in the region can be traced to sites more than 500 km away, and their impact on the atmospheric Δ14CO2 signature can sometimes be of the same magnitude as the regional fossil fuel CO2 addition. We will present our findings and possible implications for sampling campaigns and observational sites.lt;img border=0 src="images/A33P-06_B.jpg">

  14. Subsurface Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration - A Review and Look Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into subsurface formations is at least 50 years old with large-scale utilization of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) beginning in the 1970s. Early monitoring efforts had limited measurements in available boreholes. With growing interest in CO2 sequestration beginning in the 1990's, along with growth in geophysical reservoir monitoring, small to mid-size sequestration monitoring projects began to appear. The overall goals of a subsurface monitoring plan are to provide measurement of CO2 induced changes in subsurface properties at a range of spatial and temporal scales. The range of spatial scales allows tracking of the location and saturation of the plume with varying detail, while finer temporal sampling (up to continuous) allows better understanding of dynamic processes (e.g. multi-phase flow) and constraining of reservoir models. Early monitoring of small scale pilots associated with CO2-EOR (e.g., the McElroy field and the Lost Hills field), developed many of the methodologies including tomographic imaging and multi-physics measurements. Large (reservoir) scale sequestration monitoring began with the Sleipner and Weyburn projects. Typically, large scale monitoring, such as 4D surface seismic, has limited temporal sampling due to costs. Smaller scale pilots can allow more frequent measurements as either individual time-lapse 'snapshots' or as continuous monitoring. Pilot monitoring examples include the Frio, Nagaoka and Otway pilots using repeated well logging, crosswell imaging, vertical seismic profiles and CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring). For saline reservoir sequestration projects, there is typically integration of characterization and monitoring, since the sites are not pre-characterized resource developments (oil or gas), which reinforces the need for multi-scale measurements. As we move beyond pilot sites, we need to quantify CO2 plume and reservoir properties (e.g. pressure) over large scales, while still

  15. A comparison of near surface CO2 monitoring methods and their applicability in the CCS context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Ingo; Schlömer, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The detection, characterization and quantification of different gas species in the vicinity of the soil-atmosphere interface is considered as one key element of near surface monitoring related to CO2 storage operations. From a broad range of available techniques (see e.g. Korre et al. 2011 and Rütters et al. 2013), three different methods have initially been selected in order to compare their applicability in the CCS context: - The eddy covariance method which can compute CO2 fluxes within the atmospheric boundary layer, - CO2 flux measurements between soil and atmosphere by means of accumulation chambers, - Permanent CO2 concentration measurements in the vadose zone of the soil column. Additionally, basic atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements were also included in this comparison since they might have a potential as monitoring alternative on a low-cost basis. Results and lessons learned from practical field experiments were elaborated to point out advantages and disadvantages of the individual methods as well as their integration into an overall monitoring concept of CO2 storage sites. Field work has been carried out in different locations of Northern Germany, amongst others in the Altmark region, a formerly proposed CO2 injection site for enhanced gas recovery (Schlömer et al. 2014). This study benefits from interim results of the MONACO project (Monitoring approach for geological CO2 storage sites using an hierarchic observation concept) which is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF, grant 03G0817A). References: Korre, A., Imrie, C.E., May, F., Beaubien, S.E., Vandermeijer, V., Persoglia, S., Golmen, L., Fabriol, H., Dixon, T., 2011. Quantification techniques for potential CO2 leakage from geological storage sites. Energy Proc. 4, pp. 3413-3420. Rütters, H., Möller, I., May, F., Flornes, K., Hladik, V., Arvanitis, A., Gülec, N.,Bakiler, C., Dudu, A., Kucharic, L., Juhojuntti, N., Shogenova, A., Georgiev, G., 2013. State

  16. Gravity monitoring of CO2 movement during sequestration: Model studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, E.; Hoversten, G.M.

    2008-07-15

    We examine the relative merits of gravity measurements as a monitoring tool for geological CO{sub 2} sequestration in three different modeling scenarios. The first is a combined CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the second is sequestration in a brine formation, and the third is for a coalbed methane formation. EOR/sequestration petroleum reservoirs have relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}), whereas brine formations usually have much thicker injection intervals and only two components (brine and CO{sub 2}). Coal formations undergoing methane extraction tend to be thin (3-10 m), but shallow compared to either EOR or brine formations. The injection of CO{sub 2} into the oil reservoir produced a bulk density decrease in the reservoir. The spatial pattern of the change in the vertical component of gravity (G{sub z}) is directly correlated with the net change in reservoir density. Furthermore, time-lapse changes in the borehole G{sub z} clearly identified the vertical section of the reservoir where fluid saturations are changing. The CO{sub 2}-brine front, on the order of 1 km within a 20 m thick brine formation at 1900 m depth, with 30% CO{sub 2} and 70% brine saturations, respectively, produced a -10 Gal surface gravity anomaly. Such anomaly would be detectable in the field. The amount of CO{sub 2} in a coalbed methane test scenario did not produce a large enough surface gravity response; however, we would expect that for an industrial size injection, the surface gravity response would be measurable. Gravity inversions in all three scenarios illustrated that the general position of density changes caused by CO{sub 2} can be recovered, but not the absolute value of the change. Analysis of the spatial resolution and detectability limits shows that gravity measurements could, under certain circumstances, be used as a lower-cost alternative to seismic

  17. Monitoring Ocean CO2 Fluxes from Space: GOSAT and OCO-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David

    2012-01-01

    The ocean is a major component of the global carbon cycle, emitting over 330 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere each year, or about 10 times that emitted fossil fuel combustion and all other human activities [1, 2]. The ocean reabsorbs a comparable amount of CO2 each year, along with 25% of the CO2 emitted by these human activities. The nature and geographic distribution of the processes controlling these ocean CO2 fluxes are still poorly constrained by observations. A better understanding of these processes is essential to predict how this important CO2 sink may evolve as the climate changes.While in situ measurements of ocean CO2 fluxes can be very precise, the sampling density is far too sparse to quantify ocean CO2 sources and sinks over much of the globe. One way to improve the spatial resolution, coverage, and sampling frequency is to make observations of the column averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, from space [4, 5, 6]. Such measurements could provide global coverage at high resolution (< 100 km) on monthly time scales. High precision (< 1 part per million, ppm) is essential to resolve the small, near-surface CO2 variations associated with ocean fluxes and to better constrain the CO2 transport over the ocean. The Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) and the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) were first two space based sensors designed specifically for this task. GOSAT was successfully launched on January 23, 2009, and has been returning measurements of XCO2 since April 2009. The OCO mission was lost in February 2009, when its launch vehicle malfunctioned and failed to reach orbit. In early 2010, NASA authorized a re-flight of OCO, called OCO-2, which is currently under development.

  18. EXPERT-BASED DEVELOPMENT OF A SITE-SPECIFC STANDARD IN CO2 SEQUESTRATION MONITORING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to help regulators and operators alike in determining the most appropriate monitoring approaches and strategy for a given CO2 sequestration site. A monitoring strategy differs from a list of tools because it is designed as a dynamic process where...

  19. Numerical modeling of time-lapse monitoring of CO2 sequestration in a layered basalt reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khatiwada, M.; Van Wijk, K.; Clement, W.P.; Haney, M.

    2008-01-01

    As part of preparations in plans by The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) to inject CO2 in layered basalt, we numerically investigate seismic methods as a noninvasive monitoring technique. Basalt seems to have geochemical advantages as a reservoir for CO2 storage (CO2 mineralizes quite rapidly while exposed to basalt), but poses a considerable challenge in term of seismic monitoring: strong scattering from the layering of the basalt complicates surface seismic imaging. We perform numerical tests using the Spectral Element Method (SEM) to identify possibilities and limitations of seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in a basalt reservoir. While surface seismic is unlikely to detect small physical changes in the reservoir due to the injection of CO2, the results from Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) simulations are encouraging. As a perturbation, we make a 5%; change in wave velocity, which produces significant changes in VSP images of pre-injection and post-injection conditions. Finally, we perform an analysis using Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI), to quantify these changes in the reservoir properties due to CO2 injection.

  20. Using the Relationship between Vehicle Fuel Consumption and CO2 Emissions To Illustrate Chemical Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Pinto, Gabriel

    2008-02-01

    This instructional resource utilizes consumer product information by which students compare theoretical stoichiometric calculations to CO 2 car emissions and fuel consumption data. Representing graphically the emission of CO 2 versus consumption of fuel provides a tangible way of connecting concepts studied in chemistry classes to everyday life. Considerable simplification of an otherwise complex chemistry problem provides comparable theoretical and actual data. Practice with unit conversion and graphing enhance this activity promoting skills used by professionals to perform emission measurements. This activity may be used to bring awareness of car emissions issues such as the environmental impact of CO 2 emissions and the differences of hybrid engines or gasoline versus diesel engines. Scientific literacy can be approached by incorporating exercises such as this one into chemistry classroom activities. Students have expressed keen interest in this type of "tangible" chemistry where a concrete example of everyday life puts textbook chemistry in context.

  1. Geochemical Monitoring for Potential Environmental Impacts of Geologic Sequestration of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Cole, D. R.; Thordsen, J. J.; Conaway, C. H.; Gans, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    Geologically sequestered CO2 is buoyant, has a low viscosity and, when dissolved in brine, becomes reactive to minerals, cements and well pipes. These properties of CO2 may cause it to leak upward from the major storage reservoirs, possibly contaminating underground sources of drinking water. We have participated in several multi-laboratory field experiments to investigate the changes in chemical and isotopic parameters and added tracers that are applicable to the monitoring of the flow of injected CO2 in reservoirs and leakage into potable shallow groundwater. Geochemical results from the Frio Brine I and II pilot tests located near Dayton, Texas and from the SECARB Phase III tests at Cranfield oil field, Mississippi, proved powerful tools in: 1- Tracking the successful injection and flow of CO2 into the injection sandstones; 2- showing major changes in the chemical (pH, alkalinity, and major divalent cations) and isotopic (δ13C values of CO2, and δ18O values of CO2, and brine) compositions of formation water; 3-. showing mobilization of metals, including Fe Mn and Pb, and organic compounds , including DOC, BTEX, PAHs, and phenols following CO2 injection; and 4- showing that some of the CO2 injected into the Frio 'C' sandstone was detected in the overlying 'B' sandstone that is separated by 15 m of shale and muddy siltstone. Rapid, significant and systematic changes were also observed in the isotopic and chemical compositions of shallow groundwater at the ZERT site located in Bozeman, MT, in response to four yearly controlled injections of CO2 gas through a slotted pipe placed horizontally at a depth of ~2 m below ground level. The observed changes, included the lowering of groundwater pH from ~7.0 to values as low as 5.6, increases in the alkalinity from about 400 mg/L as HCO3 to values of up to 1330 mg/L, increases in the electrical conductance from ~600 μS/cm to up to 1800 μS/cm, as well as increases in the concentrations of cations and metals following CO2

  2. A field and laboratory method for monitoring the concentration and isotopic composition of soil CO2.

    PubMed

    Breecker, Dan; Sharp, Zachary D

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of nmol size gas samples can be determined accurately and precisely using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We have developed a technique that exploits this capability in order to measure delta13C and delta18O values and, simultaneously, the concentration of CO2 in sub-mL volume soil air samples. A sampling strategy designed for monitoring CO2 profiles at particular locations of interest is also described. This combined field and laboratory technique provides several advantages over those previously reported: (1) the small sample size required allows soil air to be sampled at a high spatial resolution, (2) the field setup minimizes sampling times and does not require powered equipment, (3) the analytical method avoids the introduction of air (including O2) into the mass spectrometer thereby extending filament life, and (4) pCO2, delta13C and delta18O are determined simultaneously. The reproducibility of measurements of CO2 in synthetic tank air using this technique is: +/-0.08 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.10 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-0.7% (pCO2) at 5550 ppm. The reproducibility for CO2 in soil air is estimated as: +/-0.06 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.06 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-1.6% (pCO2). Monitoring soil CO2 using this technique is applicable to studies concerning soil respiration and ecosystem gas exchange, the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 (e.g. free air carbon dioxide enrichment) on soil processes, soil water budgets including partitioning evaporation from transpiration, pedogenesis and weathering, diffuse solid-earth degassing, and the calibration of speleothem and pedogenic carbonate delta13C values as paleoenvironmental proxies. PMID:18186546

  3. Combustion Characteristics of Oxy-fuel Burners for CO2 Capturing Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joon; Kim, Hyouck Ju; Choi, Kyu Sung

    Oxy-fuel boilers have been developed to capture CO2 from the exhaust gas. A 50 kW class model burner has been developed and tested in a furnace type boiler. The burner has been scaled up to 0.5 and 3 MW class for fire-tube type boilers. The burners are commonly laid out in a coaxial type to effectively heat the combustion chamber of boilers. Burners are devised to support air and oxy-fuel combustion modes for the retrofitting scenario. FGR (flue gas recirculation) has been tried during the scale-up procedure. Oxy-fuel combustion yields stretched flame to uniformly heat the combustion chamber. It also provides the high CO2 concentration, which is over 90% in dry base. However, pure oxy-fuel combustion increases NO concentration, because of the reduced flow rate. The FGR can suppress the thermal NOx induced by the infiltration of the air.

  4. Verification and Monitoring of CO2 Storage by Using Self-potential Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, H.; Kubota, K.; Ito, H.; Suzuki, K.; Kaieda, H.; Wakahama, H.

    2008-12-01

    Accelerating of global warming is caused by increasing emissions of greenhouse gases such as CO2. Reduction approaches of the greenhouse gases is one of the urgent problems on a global scale and attempted in many countries. CO2 capture and storage is an economical and efficient technology to the reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, geophysical exploration methods for monitoring the CO2 migration are now developing. Self-potential is caused by the electrokinetic phenomenon of streaming potential, which has been applied to investigation of subsurface fluid flow. In order to confirm whether self- potential can be used for the monitoring of CO2 migration or not, we calculated self-potential variation associated with CO2 storage by using a numerical simulation code (STAR + EKP post-processor, e.g. Ishido and Pritchett, JGR, 1999). The target field of this study was set at Ogachi test field located in the northern part of the Honshu island of Japan, where CO2 injection experiment has been conducted. We calculated self- potential responses on the ground in three cases of CO2 injection (Injecting rate:10 ton/day, 30 ton/day, 50 ton/day; Injecting time: 6h). The results show significant self-potential changes around the injection well, which are 1mV by 10 ton/day, 4.7mV by 30 ton/day, and more than 12mV by 50 ton/day, respectively. Considering electrical noise on the field, more than 30 ton/day of CO2 is needed by using self-potential monitoring. This injecting rate is within practical CO2 storage rate in the actual field. Therefore, self-potential is one of the useful methods for the monitoring of CO2 storage. This research was supported by the grants of the Programmed Research "eDevelopment of evaluation technology for the CO2 in the exhaust gas sequestration into geothermal fields"f of RITE under the fund from METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry).

  5. Accuracy of CO2 monitoring via nasal cannulas and oral bite blocks during sedation for esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuo-Chen; Orr, Joe; Hsu, Wei-Chih; Yu, Lu; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Westenskow, Dwayne R; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Esophagogastroduodenoscopy procedures are typically performed under conscious sedation. Drug-induced respiratory depression is a major cause of serious adverse effects during sedation. Capnographic monitoring of respiratory activity improves patient safety during procedural sedation. This bench study compares the performance of the nasal cannulas and oral bite blocks used to monitor exhaled CO2 during sedation. We used a spontaneously breathing mechanical lung to evaluated four CO2 sampling nasal cannulas and three CO2 sampling bite blocks. We placed pneumatic resistors in the mouth of the manikin to simulate different levels of mouth opening. We compared CO2 measurements taken from the sampling device to CO2 measurements taken directly from the trachea. The end tidal CO2 concentration (PETCO2) measured through the bite blocks and nasal cannulas was always lower than the corresponding PETCO2 measured at the trachea. The difference became larger as the amount of oxygen delivered through the devices increased. The difference was larger during normal ventilation than during hypoventilation. The difference became larger as the amount of oral breathing increased. The two nasal cannulas without oral cups failed to provide sufficient CO2 for breath detection when the mouth was fully open and oxygen was delivered at 10 L/min. Our simulation found that respiratory rate can be accurately monitored during the procedure using a CO2 sampling bite block or a nasal cannula with oral cup. The accuracy of PETCO2 measurements depends on the device used, the amount of supplement oxygen, the amount of oral breathing and the patient's minute ventilation. PMID:25895481

  6. Tracking a Common Surface-Bound Intermediate during CO2-to-Fuels Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wuttig, Anna; Liu, Can; Peng, Qiling; Yaguchi, Momo; Hendon, Christopher H; Motobayashi, Kenta; Ye, Shen; Osawa, Masatoshi; Surendranath, Yogesh

    2016-08-24

    Rational design of selective CO2-to-fuels electrocatalysts requires direct knowledge of the electrode surface structure during turnover. Metallic Cu is the most versatile CO2-to-fuels catalyst, capable of generating a wide array of value-added products, including methane, ethylene, and ethanol. All of these products are postulated to form via a common surface-bound CO intermediate. Therefore, the kinetics and thermodynamics of CO adsorption to Cu play a central role in determining fuel-formation selectivity and efficiency, highlighting the need for direct observation of CO surface binding equilibria under catalytic conditions. Here, we synthesize nanostructured Cu films adhered to IR-transparent Si prisms, and we find that these Cu surfaces enhance IR absorption of bound molecules. Using these films as electrodes, we examine Cu-catalyzed CO2 reduction in situ via IR spectroelectrochemistry. We observe that Cu surfaces bind electrogenerated CO, derived from CO2, beginning at -0.60 V vs RHE with increasing surface population at more negative potentials. Adsorbed CO is in dynamic equilibrium with dissolved (13)CO and exchanges rapidly under catalytic conditions. The CO adsorption profiles are pH independent, but adsorbed CO species undergo a reversible transformation on the surface in modestly alkaline electrolytes. These studies establish the potential, concentration, and pH dependencies of the CO surface population on Cu, which serve to maintain a pool of this vital intermediate primed for further reduction to higher order fuel products. PMID:27610413

  7. Tracking a Common Surface-Bound Intermediate during CO2-to-Fuels Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rational design of selective CO2-to-fuels electrocatalysts requires direct knowledge of the electrode surface structure during turnover. Metallic Cu is the most versatile CO2-to-fuels catalyst, capable of generating a wide array of value-added products, including methane, ethylene, and ethanol. All of these products are postulated to form via a common surface-bound CO intermediate. Therefore, the kinetics and thermodynamics of CO adsorption to Cu play a central role in determining fuel-formation selectivity and efficiency, highlighting the need for direct observation of CO surface binding equilibria under catalytic conditions. Here, we synthesize nanostructured Cu films adhered to IR-transparent Si prisms, and we find that these Cu surfaces enhance IR absorption of bound molecules. Using these films as electrodes, we examine Cu-catalyzed CO2 reduction in situ via IR spectroelectrochemistry. We observe that Cu surfaces bind electrogenerated CO, derived from CO2, beginning at −0.60 V vs RHE with increasing surface population at more negative potentials. Adsorbed CO is in dynamic equilibrium with dissolved 13CO and exchanges rapidly under catalytic conditions. The CO adsorption profiles are pH independent, but adsorbed CO species undergo a reversible transformation on the surface in modestly alkaline electrolytes. These studies establish the potential, concentration, and pH dependencies of the CO surface population on Cu, which serve to maintain a pool of this vital intermediate primed for further reduction to higher order fuel products. PMID:27610413

  8. Anion-activated, thermoreversible gelation system for the capture, release, and visual monitoring of CO2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Lee, Songyi; Liu, Yifan; Lee, Minji; Yin, Jun; Sessler, Jonathan L; Yoon, Juyoung

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important green house gas. This is providing an incentive to develop new strategies to detect and capture CO2. Achieving both functions within a single molecular system represents an unmet challenge in terms of molecular design and could translate into enhanced ease of use. Here, we report an anion-activated chemosensor system, NAP-chol 1, that permits dissolved CO2 to be detected in organic media via simple color changes or through ratiometric differences in fluorescence intensity. NAP-chol 1 also acts as a super gelator for DMSO. The resulting gel is transformed into a homogeneous solution upon exposure to fluoride anions. Bubbling with CO2 regenerates the gel. Subsequent flushing with N2 or heating serves to release the CO2 and reform the sol form. This series of transformations is reversible and can be followed by easy-to-discern color changes. Thus, NAP-chol 1 allows for the capture and release of CO2 gas while acting as a three mode sensing system. In particular, it permits CO2 to be detected through reversible sol-gel transitions, simple changes in color, or ratiometric monitoring of the differences in the fluorescence features. PMID:24699626

  9. Anion-activated, thermoreversible gelation system for the capture, release, and visual monitoring of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Lee, Songyi; Liu, Yifan; Lee, Minji; Yin, Jun; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2014-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important green house gas. This is providing an incentive to develop new strategies to detect and capture CO2. Achieving both functions within a single molecular system represents an unmet challenge in terms of molecular design and could translate into enhanced ease of use. Here, we report an anion-activated chemosensor system, NAP-chol 1, that permits dissolved CO2 to be detected in organic media via simple color changes or through ratiometric differences in fluorescence intensity. NAP-chol 1 also acts as a super gelator for DMSO. The resulting gel is transformed into a homogeneous solution upon exposure to fluoride anions. Bubbling with CO2 regenerates the gel. Subsequent flushing with N2 or heating serves to release the CO2 and reform the sol form. This series of transformations is reversible and can be followed by easy-to-discern color changes. Thus, NAP-chol 1 allows for the capture and release of CO2 gas while acting as a three mode sensing system. In particular, it permits CO2 to be detected through reversible sol-gel transitions, simple changes in color, or ratiometric monitoring of the differences in the fluorescence features.

  10. Anion-activated, thermoreversible gelation system for the capture, release, and visual monitoring of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Lee, Songyi; Liu, Yifan; Lee, Minji; Yin, Jun; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important green house gas. This is providing an incentive to develop new strategies to detect and capture CO2. Achieving both functions within a single molecular system represents an unmet challenge in terms of molecular design and could translate into enhanced ease of use. Here, we report an anion-activated chemosensor system, NAP-chol 1, that permits dissolved CO2 to be detected in organic media via simple color changes or through ratiometric differences in fluorescence intensity. NAP-chol 1 also acts as a super gelator for DMSO. The resulting gel is transformed into a homogeneous solution upon exposure to fluoride anions. Bubbling with CO2 regenerates the gel. Subsequent flushing with N2 or heating serves to release the CO2 and reform the sol form. This series of transformations is reversible and can be followed by easy-to-discern color changes. Thus, NAP-chol 1 allows for the capture and release of CO2 gas while acting as a three mode sensing system. In particular, it permits CO2 to be detected through reversible sol-gel transitions, simple changes in color, or ratiometric monitoring of the differences in the fluorescence features. PMID:24699626

  11. A numerical procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Juan E.; Savioli, Gabriela B.; Carcione, José M.; Gei, D.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon Dioxide (CO2) sequestration into geologic formations is a means of mitigating greenhouse effect. In this work we present a new numerical simulation technique to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in aquifers. For that purpose we integrate numerical simulators of CO2-brine flow and seismic wave propagation (time-lapse seismics). The simultaneous flow of brine and CO2 is modeled applying the Black-Oil formulation for two phase flow in porous media, which uses the Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) behavior as a simplified thermodynamic model. Seismic wave propagation uses a simulator based on a space-frequency domain formulation of the viscoelastic wave equation. In this formulation, the complex and frequency dependent coefficients represent the attenuation and dispersion effect suffered by seismic waves travelling in fluid-saturated heterogeneous porous formations. The spatial discretization is achieved employing a nonconforming finite element space to represent the displacement vector. Numerical examples of CO2 injection and time-lapse seismics in the Utsira formation at the Sleipner field are analyzed. The Utsira formation is represented using a new petrophysical model that allows a realistic inclusion of shale seals and fractures. The results of the simulations show the capability of the proposed methodology to monitor the spatial distribution of CO2 after injection.

  12. Monitoring CO2 sequestration with a network inversion InSAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabus, B.; Ghuman, P.; MacDonald, B.

    2009-05-01

    The capture, containment and long-term storage of CO2 is increasingly discussed as an important means to counter climate change resulting from the ongoing release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. This CO2 sequestration often requires the pumping of the gas into deep saline aquifers. However, before sequestration can be regarded as a longterm solution it is necessary to investigate under which conditions permanent and leakless capture of the CO2 is achieved in the substrate. We demonstrate that a combination of spaceborne synthetic aperture interferometry (InSAR) and ground based measurements of ground uplift caused by the underground release and spreading of the CO2 can be forged into a powerful tool to monitor sequsetration. We use a novel InSAR approach, which combines the benefits of a point-based persistent scatterer algorithm with a network inversion approach, and an additional temporal filter to remove atmospheric disturbances also at smaller scales down to 1 km and less. Using case studies from several injection wells we show that InSAR and ground based data in conjunction with geological and structural information above the aquifer, as well as detailed injection logs, allow to monitor the volumetric spread of CO2 at the mm per year level. For the majority of the studied wells CO2 appears to approach a stable sequestration state, however, in at least one case our results suggest leakage outside the aquifer.

  13. Microbial monitoring during CO2 storage in deep subsurface saline aquifers in Ketzin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuerdemann, H.; Wandrey, M.; Fischer, S.; Zemke, K.; Let, D.; Zettlitzer, M.; Morozova, D.

