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Sample records for fuel identification techniques

  1. Failed fuel identification techniques for liquid-metal cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, J.D.B.; Gross, K.C.; Mikaili, R.; Frank, S.M.; Cutforth, D.C.; Angelo, P.L.

    1995-06-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), located in Idaho and operated for the US Department of Energy by Argonne National Laboratory, has been used as an irradiation testbed for LMR fuels and components for thirty years. During this time many endurance tests have been carried out with experimental LMR metal, oxide, carbide and nitride fuel elements, in which cladding failures were intentionally allowed to occur. This paper describes methods that have been developed for the detection, identification and verification of fuel failures.

  2. Detailed fuel spray analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.; Bosque, M. A.; Humenik, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed fuel spray analyses are a necessary input to the analytical modeling of the complex mixing and combustion processes which occur in advanced combustor systems. It is anticipated that by controlling fuel-air reaction conditions, combustor temperatures can be better controlled, leading to improved combustion system durability. Thus, a research program is underway to demonstrate the capability to measure liquid droplet size, velocity, and number density throughout a fuel spray and to utilize this measurement technique in laboratory benchmark experiments. The research activities from two contracts and one grant are described with results to data. The experiment to characterize fuel sprays is also described. These experiments and data should be useful for application to and validation of turbulent flow modeling to improve the design systems of future advanced technology engines.

  3. Identification techniques for SARSAT signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Naga, S.; Carter, C. R.

    1987-03-01

    A process for the identification of emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signals related to search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (SARSAT) is presented. The ELT identification process is particularly important in order to increase the probability of detection and eliminate sources of interference from the data set. A set of ELT signal parameters is introduced and methods for estimating these parameters are developed. A theoretical analysis and performance evaluation of these methods is provided.

  4. Identification of failed fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Fryer, Richard M.; Matlock, Robert G.

    1976-06-22

    A passive fission product gas trap is provided in the upper portion of each fuel subassembly in a nuclear reactor. The gas trap consists of an inverted funnel of less diameter than the subassembly having a valve at the apex thereof. An actuating rod extends upwardly from the valve through the subassembly to a point where it can be contacted by the fuel handling mechanism for the reactor. Interrogation of the subassembly for the presence of fission products is accomplished by lowering the fuel handling machine onto the subassembly to press down on the actuating rod and open the valve.

  5. Used Fuel Cask Identification through Neutron Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Eric Benton

    2015-11-20

    Currently, most spent fuel is stored near reactors. An interim consolidated fuel storage facility would receive fuel from multiple sites and store it in casks on site for decades. For successful operation of such a facility there is need for a way to restore continuity of knowledge if lost as well as a method that will indicate state of fuel inside the cask. Used nuclear fuel is identifiable by its radiation emission, both gamma and neutron. Neutron emission from fission products, multiplication from remaining fissile material, and the unique distribution of both in each cask produce a unique neutron signature. If two signatures taken at different times do not match, either changes within the fuel content or misidentification of a cask occurred. It was found that identification of cask loadings works well through the profile of emitted neutrons in simulated real casks. Even casks with similar overall neutron emission or average counts around the circumference can be distinguished from each other by analyzing the profile. In conclusion, (1) identification of unaltered casks through neutron signature profile is viable; (2) collecting the profile provides insight to the condition and intactness of the fuel stored inside the cask; and (3) the signature profile is stable over time.

  6. Comparison of two dissimilar modal identification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Schenk, Axel; Niedbal, Norbert; Klusowski, Erhard

    1992-01-01

    Recent laboratory results using a refined phase resonance method and the eigensystem realization algorithm on the same test structure are reported. These methods are dissimilar modal identification techniques suitable for future large spacecraft. The theory, application approach, and results obtained for each technique are summarized and compared. Although both methods worked well in this investigation, significant differences occurred in some identified mode shapes. Comparison of independently derived modal parameters provides the means for disclosing such discrepancies in flight projects.

  7. Optical fuel pin scanner. [Patent application; for reading identifications

    DOEpatents

    Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

    1980-12-09

    This patent relates to an optical identification system developed for post-irradiation disassembly and analysis of fuel bundle assemblies. The apparatus is designed to be lowered onto a stationary fuel pin to read identification numbers or letters imprinted on the circumference of the top fuel pin and cap. (DLC)

  8. Decision Tree Technique for Particle Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Quiller, Ryan

    2003-09-05

    Particle identification based on measurements such as the Cerenkov angle, momentum, and the rate of energy loss per unit distance (-dE/dx) is fundamental to the BaBar detector for particle physics experiments. It is particularly important to separate the charged forms of kaons and pions. Currently, the Neural Net, an algorithm based on mapping input variables to an output variable using hidden variables as intermediaries, is one of the primary tools used for identification. In this study, a decision tree classification technique implemented in the computer program, CART, was investigated and compared to the Neural Net over the range of momenta, 0.25 GeV/c to 5.0 GeV/c. For a given subinterval of momentum, three decision trees were made using different sets of input variables. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for varying kaon acceptance thresholds. This data was used to plot Receiver Operating Characteristic curves (ROC curves) to compare the performance of the classification methods. Also, input variables used in constructing the decision trees were analyzed. It was found that the Neural Net was a significant contributor to decision trees using dE/dx and the Cerenkov angle as inputs. Furthermore, the Neural Net had poorer performance than the decision tree technique, but tended to improve decision tree performance when used as an input variable. These results suggest that the decision tree technique using Neural Net input may possibly increase accuracy of particle identification in BaBar.

  9. Identification of leaking TRIGA fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, John S.; Crawford, Kevan C.; Gansauge, Todd C.; Sandquist, Gary M.

    1990-07-01

    -steel-clad fuel elements were eventually swapped. After exchanging nearly one-half of the incore fuel elements without any noticeable decrease in leaked fission-product activity, it was apparent that multiple defective elements were probably responsible for the leakage. A more aggressive identification program was implemented whereby water samples were taken directly above each fuel element in the core during operation at 90 kW. A small weighted polyethylene funnel was connected to 1/8-inch Tygon tubing extending from the reactor pool to an adjacent laboratory containing gamma spectroscopy equipment. The tubing was wrapped around a high-purity germanium detector and coupled to a small peristaltic pump adjusted to provide a flow velocity of approximately one foot-per-second and drained into a large bucket. The detector signal was fed into a multichannel scaler calibrated to measure the 151 keV photon emitted by Kr-85m. The funnel was manually suspended above each core fuel position for one minute sampling water convected along each fuel element. A careful record of the time during which each position was sampled was maintained so that elements with high krypton activity could be precisely located. After three such operations, a total of seven stainless-steel elements were identified as candidates contributing to the leakage and were replaced. Subsequent operations have shown no fission-product release and confirmed that the fuel responsible for the leakage had been removed from the core. Evaluation of the candidate leaking elements is planned to identify actual 'leakers' in the future. (author)

  10. DISTANT GALAXY IDENTIFICATION TECHNIQUE IN HUBBLE FIELD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Series of four panels that illustrate the distant-galaxy identification technique. Four panels that show (top to bottom, or right to left when rotated correctly) F814W filter, F606W filter, F450W filter, and F300W filter images, or near-infrared through near-ultraviolet images. The identified galaxy is prominent in the near-infrared image but totally absent in any of the other images. It is this spectroscopic signature that identifies this galaxy as a very distant object. Credit: Ken Lanzetta and Amos Yahil (State University of New York at Stony Brook), and NASA

  11. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Heng; Kennedy, Rory

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  12. Reliability evaluation for failed fuel identification using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Ito, Chikara; Harano, Hideki

    2013-04-01

    In the fast reactors, rapid and accurate identification of a fuel failure event is essential for ensuring safety operation. Isotopic analysis of krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) using resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is an effective identification tool, in which Kr and Xe atoms are resonantly ionized by a pulsed laser at 216.7 nm and 249.6 nm, respectively, and then three isotopic ratios: 78Kr/80Kr, 82Kr/80Kr and 126Xe/129Xe are measured to detect the location of the failed fuel assembly. In this paper, we report on the required analytical precision of RIMS estimated from simulation studies as well as the analytical performance of our spectrometer to evaluate the availability of RIMS to the failed fuel identification technique in the fast reactors.

  13. Nonintrusive irradiated fuel inventory confirmation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdy, E.J.; Nicholson, N.; Caldwell, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Successful tests showing correlation between the intensity of the Cerenkov glow surrounding irradiated fuel assemblies in water-filled spent fuel storage ponds and the exposure and cooling times of assemblies have been concluded. Fieldable instruments used in subsequent tests confirmed that such measurements can be made easily and rapidly, without fuel assembly movement or the introduction of apparatus into the storage ponds.

  14. A novel online adaptive time delay identification technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrak, Alper; Tatlicioglu, Enver

    2016-05-01

    Time delay is a phenomenon which is common in signal processing, communication, control applications, etc. The special feature of time delay that makes it attractive is that it is a commonly faced problem in many systems. A literature search on time-delay identification highlights the fact that most studies focused on numerical solutions. In this study, a novel online adaptive time-delay identification technique is proposed. This technique is based on an adaptive update law through a minimum-maximum strategy which is firstly applied to time-delay identification. In the design of the adaptive identification law, Lyapunov-based stability analysis techniques are utilised. Several numerical simulations were conducted with Matlab/Simulink to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique. It is numerically demonstrated that the proposed technique works efficiently in identifying both constant and disturbed time delays, and is also robust to measurement noise.

  15. Structural damage identification using mathematical optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Mo-How Herman

    1991-01-01

    An identification procedure is proposed to identify damage characteristics (location and size of the damage) from dynamic measurements. This procedure was based on minimization of the mean-square measure of difference between measurement data (natural frequencies and mode shapes) and the corresponding predictions obtained from the computational model. The procedure is tested for simulated damage in the form of stiffness changes in a simple fixed free spring mass system and symmetric cracks in a simply supported Bernoulli Euler beam. It is shown that when all the mode information is used in the identification procedure it is possible to uniquely determine the damage properties. Without knowing the complete set of modal information, a restricted region in the initial data space has been found for realistic and convergent solution from the identification process.

  16. Deconvolution/identification techniques for nonnegative signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.M.; Yu, D.R.

    1991-11-01

    Several methods for solving the nonparametric deconvolution/identification problem when the unknown is nonnegative are presented. First we consider the constrained least squares method and discuss three ways to estimate the regularization parameter: the discrepancy principle, Mallow`s C{sub L}, and generalized cross validation. Next we consider maximum entropy methods. Last, we present a new conjugate gradient algorithm. A preliminary comparison is presented; detailed Monte-Carlo experiments will be presented at the conference. 13 refs.

  17. Advantages and Limitations of the RICH Technique for Particle Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, Blair N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-07

    The ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technique for hadronic particle identification (PID) is described. The advantages and limitations of RICH PID counters are compared with those of other classic PID techniques, such as threshold Cherenkov counters, ionization loss (dE/dx) in tracking devices, and time of flight (TOF) detectors.

  18. The statistical analysis techniques to support the NGNP fuel performance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the development and application of statistical analysis techniques to support the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experimental program on Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) fuel performance. The experiments conducted in the Idaho National Laboratory’s Advanced Test Reactor employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule. The tests are instrumented with thermocouples embedded in graphite blocks and the target quantity (fuel temperature) is regulated by the He–Ne gas mixture that fills the gap volume. Three techniques for statistical analysis, namely control charting, correlation analysis, and regression analysis, are implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System for automated processing and qualification of the AGR measured data. The neutronic and thermal code simulation results are used for comparative scrutiny. The ultimate objective of this work includes (a) a multi-faceted system for data monitoring and data accuracy testing, (b) identification of possible modes of diagnostics deterioration and changes in experimental conditions, (c) qualification of data for use in code validation, and (d) identification and use of data trends to support effective control of test conditions with respect to the test target. Analysis results and examples given in the paper show the three statistical analysis techniques providing a complementary capability to warn of thermocouple failures. It also suggests that the regression analysis models relating calculated fuel temperatures and thermocouple readings can enable online regulation of experimental parameters (i.e. gas mixture content), to effectively maintain the fuel temperature within a given range.

  19. The statistical analysis techniques to support the NGNP fuel performance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Binh T.; Einerson, Jeffrey J.

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the development and application of statistical analysis techniques to support the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experimental program on Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) fuel performance. The experiments conducted in the Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule. The tests are instrumented with thermocouples embedded in graphite blocks and the target quantity (fuel temperature) is regulated by the He-Ne gas mixture that fills the gap volume. Three techniques for statistical analysis, namely control charting, correlation analysis, and regression analysis, are implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System for automated processing and qualification of the AGR measured data. The neutronic and thermal code simulation results are used for comparative scrutiny. The ultimate objective of this work includes (a) a multi-faceted system for data monitoring and data accuracy testing, (b) identification of possible modes of diagnostics deterioration and changes in experimental conditions, (c) qualification of data for use in code validation, and (d) identification and use of data trends to support effective control of test conditions with respect to the test target. Analysis results and examples given in the paper show the three statistical analysis techniques providing a complementary capability to warn of thermocouple failures. It also suggests that the regression analysis models relating calculated fuel temperatures and thermocouple readings can enable online regulation of experimental parameters (i.e. gas mixture content), to effectively maintain the fuel temperature within a given range.

  20. Parameter estimation techniques for LTP system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofrarias Serra, Miquel

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is the precursor mission of LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) and the first step towards gravitational waves detection in space. The main instrument onboard the mission is the LTP (LISA Technology Package) whose scientific goal is to test LISA's drag-free control loop by reaching a differential acceleration noise level between two masses in √ geodesic motion of 3 × 10-14 ms-2 / Hz in the milliHertz band. The mission is not only challenging in terms of technology readiness but also in terms of data analysis. As with any gravitational wave detector, attaining the instrument performance goals will require an extensive noise hunting campaign to measure all contributions with high accuracy. But, opposite to on-ground experiments, LTP characterisation will be only possible by setting parameters via telecommands and getting a selected amount of information through the available telemetry downlink. These two conditions, high accuracy and high reliability, are the main restrictions that the LTP data analysis must overcome. A dedicated object oriented Matlab Toolbox (LTPDA) has been set up by the LTP analysis team for this purpose. Among the different toolbox methods, an essential part for the mission are the parameter estimation tools that will be used for system identification during operations: Linear Least Squares, Non-linear Least Squares and Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods have been implemented as LTPDA methods. The data analysis team has been testing those methods with a series of mock data exercises with the following objectives: to cross-check parameter estimation methods and compare the achievable accuracy for each of them, and to develop the best strategies to describe the physics underlying a complex controlled experiment as the LTP. In this contribution we describe how these methods were tested with simulated LTP-like data to recover the parameters of the model and we report on the latest results of these mock data exercises.

  1. A machine vision identification technique from range images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehtarnavaz, N.; Mohan, S.

    1988-01-01

    An orientation-independent identification technique from three-dimensional surface maps or range images is developed. Given the range image of an object, it is decomposed into orientation-independent patches using the sign of Gaussian curvature. A relational graph is then set up such that a node represents a patch and an edge represents the adjacency of two patches. The identification of the object is achieved by matching its graph representation to a number of model graphs. The matching is performed by employing the best-first search strategy. Examples of real range images show the merit of the technique.

  2. Biometric Identification Using Holographic Radar Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Kennedy, Mike O.; Foote, Harlan P.

    2007-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have been at the forefront of developing innovative screening systems to enhance security and a novel imaging system to provide custom-fit clothing using holographic radar imaging techniques. First-of-a-kind cylindrical holographic imaging systems have been developed to screen people at security checkpoints for the detection of concealed, body worn, non-metallic threats such as plastic and liquid explosives, knifes and contraband. Another embodiment of this technology is capable of obtaining full sized body measurements in near real time without the person under surveillance removing their outer garments. Radar signals readily penetrate clothing and reflect off the water in skin. This full body measurement system is commercially available for best fitting ready to wear clothing, which was the first “biometric” application for this technology. One compelling feature of this technology for security biometric applications is that it can see effectively through disguises, appliances and body hair.

  3. Engine control techniques to account for fuel effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shankar; Frazier, Timothy R.; Stanton, Donald W.; Xu, Yi; Bunting, Bruce G.; Wolf, Leslie R.

    2014-08-26

    A technique for engine control to account for fuel effects including providing an internal combustion engine and a controller to regulate operation thereof, the engine being operable to combust a fuel to produce an exhaust gas; establishing a plurality of fuel property inputs; establishing a plurality of engine performance inputs; generating engine control information as a function of the fuel property inputs and the engine performance inputs; and accessing the engine control information with the controller to regulate at least one engine operating parameter.

  4. Identification of apolipoprotein using feature selection technique

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hua; Zou, Ping; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Rong; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein is a kind of protein which can transport the lipids through the lymphatic and circulatory systems. The abnormal expression level of apolipoprotein always causes angiocardiopathy. Thus, correct recognition of apolipoprotein from proteomic data is very crucial to the comprehension of cardiovascular system and drug design. This study is to develop a computational model to predict apolipoproteins. In the model, the apolipoproteins and non-apolipoproteins were collected to form benchmark dataset. On the basis of the dataset, we extracted the g-gap dipeptide composition information from residue sequences to formulate protein samples. To exclude redundant information or noise, the analysis of various (ANOVA)-based feature selection technique was proposed to find out the best feature subset. The support vector machine (SVM) was selected as discrimination algorithm. Results show that 96.2% of sensitivity and 99.3% of specificity were achieved in five-fold cross-validation. These findings open new perspectives to improve apolipoproteins prediction by considering the specific dipeptides. We expect that these findings will help to improve drug development in anti-angiocardiopathy disease. PMID:27443605

  5. Identification of apolipoprotein using feature selection technique.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hua; Zou, Ping; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Rong; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein is a kind of protein which can transport the lipids through the lymphatic and circulatory systems. The abnormal expression level of apolipoprotein always causes angiocardiopathy. Thus, correct recognition of apolipoprotein from proteomic data is very crucial to the comprehension of cardiovascular system and drug design. This study is to develop a computational model to predict apolipoproteins. In the model, the apolipoproteins and non-apolipoproteins were collected to form benchmark dataset. On the basis of the dataset, we extracted the g-gap dipeptide composition information from residue sequences to formulate protein samples. To exclude redundant information or noise, the analysis of various (ANOVA)-based feature selection technique was proposed to find out the best feature subset. The support vector machine (SVM) was selected as discrimination algorithm. Results show that 96.2% of sensitivity and 99.3% of specificity were achieved in five-fold cross-validation. These findings open new perspectives to improve apolipoproteins prediction by considering the specific dipeptides. We expect that these findings will help to improve drug development in anti-angiocardiopathy disease. PMID:27443605

  6. Deconvolution/identification techniques for 1-D transient signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses a variety of nonparametric deconvolution and identification techniques that we have developed for application to 1-D transient signal problems. These methods are time-domain techniques that use direct methods for matrix inversion. Therefore, they are not appropriate for large data'' problems. These techniques involve various regularization methods and permit the use of certain kinds of a priori information in estimating the unknown. These techniques have been implemented in a package using standard FORTRAN that should make the package readily transportable to most computers. This paper is also meant to be an instruction manual for the package. 25 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Development of evaluation method for software hazard identification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. W.; Chen, M. H.; Shih, C.; Yih, S.; Kuo, C. T.; Wang, L. H.; Yu, Y. C.; Chen, C. W.

    2006-07-01

    This research evaluated the applicable software hazard identification techniques nowadays, such as, Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), Markov chain modeling, Dynamic Flow-graph Methodology (DFM), and simulation-based model analysis; and then determined indexes in view of their characteristics, which include dynamic capability, completeness, achievability, detail, signal/noise ratio, complexity, and implementation cost. By this proposed method, the analysts can evaluate various software hazard identification combinations for specific purpose. According to the case study results, the traditional PHA + FMEA + FTA (with failure rate) + Markov chain modeling (with transfer rate) combination is not competitive due to the dilemma for obtaining acceptable software failure rates. However, the systematic architecture of FTA and Markov chain modeling is still valuable for realizing the software fault structure. The system centric techniques, such as DFM and simulation-based model-analysis, show the advantage on dynamic capability, achievability, detail, signal/noise ratio. However, their disadvantages are the completeness complexity and implementation cost. This evaluation method can be a platform to reach common consensus for the stakeholders. Following the evolution of software hazard identification techniques, the evaluation results could be changed. However, the insight of software hazard identification techniques is much more important than the numbers obtained by the evaluation. (authors)

  8. Detection, identification, and quantification techniques for spills of hazardous chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, J. F.; Sandness, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    The first 400 chemicals listed in the Coast Guard's Chemical Hazards Response Information System were evaluated with respect to their detectability, identifiability, and quantifiability by 12 generalized remote and in situ sensing techniques. Identification was also attempted for some key areas in water pollution sensing technology.

  9. Developing clean fuels: Novel techniques for desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehlsen, James P.

    The removal of sulfur compounds from petroleum is crucial to producing clean burning fuels. Sulfur compounds poison emission control catalysts and are the source of acid rain. New federal regulations require the removal of sulfur in both gasoline and diesel to very low levels, forcing existing technologies to be pushed into inefficient operating regimes. New technology is required to efficiently produce low sulfur fuels. Two processes for the removal of sulfur compounds from petroleum have been developed: the removal of alkanethiols by heterogeneous reaction with metal oxides; and oxidative desulfurization of sulfides and thiophene by reaction with sulfuric acid. Alkanethiols, common in hydrotreated gasoline, can be selectively removed and recovered from a hydrocarbon stream by heterogeneous reaction with oxides of Pb, Hg(II), and Ba. The choice of reactive metal oxides may be predicted from simple thermodynamic considerations. The reaction is found to be autocatalytic, first order in water, and zero order in thiol in the presence of excess oxide. The thiols are recovered by reactive extraction with dilute oxidizing acid. The potential for using polymer membrane hydrogenation reactors (PEMHRs) to perform hydrogenation reactions such as hydrodesulfurization is explored by hydrogenating ketones and olefins over Pt and Au group metals. The dependence of reaction rate on current density suggests that the first hydrogen addition to the olefin is the rate limiting step, rather than the adsorption of hydrogen, for all of the metals tested. PEMHRs proved unsuccessful in hydrogenating sulfur compounds to perform HDS. For the removal of sulfides, a two-phase reactor is used in which concentrated sulfuric acid oxidizes aromatic and aliphatic sulfides present in a hydrocarbon solvent, generating sulfoxides and other sulfonated species. The polar oxidized species are extracted into the acid phase, effectively desulfurizing the hydrocarbon. A reaction scheme is proposed for this

  10. An experimental modal testing/identification technique for personal computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roemer, Michael J.; Schlonski, Steven T.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1990-01-01

    A PC-based system for mode shape identification is evaluated. A time-domain modal identification procedure is utilized to identify the mode shapes of a beam apparatus from discrete time-domain measurements. The apparatus includes a cantilevered aluminum beam, four accelerometers, four low-pass filters, and the computer. The method's algorithm is comprised of an identification algorithm: the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) and an estimation algorithm called Minimum Model Error (MME). The identification ability of this algorithm is compared with ERA alone, a frequency-response-function technique, and an Euler-Bernoulli beam model. Detection of modal parameters and mode shapes by the PC-based time-domain system is shown to be accurate in an application with an aluminum beam, while mode shapes identified by the frequency-domain technique are not as accurate as predicted. The new method is shown to be significantly less sensitive to noise and poorly excited modes than other leading methods. The results support the use of time-domain identification systems for mode shape prediction.

  11. Rapid identification of single microbes by various Raman spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, Petra; Harz, Michaela; Schmitt, Michael; Peschke, Klaus-Dieter; Ronneberger, Olaf; Burkhardt, Hans; Motzkus, Hans-Walter; Lankers, Markus; Hofer, Stefan; Thiele, Hans; Popp, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    A fast and unambiguous identification of microorganisms is necessary not only for medical purposes but also in technical processes such as the production of pharmaceuticals. Conventional microbiological identification methods are based on the morphology and the ability of microbes to grow under different conditions on various cultivation media depending on their biochemical properties. These methods require pure cultures which need cultivation of at least 6 h but normally much longer. Recently also additional methods to identify bacteria are established e.g. mass spectroscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry or fluorescence spectroscopy. Alternative approaches for the identification of microorganisms are vibrational spectroscopic techniques. With Raman spectroscopy a spectroscopic fingerprint of the microorganisms can be achieved. Using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) macromolecules like DNA/RNA and proteins are resonantly enhanced. With an excitation wavelength of e.g. 244 nm it is possible to determine the ratio of guanine/cytosine to all DNA bases which allows a genotypic identification of microorganisms. The application of UVRR requires a large amount of microorganisms (> 10 6 cells) e.g. at least a micro colony. For the analysis of single cells micro-Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm can be used. Here, the obtained information is from all type of molecules inside the cells which lead to a chemotaxonomic identification. In this contribution we show how wavelength dependent Raman spectroscopy yields significant molecular information applicable for the identification of microorganisms on a single cell level.

  12. Rugoscopy: Human identification by computer-assisted photographic superimposition technique

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Rezwana Begum; Patil, Rajendra G.; Pammi, V. R.; Sandya, M. Pavana; Kalyan, Siva V.; Anitha, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human identification has been studied since fourteenth century and it has gradually advanced for forensic purposes. Traditional methods such as dental, fingerprint, and DNA comparisons are probably the most common techniques used in this context, allowing fast and secure identification processes. But, in circumstances where identification of an individual by fingerprint or dental record comparison is difficult, palatal rugae may be considered as an alternative source of material. Aim: The present study was done to evaluate the individualistic nature and use of palatal rugae patterns for personal identification and also to test the efficiency of computerized software for forensic identification by photographic superimposition of palatal photographs obtained from casts. Materials and Methods: Two sets of Alginate impressions were made from the upper arches of 100 individuals (50 males and 50 females) with one month interval in between and the casts were poured. All the teeth except the incisors were removed to ensure that only the palate could be used in identification process. In one set of the casts, the palatal rugae were highlighted with a graphite pencil. All the 200 casts were randomly numbered, and then, they were photographed with a 10.1 Mega Pixel Kodak digital camera using standardized method. Using computerized software, the digital photographs of the models without highlighting the palatal rugae were overlapped over the images (transparent) of the palatal rugae with highlighted palatal rugae, in order to identify the pairs by superimposition technique. Incisors were remained and used as landmarks to determine the magnification required to bring the two set of photographs to the same size, in order to make perfect superimposition of images. Results: The result of the overlapping of the digital photographs of highlighted palatal rugae over normal set of models without highlighted palatal rugae resulted in 100% positive identification. Conclusion

  13. Development of novel fuel ion ratio diagnostic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Korsholm, S. B.; Stejner, M.; Bindslev, H.; Furtula, V.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Hellermann, M. von; Lischtschenko, O.; Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2010-10-15

    To overcome the challenge of measuring the fuel ion ratio in the core ({rho}<0.3) of ITER, a coordinated effort aiming at developing diagnostic techniques has been initiated. The investigated techniques are novel uses or further development of existing methods such as charge exchange recombination spectrometry, neutron spectrometry, and collective Thomson scattering. An overview of the work on the three diagnostic techniques is presented.

  14. Safeguards techniques in a pilot conditioning plant for spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, E.; Rudolf, K.; Weh, R. )

    1991-01-01

    The pilot conditioning plant at Gorleben, Germany, is designed as a multi-purpose plant. Its primary task is the conditioning of spent fuel assemblies into a form suitable for final disposal. As a pilot plant, it allows furthermore for the development and testing of various conditioning techniques. In terms of international safeguards, the pilot conditioning plant is basically considered an item facility. Entire fuel assemblies enter the plant in transport casks, whereas bins filled with fuel rods or canisters containing cut fuel rods leave the facility in final disposal packages (e.g. POLLUX). Each POLLUX final disposal package content is uniquely correlated to a definite number of fuel assemblies which have entered the conditioning process. For this type of facility, containment/surveillance (C/S) should take over the major role in nuclear material safeguards. This paper discusses the safeguards at the Gorleben plant.

  15. Acoustic source identification using a Generalized Weighted Inverse Beamforming technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presezniak, Flavio; Zavala, Paulo A. G.; Steenackers, Gunther; Janssens, Karl; Arruda, Jose R. F.; Desmet, Wim; Guillaume, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    In the last years, acoustic source identification has gained special attention, mainly due to new environmental norms, urbanization problems and more demanding acoustic comfort expectation of consumers. From the current methods, beamforming techniques are of common use, since normally demands affordable data acquisition effort, while producing clear source identification in most of the applications. In order to improve the source identification quality, this work presents a method, based on the Generalized Inverse Beamforming, that uses a weighted pseudo-inverse approach and an optimization procedure, called Weighted Generalized Inverse Beamforming. To validate this method, a simple case of two compact sources in close vicinity in coherent radiation was investigated by numerical and experimental assessment. Weighted generalized inverse results are compared to the ones obtained by the conventional beamforming, MUltiple Signal Classification, and Generalized Inverse Beamforming. At the end, the advantages of the proposed method are outlined together with the computational effort increase compared to the Generalized Inverse Beamforming.

  16. Determining plutonium in spent fuel with nondestructive assay techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Stephen J; Charlton, William S; Fensin, Michael L; Menlove, Howard O; Hoover, A S; Quiter, B J; Rajasingam, A; Swinhoe, M T; Thompson, S J; Charlton, W S; Ehinger, M H; Sandoval, N P; Saavedra, S F; Strohmeyer, D

    2009-01-01

    There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in used (spent) fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay including the following: shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories or fuel storage facilities. Twelve NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. Unfortunately, none of these techniques is capable of determining the Pu mass in an assembly on its own. However, it is expected that the Pu mass can be quantified by combining a few of the techniques. Determining which techniques to combine and estimating the expected performance of such a system is the purpose of the research effort recently begun. The research presented here is a complimentarily experimental effort. This paper will focus on experimental results of one of the twelve non-destructive assay techniques - passive neutron albedo reactivity. The passive neutron albedo reactivity techniques work by changing the multiplication the pin experiences between two separate measurements. Since a single spent fuel pin has very little multiplication, this is a challenging measurement situation for the technique. Singles and Doubles neutron count rate were measured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for three different burnup pins to test the capability of the passive neutron albedo reactivity technique.

  17. Identification of accelerants, fuels and post-combustion residues using a colorimetric sensor array.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Jang, Minseok; Askim, Jon R; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2015-09-01

    A linear (1 × 36) colorimetric sensor array has been integrated with a pre-oxidation technique for detection and identification of a variety of fuels and post-combustion residues. The pre-oxidation method permits the conversion of fuel vapor into more detectable species and therefore greatly enhances the sensitivity of the sensor array. The pre-oxidation technique used a packed tube of chromic acid on an oxide support and was optimized in terms of the support and concentration. Excellent batch to batch reproducibility was observed for preparation and use of the disposable pre-oxidation tubes. Twenty automotive fuels including gasolines and diesel from five gasoline retailers were individually identifiable with no confusions or misclassifications in quintuplicate trials. Limits of detection were at sub-ppm concentrations for gasoline and diesel fuels. In addition, burning tests were performed on commonly used fire accelerants, and clear differentiation was achieved among both the fuels themselves and their volatile residues after burning. PMID:26215215

  18. Analytical techniques for direct identification of biosignatures and microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, C.; Garcia-Descalzo, L.; Garcia-Lopez, E.; Postigo, M.; Alcazar, A.; Baquero, F.

    2012-09-01

    Rover missions to potentially habitable ecosystems require portable instruments that use minimal power, require no sample preparation, and provide suitably diagnostic information to an Earth-based exploration team. In exploration of terrestrial analogue environments of potentially habitable ecosystems it is important to screen rapidly for the presence of biosignatures and microorganisms and especially to identify them accurately. In this study, several analytical techniques for the direct identification of biosignatures and microorganisms in different Earth analogues of habitable ecosystems are compared.

  19. 40 CFR 80.521 - What are the standards and identification requirements for diesel fuel additives?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... identification requirements for diesel fuel additives? 80.521 Section 80.521 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES... requirements for diesel fuel additives? (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, any...

  20. 40 CFR 80.521 - What are the standards and identification requirements for diesel fuel additives?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... identification requirements for diesel fuel additives? 80.521 Section 80.521 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES... requirements for diesel fuel additives? (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, any...

  1. Laser Shockwave Technique For Characterization Of Nuclear Fuel Plate Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Barry H. Rabin; Mathieu Perton; Daniel Lévesque; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Martin Lord

    2012-07-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  2. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Levesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-25

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  3. The Statistical Analysis Techniques to Support the NGNP Fuel Performance Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bihn T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes the development and application of statistical analysis techniques to support the AGR experimental program on NGNP fuel performance. The experiments conducted in the Idaho National Laboratory’s Advanced Test Reactor employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule. The tests are instrumented with thermocouples embedded in graphite blocks and the target quantity (fuel/graphite temperature) is regulated by the He-Ne gas mixture that fills the gap volume. Three techniques for statistical analysis, namely control charting, correlation analysis, and regression analysis, are implemented in the SAS-based NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) for automated processing and qualification of the AGR measured data. The NDMAS also stores daily neutronic (power) and thermal (heat transfer) code simulation results along with the measurement data, allowing for their combined use and comparative scrutiny. The ultimate objective of this work includes (a) a multi-faceted system for data monitoring and data accuracy testing, (b) identification of possible modes of diagnostics deterioration and changes in experimental conditions, (c) qualification of data for use in code validation, and (d) identification and use of data trends to support effective control of test conditions with respect to the test target. Analysis results and examples given in the paper show the three statistical analysis techniques providing a complementary capability to warn of thermocouple failures. It also suggests that the regression analysis models relating calculated fuel temperatures and thermocouple readings can enable online regulation of experimental parameters (i.e. gas mixture content), to effectively maintain the target quantity (fuel temperature) within a given range.

  4. POLYFAIL: a program for identification of multiple fuel failures with gas tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K. C.

    1980-12-01

    This report describes the development of the computer code POLYFAIL for identification of fuel failures in fast reactors or light-water reactors that use gas tagging. POLYFAIL implements a sophisticated numerical algorithm known as the method of barycentric coordinates. The code can treat problems involving up to four simultaneous tag releases in a tagging system characterized by three independent tag ratios. The sensitivity of the multiple-failure-resolution technique has been optimized by incorporation of a newly developed ratio weighting scheme. Several example problems are provided to demonstrate operation of the code under single-leaker and various postulated multiple-leaker situations.

  5. Artificial intelligence techniques for clutter identification with polarimetric radar signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanvir; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.; Han, Dawei; Srivastava, Prashant K.

    2012-06-01

    The use of different artificial intelligence (AI) techniques for clutter signals identification in the context of radar based precipitation estimation is presented. The clutter signals considered are because of ground clutter, sea clutter and anomalous propagation whereas the explored AI techniques include the support vector machine (SVM), the artificial neural network (ANN), the decision tree (DT), and the nearest neighbour (NN) systems. Eight different radar measurement combinations comprising of various polarimetric spectral signatures — the reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), differential propagation phase (ΦDP), cross-correlation coefficient (ρHV), velocity (V) and spectral width (W) from a C-band polarimetric radar are taken into account as input vectors to the AI systems. The results reveal that all four AI classifiers can identify the clutter echoes with around 98-99% accuracy when all radar input signatures are used. As standalone input vectors, the polarimetric textures of the ΦDP and the ZDR have also demonstrated excellent skills distinguishing clutter echoes with an accuracy of 97-98% approximately. If no polarimetric signature is available, a combination of the texture of ZH, V and W representing typical measurements from a single-polarization Doppler radar may be used for clutter identification, but with a lower accuracy when compared to the use of polarimetric radar measurements. In contrast, the use of ZH or W alone is found less reliable for clutter classification. Among the AI techniques, the SVM has a slightly better score in terms of various clutter identification indicators as compared to the others. Conversely, the NN algorithm has shown a lower performance in identifying the clutter echoes correctly considering the standalone radar signatures as inputs. Despite this, the performance among the different AI techniques is comparable indicating the suitability of the developed systems, and this is further supported when

  6. Nitration by a simulated fuel technique for nitride fuel re-fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young.-Woo; Ryu, Ho Jin; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Jung Won; Park, Geun Il

    2009-07-01

    Nitration reaction of a spent nuclear oxide fuel through a carbothermic reduction and the change in thermal conductivity of the resultant nitride specimens were investigated by a simulated fuel technique for use in nitride fuel re-fabrication from spent oxide fuel. The simulated spent oxide fuel was formed by compacting and sintering a powder mixture of UO 2 and stable oxide fission product impurities. It was pulverized by a 3-cycle successive oxidation-reduction treatment and converted into nitride pellet specimens through the carbothermic reduction. The rate of the nitration reaction of the simulated spent oxide fuel was decreased due to the fission product impurities when compared with pure uranium dioxide. The amount of Ba and Sr in the simulated spent oxide fuel was considerably reduced after the nitride fuel re-fabrication. The thermal conductivity of the nitride pellet specimen in the range 295-373 K was lower than that of the pure uranium nitride but higher than the simulated spent oxide fuel containing fission product impurities.

  7. 78 FR 14190 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Identification of Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ...'') for the qualifying renewable fuels they produce through approved fuel pathways. See 75 FR 14670 (March 26, 2010); 75 FR 26026 (May 10, 2010); 75 FR 37733 (June 30, 2010); 75 FR 59622 (September 28, 2010); 75 FR 76790 (December 9, 2010); 75 FR 79964 (December 21, 2010); 77 FR 1320 (January 9, 2012); and...

  8. Nuclear fuel pellet quality control using artificial intelligence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaolong

    Inspection of nuclear fuel pellets is a complex and time-consuming process. At present, quality control in the fuel fabrication field mainly relies on human manual inspection, which is essentially a judgement call. Considering the high quality requirement of fuel pellets in the nuclear industry, pellet inspection systems must have a high accuracy rate in addition to a high inspection speed. Furthermore, any inspection process should have a low rejection rate of good pellets from the manufacturer point of view. It is very difficult to use traditional techniques, such as simple image comparison, to adequately perform the inspection process of the nuclear fuel pellet. Knowledge-based inspection and a defect-recognition algorithm, which maps the human inspection knowledge, is more robust and effective. A novel method is introduced here for pellet image processing. Three artificial intelligence techniques are studied and applied for fuel pellet inspection in this research. They are an artificial neural network, fuzzy logic, and the decision tree method. A dynamic reference model is located on each input fuel pellet image. Then, those pixels that belong to the abnormal defect are enhanced with high speed and high accuracy. Next, the content-based features for the defect are extracted from those abno1mal pixels and used in the inspection algorithm. Finally, an automated inspection prototype system---Visual Inspection Studio---which combines machine vision and these three AI techniques, is developed and tested. The experimental results indicate a very successful system with a high potential for on-line automatic inspection process.

  9. FIP: A pattern recognition program for fuel spill identification. Final technical report, August 1993-August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Faruque, A.; Lavine, B.K.; Mayfield, H.T.

    1996-05-01

    Gas Chromatography and pattern recognition methods (GC-PR) constitute a powerful tool for investigating complex environmental problems e.g., realistically analyze large chromatographic data sets and to seek meaningful relationships between chemical constitution and source variables. Recently, out laboratory has investigated the potential of GC-PR as a method for typing fields in order to directly relate a spill sample to its source. A graphic user interface (GUl) based interactive software called FIP (fuel identification program) has been developed. The development of this software system takes advantage of the high performance computational and visualization routines of the MATLAB programming environment. Both neural networks and statistical pattern recognition techniques are implemented. FIP employs covariance stabilization of the data to ensure correct classification of the gas chromatograms of weathered and unweathered jet fuels.

  10. A simple histochemical technique for the identification of gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Tschirhart, D L; Noguchi, T T; Klatt, E C

    1991-03-01

    Alizarin red S (ARS) is a commonly used organic dye useful in the histologic identification of calcium deposits. ARS also forms colored reaction products with other metal ions, including barium and lead, which are present in primer residue. In histochemical studies, ARS is shown to identify primer residues from several manufacturers as well as primer residue deposited in tissue, either experimentally or in close-range gunshot wounds. This can be easily accomplished with routine histologic techniques. ARS does not stain gunpowder residue, tattoo pigment, melanin, graphite, india ink, or anthracotic pigment. PMID:2066729

  11. Automated Coronal Loop Identification Using Digital Image Processing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong K.; Gary, G. Allen; Newman, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a master thesis project on a study of computer algorithms for automatic identification of optical-thin, 3-dimensional solar coronal loop centers from extreme ultraviolet and X-ray 2-dimensional images will be presented. These center splines are proxies of associated magnetic field lines. The project is pattern recognition problems in which there are no unique shapes or edges and in which photon and detector noise heavily influence the images. The study explores extraction techniques using: (1) linear feature recognition of local patterns (related to the inertia-tensor concept), (2) parametric space via the Hough transform, and (3) topological adaptive contours (snakes) that constrains curvature and continuity as possible candidates for digital loop detection schemes. We have developed synthesized images for the coronal loops to test the various loop identification algorithms. Since the topology of these solar features is dominated by the magnetic field structure, a first-order magnetic field approximation using multiple dipoles provides a priori information in the identification process. Results from both synthesized and solar images will be presented.

  12. Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Badgley, P.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report, entitled Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,'' describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

  13. Emerging endoscopic techniques for the identification of esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, George; Akiyama, Junichi

    2016-05-01

    Esophageal diseases, both benign and malignant, impose an increasing burden to global health. In the West, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and Barrett's esophagus are increasing in prevalence and impact. In the East, squamous esophageal cancer remains a large burden, but increasingly, precancerous lesions related to GERD are recognized. We review the various advanced endoscopic techniques that have been developed to improve the accuracy of endoscopic identification of esophageal disease. These techniques are designed to increase the sensitivity of detecting disease and high-risk lesions, enable targeted biopsies, decrease total number of biopsies and costs for surveillance, but also guide therapy in real-time. After proper clinical validation, the widespread use of these technologies will lead to improved outcomes, mostly in cancer prevention. PMID:26753504

  14. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  15. Line identification studies using traditional techniques and wavelength coincidence statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Charles R.; Adelman, Saul J.

    1990-01-01

    Traditional line identification techniques result in the assignment of individual lines to an atomic or ionic species. These methods may be supplemented by wavelength coincidence statistics (WCS). The strength and weakness of these methods are discussed using spectra of a number of normal and peculiar B and A stars that have been studied independently by both methods. The present results support the overall findings of some earlier studies. WCS would be most useful in a first survey, before traditional methods have been applied. WCS can quickly make a global search for all species and in this way may enable identifications of an unexpected spectrum that could easily be omitted entirely from a traditional study. This is illustrated by O I. WCS is a subject to well known weakness of any statistical technique, for example, a predictable number of spurious results are to be expected. The danger of small number statistics are illustrated. WCS is at its best relative to traditional methods in finding a line-rich atomic species that is only weakly present in a complicated stellar spectrum.

  16. Effective techniques for the identification and accommodation of disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. D.

    1989-01-01

    The successful control of dynamic systems such as space stations, or launch vehicles, requires a controller design methodology that acknowledges and addresses the disruptive effects caused by external and internal disturbances that inevitably act on such systems. These disturbances, technically defined as uncontrollable inputs, typically vary with time in an uncertain manner and usually cannot be directly measured in real time. A relatively new non-statistical technique for modeling, and (on-line) identification, of those complex uncertain disturbances that are not as erratic and capricious as random noise is described. This technique applies to multi-input cases and to many of the practical disturbances associated with the control of space stations, or launch vehicles. Then, a collection of smart controller design techniques that allow controlled dynamic systems, with possible multi-input controls, to accommodate (cope with) such disturbances with extraordinary effectiveness are associated. These new smart controllers are designed by non-statistical techniques and typically turn out to be unconventional forms of dynamic linear controllers (compensators) with constant coefficients. The simplicity and reliability of linear, constant coefficient controllers is well-known in the aerospace field.

  17. Visualization of supersonic diesel fuel jets using a shadowgraph technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianthong, Kulachate; Behnia, Masud; Milton, Brian E.

    2001-04-01

    High-speed liquid jets have been widely used to cut or penetrate material. It has been recently conjectured that the characteristics of high-speed fuel jets may also be of benefit to engines requiring direct fuel injection into the combustion chamber. Important factors are combustion efficiency and emission control enhancement for better atomization. Fundamental studies of very high velocity liquid jets are therefore very important. The characteristics and behavior of supersonic liquid jets have been studied with the aid of a shadowgraph technique. The high-speed liquid jet (in the supersonic range) is generated by the use of a vertical, single stage powder gun. The performance of the launcher and its relation to the jet exit velocity, with a range of nozzle shapes, has been examined. This paper presents the visual evidence of supersonic diesel fuel jets (velocity around 2000 m/s) investigated by the shadowgraph method. An Argon jet has been used as a light source. With a rise time of 0.07 microseconds, light duration of 0.2 microseconds and the use of high speed Polaroid film, the shadowgraph method can effectively capture the hypersonic diesel fuel jet and its strong leading edge shock waves. This provides a clearer picture of each stage of the generation of hypersonic diesel fuel jets and makes the study of supersonic diesel fuel jet characteristics and the potential for auto-ignition possible. Also, in the experiment, a pressure relief section has been used to minimize the compressed air or blast wave ahead of the projectile. However, the benefit of using a pressure relief section in the design is not clearly known. To investigate this effect, additional experiments have been performed with the use of the shadowgraph method, showing the projectile leaving and traveling inside the nozzle at a velocity around 1100 m/s.

  18. 77 FR 13009 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Identification of Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... on January 5, 2012 (77 FR 700) to amend the Renewable Fuel Standard program regulations. The... direct final rule published at 77 FR 700, on January 5, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Vincent... rule also published on January 5, 2012 (77 FR 462). As stated in the direct final rule and the...

  19. 77 FR 462 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Identification of Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... distribution section or the RFS2 rulemaking (75 FR 14793-14795). Based on these results, today's proposed rule... that were proposed on July 1, 2011 (76 FR 38844). The first change adds ID letters to pathways to... Renewable Fuels Produced Under the Final RFS2 Program from Canola Oil'' (FR Vol. 75, No. 187, pg...

  20. 77 FR 699 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Identification of Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... regulation that were proposed on July 1, 2011(76 FR 38844). The first change adds ID letters to pathways to... an evaluation of renewable gasoline and renewable gasoline blendstocks, as well as biodiesel from... fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel. Regulated categories and entities affected by this action...

  1. Antimisting kerosene: Base fuel effects, blending and quality control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Ernest, J.; Sarohia, V.

    1984-01-01

    The problems associated with blending of the AMK additive with Jet A, and the base fuel effects on AMK properties are addressed. The results from the evaluation of some of the quality control techniques for AMK are presented. The principal conclusions of this investigation are: significant compositional differences for base fuel (Jet A) within the ASTM specification DI655; higher aromatic content of the base fuel was found to be beneficial for the polymer dissolution at ambient (20 C) temperature; using static mixer technology, the antimisting additive (FM-9) is in-line blended with Jet A, producing AMK which has adequate fire-protection properties 15 to 20 minutes after blending; degradability of freshly blended and equilibrated AMK indicated that maximum degradability is reached after adequate fire protection is obtained; the results of AMK degradability as measured by filter ratio, confirmed previous RAE data that power requirements to decade freshly blended AMK are significantly higher than equilibrated AMK; blending of the additive by using FM-9 concentrate in Jet A produces equilibrated AMK almost instantly; nephelometry offers a simple continuous monitoring capability and is used as a real time quality control device for AMK; and trajectory (jet thurst) and pressure drop tests are useful laboratory techniques for evaluating AMK quality.

  2. Chemical Detection and Identification Techniques for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Sheverev, Valery A.; Khromov, Nikolai A.

    2002-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical Instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. The minimal resources available onboard for such missions mandate that the instruments provide maximum analytical capabilities with minimal requirements of volume, weight and consumables. Advances in technology may be achieved by increasing the amount of information acquired by a given technique with greater analytical capabilities and miniaturization of proven terrestrial technology. We describe here methods to develop analytical instruments for the detection and identification of a wide range of chemical species using Gas Chromatography. These efforts to expand the analytical capabilities of GC technology are focused on the development of detectors for the GC which provide sample identification independent of the GC retention time data. A novel new approach employs Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy (PIES).

  3. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) Panel Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Holbrook

    2007-07-01

    Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) is a systematic way of gathering information from experts on a specific subject and ranking the importance of the information. NRC, in collaboration with DOE and the working group, conducted the PIRT exercises to identify safety-relevant phenomena for NGNP, and to assess and rank the importance and knowledge base for each phenomenon. The overall objective was to provide NRC with an expert assessment of the safety-relevant NGNP phenomena, and an overall assessment of R and D needs for NGNP licensing. The PIRT process was applied to five major topical areas relevant to NGNP safety and licensing: (1) thermofluids and accident analysis (including neutronics), (2) fission product transport, (3) high temperature materials, (4) graphite, and (5) process heat for hydrogen cogeneration.

  4. The development of two-dimensional object identification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebby, Gary; Sherrod, Earnest E.

    1989-01-01

    This report marks the end of the first year of an anticipated three year effort to study methods for numerically identifying objects according to shape in two dimensions. The method is based upon comparing the unit gradient of an observed object and the unit gradient of a standard object over a specified range of points. The manner in which the gradients are compared forms the basis of a shape recognition scheme, which is then applied to simple closed plane figures. The gradient based method is calibrated by using various distorted objects in comparison with a set of standard reference objects. The use of pattern recognition techniques for computer identification of two-dimensional figures will be investigated during the second and third years of this project.

  5. System identification and model reduction using modulating function techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yan

    1993-01-01

    Weighted least squares (WLS) and adaptive weighted least squares (AWLS) algorithms are initiated for continuous-time system identification using Fourier type modulating function techniques. Two stochastic signal models are examined using the mean square properties of the stochastic calculus: an equation error signal model with white noise residuals, and a more realistic white measurement noise signal model. The covariance matrices in each model are shown to be banded and sparse, and a joint likelihood cost function is developed which links the real and imaginary parts of the modulated quantities. The superior performance of above algorithms is demonstrated by comparing them with the LS/MFT and popular predicting error method (PEM) through 200 Monte Carlo simulations. A model reduction problem is formulated with the AWLS/MFT algorithm, and comparisons are made via six examples with a variety of model reduction techniques, including the well-known balanced realization method. Here the AWLS/MFT algorithm manifests higher accuracy in almost all cases, and exhibits its unique flexibility and versatility. Armed with this model reduction, the AWLS/MFT algorithm is extended into MIMO transfer function system identification problems. The impact due to the discrepancy in bandwidths and gains among subsystem is explored through five examples. Finally, as a comprehensive application, the stability derivatives of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of an F-18 aircraft are identified using physical flight data provided by NASA. A pole-constrained SIMO and MIMO AWLS/MFT algorithm is devised and analyzed. Monte Carlo simulations illustrate its high-noise rejecting properties. Utilizing the flight data, comparisons among different MFT algorithms are tabulated and the AWLS is found to be strongly favored in almost all facets.

  6. Rapid identification of chromosomal rearrangements by PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Giradet, A.; Andreo, B.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, malformation/mental retardation syndromes and carcinogenesis. The variety of structural rearrangements is almost infinite and an identification by conventional cytogenetics is often labor intensive and may remain doubtful. Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics have provided new tools for detecting chromosomal abnormalities. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure is actually the most employed technique and has led to numerous clinical applications. However, techniques required to produce suitable probes are time consuming and not accessible to all cytogenetics laboratories. The PRimed In Situ labeling (PRINS) method provides an alternate way for in situ chromosome screening. In this procedure, the chromosomal detection is performed by in situ annealing of a specific primer and subsequent primer extension by a Taq DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Application of PRINS in clinical diagnosis is still limited. We have developed a semi-automatic PRINS protocol and used it to identify the origin of several chromosomal abnormalities. We report here the results of studies of three structural rearrangements: a translocation t(21;21), a supernumerary ring marker chromosome 18 and a complex chromosome 13 mosaicism involving a 13;13 Robertsonian translocation and a ring chromosome 13.

  7. Frequency Analysis Techniques for Identification of Viral Genetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Trifonov, Vladimir; Rabadan, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Environmental metagenomic samples and samples obtained as an attempt to identify a pathogen associated with the emergence of a novel infectious disease are important sources of novel microorganisms. The low costs and high throughput of sequencing technologies are expected to allow for the genetic material in those samples to be sequenced and the genomes of the novel microorganisms to be identified by alignment to those in a database of known genomes. Yet, for various biological and technical reasons, such alignment might not always be possible. We investigate a frequency analysis technique which on one hand allows for the identification of genetic material without relying on alignment and on the other hand makes possible the discovery of nonoverlapping contigs from the same organism. The technique is based on obtaining signatures of the genetic data and defining a distance/similarity measure between signatures. More precisely, the signatures of the genetic data are the frequencies of k-mers occurring in them, with k being a natural number. We considered an entropy-based distance between signatures, similar to the Kullback-Leibler distance in information theory, and investigated its ability to categorize negative-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viral genetic data. Our conclusion is that in this viral context, the technique provides a viable way of discovering genetic relationships without relying on alignment. We envision that our approach will be applicable to other microbial genetic contexts, e.g., other types of viruses, and will be an important tool in the discovery of novel microorganisms. PMID:20824103

  8. Damage identification techniques via modal curvature analysis: Overview and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessi, Daniele; Camerlengo, Gabriele

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims to compare several damage identification methods based on the analysis of modal curvature and related quantities (natural frequencies and modal strain energy) by evaluating their performances on the same test case, a damaged Euler-Bernoulli beam. Damage is modelled as a localized and uniform reduction of stiffness so that closed-form expressions of the mode-shape curvatures can be analytically computed and data accuracy, which affects final results, can be controlled. The selected techniques belong to two categories: one includes several methods that need reference data for detecting structural modifications due to damage, the second group, including the modified Laplacian operator and the fractal dimension, avoids the knowledge of the undamaged behavior for issuing a damage diagnosis. To explain better the different performances of the methods, the mathematical formulation has been revised in some cases so as to fit into a common framework where the underlying hypotheses are clearly stated. Because the various damage indexes are calculated on 'exact' data, a sensitivity analysis has been carried out with respect to the number of points where curvature information is available, to the position of damage between adjacent points, to the modes involved in the index computation. In this way, this analysis intends to point out comparatively the capability of locating and estimating damage of each method along with some critical issues already present with noiseless data.

  9. Automatic identification of oculomotor behavior using pattern recognition techniques.

    PubMed

    Korda, Alexandra I; Asvestas, Pantelis A; Matsopoulos, George K; Ventouras, Errikos M; Smyrnis, Nikolaos P

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a methodological scheme for identifying distinct patterns of oculomotor behavior such as saccades, microsaccades, blinks and fixations from time series of eye's angular displacement is presented. The first step of the proposed methodology involves signal detrending for artifacts removal and estimation of eye's angular velocity. Then, feature vectors from fourteen first-order statistical features are formed from each angular displacement and velocity signal using sliding, fixed-length time windows. The obtained feature vectors are used for training and testing three artificial neural network classifiers, connected in cascade. The three classifiers discriminate between blinks and non-blinks, fixations and non-fixations and saccades and microsaccades, respectively. The proposed methodology was tested on a dataset from 1392 subjects, each performing three oculomotor fixation conditions. The average overall accuracy of the three classifiers, with respect to the manual identification of eye movements by experts, was 95.9%. The proposed methodological scheme provided better results than the well-known Velocity Threshold algorithm, which was used for comparison. The findings of the present study indicate that the utilization of pattern recognition techniques in the task of identifying the various eye movements may provide accurate and robust results. PMID:25836568

  10. Preliminary study: isotopic safeguards techniques (IST) LMFBR fuel cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P. J.; Kroc, T. K.

    1980-06-01

    This memorandum presents the preliminary results of the effort to investigate the applicability of isotope correlation techniques (ICT), formulated for the LWR system, to the LMFBR fuel cycle. The detailed isotopic compositional changes with burnup developed for the CRBR was utilized as the reference case. This differs from the usual LMFBR design studies in that the core uranium is natural uranium rather than depleted. Nevertheless, the general isotopic behavior should not differ significantly and does allow an initial insight into the expected behavior of isotopic correlations for the LMFBR power systems such as: the U.K. PFR and reprocessing plant; the French Phenix and Superphenix; and the US reference conceptual design studies (CDS) of homogeneous and heterogeneous LMFBR systems as they are developed.

  11. Development of a direct match technique for star identification on the SWAS mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, Walter K.; Correll, Thomas E.; Anderson, Mark O.

    1995-01-01

    A direct match technique for star identification was developed for use with the star tracker on the SWAS (Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite) spacecraft. In this technique, tracker searches are used in a two-step process for an implicit direct match star identification. A simulation of the star acquisition process was created and used in the preparation of guide star selection requirements. Flight software implementing this star acquisition technique has been developed and tested.