    2010-12-01

    Investigations on subsurface saline aquifers have shown an active biosphere composed of diverse groups of microorganisms in the subsurface. Since microorganisms represent very effective geochemical catalysts, they may influence the process of CO2 storage significantly. In the frames of the EU Project CO2SINK a field laboratory to study CO2 storage into saline aquifer was operated. Our studies aim at monitoring of biological and biogeochemical processes and their impact on the technical effectiveness of CO2 storage technique. The interactions between microorganisms and the minerals of both the reservoir and the cap rock may cause changes to the structure and chemical composition of the rock formations, which may influence the reservoir permeability locally. In addition, precipitation and corrosion may be induced around the well affecting the casing and the casing cement. Therefore, analyses of the composition of microbial communities and its changes should contribute to an evaluation of the effectiveness and reliability of the long-term CO2 storage technique. In order to investigate processes in the deep biosphere caused by the injection of supercritical CO2, genetic fingerprinting (PCR SSCP Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism) and FISH (Fluorescence in situ Hybridisation) were used for identification and quantification of microorganisms. Although saline aquifers could be characterised as an extreme habitat for microorganisms due to reduced conditions, high pressure and salinity, a high number of diverse groups of microorganisms were detected with downhole sampling in the injection and observation wells at a depth of about 650m depth. Of great importance was the identification of the sulphate reducing bacteria, which are known to be involved in corrosion processes. Microbial monitoring during CO2 injection has shown that both quantity and diversity of microbial communities were strongly influenced by the CO2 injection. In addition, the indigenous microbial

  14. CO2 capture from simulated fuel gas mixtures using semiclathrate hydrates formed by quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungwon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Youngjun; Seo, Yongwon

    2013-07-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of semiclathrate hydrate-based precombustion CO2 capture, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic studies were undertaken on the semiclathrate hydrates formed from a fuel gas mixture of H2 (60%) + CO2 (40%) in the presence of quaternary ammonium salts (QASs) such as tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) and fluoride (TBAF). The inclusion of QASs demonstrated significantly stabilized hydrate dissociation conditions. This effect was greater for TBAF than TBAB. However, due to the presence of dodecahedral cages that are partially filled with water molecules, TBAF showed a relatively lower gas uptake than TBAB. From the stability condition measurements and compositional analyses, it was found that with only one step of semiclathrate hydrate formation with the fuel gas mixture from the IGCC plants, 95% CO2 can be enriched in the semiclathrate hydrate phase at room temperature. The enclathration of both CO2 and H2 in the cages of the QAS semiclathrate hydrates and the structural transition that results from the inclusion of QASs were confirmed through Raman and (1)H NMR measurements. The experimental results obtained in this study provide the physicochemical background required for understanding selective partitioning and distributions of guest gases in the QAS semiclathrate hydrates and for investigating the feasibility of a semiclathrate hydrate-based precombustion CO2 capture process. PMID:23718261

  15. Monitoring Concept for CO2 Storage at the Pilot Site Ketzin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wipki, Mario; Liebscher, Axel; Lüth, Stefan; Ivanova, Alexandra; Möller, Fabian; Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia; Rippe, Dennis; Zimmer, Martin; Szizybalski, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Between 2008 and 2013, the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ has injected more than 67 kt of CO2 at the Pilot Site in Ketzin, 25 km west of Berlin. The CO2 was stored in porous sandstones of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation at a depth of 630 to 650 m. In more than a decade, GFZ has developed and tested an extraordinary multi-monitoring concept for onshore CO2 storages which mainly comprises the following methods: Time-lapse 3D seismic surveying is the most commonly used method for imaging and monitoring a CO2-plume in the deep underground before, during and after the injection phase. Such campaigns require high logistical and financial efforts and can be realised only to a limited extent. At Ketzin, for instance, 3D-seismic repeat surveys were acquired using several thousand surface acquisition points and lasting over two or three months. Alternative approaches include permanently buried seismic receivers. Geoelectric measurements in Ketzin are mainly applied by using a permanent downhole electrode installation (Vertical Electrical Resistivity Array = VERA) which has been implemented in three wells behind the well casings. Measurements between 590 m to 735 m are constantly carried out covering the vertical thickness of the entire CO2 storage horizon. Valuable results were achieved by a combination of inhole, crosshole and surface downhole measurements which has been carried out with appropriate acquisition geometries. For focused areas around monitoring wells, geoelectric methods may support and supplement information from seismic surveys. Borehole monitoring of pressure and temperature are generally indispensable for every underground gas storage type. In Ketzin, a remote monitoring system for all wells has been installed that constantly provides the operators with values for date, time, downhole and wellhead pressure, depth, and temperature. Moreover, all wellheads are checked weekly during onsite inspections. Samples for chemical analysis are

  16. A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods forMonitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2006-07-01

    Because of their wide application within the petroleumindustry it is natural to consider geophysical techniques for monitoringof CO2 movement within hydrocarbon reservoirs, whether the CO2 isintroduced for enhanced oil/gas recovery or for geologic sequestration.Among the available approaches to monitoring, seismic methods are by farthe most highly developed and applied. Due to cost considerations, lessexpensive techniques have recently been considered. In this article, therelative merits of gravity and electromagnetic (EM) methods as monitoringtools for geological CO2 sequestration are examined for two syntheticmodeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhancedoil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, theSchrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The secondscenario is a simplified model of a brine formation at a depth of 1,900m.

  17. Initial results from seismic monitoring at the Aquistore CO2 storage site, Saskatchewan, Canada

    DOE PAGESBeta

    White, D. J.; Roach, L. A.N.; Roberts, B.; Daley, T. M.

    2014-12-31

    The Aquistore Project, located near Estevan, Saskatchewan, is one of the first integrated commercial-scale CO2 storage projects in the world that is designed to demonstrate CO2 storage in a deep saline aquifer. Starting in 2014, CO2 captured from the nearby Boundary Dam coal-fired power plant will be transported via pipeline to the storage site and to nearby oil fields for enhanced oil recovery. At the Aquistore site, the CO2 will be injected into a brine-filled sandstone formation at ~3200 m depth using the deepest well in Saskatchewan. The suitability of the geological formations that will host the injected CO2 hasmore » been predetermined through 3D characterization using high-resolution 3D seismic images and deep well information. These data show that 1) there are no significant faults in the immediate area of the storage site, 2) the regional sealing formation is continuous in the area, and 3) the reservoir is not adversely affected by knolls on the surface of the underlying Precambrian basement. Furthermore, the Aquistore site is located within an intracratonic region characterized by extremely low levels of seismicity. This is in spite of oil-field related water injection in the nearby Weyburn-Midale field where a total of 656 million m3 of water have been injected since the 1960`s with no demonstrable related induced seismicity. A key element of the Aquistore research program is the further development of methods to monitor the security and subsurface distribution of the injected CO2. Toward this end, a permanent areal seismic monitoring array was deployed in 2012, comprising 630 vertical-component geophones installed at 20 m depth on a 2.5x2.5 km regular grid. This permanent array is designed to provide improved 3D time-lapse seismic imaging for monitoring subsurface CO2. Prior to the onset of CO2 injection, calibration 3D surveys were acquired in May and November of 2013. Comparison of the data from these surveys relative to the baseline 3D survey data

  18. Quantitative monitoring of subsurface CO2 emplacement and leakage using muon tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, M. L.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Spooner, N.; Gluyas, J.; Fung, C.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring CO2 emplacement and possible leakage is a major challenge; methods, such as repeat seismic surveys, are episodic and expensive. A relevant alternative approach will use detection of cosmic ray muons, which has been used previously in archaeological and geological research as a technique for mapping features hidden underground. We developed a model to test if this concept would work for monitoring CO2 storage and show that muon detection is a viable method. To achieve this we used the well-established MUSUN/MUSIC computer codes to model changes in muon fluxes resulting from the introduction of supercritical CO2 into a simulated sandstone reservoir. Results from our first simulation indicate that we could detect as little as 0.4% change in the mean reservoir density at about 1 km depth, resulting from changing the relative proportions of CO2 and existing brine pore fluid. This change is equivalent to 7% of the pore volume in this particular case. However, other scenarios offer the promise of considerable increase in sensitivity. We will show how practical implementation can be achieved using state of the art drilling technology to place an array of detectors in short-radius side-track horizontal wells beneath the storage site. We conclude that with an appropriate design it will be possible to monitor and image the migration or loss of injected CO2 continuously using cosmic ray muons, a significant step towards implementing widescale CCS safely and help rapid introduction of this essential technology.

  19. LBM simulation for CO2 saturation monitoring from elastic velocity and resistivity: Migration of supercritical CO2 in porous media under several PT conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.; Yamabe, H.; Matsuoka, T.

    2012-12-01

    In Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS), the monitoring of injected CO2 is critical for (1) predicting the risk of CO2 leakage from storage reservoirs, (2) reducing the cost and increasing the efficiency of CO2 injection, (3) reducing the risk of injection-induced seismicity, and (4) reducing the risk of creating new fractures, and hence opening new flow paths in an otherwise low-permeability capping formation. In seismic approaches, the change in seismic velocity derived from time-lapse seismic surveys can be used to evaluate the distribution of injected CO2, because the P-wave velocity decreases dramatically as the CO2 starts to invade the pore space of a rock initially saturated with brine. However, the rate of change decreases considerably when the saturation of CO2 reaches a value of 20% making the estimation of higher saturations a difficult task. Usefulness of resistivity to estimate CO2 saturation in wide porosity range was presented from laboratory experiments; the resistivity value increases with CO2 saturation even in higher saturation range. However, we cannot characterize the CO2 distribution within pore space only from laboratory experiments. The detailed investigation is needed to generate quantitative description of CO2 migration in porous media and to construct relationship between CO2 saturation and field-derived properties (i.e., seismic velocity and electric resistivity) for the quantitative monitoring of injected CO2. In this study, we apply two-phase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to the digital rock models, in order to investigate (a) seismic velocity and (b) electric resistivity under several pressure-temperature (PT) conditions. The simulation study has been compared with laboratory experiments. LBM is one of the computational fluid dynamics methods. In this algorithm, fluid as well as supercritical CO2 is represented as aggregation of imaginary fluid particles, then the movement of microscopic and discretized particles is calculated

  20. Geophysical Signatures to Monitor Fluids and Mineralization for CO2 Sequestration in Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; Van Wijk, K.; Batzle, M. L.; Mcling, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in large reservoirs can reduce emissions of this green house gas into the atmosphere. Basalts are promising host rocks due to their volumetric extend, worldwide distribution, and recent observations that CO2-water mixtures react with basalt minerals to precipitate as carbonate minerals, trapping the CO2. The chemical reaction between carbonic acid and minerals rich in calcium, magnesium and iron precipitates carbonates in the pore space. This process would increase the elastic modulus and velocity of the rock. At the same time, the higher compressibility of CO2 over water changes the elastic properties of the rock, decreasing the saturated rock bulk modulus and the P-wave velocity. Reservoirs where the rock properties change as a result of fluid or pressure changes are commonly monitored with seismic methods. Here we present experiments to study the feasibility of monitoring CO2 migration in a reservoir and CO2-rock reactions for a sequestration scenario in basalts. Our goal is to measure the rock's elastic response to mineralization with non-contacting ultrasonic lasers, and the effect of fluid substitution at reservoir conditions at seismic and ultrasonic frequencies. For the fluid substitution experiment we observe changes in the P- and S-wave velocities when saturating the sample with super-critical (sc) CO2, CO2-water mixtures and water alone for different pore and confining pressures. The bulk modulus of the rock is significantly dependent on frequency in the 2~to 106~Hz range, for CO2-water mixtures and pure water saturations. Dry and pure CO2 (sc or gas) do not show a frequency dependence on the modulus. Moreover, the shear wave modulus is not dispersive for either fluid. The frequency dependence of the elastic parameters is related to the attenuation (1/Q) of the rock. We will show the correlation between frequency dependent moduli and attenuation data for the different elastic moduli of the rocks. Three other basalt samples

  1. Near-surface monitoring for the ZERT shallow CO2 injection project

    SciTech Connect

    Strazisar BR; Wells AW; Diehl JR

    2009-12-01

    As part of a collaborative effort operated by the Zero Emission Research and Technology Center (ZERT), a series of two shallow releases of CO2 was performed at a test site in Bozeman, MT. The purpose of the experiment was to simulate possible leakage scenarios from a carbon capture and storage operation in order to further develop and verify monitoring technologies used to characterize and quantify the release of CO2. The project included collaboration with several research groups and organizations. Presented here are the results of soil–gasmonitoring conducted by researchers from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, including CO2 flux measurement, soil–gas analysis, perfluorocarbon tracer monitoring, and soil resistivity measurements. Together, these methods proved to be effective in detecting and characterizing leakage in the near-surface.

  2. On the influence of biomass burning on the seasonal CO2 signal as observed at monitoring stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wittenberg, U.; Heimann, Martin; Esse, G.; McGuire, A.D.; Sauf, W.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the role of biomass burning in simulating the seasonal signal in both prognostic and diagnostic analyses. The prognostic anaysis involved the High-Resolution Biosphere Model, a prognostic terrestrial biosphere model, and the coupled vegetation fire module, which together produce a prognostic data set of biomass burning. The diagnostic analysis invovled the Simple Diagnostic Biosphere Model (SDBM) and the Hao and Liu [1994] diagnostic data set of bimass burning, which have been scaled to global 2 and 4 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The monthly carbon exchange fields between the atmosphere and the biosphere with a spatial resolution of 0.5?? ?? 0.5??, the seasonal atmosphere-ocean exchange fields, and the emissions from fossil fuels have been coupled to the three-dimensional atmospheric transport model TM2. We have chosen eight monitoring stations of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration network to compare the predicted seasonal atmospheric CO2 signals with those deduced from atmosphere-biosphere carbon exchange fluxes without any contribution from biomass burning. The prognostic analysis and the diagnostic analysis with global burning emissions of 4 Pg C yr-1 agree with respect to the change in the amplitude of the seasonal CO2 concentration introduced through biomass burning. We find that the seasonal CO2 signal at stations in higher northern latitudes (north of 30??N) is marginally influenced by biomass burning. For stations in tropical regions an increase in the CO2 amplitude of more an 1 oppmv (up to 50% with respect to the observed trough to peak amplitude) has been calculated. Biomass burning at stations farther south accounts for an increase in the CO2 amplitude of up to 59% (0.6 ppmv). A change in the phase of the seasonal CO2 signal at tropical and southern stations has been shown to be strongly influenced by the onset of biomass burning in southern tropical Africa and America. Comparing simulated and observed seasonal CO2 signals

  3. High Precision Soil and Atmospheric Trace Gas Stable Isotopic Measurements For Monitoring Sources and Fluxes of Co2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounier, L.; Davis, S.; Bilodeau, G.; Morrison, J.; Dudd, S. N.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Helie, J.-F.; Varfalvy, L.

    Reliable information relating to sources and sinks of CO2 is essential when moni- toring changes in atmospheric emissions, effects of emission reduction strategies and general carbon cycling within a given ecosystem. Studies of CO2 sampled from at- mospheric and soil gases often involve the analysis of large numbers of samples re- quiring high throughput, automated sample preparation and the ability to deal with trace amounts of analyte. The Micromass TraceGas (TM) inlet allows the analysis of CO2, N2O and CH4 in trace concentrations (ppb level and below). Volumes of less than 100 ml of ambient air can automatically be pre-concentrated, purified and ana- lyzed. We present the use of the TraceGas to investigate CO2 cycling in ecosystems, through the measurement of the isotopic signature of soil gases. Emissions of natural CO2 from an area of seasonal grassland in California are compared to a second plot where the majority of CO2 is derived from the addition of elevated quantities of bot- tled gas (manufactured from fossil fuel). Significant shifts in the isotopic signatures were observed between the two plots, thus demonstrating the ability of the technique to identify areas of pollution and anthropogenic influences. In addition, we present the outcome of a recent study monitoring 13CO2 in atmospheric low pCO2-samples over a hydro-electric reservoir in Quebec, Canada. In this case, the IsoPrime (TM) IRMS configured with the MultiFlow (TM) sample preparation system has been used to ob- tain 13C measurements in samples stored in 12cc Exetainer vials. The study assesses how various factors, such as climatic events, the proximity of riverine vegetation and inputs of dissolved organic carbon, influence the 13CUCO2 signature of the overlying air. Benefits of the system for the analysis of 13C in CO2 include full automation, and high sample throughput and capacity (~3 mins per sample; > 250 samples per day).

  4. Concentrated solar energy for thermochemically producing liquid fuels from CO2 and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutzenhiser, Peter G.; Stamatiou, Anastasia; Villasmil, Willy; Meier, Anton; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    A two-step solar thermochemical cycle for producing syngas from H2O and CO2 via Zn/ZnO redox reactions is considered. The first, endothermic step is the thermolysis of ZnO to Zn and O2 using concentrated solar radiation as the source of process heat. The second, non-solar, exothermic step is the reaction of Zn with mixtures of H2O and CO2 yielding high-quality syngas (mainly H2 and CO) and ZnO; the latter is recycled to the first solar step, resulting in net reactions CO2 = CO+0.5O2 and H2O= H2 +0.5O2. Syngas is further processed to liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch or other catalytic reforming processes. State-of-the-art reactor technologies and experimental results are provided for both steps of the cycle.

  5. Laboratory investigations of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratio data enhance monitoring of CO2 underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Johannes A. C.; Myrttinen, Anssi; Becker, Veith; Nowak, Martin; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope data play an important role in monitoring CO2 in the subsurface, for instance during carbon capture and storage (CCS). This includes monitoring of supercritical and gaseous CO2 movement and reactions under reservoir conditions and detection of potential CO2 leakage scenarios. However, in many cases isotope data from field campaigns are either limited due to complex sample retrieval or require verification under controlled boundary conditions. Moreover, experimentally verified isotope fractionation factors are also accurately known only for temperatures and pressures lower than commonly found in CO2 reservoirs (Myrttinen et al., 2012). For this reason, several experimental series were conducted in order to investigate effects of elevated pressures, temperatures and salinities on stable carbon and oxygen isotope changes of CO2 and water. These tests were conducted with a heateable pressure device and with glass or metal gas containers in which CO2 reacted with fluids for time periods of hours to several weeks. The obtained results revealed systematic differences in 13C/12C-distributions between CO2 and the most important dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species under reservoir conditions (CO2(aq), H2CO3 and HCO3-). Since direct measurements of the pH, even immediately after sampling, were unreliable due to rapid CO2 de-gassing, one of the key results of this work is that carbon isotope fractionation data between DIC and CO2 may serve to reconstruct in situ pH values. pH values reconstructed with this approach ranged between 5.5 and 7.4 for experiments with 60 bars and up to 120 °C and were on average 1.4 pH units lower than those measured with standard pH electrodes directly after sampling. In addition, pressure and temperature experiments with H2O and CO2 revealed that differences between the oxygen isotope ratios of both phases depended on temperature, water-gas ratios as well as salt contents of the solutions involved. Such

  6. Influence of test fuel properties and composition on UNECE R101 CO2 and fuel economy valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 emission and fuel consumption of passenger cars is now assessed by using a simplistic procedure measuring the emission during a test performed without any control of the fuel properties and computing the fuel consumption through an unsophisticated formula. As pump gasoline and diesel fuels are refinery products mixture of many different hydrocarbons, and in case of gasoline may also contain a significant amount of oxygenates, the fuel properties, including the density, carbon and energy content may strongly vary from one pump fuel to the other. Being the specific test fuels carefully selected by the car manufacturers and everything but randomly chosen pump fuels, the claimed CO2 emission and fuel economy figures may differ largely from the certification values. I show from the analysis of the 2014 UK government data for 2358 diesel and 2103 petrol vehicles how same volumes of only theoretically same pump fuels used during the certification test by the cars manufacturers unfortunately do not produce the same carbon dioxide emission, and very likely do not have the same energy content. The CO2 emission per liter of diesel fuel is shown to oscillate froma maximum of 3049 g to a minimum of 2125 g, with an average of 2625 g, froma +16.13% to a -19.06% of the average. TheCO2 emission per liter of petrol fuel is shown to oscillate even more from a maximum of 3735 g to a minimum of 1767 g with an average of 2327 g, from a +60.48% to a -24.05% of the average. The proposed solution is to center the assessment on the energy demand by measuring with accuracy the mass of fuel consumed and the fuel properties of the test fuel starting from the lower heating. The corrected fuel consumption and the corrected carbon dioxide emission to mention from the test are then computed by using pure hydrocarbon reference fuels for diesel and petrol having a given lower heating value and a given hydrocarbon composition. Alternatively, exactly the same test fuel should be used by all the

  7. Influence of Fossil Fuel Emissions on CO2 Flux Estimation by Atmospheric Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, T.; Patra, P. K.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; Peters, W.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down approaches (or atmospheric inversions) using atmospheric transport models with CO2 observations are an effective way to estimate carbon fluxes at global and regional scales. CO2 flux estimation by Bayesian inversions require a priori knowledge of terrestrial biosphere and oceanic fluxes and fossil fuel (FF) CO2 emissions. In most inversion frameworks, FF CO2 is assumed to be a known quantity because FF CO2 based on world statistics are thought to be more reliable than natural CO2 fluxes. However different databases of FF CO2 emissions may have different temporal and spatial variations especially at locations where statistics are not so accurate. In this study, we use 3 datasets of fossil fuel emissions in inversion estimations and evaluate the sensitivity of the optimized CO2 fluxes to FF emissions with two different inverse models, JAMSTEC's ACTM and CarbonTracker Europe (CTE). Interannually varying a priori FF CO2 emissions were based on 1) CDIAC database, 2) EDGARv4.2 database, and 3) IEA database, with some modifications. Biosphere and oceanic fluxes were optimized. Except for FF emissions, other conditions were kept the same in our inverse experiments. The three a priori FF emissions showed ~5% (~0.3GtC/yr) differences in their global total emissions in the early 2000's and the differences reached ~9% (~0.9 GtC/yr) in 2010. This resulted in 0.5-1 GtC/yr (2001-2011) and 0.3-0.6 GtC/yr (2007-2011) differences in the estimated global total emissions for the ACTM and CTE inversions, respectively. Regional differences in the FF emissions were relatively large in East Asia (~0.5 GtC/yr for ACTM and ~0.3 GtC/yr for CTE) and Europe (~0.3 GtC/yr for ACTM). These a priori flux differences caused differences in the estimated biosphere fluxes for ACTM in East Asia and Europe and also their neighboring regions such as West Asia, Boreal Eurasia, and North Africa. The main differences in the biosphere fluxes for CTE were found in Asia and the Americas.

  8. Monitoring Shallow Subsurface CO2 Migration using Electrical Imaging Technique, Pilot Site in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, A.; Chang, H. K.; Moreira, A.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Geological Sequestration (CCGS or CCS) is one of the main technological strategies targeting Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions reduction, with special emphasis on carbon dioxide (CO2) coming from industrial sources. CCGS integrates the so called Carbon Management Strategies, as indicated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and is the basis of main technical route likely to enable substantial emission reduction in a safe, quick and cost-effective way. Currently one of the main challenges in the area of CO2 storage research is to grant the development, testing and validation of accurate and efficient measuring, monitoring and verification (MMV) techniques to be deployed at the final storage site, targeting maximum storage efficiency at the minimal leakage risk levels. The implementation of the first CO2 MMV field lab in Brazil, located in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina state, offered an excellent opportunity for running controlled release experiments in a real open air environment. The purpose of this work is to present the results of a time lapse monitoring experiment of CO2 migration in both saturated and unsaturated sand-rich sediments, using electrical imaging technique. The experiment covered an area of approximately 6300 m2 and CO2 was continuously injected at depth of 8 m, during 12 days, at an average rate of 90 g/ day, totalizing 1080 g of injected CO2. 2D and 3D electrical images using Wenner array were acquired daily during 13 consecutive days. Comparison of post injection electrical imaging results with pre injection images shows change in resistivity values consistent with migration pathways of CO2. A pronounced increase in resistivity values (up to ~ 500 ohm.m) with respect to the pre-injection values occurs in the vicinity of the injection well. Background values of 530 ohm.m have changed to 1118 ohm.m, right after injection. Changes in resistivity values progressively diminish outward of the well, following

  9. Monitoring of catalyst performance in CO2 lasers using frequency modulation spectroscopy with diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Liang-Guo; Sachse, Glen

    1990-01-01

    Closed-cycle CO2 laser operation with removal of O2 and regeneration of CO2 can be achieved by catalytic CO-O2 recombination. Both parametric studies of the optimum catalyst formulation and long-term performance tests require on line monitoring of CO, O2 and CO2 concentrations. There are several existing methods for molecular oxygen detection. These methods are either intrusive (such as electrochemical method or mass spectrometry) or very expensive (such as CARS, UV laser absorption). Researchers demonstrated a high-sensitivity spectroscopic measurement of O2 using the two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) technique with a near infrared GaAlAs diode laser. Besides its inexpensive cost, fast response time, nonintrusive measurements and high sensitivity, this technique may also be used to differentiate between isotopes due to its high spectroscopic resolution. This frequency modulation spectroscopy technique could also be applied for the on-line monitoring of CO and CO2 using InGaAsP diode lasers operation in the 1.55 microns region and H2O in the 1.3 microns region. The existence of single mode optical fibers at the near infrared region makes it possible to combine FMS with optical fiber technology. Optical fiber FMS is particularly suitable for making point-measurements at one or more locations in the CO2 laser/catalyst system.

  10. VSP Monitoring of CO2 Injection at the Aneth Oil Field in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Rutledge, J.; Zhou, R.; Denli, H.; Cheng, A.; Zhao, M.; Peron, J.