  12. Identification of Potential Fishing Grounds Using Geospatial Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Fishery resources surveys using actual sampling and data collection methods require extensive ship time and sampling time. Informative data from satellite plays a vital role in fisheries application. Satellite Remote Sensing techniques can be used to detect fish aggregation just like visual fish identification ultimately these techniques can be used to predict the potential fishing zones by measuring the parameters which affect the distribution of fishes. Remote sensing is a time saving technique to locate fishery resources along the coast. Pakistan has a continental shelf area of 50,270 km2 and coastline length of 1,120 km. The total maritime zone of Pakistan is over 30 percent of the land area. Fishery plays an important role in the national economy. The marine fisheries sector is the main component, contributing about 57 percent in terms of production. Fishery is the most important economic activity in the villages and towns along the coast, and in most of the coastal villages and settlements it is the sole source of employment and income generation. Fishing by fishermen is done on the sole basis of repeated experiments and collection of information from other fishermen. Often they are in doubt about the location of potential fishing zones. This leads to waste of time and money, adversely affecting fishermen incomes and over or under-exploitation of fishing zones. The main purpose of this study was to map potential fishing grounds by identifying various environmental parameters which impact fish aggregation along the Pakistan coastline. The primary reason of this study is the fact that the fishing communities of Pakistan's coastal regions are extremely poor and lack knowledge of the modern tools and techniques that may be incorporated to enhance their yield and thus, improve their livelihood. Using geospatial techniques in order to accurately map the potential fishing zones based on sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll -a content, in conjunction with

  13. Identification of Potential Fishing Grounds Using Geospatial Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Fishery resources surveys using actual sampling and data collection methods require extensive ship time and sampling time. Informative data from satellite plays a vital role in fisheries application. Satellite Remote Sensing techniques can be used to detect fish aggregation just like visual fish identification ultimately these techniques can be used to predict the potential fishing zones by measuring the parameters which affect the distribution of fishes. Remote sensing is a time saving technique to locate fishery resources along the coast. Pakistan has a continental shelf area of 50,270 km2 and coastline length of 1,120 km. The total maritime zone of Pakistan is over 30 percent of the land area. Fishery plays an important role in the national economy. The marine fisheries sector is the main component, contributing about 57 percent in terms of production. Fishery is the most important economic activity in the villages and towns along the coast, and in most of the coastal villages and settlements it is the sole source of employment and income generation. Fishing by fishermen is done on the sole basis of repeated experiments and collection of information from other fishermen. Often they are in doubt about the location of potential fishing zones. This leads to waste of time and money, adversely affecting fishermen incomes and over or under-exploitation of fishing zones. The main purpose of this study was to map potential fishing grounds by identifying various environmental parameters which impact fish aggregation along the Pakistan coastline. The primary reason of this study is the fact that the fishing communities of Pakistan's coastal regions are extremely poor and lack knowledge of the modern tools and techniques that may be incorporated to enhance their yield and thus, improve their livelihood. Using geospatial techniques in order to accurately map the potential fishing zones based on sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll -a content, in conjunction with

  14. Fuel Injector Patternation Evaluation in Advanced Liquid-Fueled, High Pressure, Gas Turbine Combustors, Using Nonintrusive Optical Diagnostic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Zaller, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and planar Mie scattering are used to examine the fuel distribution pattern (patternation) for advanced fuel injector concepts in kerosene burning, high pressure gas turbine combustors. Three diverse fuel injector concepts for aerospace applications were investigated under a broad range of operating conditions. Fuel PLIF patternation results are contrasted with those obtained by planar Mie scattering. Further comparison is also made for one injector with data obtained through phase Doppler measurements. Differences in spray patterns for diverse conditions and fuel injector configurations are readily discernible. An examination of the data has shown that a direct determination of the fuel spray angle at realistic conditions is also possible. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of these nonintrusive optical techniques for investigating fuel spray patternation under actual combustor conditions.

  15. Fuel Element Transfer Cask Modelling Using MCNP Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmawan, Rosli; Topah, Budiman Naim

    2010-01-01

    After operating for more than 25 years, some of the Reaktor TRIGA Puspati (RTP) fuel elements would have been depleted. A few addition and fuel reconfiguration exercises have to be conducted in order to maintain RTP capacity. Presently, RTP spent fuels are stored at the storage area inside RTP tank. The need to transfer the fuel element outside of RTP tank may be prevalence in the near future. The preparation shall be started from now. A fuel element transfer cask has been designed according to the recommendation by the fuel manufacturer and experience of other countries. A modelling using MCNP code has been conducted to analyse the design. The result shows that the design of transfer cask fuel element is safe for handling outside the RTP tank according to recent regulatory requirement.

  16. Fuel Element Transfer Cask Modelling Using MCNP Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Darmawan, Rosli; Topah, Budiman Naim

    2010-01-05

    After operating for more than 25 years, some of the Reaktor TRIGA Puspati (RTP) fuel elements would have been depleted. A few addition and fuel reconfiguration exercises have to be conducted in order to maintain RTP capacity. Presently, RTP spent fuels are stored at the storage area inside RTP tank. The need to transfer the fuel element outside of RTP tank may be prevalence in the near future. The preparation shall be started from now. A fuel element transfer cask has been designed according to the recommendation by the fuel manufacturer and experience of other countries. A modelling using MCNP code has been conducted to analyse the design. The result shows that the design of transfer cask fuel element is safe for handling outside the RTP tank according to recent regulatory requirement.

  17. A damage identification technique based on embedded sensitivity analysis and optimization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chulho; Adams, Douglas E.

    2014-07-01

    A vibration based structural damage identification method, using embedded sensitivity functions and optimization algorithms, is discussed in this work. The embedded sensitivity technique requires only measured or calculated frequency response functions to obtain the sensitivity of system responses to each component parameter. Therefore, this sensitivity analysis technique can be effectively used for the damage identification process. Optimization techniques are used to minimize the difference between the measured frequency response functions of the damaged structure and those calculated from the baseline system using embedded sensitivity functions. The amount of damage can be quantified directly in engineering units as changes in stiffness, damping, or mass. Various factors in the optimization process and structural dynamics are studied to enhance the performance and robustness of the damage identification process. This study shows that the proposed technique can improve the accuracy of damage identification with less than 2 percent error of estimation.

  18. Technical management techniques for identification and control of industrial safety and pollution hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R.; Dyer, M. K.; Hoard, E. G.; Little, D. G.; Taylor, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Constructive recommendations are suggested for pollution problems from offshore energy resources industries on outer continental shelf. Technical management techniques for pollution identification and control offer possible applications to space engineering and management.

  19. A system identification technique based on the random decrement signatures. Part 1: Theory and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedewi, Nabih E.; Yang, Jackson C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Identification of the system parameters of a randomly excited structure may be treated using a variety of statistical techniques. Of all these techniques, the Random Decrement is unique in that it provides the homogeneous component of the system response. Using this quality, a system identification technique was developed based on a least-squares fit of the signatures to estimate the mass, damping, and stiffness matrices of a linear randomly excited system. The mathematics of the technique is presented in addition to the results of computer simulations conducted to demonstrate the prediction of the response of the system and the random forcing function initially introduced to excite the system.

  20. Application of the electrometallurgical treatment technique to long-term disposition of DOE spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Karell, E.J.; Gourishankar, K.V.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1997-09-01

    The DOE inventory of spent nuclear fuel consists of approximately 2700 tonnes heavy metal (MTHM), containing over 100 different fuel types. The current plan for the disposition of this fuel is to condition it for dry storage until it can be placed in a geological repository. However, the variation in the physical condition and chemical composition of DOE spent fuel complicates the task of qualifying the fuel for repository disposal. Each type or category of fuel must be characterized and certified to meet repository disposal criteria, an expensive and time-consuming process. Some of the fuel types contain chemically reactive components (such as metallic sodium), which must be stabilized prior to long-term storage or disposal. Finally, some of the fuel is damaged or declad, and some has already been altered by its present storage environment, making it difficult to qualify that general type of fuel for disposal. The electrometallurgical (EM) treatment technique developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has the potential to convert many of these spent fuel types into a uniform set of three product streams (uranium metal, metal waste form, ceramic waste form). This treatment would simplify the process of preparing and qualifying these fuels for repository disposal. This paper reviews work done on evaluating the applicability of the EM technique to the treatment of the types of DOE spent fuels currently being stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL).

  1. A facial reconstruction and identification technique for seriously devastating head wounds.

    PubMed

    Joukal, Marek; Frišhons, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Many authors have focused on facial identification techniques, and facial reconstructions for cases when skulls have been found are especially well known. However, a standardized facial identification technique for an unknown body with seriously devastating head injuries has not yet been developed. A reconstruction and identification technique was used in 7 cases of accidents involving trains striking pedestrians. This identification technique is based on the removal of skull bone fragments, subsequent fixation of soft tissue onto a universal commercial polystyrene head model, precise suture of dermatomuscular flaps, and definitive adjustment using cosmetic treatments. After reconstruction, identifying marks such as scars, eyebrows, facial lines, facial hair and partly hairstyle become evident. It is then possible to present a modified picture of the reconstructed face to relatives. After comparing the results with photos of the person before death, this technique has proven to be very useful for identifying unknown bodies when other identification techniques are not available. This technique is useful for its being rather quick and especially for its results. PMID:25965304

  2. Identification of Fissionable Materials Using the Tagged Neutron Technique

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Keegan, J.P. Hurley, J.R. Tinsley, R. Trainham

    2009-06-30

    This summary describes experiments to detect and identify fissionable materials using the tagged neutron technique. The objective of this work is to enhance homeland security capability to find fissionable material that may be smuggled inside shipping boxes, containers, or vehicles. The technique distinguishes depleted uranium from lead, steel, and tungsten. Future work involves optimizing the technique to increase the count rate by many orders of magnitude and to build in the additional capability to image hidden fissionable materials. The tagged neutron approach is very different to other techniques based on neutron die-away or photo-fission. This work builds on the development of the Associated Particle Imaging (API) technique at the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) [1]. Similar investigations have been performed by teams at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia, and by the EURITRACK collaboration in the European Union [2,3,4].

  3. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  4. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  5. Application of nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques for the safeguarding of irradiated fuel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Lee, D.M.; Beach, S.E.; Bement, T.R.; Dermendjiev, E.; Hatcher, C.R.; Kaieda, K.; Medina, E.G.

    1980-05-01

    Nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques were used to characterize the irradiation exposures of irradiated fuel assemblies. Techniques for the rapid measurement of the axial-activity profiles of fuel assemblies have been developed using ion chambers and Be(..gamma..,n) detectors. Detailed measurements using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and passive neutron techniques were correlated with operator-declared values of cooling times and burnup.

  6. Technique for examining the fuel/cladding interface by TEM. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.J.S.; Makenas, B.J.; Thomas, L.E.

    1983-05-01

    Fuel and fission-product interactions with the fuel-pin cladding is an area of concern and has been evaluated in the past principally by in-cell optical metallographic and electron-microprobe examinations. The applicability of three techniques for preparing specimens to reveal the microstructural details and local microchemistry of the fuel/cladding interface under conditions of high-resolution-scanning transmission-electron microscopy has been investigated. The specimen preparation techniques were designed to preserve the fuel/cladding interface and provide and maintain a specimen surface free from smearable alpha contamination. One of the techniques, Ni plating of a fuel cladding sample, preserved the entire cladding cross-section for examination. An Fe-oxide layer on the cladding inner surface was found in specimens prepared by this method. All three techniques of specimen preparation are described in some detail, along with their advantages and disadvantages.

  7. Identification of fuel cycle simulator functionalities for analysis of transition to a new fuel cycle

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Carlsen, Brett W.; Dixon, Brent W.; Feng, Bo; Greenberg, Harris R.; Hays, Ross D.; Passerini, Stefano; Todosow, Michael; Worrall, Andrew

    2016-06-09

    Dynamic fuel cycle simulation tools are intended to model holistic transient nuclear fuel cycle scenarios. As with all simulation tools, fuel cycle simulators require verification through unit tests, benchmark cases, and integral tests. Model validation is a vital aspect as well. Although compara-tive studies have been performed, there is no comprehensive unit test and benchmark library for fuel cycle simulator tools. The objective of this paper is to identify the must test functionalities of a fuel cycle simulator tool within the context of specific problems of interest to the Fuel Cycle Options Campaign within the U.S. Department of Energy smore » Office of Nuclear Energy. The approach in this paper identifies the features needed to cover the range of promising fuel cycle options identified in the DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening (E&S) and categorizes these features to facilitate prioritization. Features were categorized as essential functions, integrating features, and exemplary capabilities. One objective of this paper is to propose a library of unit tests applicable to each of the essential functions. Another underlying motivation for this paper is to encourage an international dialog on the functionalities and standard test methods for fuel cycle simulator tools.« less

  8. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, Gil G; Ward, David C; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2015-03-10

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  9. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2010-02-23

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  10. A robust approach to battery fuel gauging, part I: Real time model identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasingam, B.; Avvari, G. V.; Pattipati, B.; Pattipati, K. R.; Bar-Shalom, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the first of a series of papers on battery fuel gauge (BFG), we present a real time parameter estimation strategy for robust state of charge (SOC) tracking. The proposed parameter estimation scheme has the following novel features: it models hysteresis as an error in the open circuit voltage (OCV) and employs a combination of real time, linear parameter estimation and SOC tracking technique to compensate for it. This obviates the need for modeling of hysteresis as a function of SOC and load current. We identify the presence of correlated noise that has been so far ignored in the literature and use it to enhance the accuracy of model identification. As a departure from the conventional "one model fits all" strategy, we identify four different equivalent models of the battery that represent four modes of typical battery operation and develop the framework for seamless SOC tracking by switching. The proposed parameter approach enables a robust initialization/re-initialization strategy for continuous operation of the BFG. The performance of the online parameter estimation scheme was first evaluated through simulated data. Then, the proposed algorithm was validated using hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) data collected from commercially available Li-ion batteries.

  11. A new computer-assisted technique to aid personal identification.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Danilo; Sala, Remo; Cantatore, Angela; Grandi, Marco; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2009-07-01

    The paper describes a procedure aimed at identification from two-dimensional (2D) images (video-surveillance tapes, for example) by comparison with a three-dimensional (3D) facial model of a suspect. The application is intended to provide a tool which can help in analyzing compatibility or incompatibility between a criminal and a suspect's facial traits. The authors apply the concept of "geometrically compatible images". The idea is to use a scanner to reconstruct a 3D facial model of a suspect and to compare it to a frame extracted from the video-surveillance sequence which shows the face of the perpetrator. Repositioning and reorientation of the 3D model according to subject's face framed in the crime scene photo are manually accomplished, after automatic resizing. Repositioning and reorientation are performed in correspondence of anthropometric landmarks, distinctive for that person and detected both on the 2D face and on the 3D model. In this way, the superimposition between the original two-dimensional facial image and the three-dimensional one is obtained and a judgment is formulated by an expert on the basis of the fit between the anatomical facial districts of the two subjects. The procedure reduces the influence of face orientation and may be a useful tool in identification. PMID:19082838

  12. Comparison of two numerical techniques for aerodynamic model identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhaegen, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    An algorithm, called the Minimal Residual QR algorithm, is presented to solve subset regression problems. It is shown that this scheme can be used as a numerically reliable implementation of the stepwise regression technique, which is widely used to identify an aerodynamic model from flight test data. This capability as well as the numerical superiority of this scheme over the stepwise regression technique is demonstrated in an experimental simulation study.

  13. Solid oxide fuel cell simulation and design optimization with numerical adjoint techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Louie C.

    This dissertation reports on the application of numerical optimization techniques as applied to fuel cell simulation and design. Due to the "multi-physics" inherent in a fuel cell, which results in a highly coupled and non-linear behavior, an experimental program to analyze and improve the performance of fuel cells is extremely difficult. This program applies new optimization techniques with computational methods from the field of aerospace engineering to the fuel cell design problem. After an overview of fuel cell history, importance, and classification, a mathematical model of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is presented. The governing equations are discretized and solved with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques including unstructured meshes, non-linear solution methods, numerical derivatives with complex variables, and sensitivity analysis with adjoint methods. Following the validation of the fuel cell model in 2-D and 3-D, the results of the sensitivity analysis are presented. The sensitivity derivative for a cost function with respect to a design variable is found with three increasingly sophisticated techniques: finite difference, direct differentiation, and adjoint. A design cycle is performed using a simple optimization method to improve the value of the implemented cost function. The results from this program could improve fuel cell performance and lessen the world's dependence on fossil fuels.

  14. Fuel temperature reactivity coefficient calculation by Monte Carlo perturbation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, H. J.; Kim, C. H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an efficient method to estimate the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient (FTC) by the Monte Carlo adjoint-weighted correlated sampling method. In this method, a fuel temperature change is regarded as variations of the microscopic cross sections and the temperature in the free gas model which is adopted to correct the asymptotic double differential scattering kernel. The effectiveness of the new method is examined through the continuous energy MC neutronics calculations for PWR pin cell problems. The isotope-wise and reaction-type-wise contributions to the FTCs are investigated for two free gas models - the constant scattering cross section model and the exact model. It is shown that the proposed method can efficiently predict the reactivity change due to the fuel temperature variation. (authors)

  15. Coordinated Parameter Identification Technique for the Inertial Parameters of Non-Cooperative Target

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xin; Zhang, Teng; Wu, Yaofa; Zhang, Pihui; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Shuai; Yue, Xiaokui; Yuan, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Space operations will be the main space missions in the future. This paper focuses on the precise operations for non-cooperative target, and researches of coordinated parameter identification (CPI) which allows the motion of multi-joints. The contents of this paper are organized: (1) Summarize the inertial parameters identification techniques which have been conducted now, and the technique based on momentum conservation is selected for reliability and realizability; (2) Elaborate the basic principles and primary algorithm of coordinated parameter identification, and analyze some special problems in calculation (3) Numerical simulation of coordinated identification technique by an case study on non-cooperative target of spacecraft mounting dual-arm with six joints is done. The results show that the coordinated parameter identification technique could get all the inertial parameters of the target in 3D by one-time identification, and does not need special configuration or driven joints, moreover the results are highly precise and save much more time than traditional ones. PMID:27116187

  16. New techniques for clay mineral identification by remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, M.J.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Lang, H.

    1983-03-01

    In the past three years there have been major advancements in our ability to identify clay minerals by remote sensing. Multispectral scanners, including NASA's Thematic Mapper Simulator (analog for Landsat-D Thematic Mapper) have had several broad-band channels in the wavelength region of 1.0 to 2.5 ..mu..m. In particular, the wavelength region 2.0 to 2.5 ..mu..m contains diagnostic spectral-absorption features for most layered silicates. Computer processing of image data obtained with these scanners has allowed the identification of the presence of clay minerals, without, however, being able to identify specific mineralogies. Studies of areas with known hydrocarbon deposits and porphyry copper deposits have demonstrated the value of this information for rock-type discrimination and recognition of hydrothermal alteration zones. Non-imaging, narrow-band radiometers and spectrometers have been used in the field, from aircraft, and from space to identify individual mineralogical constituents. This can be done because of diagnostic spectral absorption features in the 2.0 to 2.5 ..mu..m region characteristic of different clay types. Preliminary analysis of SMIRR data over Egypt showed that kaolinite, carbonate rocks, and possibly montmorillonite, could be identified directly. Plans are currently under way for development of narrow-band imaging systems which will be capable of producing maps showing the surface distribution of individual clay types. This will represent a major step in remote sensing, by allowing unique identification of minerals rather than the current ability only to discriminate among materials. Applications of this technology will provide geologists with a powerful new tool for resource exploration and general geologic mapping problems.

  17. PERFORMANCE AND COST EVALUATION OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNIQUES FOR FUEL SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soils and ground water beneath the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station at Traverse City, MI, have been contaminated with separate spills of aviation gasoline and JP-4 jet fuel. Contamination from both plumes has affected a shallow water table aquifer consisting of a medium grained sand....

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF SOURCES OF GROUNDWATER SALINIZATION USING GEOCHEMICAL TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report deals with salt-water sources that commonly mix and deteriorate fresh ground water. t reviews characteristics of salt-water sources and geochemical techniques that can be used to identify these sources after mixing has occurred. The report is designed to assist invest...

  19. Comparison of Three Statistical Classification Techniques for Maser Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Ellen M.; Holland, Barbara R.; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Breen, Shari L.; Chen, Xi; Humphries, Melissa

    2016-04-01

    We applied three statistical classification techniques-linear discriminant analysis (LDA), logistic regression, and random forests-to three astronomical datasets associated with searches for interstellar masers. We compared the performance of these methods in identifying whether specific mid-infrared or millimetre continuum sources are likely to have associated interstellar masers. We also discuss the interpretability of the results of each classification technique. Non-parametric methods have the potential to make accurate predictions when there are complex relationships between critical parameters. We found that for the small datasets the parametric methods logistic regression and LDA performed best, for the largest dataset the non-parametric method of random forests performed with comparable accuracy to parametric techniques, rather than any significant improvement. This suggests that at least for the specific examples investigated here accuracy of the predictions obtained is not being limited by the use of parametric models. We also found that for LDA, transformation of the data to match a normal distribution led to a significant improvement in accuracy. The different classification techniques had significant overlap in their predictions; further astronomical observations will enable the accuracy of these predictions to be tested.

  20. A novel system identification technique for improved wearable hemodynamics assessment.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Andrew D; Inan, Omer T

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances have led to renewed interest in ballistocardiography (BCG), a noninvasive measure of the small movements of the body due to cardiovascular events. A broad range of platforms have been developed and verified for BCG measurement including beds, chairs, and weighing scales: while the body is coupled to such a platform, the cardiogenic movements are measured. Wearable BCG, measured with an accelerometer affixed to the body, may enable continuous, or more regular, monitoring during the day; however, the signals from such wearable BCGs represent local or distal accelerations of skin and tissue rather than the whole body. In this paper, we propose a novel method to reconstruct the BCG measured with a weighing scale (WS BCG) from a wearable sensor via a training step to remove these local effects. Preliminary validation of this method was performed with 15 subjects: the wearable sensor was placed at three locations on the surface of the body while WS BCG measurements were recorded simultaneously. A regularized system identification approach was used to reconstruct the WS BCG from the wearable BCG. Preliminary results suggest that the relationship between local and central disturbances is highly dependent on both the individual and the location where the accelerometer is placed on the body and that these differences can be resolved via calibration to accurately measure changes in cardiac output and contractility from a wearable sensor. Such measurements could be highly effective, for example, for improved monitoring of heart failure patients at home. PMID:25561589

  1. Modeling XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft dynamics by frequency and time-domain identification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.; Kaletka, Juergen

    1987-01-01

    Models of the open-loop hover dynamics of the XV-15 Tilt-Rotor Aircraft are extracted from flight data using two approaches: frequency domain and time-domain identification. Both approaches are reviewed and the identification results are presented and compared in detail. The extracted models are compared favorably, with the differences associated mostly with the inherent weighing of each technique. Step responses are used to show that the predictive capability of the models from both techniques is excellent. Based on the results of this study, the relative strengths and weaknesses of the frequency and time-domain techniques are summarized and a proposal for a coordinated parameter identification approach is presented.

  2. New techniques for the characterization of refuse-derived fuels and solid recovered fuels.

    PubMed

    Rotter, Vera Susanne; Lehmann, Annekatrin; Marzi, Thomas; Möhle, Edda; Schingnitz, Daniel; Hoffmann, Gaston

    2011-02-01

    Solid recovered fuel (SRF) today refers to a waste-derived fuel meeting defined quality specifications, in terms of both origin (produced from non-hazardous waste) and levels of certain fuel properties. Refuse-derived fuel (RDF) nowadays is more used for unspecified waste after a basic processing to increase the calorific value and therefore this term usually refers to the segregated, high calorific fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW), commercial or industrial wastes. In comparison with conventional fuels, both types of secondary fuel show waste of inherently varying quality and an increased level of waste-specific contaminants.The transition from RDF to SRF in the emerging national and European market requires a quality assurance system with defined quality parameters and analytical methods to ensure reliable fuel characterization. However, due to the quality requirements for RDF and SRF, the current standardized analysis methods often do not meet these practical demands. Fast test methods, which minimize personnel, financial and time efforts and which are applicable for producers as well as users can be an important supporting tool for RDF- and SRF-characterization. Currently, a fast test system based on incineration and correlation analyses which enable the determination of relevant fuel parameters is under development. Fast test methods are not aimed at replacing current standardized test methods, but have to be considered as practical supporting tools for the characterization of RDF and SRF. PMID:20392788

  3. A Novel System Identification Technique for Improved Wearable Hemodynamics Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Andrew D.; Inan, Omer T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances have led to renewed interest in ballistocardiography (BCG), a non-invasive measure of the small reaction forces on the body from cardiovascular events. A broad range of platforms have been developed and verified for BCG measurement including beds, chairs, and weighing scales: while the body is coupled to such a platform, the cardiogenic movements of the center-of-mass (COM) are measured. Wearable BCG, measured with an accelerometer affixed to the body, may enable continuous, or more regular, monitoring during the day; however, the signals from such wearable BCGs represent local or distal accelerations of skin and tissue rather than the displacement of the body's COM. In this paper we propose a novel method to reconstruct the COM BCG from a wearable sensor via a training step to remove these local effects. Preliminary validation of this method was performed with fifteen subjects: the wearable sensor was placed at three locations on the surface of the body while COM BCG measurements were recorded simultaneously with a modified weighing scale. A regularized system identification approach was used to reconstruct the COM BCG from the wearable signal. Preliminary results suggest that the relationship between local and central forces is highly dependent on both the individual and the location where the wearable sensor is placed on the body and that these differences can be resolved via calibration to accurately measure changes in cardiac output and contractility from a wearable sensor. Such measurements could be highly effective, for example, for improved monitoring of heart failure patients at home. PMID:25561589

  4. Expert system for identification of simultaneous and sequential reactor fuel failures with gas tagging

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.

    1994-01-01

    Failure of a fuel element in a nuclear reactor core is determined by a gas tagging failure detection system and method. Failures are catalogued and characterized after the event so that samples of the reactor's cover gas are taken at regular intervals and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Employing a first set of systematic heuristic rules which are applied in a transformed node space allows the number of node combinations which must be processed within a barycentric algorithm to be substantially reduced. A second set of heuristic rules treats the tag nodes of the most recent one or two leakers as "background" gases, further reducing the number of trial node combinations. Lastly, a "fuzzy" set theory formalism minimizes experimental uncertainties in the identification of the most likely volumes of tag gases. This approach allows for the identification of virtually any number of sequential leaks and up to five simultaneous gas leaks from fuel elements.

  5. Expert system for identification of simultaneous and sequential reactor fuel failures with gas tagging

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.

    1994-07-26

    Failure of a fuel element in a nuclear reactor core is determined by a gas tagging failure detection system and method. Failures are catalogued and characterized after the event so that samples of the reactor's cover gas are taken at regular intervals and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Employing a first set of systematic heuristic rules which are applied in a transformed node space allows the number of node combinations which must be processed within a barycentric algorithm to be substantially reduced. A second set of heuristic rules treats the tag nodes of the most recent one or two leakers as background'' gases, further reducing the number of trial node combinations. Lastly, a fuzzy'' set theory formalism minimizes experimental uncertainties in the identification of the most likely volumes of tag gases. This approach allows for the identification of virtually any number of sequential leaks and up to five simultaneous gas leaks from fuel elements. 14 figs.

  6. Remote handling equipment and techniques used in the postirradiation examination of the severe fuel damage tests

    SciTech Connect

    Van Deusen, L.C.; Cook, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    Two, 32-rod, experimental fuel bundles from a pressurized water reactor have been subjected to severe reactor operation conditions in the Power Burst Facility. After testing, the fuel bundles were examined in a shielded, remotely handling facility to determine the condition of the bundles after a severe reactor transient. Special handling equipment and techniques were developed for unique application in the postirradiation examination of these large irradiated fuel bundles. This equipment was required to remotely handle the heavy, highly radioactive fuel bundles without disruption of the bundle geometry.

  7. Applications of photoacoustic techniques to the study of jet fuel residue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.

    1983-01-01

    It has been known for many years that fuels for jet aircraft engines demonstrate thermal instability. One manifestation of this thermal instability is the formation of deleterious fuel-derived thermally-induced deposits on surfaces of the aircraft's fuel-handling system. The results of an investigation of the feasibility of applying photoacoustic techniques to the study of the physical properties of these thermal deposits are presented. Both phase imaging and magnitude imaging and spectroscopy were investigated. It is concluded that the use of photoacoustic techniques in the study of films of the type encountered in this investigation is not practical.

  8. Identification of unique repeated patterns, location of mutation in DNA finger printing using artificial intelligence technique.

    PubMed

    Mukunthan, B; Nagaveni, N

    2014-01-01

    In genetic engineering, conventional techniques and algorithms employed by forensic scientists to assist in identification of individuals on the basis of their respective DNA profiles involves more complex computational steps and mathematical formulae, also the identification of location of mutation in a genomic sequence in laboratories is still an exigent task. This novel approach provides ability to solve the problems that do not have an algorithmic solution and the available solutions are also too complex to be found. The perfect blend made of bioinformatics and neural networks technique results in efficient DNA pattern analysis algorithm with utmost prediction accuracy. PMID:24589835

  9. Identification techniques for phenomenological models of hysteresis based on the conjugate gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, Petru; Oniciuc, Liviu; Stancu, Alexandru; Stoleriu, Laurentiu

    2007-09-01

    An identification technique for the parameters of phenomenological models of hysteresis is presented. The basic idea of our technique is to set up a system of equations for the parameters of the model as a function of known quantities on the major or minor hysteresis loops (e.g. coercive force, susceptibilities at various points, remanence), or other magnetization curves. This system of equations can be either over or underspecified and is solved by using the conjugate gradient method. Numerical results related to the identification of parameters in the Energetic, Jiles-Atherton, and Preisach models are presented.

  10. Underwater DVI: Simple fingerprint technique for positive identification.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Lay See; Hasmi, Ahmad Hafizam; Mahmood, Mohd Shah; Vanezis, Peter

    2016-09-01

    An underwater disaster can be declared when a maritime accident occurred or when an aircraft is plunged into water area, be it ocean, sea or river. Nevertheless, handling of human remains in an underwater recovery operation is often a difficult and demanding task as working conditions may be challenging with poor to no visibility, location of remains at considerable depths and associated hazards from surrounding water. A case of the recent helicopter crash, into a famous river in Sarawak, domiciled by huge crocodiles, is discussed in this paper. Search and recovery team as well as the combat divers from the Special Elite Troop Commando, known as VAT 69, were deployed to the scene to perform the underwater recovery to search for all the victims on board involving five Malaysians with a pilot of Philippines nationality. This paper highlights the limitations and challenges faced during the underwater search and recovery. All the bodies recovered were in moderate decomposition stage with crushed injuries and mutilated face and body. A simple and conventional fingerprint technique were used to record the fingerprint. The prints impressions were later photographed using a smartphone and transferred back to the RMP headquarters in Kuala Lumpur for fingerprint match by using WhatsApp Messenger, a phone application. All the first five victims were identified within an average of 10min. The last victim recovered was the pilot. For foreign nationals, the Immigration Department of Malaysia will record the prints of both index fingers only. The lifting of the fingerprint of the last victim was the most challenging in which only one index finger left that can be used for comparison. A few techniques were attempted using the black printer's ink, glass and tape techniques for the last victim. Subsequently, images of the prints impression were taken using the same smartphone with additional macro lens attached to it to enhance the resolution. The images were transferred to the RMP

  11. New laser technique for the identification of molecular transitions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skribanowitz, N.; Kelly, M. J.; Feld, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    A laser technique is proposed which may be useful for the assignment of molecular spectra in the visible and infrared regions. The method is based on the resonant interaction of two monochromatic fields with a Doppler-broadened three-level system. Under the appropriate conditions the absorption line shape of one of the transitions shows a complex structure over a narrow section of the Doppler profile, and for sufficiently high laser power the line shape splits into a number of narrow peaks. Analysis of the resulting intensity pattern leads to unambiguous assignment of the angular momentum quantum numbers of the three levels involved. A simple set of rules is given to facilitate interpretation of spectra. The line shapes discussed are also relevant to monochromatic optical pumping of gases and unidirectional laser amplifiers.

  12. A technique to measure fuel oil viscosity in a fuel power plant.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo, Miguel Angel; Ibargüengoytia, Pablo H; García, Uriel A

    2016-01-01

    The viscosity measurement and control of fuel oil in power plants is very important for a proper combustion. However, the conventional viscometers are only reliable for a short period of time. This paper proposes an on-line analytic viscosity evaluation based on energy balance applied to a piece of tube entering the fuel oil main heater and a new control strategy for temperature control. This analytic evaluation utilizes a set of temperature versus viscosity graphs were defined during years of analysis of fuel oil in Mexican power plants. Also the temperature set-point for the fuel oil main heater output is obtained by interpolating in the corresponding graph. Validation tests of the proposed analytic equations were carried out in the Tuxpan power plant in Veracruz, Mexico. PMID:26652127

  13. Automated identification of cancerous smears using various competitive intelligent techniques.

    PubMed

    Dounias, G; Bjerregaard, B; Jantzen, J; Tsakonas, A; Ampazis, N; Panagi, G; Panourgias, E

    2006-01-01

    In this study the performance of various intelligent methodologies is compared in the task of pap-smear diagnosis. The selected intelligent methodologies are briefly described and explained, and then, the acquired results are presented and discussed for their comprehensibility and usefulness to medical staff, either for fault diagnosis tasks, or for the construction of automated computer-assisted classification of smears. The intelligent methodologies used for the construction of pap-smear classifiers, are different clustering approaches, feature selection, neuro-fuzzy systems, inductive machine learning, genetic programming, and second order neural networks. Acquired results reveal the power of most intelligent techniques to obtain high quality solutions in this difficult problem of medical diagnosis. Some of the methods obtain almost perfect diagnostic accuracy in test data, but the outcome lacks comprehensibility. On the other hand, results scoring high in terms of comprehensibility are acquired from some methods, but with the drawback of achieving lower diagnostic accuracy. The experimental data used in this study were collected at a previous stage, for the purpose of combining intelligent diagnostic methodologies with other existing computer imaging technologies towards the construction of an automated smear cell classification device. PMID:16525690

  14. Comparison of modal identification techniques using a hybrid-data approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    Modal identification of seemingly simple structures, such as the generic truss is often surprisingly difficult in practice due to high modal density, nonlinearities, and other nonideal factors. Under these circumstances, different data analysis techniques can generate substantially different results. The initial application of a new hybrid-data method for studying the performance characteristics of various identification techniques with such data is summarized. This approach offers new pieces of information for the system identification researcher. First, it allows actual experimental data to be used in the studies, while maintaining the traditional advantage of using simulated data. That is, the identification technique under study is forced to cope with the complexities of real data, yet the performance can be measured unquestionably for the artificial modes because their true parameters are known. Secondly, the accuracy achieved for the true structural modes in the data can be estimated from the accuracy achieved for the artificial modes if the results show similar characteristics. This similarity occurred in the study, for example, for a weak structural mode near 56 Hz. It may even be possible--eventually--to use the error information from the artificial modes to improve the identification accuracy for the structural modes.

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): identification and susceptibility testing techniques.

    PubMed

    Reygaert, Wanda

    2009-01-01

    Many traditional techniques are useful for identification of MRSA strains, including techniques for detection of penicillin-resistance, such as the nitrocefin disk. Techniques for assessing methicillin-resistance vary from growth on special media or at a lower temperature, to detection of the mecA gene by manual (latex agglutination) and automated (PCR) methods. Technique development is now geared toward making MRSA identification more rapid. Real-time PCR has sped MRSA detection, but can be costly. Resistance to other drugs is also an issue. Clindamycin resistance may need to be induced, so a special disk diffusion test can be performed. Vancomycin resistance is becoming an issue, so alternative drugs need to be identified. Drugs that are currently available for MRSA infections include: daptomycin, linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and tigecycline. Drugs that are in the development phase include: ceftobiprole, dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin. These drugs provide a promising arsenal against MRSA. PMID:19534447

  16. The application of a biometric identification technique for linking community and hospital data in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Odei-Lartey, Eliezer Ofori; Boateng, Dennis; Danso, Samuel; Kwarteng, Anthony; Abokyi, Livesy; Amenga-Etego, Seeba; Gyaase, Stephaney; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Background The reliability of counts for estimating population dynamics and disease burdens in communities depends on the availability of a common unique identifier for matching general population data with health facility data. Biometric data has been explored as a feasible common identifier between the health data and sociocultural data of resident members in rural communities within the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System located in the central part of Ghana. Objective Our goal was to assess the feasibility of using fingerprint identification to link community data and hospital data in a rural African setting. Design A combination of biometrics and other personal identification techniques were used to identify individual's resident within a surveillance population seeking care in two district hospitals. Visits from resident individuals were successfully recorded and categorized by the success of the techniques applied during identification. The successes of visits that involved identification by fingerprint were further examined by age. Results A total of 27,662 hospital visits were linked to resident individuals. Over 85% of those visits were successfully identified using at least one identification method. Over 65% were successfully identified and linked using their fingerprints. Supervisory support from the hospital administration was critical in integrating this identification system into its routine activities. No concerns were expressed by community members about the fingerprint registration and identification processes. Conclusions Fingerprint identification should be combined with other methods to be feasible in identifying community members in African rural settings. This can be enhanced in communities with some basic Demographic Surveillance System or census information. PMID:26993473

  17. Identification of the motor laryngeal nerves - a new electrical stimulation technique.

    PubMed

    Spahn, J G; Bizal, J; Ferguson, S; Lingeman, R E

    1981-11-01

    Head and neck surgeons are familiar with the technique of identifying motor nerves in the head and neck region by using electrical stimulation especially in the identification of the facial and the spinal accessory nerves. The identification of the motor laryngeal nerves by electrical stimulation intra-operatively has been described; but, the difficulty of visualization of intrinsic laryngeal muscle movement has prevented the wide spread use of this technique. This paper will introduce a simple, safe and reliable method to allow the surgeon to recognize true vocal cord movement while stimulating the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The movement of a two inch 27 gauge needle placed through the cricothyroid membrane into the ipsilateral true vocal cord permits identification of intrinsic laryngeal muscle movement during electrical stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. This method has been successfully used in confirming conductivity of the laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery, Zenker's diverticulum surgery, cricotracheal trauma and recurrent nerve neurectomy for spasmodic dysphonia. PMID:7300536

  18. Shape identification technique for a two-dimensional elliptic system by boundary integral equation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Fumio

    1989-01-01

    The geometrical structure of the boundary shape for a two-dimensional boundary value problem is identified. The output least square identification method is considered for estimating partially unknown boundary shapes. A numerical parameter estimation technique using the spline collocation method is proposed.

  19. Method of preparing gas tags for identification of single and multiple failures of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, Norman J.

    1976-01-01

    For use in the identification of failed fuel assemblies in a nuclear reactor, the ratios of the tag gas isotopic concentrations are located on curved surfaces to enable the ratios corresponding to failure of a single fuel assembly to be distinguished from those formed from any combination of two or more failed assemblies.

  20. Nondestructive techniques for assaying fuel debris in piping at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Vinjamuri, K.; McIsaac, C.V.; Beller, L.S.; Isaacson, L.; Mandler, J.W.; Hobbins, R.R. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Four major categories of nondestructive techniques - ultrasonic, passive gamma ray, infrared detection, and remote video examination - have been determined to be feasible for assaying fuel debris in the primary coolant system of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Reactor. Passive gamma ray detection is the most suitable technique for the TMI-2 piping; however, further development of this technique is needed for specific application to TMI-2.

  1. Evaluation of a rapid polymerase chain reaction based identification technique for Vibrio cholerae isolates.

    PubMed

    le Roux, W J; Masoabi, D; de Wet, C M E; Venter, S N

    2004-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of waterborne pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, in drinking-water sources is important to enable effective resource management and public health protection. Phenotypic systems currently being used for the identification of Vibrio cholerae isolates are time-consuming and the need exists for the development of suitable molecular techniques that can offer both fast and reliable identification. During this study, isolates identified as Vibrio cholerae by means of two different biochemical test systems (API 20E and VITEK 32) were analysed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare the reliability of the various identification systems. The selected PCR technique amplified a sequence within the outer membrane protein of Vibrio cholerae, a gene specific for V. cholerae. It was found that out of 243 isolates biochemically identified as V. cholerae with either the API or VITEK system, 21 isolates did not give a positive result with the PCR detection method. Sequencing the 16S rDNA of more than half of these isolates and comparison of the sequences with Internet databases indicated that most of the isolates belonged to the genus Aeromonas. The results indicated that the rapid PCR procedure was more accurate than the API or VITEK systems currently being used for the phenotypic identification of Vibrio cholerae isolates. PMID:15318514

  2. Multi technique amalgamation for enhanced information identification with content based image data.

    PubMed

    Das, Rik; Thepade, Sudeep; Ghosh, Saurav

    2015-01-01

    Image data has emerged as a resourceful foundation for information with proliferation of image capturing devices and social media. Diverse applications of images in areas including biomedicine, military, commerce, education have resulted in huge image repositories. Semantically analogous images can be fruitfully recognized by means of content based image identification. However, the success of the technique has been largely dependent on extraction of robust feature vectors from the image content. The paper has introduced three different techniques of content based feature extraction based on image binarization, image transform and morphological operator respectively. The techniques were tested with four public datasets namely, Wang Dataset, Oliva Torralba (OT Scene) Dataset, Corel Dataset and Caltech Dataset. The multi technique feature extraction process was further integrated for decision fusion of image identification to boost up the recognition rate. Classification result with the proposed technique has shown an average increase of 14.5 % in Precision compared to the existing techniques and the retrieval result with the introduced technique has shown an average increase of 6.54 % in Precision over state-of-the art techniques. PMID:26798574

  3. Writing trace identification using ultraviolet Fourier-transform imaging spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hang; Liao, Ningfang; Wu, Wenmin; Li, Yasheng; Cao, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Conventional identification methods of writing traces commonly utilize imaging or spectroscopic techniques which work in visible to near infrared range or short-wave infrared range. Yet they cannot be applied in identifying the erased writing traces. In this study, we perform a research in identification of erased writing traces applying an ultraviolet Fouriertransform imaging spectrometer. Experiments of classifying the reflected ultraviolet spectra of erasable pens are made. The resulting hyperspectral images demonstrate that the erased writing traces on printing paper can be clearly identified by this ultraviolet imaging spectrometer.

  4. Remote sensing techniques for the detection of soil erosion and the identification of soil conservation practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, R. E.; Griffin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The following paper is a summary of a number of techniques initiated under the AgRISTARS (Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys Through Aerospace Remote Sensing) project for the detection of soil degradation caused by water erosion and the identification of soil conservation practices for resource inventories. Discussed are methods to utilize a geographic information system to determine potential soil erosion through a USLE (Universal Soil Loss Equation) model; application of the Kauth-Thomas Transform to detect present erosional status; and the identification of conservation practices through visual interpretation and a variety of enhancement procedures applied to digital remotely sensed data.

  5. CODEHOP-mediated PCR – A powerful technique for the identification and characterization of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Timothy M

    2005-01-01

    Consensus-Degenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primer (CODEHOP) PCR primers derived from amino acid sequence motifs which are highly conserved between members of a protein family have proven to be highly effective in the identification and characterization of distantly related family members. Here, the use of the CODEHOP strategy to identify novel viruses and obtain sequence information for phylogenetic characterization, gene structure determination and genome analysis is reviewed. While this review describes techniques for the identification of members of the herpesvirus family of DNA viruses, the same methodology and approach is applicable to other virus families. PMID:15769292

  6. Advanced techniques for noise source identification on a large generator unit

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.G.D. ); Yang, S.J. )

    1993-03-01

    Power station acoustic noise assessment, which has experienced increased environmental awareness and subsequently more stringent legislation for a number of years, has received and added stimulus due to the recent advent of powerful measurement and analysis techniques including sound intensity and coherence. These experimental techniques are explained and results, for a generator unit, illustrate their value in providing a unique, correlated insight into noise problems. This includes noise quantification, full explanation of site sound pressure level in terms of the various influences and major noise source identification. These techniques are widely applicable and an invaluable aid to any industrial noise problem.

  7. Multiple-technique identification of sibling species of the Anopheles quadrimaculatus complex.

    PubMed

    Narang, S K; Seawright, J A; Mitchell, S E; Kaiser, P E; Carlson, D A

    1993-12-01

    In the past, most researchers used a single technique for identification of cryptic taxa, population structures, biosystematics, and phylogenetic studies. Our experience with the Anopheles quadrimaculatus complex shows the importance of using several methods on individual mosquitoes. This approach consists of analysis of the polytene chromosomes in ovarian nurse cells, gas chromatographic profiles of cuticular hydrocarbons, isozyme electrophoresis, and restriction site analysis of mitochondrial or genomic DNA. We recommend use of this multiple-technique approach when analyzing feral populations for the first time, or for correlating information obtained by investigators using different techniques. PMID:8126484

  8. A Second Look at Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis as a Spent Fuel NDA Technique

    SciTech Connect

    James W .Sterbentz; David L. Chichester

    2011-07-01

    Many different nondestructive analysis techniques are currently being investigated as a part of the United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) seeking methods to quantify plutonium in spent fuel. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) is one of these techniques. Having first been explored in the mid-1970s for the analysis of individual spent-fuel pins a second look, using advanced simulation and modeling methods, is now underway to investigate the suitability of the NRTA technique for assaying complete spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The technique is similar to neutron time-of-flight methods used for cross-section determinations but operates over only the narrow 0.1-20 eV range where strong, distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239, 240, 241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Initial modeling shows excellent agreement with previously published experimental data for measurements of individual spent-fuel pins where plutonium assays were demonstrated to have a precision of 2-4%. Within the simulation and modeling analyses of this project scoping studies have explored fourteen different aspects of the technique including the neutron source, drift tube configurations, and gross neutron transmission as well as the impacts of fuel burn up, cooling time, and fission-product interferences. These results show that NRTA may be a very capable experimental technique for spent-fuel assay measurements. The results suggest sufficient transmission strength and signal differentiability is possible for assays through up to 8 pins. For an 8-pin assay (looking at an assembly diagonally), 64% of the pins in a typical 17 ? 17 array of a pressurized water reactor fuel

  9. Development of Hot Pressing as a Low Cost Processing Technique for Fuel Cell Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V

    2003-01-14

    Dependable, plentiful, and economical energy has been the driving force for financial, industrial, and political growth in the US since the mid 19th century. For a country whose progress is so deeply rooted in abundant energy and whose current political agenda involves stabilizing world fossil fuel prices, the development of a reliable, efficient and environmentally friendly power generating source seems compulsory. The maturing of high technology fuel cells may be the panacea the country will find indispensable to free itself from foreign dependence. Fuel cells offer an efficient, combustion-less, virtually pollution-free power source, capable of being sited in downtown urban areas or in remote regions. Fuel cells have few moving parts and run almost silently. Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a fuel directly to electrical energy. Unlike batteries, which store a finite amount of energy, fuel cells will generate electricity continuously, as long as fuel and oxidant are available to the electrodes. Additionally, fuel cells offer clean, efficient, and reliable power and they can be operated using a variety of fuels. Hence, the fuel cell is an extremely promising technology. Over the course of this research, the fundamental knowledge related to ceramic processing, sintering, and hot pressing to successfully hot press a single operational SOFC in one step has been developed. Ceramic powder processing for each of the components of an SOFC has bene tailored towards this goal. Processing parameter for the electrolyte and cathode have been studied and developed until they converted. Several anode fabrication techniques have been developed. Additionally, a novel anode structured has been developed and refined. These individual processes have been cultivated until a single cell SOFC has been fabricated in one step.

  10. Analytical techniques for the detection and identification of chemical warfare materials from environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudry, W.T.; Weimaster, J.F.

    1995-06-01

    The detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) material in diverse and complex matrices has become increasingly important to support the environmental clean-up of military and industrial sites that were historically used in the research, production, use, storage and/or demilitarization of chemical weapons. Reliable and defensible identification of hazardous materials (HM) is necessary to comply with the increasingly stringent regulations imposed by local, state, and federal agencies which govern handling, treatment, storage, and disposal of HM. In addition, before sites can be reutilized, existing HM must be properly identified so that the proper methods of removal, treatment and disposal can be determined. An overview of sample preparation and analytical techniques for the detection and identification of CW materials is presented in this paper.

  11. Dynamic fuel cell stack model for real-time simulation based on system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiler, M.; Schmid, O.; Schudy, M.; Hofer, E. P.

    The authors have been developing an empirical mathematical model to predict the dynamic behaviour of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. Today there is a great number of models, describing steady-state behaviour of fuel cells by estimating the equilibrium voltage for a certain set of operating parameters, but models capable of predicting the transient process between two steady-state points are rare. However, in automotive applications round about 80% of operating situations are dynamic. To improve the reliability of fuel cell systems by model-based control for real-time simulation dynamic fuel cell stack model is needed. Physical motivated models, described by differential equations, usually are complex and need a lot of computing time. To meet the real-time capability the focus is set on empirical models. Fuel cells are highly nonlinear systems, so often used auto-regressive (AR), output-error (OE) or Box-Jenkins (BJ) models do not accomplish satisfying accuracy. Best results are achieved by splitting the behaviour into a nonlinear static and a linear dynamic subsystem, a so-called Uryson-Model. For system identification and model validation load steps with different amplitudes are applied to the fuel cell stack at various operation points and the voltage response is recorded. The presented model is implemented in MATLAB environment and has a computing time of less than 1 ms per step on a standard desktop computer with a 2.8 MHz CPU and 504 MB RAM. Lab tests are carried out at DaimlerChrysler R&D Centre with DaimlerChrysler PEMFC hardware and a good agreement is found between model simulations and lab tests.

  12. Comparison of System Identification Techniques for the Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry

    1996-01-01

    In this thesis linear, dynamic, multivariable state-space models for three joints of the ground-based Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB) are identified. HMTB, housed at the NASA Langley Research Center, is a ground-based version of the Dexterous Orbital Servicing System (DOSS), a representative space station manipulator. The dynamic models of the HMTB manipulator will first be estimated by applying nonparametric identification methods to determine each joint's response characteristics using various input excitations. These excitations include sum of sinusoids, pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBS), bipolar ramping pulses, and chirp input signals. Next, two different parametric system identification techniques will be applied to identify the best dynamical description of the joints. The manipulator is localized about a representative space station orbital replacement unit (ORU) task allowing the use of linear system identification methods. Comparisons, observations, and results of both parametric system identification techniques are discussed. The thesis concludes by proposing a model reference control system to aid in astronaut ground tests. This approach would allow the identified models to mimic on-orbit dynamic characteristics of the actual flight manipulator thus providing astronauts with realistic on-orbit responses to perform space station tasks in a ground-based environment.

  13. Pigment Identification on a XIV/XV c. Wooden Crucifix Using Raman and LIBS Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawczak, M.; Sliwinski, G.; Kaminska, A.; Oujja, M.; Castillejo, M.; Domingo, C.; Klossowska, M.

    The Raman and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) techniques were applied for the pigment identification in polychrome layers on a fourteenth/fifteenth century wooden crucifix. In the Raman spectra, characteristic bands associated with compounds of the pigment samples taken from different areas of the object are observed. Groups of bands corresponding to the original white, red, and green pigments allow the identification of chalk, vermilion, red lead, malachite, and azurite. From the presence of bands ascribed to Prussian blue (282, 538 cm?1) and chrome yellow (338, 360, 403 cm?1) known since eighteenth century, retouching of some statue parts can be concluded. The elemental composition is obtained from LIBS profiles recorded under excitation at 248 and 266 nm. The gold-leaf technique is identified and the presence of Cu, Pb, Cr, Fe, CN, C2, and Ca agrees with the pigment composition applied for re-touching and observed in the Raman bands.

  14. Ultrasonographic identification of the cricothyroid membrane: best evidence, techniques, and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, M S; Teoh, W H; Rudolph, S S

    2016-09-01

    Inability to identify the cricothyroid membrane by inspection and palpation contributes substantially to the high failure rate of cricothyrotomy. This narrative review summarizes the current evidence for application of airway ultrasonography for identification of the cricothyroid membrane compared with the clinical techniques. We identified the best-documented techniques for bedside use, their success rates, and the necessary training for airway-ultrasound-naïve clinicians. After a short but structured training, the cricothyroid membrane can be identified using ultrasound in difficult patients by previously airway-ultrasound naïve anaesthetists with double the success rate of palpation. Based on the literature, we recommend identifying the cricothyroid membrane before induction of anaesthesia in all patients. Although inspection and palpation may suffice in most patients, the remaining patients will need ultrasonographic identification; a service that we should aim at making available in all locations where anaesthesia is undertaken and where patients with difficult airways could be encountered. PMID:27432055

  15. Correlation techniques to determine model form in robust nonlinear system realization/identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stry, Greselda I.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The fundamental challenge in identification of nonlinear dynamic systems is determining the appropriate form of the model. A robust technique is presented which essentially eliminates this problem for many applications. The technique is based on the Minimum Model Error (MME) optimal estimation approach. A detailed literature review is included in which fundamental differences between the current approach and previous work is described. The most significant feature is the ability to identify nonlinear dynamic systems without prior assumption regarding the form of the nonlinearities, in contrast to existing nonlinear identification approaches which usually require detailed assumptions of the nonlinearities. Model form is determined via statistical correlation of the MME optimal state estimates with the MME optimal model error estimates. The example illustrations indicate that the method is robust with respect to prior ignorance of the model, and with respect to measurement noise, measurement frequency, and measurement record length.

  16. Near-infrared spectroscopy and pattern recognition techniques applied to the identification of Jinhua ham

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honglian; Zhao, Zhilei; Pang, Yanping; Wu, Guancheng; Wang, Yanfeng; Li, Xiaoting

    2009-11-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and pattern recognition techniques are applied to develop a fast identification method of Jinhua ham. The samples are collected from different manufactures and they are nineteen Jinhua ham samples and four Xuanwei ham samples. NIR spectra are pretreated with second derivative calculation and vector normalization. The pattern recognition techniques which are cluster analysis, conformity test and principal component analysis (PCA) are separately used to qualify Jinhua ham. The three methods can all distinguish Jinhua ham successfully. The result indicated that a 100 % recognition ration is achieved by the methods and the PCA method is the best one. Overall, NIR reflectance spectroscopy using pattern recognition is shown to have significant potential as a rapid and accurate method for identification of ham.

  17. Gender identification of Grasshopper Sparrows comparing behavioral, morphological, and molecular techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ammer, F.K.; Wood, P.B.; McPherson, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct gender identification in monomorphic species is often difficult especially if males and females do not display obvious behavioral and breeding differences. We compared gender specific morphology and behavior with recently developed DNA techniques for gender identification in the monomorphic Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum). Gender was ascertained with DNA in 213 individuals using the 2550F/2718R primer set and 3% agarose gel electrophoresis. Field observations using behavior and breeding characteristics to identify gender matched DNA analyses with 100% accuracy for adult males and females. Gender was identified with DNA for all captured juveniles that did not display gender specific traits or behaviors in the field. The molecular techniques used offered a high level of accuracy and may be useful in studies of dispersal mechanisms and winter assemblage composition in monomorphic species.

  18. A simple and inexpensive bar-coding technique for denture identification.

    PubMed

    Nalawade, Sonali N; Lagdive, Sanjay B; Gangadhar, Sa; Bhandari, Aruna J

    2011-07-01

    A number of commercial methods for identifying dentures are available. They can be either invasive or noninvasive techniques. The less sophisticated procedures include simple engraving with bur, and more sophisticated procedures use labels or chips. Bar coding system is a way of transferring data to the computer and huge data can be stored as a record. Bar coding can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be used in individual identification. PMID:22408329

  19. A simple and inexpensive bar-coding technique for denture identification

    PubMed Central

    Nalawade, Sonali N; Lagdive, Sanjay B; Gangadhar, SA; Bhandari, Aruna J

    2011-01-01

    A number of commercial methods for identifying dentures are available. They can be either invasive or noninvasive techniques. The less sophisticated procedures include simple engraving with bur, and more sophisticated procedures use labels or chips. Bar coding system is a way of transferring data to the computer and huge data can be stored as a record. Bar coding can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be used in individual identification. PMID:22408329

  20. Reliability of System Identification Techniques to Assess Standing Balance in Healthy Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Andrea B.; Aarts, Ronald G. K. M.; van Gerven, Joop M. A.; Arendzen, J. Hans; Schouten, Alfred C.; Meskers, Carel G. M.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Objectives System identification techniques have the potential to assess the contribution of the underlying systems involved in standing balance by applying well-known disturbances. We investigated the reliability of standing balance parameters obtained with multivariate closed loop system identification techniques. Methods In twelve healthy elderly balance tests were performed twice a day during three days. Body sway was measured during two minutes of standing with eyes closed and the Balance test Room (BalRoom) was used to apply four disturbances simultaneously: two sensory disturbances, to the proprioceptive and the visual system, and two mechanical disturbances applied at the leg and trunk segment. Using system identification techniques, sensitivity functions of the sensory disturbances and the neuromuscular controller were estimated. Based on the generalizability theory (G theory), systematic errors and sources of variability were assessed using linear mixed models and reliability was assessed by computing indexes of dependability (ID), standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change (MDC). Results A systematic error was found between the first and second trial in the sensitivity functions. No systematic error was found in the neuromuscular controller and body sway. The reliability of 15 of 25 parameters and body sway were moderate to excellent when the results of two trials on three days were averaged. To reach an excellent reliability on one day in 7 out of 25 parameters, it was predicted that at least seven trials must be averaged. Conclusion This study shows that system identification techniques are a promising method to assess the underlying systems involved in standing balance in elderly. However, most of the parameters do not appear to be reliable unless a large number of trials are collected across multiple days. To reach an excellent reliability in one third of the parameters, a training session for participants is needed and at

  1. Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, S. J.; Fensin, M. L.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Menlove, H. O.; Quiter, B. J.; Sandoval, N. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Thompson, S. J.