    2008-12-01

    Remotely tracking the movement of injected CO2 within a geological formation is critically important for ensuring safe and long-term geologic carbon sequestration. To study the capability of vertical seismic profiling (VSP) for remote monitoring of CO2 injection, a geophone string with 60 levels and 96 channels was cemented into a monitoring well at the Aneth oil field in Utah operated by Resolute Natural Resources and Navajo National Oil and Gas Company. The oil field is located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, and was selected by the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration. The geophones are placed at depths from 805 m to 1704 m, and the oil reservoir is located approximately from 1731 m to 1786 m in depth. A baseline VSP dataset with one zero-offset and seven offset source locations was acquired in October, 2007 before CO2 injection. The offsets/source locations are approximately 1 km away from the monitoring well with buried geophone string. A time-lapse VSP dataset with the same source locations was collected in July, 2008 after five months of CO2/water injection into a horizontal well adjacent to the monitoring well. The total amount of CO2 injected during the time interval between the two VSP surveys was 181,000 MCF (million cubic feet), or 10,500 tons. The time-lapse VSP data are pre-processed to balance the phase and amplitude of seismic events above the oil reservoir. We conduct wave-equation migration imaging and interferometry analysis using the pre-processed time-lapse VSP data. The results demonstrate that time-lapse VSP surveys with high-resolution migration imaging and scattering analysis can provide reliable information about CO2 migration. Both the repeatability of VSP surveys and sophisticated time-lapse data pre-processing are essential to make VSP as an effective tool for monitoring CO2 injection.

  11. Design of a perfluorocarbon tracer based monitoring network to support monitoring verification and accounting of sequestered CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, T.; Sullivan, T.

    2013-05-01

    The levels of CO2 in the atmosphere have been growing since the beginning of the industrial revolution. The current level is 391 ppm. If there are no efforts to mitigate CO2 emissions, the levels will rise to 750 ppm by 2100. Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy that may be used to begin to reduce emissions. Sequestration will not be effective unless reservoir leak rates are significantly less than 1%. There must be rigorous monitoring protocols in place to ensure sequestration projects meet regulatory and environmental goals. Monitoring for CO2 leakage directly is difficult because of the large background levels and variability of CO2 in the atmosphere. Using tracers to tag the sequestered CO2 can mitigate some of the difficulties of direct measurement but a tracer monitoring network and the levels of tagging need to be carefully designed. Simple diffusion and dispersion models are used to predict the surface and atmospheric concentrations that would be seen by a network monitoring a sequestration site. Levels of tracer necessary to detect leaks from 0.01 to 1% are presented and suggestions for effective monitoring and protection of global tracer utility are presented.

  12. On the development of a methodology for extensive in-situ and continuous atmospheric CO2 monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Chang, S.; Jhang, T.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is recognized as the dominating greenhouse gas contributing to anthropogenic global warming. Stringent controls on carbon dioxide emissions are viewed as necessary steps in controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. From the view point of policy making, regulation of carbon dioxide emissions and its monitoring are keys to the success of stringent controls on carbon dioxide emissions. Especially, extensive atmospheric CO2 monitoring is a crucial step to ensure that CO2 emission control strategies are closely followed. In this work we develop a methodology that enables reliable and accurate in-situ and continuous atmospheric CO2 monitoring for policy making. The methodology comprises the use of gas filter correlation (GFC) instrument for in-situ CO2 monitoring, the use of CO2 working standards accompanying the continuous measurements, and the use of NOAA WMO CO2 standard gases for calibrating the working standards. The use of GFC instruments enables 1-second data sampling frequency with the interference of water vapor removed from added dryer. The CO2 measurements are conducted in the following timed and cycled manner: zero CO2 measurement, two standard CO2 gases measurements, and ambient air measurements. The standard CO2 gases are calibrated again NOAA WMO CO2 standards. The methodology is used in indoor CO2 measurements in a commercial office (about 120 people working inside), ambient CO2 measurements, and installed in a fleet of in-service commercial cargo ships for monitoring CO2 over global marine boundary layer. These measurements demonstrate our method is reliable, accurate, and traceable to NOAA WMO CO2 standards. The portability of the instrument and the working standards make the method readily applied for large-scale and extensive CO2 measurements.

  13. Seismic modeling to monitor CO2 geological storage: The Atzbach-Schwanenstadt gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picotti, Stefano; Carcione, José M.; Gei, Davide; Rossi, Giuliana; Santos, Juan E.

    2012-06-01

    We develop a petro-elastical numerical methodology to compute realistic synthetic seismograms and analyze the sensitivity of the seismic response when injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) in a depleted gas reservoir. The petro-elastical model describes the seismic properties of the reservoir rock saturated with CO2, methane and brine, and allows us to estimate the distribution and saturation of CO2 during the injection process. The gas properties, as a function of the in-situ pressure and temperature conditions, are computed with the Peng-Robinson equation of state, taking into account the absorption of gas by brine. Wave attenuation and velocity dispersion are based on the mesoscopic loss mechanism, which is simulated by an upscaling procedure to obtain an equivalent viscoelastic medium corresponding to partial saturation at the mesoscopic scale. Having the equivalent complex and frequency-dependent bulk (dilatational) modulus, we include shear attenuation and perform numerical simulations of wave propagation at the macroscale by solving the viscoelastic differential equations using the memory-variable approach. The pseudo-spectral modeling method allows general material variability and provides a complete and accurate characterization of the reservoir. The methodology is used to assess the sensitivity of the seismic method for monitoring the CO2 geological storage at the Atzbach-Schwanestadt depleted gas-field in Austria. The objective of monitoring is the detection of the CO2 plume in the reservoir and possible leakages of CO2. The leakages are located at different depths, where the CO2 is present as gaseous, liquid and supercritical phases. Even though the differences can be very subtle, this work shows that seismic monitoring of CO2 from the surface is possible. While the identification of shallow leakages is feasible, the detection of the plume and deep leakages, located in the caprock just above the injection formation, is more difficult, but possible by using

  14. Time Lapse Gravity and Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Injection at the West Hastings Field, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. F.; Richards, T.; Klopping, F.; MacQueen, J.; Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Time lapse or 4D gravity and seismic reflection surveys are being conducted at the West Hastings Field near Houston, Texas to monitor the progress of CO2 injection. This Department of Energy supported CO2 sequestration experiment is conducted in conjunction with a Denbury Onshore, LLC tertiary recovery project. The reservoir is at a depth of 1.8 km in the Oligocene Frio sands and has been produced since the 1930s. Goals are an accounting and mapping of the injected CO2 and to determine if migration occurs along intra-reservoir faults. An integrated interpretation of the geophysical surveys will be made together with well logs and engineering data. Gravity monitoring of water versus gas replacement has been very successful, but liquid phase CO2 monitoring is problematic due to the smaller density contrast with respect to oil and water. This reservoir has a small volume to depth ratio and hence only a small gravity difference signal is expected on the surface. New borehole gravity technology introduced by Micro-g-Lacoste can make gravity measurements at near reservoir depths with a much higher signal to noise ratio. This method has been successfully evaluated on a simulation of the Hastings project. Field operations have been conducted for repeated surface and borehole gravity surveys beginning in 2013. The surface survey of 95 stations covers an area of 3 by 5 km and 22 borehole gravity logs are run in the interval above the Frio formation. 4D seismic reflection surveys are being made at 6 month intervals on the surface and in 3 VSP wells. CO2 injection into the targeted portion of the reservoir only began in early 2015 and monitoring will continue into 2017. To date only the baseline reservoir conditions have been assessed. The overall success of the gravity monitoring will not be determined until 2017.

  15. Improved monitoring of subsurface CO2 storage using novel electrical and seismic measurements: scaled laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, R.; Kirichek, A.; Draganov, D.; Heller, K.

    2013-05-01

    For monitoring CO2 stored in appropriate geological settings like depleted oil or gas reservoirs, deep saline aquifers and deep unminable coalbeds, geophysical methods e.g., seismic, electromagnetics, gravity, and surface deformation studies serve as remote sensing techniques which generally provide a large coverage but a low spatial resolution. It has been concluded that of the various approaches, seismic methods have the broadest applicability for stored CO2 monitoring in various geologic settings. As a result, advanced and dedicated seismic monitoring techniques have been developed. However, three major issues that remain unresolved are: 1) to remove accurately the effect of the overburden layers in order to capture the change in seismic properties in the reservoir and thereby obtain reliable estimates of temporal and spatial changes of the rock-physical properties like pressure and saturation, 2) the difficulty to minimize the source-related variation in time-lapse seismic, and 3) the inability to monitor the changes in phase (supercritical, liquid or gaseous) of the stored CO2 in time and space. In order to address these crucial issues, we have concentrated on scaled laboratory tests mimicking realistic storage conditions, and have tested novel approaches involving analysis of complex electrical impedance coupled with seismic-interferometric characterization. A new laboratory experimental facility for simultaneous, multichannel seismic and AC electrical measurements has been developed. We have found that electrical permittivity is a very sensitive parameter to monitor the phase of the stored CO2. Secondly, a novel approach has been developed, which takes advantage of the nonphysical reflections retrieved by seismic interferometry to estimate reliable values of seismic wave velocity and attenuation in the CO2 reservoir, efficiently minimizing the effect of the overburden and removing the detrimental effect of the source-related irreproducibility. Finally, new

  16. Continental-scale enrichment of atmospheric 14CO2 from the nuclear power industry: potential impact on the estimation of fossil fuel-derived CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graven, H. D.; Gruber, N.

    2011-12-01

    The 14C-free fossil carbon added to atmospheric CO2 by combustion dilutes the atmospheric 14C/C ratio (Δ14C), potentially providing a means to verify fossil CO2 emissions calculated using economic inventories. However, sources of 14C from nuclear power generation and spent fuel reprocessing can counteract this dilution and may bias 14C/C-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 if these nuclear influences are not correctly accounted for. Previous studies have examined nuclear influences on local scales, but the potential for continental-scale influences on Δ14C has not yet been explored. We estimate annual 14C emissions from each nuclear site in the world and conduct an Eulerian transport modeling study to investigate the continental-scale, steady-state gradients of Δ14C caused by nuclear activities and fossil fuel combustion. Over large regions of Europe, North America and East Asia, nuclear enrichment may offset at least 20% of the fossil fuel dilution in Δ14C, corresponding to potential biases of more than -0.25 ppm in the CO2 attributed to fossil fuel emissions, larger than the bias from plant and soil respiration in some areas. Model grid cells including high 14C-release reactors or fuel reprocessing sites showed much larger nuclear enrichment, despite the coarse model resolution of 1.8°×1.8°. The recent growth of nuclear 14C emissions increased the potential nuclear bias over 1985-2005, suggesting that changing nuclear activities may complicate the use of Δ14C observations to identify trends in fossil fuel emissions. The magnitude of the potential nuclear bias is largely independent of the choice of reference station in the context of continental-scale Eulerian transport and inversion studies, but could potentially be reduced by an appropriate choice of reference station in the context of local-scale assessments.

  17. Stability aspects of a fiber optic sensor for CO2 phase monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, Dario; Martelli, Cicero; Gouvêa, Paula M. P.; Kato, Carla C.; Braga, Arthur M. B.; Gomes, Marcos S. P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we discuss the stability and effectiveness of an optical fiber sensor for CO2 phase monitoring that could be used inside pipelines, rock caverns and steel tanks for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) systems; in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) processes; and in mapping of natural reservoirs. The sensor is an optical fiber refractometer and is shown to be capable of identifying phase changes and when two-phase systems co-exist, even near the phase transition line. When properly calibrated, the sensor can be used to obtain the refractive index and density (calculated with the Lorentz-Lorentz formula) of CO2.

  18. Liquid Fuel From Microbial Communities: Electroalcoholgenesis: Bioelectrochemical Reduction of CO2 to Butanol

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: MUSC is developing an engineered system to create liquid fuels from communities of interdependent microorganisms. MUSC is first pumping carbon dioxide (CO2) and renewable sources of electricity into a battery-like cell. A community of microorganisms uses the electricity to convert the CO2 into hydrogen. That hydrogen is then consumed by another community of microorganisms living in the same system. These new microorganisms convert the hydrogen into acetate, which in turn feed yet another community of microorganisms. This last community of microorganisms uses the acetate to produce a liquid biofuel called butanol. Similar interdependent microbial communities can be found in some natural environments, but they’ve never been coupled together in an engineered cell to produce liquid fuels. MUSC is working to triple the amount of butanol that can be produced in its system and to reduce the overall cost of the process.

  19. Characterization, Monitoring, and Risk Assessment at the IEA GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project, Saskatchewan, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, R.; Chalaturnyk, R.; Gardner, C.; Hawkes, C.; Johnson, J.; White, D.; Whittaker, S.

    2008-12-01

    In July 2000, a major research project was initiated to study the geological storage of CO2 as part of a 5000 tonnes/day EOR project planned for the Weyburn Field in Saskatchewan, Canada. Major objectives of the IEA GHG Weyburn CO2 monitoring and storage project included: assessing the integrity of the geosphere encompassing the Weyburn oil pool for effective long-term storage of CO2; monitoring the movement of the injected CO2, and assessing the risk of migration of CO2 from the injection zone (approximately 1500 metres depth) to the surface. Over the period 2000-2004, a diverse group of 80+ researchers worked on: geological, geophysical, and hydrogeological characterizations at both the regional (100 km beyond the field) and detailed scale (10 km around the field); conducted time-lapse geophysical surveys; carried out surface and subsurface geochemical surveys; and undertook numerical reservoir simulations. Results of the characterization were used for a performance assessment that concluded the risk of CO2 movement to the biosphere was very small. By September 2007, more than 14 Mtonnes of CO2 had been injected into the Weyburn reservoir, including approximately 3 Mtonnes recycled from oil production. A "Final Phase" research project was initiated (2007- 2011) to contribute to a "Best Practices" guide for long-term CO2 storage in EOR settings. Research objectives include: improving the geoscience characterization; further detailed analysis and data collection on the role of wellbores; additional geochemical and geophysical monitoring activities; and an emphasis on quantitative risk assessments using multiple analysis techniques. In this talk a review of results from Phase I will be presented followed by plans and initial results for the Final Phase.

  20. A multiyear, global gridded fossil fuel CO2 emission data product: Evaluation and analysis of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asefi-Najafabady, S.; Rayner, P. J.; Gurney, K. R.; McRobert, A.; Song, Y.; Coltin, K.; Huang, J.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K.

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution, global quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle science and climate policy. We build upon a previously developed fossil fuel data assimilation system (FFDAS) for estimating global high-resolution fossil fuel CO2 emissions. We have improved the underlying observationally based data sources, expanded the approach through treatment of separate emitting sectors including a new pointwise database of global power plants, and extended the results to cover a 1997 to 2010 time series at a spatial resolution of 0.1°. Long-term trend analysis of the resulting global emissions shows subnational spatial structure in large active economies such as the United States, China, and India. These three countries, in particular, show different long-term trends and exploration of the trends in nighttime lights, and population reveal a decoupling of population and emissions at the subnational level. Analysis of shorter-term variations reveals the impact of the 2008-2009 global financial crisis with widespread negative emission anomalies across the U.S. and Europe. We have used a center of mass (CM) calculation as a compact metric to express the time evolution of spatial patterns in fossil fuel CO2 emissions. The global emission CM has moved toward the east and somewhat south between 1997 and 2010, driven by the increase in emissions in China and South Asia over this time period. Analysis at the level of individual countries reveals per capita CO2 emission migration in both Russia and India. The per capita emission CM holds potential as a way to succinctly analyze subnational shifts in carbon intensity over time. Uncertainties are generally lower than the previous version of FFDAS due mainly to an improved nightlight data set.

  1. Fire vs. fossil fuel: all CO2 emissions are not created equal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, J.-S.; Matthews, H. D.

    2015-09-01

    Fire is arguably the most influential natural disturbance in terrestrial ecosystems, thereby playing a major role in carbon exchanges and affecting many climatic processes. Nevertheless, fire has not been the subject of dedicated studies in coupled climate-carbon models with interactive vegetation until very recently. Hence, previous studies resorted to results from simulations of fossil fuel emissions to estimate the effects of fire-induced CO2 emissions. While atmospheric CO2 molecules are all alike, fundamental differences in their origin suggest that the effects from fire emissions on the global carbon cycle and temperature are irreconcilable with the effects from fossil fuel emissions. The main purpose of this study is to illustrate the consequences from these fundamental differences between CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and non-deforestation fires (i.e., following which the natural vegetation can recover) using 1000-year simulations of a coupled climate-carbon model with interactive vegetation. We assessed emissions from both pulse and stable fire regime changes, considering both the gross (carbon released from combustion) and net (fire-caused change in land carbon, also accounting for vegetation decomposition and regrowth, as well as climate-carbon feedbacks) fire CO2 emissions. In all cases, we found substantial differences from equivalent amounts of emissions produced by fossil fuel combustion. These findings suggest that side-by-side comparisons of non-deforestation fire and fossil fuel CO2 emissions - implicitly implying that they have similar effects - should therefore be avoided, particularly when these comparisons involve gross fire emissions. Our results also support the notion that most net emissions occur relatively soon after fire regime shifts and then progressively approach zero, whereas gross emissions stabilize around a new value that is a poor indicator of the cumulative net emissions caused by the fire regime shift. Overall, our study

  2. Investigating the Feasibility of Traveltime Tomography for Monitoring CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghouty, L. K.; Quan, Y.; Harris, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a process for improving the recovery of oil from a reservoir through injection of carbon dioxide. The monitoring CO2 EOR requires an effective method that detects the location of injected CO2 in the reservoir. This project investigates the feasibility of using crosswell seismic tomography to monitor the distribution of injected CO2. Tomography converts seismic traveltime data into seismic velocity models. The effectiveness of seismic tomography as a monitoring method depends on the level of its repeatability, e.g., how accurate the results will be under possible survey challenges such as incomplete datasets and errors in survey geometry. These challenges are found in the seismic data in a field test from west Texas. Using synthetic data comprising pre-injection and post-injection datasets similar to the recorded field datasets, several data processing techniques have been tested to assess the difference between the pre-injection and post-injection velocity models, to determine how data processing affects the time-lapse results. Such tests include limiting the aperture of one or both surveys, eliminating near offset data where traveltime picks are difficult to make, shifting receivers/sources depth coordinates to simulate the survey acquisition errors, and patching (data extrapolation) to correct for missing data. Synthetic results show that near-offset elimination does not notably affect the quality of the time-lapse results while matching pre- and post-injection survey geometries gives better results even for incomplete survey geometries. Patching of incomplete datasets gives reasonable results within certain limits, and having a depth error more than twice the inversion grid size significantly affects the results. Based on synthetic results, repeatability of seismic tomography depends highly on the accuracy of source and receiver coordinates, while repeatability tolerates mismatching pre-injection and post-injection survey

  3. Degradation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to CO and CO 2 poisoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei-Mon; Chu, Hsin-Sen; Lu, Meng-Xi; Weng, Fang-Bor; Jung, Guo-Bin; Lee, Chi-Yuan

    The CO and CO 2 poisoning effects on the degradation of cell performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) under transient stage were investigated. The mechanism of CO poisoning lies in the preferential adsorbing of CO to the platinum surface and the blocking of active sites of hydrogen. These phenomena were described with adsorption, desorption, and electro-oxidation processes of CO and hydrogen in the present work. In addition, it is well known that the reverse water gas shift reaction (RWGS) is the main effect of the CO 2 poisoning, through which a large part of the catalytic surface area becomes inactive due to the hydrogen dissociation. The predicted results showed that, by contaminating the fuel with 10 ppm CO at the condition of P H = 0.8 atm and PCO2 = 0.2 atm , the current density of the PEM fuel cell was lowered 28% with rate constant of RWGS k rs from zero to 0.02. With 50 ppm CO, the performance drop was only 18%. For the reformed gas, CO 2 poisoning became much more significantly when the CO content in the reactant gas was small.

  4. 1. Fourteen Years Of Diffuse CO2 Monitoring At Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrancos Martinez, Jose; Melián, Gladys; Ibarra, Martha; Álvarez, Julio; Rodríguez, Fátima; Nolasco, Dácil; Padilla, Germán; Calvo, David; Dionis, Samara; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Iñigo; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Muñoz, Angélica

    2013-04-01

    7. Cerro Negro is an active basaltic volcano belonging to the active Central American Volcanic Belt, which includes a 1,100 Km long chain of 41 active volcanoes from Guatemala to Panama. Cerro Negro first erupted in 1850 and has experienced 21 eruptive eruptions with inter eruptive average periods between 7 and 9 years. Since the last eruption occurred on 5 August 1999, with erupted lava flows and ash clouds together with gas emissions, a collaborative research program between INETER and ITER was established for monitoring diffuse CO2 emissions from this volcano. Until 2012, twelve soil CO2 emission surveys covering an area of 0,6 km2 have been performed by means of the accumulation chamber method to evaluate the spatial and temporal variations of CO2 degassing rate in relation to the eruptive cycle of Cerro Negro. A total diffuse CO2 emission output of 1,869 t•d-1 was estimated for the 1999 survey; just 3 months after the 1999 eruption which can be considered within the post-eruptive phase. For the April, 2002 and March, 2008 surveys, considered within the inter-eruptive phase, a clear decreasing tendency on the total diffuse CO2 output was observed, with estimates of 431 and 10 t•d-1, respectively, except a small increment in 2004, to 256 t d-1, associated with an anomalous seismic activity. The higher anomalies are located around the crater of 1995 and 1999. An increasing on the total CO2 emission has been observed, from December 2008 to February 2011, with total diffuse CO2 output estimates from 12 t•d-1 to 43 t•d-1, respectively. These temporal variations show a close relationship between diffuse CO2 emission and the eruptive cycle at Cerro Negro. This relationship indicates that monitoring CO2 emission is an important geochemical tool for the volcanic surveillance at Cerro Negro. References: (1) Rodríguez et al. (2009) AGU Fall Meeting 2009. EOS, AGU,V21-2017 . (2) Padilla et al. (2008). IV Reunión de la Red Española de Volcanología, Almagro 2008

  5. Gas monitoring during the CO2 back production field test at the Ketzin pilot site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szizybalski, Alexandra; Zimmer, Martin; Kujawa, Christian; Erzinger, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    fluids before the injection of CO2 showed that CH4, CO2, H2 and N2 are present in the original formation fluid (0.17 mg/l, 0.08 mg/l, 0.14 mg/l, 17.9 mg/l fluid; Morozova et al., 2010). The observed N2 concentrations in the back-produced gas may, therefore, result from the field tests and from injection management or from the original formation fluid. Results of the isotopic measurements are in preparation. Morozova, D., Wandrey, M., Alawi, M., Zimmer, M., Vieth, A., Zettlitzer, M., Wuerdemann, H. (2010): Monitoring of the microbial community composition in saline aquifers during CO2 storage by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Volume 4, Pages 981-989. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2009.11.014.

  6. A rate-based transcutaneous CO2 sensor for noninvasive respiration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, M; Ge, X; Kostov, Y; Luu, P; Tolosa, L; Woo, H; Viscardi, R; Falk, S; Potts, R; Rao, G

    2015-05-01

    The pain and risk of infection associated with invasive blood sampling for blood gas measurements necessitate the search for reliable noninvasive techniques. In this work we developed a novel rate-based noninvasive method for a safe and fast assessment of respiratory status. A small sampler was built to collect the gases diffusing out of the skin. It was connected to a CO2 sensor through gas-impermeable tubing. During a measurement, the CO2 initially present in the sampler was first removed by purging it with nitrogen. The gases in the system were then recirculated between the sampler and the CO2 sensor, and the CO2 diffusion rate into the sampler was measured. Because the measurement is based on the initial transcutaneous diffusion rate, reaching mass transfer equilibrium and heating the skin is no longer required, thus, making it much faster and safer than traditional method. A series of designed experiments were performed to analyze the effect of the measurement parameters such as sampler size, measurement location, subject positions, and movement. After the factor analysis tests, the prototype was sent to a level IV NICU for clinical trial. The results show that the measured initial rate of increase in CO2 partial pressure is linearly correlated with the corresponding arterial blood gas measurements. The new approach can be used as a trending tool, making frequent blood sampling unnecessary for respiratory status monitoring. PMID:25832294

  7. Monitoring CO2 sources and sinks from space : the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) will make the first space-based measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with the precision, resolution, and coverage needed to characterize the geographic distribution of CO2 sources and sinks and quantify their variability over the seasonal cycle. OCO is currently scheduled for launch in 2008. The observatory will carry a single instrument that incorporates three high-resolution grating spectrometers designed to measure the near-infrared absorption by CO2 and molecular oxygen (O2) in reflected sunlight. OCO will fly 12 minutes ahead of the EOS Aqua platform in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Afternoon Constellation (A-Train). The in-strument will collect 12 to 24 soundings per second as the Observatory moves along its orbit track on the day side of the Earth. A small sampling footprint (<3 km2 at nadir) was adopted to reduce biases in each sounding associated with clouds and aerosols and spatial variations in surface topography. A comprehensive ground-based validation program will be used to assess random errors and biases in the XCO2 product on regional to continental scales. Measurements collected by OCO will be assimilated with other environmental measurements to retrieve surface sources and sinks of CO2. This information could play an important role in monitoring the integrity of large scale CO2 sequestration projects.

  8. A rate-based transcutaneous CO2 sensor for noninvasive respiration monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, M; Kostov, Y; Luu, P; Tolosa, L; Woo, H; Viscardi, R; Falk, S; Potts, R

    2015-01-01

    The pain and risk of infection associated with invasive blood sampling for blood gas measurements necessitate the search for reliable noninvasive techniques. In this work we developed a novel rate-based noninvasive method for a safe and fast assessment of respiratory status. A small sampler was built to collect the gases diffusing out of the skin. It was connected to a CO2 sensor through gas-impermeable tubing. During a measurement, the CO2 initially present in the sampler was first removed by purging it with nitrogen. The gases in the system were then recirculated between the sampler and the CO2 sensor, and the CO2 diffusion rate into the sampler was measured. Because the measurement is based on the initial transcutaneous diffusion rate, reaching mass transfer equilibrium and heating the skin is no longer required, thus, making it much faster and safer than traditional method. A series of designed experiments were performed to analyze the effect of the measurement parameters such as sampler size, measurement location, subject positions, and movement. After the factor analysis tests, the prototype was sent to a level IV NICU for clinical trial. The results show that the measured initial rate of increase in CO2 partial pressure is linearly correlated with the corresponding arterial blood gas measurements. The new approach can be used as a trending tool, making frequent blood sampling unnecessary for respiratory status monitoring. PMID:25832294

  9. FUEL ECONOMY AND CO2 EMISSIONS STANDARDS, MANUFACTURER PRICING STRATEGIES, AND FEEBATES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David L; Bunch, Dr David S.

    2012-01-01

    Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards and CO2 emissions standards for 2012 to 2016 have significantly increased the stringency of requirements for new light-duty vehicle fuel efficiency. This study investigates the role of technology adoption and pricing strategies in meeting new standards, as well as the impact of feebate policies. The analysis is carried out by means of a dynamic optimization model that simulates manufacturer decisions with the objective of maximizing social surplus while simultaneously considering consumer response and meeting CAFE and emissions standards. The results indicate that technology adoption plays the major role and that the provision of compliance flexibility and the availability of cost-effective advanced technologies help manufacturers reduce the need for pricing to induce changes in the mix of vehicles sold. Feebates, when implemented along with fuel economy and emissions standards, can bring additional fuel economy improvement and emissions reduction, but the benefit diminishes with the increasing stringency of the standards.

  10. Integrated Geophysical Monitoring Program to Study Flood Performance and Incidental CO2 Storage Associated with a CO2 EOR Project in the Bell Creek Oil Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnison, S. A.; Ditty, P.; Gorecki, C. D.; Hamling, J. A.; Steadman, E. N.; Harju, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center, is working with Denbury Onshore LLC to determine the effect of a large-scale injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a deep clastic reservoir for the purpose of simultaneous CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and to study incidental CO2 storage at the Bell Creek oil field located in southeastern Montana. This project will reduce CO2 emissions by more than 1 million tons a year while simultaneously recovering an anticipated 30 million barrels of incremental oil. The Bell Creek project provides a unique opportunity to use and evaluate a comprehensive suite of technologies for monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) of CO2 on a large-scale. The plan incorporates multiple geophysical technologies in the presence of complementary and sometimes overlapping data to create a comprehensive data set that will facilitate evaluation and comparison. The MVA plan has been divided into shallow and deep subsurface monitoring. The deep subsurface monitoring plan includes 4-D surface seismic, time-lapse 3-D vertical seismic profile (VSP) surveys incorporating a permanent borehole array, and baseline and subsequent carbon-oxygen logging and other well-based measurements. The goal is to track the movement of CO2 in the reservoir, evaluate the recovery/storage efficiency of the CO2 EOR program, identify fluid migration pathways, and determine the ultimate fate of injected CO2. CO2 injection at Bell Creek began in late May 2013. Prior to injection, a monitoring and characterization well near the field center was drilled and outfitted with a distributed temperature-monitoring system and three down-hole pressure gauges to provide continuous real-time data of the reservoir and overlying strata. The monitoring well allows on-demand access for time-lapse well-based measurements and borehole seismic instrumentation. A 50-level permanent borehole array of 3-component geophones was installed in a

  11. Monitoring Surface CO2 Leaks Using Hyperspectral Plant Signatures During the 2008 and 2009 ZERT Shallow Subsurface CO2 Release Experiment in Bozeman, MT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Male, E. J.; Pickles, W.; Silver, E. A.; Hoffmann, G. D.; Lewicki, J. L.; Apple, M. E.; Repasky, K. S.; Dobeck, L.; Burton, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Hyperspectral plant signatures can be a powerful tool in the monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) of geologic carbon sequestration fields. They can be used to ensure safe and effective sequestration of carbon on short term, as well as on long term timescales. A compromised sequestration field could release CO2 to the surface, where it can negatively impact overlying vegetation. Plant stress caused by a CO2 leak can be observed as changes in the visible to near-infrared reflectance spectra of vegetation. We tested this technique during two controlled shallow CO2 injections during the summers of 2008 and 2009, with each injection lasting for approximately 4 weeks. CO2 gas was released through a 100-meter long horizontal injection well, at a flow rate of 300 kg/day in 2008, and 200 kg/day in 2009. In both years, overlying vegetation comprised various short and tall grasses, alfalfa, and dandelions. During the spring of 2009, following the 2008 experiment, a species of short grass, Kentucky Bluegrass (Poa pratensis), grew predominately in areas where high CO2 fluxes were previously measured, suggesting long term changes to the site as a result of the CO2 leaks. We used a “FieldSpec Pro” spectrometer by Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Inc.) to monitor plant health by measuring spectral signatures nearly daily for both experiments. We measured plants located directly over the injection well to10 m away from the well. Acquiring data both inside and outside of the CO2 leak zones allowed us to normalize our measurements to seasonal changes and other environmental factors that affected the vegetation. In both the 2008 and 2009 experiments, we began to observe plant stress within approximately 4 days of the start of each injection. The measured plant stress each year was located within zones of high CO2 flux from the injections. This correlation was also seen in aerial hyperspectral imagery acquired in 2008 by Resonon Inc. of Bozeman, MT using their self

  12. CO2 Fluxes Monitoring at the Level of Field Agroecosystem in Moscow Region of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkina, Joulia; Mazirov, Ilya; Samardzic, Miljan; Yaroslavtsev, Alexis; Valentini, Riccardo; Vasenev, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    The Central Russia is still one of the less GHG-investigated European areas especially in case of agroecosystem-level carbon dioxide fluxes monitoring by eddy covariance method. The eddy covariance technique is a statistical method to measure and calculate vertical turbulent fluxes within atmospheric boundary layers. The major assumption of the metod is that measurements at a point can represent an entire upwind area. Eddy covariance researches, which could be considered as repeated for the same area, are very rare. The research has been carried out on the Precision Farming Experimental Field of the Russian Timiryazev State Agricultural University (Moscow, Russia) in 2013 under the support of RF Government grant No. 11.G34.31.0079. Arable derno-podzoluvisls have around 1 The results have shown high daily and seasonal dynamic of agroecosystem CO2 emission. Sowing activates soil microbiological activity and the average soil CO2 emission and adsorption are rising at the same time. CO2 streams are intensified after crop emerging from values of 3 to 7 μmol/s-m2 for emission, and from values of 5 to 20 μmol/s-m2 for adsorption. Stabilization of the flow has come at achieving plants height of 10-12 cm. The vegetation period is characterized by high average soil CO2 emission and adsorption at the same time, but the adsorption is significantly higher. The resulted CO2 absorption during the day is approximately 2-5 times higher than emissions at night. For example, in mid-June, the absorption value was about 0.45 mol/m2 during the day-time, and the emission value was about 0.1 mol/m2 at night. After harvesting CO2 emission is becoming essentially higher than adsorption. Autumn and winter data are fluctuate around zero, but for some periods a small predominance of CO2 emissions over the absorption may be observed. The daily dynamics of CO2 emissions depends on the air temperature with the correlation coefficient changes between 0.4 and 0.8. Crop stage, agrotechnological

  13. The electrical conductivity of CO2-bearing pore waters at elevated pressure and temperature: a laboratory study and its implications in CO2 storage monitoring and leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Jana H.; Herdegen, Volker; Repke, Jens-Uwe; Spitzer, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    and ion species dependence of the CO2 effect. Furthermore, the observations are analysed and predicted with a semi-analytical formulation for the electrical pore water conductivity taking into account the species' interactions. For the applicability of our results in practice of exploration and monitoring, we additionally provide a purely empirical formulation to compute the impact of CO2 on pore water conductivity at equilibrium which only requires the input of pressure, temperature and salinity information.

  14. Passive microseismic monitoring at an Australian CO2 geological storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siggins, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Passive microseismic monitoring at an Australian CO2 geological storage site A.F. Siggins1 and T. Daley2 1. CO2CRC at CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, Clayton, Victoria, Australia 2. Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, Berkeley, CA, USA Prior to the injection of CO2, background micro-seismic (MS) monitoring commenced at the CO2CRC Otway project site in Victoria, south-eastern Australia on the 4th of October 2007. The seismometer installation consisted of a solar powered ISS MS™ seismometer connected to two triaxial geophones placed in a gravel pack in a shallow borehole at 10m and 40 m depth respectively. The seismometer unit was interfaced to a digital radio which communicated with a remote computer containing the seismic data base. This system was designed to give a qualitative indication of any natural micro-seismicity at the site and to provide backup to a more extensive geophone array installed at the reservoir depth of approximately 2000m. During the period, October to December 2007 in excess of 150 two-station events were recorded. These events could all be associated with surface engineering activities during the down-hole installation of instruments at the nearby Naylor 1 monitoring well and surface seismic weight drop investigations on site. Source location showed the great majority of events to be clustered on the surface. MS activity then quietened down with the completion of these tasks. Injection of a CO2 rich gas commenced in mid March 2008 continuing until late August 2009 with approximately 65,000 tonnes being injected at 2050m depth in to a depleted natural gas formation. Only a small number of subsurface MS events were recorded during 2008 although the monitoring system suffered from long periods of down-time due to power supply failures and frequent mains power outages in the region. In March 2009 the surface installation was upgraded with new hardware and software. The seismometer was replaced with a more sensitive ISS 32-bit GS

  15. On the feasibility of borehole-to-surface electromagnetics for monitoring CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. A.; Zhdanov, M. S.; Hibbs, A. D.; Black, N.; Gribenko, A. V.; Cuma, M.; Agundes, A.; Eiskamp, G.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects rely on storing supercritical CO2 in deep saline reservoirs where buoyancy forces drive the injected CO2 upward into the aquifer until a seal is reached. The permanence of the sequestration depends entirely on the long-term geological integrity of the seal. Active geophysical monitoring of the sequestration is critical for informing CO2 monitoring, accounting and verification (MVA) decisions. During injection, there exists a correlation between the changes in CO2 and water saturations in a saline reservoir. Dissolved salts react with the CO2 to precipitate out as carbonates, thereby generally decreasing the electrical resistivity. As a result, there is a correlation between the change in fluid saturation and measured electromagnetic (EM) fields. The challenge is to design an EM survey appropriate for monitoring large, deep reservoirs. Borehole-to-surface electromagnetic (BSEM) surveys consist of borehole-deployed galvanic transmitters and a surface-based array of electric and magnetic field sensors. During a recent field trial, it was demonstrated that BSEM could successfully identify the oil-water contact in the water-injection zone of a carbonate reservoir. We review the BSEM methodology, and perform full-field BSEM modeling. The 3D resistivity models used in this study are based on dynamic reservoir simulations of CO2 injection into a saline reservoir. Although the electric field response at the earth's surface is low, we demonstrate that it can be accurately measured and processed with novel methods of noise cancellation and sufficient stacking over the period of monitoring to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for subsequent seismic- and well-constrained 3D inversion. For long-term or permanent monitoring, we discuss the deployment of novel electric field sensors with chemically inert electrodes that couple to earth in a capacitive manner. This capacitive coupling is a purely EM phenomenon, which, to first order, has

  16. Rapid, Long-term Monitoring of CO2 Concentration and δ13CO2 at CCUS Sites Allows Discrimination of Leakage Patterns from Natural Background Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galfond, B.; Riemer, D. D.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    In order for Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) to gain wide acceptance as a method for mitigating atmospheric CO2 concentrations, schemes must be devised to ensure that potential leakage is detected. New regulations from the US Environmental Protection Agency require monitoring and accounting for Class VI injection wells, which will remain a barrier to wide scale CCUS deployment until effective and efficient monitoring techniques have been developed and proven. Monitoring near-surface CO2 at injection sites to ensure safety and operational success requires high temporal resolution CO2 concentration and carbon isotopic (δ13C) measurements. The only technologies currently capable of this rapid measurement of δ13C are optical techniques such as Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS). We have developed a comprehensive remote monitoring approach using CRDS and a custom manifold system to obtain accurate rapid measurements from a large sample area over an extended study period. Our modified Picarro G1101-i CRDS allows for automated rapid and continuous field measurement of δ13CO2 and concentrations of relevant gas species. At our field site, where preparations have been underway for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) operations, we have been able to measure biogenic effects on a diurnal scale, as well as variation due to precipitation and seasonality. Taking these background trends into account, our statistical treatment of real data has been used to improve signal-to-noise ratios by an order of magnitude over published models. Our system has proven field readiness for the monitoring of sites with even modest CO2 fluxes.

  17. Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, James, P.

    2010-05-26

    Funding from DoE grant # FG0204-ER63721, Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2, supposed several postdoctoral fellows and research activities at MBARI related to ocean CO2 disposal and the biological consequences of high ocean CO2 levels on marine organisms. Postdocs supported on the project included Brad Seibel, now an associate professor at the University of Rhode Island, Jeff Drazen, now an associate professor at the University of Hawaii, and Eric Pane, who continues as a research associate at MBARI. Thus, the project contributed significantly to the professional development of young scientists. In addition, we made significant progress in several research areas. We continued several deep-sea CO2 release experiments using support from DoE and MBARI, along with several collaborators. These CO2 release studies had the goal of broadening our understanding of the effects of high ocean CO2 levels on deep sea animals in the vicinity of potential release sites for direct deep-ocean carbon dioxide sequestration. Using MBARI ships and ROVs, we performed these experiments at depths of 3000 to 3600 m, where liquid CO2 is heavier than seawater. CO2 was released into small pools (sections of PVC pipe) on the seabed, where it dissolved and drifted downstream, bathing any caged animals and sediments in a CO2-rich, low-pH plume. We assessed the survival of organisms nearby. Several publications arose from these studies (Barry et al. 2004, 2005; Carman et al. 2004; Thistle et al. 2005, 2006, 2007; Fleeger et al. 2006, 2010; Barry and Drazen 2007; Bernhard et al. 2009; Sedlacek et al. 2009; Ricketts et al. in press; Barry et al, in revision) concerning the sensitivity of animals to low pH waters. Using funds from DoE and MBARI, we designed and fabricated a hyperbaric trap-respirometer to study metabolic rates of deep-sea fishes under high CO2 conditions (Drazen et al, 2005), as well as a gas-control aquarium system to support laboratory studies of the

  18. Inhibited proton transfer enhances Au-catalyzed CO2-to-fuels selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wuttig, Anna; Yaguchi, Momo; Motobayashi, Kenta; Osawa, Masatoshi; Surendranath, Yogesh

    2016-08-01

    CO2 reduction in aqueous electrolytes suffers efficiency losses because of the simultaneous reduction of water to H2 We combine in situ surface-enhanced IR absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and electrochemical kinetic studies to probe the mechanistic basis for kinetic bifurcation between H2 and CO production on polycrystalline Au electrodes. Under the conditions of CO2 reduction catalysis, electrogenerated CO species are irreversibly bound to Au in a bridging mode at a surface coverage of ∼0.2 and act as kinetically inert spectators. Electrokinetic data are consistent with a mechanism of CO production involving rate-limiting, single-electron transfer to CO2 with concomitant adsorption to surface active sites followed by rapid one-electron, two-proton transfer and CO liberation from the surface. In contrast, the data suggest an H2 evolution mechanism involving rate-limiting, single-electron transfer coupled with proton transfer from bicarbonate, hydronium, and/or carbonic acid to form adsorbed H species followed by rapid one-electron, one-proton, or H recombination reactions. The disparate proton coupling requirements for CO and H2 production establish a mechanistic basis for reaction selectivity in electrocatalytic fuel formation, and the high population of spectator CO species highlights the complex heterogeneity of electrode surfaces under conditions of fuel-forming electrocatalysis. PMID:27450088

  19. Monitoring CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation in Mine Tailings at Thetford Mines, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechat, K.; Lemieux, J. M.; Molson, J. W. H.; Beaudoin, G.; Hebert, R.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is considered a permanent option to capture and store atmospheric CO2. This reaction occurs naturally under ambient conditions in ultramafic mining and milling waste. In the region of Thetford Mines, Quebec, chrysotile mining has produced approximately 0.8 Gt of magnesium-rich milling waste, which mainly consists of poorly sorted ultramafic rock fragments (< 10 cm) and chrysotile fibers. To quantify the amount of CO2 that can be captured in the mine wastes of Thetford Mines, two experimental pilot-scale tailings cells were constructed and instrumented for measuring soil temperature, volumetric water content, gas pressure and gas composition, with ambient conditions recorded by an autonomous meteorological station. The cells were monitored for water geochemistry, carbon content and mineralogy, with the objective to better understand the mineral carbonation processes under natural conditions and to propose a conceptual model for mineral carbonation at the pilot scale. To validate this model, numerical simulations with the MIN3P reactive transport code have been carried out. The chemical composition of the cell leachate (pH > 10, Mg from 85 to 140 mg.L-1, and high total alkalinity from 260 to 300 mg.L-1 CaCO3) is consistent with active CO2 mineralization reactions within the cell. SEM analyses show precipitation of dypingite with a lamellar texture and cemented grain surfaces. The milling waste contains up to 1.2% C, which indicates CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. Measured CO2 concentrations in the interstitial air are also ten times lower than in the atmosphere. Analysis of seasonal variations in fluid flow and heat transfer (essentially by thermal conduction) shows that molecular diffusion is the main process for CO2 supply within the experimental cells. These observations have helped develop a conceptual model for mineral carbonation in the wastes and were used to calibrate the reactive transport model.

  20. Experimental study on monitoring CO2 sequestration by conjoint analysis of the P-wave velocity and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Yang, Shenglai; Huan, Kangning; Li, Fangfang; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Aiai; Zhang, Xing

    2013-09-01

    CO2 sequestration has been considered to be one of the most straightforward carbon management strategies for industrial CO2 emission. Monitoring of the CO2 injection process is one of the best ways to make sure the safety storage but is also a major challenge in CO2 geological sequestration. Previous field and laboratory researches have shown that seismic methods are among the most promising monitoring methods because of the obvious reduction in P-wave velocities caused by CO2 injection. However, as CO2 injection continues, the P-wave velocity becomes increasingly insensitive according to the pilot projects when CO2 saturation is higher than 20-40%. Therefore, the conventional seismic method needs improvement or replacement to solve its limitations. In this study, P-wave velocity and amplitude responses to supercritical CO2 injection in brine-saturated core samples from Jilin oilfield were tested using core displacement and an ultrasonic detection integrated system. Results showed that neither the P-wave velocity nor amplitude could simply be used to monitor the CO2 injection process because of the insensitive or nonmonotonous response. Consequently, a new index was established by synthetically considering these two parameters to invert and monitor the CO2 process, which can be thought of as a newer and more effective assessment criterion for the seismic method. PMID:23915233

  1. CO2 leakage up from a geological storage site to shallow fresh groundwater: CO2-water-rock interaction assessment and development of sensitive monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humez, Pauline; Audigane, Pascal; Lions, Julie; Négrel, Philippe; Lagneau, Vincent

    2010-05-01

    The assessment of environmental impacts of carbon dioxide storage in geological repository requires the investigation of the potential CO2 leakage back into fresh groundwater, particularly with respect to protected groundwater reserves. We are starting a new project with the aims of developing sensitive monitoring techniques in order to detect potential CO2 leaks and their magnitude as well as their geochemical impacts on the groundwater. In a predictive approach goal, a modelling study of the geochemical impact on fresh groundwaters of a CO2 intrusion during geological storage was performed and serves as a basis for the development of sensitive monitoring techniques (e.g. isotope tracing). Then, isotopic monitoring opportunities will be explored. A modeling study of the geochemical impact on fresh groundwaters of the ingress of CO2 during geological storage was conducted. The 3D model includes (i) storage saline aquifer, (ii) impacted overlying aquifer containing freshwater and (iii) a leakage path way up through an abandoned well represented as 1D porous medium and corresponding to the cement-rock formation interface. This model was used to simulate the supercritical CO2 migration path and the interaction between the fluid and the host rock. The model uses the carbonate saline Dogger aquifer in the Paris Basin as the storage reservoir and the Albian formation (located above the Dogger) as the fresh groundwater aquifer. The principal geochemical process simulated is the acidification of groundwaters due to CO2 dissolution, inducing the dissolution of minerals in the Albian formation. Knowing the mineralogical composition of the impacted aquifer is therefore crucial if we are to correctly determine which elements might be release during the arrival of CO2 in freshwater. Estimates of increases in element concentrations are proposed along with a direct control of the injection procedure. This predictive modeling approach impact of CO2 intrusion to fresh groundwaters

  2. Ground gas monitoring: implications for hydraulic fracturing and CO2 storage.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Christopher J; Hall, Jean A; Martin, John P; Manning, David A C

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) between the geosphere and atmosphere is essential for the management of anthropogenic emissions. Human activities such as carbon capture and storage and hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") affect the natural system and pose risks to future global warming and to human health and safety if not engineered to a high standard. In this paper an innovative approach of expressing ground gas compositions is presented, using data derived from regulatory monitoring of boreholes in the unsaturated zone at infrequent intervals (typically 3 months) with data from a high frequency monitoring instrument deployed over periods of weeks. Similar highly variable trends are observed for time scales ranging from decades to hourly for boreholes located close to sanitary landfill sites. Additionally, high frequency monitoring data confirm the effect of meteorological controls on ground gas emissions; the maximum observed CH4 and CO2 concentrations in a borehole monitored over two weeks were 40.1% v/v and 8.5% v/v respectively, but for 70% of the monitoring period only air was present. There is a clear weakness in current point monitoring strategies that may miss emission events and this needs to be considered along with obtaining baseline data prior to starting any engineering activity. PMID:25363162

  3. A multiresolution random field model for estimating fossil-fuel CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, J.; Yadav, V.; Michalak, A. M.; Lee, J.; Lefantzi, S.; VanBloemenWaanders, B.

    2013-12-01

    We present a multiscale random field model (MsRF) that can be used for representing fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions. It is low-dimensional and is meant to be used in atmospheric inversions. The MsRF is constructed using wavelets. In this work, we will demonstrate a synthetic-data inversion aimed at estimating ffCO2 emissions, with 1o x 1o resolution, in the lower 48 states of the US. Measurements from 35 towers will be used. The measurements are constructed using the Vulcan inventory. The MsRF consists of a subset of Haar wavelets that can be defined in a rectangle bounding the US. By subjecting the Vulcan database to wavelet-transforms with a wide choice, the Haar wavelet was found to offer the most compressible representation. The MsRF was constructed by subjecting an image of lights at night to Haar transforms and retaining those with large weights. The lights-at-night image is correlated with ffCO2 inversions and have been used to downscale national ffCO2 aggregates when constructing spatially resolved ffCO2 emission inventories. The MsRF is then used to solve the linear inverse problem that underlies ffCO2 emission estimation. The number of parameters in the MsRF is far too large to be constrained by the measurements and thus we enforce sparsity to regularize the inverse problem. Further, we show that the transport model is only somewhat incoherent with respect to the chosen Haar bases, indicating that sparsification will be insufficient and further regularization using a prior emission model is required. This model is obtained by scaling up the nightlights to match EDGAR emissions. Finally, we present the results of the inversion and show that the resulting inversion mechanism can extract information from the observation to update and improve upon the predictive accuracy of prior model. The density of measurements dominates the accuracy of the inversion. We find that sparsification plays an important role since it removes about 50% of the wavelets in the Ms

  4. Comparing observations of fossil fuel-derived CO2 in California with predictions from bottom-up inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graven, H. D.; Lueker, T.; Fischer, M. L.; Guilderson, T. P.; Keeling, R. F.; Brophy, K.; Arnold, T.; Bambha, R.; Callahan, W.; Campbell, J. E.; Frankenberg, C.; Hsu, Y.; Iraci, L. T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J.; LaFranchi, B. W.; Lehman, S.; Manning, A.; Michelsen, H. A.; Miller, J. B.; Newman, S.; Parazoo, N.; Sloop, C.; Walker, S.; Whelan, M.; Wunch, D.

    2015-12-01

    The US state of California has a progressive climate change mitigation policy, AB-32, enacted in 2006 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 15% by 2020 and then a further 80% by 2050. Bottom-up inventories indicate California's fossil fuel CO2 emissions are currently about 100 Mt C per year, but different inventories show discrepancies of ±15% in the state-wide total, and some larger discrepancies in various sub-regions of the state. We are developing a top-down framework for investigating fossil fuel and biospheric CO2 fluxes in California using atmospheric observations and models. California has a relatively dense collaborative network of greenhouse gas observations run by several universities, government laboratories and Earth Networks. Using this collaborative network, we conducted three field campaigns in 2014-15 to sample flasks at 10 tower sites across the state. Flasks were analysed for atmospheric CO2 and CO concentrations and for stable isotopes and radiocarbon in CO2. The flask observations of radiocarbon in CO2 allow patterns of fossil fuel-derived and biospheric CO2 to be distinguished at relatively high resolution across the state. We will report initial results from the observations showing regional gradients in fossil fuel-derived CO2 and fluctuations from changing weather patterns. We will compare the observations of fossil fuel-derived CO2 to predictions from several bottom-up inventories and two atmospheric models. Linking the flask data with observations from OCO-2, TCCON, aircraft flights and ground-based in situ analyzers, we will examine the variation in total CO2 and its drivers over California. Further analysis is planned to integrate the data into an inversion framework for fossil fuel and biospheric CO2 fluxes over California.