    2009-08-03

    There are a variety of motivations for quantifying Pu in spent (used) fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthen the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies to safeguards nuclear facilities, quantifying shipper/receiver difference, determining the input accountability value at reprocessing facilities and providing quantitative input to burnup credit determination for repositories. For the purpose of determining the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies, twelve NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. A key point motivating the present research path is the realization that none of these techniques, in isolation, is capable of both (1) quantifying the elemental Pu mass of an assembly and (2) detecting the diversion of a significant number of pins. As such, the focus of this work is determining how to best integrate 2 or 3 techniques into a system that can quantify elemental Pu and to assess how well this system can detect material diversion. Furthermore, it is important economically to down-select among the various techniques before advancing to the experimental phase. In order to achieve this dual goal of integration and down-selection, a Monte Carlo library of PWR assemblies was created and is described in another paper at Global 2009 (Fensin et al.). The research presented here emphasizes integration among techniques. An overview of a five year research plan starting in 2009 is given. Preliminary modeling results for the Monte Carlo assembly library are presented for 3 NDA techniques: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, and Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence. As part of the focus on integration, the concept of"Pu isotopic correlation" is discussed and the role of cooling time determination.

  2. Developments in techniques for the isolation, enrichment, main culture conditions and identification of spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yanan; Chen, Xiaoli; Zhu, Huabin; Wang, Dong

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro culture system of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) provides a basis for studies on spermatogenesis, and also contributes to the development of new methods for the preservation of livestock and animal genetic modification. In vitro culture systems have mainly been established for mouse SSCs, but are lacking for farm animals. We reviewed and analyzed the current progress in SSC techniques such as isolation, purification, cultivation and identification. Based on the published studies, we concluded that two-step enzyme digestion and magnetic-activated cell sorting are fast becoming the main methods for isolation and enrichment of SSCs. With regard to the culture systems, serum and feeders were earlier thought to play an important role in the self-renewal and proliferation of SSCs, but serum- and feeder-free culture systems as a means of overcoming the limitations of SSC differentiation in long-term SSC culture are being explored. However, there is still a need to establish more efficient and ideal culture systems that can also be used for SSC culture in larger mammals. Although the lack of SSC-specific surface markers has seriously affected the efficiency of purification and identification, the transgenic study is helpful for our identification of SSCs. Therefore, future studies on SSC techniques should focus on improving serum- and feeder-free culture techniques, and discovering and identifying specific surface markers of SSCs, which will provide new ideas for the optimization of SSC culture systems for mice and promote related studies in farm animals. PMID:25749914

  3. Improving photoelectron counting and particle identification in scintillation detectors with Bayesian techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi-Ronquest, M.; Amaudruz, P.-A.; Batygov, M.; Beltran, B.; Bodmer, M.; Boulay, M. G.; Broerman, B.; Buck, B.; Butcher, A.; Cai, B.; Caldwell, T.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cleveland, B.; Coakley, K.; Dering, K.; Duncan, F. A.; Formaggio, J. A.; Gagnon, R.; Gastler, D.; Giuliani, F.; Gold, M.; Golovko, V. V.; Gorel, P.; Graham, K.; Grace, E.; Guerrero, N.; Guiseppe, V.; Hallin, A. L.; Harvey, P.; Hearns, C.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Hofgartner, J.; Jaditz, S.; Jillings, C. J.; Kachulis, C.; Kearns, E.; Kelsey, J.; Klein, J. R.; Kuźniak, M.; LaTorre, A.; Lawson, I.; Li, O.; Lidgard, J. J.; Liimatainen, P.; Linden, S.; McFarlane, K.; McKinsey, D. N.; MacMullin, S.; Mastbaum, A.; Mathew, R.; McDonald, A. B.; Mei, D.-M.; Monroe, J.; Muir, A.; Nantais, C.; Nicolics, K.; Nikkel, J. A.; Noble, T.; O'Dwyer, E.; Olsen, K.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Ouellet, C.; Palladino, K.; Pasuthip, P.; Perumpilly, G.; Pollmann, T.; Rau, P.; Retière, F.; Rielage, K.; Schnee, R.; Seibert, S.; Skensved, P.; Sonley, T.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Veloce, L.; Walding, J.; Wang, B.; Wang, J.; Ward, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-05-01

    Many current and future dark matter and neutrino detectors are designed to measure scintillation light with a large array of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The energy resolution and particle identification capabilities of these detectors depend in part on the ability to accurately identify individual photoelectrons in PMT waveforms despite large variability in pulse amplitudes and pulse pileup. We describe a Bayesian technique that can identify the times of individual photoelectrons in a sampled PMT waveform without deconvolution, even when pileup is present. To demonstrate the technique, we apply it to the general problem of particle identification in single-phase liquid argon dark matter detectors. Using the output of the Bayesian photoelectron counting algorithm described in this paper, we construct several test statistics for rejection of backgrounds for dark matter searches in argon. Compared to simpler methods based on either observed charge or peak finding, the photoelectron counting technique improves both energy resolution and particle identification of low energy events in calibration data from the DEAP-1 detector and simulation of the larger MiniCLEAN dark matter detector.

  4. Non-Intrusive Measurement Techniques Applied to the Hybrid Solid Fuel Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauty, F.

    2004-10-01

    The knowledge of the solid fuel regression rate and the time evolution of the grain geometry are requested for hybrid motor design and control of its operating conditions. Two non-intrusive techniques (NDT) have been applied to hybrid propulsion : both are based on wave propagation, the X-rays and the ultrasounds, through the materials. X-ray techniques allow local thickness measurements (attenuated signal level) using small probes or 2D images (Real Time Radiography), with a link between the size of field of view and accuracy. Beside the safety hazards associated with the high-intensity X-ray systems, the image analysis requires the use of quite complex post-processing techniques. The ultrasound technique is more widely used in energetic material applications, including hybrid fuels. Depending upon the transducer size and the associated equipment, the application domain is large, from tiny samples to the quad-port wagon wheel grain of the 1.1 MN thrust HPDP motor. The effect of the physical quantities has to be taken into account in the wave propagation analysis. With respect to the various applications, there is no unique and perfect experimental method to measure the fuel regression rate. The best solution could be obtained by combining two techniques at the same time, each technique enhancing the quality of the global data.

  5. Nonlinear modelling of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack using nonlinear cancellation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barus, R. P. P.; Tjokronegoro, H. A.; Leksono, E.; Ismunandar

    2014-09-01

    Fuel cells are promising new energy conversion devices that are friendly to the environment. A set of control systems are required in order to operate a fuel cell based power plant system optimally. For the purpose of control system design, an accurate fuel cell stack model in describing the dynamics of the real system is needed. Currently, linear model are widely used for fuel cell stack control purposes, but it has limitations in narrow operation range. While nonlinear models lead to nonlinear control implemnetation whos more complex and hard computing. In this research, nonlinear cancellation technique will be used to transform a nonlinear model into a linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics. The transformation is done by replacing the input of the original model by a certain virtual input that has nonlinear relationship with the original input. Then the equality of the two models is tested by running a series of simulation. Input variation of H2, O2 and H2O as well as disturbance input I (current load) are studied by simulation. The error of comparison between the proposed model and the original nonlinear model are less than 1 %. Thus we can conclude that nonlinear cancellation technique can be used to represent fuel cell nonlinear model in a simple linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics and therefore retain the wide operation range.

  6. Nonlinear modelling of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack using nonlinear cancellation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Barus, R. P. P.; Tjokronegoro, H. A.; Leksono, E.; Ismunandar

    2014-09-25

    Fuel cells are promising new energy conversion devices that are friendly to the environment. A set of control systems are required in order to operate a fuel cell based power plant system optimally. For the purpose of control system design, an accurate fuel cell stack model in describing the dynamics of the real system is needed. Currently, linear model are widely used for fuel cell stack control purposes, but it has limitations in narrow operation range. While nonlinear models lead to nonlinear control implemnetation whos more complex and hard computing. In this research, nonlinear cancellation technique will be used to transform a nonlinear model into a linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics. The transformation is done by replacing the input of the original model by a certain virtual input that has nonlinear relationship with the original input. Then the equality of the two models is tested by running a series of simulation. Input variation of H2, O2 and H2O as well as disturbance input I (current load) are studied by simulation. The error of comparison between the proposed model and the original nonlinear model are less than 1 %. Thus we can conclude that nonlinear cancellation technique can be used to represent fuel cell nonlinear model in a simple linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics and therefore retain the wide operation range.

  7. Simulated Verification of Fuel Element Inventory in a Small Reactor Core Using the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, Brandon R; Mihalczo, John T

    2009-01-01

    The International Panel on Climate Change projects that by 2050 the world energy demand may double. Although the primary focus for new nuclear power plants in industrialized nations is on large plants in the 1000-1600 MWe range, there is an increasing demand for small and medium reactors (SMRs). About half of the innovative SMR concepts are for small (<300 MWe) reactors with a 5-30 year life without on-site refueling. This type of reactor is also known as a battery-type reactor. These reactors are particularly attractive to countries with small power grids and for non-electrical purposes such as heating, hydrogen production, and seawater desalination. Traditionally, this type of reactor has been used in a nautical propulsion role. This type of reactor is designed as a permanently sealed unit to prevent the diversion of the uranium in the core by the user. However, after initial fabrication it will be necessary to verify that the newly fabricated reactor core contains the quantity of uranium that initially entered the fuel fabrication plant. In most instances, traditional inspection techniques can be used to perform this verification, but in certain situations the core design will be considered sensitive. Non-intrusive verification techniques must be utilized in these situations. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with imaging uses active interrogation and a fast time correlation processor to characterize fissile material. The MCNP-PoliMi computer code was used to simulate NMIS measurements of a small, sealed reactor core. Because most battery-type reactor designs are still in the early design phase, a more traditional design based on a Russian icebreaker core was used in the simulations. These simulations show how the radiography capabilities of the NMIS could be used to detect the diversion of fissile material by detecting void areas in the assembled core where fuel elements have been removed.

  8. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  9. Advanced system identification techniques for wind turbine structures with special emphasis on modal parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bialasiewicz, J.T.

    1995-06-01

    The goal of this research is to develop advanced system identification techniques that can be used to accurately measure the frequency response functions of a wind-turbine structure immersed in wind noise. To allow for accurate identification, the authors have developed a special test signal called the Pseudo-Random Binary Sequence (PRBS). The Matlab program that generates this signal allows the user to interactively tailor its parameters for the frequency range of interest based on the response of the wind turbine under test. By controlling NREL`s Mobile Hydraulic Shaker System, which is attached to the wind turbine structure, the PRBS signal produces the wide-band excitation necessary to perform system identification in the presence of wind noise. The techniques presented here will enable researchers to obtain modal parameters from an operating wind turbine, including frequencies, damping coefficients, and mode shapes. More importantly, the algorithms they have developed and tested (so far using input-output data from a simulated structure) permit state-space representation of the system under test, particularly the modal state space representation. This is the only system description that reveals the internal behavior the system, such as the interaction between the physical parameters, and which, in contrast to transfer functions, is valid for non-zero initial conditions.

  10. Further Evaluation of the Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) Technique for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2011-09-01

    This is an end-of-year report (Fiscal Year (FY) 2011) for the second year of effort on a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The second-year goals for this project included: (1) assessing the neutron source strength needed for the NRTA technique, (2) estimating count times, (3) assessing the effect of temperature on the transmitted signal, (4) estimating plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly, (5) providing a preliminary assessment of the neutron detectors, and (6) documenting this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes work performed over a nine month period from January-September 2011 and is to be considered a follow-on or add-on report to our previous published summary report from December 2010 (INL/EXT-10-20620).

  11. Use of cluster counting technique for particle identification in a drift chamber with the cathode strip readout

    SciTech Connect

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir P.

    2015-07-01

    The possibility of using the clusters counting technique for particle identification in a drift chamber with the cathode strip readout is experimentally investigated. Results of counting of primary ionization clusters on a relativistic particle track, as well as results of computer simulation of pion, kaon, and proton identification in the momentum range of 1–8 GeV/c, are presented.

  12. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

    2012-01-01

    While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in‐process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.

  13. Dating and sourcing fuel ash residues from Cladh Hallan, South Uist, Scotland, using magnetic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C.; Batt, C. M.

    Mineral magnetic and archaeomagnetic measurements have been carried out on fire ash deposits from a central hearth within a circular dwelling at the Late Bronze/Early Iron Age settlement site of Cladh Hallan on South Uist, Scotland. Archaeomagnetic methods date the hearths to 560-700 BC and 650-850 BC, the earliest archaeomagnetic dates produced for the Western Isles of Scotland. A range of mineral magnetic measurements have been carried out on a continually sampled profile through the hearths/ash build-ups displaying differences between the two main ash build-ups and floors. The mineral magnetic results have also been used to assess fuel sources through the application of techniques based on modern ash residues. The results show a marked change in fuel source from well-humified peat to a more mixed fuel, with a high proportion of fibrous-upper peat/peat turf.

  14. [Molecular techniques for detection and identification of pathogens in food: advantages and limitations].

    PubMed

    Palomino-Camargo, Carolina; González-Muñoz, Yuniesky

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne diseases, caused by pathogenic microorganisms, are a major public health problem worldwide. Microbiological methods commonly used in the detection of these foodborne pathogens are laborious and time consuming. This situation, coupled with the demand for immediate results and with technological advances, has led to the development of a wide range of rapid methods in recent decades. On this basis, this review describes the advantages and limitations of the main molecular methods used in detection and identification of foodborne pathogens. To this end, we considered how recent the information was published, the objective analysis of the topic and its scope. Recent literature reports a significant number of alternative, sensitive and selective molecular techniques for detection, enumeration and identification of pathogenic microorganisms in food. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the most popular platform, while high performance sequencing is emerging as a technique of wide applicability for the future. However, even with all the advantages of these new methodologies, their limitations should not be overlooked. For example, molecular methods are not standardized protocols, which hinders its use in some cases. For this reason, hard work should be done to overcome these limitations and improve the application of these techniques in complex matrices such as food systems. PMID:25418655

  15. Neutron Detection With Ultra-Fast Digitizer and Pulse Identification Techniques on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Piglowski, D. A.

    2013-10-01

    A prototype system for neutron detection with an ultra-fast digitizer and pulse identification techniques has been implemented on the DIII-D tokamak. The system consists of a cylindrical neutron fission chamber, a charge sensitive amplifier, and a GaGe Octopus 12-bit CompuScope digitizer card installed in a Linux computer. Digital pulse identification techniques have been successfully performed at maximum data acquisition rate of 50 MSPS with on-board memory of 2 GS. Compared to the traditional approach with fast nuclear electronics for pulse counting, this straightforward digital solution has many advantages, including reduced expense, improved accuracy, higher counting rate, and easier maintenance. The system also provides the capability of neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination and pulse height analysis. Plans for the upgrade of the old DIII-D neutron counting system with these techniques will be presented. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under SC-G903402, and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  16. Use of Semisupervised Clustering and Feature-Selection Techniques for Identification of Co-expressed Genes.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sriparna; Alok, Abhay Kumar; Ekbal, Asif

    2016-07-01

    Studying the patterns hidden in gene-expression data helps to understand the functionality of genes. In general, clustering techniques are widely used for the identification of natural partitionings from the gene expression data. In order to put constraints on dimensionality, feature selection is the key issue because not all features are important from clustering point of view. Moreover some limited amount of supervised information can help to fine tune the obtained clustering solution. In this paper, the problem of simultaneous feature selection and semisupervised clustering is formulated as a multiobjective optimization (MOO) task. A modern simulated annealing-based MOO technique namely AMOSA is utilized as the background optimization methodology. Here, features and cluster centers are represented in the form of a string and the assignment of genes to different clusters is done using a point symmetry-based distance. Six optimization criteria based on several internal and external cluster validity indices are utilized. In order to generate the supervised information, a popular clustering technique, Fuzzy C-mean, is utilized. Appropriate subset of features, proper number of clusters and the proper partitioning are determined using the search capability of AMOSA. The effectiveness of this proposed semisupervised clustering technique, Semi-FeaClustMOO, is demonstrated on five publicly available benchmark gene-expression datasets. Comparison results with the existing techniques for gene-expression data clustering again reveal the superiority of the proposed technique. Statistical and biological significance tests have also been carried out. PMID:26208367

  17. Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Badgley, P.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report, entitled ``Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,`` describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

  18. Comparison of two inductive learning methods: A case study in failed fuel identification

    SciTech Connect

    Reifman, J.; Lee, J.C.

    1992-05-01

    Two inductive learning methods, the ID3 and Rg algorithms, are studied as a means for systematically and automatically constructing the knowledge base of expert systems. Both inductive learning methods are general-purpose and use information entropy as a discriminatory measure in order to group objects of a common class. ID3 constructs a knowledge base by building decision trees that discriminate objects of a data set as a function of their class. Rg constructs a knowledge base by grouping objects of the same class into patterns or clusters. The two inductive methods are applied to the construction of a knowledge base for failed fuel identification in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. Through analysis of the knowledge bases generated, the ID3 and Rg algorithms are compared for their knowledge representation, data overfitting, feature space partition, feature selection, and search procedure.

  19. Comparison of two inductive learning methods: A case study in failed fuel identification

    SciTech Connect

    Reifman, J. ); Lee, J.C. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Two inductive learning methods, the ID3 and Rg algorithms, are studied as a means for systematically and automatically constructing the knowledge base of expert systems. Both inductive learning methods are general-purpose and use information entropy as a discriminatory measure in order to group objects of a common class. ID3 constructs a knowledge base by building decision trees that discriminate objects of a data set as a function of their class. Rg constructs a knowledge base by grouping objects of the same class into patterns or clusters. The two inductive methods are applied to the construction of a knowledge base for failed fuel identification in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. Through analysis of the knowledge bases generated, the ID3 and Rg algorithms are compared for their knowledge representation, data overfitting, feature space partition, feature selection, and search procedure.

  20. Detection and identification of wild yeast contaminants of the industrial fuel ethanol fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Basílio, A C M; de Araújo, P R L; de Morais, J O F; da Silva Filho, E A; de Morais, M A; Simões, D A

    2008-04-01

    Monitoring for wild yeast contaminants is an essential component of the management of the industrial fuel ethanol manufacturing process. Here we describe the isolation and molecular identification of 24 yeast species present in bioethanol distilleries in northeast Brazil that use sugar cane juice or cane molasses as feeding substrate. Most of the yeast species could be identified readily from their unique amplification-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprint. Yeast of the species Dekkera bruxellensis, Candida tropicalis, Pichia galeiformis, as well as a species of Candida that belongs to the C. intermedia clade, were found to be involved in acute contamination episodes; the remaining 20 species were classified as adventitious. Additional physiologic data confirmed that the presence of these major contaminants cause decreased bioethanol yield. We conclude that PCR fingerprinting can be used in an industrial setting to monitor yeast population dynamics to early identify the presence of the most important contaminant yeasts. PMID:18188645

  1. High-accuracy thickness measurement of a transparent plate with the heterodyne central fringe identification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wang-Tsung; Hsieh, Hung-Chih; Chang, Wei-Yao; Chen, Yen-Liang; Su, Der-Chin

    2011-07-20

    In a modified Twyman-Green interferometer, the optical path variation is measured with the heterodyne central fringe identification technique, as the light beam is focused by a displaced microscopic objective on the front/rear surface of the test transparent plate. The optical path length variation is then measured similarly after the test plate is removed. The geometrical thickness of the test plate can be calculated under the consideration of dispersion effect. This method has a wide measurable range and a high accuracy in the measurable range.

  2. PEM fuel cell fault detection and identification using differential method: simulation and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frappé, E.; de Bernardinis, A.; Bethoux, O.; Candusso, D.; Harel, F.; Marchand, C.; Coquery, G.

    2011-05-01

    PEM fuel cell performance and lifetime strongly depend on the polymer membrane and MEA hydration. As the internal moisture is very sensitive to the operating conditions (temperature, stoichiometry, load current, water management…), keeping the optimal working point is complex and requires real-time monitoring. This article focuses on PEM fuel cell stack health diagnosis and more precisely on stack fault detection monitoring. This paper intends to define new, simple and effective methods to get relevant information on usual faults or malfunctions occurring in the fuel cell stack. For this purpose, the authors present a fault detection method using simple and non-intrusive on-line technique based on the space signature of the cell voltages. The authors have the objective to minimize the number of embedded sensors and instrumentation in order to get a precise, reliable and economic solution in a mass market application. A very low number of sensors are indeed needed for this monitoring and the associated algorithm can be implemented on-line. This technique is validated on a 20-cell PEMFC stack. It demonstrates that the developed method is particularly efficient in flooding case. As a matter of fact, it uses directly the stack as a sensor which enables to get a quick feedback on its state of health.

  3. Acoustic puncture assist device versus loss of resistance technique for epidural space identification

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Goel, Nitesh; Chowdhury, Itee; Shah, Shagun Bhatia; Singh, Brijesh Pratap; Jakhar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The conventional techniques of epidural space (EDS) identification based on loss of resistance (LOR) have a higher chance of complications, patchy analgesia and epidural failure, which can be minimised by objective confirmation of space before catheter placement. Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) technique objectively confirms EDS, thus enhancing success, with lesser complications. This study was planned with the objective to evaluate the APAD technique and compare it to LOR technique for EDS identification and its correlation with ultrasound guided EDS depth. Methods: In this prospective study, the lumbar vertebral spaces were scanned by the ultrasound for measuring depth of the EDS and later correlated with procedural depth measured by either of the technique (APAD or LOR). The data were subjected to descriptive statistics; the concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis with 95% confidence limits. Results: Acoustic dip in pitch and descent in pressure tracing on EDS localisation was observed among the patients of APAD group. Analysis of concordance correlation between the ultrasonography (USG) depth and APAD or LOR depth was significant (r ≥ 0.97 in both groups). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean difference of 0.171cm in group APAD and 0.154 cm in group LOR. The 95% limits of agreement for the difference between the two measurements were − 0.569 and 0.226 cm in APAD and − 0.530 to 0.222 cm in LOR group. Conclusion: We found APAD to be a precise tool for objective localisation of the EDS, co-relating well with the pre-procedural USG depth of EDS. PMID:27212720

  4. An analytical investigation of NO sub x control techniques for methanol fueled spark ignition engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, L. H.; Argenbright, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A thermokinetic SI engine simulation was used to study the effects of simple nitrogen oxide control techniques on performance and emissions of a methanol fueled engine. As part of this simulation, a ring crevice storage model was formulated to predict UBF emissions. The study included spark retard, two methods of compression ratio increase and EGR. The study concludes that use of EGR in high turbulence, high compression engines will both maximize power and thermal efficiency while minimizing harmful exhaust pollutants.

  5. Identification and Discrimination of Brands of Fuels by Gas Chromatography and Neural Networks Algorithm in Forensic Research

    PubMed Central

    Ugena, L.; Moncayo, S.; Manzoor, S.; Rosales, D.

    2016-01-01

    The detection of adulteration of fuels and its use in criminal scenes like arson has a high interest in forensic investigations. In this work, a method based on gas chromatography (GC) and neural networks (NN) has been developed and applied to the identification and discrimination of brands of fuels such as gasoline and diesel without the necessity to determine the composition of the samples. The study included five main brands of fuels from Spain, collected from fifteen different local petrol stations. The methodology allowed the identification of the gasoline and diesel brands with a high accuracy close to 100%, without any false positives or false negatives. A success rate of three blind samples was obtained as 73.3%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of this methodology to help in resolving criminal situations. PMID:27375919

  6. Identification and Discrimination of Brands of Fuels by Gas Chromatography and Neural Networks Algorithm in Forensic Research.

    PubMed

    Ugena, L; Moncayo, S; Manzoor, S; Rosales, D; Cáceres, J O

    2016-01-01

    The detection of adulteration of fuels and its use in criminal scenes like arson has a high interest in forensic investigations. In this work, a method based on gas chromatography (GC) and neural networks (NN) has been developed and applied to the identification and discrimination of brands of fuels such as gasoline and diesel without the necessity to determine the composition of the samples. The study included five main brands of fuels from Spain, collected from fifteen different local petrol stations. The methodology allowed the identification of the gasoline and diesel brands with a high accuracy close to 100%, without any false positives or false negatives. A success rate of three blind samples was obtained as 73.3%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of this methodology to help in resolving criminal situations. PMID:27375919

  7. Identification of Organic Binders in Ancient Chinese Paintings by Immunological Techniques.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Bingjian

    2015-10-01

    The identification and localization of organic binders in artworks are big challenges in archaeology and conservation science. Immunological techniques, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) have the potential to become powerful tools for the analysis of organic materials in ancient samples. In this study, ELISA and IFM techniques were combined to identify chicken ovalbumin, glue from several mammalian species, bovine milk, and fish glue in ancient Chinese painting samples. As binders, egg ovalbumin was found in two painting samples and animal glue was found in three samples, which were dated from the 4th to 8th centuries. The results clearly demonstrate that ELISA and IFM can be used to validate results from ancient samples. PMID:26428439

  8. Identification of Scleractinian Coral Recruits Using Fluorescent Censusing and DNA Barcoding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Min; de Palmas, Stéphane; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Denis, Vianney; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of coral recruits has been problematic due to a lack of definitive morphological characters being available for higher taxonomic resolution. In this study, we tested whether fluorescent detection of coral recruits used in combinations of different DNA-barcoding markers (cytochrome oxidase I gene [COI], open reading frame [ORF], and nuclear Pax-C intron [PaxC]) could be useful for increasing the resolution of coral spat identification in ecological studies. One hundred and fifty settlement plates were emplaced at nine sites on the fringing reefs of Kenting National Park in southern Taiwan between April 2011 and September 2012. A total of 248 living coral spats and juveniles (with basal areas ranging from 0.21 to 134.57 mm2) were detected on the plates with the aid of fluorescent light and collected for molecular analyses. Using the COI DNA barcoding technique, 90.3% (224/248) of coral spats were successfully identified into six genera, including Acropora, Isopora, Montipora, Pocillopora, Porites, and Pavona. PaxC further separated I. cuneata and I. palifera of Isopora from Acropora, and ORF successfully identified the species of Pocillopora (except P. meandrina and P. eydouxi). Moreover, other cnidarian species such as actinarians, zoanthids, and Millepora species were visually found using fluorescence and identified by COI DNA barcoding. This combination of existing approaches greatly improved the taxonomic resolution of early coral life stages, which to date has been mainly limited to the family level based on skeletal identification. Overall, this study suggests important improvements for the identification of coral recruits in ecological studies. PMID:25211345

  9. Identification of scleractinian coral recruits using fluorescent censusing and DNA barcoding techniques.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Min; de Palmas, Stéphane; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Denis, Vianney; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of coral recruits has been problematic due to a lack of definitive morphological characters being available for higher taxonomic resolution. In this study, we tested whether fluorescent detection of coral recruits used in combinations of different DNA-barcoding markers (cytochrome oxidase I gene [COI], open reading frame [ORF], and nuclear Pax-C intron [PaxC]) could be useful for increasing the resolution of coral spat identification in ecological studies. One hundred and fifty settlement plates were emplaced at nine sites on the fringing reefs of Kenting National Park in southern Taiwan between April 2011 and September 2012. A total of 248 living coral spats and juveniles (with basal areas ranging from 0.21 to 134.57 mm(2)) were detected on the plates with the aid of fluorescent light and collected for molecular analyses. Using the COI DNA barcoding technique, 90.3% (224/248) of coral spats were successfully identified into six genera, including Acropora, Isopora, Montipora, Pocillopora, Porites, and Pavona. PaxC further separated I. cuneata and I. palifera of Isopora from Acropora, and ORF successfully identified the species of Pocillopora (except P. meandrina and P. eydouxi). Moreover, other cnidarian species such as actinarians, zoanthids, and Millepora species were visually found using fluorescence and identified by COI DNA barcoding. This combination of existing approaches greatly improved the taxonomic resolution of early coral life stages, which to date has been mainly limited to the family level based on skeletal identification. Overall, this study suggests important improvements for the identification of coral recruits in ecological studies. PMID:25211345

  10. Vibration control of piezoelectric smart structures based on system identification technique: Numerical simulation and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xing-Jian; Meng, Guang; Peng, Juan-Chun

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the efficiency of a system identification technique known as observer/Kalman filter identification (OKID) technique in the numerical simulation and experimental study of active vibration control of piezoelectric smart structures. Based on the structure responses determined by finite element method, an explicit state space model of the equivalent linear system is developed by employing OKID approach. The linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) algorithm is employed for controller design. The control law is then incorporated into the ANSYS finite element model to perform closed loop simulations. Therefore, the control law performance can be evaluated in the context of a finite element environment. Furthermore, a complete active vibration control system comprising the cantilever plate, the piezoelectric actuators, the accelerometers and the digital signal processor (DSP) board is set up to conduct the experimental investigation. A state space model characterizing the dynamics of the physical system is developed from experimental results using OKID approach for the purpose of control law design. The controller is then implemented by using a floating point TMS320VC33 DSP. Numerical examples by employing the proposed numerical simulation method, together with the experimental results obtained by using the active vibration control system, have demonstrated the validity and efficiency of OKID method in application of active vibration control of piezoelectric smart structures.