  5. Application of Pressure Pulse Test Analysis in CO2 Leakage Detection and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakiba, M.; Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, numerous research and industrial projects have been devoted to investigate the feasibility and efficiency of carbon dioxide capture, storage, and utilization. Besides the studies over the characteristics of candidate formations for CO2 injection, much attention has been paid to answer the environmental concerns regarding the CO2 leak to overlying formations. To first detect and then track a possible CO2 leak, different techniques have been proposed in the literature; however, most of them examine only a small portion of the formation and have a low resolution for early leak detection. To further increase the extent of the investigation zone and to monitor a large section of the formation in more detail, multi-well testing techniques have received a significant attention. Pressure pulse testing is a multi-well test technique in which a pressure signal generated by periods of injection and shut-in from a pulser well is propagated inside the formation, and the corresponding response is recorded at the observer wells. The recorded pressure response is then analyzed to measure the rock and fluid properties and to monitor the possible changes over the time. In this research study, we have applied frequency methods as well as superposition principle to interpret the pressure pulse test data and monitor the changes in transmissibility and storativity of the formation between the well pairs. We have used synthetic reservoir models and numerical reservoir simulations to produce the pressure pulse test data. The analysis of the simulation results indicated that even a small amount of CO2 leak in the investigation zone can have a measurable effect on the calculated storativity and transmissibility factors. This can be of a great importance when an early leak detection is of interest. Moreover, when multiple wells are available in the formation, the distribution of the calculated parameters can visualize the extent of CO2 leak, which has a great

  6. Trading Off Global Fuel Supply, CO2 Emissions and Sustainable Development

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Liam; Ross, Ian; Foster, John; Hankamer, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The United Nations Conference on Climate Change (Paris 2015) reached an international agreement to keep the rise in global average temperature ‘well below 2°C’ and to ‘aim to limit the increase to 1.5°C’. These reductions will have to be made in the face of rising global energy demand. Here a thoroughly validated dynamic econometric model (Eq 1) is used to forecast global energy demand growth (International Energy Agency and BP), which is driven by an increase of the global population (UN), energy use per person and real GDP (World Bank and Maddison). Even relatively conservative assumptions put a severe upward pressure on forecast global energy demand and highlight three areas of concern. First, is the potential for an exponential increase of fossil fuel consumption, if renewable energy systems are not rapidly scaled up. Second, implementation of internationally mandated CO2 emission controls are forecast to place serious constraints on fossil fuel use from ~2030 onward, raising energy security implications. Third is the challenge of maintaining the international ‘pro-growth’ strategy being used to meet poverty alleviation targets, while reducing CO2 emissions. Our findings place global economists and environmentalists on the same side as they indicate that the scale up of CO2 neutral renewable energy systems is not only important to protect against climate change, but to enhance global energy security by reducing our dependence of fossil fuels and to provide a sustainable basis for economic development and poverty alleviation. Very hard choices will have to be made to achieve ‘sustainable development’ goals. PMID:26959977

  7. Trading Off Global Fuel Supply, CO2 Emissions and Sustainable Development.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Liam; Ross, Ian; Foster, John; Hankamer, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The United Nations Conference on Climate Change (Paris 2015) reached an international agreement to keep the rise in global average temperature 'well below 2°C' and to 'aim to limit the increase to 1.5°C'. These reductions will have to be made in the face of rising global energy demand. Here a thoroughly validated dynamic econometric model (Eq 1) is used to forecast global energy demand growth (International Energy Agency and BP), which is driven by an increase of the global population (UN), energy use per person and real GDP (World Bank and Maddison). Even relatively conservative assumptions put a severe upward pressure on forecast global energy demand and highlight three areas of concern. First, is the potential for an exponential increase of fossil fuel consumption, if renewable energy systems are not rapidly scaled up. Second, implementation of internationally mandated CO2 emission controls are forecast to place serious constraints on fossil fuel use from ~2030 onward, raising energy security implications. Third is the challenge of maintaining the international 'pro-growth' strategy being used to meet poverty alleviation targets, while reducing CO2 emissions. Our findings place global economists and environmentalists on the same side as they indicate that the scale up of CO2 neutral renewable energy systems is not only important to protect against climate change, but to enhance global energy security by reducing our dependence of fossil fuels and to provide a sustainable basis for economic development and poverty alleviation. Very hard choices will have to be made to achieve 'sustainable development' goals. PMID:26959977

  8. Satellite hyperspectral remote sensing data monitoring the temporal-spatial distribution of erupted CO2 from Gunung Merapi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Qiongqiong; Wu, Taixia; Zhang, Xia

    2011-12-01

    Satellite measurements of the distribution of the global atmospheric CO2 would get its continuous change. The atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) enables us to monitor the global distribution and transport of middle troposphere CO2. Mount merapi is an active strato-volcano located on the border between central java and yogyakarta, indonesia. The AIRS data were acquired from 15th october to 15th november in 2008, 2009 and 2010 to monitor the temporal-spatial distribution of erupted CO2 from the volcano. Mid-tropospheric CO2 concentration would increase gradually and reach its peak in one day from eruption. The dispersal range of erupted CO2 was -7.540831+/-7.5°, 110.444817+/-5° in the graticules centering around gunung merapi. Having a high correlation with the eruptions, the mid-troposphere CO2 concentration of 2010 showed different trend comparing with 2008 and 2009 trend. The 4-day CO2 concentration data of 2010 over the volcano tended to increase by 2.9 ppmv and 4.1 ppmv comparing with that of 2009 and 2008 respectively. These observations provide the evidence that extensive release of CO2 occurs during the volcano eruption time and using the AIRS CO2 products to monitor the temporal-spatial distribution of erupted CO2 from volcanoes is possible.

  9. Monitoring of injected CO2 using the seismic full waveform inversion for 2-D elastic VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. K.; Min, D. J.; KIM, S.; Shin, Y.; Moon, S.

    2014-12-01

    To monitor the injected CO2 in the subsurface, seismic monitoring techniques are extensively applied because of its high resolution. Among the seismic monitoring techniques, seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) has high applicability because it can delineate parameter changes by injected CO2. When seismic FWIs are applied, subsurface media can be generally assumed to be isotropic. However, most subsurface media are not isotropic, and shale is a representative anisotropic medium, particularly vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) medium, which is often encountered as a barrier to injected CO2. Thus, anisotropic properties of subsurface media are important for monitoring of injected CO2. For these issues, we need to consider anisotropy of subsurface media when seismic FWIs are applied as a monitoring tool for CO2 sequestration. In this study, we performed seismic FWI for 2-D elastic VTI media to investigate the effects of anisotropic properties in CO2 monitoring. For this numerical test, we assumed a geological model, which copies after one of CO2 storage prospects in Korea. We also applied seismic FWI algorithm for 2-D elastic isotropic media for comparison. From this comparison, we noticed that we can obtain more reliable results when we apply the anisotropic FWI algorithm. Numerical examples indicate that we should apply the anisotropic FWI algorithm rather than the isotropic FWI algorithm when we interpret seismic monitoring data acquired in anisotropic media to increase the success of monitoring for injected CO2. Our numerical results can also be used as references for real seismic monitoring of the Korea CO2 sequestration projects in the near future. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Human Resources Development program (No. 20134010200510) of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korean government Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy and by the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine

  10. Real-time monitoring of CO2 storage sites: Application to Illinois Basin-Decatur Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Picard, G.; Berard, T.; Chabora, E.; Marsteller, S.; Greenberg, S.; Finley, R.J.; Rinck, U.; Greenaway, R.; Champagnon, C.; Davard, J.

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage operations for efficiency and safety requires use of monitoring techniques and implementation of control protocols. The monitoring techniques consist of permanent sensors and tools deployed for measurement campaigns. Large amounts of data are thus generated. These data must be managed and integrated for interpretation at different time scales. A fast interpretation loop involves combining continuous measurements from permanent sensors as they are collected to enable a rapid response to detected events; a slower loop requires combining large datasets gathered over longer operational periods from all techniques. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it presents an analysis of the monitoring objectives to be performed in the slow and fast interpretation loops. Second, it describes the implementation of the fast interpretation loop with a real-time monitoring system at the Illinois Basin-Decatur Project (IBDP) in Illinois, USA. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Wavelet-based reconstruction of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from sparse measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, S. A.; Ray, J.; Yadav, V.; Van Bloemen Waanders, B.; Michalak, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    We present a method to estimate spatially resolved fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions from sparse measurements of time-varying CO2 concentrations. It is based on the wavelet-modeling of the strongly non-stationary spatial distribution of ffCO2 emissions. The dimensionality of the wavelet model is first reduced using images of nightlights, which identify regions of human habitation. Since wavelets are a multiresolution basis set, most of the reduction is accomplished by removing fine-scale wavelets, in the regions with low nightlight radiances. The (reduced) wavelet model of emissions is propagated through an atmospheric transport model (WRF) to predict CO2 concentrations at a handful of measurement sites. The estimation of the wavelet model of emissions i.e., inferring the wavelet weights, is performed by fitting to observations at the measurement sites. This is done using Staggered Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP), which first identifies (and sets to zero) the wavelet coefficients that cannot be estimated from the observations, before estimating the remaining coefficients. This model sparsification and fitting is performed simultaneously, allowing us to explore multiple wavelet-models of differing complexity. This technique is borrowed from the field of compressive sensing, and is generally used in image and video processing. We test this approach using synthetic observations generated from emissions from the Vulcan database. 35 sensor sites are chosen over the USA. FfCO2 emissions, averaged over 8-day periods, are estimated, at a 1 degree spatial resolutions. We find that only about 40% of the wavelets in emission model can be estimated from the data; however the mix of coefficients that are estimated changes with time. Total US emission can be reconstructed with about ~5% errors. The inferred emissions, if aggregated monthly, have a correlation of 0.9 with Vulcan fluxes. We find that the estimated emissions in the Northeast US are the most accurate. Sandia

  12. Time-lapse downhole electrical resistivity monitoring of subsurface CO2 storage at the Maguelone shallow experimental site (Languedoc, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denchik, Nataliya; Pezard, Philippe; Lofi, Johanna; Perroud, Hervé; Neyens, Denis; Luquot, Linda

    2015-04-01

    A shallow field experimental site for CO2 injection was established at Maguelone (Languedoc,France), in order to test in an integrated manner a suite of surface and downhole hydrogeophysical monitoring methods. The objective is to improve our understanding of gas transport in the shallow subsurface and to determine the sensitivity of CO2 monitoring systems for leakage detection. The site offers a natural laboratory to study the processes associated with CO2 injection in a clastic and clay-rich context saturated with saline fluids. Prior to CO2injection, three nitrogen (N2) injections were undertaken in 2012 to measure the site response to neutral gas injection. In 2013, a volume of 111 m3 of CO2 was injected during 3.5 hours at 15 meter depth. During each experiment, the gas plumes were successfully detected from pressure monitoring, time-lapse induction logging and downhole resistivity monitoring with downhole dipole-dipole arrays. Increases in resistivity are attributed to free gas propagation (either N2 or CO2) whereas decreases in resistivity correlate with CO2 dissolution in the pore fluid. Chemical analyses confirm this hypothesis with a decrease in pH and an increase in the concentration of dissolved species in the later case. The next stage of the project will be performing the CO2 injection experiments with improved monitoring schema using results of the present study. In perspective, besides of improving our understanding of gas transport in the shallow subsurface, the additional issues could not just show a capability of used geophysical and geochemical techniques to monitor the CO2 plume and to detect near-surface CO2 migration pathways, but to help quantifying potential CO2 migration.

  13. Seismic dynamic monitoring in CO2 flooding based on characterization of frequency-dependent velocity factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Hua; Li, Jun; Xiao, Wen; Tan, Ming-You; Zhang, Yun-Ying; Cui, Shi-Ling; Qu, Zhi-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The phase velocity of seismic waves varies with the propagation frequency, and thus frequency-dependent phenomena appear when CO2 gas is injected into a reservoir. By dynamically considering these phenomena with reservoir conditions it is thus feasible to extract the frequency-dependent velocity factor with the aim of monitoring changes in the reservoir both before and after CO2 injection. In the paper, we derive a quantitative expression for the frequency-dependent factor based on the Robinson seismic convolution model. In addition, an inversion equation with a frequency-dependent velocity factor is constructed, and a procedure is implemented using the following four processing steps: decomposition of the spectrum by generalized S transform, wavelet extraction of cross-well seismic traces, spectrum equalization processing, and an extraction method for frequency-dependent velocity factor based on the damped least-square algorithm. An attenuation layered model is then established based on changes in the Q value of the viscoelastic medium, and spectra of migration profiles from forward modeling are obtained and analyzed. Frequency-dependent factors are extracted and compared, and the effectiveness of the method is then verified using a synthetic data. The frequency-dependent velocity factor is finally applied to target processing and oil displacement monitoring based on real seismic data obtained before and after CO2 injection in the G89 well block within Shengli oilfield. Profiles and slices of the frequency-dependent factor determine its ability to indicate differences in CO2 flooding, and the predicting results are highly consistent with those of practical investigations within the well block.

  14. Sensitivity of Flux Accuracy to Setup of Fossil Fuel and Biogenic CO2 Inverse System in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, K.; Lauvaux, T.; Deng, A.; Lopez-Coto, I.; Gurney, K. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Turnbull, J. C.; Davis, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) aims to utilize a variety of measurements and a high resolution inversion system to estimate the spatial distribution and the temporal variation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the city of Indianapolis. We separated biogenic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes and tested the sensitivity of inverse flux estimates to inverse system configurations by performing Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). The a priori CO2 emissions from Hestia were aggregated to 1 km resolution to represent emissions from the Indianapolis metropolitan area and its surroundings. With the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled to a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM), the physical relations between concentrations at the tower locations and emissions at the surface were simulated at 1 km spatial resolution, hourly. Within a Bayesian synthesis inversion framework, we tested the effect of multiple parameters on our ability to infer fossil fuel CO2 fluxes: the presence of biogenic CO2 fluxes in the optimization procedure, the use of fossil fuel CO2 concentration measurements, the impact of reduced transport errors, the sensitivity to observation density, and the spatio-temporal properties of prior errors. The results indicate that the presence of biogenic CO2 fluxes obviously weakens the ability to invert for the fossil fuel CO2 emissions in an urban environment, but having relatively accurate fossil fuel CO2 concentration measurements can effectively compensate the interference from the biogenic flux component. Reduced transport error and more intensive measurement networks are two possible approaches to retrieve the spatial pattern of the fluxes and decrease the bias in inferred whole-city fossil fuel CO2 emissions. The accuracy of posterior fluxes is very sensitive to the spatial correlation length in the prior flux errors which, if they exist, can enhance significantly our ability to recover the known fluxes

  15. Developing a monitoring and verification plan with reference to the Australian Otway CO2 pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, K.; Daley, T.; Freifeld, B.; Urosevic, M.; Kepic, A.; Sharma, S.

    2009-05-01

    The Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) is currently injecting 100,000 tons of CO{sub 2} in a large-scale test of storage technology in a pilot project in southeastern Australia called the CO2CRC Otway Project. The Otway Basin, with its natural CO{sub 2} accumulations and many depleted gas fields, offers an appropriate site for such a pilot project. An 80% CO{sub 2} stream is produced from a well (Buttress) near the depleted gas reservoir (Naylor) used for storage (Figure 1). The goal of this project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} can be safely transported, stored underground, and its behavior tracked and monitored. The monitoring and verification framework has been developed to monitor for the presence and behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface reservoir, near surface, and atmosphere. This monitoring framework addresses areas, identified by a rigorous risk assessment, to verify conformance to clearly identifiable performance criteria. These criteria have been agreed with the regulatory authorities to manage the project through all phases addressing responsibilities, liabilities, and to assure the public of safe storage.

  16. Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 at the building/street level for the LA Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurney, K. R.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Patarasuk, R.; Song, Y.; O'Keeffe, D.; Duren, R. M.; Eldering, A.

    2013-12-01

    Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions from the bottom-up perspective is a critical element in emerging plans on a global, integrated, carbon monitoring system (CMS). A space/time explicit emissions data product can act as both verification and guidance to emissions mitigation. We have progress on applying our Hestia approach to the entire LA Basin. Here, we present these initial results focusing on a few points of progress worthy of dissemination. Geocoding of the original point sources are inaccurate, placing point sources in the wrong physical position. Sometimes these errors are many kilometers. We have corrected the majority of these point through a variety of techniques. The LAX airport and the LA Port pose large unique sources in the Basin and we have taken novel approaches to characterizing the space/time distribution of these emission sources. We have used AADT and hourly traffic data to best distribute emissions in the onroad sector. This has required both extrapolation and interpolation techniques to fully cover all road types other than local roads. Finally, we have updated the emission product to the year 2012 using a variety of scaling arguments. Work on greenhouse gas emissions has been accomplished by others, though these efforts typically go down to only the county spatial scale. However, these offer numerous opportunities to potentially calibrate or explore alternative methods and results. We will review these efforts and what benefit they are provided thus far. Finally, we will review our attempts to quantify uncertainty at the space/time scales attempted here. Uncertainty quantification remains challenging due to a variety of reasons. First, bottom-up source data is often produced by a regulatory agency, which has strict legal limits to the amount and type of information available. Even in cases where legal limitations are not at work, there is no standard for uncertainty reporting and hence, little reliable uncertainty estimation is made

  17. Monitoring a pilot CO2 injection experiment in a shallow aquifer using 3D cross-well electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Lassen, R. N.; Looms, M. C.; Jensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Three dimensional electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for monitoring the two opposing effects from gas-phase and dissolved CO2 in a shallow unconfined siliciclastic aquifer. Dissolved CO2 increases water electrical conductivity (EC) while gas phase CO2 reduce EC. We injected 45kg of CO2 into a shallow aquifer for 48 hours. ERT data were collected for 50 hours following CO2 injection. Four ERT monitoring boreholes were installed on a 5m by 5m square grid and each borehole had 24 electrodes at 0.5 m electrode spacing at depths from 1.5 m to 13 m. ERT data were inverted using a difference inversion algorithm for bulk EC. 3D ERT successfully detected the CO2 plume distribution and growth in the shallow aquifer. We found that the changes of bulk EC were dominantly positive following CO2 injection, indicating that the effect of dissolved CO2 overwhelmed that of gas phase CO2. The pre-injection baseline resistivity model clearly showed a three-layer structure of the site. The electrically more conductive glacial sand layer in the northeast region are likely more permeable than the overburden and underburden and CO2 plumes were actually confined in this layer. Temporal bulk EC increase from ERT agreed well with water EC and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar data. ERT monitoring offers a competitive advantage over water sampling and GPR methods because it provides 3D high-resolution temporal tomographic images of CO2 distribution and it can also be automated for unattended operation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL IM release#: LLNL-PROC-657944.

  18. Large Hybrid Energy Systems for Making Low CO2 Load-Following Power and Synthetic Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Cherry; Richard D. Boardman; Steven Aumeier

    2012-02-01

    Hybrid energy systems using nuclear heat sources can economically produce load-following electrical power by exploiting the surplus generation capacity available at night or seasonally to make synthetic fuel. Vehicle fuel is the only current energy use large enough to absorb all the energy capacity that might be diverted from the power industry, and its ease of storage obviates problems with discontinuous synfuel production. The potential benefits and challenges of synfuels integration are illustrated by the production of methanol from natural gas (as a source of carbon) using steam from a light water nuclear power reactor which is assumed to be available in accord with a year's worth of power demand data. Methanol's synthesis process is easily adapted to using 300 C heat from a light water reactor and this simple compound can be further processed into gasoline, biodiesel, or dimethyl ether, fuels which can be used with the current vehicle fleet. A supplemental feed to the methanol process of natural gas (for energy) allows operation at constant full rate when the nuclear heat is being used to produce electrical power. The higher capital costs of such a system are offset by a lower cost of heat and power production from a large base load type of plant and by reduced costs associated with much lower CO2 emissions. Other less tangible economic benefits of this and similar hybrid systems include better use of natural resource for fuels and greater energy services security from the domestic production of vehicle fuel.

  19. Synthetic seismic monitoring using reverse-time migration and Kirchhoff migration for CO2 sequestration in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Kim, Y.; Min, D.; Oh, J.; Huh, C.; Kang, S.

    2012-12-01

    During last two decades, CO2 sequestration in the subsurface has been extensively studied and progressed as a direct tool to reduce CO2 emission. Commercial projects such as Sleipner, In Salah and Weyburn that inject more than one million tons of CO2 per year are operated actively as well as test projects such as Ketzin to study the behavior of CO2 and the monitoring techniques. Korea also began the CCS (CO2 capture and storage) project. One of the prospects for CO2 sequestration in Korea is the southwestern continental margin of Ulleung basin. To monitor the behavior of CO2 underground for the evaluation of stability and safety, several geophysical monitoring techniques should be applied. Among various geophysical monitoring techniques, seismic survey is considered as the most effective tool. To verify CO2 migration in the subsurface more effectively, seismic numerical simulation is an essential process. Furthermore, the efficiency of the seismic migration techniques should be investigated for various cases because numerical seismic simulation and migration test help us accurately interpret CO2 migration. In this study, we apply the reverse-time migration and Kirchhoff migration to synthetic seismic monitoring data generated for the simplified model based on the geological structures of Ulleung basin in Korea. Synthetic seismic monitoring data are generated for various cases of CO2 migration in the subsurface. From the seismic migration images, we can investigate CO2 diffusion patterns indirectly. From seismic monitoring simulation, it is noted that while the reverse-time migration generates clear subsurface images when subsurface structures are steeply dipping, Kirchhoff migration has an advantage in imaging horizontal-layered structures such as depositional sediments appearing in the continental shelf. The reverse-time migration and Kirchhoff migration present reliable subsurface images for the potential site characterized by stratigraphical traps. In case of

  20. Toward Verifying Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions with the CMAQ Model: Motivation, Model Description and Initial Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen; Bambha, Ray P.; Pinto, Joseph P.; Zeng, Tao; Boylan, Jim; Huang, Maoyi; Lei, Huimin; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Shishi; Mao, Jiafu; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Shi, Xiaoying; Wei, Yaxing; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2014-03-14

    Motivated by the urgent need for emission verification of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, we have developed regional CO2 simulation with CMAQ over the contiguous U.S. Model sensitivity experiments have been performed using three different sets of inputs for net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and two fossil fuel emission inventories, to understand the roles of fossil fuel emissions, atmosphere-biosphere exchange and transport in regulating the spatial and diurnal variability of CO2 near the surface, and to characterize the well-known ‘signal-to-noise’ problem, i.e. the interference from the biosphere on the interpretation of atmospheric CO2 observations. It is found that differences in the meteorological conditions for different urban areas strongly contribute to the contrast in concentrations. The uncertainty of NEE, as measured by the difference among the three different NEE inputs, has notable impact on regional distribution of CO2 simulated by CMAQ. Larger NEE uncertainty and impact are found over eastern U.S. urban areas than along the western coast. A comparison with tower CO2 measurements at Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) shows that the CMAQ model using hourly varied and high-resolution CO2 emission from the Vulcan inventory and CarbonTracker optimized NEE reasonably reproduce the observed diurnal profile, whereas switching to different NEE inputs significantly degrades the model performance. Spatial distribution of CO2 is found to correlate with NOx, SO2 and CO, due to their similarity in emission sources and transport processes. These initial results from CMAQ demonstrate the power of a state-of-the art CTM in helping interpret CO2 observations and verify fossil fuel emissions. The ability to simulate CO2 in CMAQ will also facilitate investigations of the utility of traditionally regulated pollutants and other species as tracers to CO2 source attribution.

  1. Stored CO2 and Methane Leakage Risk Assessment and Monitoring Tool Development: CO2 Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Kieki

    2008-09-30

    The primary project goal is to develop and test tools for optimization of ECBM recovery and geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds, in addition to tools for monitoring CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbeds to support risk assessment. Three critical topics identified are (1) the integrity of coal bed methane geologic and engineered systems, (2) the optimization of the coal bed storage process, and (3) reliable monitoring and verification systems appropriate to the special conditions of CO{sub 2} storage and flow in coals.

  2. Did dead animals really spew from the IEA-GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 monitoring and storage project?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostron, B. J.; IEA-GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project, T.; Theme Leaders: IEA-GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring; Storage Project

    2011-12-01

    The IEA-GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 monitoring and storage project was initiated in 2000 to study the geological storage of CO2 as part of a CO2-EOR project in the Weyburn Field in Saskatchewan, Canada. Initial injection of CO2 began in October 2000, and continues to date, with more than 18 Mtonnes of anthropogenic CO2 stored in the Weyburn reservoir. In January 2011, a local landowner supported by a consultant's soil gas survey, claimed they had conclusive proof that the "source of the high concentrations of CO2 in soils ... is clearly the anthropogenic CO2 injected into the Weyburn reservoir". These claims quickly attracted local, provincial, national, and international media attention alerting the world to the "leakage" at the Weyburn CO2-EOR project and furthermore calling into question the safety of geological CO2 sequestration in general. A careful look at the data reveals a different story. Twenty six soil gas samples were collected in August 2010, from shallow (< 1m) drill holes and analyzed for CO2 concentrations and short-chain hydrocarbons. Six samples were analyzed for concentrations of stable isotopes of carbon, and four water samples from shallow dugouts were sampled for BTEX and hydrocarbons. Measured CO2 concentrations ranged from approximately 1 to 11%, methane concentrations ranged from approximately 1.2 to 24 ppm, and 13C/12C isotope concentrations ranged from -21.5 to -22.9 per mil. Hydrocarbons and BTEX in the water samples were below detection limits. Volumes of data collected by more than 80 international researchers in the IEA-GHG Weyburn-Midale research project, do not support the claim(s) of anthropogenic CO2 leakage from the Weyburn reservoir. A comprehensive geological, geophysical, hydrogeological, and geochemical site characterization combined with background and on-site soil gas monitoring, integrated with numerical simulations of CO2 movement has not detected any evidence of migration of CO2 above the regional subsurface seal. Shallow

  3. Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the urban scale: Results from the Indianapolis Flux Project (INFLUX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Cambaliza, M. L.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Newberger, T.; Tans, P. P.; Lehman, S.; Davis, K. J.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Shepson, P.; Gurney, K. R.; Song, Y.; Razlivanov, I. N.