  11. Biochemical component identification by light scattering techniques in whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Experimental data on detection and identification of variety of biochemical agents, such as proteins (albumin, interferon, C reactive protein), microelements (Na+, Ca+), antibiotic of different generations, in both single and multi component solutions under varied in wide range concentration are represented. Analysis has been performed on the light scattering parameters of whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonance based sensor with dielectric microspheres from glass and PMMA as sensitive elements fixed by spin - coating techniques in adhesive layer on the surface of substrate or directly on the coupling element. Sensitive layer was integrated into developed fluidic cell with a digital syringe. Light from tuneable laser strict focusing on and scattered by the single microsphere was detected by a CMOS camera. The image was filtered for noise reduction and integrated on two coordinates for evaluation of integrated energy of a measured signal. As the entrance data following signal parameters were used: relative (to a free spectral range) spectral shift of frequency of WGM optical resonance in microsphere and relative efficiency of WGM excitation obtained within a free spectral range which depended on both type and concentration of investigated agents. Multiplexing on parameters and components has been realized using spatial and spectral parameters of scattered by microsphere light with developed data processing. Biochemical component classification and identification of agents under investigation has been performed by network analysis techniques based on probabilistic network and multilayer perceptron. Developed approach is demonstrated to be applicable both for single agent and for multi component biochemical analysis.

  12. Application of Isothermal Amplification Techniques for Identification of Madurella mycetomatis, the Prevalent Agent of Human Mycetoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sarah A.; van de Sande, Wendy W. J.; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Fahal, Ahmed H.; Mhmoud, Najwa A.

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of eumycetoma may vary significantly depending on the causative agent. To date, the most common fungus causing mycetoma worldwide is Madurella mycetomatis. This species fails to express any recognizable morphological characteristics, and reliable identification can therefore only be achieved with the application of molecular techniques. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) are proposed as alternatives to phenotypic methods. Species-specific primers were developed to target the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of M. mycetomatis. Both isothermal amplification techniques showed high specificity and sufficient sensitivity to amplify fungal DNA and proved to be appropriate for detection of M. mycetomatis. Diagnostic performance of the techniques was assessed in comparison to conventional PCR using biopsy specimens from eumycetoma patients. RPA is reliable and easy to operate and has the potential to be implemented in areas where mycetoma is endemic. The techniques may be expanded to detect fungal DNA from environmental samples. PMID:26246484

  13. Application of Isothermal Amplification Techniques for Identification of Madurella mycetomatis, the Prevalent Agent of Human Mycetoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sarah A; van de Sande, Wendy W J; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Fahal, Ahmed H; Mhmoud, Najwa A; de Hoog, G S

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of eumycetoma may vary significantly depending on the causative agent. To date, the most common fungus causing mycetoma worldwide is Madurella mycetomatis. This species fails to express any recognizable morphological characteristics, and reliable identification can therefore only be achieved with the application of molecular techniques. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) are proposed as alternatives to phenotypic methods. Species-specific primers were developed to target the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of M. mycetomatis. Both isothermal amplification techniques showed high specificity and sufficient sensitivity to amplify fungal DNA and proved to be appropriate for detection of M. mycetomatis. Diagnostic performance of the techniques was assessed in comparison to conventional PCR using biopsy specimens from eumycetoma patients. RPA is reliable and easy to operate and has the potential to be implemented in areas where mycetoma is endemic. The techniques may be expanded to detect fungal DNA from environmental samples. PMID:26246484

  14. Formulation and verification of frequency response system identification techniques for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Jerrel R.; Jones, Victoria L.; Plant, Charles

    1988-01-01

    For the past several years much effort has been given to the development of techniques for designing control systems for large space structures (LSS's). The main objective of these efforts has been to develop a LSS control methodology that produces designs that meet strenuous performance requirements and are robust to model inaccuracies. Unfortunately, performance and robustness are conflicting requirements. Because LSS's can not be fully tested on ground, it has become an accepted fact that the design of LSS control systems to meet performance requirements can not be completed until the LSS is placed on-orbit and tested and an accurate model is extracted from on-orbit test results. Modern MIMO sampled-data frequency response design techniques are viable candidates for designing LSS control systems. First, this paper presents techniques for performing MIMO system identification (ID) from test data. Then, techniques for improving the performance of the system ID process in the presence of noise are presented. Finally, practical utility of the system ID approaches are validated by the presentation of results obtained from application on the LSS Ground Test Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  15. Comparison of Techniques for Non-Intrusive Fuel Drop Size Measurements in a Subscale Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Anderson, Robert C.; Hicks, Yolanda R.; Locke, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    In aviation gas turbine combustors, many factors, such as the degree and extent of fuel/air mixing and fuel vaporization achieved prior to combustion, influence the formation of undesirable pollutants. To assist in analyzing the extent of fuel/air mixing, flow visualization techniques have been used to interrogate the fuel distributions during subcomponent tests of lean-burning fuel injectors. Discrimination between liquid and vapor phases of the fuel was determined by comparing planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) images, elastically-scattered light images, and phase/Doppler interferometer measurements. Estimates of Sauter mean diameters are made by ratioing PLIF and Mie scattered intensities for various sprays, and factors affecting the accuracy of these estimates are discussed. Mie calculations of absorption coefficients indicate that the fluorescence intensities of individual droplets are proportional to their surface areas, instead of their volumes, due to the high absorbance of the liquid fuel for the selected excitation wavelengths.

  16. Review and Ranking of NDA Techniques to Determine Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cheatham, Jesse R; Wagner, John C

    2010-01-01

    A number of efforts are under way to improve nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) safeguard applications. These efforts have largely focused on advancing individual NDA approaches to assay plutonium content. Although significant improvements have been made in NDA techniques, relatively little work has been done to thoroughly and systematically compare the methods. A comparative review of the relative strengths and weaknesses of current NDA techniques brings a new perspective to guide future research. To gauge the practicality and effectiveness of the various relevant NDA approaches, criteria have been developed from two broad categories: functionality and operability. The functionality category includes accuracy estimates, measurement time, plutonium verification capabilities, and assembly or fuel rod assay. Since SNF composition changes with operational history and cooling times, the viability of certain NDA approaches will also change over time. While active interrogation approaches will benefit from reduced background radiation, passive assays will lose the information contained in short-lived isotopes. Therefore, the expected assay accuracy as a function of time is considered. The operability category attempts to gauge the challenges associated with the application of different NDA techniques. This category examines the NDA deploy-ability, measurement capabilities and constraints in spent fuel pools, required on-site facilities, NDA technique synergies, and the extent to which the measurements are obtrusive to the facility. Each topic listed in the categories will be given a numerical score used to rank the different NDA approaches. While the combined numerical score of each technique is informative, the individual-topic scoring will allow for a more-tailored ranking approach. Since the needs and tools of the International Atomic Energy Agency differ from those of a recycling facility, the best assay technique may change with users

  17. Study of solid oxide fuel cell interconnects, protective coatings and advanced physical vapor deposition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Paul Edward

    High energy conversion efficiency, decreased environmentally-sensitive emissions and fuel flexibility have attracted increasing attention toward solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems for stationary, transportation and portable power generation. Critical durability and cost issues, however, continue to impede wide-spread deployment. Many intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar SOFC systems employ metallic alloy interconnect components, which physically connect individual fuel cells into electric series, facilitate gas distribution to appropriate SOFC electrode chambers (fuel/anode and oxidant[air]/cathode) and provide SOFC stack mechanical support. These demanding multifunctional requirements challenge commercially-available and inexpensive metallic alloys due to corrosion and related effects. Many ongoing investigations are aimed at enabling inexpensive metallic alloys (via bulk and/or surface modifications) as SOFC interconnects (SOFC(IC)s). In this study, two advanced physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques: large area filtered vacuum arc deposition (LAFAD), and filtered arc plasma-assisted electron beam PVD (FA-EBPVD) were used to deposit a wide-variety of protective nanocomposite (amorphous/nanocrystalline) ceramic thin-film (<5microm) coatings on commercial and specialty stainless steels with different surface finishes. Both bare and coated steel specimens were subjected to SOFC(IC)-relevant exposures and evaluated using complimentary surface analysis techniques. Significant improvements were observed under simulated SOFC(IC) exposures with many coated specimens at ˜800°C relative to uncoated specimens: stable surface morphology; low area specific resistance (ASR <100mO·cm 2 >1,000 hours); and, dramatically reduced Cr volatility (>30-fold). Analyses and discussions of SOFC(IC) corrosion, advanced PVD processes and protective coating behavior are intended to advance understanding and accelerate the development of durable and commercially-viable SOFC

  18. An overview of the essential differences and similarities of system identification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehra, Raman K.

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in the form of outlines, graphs, tables and charts. Topics include system identification, Bayesian statistical decision theory, Maximum Likelihood Estimation, identification methods, structural mode identification using a stochastic realization algorithm, and identification results regarding membrane simulations and X-29 flutter flight test data.

  19. An intelligent signal processing and pattern recognition technique for defect identification using an active sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhongqing; Ye, Lin

    2004-08-01

    The practical utilization of elastic waves, e.g. Rayleigh-Lamb waves, in high-performance structural health monitoring techniques is somewhat impeded due to the complicated wave dispersion phenomena, the existence of multiple wave modes, the high susceptibility to diverse interferences, the bulky sampled data and the difficulty in signal interpretation. An intelligent signal processing and pattern recognition (ISPPR) approach using the wavelet transform and artificial neural network algorithms was developed; this was actualized in a signal processing package (SPP). The ISPPR technique comprehensively functions as signal filtration, data compression, characteristic extraction, information mapping and pattern recognition, capable of extracting essential yet concise features from acquired raw wave signals and further assisting in structural health evaluation. For validation, the SPP was applied to the prediction of crack growth in an alloy structural beam and construction of a damage parameter database for defect identification in CF/EP composite structures. It was clearly apparent that the elastic wave propagation-based damage assessment could be dramatically streamlined by introduction of the ISPPR technique.

  20. A delayed neutron technique for measuring induced fission rates in fresh and burnt LWR fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K. A.; Perret, G.

    2011-04-01

    The LIFE@PROTEUS program at the Paul Scherrer Institut is being undertaken to characterize the interfaces between burnt and fresh fuel assemblies in modern LWRs. Techniques are being developed to measure fission rates in burnt fuel following re-irradiation in the zero-power PROTEUS research reactor. One such technique utilizes the measurement of delayed neutrons. To demonstrate the feasibility of the delayed neutron technique, fresh and burnt UO 2 fuel samples were irradiated in different positions in the PROTEUS reactor, and their neutron outputs were recorded shortly after irradiation. Fission rate ratios of the same sample irradiated in two different positions (inter-positional) and of two different samples irradiated in the same position (inter-sample) were derived from the measurements and compared with Monte Carlo predictions. Derivation of fission rate ratios from the delayed neutron measured signal requires correcting the signal for the delayed neutron source properties, the efficiency of the measurement setup, and the time dependency of the signal. In particular, delayed neutron source properties strongly depend on the fissile and fertile isotopes present in the irradiated sample and must be accounted for when deriving inter-sample fission rate ratios. Measured inter-positional fission rate ratios generally agree within 1σ uncertainty (on the order of 1.0%) with the calculation predictions. For a particular irradiation position, however, a bias of about 2% is observed and is currently under investigation. Calculated and measured inter-sample fission rate ratios have C/E values deviating from unity by less than 1% and within 2σ of the statistical uncertainties. Uncertainty arising from delayed neutron data is also assessed, and is found to give an additional 3% uncertainty factor. The measurement data indicate that uncertainty is overestimated.

  1. Identification of a reflection boundary coefficient in an acoustic wave equation by optimal control techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S. |; Protopopescu, V.; Yong, J.

    1997-12-31

    The authors apply optimal control techniques to find approximate solutions to an inverse problem for the acoustic wave equation. The inverse problem (assumed here to have a solution) is to determine the boundary reflection coefficient from partial measurements of the acoustic signal. The sought reflection coefficient is treated as a control and the goal--quantified by an approximate functional--is to drive the model solution close to the experimental data by adjusting this coefficient. The problem is solved by finding the optimal control that minimizes the approximate functional. Then by driving the cost of the control to zero one proves that the corresponding sequence of optimal controls represents a converging sequence of estimates for the solution of the inverse problem. Compared to classical regularization methods (e.g., Tikhonov coupled with optimization schemes), their approach yields: (1) a systematic procedure to solve inverse problems of identification type and (ii) an explicit expression for the approximations of the solution.

  2. The structural identification of a methyl analog of methaqualone via 2-dimensional NMR techniques.

    PubMed

    Angelos, S A; Lankin, D C; Meyers, J A; Raney, J K

    1993-03-01

    A submission to the Drug Enforcement Administration North Central Laboratory of a substance believed to be a structural analog of methaqualone hydrochloride precipitated an interest in being able to obtain a rapid and positive identification of such compounds. Both mass spectrometry and proton NMR spectroscopy (1-dimensional) provided evidence to suggest that the structural analog possessed a second methyl group in the molecule, relative to methaqualone, and that the methyl group was attached to the existing methyl-substituted phenyl ring. By application of proton 2-dimensional (2-D) NMR techniques, specifically the homonuclear shift correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and 2-D NOE (NOESY), the precise location of the methyl group in this unknown methaqualone analog was established and shown to have the structure 2. PMID:8455002

  3. A spectral identification technique for adaptive attitude control and pointing of the Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teuber, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Space Telescope is a 2.4 m class aperture optical telescope having near-diffraction-limited performance. It will be placed into earth orbit by 1980 via the Space Shuttle. The problem considered is how to achieve negligible degradation of the astronomy imaging capability (to 0.005 arc second) due to smearing by pointing motions during observations. Initially, pointing instability sources were identified and a linear stability was used to assess the magnitude of elastic body modes and to design control system compensation regions necessary for subsequent adaptive control. A spectral identification technique for this adaptive attitude control and pointing has been investigated that will alleviate requirements for comprehensive dynamic ground testing. Typical all-digital simulation results describing motions of the telescope line of sight are presented.

  4. Vibrio parahaemolyticus: a review on the pathogenesis, prevalence, and advance molecular identification techniques

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that is found in estuarine, marine and coastal environments. V. parahaemolyticus is the leading causal agent of human acute gastroenteritis following the consumption of raw, undercooked, or mishandled marine products. In rare cases, V. parahaemolyticus causes wound infection, ear infection or septicaemia in individuals with pre-existing medical conditions. V. parahaemolyticus has two hemolysins virulence factors that are thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh)-a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans, and TDH-related hemolysin (trh), which plays a similar role as tdh in the disease pathogenesis. In addition, the bacterium is also encodes for adhesions and type III secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2) to ensure its survival in the environment. This review aims at discussing the V. parahaemolyticus growth and characteristics, pathogenesis, prevalence and advances in molecular identification techniques. PMID:25566219

  5. Phase Identification of Dual-Phase (DP980) Steels by Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Nanoindentation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Ruimi, Annie; Field, David P

    2016-02-01

    Phase identification of multi-phase materials provides essential information relating the material to its mechanical properties. In this study we selected DP980, a type of dual-phase steel, to investigate the content of martensite and ferrite grains. A combination of advanced techniques was used to provide detailed and precise information of the microstructure. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to provide observations of the sample surface at different scales. Martensite and ferrite phases of DP980 were further identified and characterized using electron backscatter diffraction and scanning probe microscopy. Results obtained with nanoindentation tests confirmed that the differences in nanohardness values in single-phase grains are martensite and ferrite with different surface heights shown by scanning probe microscopy. The similarity shown in the image quality map and scanning probe microscopy proves that a large fraction of martensite can be distinguished in this undeformed material using image quality parameters obtained during electron backscatter diffraction imaging. PMID:26781200

  6. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data has been developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  7. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  8. Designed strength identification of concrete by ultrasonic signal processing based on artificial intelligence techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Dong; Shin, Dong-Hwan; Lim, Lea-Mook; Lee, Jin; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a pattern recognition method to identify the designed strength of concrete by evidence accumulation based on artificial intelligence techniques with multiple feature parameters. Concrete specimens in this experiment, which were designed to have the strengths of 180, 210, 240, 300, and 400 kg/cm2, respectively, have been considered. Variance, zero-crossing, mean frequency, autoregressive (AR) model coefficients, and linear cepstrum coefficients are extracted as feature parameters from ultrasonic signals of concretes. Pattern recognition is carried out through the evidence accumulation procedure using the distances measured with reference parameters. A fuzzy mapping function is introduced to transform the distance for the application of the evidence accumulation method. Results are presented to support the feasibility of the suggested approach for concrete pattern identification. PMID:16212253

  9. Isolation, Identification, and Characterization of One Degradation Product in Ambroxol by HPLC-Hyphenated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Thummala, Veera Raghava Raju; Ivaturi, Mrutyunjaya Rao; Nittala, Someswara Rao

    2014-01-01

    This study details the isolation, identification, and characterization of ambroxol’s unknown impurity. One unknown impurity of ambroxol was formed in the formulated drug under stress conditions [40°C /75% relative humidity (RH) for 6 months] with the relative retention time (RRT) 0.68 in RP-HPLC. The impurity was enriched by exposing it to heat and it was isolated by using preparative HPLC. The enriched impurity was purified and characterized using the following sophisticated techniques: 2D NMR (gDQ-COSY, gHSQC, and gHMBC), FTIR, and LC-MS/MS. On the basis of the spectral data, the impurity was characterized as trans-4-(6,8-dibromoquinazolin-3(4H)-yl)cyclohexanol. PMID:24959402

  10. Development of advanced techniques for rotorcraft state estimation and parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. E., Jr.; Bohn, J. G.; Vincent, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    An integrated methodology for rotorcraft system identification consists of rotorcraft mathematical modeling, three distinct data processing steps, and a technique for designing inputs to improve the identifiability of the data. These elements are as follows: (1) a Kalman filter smoother algorithm which estimates states and sensor errors from error corrupted data. Gust time histories and statistics may also be estimated; (2) a model structure estimation algorithm for isolating a model which adequately explains the data; (3) a maximum likelihood algorithm for estimating the parameters and estimates for the variance of these estimates; and (4) an input design algorithm, based on a maximum likelihood approach, which provides inputs to improve the accuracy of parameter estimates. Each step is discussed with examples to both flight and simulated data cases.

  11. Techniques for identification of left ventricular asynchrony for cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Peter; Faerestrand, Svein

    2005-01-01

    The most recent treatment option of medically refractory heart failure includes cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) by biventricular pacing in selected patients in NYHA functional class III or IV heart failure. The widely used marker to indicate left ventricular (LV) asynchrony has been the surface ECG, but seems not to be a sufficient marker of the mechanical events within the LV and prediction of clinical response. This review presents an overview of techniques for identification of left ventricular intra- and interventricular asynchrony. Both manuscripts for electrical and mechanical asynchrony are reviewed, partly predicting response to CRT. In summary there is still no gold standard for assessment of LV asynchrony for CRT, but both traditional and new echocardiographic methods have shown asynchronous LV contraction in heart failure patients, and resynchronized LV contraction during CRT and should be implemented as additional methods for selecting patients to CRT. PMID:16943866

  12. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  13. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  14. Delamination identification of laminated composite plates using a continuum damage mechanics model and subset selection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Shen; Yun, Gun Jin; Qiao, Pizhong

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, a new model-based delamination detection methodology is presented for laminated composite plates and its performance is studied both numerically and experimentally. This methodology consists of two main parts: (1) modal analysis of an undamaged baseline finite element (FE) model and experimental modal testing of panels with delamination damage at single or multiple locations and (2) a sensitivity based subset selection technique for single or multiple delamination damage localizations. As an identification model, a higher-order finite element model is combined with a rational micromechanics-based CDM model which defines the delamination damage parameter as a ratio of delaminated area to entire area. The subset selection technique based on sensitivity of the dynamic residual force has been known to be capable of detecting multiple damage locations. However, there has been no experimental study specifically for the applications in laminated composite structures. To implement the methodology, a sensitivity matrix for the laminated composite plate model has been derived. Applications of the proposed methodology to an E-glass/epoxy symmetric composite panel composed of 16 plies [CSM/UM1208/3 layers of C1800]s = [CSM/0/(90/0)3]s with delamination damage are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally. A non-contact scanning laser vibrometer (SLV), a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuator and a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor are used to conduct experimental modal testing. From the experimental example, capabilities of the proposed methodology for damage identification are successfully demonstrated for a 2D laminated composite panel. Furthermore, various damage scenarios are considered to show its performance and detailed results are discussed for future improvements.

  15. Data Mining Techniques to Estimate Plutonium, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Trellue, Holly Renee; Fugate, Michael Lynn; Tobin, Stephen Joesph

    2015-03-19

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a multi-laboratory, university, international partner collaboration to (1) detect replaced or missing pins from spent fuel assemblies (SFA) to confirm item integrity and deter diversion, (2) determine plutonium mass and related plutonium and uranium fissile mass parameters in SFAs, and (3) verify initial enrichment (IE), burnup (BU), and cooling time (CT) of facility declaration for SFAs. A wide variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques were researched to achieve these goals [Veal, 2010 and Humphrey, 2012]. In addition, the project includes two related activities with facility-specific benefits: (1) determination of heat content and (2) determination of reactivity (multiplication). In this research, a subset of 11 integrated NDA techniques was researched using data mining solutions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for their ability to achieve the above goals.

  16. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Technique in Identification of Ancient Ceramics Bodies and Glazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, Khaled; Imam, Hisham; Madkour, Fatma; Meheina, Galila; Gamal, Yosr

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we report a study on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) as a promising non-destructive technique for the identification of the colored glazes, and clay's bodies of Fatimid ceramics ancient artifacts. The scientific examination of ceramics may be helpful in unraveling the history of ancient shards, particularly as the process of its production such as firing condition and temperatures. The analysis of pottery, ceramic bodies and glazed coatings is required in order to structure the conservation or restoration of a piece. Revealing the technical skills of ancient potters has been one of the most important issues for gaining a deep insight of bygone culture and also it is required in order to structure the conservation or restoration of a piece of art. LIBS measurements were carried out by focusing a Nd-YAG laser at 1064 nm with pulse width of 10 ns and 50 mJ pulse energy on the surface of the sample by a 100-mm focal length lens. The plasma emission was collected by telescopic system and transferred through a fiber to Echelle spectrometer attached to an ICCD camera. The focal spot diameter is found to be in the range of 100-150 μm. which is small enough to consider this technique as a non-destructive technique. LIBS technique clarified that each piece of archaeological objects has its own finger print. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was carried out on these archaeological ceramic body samples to study raw materials such as clays, which allowed the investigation of the crystal structure and showed the changes in its structure through firing process. This provided information on the ceramic characteristic and composition of the ceramic bodies.

  17. Rapid detection of defects in fuel-cell electrodes using infrared reactive-flow-through technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prodip K.; Weber, Adam Z.; Bender, Guido; Manak, Austin; Bittinat, Daniel; Herring, Andrew M.; Ulsh, Michael

    2014-09-01

    As fuel cells become more prominent, new manufacturing and production methods will need to be developed to deal efficiently and effectively with increased demand. One necessary component of this industrial growth is the accurate measurement of the variability in the manufacturing process. In this study, we present a diagnostic system that combines infrared thermography with a reactive-flow-through technique to detect catalyst-loading defects in fuel-cell gas-diffusion electrodes accurately with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Experimental results are compared with model predictions of thermal response with good agreement. Data analysis, operating-condition impacts, and detection limits are explored using both experiments and simulation. Overall, the results demonstrate the potential of this technique to measure defects on the millimeter length scale with temporal resolutions appropriate for use on a web-line. Thus we present the first development stage of a next-generation non-destructive diagnostic tool, which may be amenable to eventual use on roll-to-roll manufacturing lines.

  18. Characterization of (Th,U)O 2 fuel pellets made by impregnation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutty, T. R. G.; Nair, M. R.; Sengupta, P.; Basak, U.; Kumar, Arun; Kamath, H. S.

    2008-02-01

    Impregnation technique is an attractive alternative for manufacturing highly radiotoxic 233U bearing thoria based mixed oxide fuel pellets, which are remotely treated in hot cell or shielded glove-box facilities. This technique is being investigated to fabricate the fuel for the forthcoming Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). In the impregnation process, porous ThO 2 pellets are prepared in an unshielded facility which are then impregnated with 1.5 molar uranyl nitrate solution in a shielded facility. The resulting composites are dried and denitrated at 500 °C and then sintered in reducing/oxidizing atmosphere to obtain high density (Th,U)O 2 pellets. In this work, the densification behaviour of ThO 2-2% UO 2 and ThO 2-4% UO 2 pellets was studied in reducing and oxidizing atmospheres using a high temperature dilatometer. Densification was found to be larger in air than in Ar-8% H 2. The characterization of the sintered pellets was made by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The grain structure of ThO 2-2% UO 2 and ThO 2-4% UO 2 pellets was uniform. The EPMA data confirmed that the uranium concentration was slightly higher at the periphery of the pellet than that at the centre.

  19. TEM identification of subsurface phases in ternary U-Pu-Zr fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Papesch, Cynthia A.; Cole, James I.

    2016-05-01

    Phases and microstructure in as-cast, annealed at 850 °C, and subsequently cooled U-23Pu-9Zr fuel were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. SEM examination shows formation of three phases in the alloy that were identified in TEM using selective area diffraction pattern analysis: α-Zr globular and elongated δ-UZr2 inclusions and a thick oxide layer formed on top of β-Pu phase, which has been initially assumed to be ζ-(U, Pu). However, further examination of the cross-sectional TEM specimens identified the matrix phases as δ-UZr2, β-Pu, and (U, Zr)ht. Two types of inclusions were observed in the immediate vicinity of the specimen surface and they were consistent with α-Zr and ζ-(U, Pu).

  20. Quantitative Identification and Analysis of Sub-Seismic Extensional Structure System: Technique Schemes and Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, C.; Chen, W.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative characterization of complex sub-seismic extensional structure system that essentially controls petroleum exploitation is difficult to implement in seismic profile interpretation. This research, based on a case study in block M of Myanmar, established a set of quantitative treatment schemes and technique processes for the identification of sub-seismic low-displacement (SSLD) extensional faults or fractures upon structural deformation restoration and geometric inversion. Firstly, the master-subsidiary inheritance relations and configuration characterization of the seismic-scale extensional fault systems are determined by analyzing the structural pattern. Besides, three-dimensional (3D) pattern and characteristics of the seismic-scale extensional structure have been illustrated by 3D structure model built upon seismic sections. Moreover, according to the dilatancy obtained from structural restoration on the basis of inclined shear method, as well as the fracture-flow index, potential SSLD extensional faults or fractures have been quantitatively identified. Application of the technique processes to the sub-seismic low-displacement extensional structures in block M in Myanmar is instructive to quantitatively interpret those SSLD extensional structure systems in practice. The work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2014CB239205) and the National Science and Technology Major Project of China (20011ZX05030-005-003).