    2012-12-01

    Emissions of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) from anthropogenic sources are the primary driver of observed increases in the atmospheric CO2 burden, and hence global warming. Quantification of the magnitude of fossil fuel CO2 emissions is vital to improving our understanding of the global and regional carbon cycle, and independent evaluation of reported emissions is essential to the success of any emission reduction efforts. The urban scale is of particular interest, because ~75% CO2ff is emitted from urban regions, and cities are leading the way in attempts to reduce emissions. Measurements of 14CO2 can be used to determine CO2ff, yet existing 14C measurement techniques require laborious laboratory analysis and measurements are often insufficient for inferring an urban emission flux. This presentation will focus on how 14CO2 measurements can be combined with those of more easily measured ancillary tracers to obtain high resolution CO2ff mixing ratio estimates and then infer the emission flux. A pilot study over Sacramento, California showed strong correlations between CO2ff and carbon monoxide (CO) and demonstrated an ability to quantify the urban flux, albeit with large uncertainties. The Indianapolis Flux Project (INFLUX) aims to develop and assess methods to quantify urban greenhouse gas emissions. Indianapolis was chosen as an ideal test case because it has relatively straightforward meteorology; a contained, isolated, urban region; and substantial and well-known fossil fuel CO2 emissions. INFLUX incorporates atmospheric measurements of a suite of gases and isotopes including 14C from light aircraft and from a network of existing tall towers surrounding the Indianapolis urban area. The recently added CO2ff content is calculated from measurements of 14C in CO2, and then convolved with atmospheric transport models and ancillary data to estimate the urban CO2ff emission flux. Significant innovations in sample collection include: collection of hourly averaged samples to

  4. Influence of monsoons on atmospheric CO2 spatial variability and ground-based monitoring over India.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Yogesh K; Vellore, Ramesh K; Ravi Kumar, K; van der Schoot, Marcel; Cho, Chun-Ho

    2014-08-15

    This study examines the role of Asian monsoons on transport and spatial variability of atmospheric CO2 over the Indian subcontinent, using transport modeling tools and available surface observations from two atmospheric CO2 monitoring sites Sinhagad (SNG) and Cape Rama (CRI) in the western part of peninsular India. The regional source contributions to these sites arise from the horizontal flow in conduits within the planetary boundary layer. Greater CO2 variability, greater than 15 ppm, is observed during winter, while it is reduced nearly by half during summer. The SNG air sampling site is more susceptible to narrow regional terrestrial fluxes transported from the Indo-Gangetic Plains in January, and to wider upwind marine source regions from the Arabian Sea in July. The Western Ghats mountains appear to play a role in the seasonal variability at SNG by trapping polluted air masses associated with weak monsoonal winds. A Lagrangian back-trajectory analysis further suggests that the horizontal extent of regional sensitivity increases from north to south over the Indian subcontinent in January (Boreal winter). PMID:24880546

  5. Characterization of a novel dissolved CO2 sensor for utilization in environmental monitoring and aquaculture industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, K.; Jesus, João. M.; Gouveia, C.; Domingues, Jorge O.; Markovics, A.; Baptista, J. M.; Kovacs, B.; Pereira, Carlos M.; Borges, Maria-Teresa; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2013-11-01

    A novel optical fiber sensor is presented for measuring dissolved CO2 for water quality monitoring applications, where the optical signal is based either on refractive index changes or on color change. The sensing chemistry is based on the acid-basic equilibrium of 4-nitrophenol, that is converted into the anionic form by addition quaternary ammonium hydroxide. The CO2 sensitive layer was characterized and tested by using simple absorbance/reflectance measurement setups where the sensor was connected to a fiber optic CCD spectrometer. A prototype simulating a real shallow raceway aquaculture system was developed and its hydraulic behavior characterized. A commercially available partial-pressure- NDIR sensor was used as a reference for dissolved CO2 tests with the new optical fiber sensor under development. Preliminary tests allowed verifying the suitability of the new optical sensor for accurately tracking the dissolved carbon dioxide concentration in a suitable operation range. Direct comparison of the new sensor and the reference sensor system allowed to demonstrate the suitability of the new technology but also to identify some fragilities there are presently being addressed.

  6. Time lapse electrical resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of near-surface CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, V.; Kremer, T.; Williard, E.; Schmutz, M.; Maineult, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Field experiments were carried out to investigate the efficiency and the reliability of electrical geophysical methods to detect and monitor CO2 leakages at field scale. Each test consisted of injecting CO2 for approximately four hours at five meters depth, corresponding to a cumulative mass of gas of around six kilograms. Electrical resistivity tomography and temporal induced polarization were acquired at the surface before, during and after injections along profiles centered to the injection well. Time lapse measurements were compared to a reference acquisition performed before the injection. We observe that both methods are sensitive to variations in terms of gas saturation, the chargeability measurements being more sensitive to the presence of CO2 than electrical resistivity. During the injection, an increase of chargeability and a decrease of the measured resistivity are observed at depth in the vinicity of the injection well. Afterwards, the medium equilibrates and retrieves its original state, corresponding to the reference acquisition. The temporal variations of electrical resistivity and induced polarization responses are interpreted in terms of gas dissolution and water/gas saturation.

  7. A Vulnerability-Benefit Analysis of Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delman, E. M.; Stephenson, S. R.; Davis, S. J.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    Although we can anticipate continued improvements in our understanding of future climate impacts, the central challenge of climate change is not scientific, but rather political and economic. In particular, international climate negotiations center on how to share the burden of uncertain mitigation and adaptation costs. We expose the relative economic interests of different countries by assessing and comparing their vulnerability to climate impacts and the economic benefits they derive from the fossil fuel-based energy system. Vulnerability refers to the propensity of humans and their assets to suffer when impacted by hazards, and we draw upon the results from a number of prior studies that have quantified vulnerability using multivariate indices. As a proxy for benefit, we average CO2 related to each country's extraction of fossil fuels, production of CO2 emissions, and consumption of goods and services (Davis et al., 2011), which should reflect benefits accrued in proportion to national economic dependence on fossil fuels. We define a nondimensional vulnerability-benefit ratio for each nation and find a large range across countries. In general, we confirm that developed and emerging economies such as the U.S., Western Europe, and China rely heavily on fossil fuels and have substantial resources to respond to the impacts of climate change, while smaller, less-developed economies such as Sierra Leone and Vanuatu benefit little from current CO2 emissions and are much more vulnerable to adverse climate impacts. In addition, we identify some countries with a high vulnerability and benefit, such as Iraq and Nigeria; conversely, some nations exhibit both a low vulnerability and benefit, such as New Zealand. In most cases, the ratios reflect the nature of energy-climate policies in each country, although certain nations - such as the United Kingdom and France - assume a level of responsibility incongruous with their ratio and commit to mitigation policy despite

  8. High-resolution mapping of biogenic carbon fluxes to improve urban CO2 monitoring, reporting, and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardiman, B. S.; Hutyra, L.; Gately, C.; Raciti, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Urban areas are home to 80% of the US population and 70% of energy related fossil fuel emissions originate from urban areas. Efforts to accurately monitor, report, and verify anthropogenic CO2 missions using atmospheric measurements require reliable partitioning of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. Anthropogenic emissions peak during the daytime, coincident with biogenic drawdown of CO2. In contrast, biogenic respiration emissions peak at night when anthropogenic emissions are lower. This temporal aliasing of fluxes requires careful modeling of both biogenic and anthropogenic fluxes for accurate source attribution through inverse modeling. Biogenic fluxes in urban regions can be a significant component of the urban carbon cycle. However, vegetation in urban areas is subject to longer growing seasons, reduced competition, higher rates of nitrogen deposition, and altered patterns of biomass inputs, all interacting to elevate C turnover rates relative to analogous non-urban ecosystems. These conditions suggest that models that ignore urban vegetation or base biogenic flux estimates on non-urban forests are likely to produce inaccurate estimates of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Biosphere models often omit biogenic fluxes in urban areas despite potentially extensive vegetation coverage. For example, in Massachusetts, models mask out as much as 40% of land area, effectively assuming they have no biological flux. This results in a ~32% underestimate of aboveground biomass (AGB) across the state as compared to higher resolution vegetation maps. Our analysis suggests that some common biomass maps may underestimate forest biomass by ~520 Tg C within the state of Massachusetts. Moreover, omitted portions of the state have the highest population density, indicating that we know least about regions where most people live. We combine remote sensing imagery of urban vegetation cover with ground surveys of tree growth and mortality to improve estimates of aboveground biomass and

  9. Modeling and Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Jeff

    2012-11-30

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a viable option for mitigating the vast amount of CO{sub 2} being released into the atmosphere daily. Test sites for CO{sub 2} injection have been appearing across the world to ascertain the feasibility of capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide. A major concern with full scale implementation is monitoring and verifying the permanence of injected CO{sub 2}. Geophysical methods, an exploration industry standard, are non-invasive imaging techniques that can be implemented to address that concern. Geophysical methods, seismic and electromagnetic, play a crucial role in monitoring the subsurface pre- and post-injection. Seismic techniques have been the most popular but electromagnetic methods are gaining interest. The primary goal of this project was to develop a new geophysical tool, a software program called GphyzCO2, to investigate the implementation of geophysical monitoring for detecting injected CO{sub 2} at test sites. The GphyzCO2 software consists of interconnected programs that encompass well logging, seismic, and electromagnetic methods. The software enables users to design and execute 3D surface-to-surface (conventional surface seismic) and borehole-to-borehole (cross-hole seismic and electromagnetic methods) numerical modeling surveys. The generalized flow of the program begins with building a complex 3D subsurface geological model, assigning properties to the models that mimic a potential CO{sub 2} injection site, numerically forward model a geophysical survey, and analyze the results. A test site located in Warren County, Ohio was selected as the test site for the full implementation of GphyzCO2. Specific interest was placed on a potential reservoir target, the Mount Simon Sandstone, and cap rock, the Eau Claire Formation. Analysis of the test site included well log data, physical property measurements (porosity), core sample resistivity measurements, calculating electrical permittivity values, seismic data

  10. The Application of Transcutaneous CO2 Pressure Monitoring in the Anesthesia of Obese Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shijiang; Sun, Jie; Chen, Xing; Yu, Yingying; Liu, Xuan; Liu, Cunming

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the correlation and accuracy of transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PTCCO2) with regard to arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) in severe obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Twenty-one patients with BMI>35 kg/m2 were enrolled in our study. Their PaCO2, end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2), as well as PTCCO2 values were measured at before pneumoperitoneum and 30 min, 60 min, 120 min after pneumoperitoneum respectively. Then the differences between each pair of values (PetCO2–PaCO2) and. (PTCCO2–PaCO2) were calculated. Bland–Altman method, correlation and regression analysis, as well as exact probability method and two way contingency table were employed for the data analysis. 21 adults (aged 19–54 yr, mean 29, SD 9 yr; weight 86–160 kg, mean119.3, SD 22.1 kg; BMI 35.3–51.1 kg/m2, mean 42.1,SD 5.4 kg/m2) were finally included in this study. One patient was eliminated due to the use of vaso-excitor material phenylephrine during anesthesia induction. Eighty-four sample sets were obtained. The average PaCO2–PTCCO2 difference was 0.9±1.3 mmHg (mean±SD). And the average PaCO2–PetCO2 difference was 10.3±2.3 mmHg (mean±SD). The linear regression equation of PaCO2–PetCO2 is PetCO2 = 11.58+0.57×PaCO2 (r2 = 0.64, P<0.01), whereas the one of PaCO2–PTCCO2 is PTCCO2 = 0.60+0.97×PaCO2 (r2 = 0.89). The LOA (limits of agreement) of 95% average PaCO2–PetCO2 difference is 10.3±4.6 mmHg (mean±1.96 SD), while the LOA of 95% average PaCO2–PTCCO2 difference is 0.9±2.6 mmHg (mean±1.96 SD). In conclusion, transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring provides a better estimate of PaCO2 than PetCO2 in severe obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. PMID:24699267

  11. The application of transcutaneous CO2 pressure monitoring in the anesthesia of obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijiang; Sun, Jie; Chen, Xing; Yu, Yingying; Liu, Xuan; Liu, Cunming

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the correlation and accuracy of transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PTCCO2) with regard to arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) in severe obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Twenty-one patients with BMI>35 kg/m(2) were enrolled in our study. Their PaCO2, end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2), as well as PTCCO2 values were measured at before pneumoperitoneum and 30 min, 60 min, 120 min after pneumoperitoneum respectively. Then the differences between each pair of values (PetCO2-PaCO2) and. (PTCCO2-PaCO2) were calculated. Bland-Altman method, correlation and regression analysis, as well as exact probability method and two way contingency table were employed for the data analysis. 21 adults (aged 19-54 yr, mean 29, SD 9 yr; weight 86-160 kg, mean 119.3, SD 22.1 kg; BMI 35.3-51.1 kg/m(2), mean 42.1,SD 5.4 kg/m(2)) were finally included in this study. One patient was eliminated due to the use of vaso-excitor material phenylephrine during anesthesia induction. Eighty-four sample sets were obtained. The average PaCO2-PTCCO2 difference was 0.9 ± 1.3 mmHg (mean ± SD). And the average PaCO2-PetCO2 difference was 10.3 ± 2.3 mmHg (mean ± SD). The linear regression equation of PaCO2-PetCO2 is PetCO2 = 11.58+0.57 × PaCO2 (r(2) = 0.64, P<0.01), whereas the one of PaCO2-PTCCO2 is PTCCO2 = 0.60 + 0.97 × PaCO2 (r(2) = 0.89). The LOA (limits of agreement) of 95% average PaCO2-PetCO2 difference is 10.3 ± 4.6 mmHg (mean ± 1.96 SD), while the LOA of 95% average PaCO2-PTCCO2 difference is 0.9 ± 2.6 mmHg (mean ± 1.96 SD). In conclusion, transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring provides a better estimate of PaCO2 than PetCO2 in severe obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. PMID:24699267

  12. Otway CO2 sequestration pilot project: end of phase I monitoring program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urosevic, Milovan; Pevzner, Roman; Shulakova, Valeria; Kepic, Anton

    2010-05-01

    The first phase of CO2CRC Otway Pilot project involved the injection of 66,000 tonnes of CO2/CH4 gas mixture (80% of carbon dioxide and 20% of methane), onshore, into a deep depleted gas reservoir. Such case is particularly challenging for geophysical monitoring. However the initial results of the time lapse seismic are quite encouraging. The first time lapse anomaly was detected after only 33,000 t of CO2 were injected into Waarre C reservoir at depth of 2050 m. The final time lapse TL3D survey is recorded in January 2010, five months after injection was completed. In this study we describe and discuss the strategy we adopted for the design of TL3D seismic program. The main aim was to achieve high sensitivity of the measurements while maximising the repeatability of successful seismic measurements. The specifics of the site such as typically excessive wind, power lines, electric fences, farm animals and strict environmental restrictions made this task particularly challenging. Furthermore we used underpowered sources, with respect to the depth of the target to reduce the footprint. To achieve satisfactory signal to noise ratio, high repeatability and high resolution we designed high density, high fold 3D survey grid. Careful planning of 3D surveys allowed us to achieve excellent repeatability which is, at the reservoir level represented by normalised RMS difference values of about 20%. Single time-lapse anomaly at the reservoir level was observed, its location and amplitude agrees with the position of CO2 plume predicted by reservoir simulations and amplitude variations predicted by seismic modelling. Post injection 3D data are currently analysed.

  13. Complex fluid flow revealed by monitoring CO2 injection in a fluvial formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiemin; Cook, Paul J.; Hosseini, Seyyed A.; Yang, Changbing; Romanak, Katherine D.; Zhang, Tongwei; Freifeld, Barry M.; Smyth, Rebecca C.; Zeng, Hongliu; Hovorka, Susan D.

    2012-03-01

    At Cranfield, Mississippi, United States, a large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection through an injection well (˜3,080 m deep) was continuously monitored using U-tube samplers in two observation wells located 68 and 112 m east of the injector. The Lower Tuscaloosa Formation injection zone, which consists of amalgamated fluvial point-bar and channel-fill deposits, presents an interesting environment for studying fluid flow in heterogeneous formations. Continual fluid sampling was carried out during the first month of CO2 injection. Two subsequent tracer tests using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and krypton were conducted at different injection rates to measure flow velocity change. The field observations showed significant heterogeneity of fluid flow and for the first time clearly demonstrated that fluid flow evolved with time and injection rate. It was found the wells were connected through numerous, separate flow pathways. CO2 flowed through an increasing fraction of the reservoir and sweep efficiency improved with time. The field study also first documented in situ component exchange between brine and gas phases during CO2 injection. It was found that CH4 degassed from brine and is enriched along the gas-water contact. Multiple injectate flow fronts with high CH4 concentration arrived at different times and led to gas composition fluctuations in the observation wells. The findings provide valuable insights into heterogeneous multiphase flow in rock formations and show that conventional geological models and static fluid flow simulations are unable to fully describe the heterogeneous and dynamic flow during fluid injection.

  14. Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions at Various Spatial and Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasing, T.

    2006-12-01

    Annual values of fossil-fuel carbon emissions (FFCE), estimated directly from fuel combustion data or fuel- supply data, exist at global and national scales and have been used in studies of the global carbon cycle. Annual averages at national levels are useful in tracking emissions and developing mitigation strategies. However, such large-scale long-term averages contain no information about small-scale, short-term processes influencing FFCE. Recent development of a monthly FFCE database for the United States (US) facilitates correlations of seasonal FFCE with other seasonal variables. An increasing fraction of FFCE has occurred during the warmest months, and appears to be related to population shifts to warmer regions, general climate warming, and increased use of air conditioners. These results incorporate effects of even smaller-scale variables. FFCE from electric-generating facilities occur on space scales represented by individual stacks, and depend on regional electricity demand, which depends on temperature and other regional variables which change from hour to hour. Such variables also influence FFCE from urban areas, which, like electric generating facilities, contribute a large fraction of global FFCE but occupy a small fraction of the earth's surface. Preliminary studies in US cities indicate elevated winter CO2 concentrations from local emissions due to combustion of natural gas for heating, but summer concentrations are much closer to global background levels. Energy for air conditioning in summer is likely to be provided by electric-generating facilities at distant locations; distance from the emissions sources, along with increased convection in summer would reduce urban CO2 concentrations. Greater understanding of processes affecting local and urban FFCE, as well as any spatial homogeneities arising from reliance on common resources and energy demands, transportation links, etc., will be necessary to project emissions changes in response to future

  15. Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions at Various Spatial and Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuglestvedt, J.; Berntsen, T.; Myhre, G.; Stordal, F.; Berglen, T.

    2005-05-01

    Annual values of fossil-fuel carbon emissions (FFCE), estimated directly from fuel combustion data or fuel- supply data, exist at global and national scales and have been used in studies of the global carbon cycle. Annual averages at national levels are useful in tracking emissions and developing mitigation strategies. However, such large-scale long-term averages contain no information about small-scale, short-term processes influencing FFCE. Recent development of a monthly FFCE database for the United States (US) facilitates correlations of seasonal FFCE with other seasonal variables. An increasing fraction of FFCE has occurred during the warmest months, and appears to be related to population shifts to warmer regions, general climate warming, and increased use of air conditioners. These results incorporate effects of even smaller-scale variables. FFCE from electric-generating facilities occur on space scales represented by individual stacks, and depend on regional electricity demand, which depends on temperature and other regional variables which change from hour to hour. Such variables also influence FFCE from urban areas, which, like electric generating facilities, contribute a large fraction of global FFCE but occupy a small fraction of the earth's surface. Preliminary studies in US cities indicate elevated winter CO2 concentrations from local emissions due to combustion of natural gas for heating, but summer concentrations are much closer to global background levels. Energy for air conditioning in summer is likely to be provided by electric-generating facilities at distant locations; distance from the emissions sources, along with increased convection in summer would reduce urban CO2 concentrations. Greater understanding of processes affecting local and urban FFCE, as well as any spatial homogeneities arising from reliance on common resources and energy demands, transportation links, etc., will be necessary to project emissions changes in response to future

  16. Microseismicity monitoring at the Decatur, IL, CO2 sequestration demonstration site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaven, J. Ole; Hickman, Stephen H.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Greenberg, Sallie

    2016-04-01

    Industrial-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) will require the injection of large volumes of CO2 into extensive undisturbed brine aquifers. Large-volume injection has the potential to induce earthquake activity (Zoback and Gorelick, 2012). To assess the seismic hazard posed by one such operation, the USGS has been monitoring seismic activity at a CCS demonstration site in Decatur, IL, where supercritical CO2 is injected into the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a basal brine formation, at a depth of about 2 km, several 10s of meters above granitic basement. During the first phase of injection, supercritical CO2 was injected at a rate of about 1000 metric tons/day from November 2011 until November 2014. The USGS monitored microseismicity using a seismic network that consists of 16 stations (4 in 500 ft boreholes). The USGS data set contains 179 locatable events and shows that the microseismicity occurs in the Mt Simon sandstone injection interval and, to a lesser degree, in the pre-Mt Simon and the Precambrian basement. Microseismicity occurs in distinct clusters at varying distances from the injection well and distance from the well does not increase systematically with time. Double difference relocations of these events reveal that these clusters tend to form linear features in both the Mt. Simon and the basement, suggesting that the microseismicity involves reactivation of preexisting fractures and faults. This finding is corroborated by composite focal mechanisms for individual clusters that are consistent with the regional horizontal principal stress orientations and right-lateral slip across the reactivated faults and fractures. Despite the injection of nearly one million tons of CO2 the largest microearthquake magnitudes barely exceeded 1 and, thus, none of these events could be felt at the surface. During the second phase, injection down a second borehole will be at a rate of about 3000 metric tons/day starting in early 2016 and continue for three years. To augment

  17. Toward Regional Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Verification Using WRF-CHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Monache, L.; Kosoviæ, B.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Bergmann, D.; Grant, K.; Guilderson, T.

    2008-12-01

    As efforts to reduce emissions of green house gases take shape it is becoming obvious that an essential component of a viable solution will involve emission verification. While detailed inventories of green house gas sources will represent important component of the solution additional verification methodologies will be necessary to reduce uncertainties in emission estimates especially for distributed sources and CO2 offsets. We developed tools for solving inverse dispersion problem for distributed emissions of green house gases. For that purpose we combine probabilistic inverse methodology based on Bayesian inversion with stochastic sampling and weather forecasting and air quality model WRF-CHEM. We demonstrate estimation of CO2 emissions associated with fossil fuel burning in California over two one-week periods in 2006. We use WRF- CHEM in tracer simulation mode to solve forward dispersion problem for emissions over eleven air basins. We first use direct inversion approach to determine optimal location for a limited number of CO2 - C14 isotope sensors. We then use Bayesian inference with stochastic sampling to determine probability distributions for emissions from California air basins. Moreover, we vary the number of sensors and frequency of measurements to study their effect on the accuracy and uncertainty level of the emission estimation. Finally, to take into account uncertainties associated with forward modeling, we combine Bayesian inference and stochastic sampling with ensemble modeling. The ensemble is created by running WRF-CHEM with different initial and boundary conditions as well as different boundary layer and surface model options. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL-ABS-406901-DRAFT). The project 07-ERD- 064 was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL.

  18. Least-squares reverse-time migration of Cranfield VSP data for monitoring CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TAN, S.; Huang, L.

    2012-12-01

    Cost-effective monitoring for carbon utilization and sequestration requires high-resolution imaging with a minimal amount of data. Least-squares reverse-time migration is a promising imaging method for this purpose. We apply least-squares reverse-time migration to a portion of the 3D vertical seismic profile data acquired at the Cranfield enhanced oil recovery field in Mississippi for monitoring CO2 injection. Conventional reverse-time migration of limited data suffers from significant image artifacts and a poor image resolution. Lease-squares reverse-time migration can reduce image artifacts and improves the image resolution. We demonstrate the significant improvements of least-squares reverse-time migration by comparing its migration images of the Cranfield VSP data with that obtained using the conventional reverse-time migration.

  19. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Default CO2 Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel C Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel Default CO2 Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel Fuel type Default high heat value Default CO2 emission factor Coal...

  20. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Default CO2 Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel C Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel Default CO2 Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel Fuel type Default high heat value Default CO2 emission factor Coal...

  1. Multipoint Pressure and Temperature Sensing Fiber Optic Cable for Monitoring CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Challener, William

    2014-12-31

    This report describes the work completed on contract DE-FE0010116. The goal of this two year project was to develop and demonstrate in the laboratory a highly accurate multi-point pressure measurement fiber optic cable based on MEMS pressure sensors suitable for downhole deployment in a CO2 sequestration well. The sensor interrogator was also to be demonstrated in a remote monitoring system and environmental testing was to be completed to indicate its downhole survivability over a lengthy period of time (e.g., 20 years). An interrogator system based on a pulsed laser excitation was shown to be capable of multiple (potentially 100+) simultaneous sensor measurements. Two sensors packages were completed and spliced in a cable onto the same fiber and measured. One sensor package was subsequently measured at high temperatures and pressures in supercritical CO2, while the other package was measured prior and after being subjected to high torque stresses to mimic downhole deployment. The environmental and stress tests indicated areas in which the package design should be further improved.