  1. Quantitative identification and analysis of sub-seismic extensional structure system: technique schemes and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenghua, Ou; Chen, Wei; Ma, Zhonggao

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative characterization of complex sub-seismic extensional structure system that essentially controls petroleum exploitation is difficult to implement in seismic profile interpretation. This research, based on a case study in block M of Myanmar, established a set of quantitative treatment schemes and technique processes for the identification of sub-seismic low-displacement (SSLD) extensional faults or fractures upon structural deformation restoration and geometric inversion. Firstly, the master-subsidiary inheritance relations and configuration of the seismic-scale extensional fault systems are determined by analyzing the structural pattern. Besides, three-dimensional (3D) pattern and characteristics of the seismic-scale extensional structure have been illustrated by a 3D structure model built upon seismic sections. Moreover, according to the dilatancy obtained from structural restoration on the basis of inclined shear method, as well as the fracture-flow index, potential SSLD extensional faults or fractures have been quantitatively identified. Application of the technique processes to the sub-seismic low-displacement extensional structures in block M in Myanmar is instructive to quantitatively interpret those SSLD extensional structure systems in practice.

  2. Dual redundant sensor FDI techniques applied to the NASA F8C DFBW aircraft. [Failure Detection and Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, M. N.; Deckert, J. C.; Deyst, J. J.; Willsky, A. S.; Chow, E. Y.

    1976-01-01

    An onboard failure detection and identification (FDI) technique for dual redundant sensors on the NASA F8C digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) aircraft is presented. The failure of one of a pair of sensors of the same type is detected by a direct redundancy trigger which observes the difference between the outputs of these two sensors. Identification of the failed sensor is accomplished utilizing the analytic redundancy that exists as kinematic and functional relationships among the variables being measured by dissimilar instruments. In addition, identification of generic failures, common to both instruments of a given type, is accomplished by using a time trigger to periodically initiate analytic redundancy failure identification tests for individual sensors. The basic form of these tests is the comparison of the measurement of a variable using the suspect instrument with another measurement of the same variable obtained using other instrument types.

  3. Yangon River Geomorphology Identification and its Enviromental Imapacts Analsysi by Optical and Radar Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lwin, A.; Khaing, M. M.

    2012-07-01

    The Yangon river, also known as the Rangoon river, is about 40 km long (25miles), and flows from southern Myanmar as an outlet of the Irrawaddy (Ayeyarwady) river into the Ayeyarwady delta. The Yangon river drains the Pegu Mountains; both the Yangon and the Pathein rivers enter the Ayeyarwady at the delta. Fluvial geomorphology is based primarily on rivers of manageable dimensions. The emphasis is on geomorphology, sedimentology of Yangon river and techniques for their identification and management. Present techniques such as remote sensing have made it easier to investigate and interpret in details analysis of river geomorphology. In this paper, attempt has been made the complicated issues of geomorphology, sedimentation patterns and management of river system and evolution studied. The analysis was carried out for the impact of land use/ land cover (LULC) changes on stream flow patterns. The hydrologic response to intense, flood producing rainfall events bears the signatures of the geomorphic structure of the channel network and of the characteristic slope lengths defining the drainage density of the basin. The interpretation of the hydrologic response as the travel time distribution of a water particle randomly injected in a distributed manner across the landscape inspired many geomorphic insights. In 2008, Cyclone Nargis was seriously damaged to mangrove area and its biodiversity system in and around of Yangon river terraces. A combination of digital image processing techniques was employed for enhancement and classification process. It is observed from the study that middle infra red band (0.77mm - 0.86mm) is highly suitable for mapping mangroves. Two major classes of mangroves, dense and open mangroves were delineated from the digital data.

  4. Pixel-Level Analysis Techniques for False-Positive Identification in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, J.; Gilliland, R.; Batalha, N.; Gautier, T. N.; Rowe, J.; Dunham, E.; Latham, D.; Caldwell, D.; Twicken, J.; Tenenbaum, P.; Clarke, B.; Li, J.; Wu, H.; Quintana, E.; Ciardi, D.; Torres, G.; Dotson, J.; Still, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler mission seeks to identify Earth-size exoplanets by detecting transits of their parent star. The resulting transit signature will be small ( 100 ppm). Several astrophysical phenomena can mimic an Earth-size transit signature, most notably background eclipsing binaries (BGEBs). As part of a larger false-positive identification effort, pixel-level analysis of the Kepler data has proven crucial in identifying the likelihood of these confounding signals. Pixel-level analysis is primarily useful for the case of the transit being a BGEB. Several analysis techniques are presented, including: - measurement of centroid motion in and out of transit compared with detailed modeling of expected centroid motion, including an estimate of the transit source location - transit source location determination through a high-precision PSF-fit of the difference between in- and out-of-transit pixels, directly measuring the location of the transit source - source location determination through fitting the observed summed flux time series (or the light curve derived from the transit model) to each pixel's time series data. These techniques have been automated and are being considered for inclusion in the Kepler Science Operations Center Data Analysis Pipeline. They are supplemented by various diagnostic plots of the Kepler data as well as comparison with background stars identified by the Kepler Follow-up Observing Program (FOP). The final determination of whether an observed transit is a false positive integrates several sources, including pixel-level analysis and FOP results. Pixel-level techniques can identify BGEBs that are separated from the Kepler target star by more than a certain radius, called the "radius of confusion". The determination of the radius of confusion, and the role it plays in assigning the probability of the transit being due to a planet, is briefly discussed. The statistics from the latest false-positive list are provided. Funding for this mission provided

  5. Borehole time domain reflectometry in layered sandstone: Impact of measurement technique on vadose zone process identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jared West, L.; Truss, Steven W.

    2006-03-01

    The hydraulic behaviour of the vadose zone of a layered sandstone aquifer has been investigated using borehole-based Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). Both a commercially available portable packer TDR system (TRIME-B3L Borehole Packer Probe) and specially designed borehole-emplaced TDR probes were used to monitor seasonal fluctuations in water content in the vadose zone of a layered sandstone over 1 year under natural rainfall loading. The data show that the vadose zone contains seasonal perched water tables that form when downward percolating water reaches layers of fine grained sandstone and siltstone and causes local saturation. The formation of perched water tables is likely to lead to lateral flow bypassing the less permeable, finer layers. This contrasts with behaviour inferred from previous studies of the same aquifer that used borehole radar and resistivity, which suggested its vadose zone behaviour was characterized by uniform downwards migration of wetting fronts. To investigate the impact of measurement technique on observed response, the TDR data reported here were used to produce simulated zero offset profile (ZOP) borehole radar responses. This simulation confirmed the limited ability of ZOP borehole radar to detect key vadose zone processes, because the phenomenon of critical refraction minimizes the sensitivity of the results to high water content layers. The ability of the resistivity method to detect perched water table responses is also limited, because of the relatively large sampling volume of the technique. The study illustrates that inappropriate technique selection results in hydrological process mis-identification, with serious consequences for the usefulness of data in hydrological modeling.

  6. Predicting fissile content of spent nuclear fuel assemblies with the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique and Monte Carlo code emulation

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-10-13

    There is a great need in the safeguards community to be able to nondestructively quantify the mass of plutonium of a spent nuclear fuel assembly. As part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative, we are investigating several techniques, or detector systems, which, when integrated, will be capable of quantifying the plutonium mass of a spent fuel assembly without dismantling the assembly. This paper reports on the simulation of one of these techniques, the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity with Fission Chambers (PNAR-FC) system. The response of this system over a wide range of spent fuel assemblies with different burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time characteristics is shown. A Monte Carlo method of using these modeled results to estimate the fissile content of a spent fuel assembly has been developed. A few numerical simulations of using this method are shown. Finally, additional developments still needed and being worked on are discussed.

  7. Artificial Intelligence Techniques for the Estimation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasiloglu, Abdulsamet; Aras, Ömür; Bayramoglu, Mahmut

    2016-04-01

    Artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy inference systems are well known artificial intelligence techniques used for black-box modelling of complex systems. In this study, Feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are used for modelling the performance of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Current density (I), fuel cell temperature (T), methanol concentration (C), liquid flow-rate (q) and air flow-rate (Q) are selected as input variables to predict the cell voltage. Polarization curves are obtained for 35 different operating conditions according to a statistically designed experimental plan. In modelling study, various subsets of input variables and various types of membership function are considered. A feed -forward architecture with one hidden layer is used in ANN modelling. The optimum performance is obtained with the input set (I, T, C, q) using twelve hidden neurons and sigmoidal activation function. On the other hand, first order Sugeno inference system is applied in ANFIS modelling and the optimum performance is obtained with the input set (I, T, C, q) using sixteen fuzzy rules and triangular membership function. The test results show that ANN model estimates the polarization curve of DMFC more accurately than ANFIS model.

  8. An ultra-fast fabrication technique for anode support solid oxide fuel cells by microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Zhenjun; Shikazono, Naoki; Kasagi, Nobuhide

    An effective and facile technique has been developed for high temperature anode-electrolyte co-sintering of anode support solid oxide fuel cells by using microwave activated sparking plasma. A high sintering temperature of 1600 °C can be achieved in a few minutes time by discharging effect. Anode support substrate pellet is uniaxially pressed, and then dip-coated with a 10 μm yttria stabilized zirconia electrolyte layer. After the microwave co-sintering, La 0.8Sr 0.2MnO x cathode is screen-printed onto electrolyte and sintered by conventional thermal method. The cell has stably operated in 3% humidified hydrogen for more than 130 h.

  9. Multiple techniques for mineral identification of terrestrial evaporites relevant to Mars exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stivaletta, N.; Dellisanti, F.; D'Elia, M.; Fonti, S.; Mancarella, F.

    2013-05-01

    Sulfates, commonly found in evaporite deposits, were observed on Mars surface during orbital remote sensing and surface exploration. In terrestrial environments, evaporite precipitation creates excellent microniches for microbial colonization, especially in desert areas. Deposits comprised of gypsum, calcite, quartz and silicate deposits (phyllosilicates, feldspars) from Sahara Desert in southern Tunisia contain endolithic colonies just below the rock surface. Previous optical observations verified the presence of microbial communities and, as described in this paper, spectral visible analyses have led to identification of chlorophylls belonging to photosynthetic bacteria. Spectral analyses in the infrared region have clearly detected the presence of gypsum and phyllosilicates (mainly illite and/or smectite), as well as traces of calcite, but not quartz. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis has identified the dominant presence of gypsum as well as that of other secondary minerals such as quartz, feldspars and Mg-Al-rich phyllosilicates, such as chlorite, illite and smectite. The occurrence of a small quantity of calcite in all the samples was also highlighted by the loss of CO2 by thermal analysis (TG-DTA). A normative calculation using XRD, thermal data and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis has permitted to obtain the mineralogical concentration of the minerals occurring in the samples. The combination of multiple techniques provides information about the mineralogy of rocks and hence indication of environments suitable for supporting microbial life on Mars surface.

  10. Airborne Fungi in Sahara Dust Aerosols Reaching the Eastern Caribbean: II. Species Identification Using Molecular Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Mota, A.; Betancourt, C.; Detres, Y.; Armstrong, R.

    2003-12-01

    Fungi samples from filters collected in Castle Bruce, Dominica from March through July 2002, were previously purified and identified to genus level using classic macroscopic and microscopic techniques. A total of 105 isolated colonies were cultured in liquid media and the mycelial mats used for DNA extraction. PCR was used to amplify the ITS region of the rDNA using the ITS1 and ITS4 primers. Both strands of the amplified products were sequenced and the final identification to species level was completed by a GenBank search. Fourteen different species and one fungal endophyte were identified from genders Aspergillus,Penicillium, Fusarium, Cladosporium, Curvularia and Phanerochaete. Some of these species such as A. fumigatus, A. japonicus, P. citrinum and C. cladosporoides are known to cause respiratory disorders in humans. A. fumigatus causes an aggressive pulmonary allergic response that might result in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Other species such as F. equiseti and C. brachyspora are plant pathogens affecting economically important crops. Sahara dust is an important source of fungal spores of species that are not common in the Caribbean region.

  11. Identification of cross-formation flow in multireservoir systems using isotopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Szpakiewicz, M.

    1991-10-01

    This study was designed to add quantitative solutions to the problem of undesirable hydraulic communication which results in active fluid flow between productive horizons. Transfer of novel geochemical methods, based on effective, economic, and environmentally acceptable isotopic techniques for identification of leaking hydrocarbon reservoirs, is a major objective of this study. The effectiveness of a continuous trap's seal depends on an equilibrium between the capillary forces holding formation water in pore spaces of the seal and the buoyancy forces of the oil and gas column in a system. Therefore, some seals may leak selectively at changing pressure and temperature conditions with respect to different fluid phases (oil, gas, and water). A break in continuity of confining layers will promote relatively fast interreservoir migration of fluids. It may intensify in reservoirs subjected to high pressures during implementation of secondary and tertiary processes of recovery. Such fluid flow should result in identifiable chemical, isotopic, and often thermal anomalies in the area of an open flow path. Quantitative hydrodynamic reservoir modeling based on geochemical/isotopic and other evidence of fluid migration in a system require, however, more systematic methodological study. Such a study is being recommended in addition to a field demonstration of the method in a selected oil/gas reservoir where geochemical and production anomalies have been documented. 62 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Direct Experimental Evaluation of the Grain Boundaries Gas Content in PWR fuels: New Insight and Perspective of the ADAGIO Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pontillon, Y.; Noirot, J.; Caillot, L.

    2007-07-01

    Over the last decades, many analytical experiments (in-pile and out-of-pile) have underlined the active role of the inter-granular gases on the global fuel transient behavior under accidental conditions such as RIA and/or LOCA. In parallel, the improvement of fission gas release modeling in nuclear fuel performance codes needs direct experimental determination/validation regarding the local gas distribution inside the fuel sample. In this context, an experimental program, called 'ADAGIO' (French acronym for Discriminating Analysis of Accumulation of Inter-granular and Occluded Gas), has been initiated through a joint action of CEA, EDF and AREVA NP in order to develop a new device/technique for quantitative and direct measurement of local fission gas distribution within an irradiated fuel pellet. ADAGIO technique is based on the fact that fission gas inventory (intra and inter-granular parts) can be distinguished by controlled fuel oxidation, since grain boundaries oxidize faster than the bulk. The purpose of the current paper is to present both the methodology and the associated results of the ADAGIO program performed at CEA. It has been divided into two main parts: (i) feasibility (UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels), (ii) application on high burn up UO{sub 2} fuel. (authors)

  13. Time-of-flight technique for particle identification at energies from 2 to 400 keV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    The time of flight technique for particle identification was extended to 2 keV/nucleon and the size of the start-time detector was reduced considerably by the use of carbon foils of few micrograms/cm square in thickness combined with microchannel plates for detecting secondary electrons. Time of flight telescopes incorporating this start-time device were used to measure the stopping power of a number of low energy heavy ions in thin carbon foils and the charge states of these ions emerging from such foils. Applications for the detection and identification of low energy interplanetary and magnetospheric particles are suggested.

  14. Use of the gas-filled-magnet technique for particle identification at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.K.; Jiang, C.L.; Paul, M.

    1995-08-01

    Reaction studies of interest to astrophysics with radioactive ion beams will be done mainly in inverse reaction kinematics, i.e., heavy particles bombarding a hydrogen target. The low energy of the outgoing heavy reaction products makes particle identification with respect to mass and nuclear charge a major challenge. For the planned {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}) experiment one expects five different types of particles in the outgoing channels: {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O (from elastic scattering of {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O on {sup 12}C), {sup 15}O and {sup 15}N (from the {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O induced (p,{alpha}) reactions) and {sup 12}C recoils from the polypropylene target. While mass determination can be achieved easily by time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, a determination of the nuclear charge presents a challenge, especially if the energy of the particles is below 500 keV/u. We studied the gas-filled magnet technique for Z-identification of light ions between Z = 6-9. In a gas-filled magnet the particles move with an average charge state {bar q} which in one parameterization is given by {bar q} = Z ln(avZ{sup {alpha}})/ln(bZ{sup {beta}}) where Z is the nuclear charge of the ions and v their velocity. Introducing into the expression for the magnetic rigidity B{rho} = mv/{bar q} results in a Z dependence of B{rho} which is valid to very low velocities. As a magnet we used the Enge split-pole spectrograph which was filled with nitrogen gas at a pressure of 0.5 Torr. The particles were detected in the focal plane with a 50 x 10 cm{sup 2} parallel-grid-avalanche counter which measured TOF and magnetic rigidity. The mass and Z separation was tested with {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O beams at energies of about 600 keV/u and recoil particles ranging from {sup 12}C to {sup 19}F. The Z-separation obtained at these energies was {triangle}Z/Z = 0.28 which is sufficient to separate individual elements for Z < 10.

  15. Automatic Whole-Spectrum Matching Techniques for Identification of Pure and Mixed Minerals using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Carey, C. J.; Breitenfeld, L.; Tague, T.; Wang, P.

    2015-12-01

    In situuse of Raman spectroscopy on Mars is planned for three different instruments in the next decade. Although implementations differ, they share the potential to identify surface minerals and organics and inform Martian geology and geochemistry. Their success depends on the availability of appropriate databases and software for phase identification. For this project, we have consolidated all known publicly-accessible Raman data on minerals for which independent confirmation of phase identity is available, and added hundreds of additional spectra acquired using varying instruments and laser energies. Using these data, we have developed software tools to improve mineral identification accuracy. For pure minerals, whole-spectrum matching algorithms far outperform existing tools based on diagnostic peaks in individual phases. Optimal matching accuracy does depend on subjective end-user choices for data processing (such as baseline removal, intensity normalization, and intensity squashing), as well as specific dataset characteristics. So, to make this tuning process amenable to automated optimization methods, we developed a machine learning-based generalization of these choices within a preprocessing and matching framework. Our novel method dramatically reduces the burden on the user and results in improved matching accuracy. Moving beyond identifying pure phases into quantification of relative abundances is a complex problem because relationships between peak intensity and mineral abundance are obscured by complicating factors: exciting laser frequency, the Raman cross section of the mineral, crystal orientation, and long-range chemical and structural ordering in the crystal lattices. Solving this un-mixing problem requires adaptation of our whole-spectrum algorithms and a large number of test spectra of minerals in known volume proportions, which we are creating for this project. Key to this effort is acquisition of spectra from mixtures of pure minerals paired

  16. [Review of dual stable isotope technique for nitrate source identification in surface- and groundwater in China].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yu, Gui-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Wen, Xue-Fa

    2014-08-01

    Water nitrate (NO3-) contamination is a world-wide environmental problem under the effects of intensive human activities. Sources identification of NO3- contamination in water is important for better management of water quality. Dual stable isotope data of nitrate nitrogen (delta15N) and nitrate oxygen (delta18O) combined with other stable isotopes and chemical analysis data have been frequently used to identify NO3- sources, differentiate percentage of the different NO3- sources and assess the nitrification/denitrification processes of surface water, groundwater and precipitation, respectively. This review summarized the analysis technique of nitrate delta15N and delta18O in domestic and abroad, assessed typical values of delta15N, delta18O from different NO3- sources and evaluated the progress in application of dual stable isotope of delta15N and delta18O technique to trace NO3- sources in surface- and ground-water. Both ion exchange-AgNO3 and bacteria denitrifying methods have been successfully used in tracing water nitrate sources nationwide. The comprehensive metadata analysis of nitrate sources showed that the delta15N values of sewage and manure, soil, precipitation, fertilizer ranged from 3 per thousand to 17 per thousand, 3 per thousand to 8 per thousand, - 9 per thousand to 9 per thousand, -2 per thousand to 4 per thousand, respectively. And the delta15N values of ammonium fertilizer ranged from - 4 per thousand to 2 per thousand. According to the stable isotope technique, sewage and manure were identified as the major nitrate sources of surface- and ground-water in China. This indicated that municipal sewage and aquaculture exerted serious influence on the nitrate pollution of surface water. In the future, long-term monitoring, dual stable isotope fingerprinting and hydro-chemical analysis should be applied together to quantitatively differentiate contribution of nitrate sources, and to assess seasonal dynamic of nitrate sources. It will provide useful

  17. A short note on physical properties to irradiated nuclear fuel by means of X-ray diffraction and neutron scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Yusof Husain, Hishamuddin; Hak, Cik Rohaida Che; Alias, Nor Hayati; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Kasim, Norasiah Ab; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-29

    For nuclear reactor applications, understanding the evolution of the fuel materials microstructure during irradiation are of great importance. This paper reviews the physical properties of irradiated nuclear fuel analysis which are considered to be of most importance in determining the performance behavior of fuel. X-rays diffraction was recognize as important tool to investigate the phase identification while neutron scattering analyses the interaction between uranium and other materials and also investigation of the defect structure.

  18. Identification of the fragmentation of brittle particles during compaction process by the acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Favretto-Cristini, Nathalie; Hégron, Lise; Sornay, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Some nuclear fuels are currently manufactured by a powder metallurgy process that consists of three main steps, namely preparation of the powders, powder compaction, and sintering of the compact. An optimum between size, shape and cohesion of the particles of the nuclear fuels must be sought in order to obtain a compact with a sufficient mechanical strength, and to facilitate the release of helium and fission gases during irradiation through pores connected to the outside of the pellet after sintering. Being simple to adapt to nuclear-oriented purposes, the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is used to control the microstructure of the compact by monitoring the compaction of brittle Uranium Dioxide (UO2) particles of a few hundred micrometers. The objective is to identify in situ the mechanisms that occur during the UO2 compaction, and more specifically the particle fragmentation that is linked to the open porosity of the nuclear matter. Three zones of acoustic activity, strongly related to the applied stress, can be clearly defined from analysis of the continuous signals recorded during the compaction process. They correspond to particle rearrangement and/or fragmentation. The end of the noteworthy fragmentation process is clearly defined as the end of the significant process that increases the compactness of the material. Despite the fact that the wave propagation strongly evolves during the compaction process, the acoustic signature of the fragmentation of a single UO2 particle and a bed of UO2 particles under compaction is well identified. The waveform, with a short rise time and an exponential-like decay of the signal envelope, is the most reliable descriptor. The impact of the particle size and cohesion on the AE activity, and then on the fragmentation domain, is analyzed through the discrete AE signals. The maximum amplitude of the burst signals, as well as the mean stress corresponding to the end of the recorded AE, increase with increasing mean diameter of

  19. Identification of the mechanism limiting the alteration of clad spent fuel segments in aerated carbonated groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jégou, C.; Peuget, S.; Broudic, V.; Roudil, D.; Deschanels, X.; Bart, J. M.

    2004-03-01

    Leaching experiments were performed with five spent fuel samples (20 mm segments of clad fuel rods) from French power reactors (four UO 2 fuel samples with burnup ratings of 22, 37, 47 and 60 GW d t HM-1 and a MOX fuel sample irradiated to 47 GW d t HM-1) to determine the release kinetics of the matrix containing most of the radionuclides. The experiments were carried out with carbonated groundwater on previously leached sections of clad fuel rods in static mode, in an aerated medium at room temperature (25 °C) in a hot cell. Until 313 days of leaching and below uranium saturation, the Sr/U congruence ratios for all the UO 2 fuel samples ranged from 1 to 2; allowing for the experimental uncertainty, strontium can thus be considered as a satisfactory matrix alteration tracer. No significant burnup effect was observed on the alteration of the UO 2 fuel matrix. The daily strontium release factor was approximately 2.7 × 10 -8 d -1 for UO 2 fuel after 706 days of leaching, and seven to eight times higher for MOX fuel. Several alteration mechanisms (radiolysis, solubility, precipitation/clogging) are examined to account for the experimental findings. All the available experimental data (characterization of secondary phases and leaching data) indicate that the mechanism limiting the spent fuel alteration kinetics, for the conditions studied, is likely based on the transport and accessibility of oxidizing species and/or water within the segment.

  20. On the combination of delayed neutron and delayed gamma techniques for fission rate measurement in nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, G.; Jordan, K. A.

    2011-07-01

    Novel techniques to measure newly induced fissions in spent fuel after re-irradiation at low power have been developed and tested at the Proteus zero-power research reactor. The two techniques are based on the detection of high energy gamma-rays emitted by short-lived fission products and delayed neutrons. The two techniques relate the measured signals to the total fission rate, the isotopic composition of the fuel, and nuclear data. They can be combined to derive better estimates on each of these parameters. This has potential for improvement in many areas. Spent fuel characterisation and safeguard applications can benefit from these techniques for non-destructive assay of plutonium content. Another application of choice is the reduction of uncertainties on nuclear data. As a first application of the combination of the delayed neutron and gamma measurement techniques, this paper shows how to reduce the uncertainties on the relative abundances of the longest delayed neutron group for thermal fissions in {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and fast fissions in {sup 238}U. The proposed experiments are easily achievable in zero-power research reactors using fresh UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel and do not require fast extraction systems. The relative uncertainties (1{sigma}) on the relative abundances are expected to be reduced from 13% to 4%, 16% to 5%, and 38% to 12% for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu, respectively. (authors)

  1. Identification of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and rocket fuels using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, Jaime A.; McElman, Sarah E.; Dodd, James A.

    2010-05-01

    Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the identification of security threats is a growing area of research. This work presents LIBS spectra of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and typical rocket fuels. A large dataset of spectra was acquired using a variety of gas mixtures and background pressures and processed using partial least squares analysis. The five compounds studied were identified with a 99% success rate by the best method. The temporal behavior of the emission lines as a function of chamber pressure and gas mixture was also investigated, revealing some interesting trends that merit further study.

  2. Non-probabilistic information fusion technique for structural damage identification based on measured dynamic data with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Chen; Qiu, Zhi-Ping

    2013-04-01

    Based on measured natural frequencies and acceleration responses, a non-probabilistic information fusion technique is proposed for the structural damage detection by adopting the set-membership identification (SMI) and two-step model updating procedure. Due to the insufficiency and uncertainty of information obtained from measurements, the uncertain problem of damage identification is addressed with interval variables in this paper. Based on the first-order Taylor series expansion, the interval bounds of the elemental stiffness parameters in undamaged and damaged models are estimated, respectively. The possibility of damage existence (PoDE) in elements is proposed as the quantitative measure of structural damage probability, which is more reasonable in the condition of insufficient measurement data. In comparison with the identification method based on a single kind of information, the SMI method will improve the accuracy in damage identification, which reflects the information fusion concept based on the non-probabilistic set. A numerical example is performed to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  3. Characterization of Bond Strength of U-Mo Fuel Plates Using the Laser Shockwave Technique: Capabilities and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Smith; D. L. Cottle; B. H. Rabin

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes work conducted to-date on the implementation of new laser-based capabilities for characterization of bond strength in nuclear fuel plates, and presents preliminary results obtained from fresh fuel studies on as-fabricated monolithic fuel consisting of uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum alloys clad in 6061 aluminum by hot isostatic pressing. Characterization involves application of two complementary experimental methods, laser-shock testing and laser-ultrasonic imaging, collectively referred to as the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST), that allows the integrity, physical properties and interfacial bond strength in fuel plates to be evaluated. Example characterization results are provided, including measurement of layer thicknesses, elastic properties of the constituents, and the location and nature of generated debonds (including kissing bonds). LST provides spatially localized, non-contacting measurements with minimum specimen preparation, and is ideally suited for applications involving radioactive materials, including irradiated materials. The theoretical principles and experimental approaches employed in characterizing nuclear fuel plates are described, and preliminary bond strength measurement results are discussed, with emphasis on demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of these methods. These preliminary results demonstrate the ability to distinguish bond strength variations between different fuel plates. Although additional development work is necessary to validate and qualify the test methods, these results suggest LST is viable as a method to meet fuel qualification requirements to demonstrate acceptable bonding integrity.

  4. Determining plutonium mass in spent fuel with non-destructive assay techniques - NGSU research overview and update on 6 NDA techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Stephen J; Conlin, Jeremy L; Evans, Louise G; Hu, Jianwei; Blanc, Pauline C; Lafleur, Adrienne M; Menlove, Howard O; Schear, Melissa A; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Croft, Stephen; Fensin, Michael L; Freeman, Corey R; Koehler, William E; Mozin, V; Sandoval, N P; Lee, T H; Cambell, L W; Cheatham, J R; Gesh, C J; Hunt, A; Ludewigt, B A; Smith, L E; Sterbentz, J

    2010-09-15

    This poster is one of two complementary posters. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE has initiated a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in, and detect the diversion of pins from, spent nuclear fuel assemblies with non-destructive assay (NDA). This research effort has the goal of quantifying the capability of 14 NDA techniques as well as training a future generation of safeguards practitioners. By November of 2010, we will be 1.5 years into the first phase (2.5 years) of work. This first phase involves primarily Monte Carlo modelling while the second phase (also 2.5 years) will focus on experimental work. The goal of phase one is to quantify the detection capability of the various techniques for the benefit of safeguard technology developers, regulators, and policy makers as well as to determine what integrated techniques merit experimental work, We are considering a wide range of possible technologies since our research horizon is longer term than the focus of most regulator bodies. The capability of all of the NDA techniques will be determined for a library of 64 17 x 17 PWR assemblies [burnups (15, 30, 45, 60 GWd/tU), initial enrichments (2, 3, 4, 5%) and cooling times (1, 5, 20, 80 years)]. The burnup and cooling time were simulated with each fuel pin being comprised of four radial regions. In this paper an overview of the purpose will be given as well as a technical update on the following 6 neutron techniques: {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Self-Integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry. The technical update will quantify the anticipated performance of each technique for the 64 assemblies of the spent fuel library.