  2. Oxy-fuel Combustion and Integrated Pollutant Removal as Retrofit Technologies for Removing CO2 from Coal Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, T.L.; Oryshchyn, D.B.; Summers, C.A.; Gerdemann, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    One third of the US installed capacity is coal-fired, producing 49.7% of net electric generation in 20051. Any approach to curbing CO2 production must consider the installed capacity and provide a mechanism for preserving this resource while meeting CO2 reduction goals. One promising approach to both new generation and retrofit is oxy-fuel combustion. Using oxygen instead of air as the oxidizer in a boiler provides a concentrated CO2 combustion product for processing into a sequestration-ready fluid.... Post-combustion carbon capture and oxy-fuel combustion paired with a compression capture technology such as IPR are both candidates for retrofitting pc combustion plants to meet carbon emission limits. This paper will focus on oxy-fuel combustion as applied to existing coal power plants.

  3. Rb-stabilized laser at 1572 nm for CO2 monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthey, R.; Moreno, W.; Gruet, F.; Brochard, P.; Schilt, S.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a compact rubidium-stabilized laser system to serve as optical frequency reference in the 1.55-μm wavelength region, in particular for CO2 monitoring at 1572 nm. The light of a fiber-pigtailed distributed feedback (DFB) laser emitting at 1560 nm is frequency-doubled and locked to a sub-Doppler rubidium transition at 780 nm using a 2-cm long vapor glass cell. Part of the DFB laser light is modulated with an electro-optical modulator enclosed in a Fabry-Perot cavity, generating an optical frequency comb with spectral coverage extending from 1540 nm to 1580 nm. A second slave DFB laser emitting at 1572 nm and offset-locked to one line of the frequency comb shows a relative frequency stability of 1.10-11 at 1 s averaging time and <4.10-12 from 1 hour up to 3 days.

  4. mCSEM inversion for CO2 sequestration monitoring at a deep brine aquifer in a shallow sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seogi; Noh, Kyubo; Seol, Soon Jee; Byun, Joongmoo

    2015-11-01

    Carbon dioxide injection monitoring in offshore environments is a promising future application of the marine controlled-source electromagnetic (mCSEM) method. To investigate whether the mCSEM method can be used to quantitatively monitor variations in the distribution of the injected CO2, we developed a mCSEM inversion scheme and conducted numerical analyses. Furthermore, to demonstrate the monitoring capability of the mCSEM method in challenging environments, we used a deep brine aquifer model in shallow sea as an injection target. The mCSEM responses of the injected CO2 in the deep brine aquifer were severely decayed and heavily masked by the air wave due to the proximity of the free space. Therefore, the accurate computation of small mCSEM responses due to the injected CO2 and the proper incorporation into the inversion process are critically important for the mCSEM method to be successful. Additionally, in monitoring situations, some useful a priori information is usually available (e.g. well logs and seismic sections), and the proper implementation of this to our inversion framework is crucial to ensure reliable estimation of the distribution of the injected CO2 plume. In this study, we developed an efficient 2.5D mCSEM inversion algorithm based on an accurate forward modelling algorithm and the judicious incorporation of a priori information into our inversion scheme. The inversion scheme was tested with simplified and realistic CO2 injection models and successfully recovered the resistivity distributions of the injected CO2, although it still required the presence of a considerable amount of the injected CO2. Based on these inversion experiments, we demonstrated that the mCSEM method is capable of quantitatively monitoring variations in the distribution of injected CO2 in offshore environments.

  5. EM Methods Applied for the Characterization and Monitoring of the Hontomin (Spain) CO2 Storage Pilot Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Ogaya, Xenia; Vilamajo, Eloi; Bosch, David; Escalas, Lena; Piña, Perla

    2013-04-01

    The work presented here correspond to an on-going project in the frame of the development of a pilot plant for CO2 storage in a deep saline aquifer funded by Fundación Ciudad de la Energía-CIUDEN (http://www.ciuden.es/) on behalf of the Spanish Government. The main objective of the research Project is to monitor the CO2 migration within the reservoir during and after the injection as well as testing and evaluating different EM monitoring methods. In this way, a good characterization of the zone is imperative to perceive and quantify, as soon as possible, any change owing to the CO2 injection. Among all geophysical techniques, electrical and electromagnetic methods are especially useful and meaningful to monitor the CO2 plume since these methods are sensitive to the electrical conductivity of the pore fluid. The presence of CO2 inside the pore will replace a fraction of saline fluid within the storage aquifer, reducing the effective volume available for ionic transport. As a consequence, the bulk electrical resistivity of the rock is expected to increase significantly. The proposed EM techniques are the following: 1- Magnetotelluric method, 2-Cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography, 3- Control source electromagnetics. Moreover laboratory experiments are being carried out to monitor the CO2 flux inside sample cores using ERT.

  6. Borehole Seismic Monitoring of Injected CO2 at the Frio Site

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Hoversten, G.M.; Peterson, JohnE.; Korneev, Valeri A.

    2006-04-21

    As part of a small scale sequestration test (about 1500 tonsof CO2) in a saline aquifer, time-lapse borehole seismic surveys wereconducted to aid in characterization of subsurface CO2 distribution andmaterial property changes induced by the injected CO2. A VSP surveydemonstrated a large increase (about 75 percent) in seismic reflectivitydue to CO2 injection and allowed estimation of the spatial extent of CO2induced changes. A crosswell survey imaged a large seismic velocitydecrease (up to 500 m/s) within the injection interval and provided ahigh resolution image of this velocity change which maps the subsurfacedistribution of CO2 between two wells. Numerical modeling of the seismicresponse uses the crosswell measurements to show that this small CO2volume causes a large response in the seismic reflectivity. This resultdemonstrates that seismic detection of small CO2 volumes in salineaquifers is feasible and realistic.

  7. Can satellite-based monitoring techniques be used to quantify volcanic CO2 emissions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kuze, Akihiko; Kataoka, Fumie; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki; Popp, Christoph; Ajiro, Masataka; Suto, Hiroshi; Takeda, Toru; Kanekon, Sayaka; Sealing, Christine; Flower, Verity

    2014-05-01

    Since 2010, we investigate and improve possible methods to regularly target volcanic centers from space in order to detect volcanic carbon dioxide (CO2) point source anomalies, using the Japanese Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Our long-term goals are: (a) better spatial and temporal coverage of volcano monitoring techniques; (b) improvement of the currently highly uncertain global CO2 emission inventory for volcanoes, and (c) use of volcanic CO2 emissions for high altitude, strong point source emission and dispersion studies in atmospheric science. The difficulties posed by strong relief, orogenic clouds, and aerosols are minimized by a small field of view, enhanced spectral resolving power, by employing repeat target mode observation strategies, and by comparison to continuous ground based sensor network validation data. GOSAT is a single-instrument Earth observing greenhouse gas mission aboard JAXA's IBUKI satellite in sun-synchronous polar orbit. GOSAT's Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) has been producing total column XCO2 data since January 2009, at a repeat cycle of 3 days, offering great opportunities for temporal monitoring of point sources. GOSAT's 10 km field of view can spatially integrate entire volcanic edifices within one 'shot' in precise target mode. While it doesn't have any spatial scanning or mapping capability, it does have strong spectral resolving power and agile pointing capability to focus on several targets of interest per orbit. Sufficient uncertainty reduction is achieved through comprehensive in-flight vicarious calibration, in close collaboration between NASA and JAXA. Challenges with the on-board pointing mirror system have been compensated for employing custom observation planning strategies, including repeat sacrificial upstream reference points to control pointing mirror motion, empirical individualized target offset compensation, observation pattern simulations to minimize view angle azimuth. Since summer 2010

  8. Multi-species monitoring for fugitive gases and CO2 leakage at enhanced oil recovery operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risk, D. A.; Lavoie, M.; Brooks, B.; Goeckede, M.; Phillips, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon, Capture, and Storage (CCS) remains an option for reducing fossil CO2 emissions, but public acceptance continues to limit the roll-out of new projects. Monitoring is one mechanism by which operators can demonstrate credibility, competency, and environmental performance. While many previous research initiatives on surface monitoring have focused largely on soil gas sampling and geochemistries, fewer have tackled site-scale atmospheric detection techniques. This study aims to develop suitable techniques for identifying produced fluid leaks from wells and fugitive emissions from other associated infrastructure, and also to understand the variability of the target gases across land use types, and through time. During the growing season of 2013, we conducted multi-species atmospheric surveys of a 100 square kilometre Enhanced Oil Recovery site, using stationary and vehicle-mounted Cavity Ringdown Spectrometers (CRDS) targeting CH4, δ13C-CH4, CO2, and H2S. The study site offered excellent opportunity to study anthropogenic emissions, as it had well over 1000 active wells onsite, spatially distributed pipeline infrastructure, geochemical differentiation among the various possible emission sources, and also a road network that provided good access to most areas of the site. Leak detection using this method presented challenges related to the atmospheric transport modelling needed to back-calculate the source regions for observed anomalies. Transport models are generally not readily applicable at these smaller scales, so we developed an operational leak detection package. This package included the in situ and roving measurements, interpreted using simple mathematical models, maps, and remote sensing data, to narrow our survey search window and score sub-domains based on the gases present and the probability that these gases were man-made (as opposed to natural), in addition to the likely nature of the anthropogenic source as indicated by gas mixing ratios. Both

  9. A simple high-performance matrix-free biomass molten carbonate fuel cell without CO2 recirculation

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2016-01-01

    In previous reports, flowing CO2 at the cathode is essential for either conventional molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) based on molten carbonate/LiAlO2 electrolytes or matrix-free MCFCs. For the first time, we demonstrate a high-performance matrix-free MCFC without CO2 recirculation. At 800°C, power densities of 430 and 410 mW/cm2 are achieved when biomass—bamboo charcoal and wood, respectively–is used as fuel. At 600°C, a stable performance is observed during the measured 90 hours after the initial degradation. In this MCFC, CO2 is produced at the anode when carbon-containing fuels are used. The produced CO2 then dissolves and diffuses to the cathode to react with oxygen in open air, forming the required CO32− or CO42− ions for continuous operation. The dissolved O2− ions may also take part in the cell reactions. This provides a simple new fuel cell technology to directly convert carbon-containing fuels such as carbon and biomass into electricity with high efficiency. PMID:27540588

  10. A simple high-performance matrix-free biomass molten carbonate fuel cell without CO2 recirculation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2016-08-01

    In previous reports, flowing CO2 at the cathode is essential for either conventional molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) based on molten carbonate/LiAlO2 electrolytes or matrix-free MCFCs. For the first time, we demonstrate a high-performance matrix-free MCFC without CO2 recirculation. At 800°C, power densities of 430 and 410 mW/cm(2) are achieved when biomass-bamboo charcoal and wood, respectively-is used as fuel. At 600°C, a stable performance is observed during the measured 90 hours after the initial degradation. In this MCFC, CO2 is produced at the anode when carbon-containing fuels are used. The produced CO2 then dissolves and diffuses to the cathode to react with oxygen in open air, forming the required [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] ions for continuous operation. The dissolved [Formula: see text] ions may also take part in the cell reactions. This provides a simple new fuel cell technology to directly convert carbon-containing fuels such as carbon and biomass into electricity with high efficiency. PMID:27540588

  11. Applying monitoring, verification, and accounting techniques to a real-world, enhanced oil recovery operational CO2 leak

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wimmer, B.T.; Krapac, I.G.; Locke, R.; Iranmanesh, A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of carbon dioxide (CO2) for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is being tested for oil fields in the Illinois Basin, USA. While this technology has shown promise for improving oil production, it has raised some issues about the safety of CO2 injection and storage. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) organized a Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) team to develop and deploy monitoring programs at three EOR sites in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, USA. MVA goals include establishing baseline conditions to evaluate potential impacts from CO2 injection, demonstrating that project activities are protective of human health and the environment, and providing an accurate accounting of stored CO2. This paper focuses on the use of MVA techniques in monitoring a small CO2 leak from a supply line at an EOR facility under real-world conditions. The ability of shallow monitoring techniques to detect and quantify a CO2 leak under real-world conditions has been largely unproven. In July of 2009, a leak in the pipe supplying pressurized CO2 to an injection well was observed at an MGSC EOR site located in west-central Kentucky. Carbon dioxide was escaping from the supply pipe located approximately 1 m underground. The leak was discovered visually by site personnel and injection was halted immediately. At its largest extent, the hole created by the leak was approximately 1.9 m long by 1.7 m wide and 0.7 m deep in the land surface. This circumstance provided an excellent opportunity to evaluate the performance of several monitoring techniques including soil CO2 flux measurements, portable infrared gas analysis, thermal infrared imagery, and aerial hyperspectral imagery. Valuable experience was gained during this effort. Lessons learned included determining 1) hyperspectral imagery was not effective in detecting this relatively small, short-term CO2 leak, 2) even though injection was halted, the leak remained dynamic and presented a safety risk concern

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring of hydraulic fracturing laboratory experiment with supercritical and liquid CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Aoyagi, Kazuhei; Niwa, Tomoya; Chen, Youqing; Murata, Sumihiko; Chen, Qu; Nakayama, Yoshiki

    2012-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is often used for enhanced oil recovery in depleted petroleum reservoirs, and its behavior in rock is also of interest in CO2 capture and storage projects. CO2 usually becomes supercritical (SC-CO2) at depths greater than 1,000 m, while it is liquid (L-CO2) at low temperatures. The viscosity of L-CO2 is one order lower than that of normal liquid water, and that of SC-CO2 is much lower still. To clarify fracture behavior induced with injection of the low viscosity fluids, we conducted hydraulic fracturing experiments using 17 cm cubic granite blocks. The AE sources with the SC- and L-CO2 injections tend to distribute in a larger area than those with water injection, and furthermore, SC-CO2 tended to generate cracks extending more three dimensionally rather than along a flat plane than L-CO2. It was also found that the breakdown pressures for SC- and L-CO2 injections are expected to be considerably lower than for water.

  13. 40 CFR 600.209-12 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type. 600.209-12 Section 600.209-12 Protection of... EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values § 600.209-12 Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for...

  14. 40 CFR 600.209-12 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type. 600.209-12 Section 600.209-12 Protection of... EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values § 600.209-12 Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for...

  15. 40 CFR 600.209-12 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type. 600.209-12 Section 600.209-12 Protection of... EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values § 600.209-12 Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for...

  16. 40 CFR 600.208-12 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) The manufacturer shall supply total model year sales projections for each car line/vehicle...-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. 600.208-12... fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. (a) Fuel...

  17. 40 CFR 600.208-12 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The manufacturer shall supply total model year sales projections for each car line/vehicle...-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. 600.208-12... fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. (a) Fuel...

  18. 40 CFR 600.208-12 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The manufacturer shall supply total model year sales projections for each car line/vehicle...-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. 600.208-12... fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. (a) Fuel...

  19. Testing surface gas monitoring methods at sites of natural and man-made CO2 seepage in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Lister, R.; Barkwith, A.; Barlow, T.; Shaw, R.; Strutt, M.; Lombardi, S.; Beaubien, S.; Annunziatellis, A.; Graziani, S.

    2011-12-01

    Useful lessons for monitoring techniques and strategies can be learned at natural CO2 seepage sites. Existing methods and new developments can be tested at such sites to assess how useful they would be at geological CO2 storage sites. Such testing is not possible at actual storage sites where there is no leakage. Experience has been gained at the natural CO2 seepage sites near Latera in Italy, the Laacher See in Germany and Florina in Greece. Studies have also been carried out at experimental CO2 injection sites in the UK and Norway and at landfill sites in the UK. The sites have been used as a testing ground for existing and new techniques including open path lasers, eddy covariance, CO2 monitoring stations, flux chambers and in situ and laboratory soil gas analysis. Natural CO2 seepage at the sites tends to occur at gas vents of restricted surface extent. Typically such vents have a diameter of metres to tens of metres. Whilst the vents may align along faults or fractures they occur at small discrete points on such features where permeability is higher. These appear commonly to be associated with fracture intersections. Venting therefore occurs over only a small fraction of the total area of the sites. By analogy this suggests that a surface monitoring strategy for a CO2 storage site needs to include cost effective screening methods that can cover large areas quickly but which are capable of finding small leakage targets. Soil gas concentrations and fluxes vary with time in response to factors such as temperature, pressure, wind speed and soil moisture. This gives rise to diurnal, seasonal and weather system related cycles. Seepage of CO2 can therefore vary over time and this implies the need for continuous monitoring techniques to avoid missing transient releases. Developing legislation for CO2 storage sites (such as the European Union Storage Directive) also requires the quantification of any detected CO2 leakage and this will require an understanding of

  20. Monitoring CO2 concentration and δ13C in an underground cavity using a commercial isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillon, Sophie; Agrinier, Pierre; Pili, Éric

    2015-04-01

    CO2 stable carbon isotopes are very attractive in environmental research to investigate both natural and anthropogenic carbon sources. Laser-based isotope ratio infrared spectrometers (IRIS) allow in situ continuous monitoring of CO2 isotopes, and therefore they have a potential for unprecedented understanding of carbon sources and dynamics with a high temporal resolution. Here we present the performance assessment of a commercial IRIS analyzer, including the measurement setup and the data processing scheme that we used. Even if the analyzer performs 1-Hz measurements, an integration time of the order of 1 h is commonly needed to obtain acceptable precision for δ13C. The main sources of uncertainty on δ13C come from the concentration dependence and from the temporal instability of the analyzer. The method is applied to the in situ monitoring of the CO2 carbon isotopes in an underground cavity (Roselend Natural Laboratory, France) during several months. On a weekly timescale, the temporal variability of CO2 is dominated by transient contamination by human breath. Discarding these anthropogenic contaminations, CO2 and δ13C backgrounds do not show diurnal or seasonal fluctuations. A CO2 flux released into the tunnel by the surrounding rocks is measured. The carbon isotope composition of this CO2, identified with a Keeling plot, is consistent with a main production by microbial respiration and a minor production from weathering of carbonate minerals. The presented instrument and application study are relevant to cave monitoring, whether to understand CO2 dynamics in visited and/or painted caves for preservation purposes or to understand paleoclimate recording in speleothems.

  1. Periodic behavior of soil CO2 emissions in diffuse degassing areas of the Azores archipelago: Application to seismovolcanic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, Fátima; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Ferreira, Teresa; Silva, Catarina; Cruz, José V.

    2014-10-01

    Time series of soil CO2 efflux recorded in the Azores archipelago volcanic-hydrothermal areas feature daily and seasonal variations. The recorded CO2 efflux values were lower during summer than in the winter season. The diurnal CO2 efflux values were higher at dawn and lower in the early afternoon, contrary to that observed in biogenic environments. CO2 efflux cycles correlated well with the environmental variables, such as air temperature, wind speed, and barometric pressure, which also showed low- and high-frequency periodicities. Several simulations were performed here using the Transport of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat 2 (TOUGH2) geothermal simulator to complement the study of Rinaldi et al. (2012). The effects of the water table depth, air temperature perturbation amplitude, and soil thermal gradient contributed to an explanation of the contrasts observed in the diurnal (S1) and semidiurnal (S2) soil CO2 efflux peaks for the different monitoring sites and seasons. Filtering techniques (multivariate regression analysis and fast Fourier transform filters) were also applied to the recorded time series to remove effects of external variables on the soil CO2 efflux. The resulting time series (the residuals) correspond to the best approach to the deep-seated (volcanic/hydrothermal) CO2 emissions and thus should be used in seismovolcanic monitoring programs. Even if no evident correlation can be established yet between the soil CO2 residuals and seismicity over the monitored time, a seismic swarm that occurred around the end of 2008 might have triggered some deviations from the observed daily cycles.

  2. Seismic monitoring results from the first 6 months of CO2 injection at the Aquistore geological storage site, Saskatchewan, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, T. M.; White, D. J.; Stork, A.; Schmitt, D. R.; Worth, K.; Harris, K.; Roberts, B.; Samson, C.; Kendal, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Aquistore Project, located in SE Saskatchewan, Canada, is a demonstration project for CO2 storage in a deep saline aquifer. CO2 captured from a nearby coal-fired power plant is being injected into a brine-filled sandstone formation at 3100-3300 m depth. CO2 injection commenced in April, 2015, at initial rates of up to 250 tonnes per day. Seismic monitoring methods have been employed to track the subsurface CO2 plume and to record any injection-induced microseismicity. Active seismic methods utilized include 4D surface seismics using a sparse permanent array, 4D vertical seismic profiles (VSP) with both downhole geophones and a fiber optic distributed acoustic sensor (DAS) system. Pre-injection baseline seismic surveys have established very good repeatability with NRMS values as low as 0.07. 3D finite-difference seismic modelling of fluid flow simulations is used with the repeatability estimates to determine the appropriate timing for the first CO2 monitor surveys. Time-lapse logging is being conducted on a regular basis to provide in situ measurement of the change in seismic velocity associated with changes in CO2 saturation. Continuous passive seismic recording has been ongoing since the summer of 2012 to establish background local seismicity prior to the start of CO2 injection. Passive monitoring is being conducted using two, 2.5 km long, orthogonal linear arrays of surface geophones.with 3-component short-period geophones, 3 broadband surface seismometers, and an array of 3-component short-period geophones in an observation well. No significant injection-related seismicity (Mw > -1) has been detected at the surface during the first 4 months of CO2 injection. On-going analysis of the downhole passive data will provide further information as to the occurrence of lower magnitude microseismicity (Mw of -1 to -3).

  3. 40 CFR 600.210-12 - Calculation of fuel economy and CO2 emission values for labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR... hydrogen/mile results to miles per kilogram of hydrogen and miles per gasoline gallon equivalent. CO2 label... by the Administrator. Convert kilograms of hydrogen/mile results to miles per kilogram of...

  4. High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-03-19

    Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

  5. Feasibility of Monitoring the Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) CO2 Storage Site Using a Deep EM Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilamajó, Eloi; Queralt, Pilar; Ledo, Juanjo; Marcuello, Alex

    2013-07-01

    Geophysical methods have been used experimentally during the last decade, a period of strong development, being adopted as complementary techniques for characterizing and monitoring hydrocarbon and gas reservoirs. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method to monitor the storage of CO2 at the Research Laboratory on Geological Storage of CO2 at Hontomín (Burgos, Spain). Two aspects of the CSEM monitoring were examined considering the geoelectrical structure at the site, the technological constraints and the noise conditions of the Hontomín area. Borehole-to-surface simulations were performed to evaluate the detectability of the resistivity changes in the reservoir and the capacity to determine the location of the CO2 plume. The synthetic time-lapse study explores the possibilities of CSEM monitoring with a deep electric source. Three depths of the source are analyzed: above the plume, inside the plume, and beneath the stored CO2. In terms of the Hontomín storage site, the study confirmed that a deep electric source located beneath the injection depth can provide valuable information on the behavior of the stored CO2.

  6. Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, Vivak

    2014-06-30

    The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ≤ T ≤ 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (≤ 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and shale

  7. Integration & Co-development of a Geophysical CO2 Monitoring Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, S J

    2007-07-24

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has emerged as a key technology for dramatic short-term reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in particular from large stationary. A key challenge in this arena is the monitoring and verification (M&V) of CO2 plumes in the deep subsurface. Towards that end, we have developed a tool that can simultaneously invert multiple sub-surface data sets to constrain the location, geometry, and saturation of subsurface CO2 plumes. We have focused on a suite of unconventional geophysical approaches that measure changes in electrical properties (electrical resistance tomography, electromagnetic induction tomography) and bulk crustal deformation (til-meters). We had also used constraints of the geology as rendered in a shared earth model (ShEM) and of the injection (e.g., total injected CO{sub 2}). We describe a stochastic inversion method for mapping subsurface regions where CO{sub 2} saturation is changing. The technique combines prior information with measurements of injected CO{sub 2} volume, reservoir deformation and electrical resistivity. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The method can (a) jointly reconstruct disparate data types such as surface or subsurface tilt, electrical resistivity, and injected CO{sub 2} volume measurements, (b) provide quantitative measures of the result uncertainty, (c) identify competing models when the available data are insufficient to definitively identify a single optimal model and (d) rank the alternative models based on how well they fit available data. We present results from general simulations of a hypothetical case derived from a real site. We also apply the technique to a field in Wyoming, where measurements collected during CO{sub 2} injection for enhanced oil recovery serve to illustrate the method's performance. The stochastic inversions provide estimates of the most probable location, shape, volume of the plume and most likely CO{sub 2

  8. Monitoring underground migration of sequestered CO2 using self-potential methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishido, T.; Pritchett, J.; Tosha, T.; Nishi, Y.; Nakanishi, S.