  5. A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR THE RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ALPHA EMITTERS RELEASED DURING A RADIOLOGICAL INCIDENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently there are no standard radioanalytical methods applicable to the initial phase of a radiological emergency, for the early identification and quantification of alpha emitting radionuclides. Of particular interest are determinations of the presence and concentration of is...

  6. Cord identification technique for ultra-low bending loss fibers using higher order modes of visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Tsujikawa, Kyozo; Aozasa, Shinichi; Azuma, Yuji

    2013-06-01

    We propose a cord identification technique for ultra-low bending loss fiber using higher order modes of visible light. With this kind of fiber, bending losses are greatly reduced and it is difficult to obtain sufficient leaked light with a conventional macro-bending technique. The bending loss of higher order modes is several orders larger than that of fundamental modes. Higher order modes can exist at shorter wavelengths and their guiding loss is small when the fiber is not tightly bent. As a result, higher order modes are suitable for cord identification purposes with ultra-low bending loss fiber. We determined that the LP21 and LP02 modes at 650 nm (red) and the LP31 mode at 532 nm (green) are the most effective for cord identification purposes. We employed an offset launch technique to excite higher order modes, and achieved a sensitivity improvement of more than 14 dB. By using our method, a cord can be identified by red or green light even with the naked eye.

  7. Identification and Analysis of Critical Gaps in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Codes Required by the SINEMA Program

    SciTech Connect

    Adrian Miron; Joshua Valentine; John Christenson; Majd Hawwari; Santosh Bhatt; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar: Michael Lineberry

    2009-10-01

    The current state of the art in nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) modeling is an eclectic mixture of codes with various levels of applicability, flexibility, and availability. In support of the advanced fuel cycle systems analyses, especially those by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), Unviery of Cincinnati in collaboration with Idaho State University carried out a detailed review of the existing codes describing various aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and identified the research and development needs required for a comprehensive model of the global nuclear energy infrastructure and the associated nuclear fuel cycles. Relevant information obtained on the NFC codes was compiled into a relational database that allows easy access to various codes' properties. Additionally, the research analyzed the gaps in the NFC computer codes with respect to their potential integration into programs that perform comprehensive NFC analysis.

  8. Nondestructive determination of plutonium mass in spent fuel: prelliminary modeling results using the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Tobin, Stephen J; Schear, Melissa A; Menlove, Howard O; Lee, Sang Y; Swinhoe, Martyn T

    2009-01-01

    There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium (Pu) in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capability of the International Atomic Energy Agency (LAEA) to safeguard nuclear facilities, quantifying shipper/receiver difference, determining the input accountability value at pyrochemical processing facilities, providing quantitative input to burnup credit and final safeguards measurements at a long-term repository. In order to determine Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies, thirteen NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. A key motivation of the present research is the realization that none of these techniques, in isolation, is capable of both (1) quantifying the Pu mass of an assembly and (2) detecting the diversion of a significant number of rods. It is therefore anticipated that a combination of techniques will be required. A 5 year effort funded by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE was recently started in pursuit of these goals. The first two years involves researching all thirteen techniques using Monte Carlo modeling while the final three years involves fabricating hardware and measuring spent fuel. Here, we present the work in two main parts: (1) an overview of this NGSI effort describing the motivations and approach being taken; (2) The preliminary results for one of the NDA techniques - Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR). The PNAR technique functions by using the intrinsic neutron emission of the fuel (primarily from the spontaneous fission of curium) to self-interrogate any fissile material present. Two separate measurements of the spent fuel are made, both with and without cadmium (Cd) present. The ratios of the Singles, Doubles and Triples count rates obtained in each case are analyzed; known as the Cd ratio. The primary differences between the two measurements are the neutron energy spectrum

  9. Ionospheric parameter analysis techniques and anomaly identification in periods of ionospheric perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrikova, Oksana; Polozov, Yury; Fetisova Glushkova, Nadejda; Shevtsov, Boris

    In the present paper we suggest intellectual techniques intended for the analysis of ionospheric parameters. These techniques are directed at studying dynamic processes in the "magnetosphere-ionosphere" system during perturbations. Using the combination of the wavelet transform and neural networks, the authors have developed a technique of approximating the time variation of ionospheric parameters. This technique allows us to make data predictions and detect anomalies in the ionosphere. Multiscale component approximations of the critical frequency of the ionosphere layer F2 were constructed. These approximations can be presented in the following form: begin{center} c_{l,k+m} (t) = varphi_m(3) Bigl (sum_i omega(3_{mi}) varphi_i(2) Bigl (sum_j omega(2_{ij}) varphi_j(1) Bigl (sum_k omega(1_{jk}) c_{l,k} (t) Bigr ) Bigr ) Bigr ) , where c_{l,k} = bigl < f , Psi_{l,k} bigr > ; Psi_{l,k} (t) = 2(l/2) Psi (2(l) t - k) is the wavelet basis; omega(1_{jk}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron j of the network input layer; omega(2_{ij}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron i of the network hidden layer; omega(3_{mi}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron m of the network output layer; varphi(1_j) (z) = varphi(2_i) (z) = (1)/(1+exp(-z))) ; varphi(3_m) (z) = x*z+y . The coefficients c_{l,k} can be found as a result of transforming the original function f into the space with the scale l . In order to obtain the approximations of the time variation of data, neural networks can be united in groups. In the paper we have suggested a multicomponent time variation model of ionospheric parameters, which makes it possible to perform the analysis of the ionospheric dynamic mode, receive predictions about parameter variations, and detect anomalies in periods of perturbations. The multicomponent model also allows us to fill missing values in critical frequency data taking into account diurnal and seasonal variations. Identification of the model is based on combining

  10. Materials and characterization techniques for high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary The performance of high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFC) is critically dependent on the selection of materials and optimization of individual components. A conventional high-temperature membrane electrode assembly (HT-MEA) primarily consists of a polybenzimidazole (PBI)-type membrane containing phosphoric acid and two gas diffusion electrodes (GDE), the anode and the cathode, attached to the two surfaces of the membrane. This review article provides a survey on the materials implemented in state-of-the-art HT-MEAs. These materials must meet extremely demanding requirements because of the severe operating conditions of HT-PEMFCs. They need to be electrochemically and thermally stable in highly acidic environment. The polymer membranes should exhibit high proton conductivity in low-hydration and even anhydrous states. Of special concern for phosphoric-acid-doped PBI-type membranes is the acid loss and management during operation. The slow oxygen reduction reaction in HT-PEMFCs remains a challenge. Phosphoric acid tends to adsorb onto the surface of the platinum catalyst and therefore hampers the reaction kinetics. Additionally, the binder material plays a key role in regulating the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of the catalyst layer. Subsequently, the binder controls the electrode–membrane interface that establishes the triple phase boundary between proton conductive electrolyte, electron conductive catalyst, and reactant gases. Moreover, the elevated operating temperatures promote carbon corrosion and therefore degrade the integrity of the catalyst support. These are only some examples how materials properties affect the stability and performance of HT-PEMFCs. For this reason, materials characterization techniques for HT-PEMFCs, either in situ or ex situ, are highly beneficial. Significant progress has recently been made in this field, which enables us to gain a better understanding of underlying processes occurring during

  11. Comparison of traditional nondestructive analysis of RERTR fuel plates with digital radiographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Davidsmeier, T.; Koehl, R.; Lanham, R.; O'Hare, E.; Wiencek, T

    2008-07-15

    The current design and fabrication process for RERTR fuel plates utilizes film radiography during the nondestructive testing and characterization. Digital radiographic methods offer a potential increases in efficiency and accuracy. The traditional and digital radiographic methods are described and demonstrated on a fuel plate constructed with and average of 51% by volume fuel using the dispersion method. Fuel loading data from each method is analyzed and compared to a third baseline method to assess accuracy. The new digital method is shown to be more accurate, save hours of work, and provide additional information not easily available in the traditional method. Additional possible improvements suggested by the new digital method are also raised. (author)

  12. PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, F.D. Jr.; James, B.D.; Mooradian, R.P.

    1997-12-31

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells fueled with direct hydrogen have demonstrated substantial technical potential to replace Internal Combustion Engines (ICE`s) in light duty vehicles. Such a transition to a hydrogen economy offers the potential of substantial benefits from reduced criteria and greenhouse emissions as well as reduced foreign fuel dependence. Research conducted for the Ford Motor Co. under a US Department of Energy contract suggests that hydrogen fuel, when used in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), can achieve a cost per vehicle mile less than or equal to the gasoline cost per mile when used in an ICE vehicle. However, fuel cost parity is not sufficient to ensure overall economic success: the PEM fuel cell power system itself must be of comparable cost to the ICE. To ascertain if low cost production of PEM fuel cells is feasible, a powerful set of mechanical engineering tools collectively referred to as Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) has been applied to several representative PEM fuel cell designs. The preliminary results of this work are encouraging, as presented.

  13. Identification and Quantification of Processes Affecting the Fate of Ethanol-Blended Fuel in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devries, J. M.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    At present, the oil and gas industry distributes gasoline with an ethanol content of up to 10% (E10) to the consumer. However, ethanol advocates are promoting gasoline blends with higher ethanol content to be introduced into the market (e.g., E20, corresponding to an ethanol content of 20%). The likelihood of unintended fuel releases with elevated ethanol concentrations through surficial spills or from underground storage systems will therefore increase. A particular concern is the increased rate of CH4 and CO2 production as the spill biodegrades, which is believed to be associated with the increased ethanol content in the fuel. Consequently, high gas generation rates associated with ethanol-blended fuels may amplify the risk of vapor intrusion of CH4 and BTEX into basements or other subsurface structures that may be nearby. A comprehensive and comparative study on the fate of higher concentration ethanol-blended fuels in the subsurface has not been conducted to date. The present study focuses on determining the fate of ethanol blended fuels in the subsurface through a series of controlled and instrumented laboratory column experiments. The experiments compare the behavior of pure gasoline with that of ethanol-blended fuels for different soil types (sand and silt) in columns 2 meters tall and 30cm in diameter. The column experiments focus on the quantification of gas generation by volatilization and biodegradation and 1-D vertical fate and transport of CO2, CH4, benzene and toluene through the vadose zone. The fuel blends have been injected into the lower third of the columns and gas composition and fluxes within the column are being monitored over time. The goal of this study is to contribute to the scientific foundation that will allow gauging the level of risk and the need for remediation at fuel spill sites with higher ethanol blends.

  14. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  15. Application of system identification techniques to an rf cavity tuning loop

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, L.K. ); Planner, C.W. )

    1990-11-01

    Modern system identification is applied to rf cavity tuning on the ISIS synchrotron. Four types of test signals are investigated to assess their suitability for real time measurement in an accelerator environment. The Pseudo Random Binary Signal (PRBS) appears to be the most advantageous. Measurements under normal operating conditions allow automatic identification for a self-adapting loop. The interactive software MATLAB is used to process the data and the identified model is represented in pole-zero form. The model shows good correlation with system performance. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Basalt identification by interpreting nuclear and electrical well logging measurements using fuzzy technique (case study from southern Syria).

    PubMed

    Asfahani, J; Abdul Ghani, B; Ahmad, Z

    2015-11-01

    Fuzzy analysis technique is proposed in this research for interpreting the combination of nuclear and electrical well logging data, which include natural gamma ray, density and neutron-porosity, while the electrical well logging include long and short normal. The main objective of this work is to describe, characterize and establish the lithology of the large extended basaltic areas in southern Syria. Kodana well logging measurements have been used and interpreted for testing and applying the proposed technique. The established lithological cross section shows the distribution and the identification of four kinds of basalt, which are hard massive basalt, hard basalt, pyroclastic basalt and the alteration basalt products, clay. The fuzzy analysis technique is successfully applied on the Kodana well logging data, and can be therefore utilized as a powerful tool for interpreting huge well logging data with higher number of variables required for lithological estimations. PMID:26275816

  17. Method and Apparatus for Reading Two Dimensional Identification Symbols Using Radar Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Roxby, Donald L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for sensing two-dimensional identification marks provided on a substrate or embedded within a substrate below a surface of the substrate. Micropower impulse radar is used to transmit a high risetime, short duration pulse to a focussed radar target area of the substrate having the two dimensional identification marks. The method further includes the steps of listening for radar echoes returned from the identification marks during a short listening period window occurring a predetermined time after transmission of the radar pulse. If radar echoes are detected, an image processing step is carried out. If no radar echoes are detected, the method further includes sequentially transmitting further high risetime, short duration pulses, and listening for radar echoes from each of said further pulses after different elapsed times for each of the further pulses until radar echoes are detected. When radar echoes are detected, data based on the detected echoes is processed to produce an image of the identification marks.

  18. Determining fissile content in PWR spent fuel assemblies using a passive neutron Albedo reactivity with fission chambers technique

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    State regulatory bodies and organizations such as the IAEA that are concerned with preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons are interested in a means of quantifying the amount of plutonium in a given spent fuel assembly. The complexity of spent nuclear fuel makes the measurement of plutonium content challenging. There are a variety of techniques that can measure various properties of spent nuclear fuel including burnup, and mass of fissile content. No single technique can provide all desired information, necessitating an approach using multiple detector systems and types. This paper presents our analysis of the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity Fission Chamber (PNAR-FC) detector system. PNAR-FC is a simplified version of the PNAR technique originally developed in 1997. This earlier research was performed with a high efficiency, {sup 3}He-based system (PNAR-3He) with which multiplicty analysis was performed. With the PNAR technique a portion of the spent fuel assembly is wrapped in a 1 mm thick cadmium liner. Neutron count rates are measured both with and without the cadmium liner present. The ratio of the count rate with the cadmium liner to the count rate without the cadmium liner is calculated and called the cadmium ratio. In the PNAR-3He technique, multiplicity measurements were made and the cadmium ratio was shown to scale with the fissile content of the material being measured. PNAR-FC simplifies the PNAR technique by using only a few fission chambers instead of many {sup 3}He tubes. Using a simplified PNAR-FC technique provides for a cheaper, lighter, and thus more portable detector system than was possible with the PNAR-3He system. The challenge with the PNAR-FC system are two-fold: (1) the change in the cadmium ratio is weaker as a afunction of the changing fissile content relative to multiplicity count rates, and (2) the efficiency for the fission chamber based system are poorer than for the {sup 3}He based detectors. In this paper, we present our

  19. Multiple techniques for mineral identification on Mars:. a study of hydrothermal rocks as potential analogues for astrobiology sites on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Murad, Enver; Lane, Melissa D.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    2004-06-01

    Spectroscopic studies of Mars analog materials combining multiple spectral ranges and techniques are necessary in order to obtain ground truth information for interpretation of rocks and soils on Mars. Two hydrothermal rocks from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, were characterized here because they contain minerals requiring water for formation and they provide a possible niche for some of the earliest organisms on Earth. If related rocks formed in hydrothermal sites on Mars, identification of these would be important for understanding the geology of the planet and potential habitability for life. XRD, thermal properties, VNIR, mid-IR, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to identify the mineralogy of the samples in this study. The rocks studied here include a travertine from Mammoth Formation that contains primarily calcite with some aragonite and gypsum and a siliceous sinter from Octopus Spring that contains a variety of poorly crystalline to amorphous silicate minerals. Calcite was detected readily in the travertine rock using any one of the techniques studied. The small amount of gypsum was uniquely identified using XRD, VNIR, and mid-IR, while the aragonite was uniquely identified using XRD and Raman. The siliceous sinter sample was more difficult to characterize using each of these techniques and a combination of all techniques was more useful than any single technique. Although XRD is the historical standard for mineral identification, it presents some challenges for remote investigations. Thermal properties are most useful for minerals with discrete thermal transitions. Raman spectroscopy is most effective for detecting polarized species such as CO 3, OH, and CH, and exhibits sharp bands for most highly crystalline minerals when abundant. Mid-IR spectroscopy is most useful in characterizing Si-O (and metal-O) bonds and also has the advantage that remote information about sample texture (e.g., particle size) can be determined. Mid-IR spectroscopy is also

  20. Identification of fuel samples from the Prestige wreckage by pattern recognition methods.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Varela, R; Andrade, J M; Muniategui, S; Prada, D; Ramírez-Villalobos, F

    2008-02-01

    A set of 34 worldwide crude oils, 12 distilled products (kerosene, gas oils, and fuel oils) and 45 oil samples taken from several Galician beaches (NW Spain) after the wreckage of the Prestige tanker off the Galician coast was studied. Gas chromatography with flame ionization detection was combined with chemometric multivariate pattern recognition methods (principal components analysis, cluster analysis and Kohonen neural networks) to differentiate and characterize the Prestige fuel oil. All multivariate studies differentiated between several groups of crude oils, fuel oils, distilled products, and samples belonging to the Prestige's wreck and samples from other illegal discharges. In addition, a reduced set of 13 n-alkanes out of 36, were statistically selected by Procrustes Rotation to cope with the main patterns in the datasets. These variables retained the most important characteristics of the data set and lead to a fast and cheap analytical screening methodology. PMID:18054966

  1. Therapeutic identification of depression in young people: lessons fromthe introduction of a new technique in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Iliffe, Steve; Gallant, Ceri; Kramer, Tami; Gledhill, Julia; Bye, Amanda; Fernandez, Victoria; Vila, Mar; Miller, Lisa; Garralda, M Elena

    2012-01-01

    Background Mild-to-moderate depression in young people is associated with impaired social functioning and high rates of affective disorder in adult life. Earlier recognition of depression in young people has the potential to reduce the burden of depression in adulthood. However, depression in teenagers is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Aim To assess the usability and usefulness of a cognitive-behavioural-therapy-based technique for Therapeutic Identification of Depression in Young people (TIDY). Design and setting A qualitative study of four group practices in northwest London. Method Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with practitioners who had been trained in the use of the TIDY technique. Results Twenty-five GPs and six nurses were interviewed. The key themes that emerged from the interviews were: practitioners were ‘making sense of teenage depression’ when interpreting signs and symptoms; the training in the technique was variable in its impact on practitioners' attitudes and practice; and time factors constrained practitioners in the application of the technique. Conclusion The TIDY technique is usable in routine practice, but only if practitioners are allowed to use it selectively. This need for selectivity arises partly from concerns about time management, and partly to avoid medicalisation of psychological distress in young people. The perceived usefulness of the TIDY technique depends on the practitioner's prior knowledge, experience, and awareness. PMID:22429434

  2. Neural Networks and other Techniques for Fault Identification and Isolation of Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Innocenti, M.; Napolitano, M.

    2003-01-01

    Fault identification, isolation, and accomodation have become critical issues in the overall performance of advanced aircraft systems. Neural Networks have shown to be a very attractive alternative to classic adaptation methods for identification and control of non-linear dynamic systems. The purpose of this paper is to show the improvements in neural network applications achievable through the use of learning algorithms more efficient than the classic Back-Propagation, and through the implementation of the neural schemes in parallel hardware. The results of the analysis of a scheme for Sensor Failure, Detection, Identification and Accommodation (SFDIA) using experimental flight data of a research aircraft model are presented. Conventional approaches to the problem are based on observers and Kalman Filters while more recent methods are based on neural approximators. The work described in this paper is based on the use of neural networks (NNs) as on-line learning non-linear approximators. The performances of two different neural architectures were compared. The first architecture is based on a Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) NN trained with the Extended Back Propagation algorithm (EBPA). The second architecture is based on a Radial Basis Function (RBF) NN trained with the Extended-MRAN (EMRAN) algorithms. In addition, alternative methods for communications links fault detection and accomodation are presented, relative to multiple unmanned aircraft applications.

  3. Identification of early cancerous lesion of esophagus with endoscopic images by hyperspectral image technique (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chen, Weichung; Wu, I.-Chen; Wu, Ming Tsang; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a method to identify early esophageal cancer within endoscope using hyperspectral imaging technology. The research samples are three kinds of endoscopic images including white light endoscopic, chromoendoscopic, and narrow-band endoscopic images with different stages of pathological changes (normal, dysplasia, dysplasia - esophageal cancer, and esophageal cancer). Research is divided into two parts: first, we analysis the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images with different stages to know the spectral responses by pathological changes. Second, we identified early cancerous lesion of esophagus by principal component analysis (PCA) of the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images. The results of this study show that the identification of early cancerous lesion is possible achieve from three kinds of images. In which the spectral characteristics of NBI endoscopy images of a gray area than those without the existence of the problem the first two, and the trend is very clear. Therefore, if simply to reflect differences in the degree of spectral identification, chromoendoscopic images are suitable samples. The best identification of early esophageal cancer is using the NBI endoscopic images. Based on the results, the use of hyperspectral imaging technology in the early endoscopic esophageal cancer lesion image recognition helps clinicians quickly diagnose. We hope for the future to have a relatively large amount of endoscopic image by establishing a hyperspectral imaging database system developed in this study, so the clinician can take this repository more efficiently preliminary diagnosis.

  4. Identification of direct targets of plant transcription factors using the GR fusion technique.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Winter, Cara M; Wellmer, Frank; Wagner, Doris

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor-dependent activation of plant transcription factors has proven to be a powerful tool for the identification of their direct target genes. In the absence of the synthetic steroid hormone dexamethasone (dex), transcription factors fused to the hormone-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (TF-GR) are held in an inactive state, due to their cytoplasmic localization. This requires physical interaction with the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) complex. Hormone binding leads to disruption of the interaction between GR and HSP90 and allows TF-GR fusion proteins to enter the nucleus. Once inside the nucleus, they bind to specific DNA sequences and immediately activate or repress expression of their targets. This system is well suited for the identification of direct target genes of transcription factors in plants, as (A) there is little basal protein activity in the absence of dex, (B) steroid application leads to rapid transcription factor activation, (C) no side effects of dex treatment are observed on the physiology of the plant, and (D) secondary effects of transcription factor activity can be eliminated by simultaneous application of an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis, cycloheximide (cyc). In this chapter, we describe detailed protocols for the preparation of plant material, for dex and cyc treatment, for RNA extraction, and for the PCR-based or genome-wide identification of direct targets of transcription factors fused to GR. PMID:25757770

  5. Damage Source Identification of Reinforced Concrete Structure Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    PubMed Central

    Panjsetooni, Alireza; Bunnori, Norazura Muhamad; Vakili, Amir Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is one of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that have been considered as the prime candidate for structural health and damage monitoring in loaded structures. This technique was employed for investigation process of damage in reinforced concrete (RC) frame specimens. A number of reinforced concrete RC frames were tested under loading cycle and were simultaneously monitored using AE. The AE test data were analyzed using the AE source location analysis method. The results showed that AE technique is suitable to identify the sources location of damage in RC structures. PMID:23997681

  6. Upgrade of the Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Precise Identification of Failed Fuel in a Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Ito, Chikara; Harano, Hideki; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2011-12-13

    Isotopic analysis of krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is an effective tool for identification of failed fuel in fast reactors to achieve their safety operation and high plant availability. Reliability of the failed fuel detection and location (FFDL) system depends on the precise determination of {sup 78}Kr/{sup 80}Kr, {sup 82}Kr/{sup 80}Kr and {sup 126}Xe/{sup 129}Xe isotopic ratios, which is mainly hampered by statistical errors for detection of the corresponding isotopes except {sup 82}Kr generated in large amounts during operation of fast reactors. In this paper, we report on improvements of the laser optical system of our spectrometer to increase the resonance ionization efficiency of Kr and Xe atoms, focusing on (i) utilization of the uniform YAG laser beam to improve the wavelength conversion efficiency of sum frequency generation and (ii) reflection of the ultraviolet light by a concave mirror to increase the photon density. The results indicate that our upgraded resonance ionization mass spectrometer has enough performance for isotopic analysis of Kr and Xe required in the Monju FFDL system.

  7. Upgrade of the Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Precise Identification of Failed Fuel in a Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Harano, Hideki; Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2011-12-01

    Isotopic analysis of krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is an effective tool for identification of failed fuel in fast reactors to achieve their safety operation and high plant availability. Reliability of the failed fuel detection and location (FFDL) system depends on the precise determination of 78Kr/80Kr, 82Kr/80Kr and 126Xe/129Xe isotopic ratios, which is mainly hampered by statistical errors for detection of the corresponding isotopes except 82Kr generated in large amounts during operation of fast reactors. In this paper, we report on improvements of the laser optical system of our spectrometer to increase the resonance ionization efficiency of Kr and Xe atoms, focusing on (i) utilization of the uniform YAG laser beam to improve the wavelength conversion efficiency of sum frequency generation and (ii) reflection of the ultraviolet light by a concave mirror to increase the photon density. The results indicate that our upgraded resonance ionization mass spectrometer has enough performance for isotopic analysis of Kr and Xe required in the Monju FFDL system.

  8. Nanoparticle emission assessment technique (NEAT) for the identification and measurement of potential inhalation exposure to engineered nanomaterials--part A.

    PubMed

    Methner, M; Hodson, L; Geraci, C

    2010-03-01

    There are currently no exposure limits specific to engineered nanomaterial nor any national or international consensus standards on measurement techniques for nanomaterials in the workplace. However, facilities engaged in the production and use of engineered nanomaterials have expressed an interest in learning whether the potential for worker exposure exists. To assist with answering this question, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health established a nanotechnology field research team whose primary goal was to visit facilities and evaluate the potential for release of nanomaterials and worker exposure. The team identified numerous techniques to measure airborne nanomaterials with respect to particle size, mass, surface area, number concentration, and composition. However, some of these techniques lack specificity and field portability and are difficult to use and expensive when applied to routine exposure assessment. This article describes the nanoparticle emission assessment technique (NEAT) that uses a combination of measurement techniques and instruments to assess potential inhalation exposures in facilities that handle or produce engineered nanomaterials. The NEAT utilizes portable direct-reading instrumentation supplemented by a pair of filter-based air samples (source-specific and personal breathing zone). The use of the filter-based samples are crucial for identification purposes because particle counters are generally insensitive to particle source or composition and make it difficult to differentiate between incidental and process-related nanomaterials using number concentration alone. Results from using the NEAT at 12 facilities are presented in the companion article (Part B) in this issue. PMID:20017054

  9. Isolation and identification of cobalt- and caesium-resistant bacteria from a nuclear fuel storage pond.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Linda; Osborne, Thomas H; Santini, Joanne M

    2014-10-01

    One of the issues facing the nuclear power industry is how to store spent nuclear fuel which is contaminated with radionuclides produced during nuclear fission, including caesium ((134)Cs(+), (135)Cs(+) and (137)Cs(+)) and cobalt ((60)Co(2+)). In this study, we have isolated Co(2+)- and Cs(+)-resistant bacteria from water collected from a nuclear fuel storage pond. The most resistant Cs(+) and Co(2+) isolates grew in the presence of 500 mM CsCl and 3 mM CoCl2. Strain Cs67-2 is resistant to fourfold more Cs(+) than Cupriavidus metallidurans str. CH34 making it the most Cs(+)-resistant strain identified to date. The Cs(+)-resistant isolates were closely related to bacteria in the Serratia and Yersinia genera, while the Co(2+)-resistant isolates were closely related to the Curvibacter and Tardiphaga genera. These new isolates could be used for bioremediation. PMID:25091383

  10. Development of a Robust star identification technique for use in attitude determination of the ACE spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Mark; Rohrbaugh, Dave

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft is designed to fly in a spin-stabilized attitude. The spacecraft will carry two attitude sensors - a digital fine Sun sensor and a charge coupled device (CCD) star tracker - to allow ground-based determination of the spacecraft attitude and spin rate. Part of the processing that must be performed on the CCD star tracker data is the star identification. Star data received from the spacecraft must be matched with star information in the SKYMAP catalog to determine exactly which stars the sensor is tracking. This information, along with the Sun vector measured by the Sun sensor, is used to determine the spacecraft attitude. Several existing star identification (star ID) systems were examined to determine whether they could be modified for use on the ACE mission. Star ID systems which exist for three-axis stabilized spacecraft tend to be complex in nature and many require fairly good knowledge of the spacecraft attitude, making their use for ACE excessive. Star ID systems used for spinners carrying traditional slit star sensors would have to be modified to model the CCD star tracker. The ACE star ID algorithm must also be robust, in that it will be able to correctly identify stars even though the attitude is not known to a high degree of accuracy, and must be very efficient to allow real-time star identification. The paper presents the star ID algorithm that was developed for ACE. Results from prototype testing are also presented to demonstrate the efficiency, accuracy, and robustness of the algorithm.