    2013-12-01

    An appropriate monitoring program is indispensable for an individual geologic storage project to aid in answering various operational questions by detecting changes within the reservoir and to provide early warning of potential CO2 leakage through the caprock. Such a program is also essential to reduce uncertainties associated with reservoir parameters and to improve the predictive capability of reservoir models. Repeat geophysical measurements performed at the earth surface show particular promise for monitoring large subsurface volumes. To appraise the utility of geophysical techniques, Ishido et al. carried out numerical simulations of an aquifer system underlying a portion of Tokyo Bay and calculated the temporal changes in geophysical observables caused by changing underground conditions as computed by reservoir simulation (Energy Procedia, 2011). They used 'geophysical postprocessors' to calculate the resulting temporal changes in the earth-surface distributions of microgravity, self-potential (SP), apparent resistivity (from MT surveys) and seismic observables. The applicability of any particular method is likely to be highly site-specific, but these calculations indicate that none of these techniques should be ruled out altogether. Some survey techniques (gravity, MT resistivity) appear to be suitable for characterizing long-term changes, whereas others (seismic reflection, SP) are quite responsive to short term disturbances. The self-potential postprocessor calculates changes in subsurface electrical potential induced by pressure disturbances through electrokinetic coupling (Ishido & Pritchett, JGR 1999). In addition to electrokinetic coupling, SP anomalies may be generated by various other mechanisms such as thermoelectric coupling, electrochemical diffusion potential, etc. In particular, SP anomalies of negative polarity, which are frequently observed near wells, appear to be caused by an underground electrochemical mechanism similar to a galvanic cell

  9. Elevated atmospheric CO2 fuels leaching of old dissolved organic matter at the alpine treeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Frank; van Hees, Patrick A. W.; Handa, I. Tanya; HäTtenschwiler, Stephan

    2008-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM), the mobile form of soil organic matter (SOM), plays an important role in soil C cycling and in nutrient transport. We investigated the effects of 5 years of CO2 enrichment (370 versus 570 μmol CO2 mol-1) on DOM dynamics at the alpine treeline, including the analysis of fast-cycling components such as low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) biodegradability, and the decomposition of 14C-labeled oxalate. Concentrations of DOC in canopy throughfall were 20% higher at elevated CO2, probably driven by higher carbohydrate concentrations in leaves. In the organic soil layer, 5 years of CO2 enrichment increased water-extractable organic C by 17% and soil solution DOC at 5 cm depth by 20%. The 13C tracing of recently assimilated CO2 revealed that the input of recent plant-derived C (<15% of total DOC) was smaller than the CO2-induced increase in DOC. This strongly suggests that CO2 enrichment enhanced the mobilization of native DOC, which is supported by significant increases in dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). We mainly attribute these increases to a stimulated microbial activity as indicated by higher basal and soil respiration rates (+27%). The 14C-labeled oxalate was more rapidly mineralized from high CO2 soils. The concentrations of LMWOAs, but also those of "hydrophilic" DOC and biodegradable DOC (6% of total DOC), were, however, not affected by elevated CO2, suggesting that production and consumption of "labile" DOC were in balance. In summary, our data suggest that 5 years of CO2 enrichment speeded up the cycling of "labile" DOM and SOM in a late successional treeline ecosystem and increased the mobilization of older DOM through a stimulated microbial activity. Such a "priming effect" implies that elevated CO2 can accelerate the turnover of native SOM, and thus, it may induce increasing losses of old C from thick organic layers.

  10. Hopewell Beneficial CO2 Capture for Production of Fuels, Fertilizer and Energy

    SciTech Connect

    UOP; Honeywell Resins & Chemicals; Honeywell Process Solutions; Aquaflow Bionomics Ltd

    2010-09-30

    For Phase 1 of this project, the Hopewell team developed a detailed design for the Small Scale Pilot-Scale Algal CO2 Sequestration System. This pilot consisted of six (6) x 135 gallon cultivation tanks including systems for CO2 delivery and control, algal cultivation, and algal harvesting. A feed tank supplied Hopewell wastewater to the tanks and a receiver tank collected the effluent from the algal cultivation system. The effect of environmental parameters and nutrient loading on CO2 uptake and sequestration into biomass were determined. Additionally the cost of capturing CO2 from an industrial stack emission at both pilot and full-scale was determined. The engineering estimate evaluated Amine Guard technology for capture of pure CO2 and direct stack gas capture and compression. The study concluded that Amine Guard technology has lower lifecycle cost at commercial scale, although the cost of direct stack gas capture is lower at the pilot scale. Experiments conducted under high concentrations of dissolved CO2 did not demonstrate enhanced algae growth rate. This result suggests that the dissolved CO2 concentration at neutral pH was already above the limiting value. Even though dissolved CO2 did not show a positive effect on biomass growth, controlling its value at a constant set-point during daylight hours can be beneficial in an algae cultivation stage with high algae biomass concentration to maximize the rate of CO2 uptake. The limited enhancement of algal growth by CO2 addition to Hopewell wastewater was due at least in part to the high endogenous CO2 evolution from bacterial degradation of dissolved organic carbon present at high levels in the wastewater. It was found that the high level of bacterial activity was somewhat inhibitory to algal growth in the Hopewell wastewater. The project demonstrated that the Honeywell automation and control system, in combination with the accuracy of the online pH, dissolved O2, dissolved CO2, turbidity, Chlorophyll A and

  11. Response of CO2 Concentration in Andisol to Rainfall Events by Using Buried Tubing Gas Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Toshifumi; Tokida, Takeshi; Imoto, Hiromi; Nishimura, Taku; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    For the purpose of continuous soil CO2 gas monitoring, gas permeable resins were evaluated. Among polytetrafluoroethylen (PTFE), polyfluoroethylene propylene (PFEP) and silicone, the silicone rubber tube had highest permeability for oxygen gas. Buried Tubing Gas Monitoring System (BT-GMS) consisting of silicone rubber tube connected to a Non-diffuse infrared (NDIR) -CO2 gas and galvanic cell O2 gas sensors were constructed, and buried into an Andisol upland field at a depth of 20cm. Thermo-couples and EC-5 soil moisture sensors were inserted into 10 and 20cm deep layers. Soil CO2 gas concentration, temperature and moisture were continuously monitored for 5 months. Soil CO2 concentration was sensitive to rainfall events and soil moisture change. Responses were keen during summer until early autumn when soil temperature was higher than 20°C. Then, when soil temperature got lower the response tended to be dull. This suggested quick CO2 gas concentration change following a rainfall event was mostly due to enhancement in soil respiration with soil moisture rise.

  12. Uncertainty in projected climate change caused by methodological discrepancy in estimating CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilcaille, Yann; Gasser, Thomas; Ciais, Philippe; Lecocq, Franck; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Mohr, Steve; Andres, Robert J.; Bopp, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    There are different methodologies to estimate CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. The term "methodology" refers to the way subtypes of fossil fuels are aggregated and their implied emissions factors. This study investigates how the choice of a methodology impacts historical and future CO2 emissions, and ensuing climate change projections. First, we use fossil fuel extraction data from the Geologic Resources Supply-Demand model of Mohr et al. (2015). We compare four different methodologies to transform amounts of fossil fuel extracted into CO2 emissions based on the methodologies used by Mohr et al. (2015), CDIAC, EDGARv4.3, and IPCC 1996. We thus obtain 4 emissions pathways, for the historical period 1750-2012, that we compare to the emissions timeseries from EDGARv4.3 (1970-2012) and CDIACv2015 (1751-2011). Using the 3 scenarios by Mohr et al. (2015) for projections till 2300 under the assumption of an Early (Low emission), Best Guess or Late (High emission) extraction peaking, we obtain 12 different pathways of CO2 emissions over 1750-2300. Second, we extend these CO2-only pathways to all co-emitted and climatically active species. Co-emission ratios for CH4, CO, BC, OC, SO2, VOC, N2O, NH3, NOx are calculated on the basis of the EDGAR v4.3 dataset, and are then used to produce complementary pathways of non-CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion only. Finally, the 12 emissions scenarios are integrated using the compact Earth system model OSCAR v2.2, in order to quantify the impact of the selected driver onto climate change projections. We find historical cumulative fossil fuel CO2 emissions from 1750 to 2012 ranging from 365 GtC to 392 GtC depending upon the methodology used to convert fossil fuel into CO2 emissions. We notice a drastic increase of the impact of the methodology in the projections. For the High emission scenario with Late fuel extraction peaking, cumulated CO2 emissions from 1700 to 2100 range from 1505 GtC to 1685 GtC; this corresponds

  13. Highly efficient visible light photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbon fuels by Cu-nanoparticle decorated graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Shown, Indrajit; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Chang, Yu-Chung; Lin, Chang-Hui; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Ganguly, Abhijit; Wang, Chen-Hao; Chang, Jan-Kai; Wu, Chih-I; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    2014-11-12

    The production of renewable solar fuel through CO2 photoreduction, namely artificial photosynthesis, has gained tremendous attention in recent times due to the limited availability of fossil-fuel resources and global climate change caused by rising anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere. In this study, graphene oxide (GO) decorated with copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs), hereafter referred to as Cu/GO, has been used to enhance photocatalytic CO2 reduction under visible-light. A rapid one-pot microwave process was used to prepare the Cu/GO hybrids with various Cu contents. The attributes of metallic copper nanoparticles (∼4-5 nm in size) in the GO hybrid are shown to significantly enhance the photocatalytic activity of GO, primarily through the suppression of electron-hole pair recombination, further reduction of GO's bandgap, and modification of its work function. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy studies indicate a charge transfer from GO to Cu. A strong interaction is observed between the metal content of the Cu/GO hybrids and the rates of formation and selectivity of the products. A factor of greater than 60 times enhancement in CO2 to fuel catalytic efficiency has been demonstrated using Cu/GO-2 (10 wt % Cu) compared with that using pristine GO. PMID:25354234

  14. DIAGNOSTIC MONITORING OF BIOGEOCHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF A SHALLOW AQUIFER IN RESPONSE TO A CO2 LEAK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from these coupled laboratory and field experiments will greatly improve our understanding of the geochemical and microbiological reactions under low pH - high CO2 stress. We anticipate that this research will: (1) provide criteria for site selection for geological CO2...

  15. Efficient Data Assimilation Tool For Real Time CO2 Reservoir Monitoring and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. Y.; Ambikasaran, S.; Kokkinaki, A.; Darve, E. F.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoir forecasting and management are increasingly relying on a data-driven approach, which involves data assimilation to calibrate and keep up to date the complex model of multi-phase flow and transport in the geologic formation and to evaluate its uncertainty using monitoring data of different types and temporal resolution. The numbers of unknowns and measurements are usually very large, which represents a major computational challenge. Kalman filter (KF), the archetypical recursive filter, provides the framework to assimilate reservoir monitoring data into a dynamic system but the cost of implementing the original algorithm to large systems is computationally prohibitive. In our work, we have developed several Kalman-filter based approaches that reduce the computational and storage cost of standard KF from O (m2) to O (m), where m is the number of unknowns, and have the potential to be applied to field-scale problems. HiKF, a linear filter based on the hierarchical matrix approach, takes advantage of the informative high-frequency data acquired quasi-continuously and uses a random-walk model in the state forecast step when the a state evolution model is unavailable. A more general-purpose nonlinear filter CSKF achieves computational efficiency by exploiting the fact that the state covariance matrix for most dynamical systems can be approximated adequately through a low-rank matrix, and it allows using a forward simulator as a black-box for nonlinear error propagation. We will demonstrate both methods using synthetic CO2 injection cases and compare with the standard ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF).

  16. Induced Seismicity Monitoring at the Decatur, IL, CO2 Sequestration Demonstration Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaven, J. O.; Hickman, S. H.; McGarr, A.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    Industrial-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) will likely require the injection of large volumes of CO2 into extensive undisturbed brine aquifers. Large-volume injection has the potential to induce earthquake activity (Zoback and Gorelick, 2012). To assess the seismic hazard posed by one such operation, the USGS has been monitoring seismic activity at a CCS demonstration site in Decatur, IL, where supercritical carbon dioxide is injected at 2.1 km depth into the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a basal brine formation over granitic basement. Injection began in November 2011 at a rate of about 1000 metric tons/day, which, pending permit approval will increase to about 3000 metric tons/day in 2015. Our seismic network, about 8 km in aperture, consists of 12 stations, three equipped with boreholes. The nine surface stations have three-component (3C) broadband seismometers and 3C force-balance accelerometers. The borehole stations have 2 Hz 3C geophones at 150 m depth and accelerometers at the surface. We derived a one-dimensional velocity model from a VSP survey and well logs and have used this model to locate seismic events. We identify phase arrivals using standard waveform inspection, spectral analysis and waveform cross-correlation. We calculated seismic moments by integrating the pulses of P- and S-wave ground displacement, a procedure that yielded moment-magnitudes MW ranging from -0.8 to 1.1. These events locate in two distinct clusters: 0.4 to 1.0 km NE and 1.8 to 2.6 km WNW from the injection well. Double-difference relocations reveal that the cluster closest to the injection well forms a lineament trending N-NE to S-SW. A preliminary strike-slip focal mechanism for an Mw 0.54 event within this cluster is consistent with the orientation of the lineament and regional horizontal principal stress orientations, suggesting reactivation of a pre-existing basement fault. Even with nearly a million tonnes of CO2 injected, no felt events have been detected so far.

  17. Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. • land use • water use • CO2 emissions • radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

  18. Monitoring gaseous CO2 and ethanol above champagne glasses: flute versus coupe, and the role of temperature.

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    In champagne tasting, gaseous CO(2) and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO(2) and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC), all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO(2) was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO(2) visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO(2) found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO(2) escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles. PMID:22347390

  19. Monitoring Gaseous CO2 and Ethanol above Champagne Glasses: Flute versus Coupe, and the Role of Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    In champagne tasting, gaseous CO2 and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO2 and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC), all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO2 was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO2 visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO2 found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO2 escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles. PMID:22347390

  20. Uranium extraction from TRISO-coated fuel particles using supercritical CO2 containing tri-n-butyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liyang; Duan, Wuhua; Xu, Jingming; Zhu, Yongjun

    2012-11-30

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are advanced nuclear systems that will receive heavy use in the future. It is important to develop spent nuclear fuel reprocessing technologies for HTGR. A new method for recovering uranium from tristructural-isotropic (TRISO-) coated fuel particles with supercritical CO(2) containing tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as a complexing agent was investigated. TRISO-coated fuel particles from HTGR fuel elements were first crushed to expose UO(2) pellet fuel kernels. The crushed TRISO-coated fuel particles were then treated under O(2) stream at 750°C, resulting in a mixture of U(3)O(8) powder and SiC shells. The conversion of U(3)O(8) into solid uranyl nitrate by its reaction with liquid N(2)O(4) in the presence of a small amount of water was carried out. Complete conversion was achieved after 60 min of reaction at 80°C, whereas the SiC shells were not converted by N(2)O(4). Uranyl nitrate in the converted mixture was extracted with supercritical CO(2) containing TBP. The cumulative extraction efficiency was above 98% after 20 min of online extraction at 50°C and 25 MPa, whereas the SiC shells were not extracted by TBP. The results suggest an attractive strategy for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from HTGR to minimize the generation of secondary radioactive waste. PMID:23089063

  1. Effect of CO and CO 2 impurities on performance of direct hydrogen polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.

    Mechanisms by which trace amounts of CO and CO 2 impurities in fuel may affect the performance of direct hydrogen polymer-electrolyte fuel cell stacks have been investigated. It is found that the available data on CO-related polarization losses for Pt electrodes could be explained on the basis of CO adsorption on bridge sites, if the CO concentration is less than about 100 ppm, together with electrochemical oxidation of adsorbed CO at high overpotentials. The literature data on voltage degradation due to CO 2 is consistent with CO production by the reverse water-gas shift reaction between the gas phase CO 2 and the H 2 adsorbed on active Pt sites. The effect of oxygen crossover and air bleed in "cleaning" of poisoned sites could be modeled by considering competitive oxidation of adsorbed CO and H by gas phase O 2. A model has been developed to determine the buildup of CO and CO 2 impurities due to anode gas recycle. It indicates that depending on H 2 utilization, oxygen crossover and current density, anode gas recycle can enrich the recirculating gas with CO impurity but recycle always leads to buildup of CO 2 in the anode channels. The buildup of CO and CO 2 impurities can be controlled by purging a fraction of the spent anode gas. There is an optimum purge fraction at which the degradation in the stack efficiency is the smallest. At a purge rate higher than the optimum, the stack efficiency is reduced due to excessive loss of H 2 in purge gas. At a purge rate lower than the optimum, the stack efficiency is reduced due to the decrease in cell voltage caused by the excessive buildup of CO and CO 2. It is shown that the poisoning model can be used to determine the limits of CO and CO 2 impurities in fuel H 2 for a specified maximum acceptable degradation in cell voltage and stack efficiency. The impurity limits are functions of operating conditions, such as pressure and temperature, and stack design parameters, such as catalyst loading and membrane thickness.

  2. Creating a multi-gas proxy for Delta 14C and atmospheric fossil fuel-CO2. Kevin Coakley, John Miller , Scott Lehman, Stephen Montzka, Colm Sweeney, Arlyn Andrews , Ben Miller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, K. J.; Miller, J. B.; Lehman, S.; Montzka, S. A.; Andrews, A. E.; Miller, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    The C14:C12 ratio of atmospheric CO2 (expressed as Delta 14C) is the gold standard measurement to derive the portion of observed atmospheric CO2 gradients resulting from combustion of fossil fuels (CO2-ff). This is because fossil fuels are devoid of 14C, unlike all other sources and sinks that impact atmospheric Delta14C. With enough 14C measurements, independent, 'top-down', estimation of US fossil fuel-CO2 emissions should be possible. However, our ability to make carbon-14 measurements is severely constrained by cost, accessibility to accelerator mass spectrometers (AMS) and the volume of air required to make high precision (~0.2 %) measurements of 14CO2 (mixing ratio is ~ 4e-16 mol/mol). Thus, Delta 14C is currently measured in only a small subset of NOAA/ESRL Global Monitoring Division (GMD) tall-tower and aircraft air samples. Here, we present a Projection Pursuit Regression (PPR) model to predict CO2-ff measured at different times and altitudes in terms of surrogate gases that are more widespread and relatively inexpensive to measure. This method would, in effect, allow expansion of Delta 14C measurements by factor of ~3 or 4 throughout North America. To create a proxy for CO2-ff, we take advantage of the observed correlations between (Delta 14C-derrived) CO2-ff and regional-scale enhancements of a wide array of anthropogenic gases, like CO, SF6, and halo- and hydro-carbons. We select the complexity and form of the PPR model by cross validation where validation data prediction error is minimized. In cross validation, the prediction model is based on the training data and not the validation data. We quantify prediction model performance with test data excluded from the model development process. According to cross validation, the PPR model is superior to a simpler linear model. Comparison with test CO2-ff data shows that CO2-ff can be predicted with a root mean square error of 1.1 ppm, only slightly higher than the Delta 14C-precision limit for CO2-ff of 1

  3. sparse-msrf:A package for sparse modeling and estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emission fields

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-06

    The software is used to fit models of emission fields (e.g., fossil-fuel CO2 emissions) to sparse measurements of gaseous concentrations. Its primary aim is to provide an implementation and a demonstration for the algorithms and models developed in J. Ray, V. Yadav, A. M. Michalak, B. van Bloemen Waanders and S. A. McKenna, "A multiresolution spatial parameterization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions", accepted, Geoscientific Model Development, 2014. The software can be used to estimate emissions of non-reactive gases such as fossil-fuel CO2, methane etc. The software uses a proxy of the emission field being estimated (e.g., for fossil-fuel CO2, a population density map is a good proxy) to construct a wavelet model for the emission field. It then uses a shrinkage regression algorithm called Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP) to fit the wavelet model to concentration measurements, using an atmospheric transport model to relate emission and concentration fields. Algorithmic novelties described in the paper above (1) ensure that the estimated emission fields are non-negative, (2) allow the use of guesses for emission fields to accelerate the estimation processes and (3) ensure that under/overestimates in the guesses do not skew the estimation.

  4. sparse-msrf:A package for sparse modeling and estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emission fields

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-10-06

    The software is used to fit models of emission fields (e.g., fossil-fuel CO2 emissions) to sparse measurements of gaseous concentrations. Its primary aim is to provide an implementation and a demonstration for the algorithms and models developed in J. Ray, V. Yadav, A. M. Michalak, B. van Bloemen Waanders and S. A. McKenna, "A multiresolution spatial parameterization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions", accepted, Geoscientific Model Development, 2014. The softwaremore » can be used to estimate emissions of non-reactive gases such as fossil-fuel CO2, methane etc. The software uses a proxy of the emission field being estimated (e.g., for fossil-fuel CO2, a population density map is a good proxy) to construct a wavelet model for the emission field. It then uses a shrinkage regression algorithm called Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP) to fit the wavelet model to concentration measurements, using an atmospheric transport model to relate emission and concentration fields. Algorithmic novelties described in the paper above (1) ensure that the estimated emission fields are non-negative, (2) allow the use of guesses for emission fields to accelerate the estimation processes and (3) ensure that under/overestimates in the guesses do not skew the estimation.« less

  5. Surface-downhole and crosshole geoelectrics for monitoring of brine injection at the Ketzin CO2 storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rippe, Dennis; Bergmann, Peter; Labitzke, Tim; Wagner, Florian; Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia

    2016-04-01

    The Ketzin pilot site in Germany is the longest operating on-shore CO2 storage site in Europe. From June 2008 till August 2013, a total of ˜67,000 tonnes of CO2 were safely stored in a saline aquifer at depths of 630 m to 650 m. The storage site has now entered the abandonment phase, and continuation of the multi-disciplinary monitoring as part of the national project "CO2 post-injection monitoring and post-closure phase at the Ketzin pilot site" (COMPLETE) provides the unique chance to participate in the conclusion of the complete life cycle of a CO2 storage site. As part of the continuous evaluation of the functionality and integrity of the CO2 storage in Ketzin, from October 12, 2015 till January 6, 2015 a total of ˜2,900 tonnes of brine were successfully injected into the CO2 reservoir, hereby simulating in time-lapse the natural backflow of brine and the associated displacement of CO2. The main objectives of this brine injection experiment include investigation of how much of the CO2 in the pore space can be displaced by brine and if this displacement of CO2 during the brine injection differs from the displacement of formation fluid during the initial CO2 injection. Geophysical monitoring of the brine injection included continuous geoelectric measurements accompanied by monitoring of pressure and temperature conditions in the injection well and two adjacent observation wells. During the previous CO2 injection, the geoelectrical monitoring concept at the Ketzin pilot site consisted of permanent crosshole measurements and non-permanent large-scale surveys (Kiessling et al., 2010). Time-lapse geoelectrical tomographies derived from the weekly crosshole data at near-wellbore scale complemented by six surface-downhole surveys at a scale of 1.5 km showed a noticeable resistivity signature within the target storage zone, which was attributed to the CO2 plume (Schmidt-Hattenberger et al., 2011) and interpreted in terms of relative CO2 and brine saturations (Bergmann

  6. 40 CFR 600.207-12 - Calculation and use of vehicle-specific 5-cycle-based fuel economy and CO2 emission values for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values § 600.207-12 Calculation and use of vehicle-specific 5-cycle-based...-specific 5-cycle-based fuel economy and CO2 emission values for vehicle configurations. 600.207-12 Section... vehicle-specific 5-cycle city and highway fuel economy and CO2 emission values for each...

  7. 40 CFR 600.207-12 - Calculation and use of vehicle-specific 5-cycle-based fuel economy and CO2 emission values for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values § 600.207-12 Calculation and use of vehicle-specific 5-cycle-based...-specific 5-cycle-based fuel economy and CO2 emission values for vehicle configurations. 600.207-12 Section... vehicle-specific 5-cycle city and highway fuel economy and CO2 emission values for each...

  8. 40 CFR 600.207-12 - Calculation and use of vehicle-specific 5-cycle-based fuel economy and CO2 emission values for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values § 600.207-12 Calculation and use of vehicle-specific 5-cycle-based...-specific 5-cycle-based fuel economy and CO2 emission values for vehicle configurations. 600.207-12 Section... vehicle-specific 5-cycle city and highway fuel economy and CO2 emission values for each...

  9. Active CO2 Reservoir Management for Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Sequestration: Impact on Permitting, Monitoring, and Public Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Chen, M.; Sun, Y.; Hao, Y.; Court, B.; Celia, M. A.; Wolery, T.; Aines, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) integrated with geothermal energy production in deep geological formations can play an important role in reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and thereby mitigate global climate change. For industrial-scale CO2 injection in saline formations, pressure buildup can limit storage capacity and security. Active CO2 Reservoir Management (ACRM) combines brine production with CO2 injection to relieve pressure buildup, increase injectivity, manipulate CO2 migration, constrain brine leakage, and enable beneficial utilization of produced brine. Therefore, ACRM can be an enabler of carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration (CCUS). Useful products may include freshwater, cooling water, make-up water for pressure support in oil, gas, and geothermal reservoir operations, and geothermal energy production. Implementation barriers to industrial-scale CCS include concerns about (1) CO2 sequestration security and assurance, (2) pore-space competition with neighboring subsurface activities, (3) CO2 capture costs, and (4) water-use demands imposed by CCS operations, which is particularly important where water resources are already scarce. CCUS, enabled by ACRM, has the potential of addressing these barriers. Pressure relief from brine production can substantially reduce the driving force for potential CO2 and brine migration, as well as minimize interference with neighboring subsurface activities. Electricity generated from geothermal energy can offset a portion of the parasitic energy and financial costs of CCS. Produced brine can be used to generate freshwater by desalination technologies, such as RO, provide a source for saltwater cooling systems or be used as make-up water for oil, gas, or geothermal reservoir operations, reducing the consumption of valuable freshwater resources. We examine the impact of brine production on reducing CO2 and brine leakage. A volumetric balance between injected and produced fluids minimizes the spatial

  10. Safe storage and effective monitoring of CO2 in depleted gas fields.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Charles R; Cook, Peter J; Ennis-King, Jonathan; Undershultz, James; Boreham, Chris; Dance, Tess; de Caritat, Patrice; Etheridge, David M; Freifeld, Barry M; Hortle, Allison; Kirste, Dirk; Paterson, Lincoln; Pevzner, Roman; Schacht, Ulrike; Sharma, Sandeep; Stalker, Linda; Urosevic, Milovan

    2012-01-10

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is vital to reduce CO(2) emissions to the atmosphere, potentially providing 20% of the needed reductions in global emissions. Research and demonstration projects are important to increase scientific understanding of CCS, and making processes and results widely available helps to reduce public concerns, which may otherwise block this technology. The Otway Project has provided verification of the underlying science of CO(2) storage in a depleted gas field, and shows that the support of all stakeholders can be earned and retained. Quantitative verification of long-term storage has been demonstrated. A direct measurement of storage efficiency has been made, confirming that CO(2) storage in depleted gas fields can be safe and effective, and that these structures could store globally significant amounts of CO(2). PMID:22184225